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Sample records for paramagnetic resonance spectrum

  1. Fine structure of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of Fe3+ centres in LiTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhenin, V. A.; Guseva, V. B.; Artyomov, M. Yu; Route, R. K.; Fejer, M. M.; Byer, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of trigonal Fe3+ centres has been investigated and parameters of the spin Hamiltonian obtained for nominally pure congruent LiTaO3 crystals annealed at ~1500 K under Li2O vapour pressure corresponding to the pressure over the stoichiometric lithium tantalate. The possibility of calculating the zero-field splitting of the ground state of the impurity ion on the basis of the superposition model is discussed.

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of Cu(CO)/sub 3/: an inorganic isolobal analogue of methyl

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.A.; Mile, B.; Morton, J.R.; Preston, K.F.; Sutcliffe, R.

    1986-03-13

    Copper tricarbonyl, Cu(CO)/sub 3/, has been prepared on a rotating cryostat by reacting /sup 63/Cu atoms with CO on either a cyclohexane or adamantane surface at 77 K. Its EPR spectrum (4-77 K) yielded the following parameters: g/sub xx/ = g/sub yy/ = 2.0028, g/sub zz/ = 2.0010; for /sup 63/Cu, a/sub xx/ = a/sub yy/ approx. = 0 MHz, a/sub zz/ = 225 MHz; for /sup 13/C, a/sub xx/ = a/sub yy/ = 29 MHz, a/sub zz/ = 8 MHz. The spectrum of Cu(CO)/sub 3/ in adamantane was isotropic at 223 K, yielding the following parameters: g/sub iso/ = 2.0014, a/sub 63/ = 93.9 MHz, a/sub 13/(3) = 22.0 MHz. Cu(CO)/sub 3/ is a planar molecule belonging to the A/sub 2/ representation in D/sub 3h/ symmetry. Most of the unpaired electron is in the Cu 4p/sub z/ orbital perpendicular to the molecular plane. There is a marked temperature dependence of the isotropic copper hyperfine interaction, which increases from 75 MHz at 4 K to 98 MHz at 250 K. This is attributed to an out-of-plane vibration of the radical which modulates the isotropic copper hyperfine interaction. An analysis of this effect yields a nu/sub 2/ vibration frequency of approx. 300 cm/sup -1/. Cu(CO)/sub 3/ is stable to decomposition or dimerization in adamantane up to at least 263 K and may provide a suitable vehicle for incorporating copper into inert supports for catalytic purposes. 23 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyukha, Alex; Trompier, Francois

    2011-05-05

    Necessity for, principles of, and general concepts of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) retrospective dosimetry are presented. Also presented and given in details are examples of EPR retrospective dosimetry applications in tooth enamel, bone, and fingernails with focus on general approaches for solving technical and methodological problems. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible future developments are discussed and an extensive bibliography on EPR retrospective dosimetry is provided.

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of Pr

    SciTech Connect

    Tezuka, Keitaro; Hinatsu, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of tetravalent praseodymium ions doped in the cubic perovskite compound BaHfO{sub 3} have been measured at 4.2 K. A very large hyperfine interaction with the {sup 141}Pr nucleus was observed in the spectrum of Pr{sup 4+}/ BaHfO{sub 3}. The results were analyzed based on the weak field approximation, and the g value (|g|=0.619) and a hyperfine coupling constant (A=0.0589 cm{sup {minus}1}) were obtained. The measured g value is much smaller than |-10/7|, which indicates that the crystal field effect on the behavior of a 4f electron is large. These g and A values were compared with the EPR results for other f{sup 1} ions in an octahedral crystal field.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals.

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md; Frost, Ray L; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals. PMID:17324611

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Three Axis Vector Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The Northrop Grumman Corporation is leveraging the technology developed for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) to build a combined Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (EPR-NMR) magnetometer. The EPR-NMR approach provides a high bandwidth and high sensitivity simultaneous measurement of all three vector components of the magnetic field averaged over the small volume of the sensor's one vapor cell. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the EPR-NMR magnetometer including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated to date. General performance results will also be presented.

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance at dislocations in germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Pakulis, E.J.

    1982-06-01

    The first observation of the paramagnetic resonance of electrons at dislocations in germanium single crystals is reported. Under subband gap optical excitation, two sets of lines are detected: four lines about the <111> axes with g/sub perpendicular to/ = 0.34 and g/sub parallel/ = 1.94, and 24 lines with g/sub perpendicular to/ = 0.73 and g/sub parallel/ = 1.89 about <111> axes with the six-fold 1.2/sup 0/ distortion. This represents the first measurement of the disortion angle of a dislocation dangling bond. The possibility that the distortion results from a Peierls transition along the dislocation line is discussed.

  9. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  10. A cyanide-bridged heterometallic coordination polymer constructed from square-planar [Ni(CN)4](2-): synthesis, crystal structure, thermal decomposition, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying Lian; Yang, Bin Wu; Wang, Gao Feng; Sun, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Square-planar complexes are commonly formed by transition metal ions having a d(8) electron configuration. Planar cyanometallate anions have been used extensively as design elements in supramolecular coordination systems. In particular, square-planar tetracyanometallate(II) ions, i.e. [M(CN)4](2-) (M(II) = Ni, Pd or Pt), are used as good building blocks for bimetallic Hofmann-type assemblies and their analogues. Square-planar tetracyanonickellate(II) complexes have been extensively developed with N-donor groups as additional co-ligands, but studies of these systems using O-donor ligands are scarce. A new cyanide-bridged Cu(II)-Ni(II) heterometallic compound, poly[[diaquatetra-μ2-cyanido-κ(8)C:N-nickel(II)copper(II)] monohydrate], {[Cu(II)Ni(II)(CN)4(H2O)2]·H2O}n, has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction analyses, vibrational spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetic moment measurements. The structural analysis revealed that it has a two-dimensional grid-like structure built up of cationic [Cu(H2O)2](2+) and anionic [Ni(CN)4](2-) units connected through bridging cyanide ligands. The overall three-dimensional supramolecular network is expanded by a combination of interlayer O-H...N and intralayer O-H...O hydrogen-bond interactions. The first decomposition reactions take place at 335 K under a static air atmosphere, which illustrates the existence of guest water molecules in the interlayer spaces. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum confirms that the Cu(II) cation has an axial coordination symmetry and that the unpaired electrons occupy the d(x(2)-y(2)) orbital. In addition, magnetic investigations showed that antiferromagnetic interactions exist in the Cu(II) atoms through the diamagnetic [Ni(CN)4](2-) ion. PMID:27377277

  11. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Er3+ ions in aluminum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shan; Evans, S. M.; Halliburton, L. E.; Slack, G. A.; Schujman, S. B.; Morgan, K. E.; Bondokov, R. T.; Mueller, S. G.

    2009-01-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum from Er3+ ions has been observed in a bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN). These Er3+ ions were introduced into the crystal during growth and had a concentration of approximately 2×1016 cm-3. The Er3+ EPR signal, monitored at 4.5 K, exhibits axial symmetry (the unique axis is parallel to the c axis in this wurtzite lattice) and shows well-resolved hyperfine splittings due to E167r nuclei. An absence of site splittings in the EPR angular dependence indicates that these erbium ions, replacing aluminum ions in the AlN crystal, have no nearby defects. Principal values for the g and hyperfine matrices are g∥=4.337, g⊥=7.647, |A∥|=454 MHz, and |A⊥|=796 MHz. Forbidden transitions, appearing in the low-field portion of the hyperfine spectrum when the magnetic field is rotated a few degrees away from the c axis, give |P|=7.8 MHz for the nuclear electric quadrupole parameter.

  12. Detection of electron paramagnetic resonance absorption using frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Kuyama, Toshifumi; Ono, Mitsuhiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2003-10-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) method was developed to measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption. The first-derivative spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder was measured with this FM method. Frequency modulation of up to 1.6 MHz (peak-to-peak) was achieved at a microwave carrier frequency of 1.1 GHz. This corresponds to a magnetic field modulation of 57microT (peak-to-peak) at 40.3 mT. By using a tunable microwave resonator and automatic control systems, we achieved a practical continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectrometer that incorporates the FM method. In the present experiments, the EPR signal intensity was proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. The background signal at the modulation frequency (1 kHz) for EPR detection was also proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. An automatic matching control (AMC) system reduced the amplitude of noise in microwave detection and improved the baseline stability. Distortion of the spectral lineshape was seen when the spectrometer settings were not appropriate, e.g., with a lack of the open-loop gain in automatic tuning control (ATC). FM is an alternative to field modulation when the side-effect of field modulation is detrimental for EPR detection. The present spectroscopic technique based on the FM scheme is useful for measuring the first derivative with respect to the microwave frequency in investigations of electron-spin-related phenomena. PMID:14511592

  13. Detection of electron paramagnetic resonance absorption using frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Kuyama, Toshifumi; Ono, Mitsuhiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2003-10-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) method was developed to measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption. The first-derivative spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder was measured with this FM method. Frequency modulation of up to 1.6 MHz (peak-to-peak) was achieved at a microwave carrier frequency of 1.1 GHz. This corresponds to a magnetic field modulation of 57 μT (peak-to-peak) at 40.3 mT. By using a tunable microwave resonator and automatic control systems, we achieved a practical continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectrometer that incorporates the FM method. In the present experiments, the EPR signal intensity was proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. The background signal at the modulation frequency (1 kHz) for EPR detection was also proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. An automatic matching control (AMC) system reduced the amplitude of noise in microwave detection and improved the baseline stability. Distortion of the spectral lineshape was seen when the spectrometer settings were not appropriate, e.g., with a lack of the open-loop gain in automatic tuning control (ATC). FM is an alternative to field modulation when the side-effect of field modulation is detrimental for EPR detection. The present spectroscopic technique based on the FM scheme is useful for measuring the first derivative with respect to the microwave frequency in investigations of electron-spin-related phenomena.

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance of a donor in aluminum nitride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. M.; Giles, N. C.; Halliburton, L. E.; Slack, G. A.; Schujman, S. B.; Schowalter, L. J.

    2006-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra are obtained from a donor in aluminum nitride (AlN) crystals. Although observed in as-grown crystals, exposure to x rays significantly increases the concentration of this center. ENDOR identifies a strong hyperfine interaction with one aluminum neighbor along the c axis and weaker equivalent hyperfine interactions with three additional aluminum neighbors in the basal plane. These aluminum interactions indicate that the responsible center is a deep donor at a nitrogen site. The observed paramagnetic defect is either a neutral oxygen substituting for nitrogen (ON0) or a neutral nitrogen vacancy (VN0).

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of paramagnetic centers in carbon-fumed silica adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Savchenko, D. V.; Shanina, B. D.; Kalabukhova, E. N.; Sitnikov, A. A.; Lysenko, V. S.; Tertykh, V. A.

    2014-04-07

    Fumed silica A-300 was carbonized by means of pyrolysis of CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. The obtained initial SiO{sub 2}:C nanopowders of black color, with an average diameter of 14–16 nm and carbon (C) concentration 7 wt. %, subjected to the oxidation and passivation treatment were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the temperature range 4–400 K. Two EPR signals of Lorentzian lineshape with nearly equal g-factors and different linewidth were observed in the initial, oxidized, and passivated SiO{sub 2}:C nanopowders. The two-component EPR spectrum was explained by the presence of C in two electronic states. The intensive narrow EPR signal, which has a temperature-dependent intensity, linewidth, and resonance field position, was attributed to the carbon-related defect with non-localized electron hopping between neighboring C-dangling bonds. The striking effect is that the temperature dependence of the EPR linewidth demonstrates the motional narrowing of the EPR signal at very low temperatures from 4 K to 20 K, which is not typically for nonmetallic materials and was explained by the quantum character of C layer conductivity in the SiO{sub 2}:C. The observed peaks in the temperature dependence of the conduction electron EPR signal integral intensity in the high-temperature range 200–440 K was explained by the presence of the C nanodots at the surface of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and the ejection of electrons from the confinement energy levels of C quantum dot when the temperature becomes comparable to the confinement energy.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of paramagnetic centers in carbon-fumed silica adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, D. V.; Shanina, B. D.; Kalabukhova, E. N.; Sitnikov, A. A.; Lysenko, V. S.; Tertykh, V. A.

    2014-04-01

    Fumed silica A-300 was carbonized by means of pyrolysis of CH2Cl2. The obtained initial SiO2:C nanopowders of black color, with an average diameter of 14-16 nm and carbon (C) concentration 7 wt. %, subjected to the oxidation and passivation treatment were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the temperature range 4-400 K. Two EPR signals of Lorentzian lineshape with nearly equal g-factors and different linewidth were observed in the initial, oxidized, and passivated SiO2:C nanopowders. The two-component EPR spectrum was explained by the presence of C in two electronic states. The intensive narrow EPR signal, which has a temperature-dependent intensity, linewidth, and resonance field position, was attributed to the carbon-related defect with non-localized electron hopping between neighboring C-dangling bonds. The striking effect is that the temperature dependence of the EPR linewidth demonstrates the motional narrowing of the EPR signal at very low temperatures from 4 K to 20 K, which is not typically for nonmetallic materials and was explained by the quantum character of C layer conductivity in the SiO2:C. The observed peaks in the temperature dependence of the conduction electron EPR signal integral intensity in the high-temperature range 200-440 K was explained by the presence of the C nanodots at the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles and the ejection of electrons from the confinement energy levels of C quantum dot when the temperature becomes comparable to the confinement energy.

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of two smectic A liquid crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Gelerinter, E.; Fishel, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the molecular ordering in two smectic A liquid crystals using vanadyl acetylacetonate as a paramagnetic probe. The average hyperfine splitting of the spectrum in the smectic A mesophase is measured as a function of the orientation relative to the dc magnetic field of the spectrometer after alignment of the molecules of the liquid crystal.

  18. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  19. Investigation of electron paramagnetic resonance in carbon tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byszewski, P.; Nabialek, A.

    1996-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) on carbon nanotubes was measured in a wide range of temperatures, the resonance disappeared after oxidizing the tubes. The results are discussed in terms of graphite properties and a model introducing a deformation potential to describe tubular structure. It leads to persistent ring currents in the magnetic field due to the carriers circular motion around a tube. A spin angular-momentum interaction is discussed in an attempt to explain the lack of EPR in purified carbon nanotubes.

  20. Hyperfine Structure and Exchange Narrowing of Paramagnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Turkevich, J.

    1950-01-01

    Discussion of electronic paramagnetic resonance for the free radical á, á-diphenyl â-picryl hydrazyl as observed by its effect on the transmission of microwave through a TE{sub 01} cavity with a small amount of the free radical placed approximately on the axis of the cavity; the half-width of this resonance at half maximum absorption was 1.45 oersteds.

  1. Electron-paramagnetic resonance detection with software time locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Giovanni; Mannini, Matteo; Caneschi, Andrea; Dolci, David; Carlà, Marcello

    2014-02-01

    A setup for electron paramagnetic resonance with narrow band digital detection is described. A low frequency reference tone is added to the radio frequency signal. This reference signal, after digital detection, is used to lock the resonance signal, even in the absence of hardware time locking among the radio frequency generator, the conversion local oscillators, and the sampling stage. Results obtained with 2,2-Diphenyl-1-Pycryl-Hydrazil are presented and discussed.

  2. Intracellular hypoxia of tumor tissue estimated by noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry technique using paramagnetic probes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Atsuko; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Matsumoto, Shingo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Sowers, Anastasia L; Koscielniak, Janusz W; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2011-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry at 700 MHz operating frequency employing a surface coil resonator is used to assess tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) using paramagnetic media whose linewidth and decay constant are related to oxygen concentration. Differences in extracellular and intracellular pO(2) in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumor tissue were tested using several types of water-soluble paramagnetic media, which localize extracellularly or permeate through the cell membrane. The nitroxide carboxy-PROXYL (CxP) can only be distributed in blood plasma and extracellular fluids whereas the nitroxides carbamoyl-PROXYL (CmP) and TEMPOL (TPL) can permeate cell membranes and localize intracellularly. EPR signal decay constant and the linewidth of the intravenously administered nitroxides in SCC tumor tissues implanted in mouse thigh and the contralateral normal muscle of healthy mice breathing gases with different pO(2) were compared. The pO(2) in the blood can depend on the oxygen content in the breathing gas while tissue pO(2) was not directly influenced by pO(2) in the breathing gas. The decay constants of CmP and TPL in tumor tissue were significantly larger than in the normal muscles, and lower linewidths of CmP and TPL in tumor tissue was observed. The SCC tumor showed intracellular hypoxia even though the extracellular pO(2) is similar to normal tissue in the peripheral region. PMID:21212532

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-doped magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, P. C.; Alonso, A.; Silva, O.; Buske, N.

    2002-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance was used to investigate surface-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluids doped with TEMPOL. Two magnetic fluid samples, having magnetite nanoparticles with average diameter of 94 Å and coated with different coating layers (lauric acid plus ethoxylated polyalcohol in one case and oleoylsarcosine in the other case), were doped with TEMPOL (6 mM and pH 7.4) and investigated as a function of the nanoparticle concentration. The resonance field and the resonance linewidth both scale linearly with the nanoparticle concentration.

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance of material properties and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper demonstrates, primarily for the non-specialist and within the context of new and recent achievements, the diagnostic value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the study of material properties and processes. I have selected three EPR studies which demonstrate the elegance and uniqueness of EPR in atomic defect studies and exemplify unusual achievements through the use of new techniques for material measurement and preparation. A brief introduction into the origin, interaction, and detection of unpaired electrons is included.

  5. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges for detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different than those for transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems. PMID:20304044

  6. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, R; Cook, J A; Devasahayam, N; Afeworki, M; Subramanian, S; Tschudin, R; Larsen, J A; Mitchell, J B; Russo, A; Krishna, M C

    1997-09-01

    Imaging of free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using time domain acquisition as in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has not been attempted because of the short spin-spin relaxation times, typically under 1 microsecond, of most biologically relevant paramagnetic species. Recent advances in radiofrequency (RF) electronics have enabled the generation of pulses of the order of 10-50 ns. Such short pulses provide adequate spectral coverage for EPR studies at 300 MHz resonant frequency. Acquisition of free induction decays (FID) of paramagnetic species possessing inhomogenously broadened narrow lines after pulsed excitation is feasible with an appropriate digitizer/averager. This report describes the use of time-domain RF EPR spectrometry and imaging for in vivo applications. FID responses were collected from a water-soluble, narrow line width spin probe within phantom samples in solution and also when infused intravenously in an anesthetized mouse. Using static magnetic field gradients and back-projection methods of image reconstruction, two-dimensional images of the spin-probe distribution were obtained in phantom samples as well as in a mouse. The resolution in the images was better than 0.7 mm and devoid of motional artifacts in the in vivo study. Results from this study suggest a potential use for pulsed RF EPR imaging (EPRI) for three-dimensional spatial and spectral-spatial imaging applications. In particular, pulsed EPRI may find use in vivo studies to minimize motional artifacts from cardiac and lung motion that cause significant problems in frequency-domain spectral acquisition, such as in continuous wave (cw) EPR techniques. PMID:9339442

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance of individual atoms on a surface.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Susanne; Paul, William; Choi, Taeyoung; Lutz, Christopher P; Ardavan, Arzhang; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2015-10-23

    We combined the high-energy resolution of conventional spin resonance (here ~10 nano-electron volts) with scanning tunneling microscopy to measure electron paramagnetic resonance of individual iron (Fe) atoms placed on a magnesium oxide film. We drove the spin resonance with an oscillating electric field (20 to 30 gigahertz) between tip and sample. The readout of the Fe atom's quantum state was performed by spin-polarized detection of the atomic-scale tunneling magnetoresistance. We determine an energy relaxation time of T1 ≈ 100 microseconds and a phase-coherence time of T2 ≈ 210 nanoseconds. The spin resonance signals of different Fe atoms differ by much more than their resonance linewidth; in a traditional ensemble measurement, this difference would appear as inhomogeneous broadening. PMID:26494753

  8. General magnetic transition dipole moments for electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Nehrkorn, Joscha; Schnegg, Alexander; Holldack, Karsten; Stoll, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We present general expressions for the magnetic transition rates in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments of anisotropic spin systems in the solid state. The expressions apply to general spin centers and arbitrary excitation geometry (Voigt, Faraday, and intermediate). They work for linear and circular polarized as well as unpolarized excitation, and for crystals and powders. The expressions are based on the concept of the (complex) magnetic transition dipole moment vector. Using the new theory, we determine the parities of ground and excited spin states of high-spin (S=5/2) Fe(III) in hemin from the polarization dependence of experimental EPR line intensities. PMID:25615456

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance in Zn1-xCoxO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Humánez, F.; Cogollo Pitalúa, R.; Almanza, O.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper is reported the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies in Zn1-xCoxO powder, with 0.01≤x≤0.05, at many temperatures (105-250 K). These samples were synthesized by the sol-gel method (citrate route). Results suggest that the ferromagnetism behavior of the materials is governed by ferromagnetic coupling among cobalt ions. For cobalt concentration higher than 3% were obtained mean size particle higher than 25 nm, measured by X-ray diffraction, and for this were also observed shallow free radical.

  10. Temperature dependence on the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of natural jasper from Taroko Gorge (Taiwan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemantha Kumar, G. N.; Parthasarathy, G.; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. Lakshmana; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2010-04-01

    Structural properties of natural jasper from Taroko Gorge (Taiwan) have been investigated by means of powder X-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic techniques. The EPR spectrum at room temperature exhibits a sharp resonance signal at g = 2.007 and two more resonance signals centered at g ≈ 4.3 and 14.0. The resonance signal at g = 2.007 has been attributed to the E' center and is related to a natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defect. Two more resonance signals centered at g ≈ 4.3 and 14.0 are characteristic of Fe3+ ions. The EPR spectra recorded at room temperature of jasper samples, heat-treated at temperatures ranging from 473 to 1,473 K exhibit marked temperature dependence. The resonance signal corresponding to E' center disappears at elevated temperatures. A broad, intense resonance signal centered at g ≈ 2.0 appears at elevated temperatures. This resonance signal is a characteristic of Fe3+ ions, which are present as hematite in the jasper sample. The intensity of the resonance signal becomes dominant at elevated temperatures at ≥873 K, masking g ≈ 4.3 and g ≈ 14.0 resonance signals. The EPR spectra of jasper heat-treated at 673 K have been recorded at temperatures between 123 and 296 K. The population of spin levels ( N) has been calculated for the broad g ≈ 2.0 resonance signal. It is found that N decreases with decreasing temperature. The linewidth (ΔH) of g ≈ 2.0 resonance signal of the heat-treated jasper is found to increase with decreasing temperature. This has been attributed to spin-spin interaction of the Fe3+ ions present in the form of hematite in the studied jasper sample.

  11. Calculation of electron paramagnetic resonance spectra from Brownian dynamics trajectories: application to nitroxide side chains in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, H J; Hubbell, W L

    1996-01-01

    We present a method to simulate electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of spin-labeled proteins that explicitly includes the protein structure in the vicinity of the attached spin label. The method is applied to a spin-labeled polyleucine alpha-helix trimer. From short (6 ns) stochastic dynamics simulations of this trimer, an effective potential energy function is calculated. Interaction with secondary and tertiary structures determine the reorientational motion of the spin label side chains. After reduction to a single particle problem, long stochastic dynamic trajectories (700 ns) of the spin label side-chain reorientation are calculated from which the Lamor frequency trajectory and subsequently the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum is determined. The simulated spectra agree well with experimental electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of bacteriorhodopsin mutants with spin labels in similar secondary and tertiary environments as in the polyleucine. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8889196

  12. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg2+ doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  13. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  14. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-01-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg2+ doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown. PMID:25362434

  15. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sidabras, Jason W; Varanasi, Shiv K; Mett, Richard R; Swarts, Steven G; Swartz, Harold M; Hyde, James S

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg(2+) doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown. PMID:25362434

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance of a donor in aluminum nitride crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Sean; Giles, Nancy; Halliburton, Larry; Slack, Glen; Schujman, Sandra; Schowalter, Leo

    2006-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) have been used to characterize a dominant donor in single crystals of aluminum nitride (AlN). A broad EPR signal, with g (parallel) = 2.002 and g (perpendicular) = 2.006, is observed in the as-grown crystals. Exposure to x-rays (i.e., ionizing radiation) increases the concentration of this center by a factor of five to ten (depending on sample), thus indicating that most of these centers are initially present in the crystals in a nonparamagnetic charge state. ENDOR identifies a strong hyperfine interaction with one aluminum neighbor along the c axis (described by A (parallel) = 111.30 MHz, A (perpendicular) = 54.19 MHz, and P = 0.289 MHz) and weaker equivalent hyperfine interactions with three additional aluminum neighbors in the basal plane. These aluminum interactions indicate that the responsible center is a deep donor at a nitrogen site. The observed paramagnetic defect is either a neutral oxygen substituting for nitrogen or a neutral nitrogen vacancy. This work was supported at West Virginia University by the National Science Foundation (Grant DMR-0508140). One of the authors (SME) received support from the WV EPSCoR STEM fellowship program.

  17. Improvement of temporal resolution for three-dimensional continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes improved temporal resolution for three-dimensional (3D) continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging. To improve temporal resolution, the duration of magnetic filed scanning that is used to obtain an EPR spectrum for each projection was reduced to 40 ms. The Helmholtz coil pair for field scanning was driven by triangular waves. The uniform distribution of projections was also used to reduce the number of projections for 3D image reconstruction. The reduction reaction of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidinooxy with ascorbic acid was visualized by improved 3D EPR imaging techniques with a temporal resolution of 5.8 s.

  18. Nondestructive measurement of large objects with electron paramagnetic resonance: Pottery, sculpture, and jewel ornament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Motoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ishii, Hiroshi

    1994-12-01

    A cylindicral cavity of TE111 mode with an aperture of 3 mm in diameter has been used to measure the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of a large object placed over the aperture. EPR spectra of a precious fossil of a dinosaur tooth piece and a fossil bone of the Machikane Alligator were measured nondestructively in addition to a jadeite sculpture, a pearl and turquoise necklace, a large turmaline, a star ruby, and ceramic pottery. Thus, EPR can be a nondestructive tool to detect forgery and to test the authenticity in art as well as to allocate ancient objects in archaeological provenance study.

  19. Temperature dependent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of SrZrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.; Pathak, Nimai; Ghosh, P. S.; Rajeshwari, B.; Natarajan, V.; Kadam, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    SrZrO3 (SZO), a distorted perovskite was synthesized using gel-combustion route employing citric acid as a fuel and ammonium nitrate as oxidizer followed by characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Purity of the sample is confirmed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis. Broadening and shift of the resonance field position in EPR spectrum to the lower field was observed as the temperature is lowered; which is the characteristic of ferromagnetic resonance spectra. The value of Curie-Weiss temperature obtained for SZO particles is 8.7 K. The positive sign of the Curie-Weiss temperature indicates that some of the spins are ferromagnetically coupled in this sample. Theoretical investigation using density functional theory (DFT) calculation revealed that Vacancy at zirconium site contribute maximum to the magnetic moment.

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance in positively charged Au25 molecular nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Akbari-Sharbaf, Arash; Hesari, Mahdi; Workentin, Mark S; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2013-01-14

    In this study, we investigated the unpaired electrons and singly occupied molecular orbitals (SOMO) of positively charged Au(25) molecular clusters using solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The EPR powder spectra of the positively charged (Au(25) (+)) and neutral (Au(25) (0)) species of Au(25) are discussed and compared. Our study demonstrates that Au(25) (+) is paramagnetic with a SOMO that is mostly localized about the central gold atom in the core of the molecule and possesses a strong p-type atomic character. The unpaired electron spin is demonstrated to strongly interact with the nuclear spins from other (197)Au nuclei in the core of Au(25) (+) molecules and the hyperfine tensor describing such interaction was extracted from the comparison of the EPR spectra with quantum mechanical simulations assuming an anisotropic structure of the core. Our simulations suggest that the core of Au(25) (+) molecular clusters is more distorted than in the corresponding neutral counterpart. They also confirm previous hypotheses suggesting that the icosahedral core of Au(25) (+) experiences contraction with decreasing temperature. PMID:23320681

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance in Cu-doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchheit, R.; Acosta-Humánez, F.; Almanza, O.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, ZnO and Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles (Zn1‑xCuxO, x = 3%), with a calcination temperature of 500∘C were synthesized using the sol-gel method. The particles were analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at X-band, measurement in a temperature range from 90 K to room temperature. AAS confirmed a good correspondence between the experimental doping concentration and the theoretical value. XRD reveals the presence of ZnO phase in hexagonal wurtzite structure and a nanoparticle size for the samples synthesized. EPR spectroscopy shows the presence of point defects in both samples with g-values of g = 1.959 for shallow donors and g = 2.004 for ionized vacancies. It is important when these materials are required have been used as catalysts, as suggested that it is not necessary prepare them at higher temperature. A simulation of the Cu EPR signal using an anisotropic spin Hamiltonian was performed and showed good coincidence with the experimental spectra. It was shown that Cu2+ ions enter interstitial octahedral sites of orthorhombic symmetry in the wurtzite crystal structure. Temperature dependence of the EPR linewidth and signal intensity shows a paramagnetic behavior of the sample in the measurement range. A Néel temperature TN = 78 ± 19 K was determined.

  2. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Photoluminescence Studies of LaMgAl11O19:Mn2+ Green Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. L.; Dhoble, S. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-09-01

    Manganese-doped LaMgAl11O19 powder has been prepared by an easy combustion method. Powder x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the as-prepared phosphor. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of LaMgAl11O19:Mn2+ phosphor exhibits six-line hyperfine structure centered at g ≈ 1.973. The number of spins participating in resonance (N) and the paramagnetic susceptibility (χ) for the resonance signal at g ≈ 1.973 have been calculated as a function of temperature. The photoluminescence spectrum exhibits green emission at 516 nm, which is attributed to 4T1 → 6A1 transition of Mn2+ ions. From EPR and luminescence studies, it is observed that Mn2+ ions occupy Mg2+ sites and Mn2+ ions are located at tetrahedral sites in the prepared phosphors.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of metalloendofullerene derived carbon nanotube peapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakes, P.; Gembus, A.; Dinse, K.-P.; Hata, K.

    2008-02-01

    Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) prepared by the "super growth" method and arc-grown material were used as templates for peapod preparation with La@C82. A qualitative change of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties of La@C82 is observed after incorporation into SWNT. The loss of lanthanum hyperfine interaction in combination with the observed increase of EPR susceptibility by two orders of magnitude after peapod preparation when comparing with signals from "empty" tubes is indicative for the generation of itinerant spins by charge and spin transfer from La@C82 to the tubes. This interpretation is supported by the observation of fast spin dephasing, detected with pulsed EPR techniques.

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of metalloendofullerene derived carbon nanotube peapods.

    PubMed

    Jakes, P; Gembus, A; Dinse, K-P; Hata, K

    2008-02-01

    Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) prepared by the "super growth" method and arc-grown material were used as templates for peapod preparation with La@C(82). A qualitative change of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties of La@C(82) is observed after incorporation into SWNT. The loss of lanthanum hyperfine interaction in combination with the observed increase of EPR susceptibility by two orders of magnitude after peapod preparation when comparing with signals from "empty" tubes is indicative for the generation of itinerant spins by charge and spin transfer from La@C(82) to the tubes. This interpretation is supported by the observation of fast spin dephasing, detected with pulsed EPR techniques. PMID:18266423

  5. Magnetic nanoparticle imaging using multiple electron paramagnetic resonance activation sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Coene, A. Dupré, L.; Crevecoeur, G.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in several biomedical applications such as hyperthermia, drug targeting, and disease detection. To realize an effective working of these applications, the spatial distribution of the particles needs to be accurately known, in a non-invasive way. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a promising and sensitive measurement technique for recovering these distributions. In the conventional approach, EPR is applied with a homogeneous magnetic field. In this paper, we employ different heterogeneous magnetic fields that allow to stabilize the solution of the associated inverse problem and to obtain localized spatial information. A comparison is made between the two approaches and our novel adaptation shows an average increase in reconstruction quality by 5% and is 12 times more robust towards noise. Furthermore, our approach allows to speed up the EPR measurements while still obtaining reconstructions with an improved accuracy and noise robustness compared to homogeneous EPR.

  6. High field electron paramagnetic resonance characterization of electronic and structural environments for paramagnetic metal ions and organic free radicals in Deepwater Horizon oil spill tar balls.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Vasanth; van Tol, Johan; McKenna, Amy M; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G; Dalal, Naresh S

    2015-02-17

    In the first use of high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to characterize paramagnetic metal-organic and free radical species from tar balls and weathered crude oil samples from the Gulf of Mexico (collected after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill) and an asphalt volcano sample collected off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA, we are able to identify for the first time the various paramagnetic species present in the native state of these samples and understand their molecular structures and bonding. The two tar ball and one asphalt volcano samples contain three distinct paramagnetic species: (i) an organic free radical, (ii) a [VO](2+) containing porphyrin, and (iii) a Mn(2+) containing complex. The organic free radical was found to have a disc-shaped or flat structure, based on its axially symmetric spectrum. The characteristic spectral features of the vanadyl species closely resemble those of pure vanadyl porphyrin; hence, its nuclear framework around the vanadyl ion must be similar to that of vanadyl octaethyl porphyrin (VOOEP). The Mn(2+) ion, essentially undetected by low-field EPR, yields a high-field EPR spectrum with well-resolved hyperfine features devoid of zero-field splitting, characteristic of tetrahedral or octahedral Mn-O bonding. Although the lower-field EPR signals from the organic free radicals in fossil fuel samples have been investigated over the last 5 decades, the observed signal was featureless. In contrast, high-field EPR (up to 240 GHz) reveals that the species is a disc-shaped hydrocarbon molecule in which the unpaired electron is extensively delocalized. We envisage that the measured g-value components will serve as a sensitive basis for electronic structure calculations. High-field electron nuclear double resonance experiments should provide an accurate picture of the spin density distribution for both the vanadyl-porphyrin and Mn(2+) complexes, as well as the organic free radical, and will be the focus of follow

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of a Single NV Nanodiamond Attached to an Individual Biomolecule.

    PubMed

    Teeling-Smith, Richelle M; Jung, Young Woo; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Cardellino, Jeremy; Rampersaud, Isaac; North, Justin A; Šimon, Marek; Bhallamudi, Vidya P; Rampersaud, Arfaan; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Poirier, Michael G; Hammel, P Chris

    2016-05-10

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), an established and powerful methodology for studying atomic-scale biomolecular structure and dynamics, typically requires in excess of 10(12) labeled biomolecules. Single-molecule measurements provide improved insights into heterogeneous behaviors that can be masked in ensemble measurements and are often essential for illuminating the molecular mechanisms behind the function of a biomolecule. Here, we report EPR measurements of a single labeled biomolecule. We selectively label an individual double-stranded DNA molecule with a single nanodiamond containing nitrogen-vacancy centers, and optically detect the paramagnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy spins in the nanodiamond probe. Analysis of the spectrum reveals that the nanodiamond probe has complete rotational freedom and that the characteristic timescale for reorientation of the nanodiamond probe is slow compared with the transverse spin relaxation time. This demonstration of EPR spectroscopy of a single nanodiamond-labeled DNA provides the foundation for the development of single-molecule magnetic resonance studies of complex biomolecular systems. PMID:27166812

  8. Paramagnetic and ferromagnetic resonance imaging with a tip-on-cantilever magnetic resonance force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, K.; Botkin, D.; Yannoni, C. S.; Rugar, D.

    1998-05-01

    A magnetic resonance force microscope with a "tip-on-cantilever" configuration was used to compare imaging characteristics of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic samples. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real-space magnetization image to be successfully reconstructed. In contrast to the EPR case, ferromagnetic resonance imaging of a micron-scale yttrium iron garnet sample showed no significant line broadening despite the strong field gradient (˜10 G/μm). Two-dimensional force maps revealed spatial dependence of magnetostatic and magnetoelastic modes.

  9. Comparison of Paramagnetic and Ferromagnetic Resonance Imaging with an Improved Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, K.; Botkin, D.; Yannoni, C. S.; Rugar, D.

    1998-03-01

    A magnetic resonance force microscope with an improved ``tip-on-cantilever'' configuration was used to compare imaging characteristics of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic samples. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real-space magnetization image to be successfully reconstructed. In contrast to the EPR case, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) imaging of a micron-scale yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sample showed no significant line broadening despite the strong field gradient ( ~ 10 G/μm). Two-dimensional force maps revealed spatial dependence of magnetostatic and magnetoelastic modes.

  10. Vector electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with first and second harmonic displays of ferrihemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Watari, H; Murakami, M; Seo, Y; Shimoyama, Y

    1989-07-31

    Superimposed plots of electron paramagnetic resonance spectra with the first and second harmonic displays of ferrihemoglobin at pH 9.1 and 90 K were measured at 20 degree intervals of phase angle using a phase-sensitive detector. The high spin signal in the g = 6 region was observed in both displays, and a small splitting of the signal was found in the calculated amplitude spectrum of the second harmonic display, with g values of 5.95 and 6.05. Low spin signals were observed at g = 2.55, 2.25 and 1.82 in both harmonic displays. A signal in the g = 2.05 region was observed only in the second harmonic display. The signal is probably associated with the low spin spectrum; however, its origin is obscure. PMID:2547369

  11. Single Acquisition Quantitative Single Point Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyungseok; Subramanian, Sankaran; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Saito, Keita; Matsumoto, Shingo; Krishna, Murali C; McMillan, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has emerged as a promising non-invasive technology to dynamically image tissue oxygenation. Due to its extremely short spin-spin relaxation times, EPRI benefits from a single-point imaging (SPI) scheme where the entire FID signal is captured using pure phase encoding. However, direct T2*/pO2 quantification is inhibited due to constant magnitude gradients which result in time-decreasing FOV. Therefore, conventional acquisition techniques require repeated imaging experiments with differing gradient amplitudes (typically 3), which results in long acquisition time. Methods In this study, gridding was evaluated as a method to reconstruct images with equal FOV to enable direct T2*/pO2 quantification within a single imaging experiment. Additionally, an enhanced reconstruction technique that shares high spatial k-space regions throughout different phase encoding time delays was investigated (k-space extrapolation). Results The combined application of gridding and k-space extrapolation enables pixelwise quantification of T2* from a single acquisition with improved image quality across a wide range of phase encoding delay times. The calculated T2*/pO2 does not vary across this time range. Conclusion By utilizing gridding and k-space extrapolation, accurate T2*/pO2 quantification can be achieved within a single dataset to allow enhanced temporal resolution (by a factor of 3). PMID:23913515

  12. The Contribution of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance to Melanoma Research

    PubMed Central

    Godechal, Quentin; Gallez, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, is rising each year. However, some aspects of the tumor initiation and development are still unclear, and the current method of diagnosis, based on the visual aspect of the tumor, shows limitations. For these reasons, developments of new techniques are ongoing to improve basic knowledge on the disease and diagnosis of tumors in individual patients. This paper shows how electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), a method able to detect free radicals trapped in melanin pigments, has recently brought its unique value to this specific field. The general principles of the method and the convenience of melanin as an endogenous substrate for EPR measurements are explained. Then, the way by which EPR has recently helped to assess the contribution of ultraviolet rays (UVA and UVB) to the initiation of melanoma is described. Finally, we describe the improvements of EPR spectrometry and imaging in the detection and mapping of melanin pigments inside ex vivo and in vivo melanomas. We discuss how these advances might improve the diagnosis of this skin cancer and point out the present capabilities and limitations of the method. PMID:21941659

  13. Maximally spaced projection sequencing in electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Gage; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) provides 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo with excellent spatial and pO2 resolution. When investigating such physiologic parameters in living animals, the situation is inherently dynamic. Improvements in temporal resolution and experimental versatility are necessary to properly study such a system. Uniformly distributed projections result in efficient use of data for image reconstruction. This has dictated current methods such as equal-solid-angle (ESA) spacing of projections. However, acquisition sequencing must still be optimized to achieve uniformity throughout imaging. An object-independent method for uniform acquisition of projections, using the ESA uniform distribution for the final set of projections, is presented. Each successive projection maximizes the distance in the gradient space between itself and prior projections. This maximally spaced projection sequencing (MSPS) method improves image quality for intermediate images reconstructed from incomplete projection sets, enabling useful real-time reconstruction. This method also provides improved experimental versatility, reduced artifacts, and the ability to adjust temporal resolution post factum to best fit the data and its application. The MSPS method in EPRI provides the improvements necessary to more appropriately study a dynamic system. PMID:26185490

  14. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance studies of x-ray irradiated Nafion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Juan; Usher, Timothy

    2007-03-01

    Fuel cells promise a bright future as power sources for a variety of electronic equipment as well as more power demanding elements. Nafion (DuPont's trademark of a sulfonated tetrafluorethylene polymer modified from Teflon) is the heart of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) as well as Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs). Fuel cells are used to power electronic equipment on spacecraft, satellites and unpiloted high altitude aircraft, where ionizing radiation can be a concern. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a spectroscopic technique that is very sensitive to free radicals such as those produced by ionizing radiation therefore EPR can give us a window into the degradation of the Nafion membranes due to the ionizing radiation. Nafion samples were irradiated using a x-ray diffractometer with a copper target operating at 40kV and 55mA for at least 3hrs. X-Band EPR spectroscopy of the irradiated nafion reveals a peak at 3400G with a width of 10G, which decays over time, completely diminishing in a couple of weeks. Preliminary results from the polarization studies on the effects of ionizing radiation will also be presented.

  15. Uniform Spinning Sampling Gradient Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David H.; Ahmad, Rizwan; Liu, Yangping; Chen, Zhiyu; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve the quality and speed of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) acquisition by combining a uniform sampling distribution with spinning gradient acquisition. Theory and Methods A uniform sampling distribution was derived for spinning gradient EPRI acquisition (Uniform Spinning Sampling, USS) and compared to the existing (Equilinear Spinning Sampling, ESS) acquisition strategy. Novel corrections were introduced to reduce artifacts in experimental data. Results Simulations demonstrated that USS puts an equal number of projections near each axis whereas ESS puts excessive projections at one axis, wasting acquisition time. Artifact corrections added to the magnetic gradient waveforms reduced noise and correlation between projections. USS images had higher SNR (85.9±0.8 vs. 56.2±0.8) and lower mean-squared error than ESS images. The quality of the USS images did not vary with the magnetic gradient orientation, in contrast to ESS images. The quality of rat heart images was improved using USS compared to that with ESS or traditional fast-scan acquisitions. Conclusion A novel EPRI acquisition which combines spinning gradient acquisition with a uniform sampling distribution was developed. This USS spinning gradient acquisition offers superior SNR and reduced artifacts compared to prior methods enabling potential improvements in speed and quality of EPR imaging in biological applications. PMID:23475830

  16. 76 FR 67200 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Devices and Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Electron... of use limited to electron paramagnetic resonance devices and systems for oximetry. DATES:...

  17. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Nitroxide-Labeled Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Paula B.; Puett, David

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly conserved calcium-binding protein consisting of two homologous domains, each of which contains two EF-hands, that is known to bind well over 300 proteins and peptides. In most cases the (Ca2+)4-form of CaM leads to the activation of a key regulatory enzyme or protein in a myriad of biological processes. Using the nitroxide spin-labeling reagent, 3-(2-iodoacetamido)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyl oxyl, bovine brain CaM was modified at 2-3 methionines with retention of activity as judged by the activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the spectral changes upon addition of Ca2+ to the apo-form of spin-labeled protein. A significant loss of spectral intensity, arising primarily from reductions in the heights of the low, intermediate, and high field peaks, accompanied Ca2+ binding. The midpoint of the Ca2+-mediated transition determined by EPR occurred at a higher Ca2+ concentration than that measured with circular dichroic spectroscopy and enzyme activation. Recent data have indicated that the transition from the apo-state of CaM to the fully saturated form, [Ca2+)4-CaM], contains a compact intermediate corresponding to [Ca2+)2-CaM], and the present results suggest that the spin probes are reporting on Ca2+ binding to the last two sites in the N-terminal domain, i.e. for the [Ca2+)2-CaM] → [Ca2+)4-CaM] transition in which the compact structure becomes more extended. EPR of CaM, spin-labeled at methionines, offers a different approach for studying Ca2+-mediated conformational changes and may emerge as a useful technique for monitoring interactions with target proteins. PMID:24718677

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry: Methodology and material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert Bruce

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) methodologies for radiation dose reconstruction are investigated using various dosimeter materials. Specifically, methodologies were developed and used that were intended to improve the accuracy and precision of EPR dosimetric techniques, including combining specimen rotation during measurement, use of an internal manganese standard, instrument stabilization techniques and strict measurement protocols. Characterization and quantification of these improvements were preformed on three specific EPR dosimeter materials. The dosimeter materials investigated using these optimized EPR techniques were Walrus teeth, human tooth enamel and alanine dosimeters. Walrus teeth showed the least desirable properties for EPR dosimetry yielding large native signals and low sensitivity (EPR signal per unit dose). The methods for tooth enamel and alanine resulted in large improvements in precision and accuracy. The minimum detectable dose (MDD) found for alanine was approximately 30 mGy (three standard deviations from the measured zero dose value). This is a sensitivity improvement of 5 to 10 over other specialized techniques published in the literature that offer MDD's in the range of 150 mGy to 300 mGy. The accuracy of the method on tooth enamel was comparable to that typically reported in the literature although the measurement precision was increased by about 7. This improvement in measurement precision enables various applications including dose vs. depth profile analysis and a more nondestructive testing evaluation (where the whole sample need not be additively irradiated in order to calibrate its radiation response). A nondestructive evaluation of numerous samples showed that the method could reconstruct the same doses to within 10 mGy of those evaluated destructively. Doses used for this assessment were in the range of 100 to 250 mGy. The method had sufficient stability to measure tooth enamel samples exhibiting extreme anisotropy with a

  19. Dating Carbonaceous Matter in Archean Cherts by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Bourbin, M.; Derenne, S.; Binet, L.; Le Du, Y.; Westall, F.; Kremer, B.; Gautret, P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ancient geological materials are likely to be contaminated through geological times. Thus, establishing the syngeneity of the organic matter embedded in a mineral matrix is a crucial step in the study of very ancient rocks. This is particularly the case for Archean siliceous sedimentary rocks (cherts), which record the earliest traces of life. We used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) for assessing the syngeneity of organic matter in cherts that have a metamorphic grade no higher than greenschist. A correlation between the age of Precambrian samples and the shape of their EPR signal was established and statistically tested. As thermal treatments impact organic matter maturity, the effect of temperature on this syngeneity proxy was studied; cyanobacteria were submitted to cumulative short thermal treatment at high temperatures followed by an analysis of their EPR parameters. The resulting carbonaceous matter showed an evolution similar to that of a thermally treated young chert. Furthermore, the possible effect of metamorphism, which is a longer thermal event at lower temperatures, was ruled out for cherts older than 2 Gyr, based on the study of Silurian cherts of the same age and same precursors but various metamorphic grades. We determined that even the most metamorphosed sample did not exhibit the lineshape of an Archean sample. In the hope of detecting organic contamination in Archean cherts, a “contamination-like” mixture was prepared and studied by EPR. It resulted that the lineshape analysis alone does not allow contamination detection and that it must be performed along with cumulative thermal treatments. Such treatments were applied to three Archean chert samples, making dating of their carbonaceous matter possible. We concluded that EPR is a powerful tool to study primitive organic matter and could be used in further exobiology studies on low-metamorphic grade samples (from Mars for example). Key Words: Kerogen—Sedimentary rocks

  20. Dating carbonaceous matter in archean cherts by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Bourbin, M; Gourier, D; Derenne, S; Binet, L; Le Du, Y; Westall, F; Kremer, B; Gautret, P

    2013-02-01

    Ancient geological materials are likely to be contaminated through geological times. Thus, establishing the syngeneity of the organic matter embedded in a mineral matrix is a crucial step in the study of very ancient rocks. This is particularly the case for Archean siliceous sedimentary rocks (cherts), which record the earliest traces of life. We used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) for assessing the syngeneity of organic matter in cherts that have a metamorphic grade no higher than greenschist. A correlation between the age of Precambrian samples and the shape of their EPR signal was established and statistically tested. As thermal treatments impact organic matter maturity, the effect of temperature on this syngeneity proxy was studied; cyanobacteria were submitted to cumulative short thermal treatment at high temperatures followed by an analysis of their EPR parameters. The resulting carbonaceous matter showed an evolution similar to that of a thermally treated young chert. Furthermore, the possible effect of metamorphism, which is a longer thermal event at lower temperatures, was ruled out for cherts older than 2 Gyr, based on the study of Silurian cherts of the same age and same precursors but various metamorphic grades. We determined that even the most metamorphosed sample did not exhibit the lineshape of an Archean sample. In the hope of detecting organic contamination in Archean cherts, a "contamination-like" mixture was prepared and studied by EPR. It resulted that the lineshape analysis alone does not allow contamination detection and that it must be performed along with cumulative thermal treatments. Such treatments were applied to three Archean chert samples, making dating of their carbonaceous matter possible. We concluded that EPR is a powerful tool to study primitive organic matter and could be used in further exobiology studies on low-metamorphic grade samples (from Mars for example). PMID:23397956

  1. Optically detected electron paramagnetic resonance of AlN single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P. M.; Przybylinska, H.; Watkins, G. D.; Choyke, W. J.; Slack, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    AlN single crystals have been investigated using photoluminescence (PL) and optical detection of electron paramagnetic resonance in the PL (ODEPR). All crystals were found to exhibit intense PL extending from the visible into the near infrared. Several S=1 centers, each with its own distinct emission spectrum, and distant S=1/2 pair recombination centers have been observed via ODEPR. In all except one center, D5, no hyperfine structure was observed preventing chemical identification of the impurity involved. In the case of D5 the partially resolved hyperfine structure suggests interaction with a 100% abundant nucleus of I~5/2. We present arguments to associate it with a displaced host aluminum atom.

  2. Simultaneous electrochemical and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of carotenoids. Effect of electron donating and accepting substituents

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, A.S.; Khaled, M.; Kispert, L.D. )

    1994-08-11

    A series of substituted phenyl-7[prime]-apocarotenoids with varying electron donating and accepting substituents was examined by cyclic voltammogram (CV) and simultaneous electrochemical electron paramagnetic resonance (SEEPR). Carotenoids substituted with electron donating groups are more easily oxidized than those with electron accepting substituents. Comproportionation constants for the dication and the neutral species were measured by SEEPR techniques and by simulation of the CVs. The [Delta]H[sub pp] of the SEEPR spectrum of the cation radicals varies from 13.2 to 15.6 G, and the g factors are 2.0027 [+-] 0.0002. These EPR parameters suggest a polyene [pi]-cation radical structure. The CVs are calculated using DigiSim, a CV simulation program, and the proposed mechanism involves three electrode reactions and two homogeneous reactions. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Electrochemical electron paramagnetic resonance utilizing loop gap resonators and micro-electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Tamski, Mika A; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R; Newton, Mark E

    2015-09-28

    A miniaturised electrochemical cell design for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies is reported. The cell incorporates a Loop Gap Resonator (LGR) for EPR investigation of electrochemically generated radicals in aqueous (and other large dielectric loss) samples and achieves accurate potential control for electrochemistry by using micro-wires as working electrodes. The electrochemical behaviour of the cell is analysed with COMSOL finite element models and the EPR sensitivity compared to a commercial TE011 cavity resonator using 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) as a reference. The electrochemical EPR performance is demonstrated using the reduction of methyl viologen as a redox probe in both water and acetonitrile. The data reported herein suggest that sub-micromolar concentrations of radical species can be detected in aqueous samples with accurate potential control, and that subtle solution processes coupled to electron transfer, such as comproportionation reactions, can be studied quantitatively using EPR. PMID:26291423

  4. Towards Human Oxygen Images with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Redler, Gage; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has been used to noninvasively provide 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in small animals. These oxygen images are well resolved both spatially (∼1mm) and in pO2 (1-3 torr). EPRI preclinical images of pO2 have demonstrated extremely promising results for various applications investigating oxygen related physiologic and biologic processes as well as the dependence of various disease states on pO2, such as the role of hypoxia in cancer. Recent developments have been made that help to progress EPRI towards the eventual goal of human application. For example, a bimodal crossed-wire surface coil has been developed. Very preliminary tests demonstrated a 20 dB isolation between transmit and receive for this coil, with an anticipated additional 20dB achievable. This could potentially be used to image local pO2 in human subjects with superficial tumors with EPRI. Local excitation and detection will reduce the specific absorption rate limitations on images and eliminate any possible power deposition concerns. Additionally, a large 9 mT EPRI magnet has been constructed which can fit and provide static main and gradient fields for imaging local anatomy in an entire human. One potential obstacle that must be overcome in order to use EPRI to image humans is the approved use of the requisite EPRI spin probe imaging agent (trityl). While nontoxic, EPRI trityl spin probes have been injected intravenously when imaging small animals, which results in relatively high total body injection doses that would not be suitable for human imaging applications. Work has been done demonstrating the alternative use of intratumoral (IT) injections, which can reduce the amount of trityl required for imaging by a factor of 2000- relative to a whole body intravenous injection. The development of a large magnet that can accommodate human subjects, the design of a surface coil for imaging of superficial pO2, and the reduction of required

  5. Semiquinone Radicals from Oxygenated Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can be oxygenated to form very reactive hydroquinone and quinone products. A guiding hypothesis in the PCB research community is that some of the detrimental health effects of some PCBs are a consequence of these oxygenated forms undergoing one-electron oxidation or reduction, generating semiquinone radicals (SQ•−). These radicals can enter into a futile redox cycle resulting in the formation of reactive oxygen species, that is, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Here, we examine some of the properties and chemistry of these semiquinone free radicals. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to detect SQ•− formation, we observed that (i) xanthine oxidase can reduce quinone PCBs to the corresponding SQ•−; (ii) the heme-containing peroxidases (horseradish and lactoperoxidase) can oxidize hydroquinone PCBs to the corresponding SQ•−; (iii) tyrosinase acting on PCB ortho-hydroquinones leads to the formation of SQ•−; (iv) mixtures of PCB quinone and hydroquinone form SQ•− via a comproportionation reaction; (v) SQ•− are formed when hydroquinone-PCBs undergo autoxidation in high pH buffer (≈>pH 8); and, surprisingly, (vi) quinone-PCBs in high pH buffer can also form SQ•−; (vii) these observations along with EPR suggest that hydroxide anion can add to the quinone ring; (viii) H2O2 in basic solution reacts rapidly with PCB-quinones; and (ix) at near-neutral pH SOD can catalyze the oxidization of PCB-hydroquinone to quinone, yielding H2O2. However, using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-1-oxide (DMPO) as a spin-trapping agent, we did not trap superoxide, indicating that generation of superoxide from SQ•− is not kinetically favorable. These observations demonstrate multiple routes for the formation of SQ•− from PCB-quinones and hydroquinones. Our data also point to futile redox cycling as being one mechanism by which oxygenated PCBs can lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species, but this is most efficient

  6. Dielectric microwave resonators in TE011 cavities for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mett, Richard R.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Golovina, Iryna S.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-09-01

    The coupled system of the microwave cylindrical TE011 cavity and the TE01δ dielectric modes has been analyzed in order to determine the maximum achievable resonator efficiency parameter of a dielectric inserted into a cavity, and whether this value can exceed that of a dedicated TE01δ mode dielectric resonator. The frequency, Q value, and resonator efficiency parameter Λ for each mode of the coupled system were calculated as the size of the dielectric was varied. Other output parameters include the relative field magnitudes and phases. Two modes are found: one with fields in the dielectric parallel to the fields in the cavity center and the other with antiparallel fields. Results closely match those from a computer program that solves Maxwell's equations by finite element methods. Depending on the relative natural resonance frequencies of the cavity and dielectric, one mode has a higher Q value and correspondingly lower Λ than the other. The mode with the higher Q value is preferentially excited by a coupling iris or loop in or near the cavity wall. However, depending on the frequency separation between modes, either can be excited in this way. A relatively narrow optimum is found for the size of the insert that produces maximum signal for both modes simultaneously. It occurs when the self-resonance frequencies of the two resonators are nearly equal. The maximum signal is almost the same as that of the dedicated TE01δ mode dielectric resonator alone, Λ ≅40 G/W1/2 at X-band for a KTaO3 crystal. The cavity is analogous to the second stage of a two-stage coupler. In general, there is no electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal benefit by use of a second stage. However, there is a benefit of convenience. A properly designed sample-mounted resonator inserted into a cavity can give EPR signals as large as what one would expect from the dielectric resonator alone.

  7. Dielectric microwave resonators in TE(011) cavities for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mett, Richard R; Sidabras, Jason W; Golovina, Iryna S; Hyde, James S

    2008-09-01

    The coupled system of the microwave cylindrical TE(011) cavity and the TE(01delta) dielectric modes has been analyzed in order to determine the maximum achievable resonator efficiency parameter of a dielectric inserted into a cavity, and whether this value can exceed that of a dedicated TE(01delta) mode dielectric resonator. The frequency, Q value, and resonator efficiency parameter Lambda for each mode of the coupled system were calculated as the size of the dielectric was varied. Other output parameters include the relative field magnitudes and phases. Two modes are found: one with fields in the dielectric parallel to the fields in the cavity center and the other with antiparallel fields. Results closely match those from a computer program that solves Maxwell's equations by finite element methods. Depending on the relative natural resonance frequencies of the cavity and dielectric, one mode has a higher Q value and correspondingly lower Lambda than the other. The mode with the higher Q value is preferentially excited by a coupling iris or loop in or near the cavity wall. However, depending on the frequency separation between modes, either can be excited in this way. A relatively narrow optimum is found for the size of the insert that produces maximum signal for both modes simultaneously. It occurs when the self-resonance frequencies of the two resonators are nearly equal. The maximum signal is almost the same as that of the dedicated TE(01delta) mode dielectric resonator alone, Lambda congruent with40 G/W(1/2) at X-band for a KTaO(3) crystal. The cavity is analogous to the second stage of a two-stage coupler. In general, there is no electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal benefit by use of a second stage. However, there is a benefit of convenience. A properly designed sample-mounted resonator inserted into a cavity can give EPR signals as large as what one would expect from the dielectric resonator alone. PMID:19044441

  8. Evaluation of sub-microsecond recovery resonators for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, F.; Subramanian, S.; Devasahayam, N.; Murugesan, R.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, J. B.; Krishna, M. C.

    2008-02-01

    Time-domain (TD) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging at 300 MHz for in vivo applications requires resonators with recovery times less than 1 μs after pulsed excitation to reliably capture the rapidly decaying free induction decay (FID). In this study, we tested the suitability of the Litz foil coil resonator (LCR), commonly used in MRI, for in vivo EPR/EPRI applications in the TD mode and compared with parallel coil resonator (PCR). In TD mode, the sensitivity of LCR was lower than that of the PCR. However, in continuous wave (CW) mode, the LCR showed better sensitivity. The RF homogeneity was similar in both the resonators. The axis of the RF magnetic field is transverse to the cylindrical axis of the LCR, making the resonator and the magnet co-axial. Therefore, the loading of animals, and placing of the anesthesia nose cone and temperature monitors was more convenient in the LCR compared to the PCR whose axis is perpendicular to the magnet axis.

  9. Enhanced dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of in vivo physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redler, Gage

    It is well established that low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in tumors strongly affects their malignant state and resistance to therapy. The importance of tumor oxygenation status has led to increased interest in the development of robust oxygen imaging modalities. One such method is electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). EPRI has provided a non-invasive, quantitative imaging modality with sensitivity deep in tissues, capable of investigating static oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo and has helped to corroborate the correlation between chronic states of hypoxia and tumor malignancy. However, when studying the complicated physiology of a living animal, the situation tends to be inherently dynamic. It has been found that in certain tumor regions there may exist steady states of hypoxia, or chronic hypoxia, whereas in other regions there may exist transient states of hypoxia, or acute hypoxia. It has been postulated that the negative prognostic implications associated with hypoxic tumors may be amplified for acutely hypoxic tumors. However, controversial data and a current lack in methods with the capability to noninvasively image tumor pO2 in vivo with sufficient spatial, temporal, and pO 2 resolution preclude definitive conclusions on the relationships between the different forms of hypoxia and the differences in their clinical implications. A particularly promising oxygen imaging modality that can help to study both chronic and acute hypoxia and elucidate important physiological and clinical differences is rapid Dynamic EPRI. The focus of this work is the development of methods enabling Dynamic EPRI of in vivo physiology as well as its potential applications. This work describes methods which enhance various aspects of EPRI in order to establish a more robust Dynamic EPRI capable of noninvasively studying and quantifying acute hypoxia in vivo. These enhancements are achieved through improvements that span from methods for the acquisition of individual

  10. Magnetic resonance studies of isotopically labeled paramagnetic proteins: (2FE-2S) ferredoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.; Xia, B.; Chae, Y.K.; Westler, W.M.; Markley, J.L.

    1994-12-01

    Recent developments in NMR spectroscopy, especially multidimensional, multinuclear NMR techniques, have made NMR the most versatile tool available for studying protein structure and function in solution. Unlike diamagnetic proteins, paramagnetic proteins contain centers with unpaired electrons. These unpaired electrons interact with magnetic nuclei either through chemical bonds by a contact mechanism or through space by a pseudocontact mechanism. Such interactions make the acquisition and analysis of NMR spectra of paramagnetic proteins more challenging than those of diamagnetic proteins. Some NMR signals from paramagnetic proteins are shifted outside the chemical shift region characteristic of diamagnetic proteins; these {open_quotes}hyperfine-shifted{close_quotes} resonances originate from nuclei that interact with unpaired electrons from the paramagnetic center. The large chemical shift dispersion in spectra of paramagnetic proteins makes it difficult to excite the entire spectral window and leads to distortions in the baseline. Interactions with paramagnetic centers shorten T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times of nuclei; the consequences are line broadening and lower spectral sensitivity. Scalar (through bond) and dipolar (through space) interactions between pairs of nuclei are what give rise to crosspeak signals in multi-dimensional NMR spectra of small diamagnetic proteins. When such interactions involve a nucleus that is strongly relaxed by interaction with a paramagnetic center, specialized methods may be needed for its detection or it may be completely undetectable by present nD NMR methods.

  11. Resonance spectra of a paramagnetic probe dissolved in a viscous medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, J. I.; Gelerinter, E.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    A model is presented for calculating the paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of vanadyl acetylacetonate (VAAC) dissolved in either a liquid crystal or isotropic solvent. It employs density matrix formulation in the rotating reference frame. The molecules occupy several discrete angles with respect to the magnetic field and can relax to neighboring positions in a characteristic time tau(theta). The form of tau(theta) is found from a diffusion approach, and the magnitude of tau(theta) is a measure of how freely the VAAC probe tumbles in the solvent. Spectra are predicted for values of tau between 10 to the minus 11th power sec and 10 to the minus 7th power sec. The EPR spectrum, in the isotropic case, is obtained be summing the contributions from the allowed angles weighted by the polar volume element, sin theta. When applying the model to the nematic liquid crystal case it is also necessary to multiply by the Saupe distribution function. For this case tau(theta) is obtained from the diffusion approach in which two diffusion constants are employed to reflect the difference in the parallel and perpendicular components of the viscosity.

  12. Reduction of artifact of metallic implant in magnetic resonance imaging by combining paramagnetic and diamagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yanhui; Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Kushibe, Atsumichi; Yamazaki, Keita; Chiba, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Toru

    2010-05-01

    The method of coating the metallic implant made of paramagnetic materials with diamagnetic materials has been proposed to reduce the magnetic disturbance of metallic implants which causes artifact in magnetic resonance imaging. The optimal thicknesses of the diamagnetic coatings have been obtained for a straight cylindrical hip joint and an aneurysm clip by using the magnetic field analysis of the finite element method (FEM). Whereas in the manufacturing, with respect to the mechanical force of the diamagnetic material, etc., the new structure of dual-material model with diamagnetic material inside and paramagnetic material outside is considered better. In this paper, first the effectiveness of the structure of the dual-material model with actual diamagnetic material inside and paramagnetic material outside is investigated by using the FEM. Then optimal thicknesses of paramagnetic coating of two models are obtained. Finally the effectiveness of the dual-material model is verified by the experiment.

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of purified catalyst-free single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zaka, Mujtaba; Ito, Yasuhiro; Wang, Huiliang; Yan, Wenjing; Robertson, Alex; Wu, Yimin A; Rümmeli, Mark H; Staunton, David; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Morton, John J L; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G Andrew D; Warner, Jamie H

    2010-12-28

    Electron paramagnetic resonance of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been bedevilled by the presence of paramagnetic impurities. To address this, SWCNTs produced by laser ablation with a nonmagnetic PtRhRe catalyst were purified through a multiple step centrifugation process in order to remove amorphous carbon and catalyst impurities. Centrifugation of a SWCNT solution resulted in sedimentation of carbon nanotube bundles containing clusters of catalyst particles, while isolated nanotubes with reduced catalyst particle content remained in the supernatant. Further ultracentrifugation resulted in highly purified SWCNT samples with a narrow diameter distribution and almost no detectable catalyst particles. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals were detected only for samples which contained catalyst particles, with the ultracentrifuged SWCNTs showing no EPR signal at X-band (9.4 GHz) and fields < 0.4 T. PMID:21082779

  14. Field-stepped direct detection electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhelin; Liu, Tengzhi; Elajaili, Hanan; Rinard, George A.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2015-09-01

    The widest scan that had been demonstrated previously for rapid scan EPR was a 155 G sinusoidal scan. As the scan width increases, the voltage requirement across the resonating capacitor and scan coils increases dramatically and the background signal induced by the rapidly changing field increases. An alternate approach is needed to achieve wider scans. A field-stepped direct detection EPR method that is based on rapid-scan technology is now reported, and scan widths up to 6200 G have been demonstrated. A linear scan frequency of 5.12 kHz was generated with the scan driver described previously. The field was stepped at intervals of 0.01 to 1 G, depending on the linewidths in the spectra. At each field data for triangular scans with widths up to 11.5 G were acquired. Data from the triangular scans were combined by matching DC offsets for overlapping regions of successive scans. This approach has the following advantages relative to CW, several of which are similar to the advantages of rapid scan. (i) In CW if the modulation amplitude is too large, the signal is broadened. In direct detection field modulation is not used. (ii) In CW the small modulation amplitude detects only a small fraction of the signal amplitude. In direct detection each scan detects a larger fraction of the signal, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio. (iii) If the scan rate is fast enough to cause rapid scan oscillations, the slow scan spectrum can be recovered by deconvolution after the combination of segments. (iv) The data are acquired with quadrature detection, which permits phase correction in the post processing. (v) In the direct detection method the signal typically is oversampled in the field direction. The number of points to be averaged, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio, is determined in post processing based on the desired field resolution. A degased lithium phthalocyanine sample was used to demonstrate that the linear deconvolution procedure can be employed with

  15. Tuner and radiation shield for planar electron paramagnetic resonance microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Narkowicz, Ryszard; Suter, Dieter

    2015-02-15

    Planar microresonators provide a large boost of sensitivity for small samples. They can be manufactured lithographically to a wide range of target parameters. The coupler between the resonator and the microwave feedline can be integrated into this design. To optimize the coupling and to compensate manufacturing tolerances, it is sometimes desirable to have a tuning element available that can be adjusted when the resonator is connected to the spectrometer. This paper presents a simple design that allows one to bring undercoupled resonators into the condition for critical coupling. In addition, it also reduces radiation losses and thereby increases the quality factor and the sensitivity of the resonator.

  16. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: A High-Resolution Tool for Muscle Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, LaDora V.; Lowe, Dawn A.; Ferrington, Deborah A.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function can be altered by changes in protein structure and motion. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) paired with site-directed spin labeling has been used to study the relationships between (a) muscle force and myosin structure and (b) muscle relaxation and Ca-ATPase motion and structure. PMID:11210444

  17. The Effect of Electronic Paramagnetism on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Frequencies in Metals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Herring, C.; Knight, W. D.

    1950-09-22

    Observations on the shifts of nuclear resonances in metals ( Li{sup 7}, Na{sup 23}, Cu {sup 63}, Be{sup 9}, Pb{sup 207}, Al{sup 27}, and Ca{sup 69} ) due to free electron paramagnetism; comparison with theoretical values.

  18. Disulfide-Linked Dinitroxides for Monitoring Cellular Thiol Redox Status through Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Legenzov, Eric A; Sims, Stephen J; Dirda, Nathaniel D A; Rosen, Gerald M; Kao, Joseph P Y

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular thiol-disulfide redox balance is crucial to cell health, and may be a key determinant of a cancer's response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The ability to assess intracellular thiol-disulfide balance may thus be useful not only in predicting responsiveness of cancers to therapy, but in assessing predisposition to disease. Assays of thiols in biology have relied on colorimetry or fluorimetry, both of which require UV-visible photons, which do not penetrate the body. Low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is an emerging magnetic imaging technique that uses radio waves, which penetrate the body well. Therefore, in combination with tailored imaging agents, EPRI affords the opportunity to image physiology within the body. In this study, we have prepared water-soluble and membrane-permeant disulfide-linked dinitroxides, at natural isotopic abundance, and with D,(15)N-substitution. Thiols such as glutathione cleave the disulfides, with simple bimolecular kinetics, to yield the monomeric nitroxide species, with distinctive changes in the EPR spectrum. Using the D,(15)N-substituted disulfide-dinitroxide and EPR spectroscopy, we have obtained quantitative estimates of accessible intracellular thiol in cultured human lymphocytes. Our estimates are in good agreement with published measurements. This suggests that in vivo EPRI of thiol-disulfide balance is feasible. Finally, we discuss the constraints on the design of probe molecules that would be useful for in vivo EPRI of thiol redox status. PMID:26523485

  19. Comparative identification of irradiated herbs by the methods of electron paramagnetic resonance and thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Gancheva, V.; Radicheva, M.; Hristova, B.; Guelev, M.; Penchev, O.

    1998-12-01

    Non irradiated and γ-irradiated dry herbs savoury ( Savoury), wild thyme ( Thymus serpollorium) and marjoram ( Origanum) with absorbed dose of 8 kGy have been investigated by the methods of elecrtron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and thermoluminescence (TL). Non-irradiated herbs exhibit only one weak siglet EPR signal whereas in irradiated samples its intensity increase and in addition two satelite lines are recorded. This triplet EPR spectrum is attributed to cellulose free radical generated by irradiation. It has been found that upon keeping the samples under the normal stock conditions the life-time of the cellulose free radical in the examined samples is ˜60-80 days. Thus the conclusion has been made that the presence of the EPR signal of cellulose free radical is unambiguous indication that the sample under study has been irradiated but its absence can not be considered as the opposite evidence. In the case when EPR signal was absent the method of TL has been used to give the final decision about the previous radiation treatment of the sample.

  20. A study of the antioxidant properties of beers using electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Stanimirova, Ivana

    2013-12-01

    The antioxidant properties of various kinds of beers were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. This was possible by measuring the changes in the intensity of the EPR spectrum that resulted from the interaction of the stable radical DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) with the antioxidants found in a beer sample. The antioxidant capacity was then presented in Trolox Equivalents, e.g. μM trolox in a beer sample of 100ml. The influence of the type, colour, the content of the extract and alcohol on the antioxidant activities of commercial beer samples was investigated using two-way hierarchical clustering and analysis of variance. The results showed that all of the beers investigated exhibit antioxidant properties. By performing an analysis of variance, it was found that the value of the antioxidant capacity significantly (0.05 level of significance) depends on the content of the extract and the colour of the beer. It seems that additives also influence the antioxidant properties to some extent, but neither the alcohol content nor the kind of fermentation affects the antioxidant properties of beer. PMID:23871057

  1. An electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetically modulated microwave absorption characterization of thermochromic (Ba, Li)-Mn oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, G.; Zamorano, R.; Heiras, J.; Castellanos, M.; Valenzuela, R.

    2007-09-01

    We report electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetically modulated microwave absorption spectroscopy (MAMMAS) studies on powdered BaMnO 3 and Li 2MnO 3 in the 77-300 K temperature range. The two oxides showed one single-line EPR spectra at room temperature. For Li 2MnO 3 the absorption line changed continuously with temperature, and showed a paramagnetic behavior in the whole temperature range. For BaMnO 3 an additional signal was observed below ˜196 K; at low temperature (<135 K) the original signal has practically vanished. The changes in the g-factor, peak-to-peak linewidth (Δ Hpp) and integrated intensity ( IEPR) as a function of temperature are studied. The MAMMAS spectrum for Li 2Mn0 3 showed a monotonic increase with temperature; this result confirmed its paramagnetic behavior. For BaMnO 3 the MAMMAS signal exhibited a maximum at Tmax=139 K, approximately the temperature for the color change.

  2. Radiation-induced electron paramagnetic resonance signal and soybean isoflavones content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcos R. R.; Mandarino, José M. G.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2012-09-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a well-known spectroscopic technique that detects paramagnetic centers and can detect free radicals with high sensitivity. In food, free radicals can be generated by several commonly used industrial processes, such as radiosterilization or heat treatment. EPR spectroscopy is used to detect radioinduced free radicals in food. In this work the relation between EPR signal induced by gamma irradiation treatment and soybean isoflavones content was investigated. Present results did not show correlation between total isoflavones content and the EPR signal. Nevertheless, some isoflavone contents had a negative correlation with the radiation-induced EPR signal.

  3. ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE DOSIMETRY FOR A LARGE-SCALE RADIATION INCIDENT

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Harold M.; Flood, Ann Barry; Williams, Benjamin B.; Dong, Ruhong; Swarts, Steven G.; He, Xiaoming; Grinberg, Oleg; Sidabras, Jason; Demidenko, Eugene; Gui, Jiang; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Kobayashi, Kyo; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Marsh, Stephen D.P.; Matthews, Thomas P.; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Pennington, Patrick M.; Raynolds, Timothy; Salikhov, Ildar; Wilcox, Dean E.; Zaki, Bassem I.

    2013-01-01

    With possibilities for radiation terrorism and intensified concerns about nuclear accidents since the recent Fukushima Daiichi event, the potential exposure of large numbers of individuals to radiation that could lead to acute clinical effects has become a major concern. For the medical community to cope with such an event and avoid overwhelming the medical care system, it is essential to identify not only individuals who have received clinically significant exposures and need medical intervention but also those who do not need treatment. The ability of electron paramagnetic resonance to measure radiation-induced paramagnetic species, which persist in certain tissues (e.g., teeth, fingernails, toenails, bone, and hair), has led this technique to become a prominent method for screening significantly exposed individuals. Although the technical requirements needed to develop this method for effective application in a radiation event are daunting, remarkable progress has been made. In collaboration with General Electric, and through funding committed by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, electron paramagnetic resonance tooth dosimetry of the upper incisors is being developed to become a Food and Drug Administration-approved and manufacturable device designed to carry out triage for a threshold dose of 2 Gy. Significant progress has also been made in the development of electron paramagnetic resonance nail dosimetry based on measurements of nails in situ under point-of-care conditions, and in the near future this may become a second field-ready technique. Based on recent progress in measurements of nail clippings, we anticipate that this technique may be implementable at remotely located laboratories to provide additional information when the measurements of dose on site need to be supplemented. We conclude that electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry is likely to be a useful part of triage for a large-scale radiation incident. PMID:22850230

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Single Magnetic Moment on a Surface.

    PubMed

    Berggren, P; Fransson, J

    2016-01-01

    We address electron spin resonance of single magnetic moments in a tunnel junction using time-dependent electric fields and spin-polarized current. We show that the tunneling current directly depends on the local magnetic moment and that the frequency of the external electric field mixes with the characteristic Larmor frequency of the local spin. The importance of the spin-polarized current induced anisotropy fields acting on the local spin moment is, moreover, demonstrated. Our proposed model thus explains the absence of an electron spin resonance for a half integer spin, in contrast with the strong signal observed for an integer spin. PMID:27156935

  5. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Single Magnetic Moment on a Surface

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, P.; Fransson, J.

    2016-01-01

    We address electron spin resonance of single magnetic moments in a tunnel junction using time-dependent electric fields and spin-polarized current. We show that the tunneling current directly depends on the local magnetic moment and that the frequency of the external electric field mixes with the characteristic Larmor frequency of the local spin. The importance of the spin-polarized current induced anisotropy fields acting on the local spin moment is, moreover, demonstrated. Our proposed model thus explains the absence of an electron spin resonance for a half integer spin, in contrast with the strong signal observed for an integer spin. PMID:27156935

  6. A tuneable doubly stacked dielectric resonator housed in an intact TE 102 cavity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattar, Saba M.; Emwas, Abdul H.

    2003-01-01

    An EPR resonator is constructed by inserting a pair of dielectric ceramic rings in an unmodified rectangular TE 102 cavity. It is tuneable over the range of 8.0-10.0 GHz. Therefore, existing EPR cavities can be easily converted to resonators with superior signal-to-noise ratios that are at least 24 times larger than the original ones in this extended frequency range. The resonator's performance is tested using DPPH, TEMPONE, MnO and Cu 2+ complexes and displays excellent resolution and sensitivity. Thus EPR spectra of small paramagnetic organic and inorganic samples and spin labeled biomolecules may be obtained without resorting to loop gap resonators.

  7. High-frequency (95 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance study of the photoinduced charge transfer in conjugated polymer-fullerene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceuster, J. De; Goovaerts, E.; Bouwen, A.; Hummelen, J. C.; Dyakonov, V.

    2001-11-01

    Light-induced electron paramagnetic resonance (LEPR) measurements are reported in composites of poly(2-methoxy-5-(3-,7-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MDMO-PPV) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), a soluble derivative of C60. Under illumination of the sample, two paramagnetic species are formed due to photoinduced charge transfer between conjugated polymer and fullerene. One is the positive polaron P+ on the polymer backbone and the other is the radical anion on the methanofullerene. Using high-frequency (95 GHz) LEPR it was possible to separate these two contributions to the spectrum on the basis of their g factors, and moreover to resolve the g anisotropy for both radicals. The positive polaron on the conjugated polymer chain possesses axial symmetry with g values g||=2.0034(1) and g⊥=2.0024(1). EPR on low doped polymer gave extra proof for the assignment to the positive polaron. The negatively charged methanofullerene has a lower, rhombic symmetry with gx=2.0003(1), gy=2.0001(1), and gz=1.9982(1). Different spin-lattice relaxation of both species gives rise to a rapid passage effect for the positive polaron spectrum.

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance of spin-variable metallomesogens [Fe L 2] X ( X = PF6, SCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, I. V.; Ivanova, T. A.; Turanov, A. N.; Garipov, R. R.

    2009-10-01

    Significant differences in the manifestation of spin-crossover properties of the mesogen compounds [Fe L 2] X with oxysalicylidene- N'-ethyl- N-ethylenediamine ligands L and anions X = PF{6/-} and SCH- have been found by means of electron paramagnetic resonance. The electron paramagnetic resonance data and the quantum-chemical calculation within the density functional theory enables us to establish that the observed specific features are associated with the incorporation of the SCH- ion into the first coordination sphere of the Fe(III) ion. The role of the transition of the material to the liquid-state phase in the formation of a low-dimensional (two-dimensional) structure with stronger intermolecular interactions has been revealed.

  9. Structure and dynamics in B12 enzyme catalysis revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    2009-03-01

    Challenges to the understanding of how protein structure and dynamics contribute to catalysis in enzymes, and the use of time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic techniques to address the challenges, are examined in the context of the coenzyme B12-dependent enzyme, ethanolamine ammonia-lyase (EAL), from Salmonella typhimurium. EAL conducts the homolytic cleavage of the coenzyme cobalt-carbon bond, intraprotein radical migration (5-6 å), and hydrogen atom transfers, which enable the core radical-mediated rearrangement reaction. Thermodynamic and activation parameters are measured in two experimental systems, which were developed to isolate sub-sequences from the multi-step catalytic cycle, as follows: (1) A dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)/water cryosolvent system is used to prepare the kinetically-arrested enzyme/coenzyme/substrate ternary complex in fluid solution at 230 K.[1] Temperature-step initiated cobalt-carbon bond cleavage and radical pair separation to form the Co(II)-substrate radical pair are monitored by using time-resolved, full-spectrum EPR spectroscopy (234<=T<=250 K).[1] (2) The Co(II)-substrate radical pair is cryotrapped in frozen aqueous solution at T<150 K, and then promoted to react by a temperature step. The reaction of the substrate radical along the native pathway to form the diamagnetic bound products is monitored by using time-resolved, full-spectrum EPR spectroscopy (187<=T<=217 K).[2] High temporal resolution is achieved, because the reactions are dramatically slowed at the low temperatures, relative to the initiation and spectrum acquistion times. The results are combined with high resolution structures of the reactant centers, obtained by pulsed-EPR spectroscopies,[3] and the protein, obtained by structural proteomics[4] and EPR and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) in combination with site directed mutagenesis,[5] to approach a molecular level description of protein contributions to catalysis in EAL. [4

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies on conformation states and metal ion exchange properties of vanadium bromoperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, E.; Boon, K.; Wever, R.

    1988-03-08

    An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study was carried out to examine structural aspects of vanadium-containing bromoperoxidase from the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum. At high pH, the reduced form of bromoperoxidase showed an apparently axially symmetric EPR signal with 16 hyperfine lines. When the pH was lowered, a new EPR spectrum was formed. When EPR spectra of the reduced enzyme were recorded in the pH range from 4.2 to 8.4, it appeared that these changes were linked to a functional group with an apparent pK/sub a/ of about 5.4. In D/sub 2/O this value for the pK/sub a/ was 5.3. It is suggested that these effects arise from protonation of histidine or aspartate/glutamate residues near the metal ion. The values for the isotropic hyperfine coupling constant of the reduced enzyme at both high and low pH are also consistent with a ligand field containing nitrogen and/or oxygen donor atoms. When reduced bromoperoxidase was dissolved in D/sub 2/O or H/sub 2//sup 17/O instead of H/sub 2//sup 16/O, vanadium (IV) hyperfine line widths were markedly affected, demonstrating that water is a ligand of the metal ion. Together with previous work these findings suggest that vanadium (IV) is not involved in catalytic turnover and confirm the model in which the vanadium (V) ion of the native enzyme only serves to bind both hydrogen peroxide and bromide. After excess vanadate was added to a homogeneous preparation of purified bromoperoxidase, the extent of vanadium bound to the protein increased from 0.5 to 1.1, with a concomitant enhancement of enzymic activity. Finally, it is demonstrated that both vanadate (VO/sub 4//sup 3 -/) and molybdate (MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) compete for the same site on apobromoperoxidase.

  11. Methodology for increased precision in saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance studies of rotational dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Squier, T C; Thomas, D D

    1986-01-01

    Microsecond rotational motions of nitroxide spin labels are measured primarily with saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance (ST-EPR). In the present study we have used model system experiments to quantitatively evaluate different ST-EPR spectral parameters, both in-phase and out-of-phase, with an emphasis on techniques for suppressing the interference from weakly immobilized probes. Analyses of both systematic and random errors show that maximum sensitivity to small changes in correlation time and minimum ambiguity of interpretation are best achieved by combining measurements of both spectral line-shape, i.e., the ratio of line-heights, and spectral intensity, i.e., the absolute amplitude of either a position within a spectrum or a spectral integral. Errors in the measurement of correlation times for the two types of parameters tend to be complementary. Integrated intensity parameters are particularly useful in measuring microsecond probe motions in the presence of weakly immobilized components. We confirm that integrated intensity parameters are sometimes effective in rejecting signals from weakly immobilized probes, but the effectiveness of this rejection is more limited than previously supposed and depends on the type of parameter being measured. We describe procedures for evaluating and minimizing errors due to weakly immobilized probes, emphasizing the advantages of a new kind of intensity parameter obtained from integrated in-phase spectra. We provide detailed descriptions of experimental procedures, along with calibration plots of the most useful spectral parameters vs. rotational correlation time, which should make it possible for workers in other laboratories, using different instruments and sample geometries, to reproduce spectra quantitatively and to make accurate correlation time measurements. PMID:3013330

  12. Orthogonal resonators for pulse in vivo electron paramagnetic imaging at 250 MHz

    PubMed Central

    Sundramoorthy, Subramanian V.; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    A 250 MHz bimodal resonator with a 19 mm internal diameter for in vivo pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging is presented. Two separate coaxial cylindrical resonators inserted one into another were used for excitation and detection. The Alderman-Grant excitation resonator (AGR) showed the highest efficiency among all the excitation resonators tested. The magnetic field of AGR is confined to the volume of the detection resonator, which results in highly efficient use of the radio frequency power. A slotted inner single loop single gap resonator (SLSG LGR), coaxial to the AGR, was used for signal detection. The resulting bimodal resonator (AG/LGR) has two mutually orthogonal magnetic field modes; one of them has the magnetic field in the axial direction. The resonator built in our laboratory achieved 40dB isolation over 20 MHz bandwidth with quality factors of detection and excitation resonators of 36 and 11 respectively. Considerable improvement of the B1 homogeneity and EPR image quality in comparison with reflection loop-gap resonator of similar size and volume was observed. PMID:24530507

  13. Tetrachloridocuprates(II)—Synthesis and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Alette; Zabel, André; Strauch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) on the basis of metal containing anions and/or cations are of interest for a variety of technical applications e.g., synthesis of particles, magnetic or thermochromic materials. We present the synthesis and the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analyses of a series of some new potential ionic liquids based on tetrachloridocuprates(II), [CuCl4]2−, with different sterically demanding cations: hexadecyltrimethylammonium 1, tetradecyltrimethylammonium 2, tetrabutylammonium 3 and benzyltriethylammonium 4. The cations in the new compounds were used to achieve a reasonable separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II) ions for EPR spectroscopy. The EPR hyperfine structure was not resolved. This is due to the exchange broadening, resulting from still incomplete separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II) centers. Nevertheless, the principal values of the electron Zeemann tensor (g║ and g┴) of the complexes could be determined. Even though the solid substances show slightly different colors, the UV/Vis spectra are nearly identical, indicating structural changes of the tetrachloridocuprate moieties between solid state and solution. The complexes have a promising potential e.g., as high temperature ionic liquids, as precursors for the formation of copper chloride particles or as catalytic paramagnetic ionic liquids. PMID:22408411

  14. Electron injection at the PTCDA/metal interface detected by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardi, G. J.; Domenico, J.; Muraca, A.; Gerardi, H. K.

    2014-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance absorption was observed for samples prepared by vacuum vapor deposition of thin films of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) on metal films of magnesium (Mg), aluminum (Al) and silver (Ag) but not on gold (Au) or PTCDA on quartz. The resonance absorption is seen as a Lorentzian line with g-value of 2.0030 and a linewidth of 0.19 mT. The signal is attributed to PTCDA anions at the metal organic interface. The relative values of the metal work function and the PTCDA electron affinity appear to determine the occurrence of the EPR absorption.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging for real-time monitoring of Li-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Sathiya, M.; Leriche, J.-B.; Salager, E.; Gourier, D.; Tarascon, J.-M.; Vezin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Batteries for electrical storage are central to any future alternative energy paradigm. The ability to probe the redox mechanisms occurring at electrodes during their operation is essential to improve battery performances. Here we present the first report on Electron Paramagnetic Resonance operando spectroscopy and in situ imaging of a Li-ion battery using Li2Ru0.75Sn0.25O3, a high-capacity (>270 mAh g−1) Li-rich layered oxide, as positive electrode. By monitoring operando the electron paramagnetic resonance signals of Ru5+ and paramagnetic oxygen species, we unambiguously prove the formation of reversible (O2)n− species that contribute to their high capacity. In addition, we visualize by imaging with micrometric resolution the plating/stripping of Li at the negative electrode and highlight the zones of nucleation and growth of Ru5+/oxygen species at the positive electrode. This efficient way to locate ‘electron’-related phenomena opens a new area in the field of battery characterization that should enable future breakthroughs in battery research. PMID:25662295

  16. On the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies in Mixed Alkali Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaja, G.; Reddy, T. Goverdhan; Kistaiah, P.

    2011-10-20

    Mixed alkali effect in oxide based glasses is one of the current research activity and studies on the behavior of spectroscopic parameters in these systems are quite important to understand the basic nature of this phenomenon. EPR studies of mixed alkali glasses Li{sub 2}O-K{sub 2}O-ZnO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped with Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} were carried out at room temperature. The EPR spectra show typical resonances of d{sup 5} system (Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}) in all the measured glass specimens. Evaluated hyperfine constant, number of paramagnetic centers and paramagnetic susceptibility values show deviation from the linearity with the progressive substitution of the Li ion with K in glass network.

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance and FT-IR spectroscopic studies of glycine anhydride and betaine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim Başkan, M.; Kartal, Zeki; Aydın, Murat

    2015-12-01

    Gamma irradiated powders of glycine anhydride and betaine hydrochloride have been investigated at room temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In these compounds, the observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the R1 and R2 radicals, respectively. It was determined that the free electron interacted with environmental protons and 14N nucleus in both radicals. The EPR spectra of gamma irradiated powder samples remained unchanged at room temperature for two weeks after irradiation. Also, the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), FT-Raman and thermal analyses of both compounds were investigated. The functional groups in the molecular structures of glycine anhydride and betaine hydrochloride were identified by vibrational spectroscopies (FT-IR and FT-Raman).

  18. Biophysical Characterisation of Globins and Multi-Heme Cytochromes Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Filip

    Heme proteins of different families were investigated in this work, using a combination of pulsed and continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy and laser flash photolysis. The first class of proteins that were investigated, were the globins. The globin-domain of the globin-coupled sensor of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was studied in detail using different pulsed EPR techniques (HYSCORE and Mims ENDOR). The results of this pulsed EPR study are compared with the results of the optical investigation and the crystal structure of the protein. The second globin, which was studied, is the Protoglobin of Methanosarcina acetivorans, various mutants of this protein were studied using laser flash photolysis and Raman spectroscopy to unravel the link between this protein's unusual structure and its ligand-binding kinetics. In addition to this, the CN -bound form of this protein was investigated using EPR and the influence of the strong deformation of the heme on the unusual low gz values is discussed. Finally, the neuroglobins of three species of fishes, Danio rerio, Dissostichus mawsoni and Chaenocephalus aceratus are studied. The influence of the presence or absence of two cysteine residues in the C-D and D-region of the protein on the EPR spectrum, and the possible formation of a disulfide bond is studied. The second group of proteins that were studied in this thesis belong to the family of the cytochromes. First the Mouse tumor suppressor cytochrome b561 was studied, the results of a Raman and EPR investigation are compared to the Human orthologue of the protein. Secondly, the tonoplast cytochrome b561 of Arabidopsis was investigated in its natural form and in two double-mutant forms, in which the heme at the extravesicular side was removed. The results of this investigation are then compared with two models in literature that predict the localisation of the hemes in this

  19. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Freund, H.-J.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic

  20. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Risse, T.; Freund, H.-J.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of spin-labeled camptothecin derivatives: a different look of the ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Antonio; Marinello, Jessica; Bortolus, Marco; Sánchez, Albert; Grandas, Anna; Pedroso, Enrique; Pommier, Yves; Capranico, Giovanni; Maniero, Anna Lisa; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2011-02-24

    Camptothecin (CPT) derivatives are clinically effective poisons of DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) able to form a ternary complex with the Top1-DNA complex. The aim of this investigation was to examine the dynamic aspects of the ternary complex formation by means of site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR). Two semisynthetic CPT derivatives bearing the paramagnetic moiety were synthesized, and their biological activity was tested. A 22-mer DNA oligonucleotide sequence with high affinity cleavage site for Top1 was also synthesized. EPR experiments were carried out on modified CPT in the presence of DNA, of Top1, or of both. In the last case, a slow motion component in the EPR signal appeared, indicating the formation of the ternary complex. Deconvolution of the EPR spectrum allowed to obtain the relative drug amounts in the complex. It was also possible to demonstrate that the residence time of CPT "trapped" in the ternary complex is longer than hundreds of microseconds. PMID:21254781

  2. Bulk Quantum Computation with Pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Simulations of Single-Qubit Error Correction Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmuratov, I. K.; Baibekov, E. I.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the possibility to restore transient nutations of electron spin centers embedded in the solid using specific composite pulse sequences developed previously for the application in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We treat two types of systematic errors simultaneously: (i) rotation angle errors related to the spatial distribution of microwave field amplitude in the sample volume, and (ii) off-resonance errors related to the spectral distribution of Larmor precession frequencies of the electron spin centers. Our direct simulations of the transient signal in erbium- and chromium-doped CaWO4 crystal samples with and without error corrections show that the application of the selected composite pulse sequences can substantially increase the lifetime of Rabi oscillations. Finally, we discuss the applicability limitations of the studied pulse sequences for the use in solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  3. Intrinsic oscillations of spin current polarization in a paramagnetic resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.; Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2012-10-01

    A spin- and time-dependent electron transport has been studied in a paramagnetic resonant tunneling diode using the self-consistent Wigner-Poisson method. Based on the calculated current-voltage characteristics in an external magnetic field, we have demonstrated that under a constant bias both the spin-up and spin-down current components exhibit the THz oscillations in two different bias voltage regimes. We have shown that the oscillations of the spin-up (down) polarized current result from the coupling between the two resonance states: one localized in the triangular quantum well created in the emitter region and the second localized in the main quantum well. We have also elaborated the one-electron model of the current oscillations, which confirms the results obtained with the Wigner-Poisson method. The spin current oscillations can lower the effectiveness of spin filters based on the paramagnetic resonant tunneling structures and can be used to design the generators of the spin polarized current THz oscillations that can operate under the steady bias and constant magnetic field.

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Fe3+ in near-stoichiometric LiTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyo-Menoyo, M.; Keeble, D. J.; Furukawa, Y.; Kitamura, K.

    2004-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments on the dominant Fe3+ centre in near-stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystals grown by the double crucible Czochralski method are reported. A near complete roadmap of EPR positions was obtained, and transitions from two magnetically non-equivalent sites clearly resolved in the zx plane, perpendicular to the glide plane. This allowed accurate determination of C3 symmetry spin Hamiltonian parameters. Newman superposition model analyses of second and fourth order zero field splitting term parameters were performed to give further insight into the site of incorporation. The second order calculations provide evidence for Fe3+ substitution within the Li octahedron.

  5. Environmental Factors Influencing the Hyperfine Structure of Manganous Low-Temperature Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nebert, D. W.; Allen, B. T.

    1966-01-01

    Hyperfine structure is observed in low temperature (T = -180°C) EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectra of a number of solutions containing Mn++ ions 13, 15) which have characteristics in common with low temperature EPR spectra from biological substances such as mitochondria and microsomes (1-4). This investigation is an attempt to understand the features of these signals in terms of the molecular environment of the manganous ion, and a qualitative explanation for the observations reported here is advanced in terms of the amount of axial distortion of a manganese hydrate in different environments. PMID:4289642

  6. Feasibility study of superresolution continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Wakana, Michi; Susaki, Hitoshi

    2006-06-01

    In this letter, we report that superresolution continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw-EPR) imaging is feasible for enhancing spatial resolution in images of unpaired electrons. We demonstrate one-dimensional superresolution EPR imaging for phantoms of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder with a 650MHz cw-EPR imager. The spatial resolution was improved up to fivefold with iterative deconvolution techniques. Our superresolution EPR imaging includes two-stage postprocessing, i.e., noniterative deconvolution for measured EPR spectra and iterative deconvolution processing for a blurred EPR image profile with the point spread function of the low-pass window function being applied.

  7. Degradation of edible oil during food processing by ultrasound: electron paramagnetic resonance, physicochemical, and sensory appreciation.

    PubMed

    Pingret, Daniella; Durand, Grégory; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Rockenbauer, Antal; Ginies, Christian; Chemat, Farid

    2012-08-01

    During ultrasound processing of lipid-containing food, some off-flavors can be detected, which can incite depreciation by consumers. The impacts of ultrasound treatment on sunflower oil using two different ultrasound horns (titanium and pyrex) were evaluated. An electron paramagnetic resonance study was performed to identify and quantify the formed radicals, along with the assessment of classical physicochemical parameters such as peroxide value, acid value, anisidine value, conjugated dienes, polar compounds, water content, polymer quantification, fatty acid composition, and volatiles profile. The study shows an increase of formed radicals in sonicated oils, as well as the modification of physicochemical parameters evidencing an oxidation of treated oils. PMID:22804736

  8. Spin label electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of Huntington disease erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, L W; Ostrowski, M S

    1982-01-01

    Several spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of red cell membranes appear to show abnormalities in some Huntington disease (HD) patients, but not in others. Both studies measure the W/S ratios, presumably under similar conditions, but have different results. We have studied the W/S ratio in some detail to gain a better understanding of this experimental parameter and to determine its potential application in detecting HD abnormalities. Our results offer little encouragement for continued use of W/S as an indication of membrane defect in HD. PMID:6282120

  9. Al-doped MgB2 materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, Ali; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Somer, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB2) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB2. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB2 disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  10. Design and evaluation of a 1.1-GHz surface coil resonator for electron paramagnetic resonance-based tooth dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hirotaka; Hirata, Hiroshi; Petryakov, Sergey; Lesniewski, Piotr; Williams, Benjamin B; Flood, Ann Barry; Swartz, Harold M

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes an optimized design of a surface coil resonator for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based tooth dosimetry. Using the optimized resonator, dose estimates with the standard error of the mean of approximately 0.5 Gy were achieved with irradiated human teeth. The product of the quality factor and the filling factor of the resonator was computed as an index of relative signal intensity in EPR tooth dosimetry by the use of 3-D electromagnetic wave simulator and radio frequency circuit design environment (ANSYS HFSS and Designer). To verify the simulated results of the signal intensity in our numerical model of the resonator and a tooth sample, we experimentally measured the radiation-induced signals from an irradiated tooth with an optimally designed resonator. In addition to the optimization of the resonator design, we demonstrated the improvement of the stability of EPR spectra by decontamination of the surface coil resonator using an HCl solution, confirming that contamination of small magnetic particles on the silver wire of the surface coil had degraded the stability of the EPR spectral baseline. PMID:24845300

  11. Hysteresis loops of spin-dependent electronic current in a paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, P.; Spisak, B. J.; Wołoszyn, M.; Adamowski, J.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear properties of the spin-dependent electronic transport through a semiconductor resonant tunnelling diode with a paramagnetic quantum well are considered. The spin-dependent Wigner-Poisson model of the electronic transport and the two-current Mott’s formula for the independent spin channels are applied to determine the current-voltage curves of the nanodevice. Two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops are found in the current-voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current. The physical interpretation of these two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops is given based on the analysis of the spin-dependent electron densities and the potential energy profiles. The differences between the current-voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current allow us to explore the changes of the spin polarization of the current for different electric fields and determine the influence of the electronic current hysteresis on the spin polarization of the current flowing through the paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode.

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of Fe3+ in α-quartz: Hydrogen-compensated center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mombourquette, M. J.; Minge, J.; Hantehzadeh, M. R.; Weil, J. A.; Halliburton, L. E.

    1989-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and proton electron-nuclear double-resonance studies of a hydrogen-compensated Fe3+ (S=(5/2) center in synthetic iron-doped α-quartz have been carried out at 20 and 15 K, respectively. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters were determined, allowing anisotropy of the g matrix as well as [g,D,A(1H)]-matrix noncoaxiality, and including high-spin terms of the form S4. Evaluation of the results gives strong evidence that the center (called S2 by some workers) consists of a Fe3+ ion occurring substitutionally at a Si4+ site, charge compensated by an interstitial hydrogen ion. The label [FeO4/H+]0 is proposed for the center.

  13. Imaging of Nitroxides at 250 MHz using Rapid-Scan Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Joshua R.; Tseitlin, Mark; Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Weismiller, Hilary A.; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    Projections for 2D spectral-spatial images were obtained by continuous wave and rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance using a bimodal cross-loop resonator at 251 MHz. The phantom consisted of three 4 mm tubes containing different 15N,2H-substituted nitroxides. Rapid-scan and continuous wave images were obtained with 5 min total acquisition times. For comparison, images also were obtained with 29 s acquisition time for rapid scan and 15 min for continuous wave. Relative to continuous wave projections obtained for the same data acquisition time, rapid-scan projections had significantly less low-frequency noise and substantially higher signal-to-noise at higher gradients. Because of the improved image quality for the same data acquisition time, linewidths could be determined more accurately from the rapid-scan images than from the continuous wave images. PMID:24650729

  14. Combustion Synthesized Cr3+-doped-BaMgAl10O17 Phosphor: An Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Sivaramaiah, G.; Rao, J. L.; Srivastava, Anoop K.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.; Dhoble, S. J.; Singh, P. K.; Mohapatra, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    BaMgAl10O17 phosphors doped with Cr3+ ions were prepared by a combustion route at a furnace temperature of 773 K. The X-ray diffraction pattern revealed that the BaMgAl10O17 phosphor was in a hexagonal phase. Energy-dispersive X-ray mapping images demonstrated the presence of the dopant ion in the BaMgAl10O17 matrix. The bands observed in the optical absorption spectrum were characteristic of Cr3+ ions in octahedral geometry. Upon 555-nm excitation, an intense narrow red emission line centred at 690 nm due to the 2Eg → 4A2g transition of Cr3+ ions was observed. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of Cr3+ ions in BaMgAl10O17 phosphor showed multiple absorption bands having at least 6 g values. Based on the EPR data, various parameters such as the absolute number of spins, Gibbs potential, magnetic susceptibility and magnetic moments, Curie constant, etc., for the system were evaluated.

  15. Application of Paramagnetically Tagged Molecules for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Biofilm Mass Transport Processes▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, B.; Holmes, W. M.; Sloan, W. T.; Phoenix, V. R.

    2010-01-01

    Molecules become readily visible by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when labeled with a paramagnetic tag. Consequently, MRI can be used to image their transport through porous media. In this study, we demonstrated that this method could be applied to image mass transport processes in biofilms. The transport of a complex of gadolinium and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), a commercially available paramagnetic molecule, was imaged both in agar (as a homogeneous test system) and in a phototrophic biofilm. The images collected were T1 weighted, where T1 is an MRI property of the biofilm and is dependent on Gd-DTPA concentration. A calibration protocol was applied to convert T1 parameter maps into concentration maps, thus revealing the spatially resolved concentrations of this tracer at different time intervals. Comparing the data obtained from the agar experiment with data from a one-dimensional diffusion model revealed that transport of Gd-DTPA in agar was purely via diffusion, with a diffusion coefficient of 7.2 × 10−10 m2 s−1. In contrast, comparison of data from the phototrophic biofilm experiment with data from a two-dimensional diffusion model revealed that transport of Gd-DTPA inside the biofilm was by both diffusion and advection, equivalent to a diffusion coefficient of 1.04 × 10−9 m2 s−1. This technology can be used to further explore mass transport processes in biofilms, either by using the wide range of commercially available paramagnetically tagged molecules and nanoparticles or by using bespoke tagged molecules. PMID:20435773

  16. A Spectrometer for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at High Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, L. R.; Gerfen, G. J.; Bellew, B. F.; Bryant, J. A.; Hall, D. A.; Inati, S. J.; Weber, R. T.; Un, S.; Prisner, T. F.; McDermott, A. E.; Fishbein, K. W.; Kreischer, K. E.; Temkin, R. J.; Singel, D. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    A high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)/electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer operating at 211 MHz for 1H and 140 GHz for g= 2 paramagnetic centers (5 T static field) is described. The salient feature of the instrument is a cyclotron-resonance maser (gyrotron) which generates high-frequency, high-power microwave radiation. This gyrotron, which under conventional operation produces millisecond pulses at kilowatt powers, has been adapted to operate at ˜100 W for 1 to 20 s pulses and in the continuous wave mode at the 10 W power level. Experiments combining DNP with magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance were performed on samples consisting of 2% by weight of the free radical BDPA doped into polystyrene. Room-temperature DNP enhancement factors of 10 for 1H and 40 for 13C were obtained in the NMR-MAS spectra. Static DNP NMR has also been performed on samples containing nitroxides dissolved in water:glycerol solvent mixtures. Enhancements of approximately 200 have been obtained for low-temperature (14 K) 1H NMR. A pulsed/CW EPR spectrometer operating at 140 GHz has been developed in conjunction with the DNP spectrometer. Microwave sources include Gunn-diode oscillators which provide low-power (20 mW) radiation, and the gyrotron, which has been used to deliver higher power levels in pulsed experiments. Results using this spectrometer are presented for continuous-wave and echo-detected EPR, electron spin-echo-envelope modulation (ESEEM), and Fourier-transform EPR.

  17. Visuomotor resonance in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Becchio, Cristina; Castiello, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    When we observe the actions performed by others, our motor system "resonates" along with that of the observed agent. Is a similar visuomotor resonant response observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD)? Studies investigating action observation in ASD have yielded inconsistent findings. In this perspective article we examine behavioral and neuroscientific evidence in favor of visuomotor resonance in ASD, and consider the possible role of action-perception coupling in social cognition. We distinguish between different aspects of visuomotor resonance and conclude that while some aspects may be preserved in ASD, abnormalities exist in the way individuals with ASD convert visual information from observed actions into a program for motor execution. Such abnormalities, we surmise, may contribute to but also depend on the difficulties that individuals with ASD encounter during social interaction. PMID:23189045

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Cr3+ in near-stoichiometric LiTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyo-Menoyo, M.; Keeble, D. J.; Furukawa, Y.; Kitamura, K.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) experiments on the dominant Cr3+ center in near-stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystals, grown by the double crucible Czochralski method, are reported. A near complete roadmap of EPR positions was obtained allowing an accurate determination of the spin-Hamiltonian parameters. Newman superposition model calculations of zero-field splitting term were performed and support the model of Cr3+ incorporation within the Li octahedron. Calculations were also made for Cr3+ in LiNbO3, again good agreement with a Li site model was obtained for the main EPR center. The temperature dependence of the zero-field splitting parameter for Cr3+ in LiTaO3 was found to show anomalous behavior in the region of 40 K, suggesting the presence local structural instability at the ion site.

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance as a quantitative tool for the study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. N.; O'Brien, D. F.; Dalton, A. B.; McCarthy, B.; Lahr, B.; Barklie, R. C.; Blau, W. J.

    2000-12-01

    We have described a method that maximizes the phase separation of graphitic particles (GP) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) in solutions of various organic polymeric hosts. This involves the formation of sediment and a solute. These components were characterized for MWNT and GP content using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. All EPR signals could be deconvoluted into nanotube and GP components. When normalized, these components are representative of the mass of MWNT and GP present. This allows us to make quantitative measurements of nanotube and GP content in different environments. The most successful polymer host was poly (m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) (PmPV). In this case the solute contained 63% of the added nanotubes with only 2% of the added graphite remaining.

  20. Comparison of pulse sequences for R1-based electron paramagnetic resonance oxygen imaging.

    PubMed

    Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J

    2015-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) oxygen imaging has proven to be an indispensable tool for assessing oxygen partial pressure in live animals. EPR oxygen images show remarkable oxygen accuracy when combined with high precision and spatial resolution. Developing more effective means for obtaining SLR rates is of great practical, biological and medical importance. In this work we compared different pulse EPR imaging protocols and pulse sequences to establish advantages and areas of applicability for each method. Tests were performed using phantoms containing spin probes with oxygen concentrations relevant to in vivo oxymetry. We have found that for small animal size objects the inversion recovery sequence combined with the filtered backprojection reconstruction method delivers the best accuracy and precision. For large animals, in which large radio frequency energy deposition might be critical, free induction decay and three pulse stimulated echo sequences might find better practical usage. PMID:25828242

  1. Infrared absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of vinyl radical in noble-gas matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Raesaenen, Markku; Feldman, Vladimir I.; Sukhov, Fedor F.; Orlov, Aleksei Yu.; Tyurin, Daniil A.

    2005-08-08

    Vinyl radicals produced by annealing-induced reaction of mobilized hydrogen atoms with acetylene molecules in solid noble-gas matrices (Ar, Kr, and Xe) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The hydrogen atoms were generated from acetylene by UV photolysis or fast electron irradiation. Two vibrational modes of the vinyl radical ({nu}{sub 7} and {nu}{sub 5}) were assigned in IR absorption studies. The assignment is based on data for various isotopic substitutions (D and {sup 13}C) and confirmed by comparison with the EPR measurements and density-functional theory calculations. The data on the {nu}{sub 7} mode is in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results whereas the {nu}{sub 5} frequency agrees well with the computational data but conflicts with the gas-phase IR emission results.

  2. Study of free radicals in gamma irradiated cellulose of cultural heritage materials using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Yasko; Rodrigues, Orlando, Jr.; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Santos, Paulo de Souza; Vasquez, Pablo A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Main subject of this article was to study room temperature stable radicals in Co-60 gamma irradiated contemporary paper using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer (EPR). XRD was used to study the effect of ionizing radiation on the morphology of book paper. SEM images presented regions with cellulose fibers and regions with particles agglomeration on the cellulose fibers. Those agglomerations were rich in calcium, observed by EDS. XRD analysis confirmed presence of calcium carbonate diffraction peaks. The main objective of this study was to propose a method using conventional kinetics chemical reactions for the observed radical formed by ionizing radiation. Therefore, further analyses were made to study the half-life and the kinetics of the free radical created. This method can be suitably applied to study radicals on cultural heritage objects.

  3. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spin-Trapping with Iron-Dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Maia, Luisa B; Moura, José J G

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is the ideal methodology to identify radicals (detection and characterization of molecular structure) and to study their kinetics, in both simple and complex biological systems. The very low concentration and short life-time of NO and of many other radicals do not favor its direct detection and spin-traps are needed to produce a new and persistent radical that can be subsequently detected by EPR spectroscopy.In this chapter, we present the basic concepts of EPR spectroscopy and of some spin-trapping methodologies to study NO. The "strengths and weaknesses" of iron-dithiocarbamates utilization, the NO traps of choice for the authors, are thoroughly discussed and a detailed description of the method to quantify the NO formation by molybdoenzymes is provided. PMID:27094413

  4. An alternative method using microwave power saturate in fingernail/electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon; Park, Byeongryong; Choi, Muhyun; Lee, Byungil; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2014-06-01

    An alternative method for fingernail/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry valid at low doses (0-3 Gy) is suggested in this paper. The method consisted of two steps. The first step involved dehydrating fingernail clippings to remove their water content by heating them at 70 °C for 72 h. As the water content in the fingernails decreased, the variability of the EPR signals improved. The second step involved measuring and fitting the EPR signals at successive microwave power levels. A newly derived value known as 'curvature', which was based on the conventional peak-to-peak amplitudes of the EPR signals, was applied for the dosimetry. This method could be used as an alternative method in cases of low-radiation exposure doses (<3 Gy) or where use of the conventional dosimetry method is not proper for a fingernail sample. PMID:24876339

  5. Comparison of pulse sequences for R1-based electron paramagnetic resonance oxygen imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) oxygen imaging has proven to be an indispensable tool for assessing oxygen partial pressure in live animals. EPR oxygen images show remarkable oxygen accuracy when combined with high precision and spatial resolution. Developing more effective means for obtaining SLR rates is of great practical, biological and medical importance. In this work we compared different pulse EPR imaging protocols and pulse sequences to establish advantages and areas of applicability for each method. Tests were performed using phantoms containing spin probes with oxygen concentrations relevant to in vivo oxymetry. We have found that for small animal size objects the inversion recovery sequence combined with the filtered backprojection reconstruction method delivers the best accuracy and precision. For large animals, in which large radio frequency energy deposition might be critical, free induction decay and three pulse stimulated echo sequences might find better practical usage.

  6. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of the tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum.

    PubMed

    Deaton, J C; Solomon, E I; Watt, G D; Wetherbee, P J; Durfor, C N

    1987-12-16

    The redox centers in the tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum were examined by potentiometric titration and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. At low temperature two overlapping iron-sulfur signals which correlated with enzymatic activity were observed with formal potentials near -400 mV vs. SHE. Based on their temperature dependences, one signal is assigned to a reduced Fe2S2 cluster and one to a reduced Fe4S4 cluster. Quantitation of signal intensity suggests two Fe2S2 and two Fe4S4 clusters per formate dehydrogenase molecule. Another signal (g = 2.101, 1.980, 1.950) present in low concentrations at more negative potentials was observable up to 200 degrees K and is not attributed to any iron-sulfur cluster. The possible origin of this signal is analyzed using ligand field theory, and the redox behavior is considered with respect to possible ligation at the active site. PMID:2827642

  8. Growth Kinetics of the S Sub H Center on Magnesium Oxide Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayne, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study the growth of S sub H centers on magnesium oxide powder which had hydrogen adsorbed on its surface. The centers were produced by ultraviolet radiation. The effects of both radiation intensity and hydrogen pressure were also studied. At constant hydrogen pressure and radiation dose, the initial S sub H center growth rate was found to be zero order. Beyond the initial region the growth rate deviated from zero order and finally approached saturation. The results are interpreted in terms of a model which assumes that the S sub H center is a hydrogen atom associated with a surface vacancy. Saturation appears to result from a limited supply of surface vacancies.

  9. Study of the effects of hydroxyapatite nanocrystal codoping by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, M. R.; Biktagirov, T. B.; Mamin, G. V.; Shurtakova, D. V.; Klimashina, E. S.; Putlyaev, V. I.; Orlinskii, S. B.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of codoping of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocrystals with average sizes of 35 ± 15 nm during "wet" synthesis by CO 3 2- carbonate anions and Mn2+ cations on relaxation characteristics (for the times of electron spin-spin relaxation) of the NO 3 2- nitrate radical anion has been studied. By the example of HAP, it has been demonstrated that the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is an efficient method for studying anion-cation (co)doping of nanoscale particles. It has been shown experimentally and by quantummechanical calculations that simultaneous introduction of several ions can be energetically more favorable than their separate inclusion. Possible codoping models have been proposed, and their energy parameters have been calculated.

  10. Direct electron paramagnetic resonance study of tobacco. 1. Manganese(ii) as a marker.

    PubMed

    Morsy, M A; Khaled, M M

    2001-02-01

    Three categories of tobacco products were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy: Cuban cigar brand name Montecristo, four international trademark cigarettes, and three types of Middle Eastern tobacco blends called Al-Moassal or Jurak. The Montecristo Cuban cigar is used as standard of high-quality tobacco. Mainly two EPR signals from all of the studied samples are observed: a very weak sharp EPR signal superimposed on a broad signal. The broad EPR signal is attributed to a manganese(II) complex. The intensity of the manganese(II) EPR signal is found to be related to the quality of the tobacco content. The sharp signal, which is characteristic of semiquinone radicals, is observed at room temperature, and its intensity increases drastically with temperature. PMID:11262012

  11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and DTA Investigation of Cr3+ in Tris(guanidinium) Hexafluoroaluminate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Kasturi, T.; Krishnan, V. G.

    1998-05-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies of Cr 3+ in single crystals of tris(guanidinium) hexafluoroaluminate, [C(NH2)3]3 AlF6 , have been carried out in the X-band region. A temperature dependent study of the zero-field splitting parameter D in the range 77-398 K shows the presence of a phase transition, which is supported by Differential Thermal Analysis. In addition, 19F superhyperfine struc-ture has been observed in the 9.3% naturally abundant 53Cr isotope hyperfine structure. D shows a large decrease with increasing temperature. The phase transition brings about a chemical inequivalence in the two chemically equivalent but magnetically inequivalent room temperature (CrF6)3- species. Compar-ison is made with the alums AlCl3 • 6H20, as well as other guanidinium aluminum salts.

  12. Comparison of Pulse Sequences for R1–based Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Oxygen Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) oxygen imaging has proven to be an indispensable tool for assessing oxygen partial pressure in live animals. EPR oxygen images show remarkable oxygen accuracy when combined with high precision and spatial resolution. Developing more effective means for obtaining SLR rates is of great practical, biological and medical importance. In this work we compared different pulse EPR imaging protocols and pulse sequences to establish advantages and areas of applicability for each method. Tests were performed using phantoms containing spin probes with oxygen concentrations relevant to in vivo oxymetry. We have found that for small animal size objects the inversion recovery sequence combined with the filtered backprojection reconstruction method delivers the best accuracy and precision. For large animals, in which large radio frequency energy deposition might be critical, free induction decay and three pulse stimulated echo sequences might find better practical usage. PMID:25828242

  13. Age of an Indonesian Fossil Tooth Determined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, JS

    2004-04-07

    The first fossil hominid tooth recovered during 1999 excavations from the Cisanca River region in West Java, Indonesia, was associated with a series of bovid teeth from a single individual that was recovered 190 cm beneath the hominid tooth. The age of the fossil bovid teeth was determined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis as part of an effort to bracket the age of the hominid tooth. The EPR-derived age of the bovid teeth is (5.16 {+-} 2.01) x 10{sup 5} years. However, the age estimate reported here is likely an underestimate of the actual age of deposition since evidence of heating was detected in the EPR spectra of the bovid teeth, and the heating may have caused a decrease in the intensity of EPR components on which the age calculation is based.

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in radiation research: Current status and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Chawla, Raman; Kumar, Raj; Singh, Shefali; Zheleva, Antoaneta; Dimitrova, Yanka; Gadjeva, Veselina; Arora, Rajesh; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to radiation leads to a number of health-related malfunctions. Ionizing radiation is more harmful than non-ionizing radiation, as it causes both direct and indirect effects. Irradiation with ionizing radiation results in free radical-induced oxidative stress. Free radical-mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in a plethora of diseased states, including cancer, arthritis, aging, Parkinson's disease, and so on. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has various applications to measure free radicals, in radiation research. Free radicals disintegrate immediately in aqueous environment. Free radicals can be detected indirectly by the EPR spin trapping technique in which these forms stabilize the radical adduct and produce characteristic EPR spectra for specific radicals. Ionizing radiation-induced free radicals in calcified tissues, for example, teeth, bone, and fingernail, can be detected directly by EPR spectroscopy, due to their extended stability. Various applications of EPR in radiation research studies are discussed in this review. PMID:21814437

  15. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Studies of Near-Surface Magnetic Properties of YBCO Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugel, D. E.; Xia, Y.-M.; Salamon, M. B.; Greene, L. H.

    2000-03-01

    Several thin film planar tunneling experiments are consistent with a broken time-reversal symmetry (BTRS) state [1-4].To compliment tunneling measurements, we have developed a technique to measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) effects of the near-surface region of a superconductor. Preliminary data are consistent with the spontaneous formation of magnetic moments at low temperature on YBCO thin films and may prove to be an important confirmation of BTRS. 1. Covington,M. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 79, 277, (1997). 2. Kashiwaya, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. Solids, 59, 2034, (1997). 3. Krupke, R. and Deutscher,G., Phys. Rev. Lett., 83, 4634, (1999). 4. Lesueur,J., Grison,X., Aprili,M. and Kontos,T., cond-mat/9909212. -------------------------------------------------------------

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance linewidths and line shapes for the molecular magnets Fe8 and Mn12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungwha; Novotny, M. A.; Dalal, N. S.; Hill, S.; Rikvold, P. A.

    2002-05-01

    We study theoretically electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) linewidths for single crystals of the molecular magnets Fe8 and Mn12 as functions of energy eigenstates Ms, frequency, and temperature when a magnetic field along the easy axis is swept at fixed excitation frequency. This work was motivated by recent EPR experiments. To calculate the linewidths, we use density-matrix equations, including dipolar interactions and distributions of the uniaxial anisotropy parameter D and the Landé g factor. Our calculated linewidths agree well with the experimental data. We also examine the line shapes of the EPR spectra due to local rotations of the magnetic anisotropy axes caused by defects in samples. Our preliminary results predict that this effect leads to asymmetry in the EPR spectra.

  17. Evaluation of adriamycin nephropathy by an in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Oteki, Takaaki; Nagase, Sohji . E-mail: sohji-n@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Yokoyama, Hidekatsu; Ohya, Hiroaki; Akatsuka, Takao; Tada, Mika; Ueda, Atsushi; Hirayama, Aki; koyama, Akio

    2005-07-01

    A rat model for human minimal change nephropathy was obtained by the intravenous injection of adriamycin (ADR) at 5 mg/kg. By using an in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 700 MHz, the temporal changes in signal intensities of a nitroxide radical, 4-hydroxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL), in the kidneys of rats with ADR nephropathy were investigated. The decay rate of the EPR signal intensity obtained in the kidney is indicative of the renal reducing ability. It was found that the reducing ability in the kidney declined on the 7th day after ADR administration and recovered after the 14th day. Impairment of the reducing ability occurred before the appearance of continuous urinary protein. The in vitro EPR study showed that this impairment of in vivo renal reducing ability is related to impairment of the reducing ability in the mitochondria.

  18. Visuomotor resonance in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Becchio, Cristina; Castiello, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    When we observe the actions performed by others, our motor system “resonates” along with that of the observed agent. Is a similar visuomotor resonant response observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD)? Studies investigating action observation in ASD have yielded inconsistent findings. In this perspective article we examine behavioral and neuroscientific evidence in favor of visuomotor resonance in ASD, and consider the possible role of action-perception coupling in social cognition. We distinguish between different aspects of visuomotor resonance and conclude that while some aspects may be preserved in ASD, abnormalities exist in the way individuals with ASD convert visual information from observed actions into a program for motor execution. Such abnormalities, we surmise, may contribute to but also depend on the difficulties that individuals with ASD encounter during social interaction. PMID:23189045

  19. Combustion Synthesized Europium Doped LaAI₁₁O₁₈ Phosphors--An Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optical Study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Sivaramaiah, G; Rao, J L; Kumaran, R Senthil; Dhoble, S J

    2016-01-01

    By adopting a facile solution combustion synthesis, crystallized europium doped blue phosphors were successfully prepared. These phosphors were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Photoluminescence (PL) experimental methods. The photoluminescence spectrum indicates Eu²⁺ and Eu³⁺ ions in these phosphors. The band at around 442 nm is attributed to the spin-allowed 4f⁶5d¹ (2D) --> 4f⁷(⁸S₇/2) transition of Eu²⁺ ions. The sharp bands at 591 (⁵D₀ --> ⁷F₁) and 616 (⁵D₀ --> ⁷F₂) nm are attributed to the spin-forbidden transitions of Eu³⁺ ions. The EPR spectra of as-prepared and post-treated LaAl₁₁O₁₈:Eu phosphors exhibit signals characteristic of La²⁺ and Eu²⁺ ions. The number of spins, Gibbs energy, magnetic susceptibility, Curie constant and effective magnetic moment values were calculated and compared at 296 and 110 K. PMID:27398524

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of the soluble CuA protein from the cytochrome ba3 of Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Karpefors, M; Slutter, C E; Fee, J A; Aasa, R; Källebring, B; Larsson, S; Vänngård, T

    1996-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the binuclear CuA center in the water-soluble subunit II fragment from cytochrome ba3 of Thermus thermophilus was recorded at 3.93, 9.45, and 34.03 GHz, and the EPR parameters were determined by computer simulations. The frequency and M1 dependence of the linewidth was discussed in terms of g strain superimposed on a correlation between the A and g values. The g values were found to be gx = 1.996, gy = 2.011, gz = 2.187, and the two Cu ions contribute nearly equally to the hyperfine structure, with magnitude of Ax magnitude of approximately 15 G, magnitude of Ay magnitude = 29 G, and magnitude of Az magnitude of = 28.5 G (65Cu). Theoretical CNDO/S calculations, based on the x-ray structure of the Paracoccus denitrificans enzyme, yield a singly occupied antibonding orbital in which each Cu is pi*-bonded to one S and sigma*-bonded to the other. In contrast to the equal spin distribution suggested by the EPR simulations, the calculated contributions from the Cu ions differ by a factor of 2. However, only small changes in the ligand geometry are needed to reproduce the experimental results. PMID:8913619

  1. Characterization of radiation-induced damage in high performance polymers by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suleman, Naushadalli K.

    1992-01-01

    The potential for long-term human activity beyond the Earth's protective magnetosphere is limited in part by the lack of detailed information on the effectiveness and performance of existing structural materials to shield the crew and spacecraft from highly penetrating space radiations. The two radiations of greatest concern are high energy protons emitted during solar flares and galactic cosmic rays which are energetic ions ranging from protons to highly oxidized iron. Although the interactions of such high-energy radiations with matter are not completely understood at this time, the effects of the incident radiation are clearly expected to include the formation of paramagnetic spin centers via ionization and bond-scission reactions in the molecular matrices of structural materials. Since this type of radiation damage is readily characterized by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the NASA Langley Research Center EPR system was repaired and brought on-line during the 1991 ASEE term. A major goal of the 1992 ASEE term was to adapt the existing core of the LaRC EPR system to meet the requirements for EPR Imaging--a powerful new technique which provides detailed information on the internal structure of materials by mapping the spatial distribution of unpaired spin density in bulk media. Major impetus for this adaptation arises from the fact that information derived from EPRI complements other methods such as scanning electron microscopy which primarily characterize surface phenomena. The modification of the EPR system has been initiated by the construction of specially designed, counterwound Helmholtz coils which will be mounted on the main EPR electromagnet. The specifications of the coils have been set to achieve a static linear magnetic field gradient of 10 gauss/mm/amp along the principal (Z) axis of the Zeeman field. Construction is also in progress of a paramagnetic standard in which the spin distribution is known in all three dimensions. This

  2. Optical Absorption and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance studies of two different solid solutions of Pyralspite Garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Espinoza, S. R. Q.; Chubaci, J. F. D.; Cano, N. F.; Cornejo, D. R.

    2015-04-01

    Two different solid solutions of pyralspite garnet have been investigated as to their optical absorption and EPR properties. The absorption band around 9850 cm-1 is due to Fe2+. After heating above 950 °C we found this band diminishes considerably; which was interpreted as Fe2+ loosing an electron to become Fe3+. The EPR spectrum of sample consisted of a straight line with angular coefficient of about 176°. After 600°C/1hr annealing, the spectrum starts deviating from a straight line. A strong typical EPR signal is observed around g = 2.0 after annealing at 850°C. We assume that with high temperature annealing a large number of Fe2+ are converted to Fe3+ as the optical absorption has shown. These results were also confirmed by chemical reaction. The susceptibility vs. magnetic field measurement has shown that the samples annealed at temperatures below 850°C present normal paramagnetic behavior, however, annealed above 900 °C, they show hysteresis, namely ferromagnetic behavior.

  3. Assessment of melanoma extent and melanoma metastases invasion using electron paramagnetic resonance and bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Godechal, Quentin; Defresne, Florence; Danhier, Pierre; Leveque, Philippe; Porporato, Paolo Ettore; Sonveaux, Pierre; Baurain, Jean-François; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The clinical outcome of melanoma depends on the local and distant spread of the disease at the time of diagnosis, as the estimated 5-year survival rate is about 100% for superficial melanoma diagnosed early, but less than 10% for melanoma that has disseminated to major organs such as lungs. There is a crucial need for new effective methods for the detection and the characterization of melanomas. In the pre-clinical setting, this will help to understand the factors that contribute to the malignancy while the transfer into the clinic will contribute to an early effective treatment of patients. Melanoma lesions can be detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using paramagnetic properties of melanin pigments. As part of the development of EPR imaging to characterize melanomas, we evaluated in the present study the usefulness of EPR to report on the extension of lung metastases by comparing the method with bioluminescence imaging using B16 melanoma cells expressing luciferase. B16 melanoma cells were injected subcutaneously or intravenously in C57/BL6 mice. The primary tumors or the lung colonization by melanoma cells was measured after several delay periods to obtain several degrees of invasiveness. The animals were measured in-vivo with bioluminescence after i.v. injection of luciferin. The primary tumors or lungs were then excised. After freeze-drying, the content of melanin in lungs was measured and imaged by EPR at 9 GHz. We observed a direct relationship between the EPR intensity and the bioluminescence intensity. Another tumor model (KHT sarcoma), non-pigmented but expressing luciferase, was used to confirm that the EPR signal was directly linked to the melanin pigment present in the tumors. PMID:21861288

  4. First-principles calculation of parameters of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in solids.

    PubMed

    Kadantsev, Eugene S; Ziegler, Tom

    2010-12-01

    The hyperfine A-tensor and Zeeman g-tensor parameterize the interaction of an 'effective' electron spin with the magnetic field due to the nuclear spin and the homogeneous external magnetic field, respectively. The A- and g-tensors are the quantities of primary interest in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this paper, we review our work [E.S. Kadantsev, T. Ziegler, J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 4521; E. S. Kadantsev, T. Ziegler, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 1327] on the calculation of these EPR parameters under periodic boundary conditions (PBC) from first-principles. Our methodology is based on the Kohn-Sham DFT (KS DFT), explicit usage of Bloch basis set made up of numerical and Slater-type atomic orbitals (NAOs/STOs), and is implemented in the 'full potential' program BAND. Our implementation does not rely on the frozen core approximation. The NAOs/STOs basis is well suited for the accurate representation of the electron density near the nuclei, a prerequisite for the calculation of highly accurate hyperfine parameters. In the case of g-tensor, our implementation is based on the method of Van Lenthe et al. [E. van Lenthe, P. E. S. Wormer, A. van der Avoird, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 107, 2488] in which the spin-orbital coupling is taken into account variationally. We demonstrate the viability of our scheme by calculating EPR parameters of paramagnetic defects in solids. We consider the A-tensor of 'normal' and 'anomalous' muonium defect in IIIA-VA semiconductors as well as the S2 anion radical in KCl host crystal lattice. PMID:20821407

  5. An improved coupling design for high-frequency TE011 electron paramagnetic resonance cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitsky, A.; Grishin, Yu.; Rakhmatullin, R.; Reijerse, E.; Lubitz, W.

    2013-01-01

    In high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy the sample is usually accommodated in a single-mode cylindrical TE011 microwave cavity. This cavity stands out in terms of flexibility for various types of EPR experiments due to convenient control of its resonance frequency and easy waveguide-to-cavity microwave coupling. In continuous wave and in pulsed EPR it is, however, essential to be able to vary the coupling efficiency over a large range. We present a new mechanical design to vary the microwave coupling to the cavity using a movable metal sphere. This coupling sphere is shifted in the plane of the iris wall inside the coupling waveguide. The design allows for a compact and robust construction of the EPR probehead that can be easily accommodated inside a limited space of helium flow cryostat. The construction details and characterization of the coupling element for 95 GHz (W-band) EPR as well as for 34 GHz (Q-band) are presented.

  6. Structural investigation and electron paramagnetic resonance of vanadyl doped alkali niobium borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sheoran, A; Sanghi, S; Bhatnagar, V; Gupta, S K; Arora, M

    2010-03-01

    Glasses with compositions xNb(2)O(5).(30-x)M(2)O.69B(2)O(3) (where M=Li, Na, K; x=0, 4, 8 mol%) doped with 1 mol% V(2)O(5) have been prepared using normal melt quench technique. The IR transmission spectra of the glasses have been studied over the range 400-4000 cm(-1). The changes caused by the addition of Nb(2)O(5) on the structure of these glasses have been reported. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of VO(2+) ions in these glasses have been recorded in X-band (9.14 GHz) at room temperature (300 K). The spin Hamiltonian parameters, dipolar hyperfine coupling parameter and Fermi contact interaction parameter have been calculated. It is observed that the resultant resonance spectra contain hyperfine structures (hfs) due to V(4+) ions which exist as VO(2+) ions in octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression in the present glasses. The tetragonality of V(4+)O(6) complex decreases with increasing concentration of Nb(2)O(5). The 3d(xy) orbit contracts with increase in Nb(2)O(5):M(2)O ratio. Values of the theoretical optical basicity, Lambda(th), have also been reported. PMID:20060775

  7. Magic-angle sample spinning electron paramagnetic resonance--instrumentation, performance, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Hessinger, D; Bauer, C; Hubrich, M; Jeschke, G; Spiess, H W

    2000-12-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup for line narrowing experiments with fast sample spinning at variable angles between the rotation axis and the static magnetic field is described and applied in the magic-angle sample spinning (MAS) EPR experiment at X-band frequencies (9.5 GHz). Sample spinning speeds up to 17 kHz at temperatures down to 200 K can be achieved with rotors of 4-mm outer and 2.5-mm inner diameter without severe losses in microwave amplitude compared to standard pulse EPR probeheads. A phase cycle is introduced that provides pure absorption MAS EPR spectra and allows one to distinguish between positive and negative frequency offsets (pseudo-quadrature detection). Possible broadening mechanisms in MAS EPR spectra are discussed. It is demonstrated both by theory and by experiment that the MAS EPR experiment requires excitation bandwidths that are comparable to the total spectral width, since otherwise destructive interference between contributions of spins with similar resonance offsets suppresses the signal. Experimental observations on the E(1) center in gamma-irradiated silica glass and on the SO(-)(3) radical in gamma-irradiated sulfamic acid are reported. PMID:11097812

  8. A versatile and modular quasi optics-based 200GHz dual dynamic nuclear polarization and electron paramagnetic resonance instrument.

    PubMed

    Siaw, Ting Ann; Leavesley, Alisa; Lund, Alicia; Kaminker, Ilia; Han, Songi

    2016-03-01

    Solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at higher magnetic fields (>3T) and cryogenic temperatures (∼ 2-90K) has gained enormous interest and seen major technological advances as an NMR signal enhancing technique. Still, the current state of the art DNP operation is not at a state at which sample and freezing conditions can be rationally chosen and the DNP performance predicted a priori, but relies on purely empirical approaches. An important step towards rational optimization of DNP conditions is to have access to DNP instrumental capabilities to diagnose DNP performance and elucidate DNP mechanisms. The desired diagnoses include the measurement of the "DNP power curve", i.e. the microwave (MW) power dependence of DNP enhancement, the "DNP spectrum", i.e. the MW frequency dependence of DNP enhancement, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum, and the saturation and spectral diffusion properties of the EPR spectrum upon prolonged MW irradiation typical of continuous wave (CW) DNP, as well as various electron and nuclear spin relaxation parameters. Even basic measurements of these DNP parameters require versatile instrumentation at high magnetic fields not commercially available to date. In this article, we describe the detailed design of such a DNP instrument, powered by a solid-state MW source that is tunable between 193 and 201 GHz and outputs up to 140 mW of MW power. The quality and pathway of the transmitted and reflected MWs is controlled by a quasi-optics (QO) bridge and a corrugated waveguide, where the latter couples the MW from an open-space QO bridge to the sample located inside the superconducting magnet and vice versa. Crucially, the versatility of the solid-state MW source enables the automated acquisition of frequency swept DNP spectra, DNP power curves, the diagnosis of MW power and transmission, and frequency swept continuous wave (CW) and pulsed EPR experiments. The flexibility of the DNP instrument centered around the QO MW

  9. A versatile and modular quasi optics-based 200 GHz dual dynamic nuclear polarization and electron paramagnetic resonance instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siaw, Ting Ann; Leavesley, Alisa; Lund, Alicia; Kaminker, Ilia; Han, Songi

    2016-03-01

    Solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at higher magnetic fields (>3 T) and cryogenic temperatures (∼2-90 K) has gained enormous interest and seen major technological advances as an NMR signal enhancing technique. Still, the current state of the art DNP operation is not at a state at which sample and freezing conditions can be rationally chosen and the DNP performance predicted a priori, but relies on purely empirical approaches. An important step towards rational optimization of DNP conditions is to have access to DNP instrumental capabilities to diagnose DNP performance and elucidate DNP mechanisms. The desired diagnoses include the measurement of the "DNP power curve", i.e. the microwave (MW) power dependence of DNP enhancement, the "DNP spectrum", i.e. the MW frequency dependence of DNP enhancement, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum, and the saturation and spectral diffusion properties of the EPR spectrum upon prolonged MW irradiation typical of continuous wave (CW) DNP, as well as various electron and nuclear spin relaxation parameters. Even basic measurements of these DNP parameters require versatile instrumentation at high magnetic fields not commercially available to date. In this article, we describe the detailed design of such a DNP instrument, powered by a solid-state MW source that is tunable between 193 and 201 GHz and outputs up to 140 mW of MW power. The quality and pathway of the transmitted and reflected MWs is controlled by a quasi-optics (QO) bridge and a corrugated waveguide, where the latter couples the MW from an open-space QO bridge to the sample located inside the superconducting magnet and vice versa. Crucially, the versatility of the solid-state MW source enables the automated acquisition of frequency swept DNP spectra, DNP power curves, the diagnosis of MW power and transmission, and frequency swept continuous wave (CW) and pulsed EPR experiments. The flexibility of the DNP instrument centered around the QO MW

  10. Spectrum Analyzers Incorporating Tunable WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2009-01-01

    A photonic instrument is proposed to boost the resolution for ultraviolet/ optical/infrared spectral analysis and spectral imaging allowing the detection of narrow (0.00007-to-0.07-picometer wavelength resolution range) optical spectral signatures of chemical elements in space and planetary atmospheres. The idea underlying the proposal is to exploit the advantageous spectral characteristics of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators to obtain spectral resolutions at least three orders of magnitude greater than those of optical spectrum analyzers now in use. Such high resolutions would enable measurement of spectral features that could not be resolved by prior instruments.

  11. Advanced Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopies of Iron-Sulfur Proteins: Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM)

    PubMed Central

    Cutsail, George E.; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    The advanced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques, electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies, provide unique insights into the structure, coordination chemistry, and biochemical mechanism of Nature’s widely distributed iron-sulfur cluster (FeS) proteins. This review describes the ENDOR and ESEEM techniques and then provides a series of case studies on their application to a wide variety of FeS proteins including ferredoxins, nitrogenase, and radical SAM enzymes. PMID:25686535

  12. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pursley, Randall H.; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (Lf) of 300 MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency Lf, in conjunction with our ~10 MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented. PMID:16243552

  13. Novel antioxidant capacity assay for lipophilic compounds using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yushi; Ichimori, Kohji; Okano, Masahito; Goto, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    A novel antioxidant capacity assay for lipophilic compounds was developed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The assay is based on antioxidant’s scavenging ability against the tert-butoxyl radical generated photolytically from di-tert-butyl peroxide in ethyl acetate, and named the tert-butoxyl-based antioxidant capacity (BAC) assay. The radical was trapped by spin trap, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide, and EPR signal intensity of the spin adduct was used as a quantitative marker of radical levels. Signal intensity decreased in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of an antioxidant that competitively reacts with the radical, which was utilized to evaluate BAC values. The BAC method enabled the accurate estimation of antioxidant capacity for lipophilic materials that may counteract lipid peroxidation in biological membranes. The BAC values for quercetin and caffeic acid are 0.639 ± 0.020 and 0.118 ± 0.012 trolox equivalents, respectively, which are much smaller than values obtained by other aqueous methods such as H-ORAC and ORAC-EPR. Thus, antioxidants present in a non-aqueous environment should be evaluated using a non-aqueous system. In combination with in situ ascorbate reduction, the BAC method was capable of accurately determining the antioxidant capacity of water-insoluble materials that may be reduced in living cells. PMID:25759515

  14. The fate of free radicals in a cellulose based hydrogel: detection by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Basumallick, Lipika; Ji, J Andrea; Naber, Nariman; Wang, Y John

    2009-07-01

    Cellulose derivatives are commonly used as gelling agents in topical and ophthalmic drug formulations. During the course of manufacturing, cellulose derivatives are believed to generate free radicals. These free radicals may degrade the gelling agent, leading to lower viscosity. Free radicals also may react with the active ingredient in the product. The formation of radicals in a 3% hydrogel of hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose) was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and spin trapping techniques. Radicals were trapped with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and quantitated by comparing the EPR intensity with 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL), a stable free radical. Typically, the hydrogels showed an initial increase in the radical concentration within 2 days after autoclaving, followed by a drop in radical concentration in 7 days. EDTA prevented the formation of free radicals in the hypromellose (HPMC) hydrogel, suggesting the involvement of metal ions in the generation of free radicals. The oxidizing potential of the hydrogel was estimated by measuring the rate at which methionine (a model for the protein active pharmaceutical ingredient) was degraded, and was consistent with the amount of radicals present in the gel. This study is the first report investigating the application of EPR spectroscopy in detecting and estimating free radical concentration in cellulose based hydrogels. PMID:19090570

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy of Er-doped β-Ga2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, J.; Guillot-Noël, O.; Binet, L.; Aschehoug, P.; Le Du, Y.; Beaudoux, F.; Goldner, P.

    2008-08-01

    Conducting β-Ga2O3 single crystals doped with Er3+ were grown using the floating zone method. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) showed that conduction electrons can coexist with the Er3+ dopant. Optical and EPR characterizations of samples nominally doped with 0.5% and 1.5% were performed at low temperature showing that erbium substitution into β-Ga2O3 can only be achieved effectively at the lower concentration because of the appearance of an erbium gallium garnet phase when the erbium concentration is increased. Despite the existence of two cationic sites in β-Ga2O3, EPR measurements demonstrate that Er incorporation occurs at a single crystallographic position. Optical spectroscopy of 0.5% doped samples of the 1.5μm transition allowed us to determine some crystal field levels of the I15/24 and I13/24 multiplets. A lifetime of about 12ms was found for the 1.5μm emission, indicating a high quantum yield for the I13/24 multiplet.

  16. Superparamagnetic And Paramagnetic MRI Contrast Agents: Application Of Rapid Magnetic Resonance Imaging To Assess Renal Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvlin, Mark J.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Arger, Peter; Kundel, Harold L.; Dougherty, Larry; Axel, Leon; Kassab, Eleanor; Moore, Bethanne

    1988-06-01

    The paramagnetic chelate complex, gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid, Gd-DTPA, and superparamagnetic particles, such as those composed of dextran coated magnetite, function as magnetic resonance contrast agents by changing the relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2. The effects that these agents have upon MR signal intensity are determined by: the inherent biophysical properties of the tissue being imaged, the concentration of the contrast agent and the data acquisition scheme (pulse sequence parameters) employed. Following the time course of MR signal change in the first minutes after the injection of contrast agent(s) allows a dynamic assessment of organ functions in a manner analogous to certain nuclear medicine studies. In order to study renal function, sequential MR fast scan images, gradient echo (TR=35/TE=7 msec, flip angle=25 degrees), were acquired, one every 12 seconds, after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA and/or dextran-magnetite. Gd-DTPA, which is freely filtered at the glomerulus and is neither secreted nor reabsorbed, provides information concerning renal perfusion, glomerular filtration and tubular concentrating ability. Dextran-magnetite (200 A diameter), which is primarily contained within the intravascular space shortly after injection, provides information on blood flow to and distribution within the kidney. The MR signal change observed after administration of contrast agents varied dramatically depending upon the agents injected and the imaging parameters used. Hence a broad range of physiolgic processes may be described using these techniques, i.e. contrast agent enhanced functional MR examinations.

  17. Stabilization of reactive nitroxides using invasomes to allow prolonged electron paramagnetic resonance measurements.

    PubMed

    Haag, S F; Taskoparan, B; Bittl, R; Teutloff, C; Wenzel, R; Fahr, A; Chen, M; Lademann, J; Schäfer-Korting, M; Meinke, M C

    2011-01-01

    The detection of the antioxidative capacity of the skin is of great practical relevance since free radicals are involved in many skin damaging processes, including aging and inflammation. The nitroxide TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for measuring the antioxidative capacity since its reaction with reducing agents is considerably fast. Yet, in order to achieve longer measurement times, e.g. in inflammatory skin diseases, the stabilizing effect of an invasome (ultraflexible vesicle/liposome) suspension with TEMPO was investigated ex vivo on porcine skin and in vivo on human skin. Invasomes increased the measurement time ex vivo 2-fold and the reduction was significantly slowed down in vivo, which is due to membrane-associated and therefore protected TEMPO. Furthermore, TEMPO accumulation in the membrane phase as well as the decreasing polarity of the ultimate surroundings of TEMPO during skin penetration explains the stabilizing effect. Thus, an invasome suspension with TEMPO exhibits stabilizing effects ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:21822032

  18. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursley, Randall H.; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2006-02-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency ( Lf) of 300 MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency Lf, in conjunction with our ˜10 MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented.

  19. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of a Photosynthetic Microbial Mat and Comparison with Archean Cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbin, M.; Derenne, S.; Gourier, D.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Gautret, P.; Westall, F.

    2012-12-01

    Organic radicals in artificially carbonized biomass dominated by oxygenic and non-oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, Microcoleus chthonoplastes-like and Chloroflexus-like bacteria respectively, were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The two bacteria species were sampled in mats from a hypersaline lake. They underwent accelerated ageing by cumulative thermal treatments to induce progressive carbonization of the biological material, mimicking the natural maturation of carbonaceous material of Archean age. For thermal treatments at temperatures higher than 620 °C, a drastic increase in the EPR linewidth is observed in the carbonaceous matter from oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and not anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. This selective EPR linewidth broadening reflects the presence of a catalytic element inducing formation of radical aggregates, without affecting the molecular structure or the microstructure of the organic matter, as shown by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For comparison, we carried out an EPR study of organic radicals in silicified carbonaceous rocks (cherts) from various localities, of different ages (0.42 to 3.5 Gyr) and having undergone various degrees of metamorphism, i.e. various degrees of natural carbonization. EPR linewidth dispersion for the most primitive samples was quite significant, pointing to a selective dipolar broadening similar to that observed for carbonized bacteria. This surprising result merits further evaluation in the light of its potential use as a marker of past bacterial metabolisms, in particular oxygenic photosynthesis, in Archean cherts.

  20. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance imaging technique for mapping porosity in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kordas, G.; Kang, Y.H. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on a three-dimensional (3D) electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) method which was developed to probe the structure and size of pores in ceramic materials. The imaging device that was added to the EPR instrument consisted of a computer-controlled current source and magnetic field gradient. This add-on facility was tested using a well-defined diphenlpicrylhydrazzyl phantom sample. Pumice was then used to demonstrate the potential of the technique. This stone was immersed in a 0.5 mm {sup 15}N-substituted per-deutereted tempone water solution to fill the pores with spin labels. Images were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection technique. A two-dimensional (2D) imaging plane was constructed by collecting 33 projection planes over 180 {degrees}. A 3D image was derived from 22 planes each constructed by 22 projections. At present, the facility allows a resolution of 69 and 46 {mu}m for 2D and 3D imaging, respectively. Advancements of the imaging apparatus, software, and line width of the spin labels will be needed to enhance the resolution of this technique.

  1. Training Effects on ROS Production Determined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in Master Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Porcelli, Simone; Pugliese, Lorenzo; Pavei, Gaspare; Bellistri, Giuseppe; Montorsi, Michela; Tacchini, Philippe; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise induces an increase in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production dependent on exercise intensity with highest ROS amount generated by strenuous exercise. However, chronic repetition of exercise, that is, exercise training, may reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress. Aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 6-weeks high-intensity discontinuous training (HIDT), characterized by repeated variations of intensity and changes of redox potential, on ROS production and antioxidant capacity in sixteen master swimmers. Time course changes of ROS generation were assessed by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in capillary blood by a microinvasive approach. An incremental arm-ergometer exercise (IE) until exhaustion was carried out at both before (PRE) and after (POST) training (Trg) period. A significant (P < 0.01) increase of ROS production from REST to the END of IE in PRE Trg (2.82 ± 0.66 versus 3.28 ± 0.66 µmol·min−1) was observed. HIDT increased peak oxygen consumption (36.1 ± 4.3 versus 40.6 ± 5.7 mL·kg−1·min−1 PRE and POST Trg, resp.) and the antioxidant capacity (+13%) while it significantly decreased the ROS production both at REST (−20%) and after IE (−25%). The observed link between ROS production, adaptive antioxidant defense mechanisms, and peak oxygen consumption provides new insight into the correlation between ROS response pathways and muscle metabolic function. PMID:25874024

  2. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) for the study of ascorbyl radical and lipid radicals in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    González, Paula Mariela; Aguiar, María Belén; Malanga, Gabriela; Puntarulo, Susana

    2013-08-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy detects the presence of radicals of biological interest, such as ascorbyl radical (A(•)) and lipid radicals. A(•) is easily detectable by EPR even in aqueous solution at room-temperature. Under oxidative conditions leading to changes in total ascorbate (AH(-)) content, the A(•)/AH(-) ratio could be used to estimate early oxidative stress in the hydrophilic milieu. This methodology was applied to a wide range of aquatic systems including algae, sea urchin, limpets, bivalves and fish, under physiological and oxidative stress conditions as well. The A(•)/AH(-) ratio reflected the state of one part of the oxidative defense system and provided an early and simple diagnosis of environmental stressing conditions. Oxidative damage to lipids was assessed by the EPR-sensitive adduct formation that correlates well with cell membrane damage with no interference from other biological compounds. Probe instability, tissue metabolism, and lack of spin specificity are drawback factors for employing EPR for in vivo determination of free radicals. However, the dependability of this technique, mostly by combining it with other biochemical strategies, enhances the value of these procedures as contributors to the knowledge of oxidative condition in aquatic organisms. PMID:23485428

  3. Use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Evaluate the Redox State In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    SWARTZ, HAROLD M.; KHAN, NADEEM; KHRAMTSOV, VALERY V.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of how electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) can be used to measure redox-related parameters in vivo. The values of this approach include that the measurements are made under fully physiological conditions, and some of the measurements cannot be made by other means. Three complementary approaches are used with in vivo EPR: the rate of reduction or reactions of nitroxides, spin trapping of free radicals, and measurements of thiols. All three approaches already have produced unique and useful information. The measurement of the rate of decrease of nitroxides technically is the simplest, but difficult to interpret because the measured parameter, reduction in the intensity of the nitroxide signal, can occur by several different mechanisms. In vivo spin trapping can provide direct evidence for the occurrence of specific free radicals in vivo and reflect relative changes, but accurate absolute quantification remains challenging. The measurement of thiols in vivo also appears likely to be useful, but its development as an in vivo technique is at an early stage. It seems likely that the use of in vivo EPR to measure redox processes will become an increasingly utilized and valuable tool. PMID:17678441

  4. Training effects on ROS production determined by electron paramagnetic resonance in master swimmers.

    PubMed

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Porcelli, Simone; Pugliese, Lorenzo; Pavei, Gaspare; Bellistri, Giuseppe; Montorsi, Michela; Tacchini, Philippe; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise induces an increase in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production dependent on exercise intensity with highest ROS amount generated by strenuous exercise. However, chronic repetition of exercise, that is, exercise training, may reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress. Aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 6-weeks high-intensity discontinuous training (HIDT), characterized by repeated variations of intensity and changes of redox potential, on ROS production and antioxidant capacity in sixteen master swimmers. Time course changes of ROS generation were assessed by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in capillary blood by a microinvasive approach. An incremental arm-ergometer exercise (IE) until exhaustion was carried out at both before (PRE) and after (POST) training (Trg) period. A significant (P < 0.01) increase of ROS production from REST to the END of IE in PRE Trg (2.82 ± 0.66 versus 3.28 ± 0.66 µmol·min(-1)) was observed. HIDT increased peak oxygen consumption (36.1 ± 4.3 versus 40.6 ± 5.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) PRE and POST Trg, resp.) and the antioxidant capacity (+13%) while it significantly decreased the ROS production both at REST (-20%) and after IE (-25%). The observed link between ROS production, adaptive antioxidant defense mechanisms, and peak oxygen consumption provides new insight into the correlation between ROS response pathways and muscle metabolic function. PMID:25874024

  5. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging of the Spatial Distribution of Free Radicals in PMR-15 Polyimide Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Myong K.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    1997-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that free radicals generated by heating polyimides above 300 C are stable at room temperature and are involved in thermo-oxidative degradation in the presence of oxygen gas. Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a technique to determine the spatial distribution of free radicals. X-band (9.5 GHz) EPR images of PMR-15 polyimide were obtained with a spatial resolution of approximately 0.18 mm along a 2-mm dimension of the sample. In a polyimide sample that was not thermocycled, the radical distribution was uniform along the 2-mm dimension of the sample. For a polyimide sample that was exposed to thermocycling in air for 300 1-h cycles at 335 C, one-dimensional EPRI showed a higher concentration of free radicals in the surface layers than in the bulk sample. A spectral-spatial two-dimensional image showed that the EPR lineshape of the surface layer remained the same as that of the bulk. These EPRI results suggest that the thermo-oxidative degradation of PMR-15 resin involves free radicals present in the oxygen-rich surface layer.

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of a photosynthetic microbial mat and comparison with Archean cherts.

    PubMed

    Bourbin, M; Derenne, S; Gourier, D; Rouzaud, J-N; Gautret, P; Westall, F

    2012-12-01

    Organic radicals in artificially carbonized biomass dominated by oxygenic and non-oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, Microcoleus chthonoplastes-like and Chloroflexus-like bacteria respectively, were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The two bacteria species were sampled in mats from a hypersaline lake. They underwent accelerated ageing by cumulative thermal treatments to induce progressive carbonization of the biological material, mimicking the natural maturation of carbonaceous material of Archean age. For thermal treatments at temperatures higher than 620 °C, a drastic increase in the EPR linewidth is observed in the carbonaceous matter from oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and not anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. This selective EPR linewidth broadening reflects the presence of a catalytic element inducing formation of radical aggregates, without affecting the molecular structure or the microstructure of the organic matter, as shown by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For comparison, we carried out an EPR study of organic radicals in silicified carbonaceous rocks (cherts) from various localities, of different ages (0.42 to 3.5 Gyr) and having undergone various degrees of metamorphism, i.e. various degrees of natural carbonization. EPR linewidth dispersion for the most primitive samples was quite significant, pointing to a selective dipolar broadening similar to that observed for carbonized bacteria. This surprising result merits further evaluation in the light of its potential use as a marker of past bacterial metabolisms, in particular oxygenic photosynthesis, in Archean cherts. PMID:23254854

  7. Time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance of radical pair intermediates in cryptochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskup, Till

    2013-12-01

    Electron transfer plays a key role in many biological systems, including core complexes of photosynthesis and respiration. As this involves unpaired electron spins, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is the method of choice to investigate such processes. Systems that show photo-induced charge separation and electron transfer are of particular interest, as here the processes can easily be synchronised to the experiment and therefore followed directly over its time course. One particular class of proteins, the cryptochromes, showing charge separation and in turn spin-correlated radical pairs upon excitation with blue light, have been investigated by time-resolved EPR spectroscopy in great detail and the results obtained so far are summarised in this contribution. Highlights include the first observation of spin-correlated radical pairs in these proteins, a fact with great impact on the proposed role as key part of a magnetic compass of migratory birds, as well as the assignment of the radical-pair partners and the unravelling of alternative and unexpected electron transfer pathways in these proteins, giving new insights into aspects of biological electron transfer itself.

  8. Paramagnetic hollow silica nanospheres for in vivo targeted ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    An, Lu; Hu, He; Du, Jing; Wei, Jie; Wang, Li; Yang, Hong; Wu, Dongmei; Shi, Haili; Li, Fenghua; Yang, Shiping

    2014-07-01

    A series of hollow silica nanospheres (HSNSs) with sizes ranging from 100 to 400 nm were synthesized and used for primary ultrasound imaging (US) efficiency assessment. The 400 nm HSNSs were chosen as platform for conjugation with Gd-DTPA and cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid c(RGD) peptide to construct US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modal contrast agents (CAs): [HSNSs@(DTPA-Gd)-RGD]. The obtained CAs displayed good physiological stability, low cytotoxicity and negligible hemolytic activity in vitro. Furthermore, the passive accumulation and active-targeting of the HSNSs in the tumor site of mice was demonstrated by US and MR imaging, respectively. The qualitative and quantitative biodistribution of the HSNSs showed that they mainly accumulated in the tissues of liver, lung, tumor after intravenous administration and then be excreted from feces. In addition, histological, hematological, blood and biochemical analysis were used to further study toxicity of the HSNSs, and all results indicated that there were no covert toxicity of HSNSs in mice after long exposure times. Findings from this study indicated that the silica-based paramagnetic HSNSs can be used as a platform for long-term targeted imaging and therapy studies safely in vivo. PMID:24703718

  9. Determination of very rapid molecular rotation by using the central electron paramagnetic resonance line.

    PubMed

    Kurban, Mark R

    2013-02-21

    Picosecond rotational correlation times of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) are found in alkane and aromatic liquids by directly using the spectral width of the central electron paramagnetic resonance line. This is done by mathematically eliminating the nonsecular spectral density from the spectral parameter equations, thereby removing the need to assume a particular form for it. This is preferable to fitting a constant correction factor to the spectral density, because such a factor does not fit well in the low picosecond range. The electron-nuclear spin dipolar interaction between the probe and solvent is shown to be negligible for the very rapid rotation of PDT in these liquids at the temperatures of the study. The rotational correlation times obtained with the proposed method generally agree to within experimental uncertainty with those determined by using the traditional parameters. Using the middle line width offers greater precision and smoother trends. Previous work with the central line width is discussed, and past discrepancies are explained as possibly resulting from residual inhomogeneous broadening. The rotational correlation time almost forms a common curve across all of the solvents when plotted with respect to isothermal compressibility, which shows the high dependence of rotation on liquid free volume. PMID:23320940

  10. Antioxidant and radical-scavenging activities of Slovak honeys - An electron paramagnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Zalibera, Michal; Staško, Andrej; Šlebodová, Anna; Jančovičová, Viera; Čermáková, Tatiana; Brezová, Vlasta

    2008-09-15

    The antioxidant properties of 15 honey samples from different floral sources and various Slovak regions were investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cation radical of ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt), DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) and hydroxyl radicals generated by the photochemical decomposition of hydrogen peroxide were used as oxidants. The antioxidant activities found with ABTS(+), expressed as trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ranged from 0.15 to 1.14mmolkg(-1), and those determined with DPPH, from 0.04 to 0.32mmolkg(-1). TEAC values correlated well with results found by elimination of DPPH, and both values revealed a linear relationship with the concentration of phenolics obtained with the Folin-Ciocalteu phenol test (expressed as gallic acid equivalents, GAE). The colour coordinates (CIE L(∗)a(∗)b(∗)), as well as reflectance spectra determined for original honeys using a white background, demonstrated that the colour difference (ΔE(∗)) and coordinate b(∗) interrelate with TEAC values. The radical-scavenging capacities (RSC) of the honey samples determined in the experiments with photochemically decomposed hydrogen peroxide, generating reactive OH radicals in the presence of spin trapping agent, differ from those found with ABTS(+) and DPPH. Here, probably, the reactive OH radicals, having higher redox potential, are scavenged by a variety of compounds not effective with ABTS(+) and DPPH (e.g., saccharides, proteins). PMID:26049247

  11. Antioxidant activity in hepatopancreas of the shrimp (Pleoticus muelleri) by electron paramagnetic spin resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Ana C; Fernández Gimenez, Analía V; Mendiara, Sara N; Fenucci, Jorge L

    2004-05-19

    Free radical scavenging properties of hepatopancreas extracts of Pleoticus muelleri were evaluated by electron paramagnetic spin resonance spectrometry methods (EPR) against the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. The present study was carried out to characterize different physiological stages of the shrimp under environmental and nutritional stress, evaluating the effect on growth, survival, and functional morphology of the hepatopancreas. Feeding trials were carried out on juveniles (1 g initial weight) held in aquaria. Each diet, with different concentrations of vitamins A and E, was tested in triplicate groups during 25 days. The control groups were fed with fresh squid mantle and with a vitamin-free diet. For all of the diets, the extracts exhibited strong DPPH radical scavenging activity, suggesting that the tissue is a powerful natural antioxidant. Individuals fed with different concentrations of vitamin E showed the strongest effect on the DPPH radicals, reducing the DPPH radicals to 50%, after an incubation period of 3 min. In contrast, the extracts of control animals, fed with squid mantle, had the weakest antioxidant activity (4%). These data indicated that the presence of vitamin E in the diet can provide immediate protection against free radicals. PMID:15137874

  12. Anthocyanin composition of wild Colombian fruits and antioxidant capacity measurement by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Liliana; Carriazo, José G; Almanza, Ovidio; Osorio, Coralia

    2012-02-15

    The qualitative and quantitative anthocyanin composition of four wild tropical fruits from Colombia was studied. Compounds of "mora pequeña" ( Rubus megalococcus Focke.), "uva de árbol" ( Myrciaria aff. cauliflora O. Berg), coral, and motilón ( Hyeronima macrocarpa Mull. Arg.) fruits were separately extracted with methanol-acetic acid (95:5, v/v). The anthocyanin-rich extracts (AREs) were obtained by selective adsorption on Amberlite XAD-7. Each extract was analyzed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-HRESI-MS(n) with LCMS-IT-TOF equipment in order to characterize the anthocyanin pigments and the coinjection in HPLC using standards allowed identifying the major constituents in each extract. The antioxidant activity was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-vis spectroscopy, using ABTS and DPPH free radicals. The ARE of motilón ( H. macrocarpa Müll. Arg) exhibited the highest radical scavenging activity in comparison to the other extracts. A second-order kinetic model was followed in all of the cases. These results suggested that the studied fruits are promising not only as source of natural pigments but also as antioxidant materials for food industry. PMID:22242913

  13. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pursley, Randall H; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C; Pohida, Thomas J

    2006-02-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (L(f)) of 300MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency L(f), in conjunction with our approximately 10MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented. PMID:16243552

  14. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging of the Spatial Distribution of Free Radicals in PMR-15 Polyimide Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Myong K.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    1997-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that free radicals generated by heating polyimides above 300 C are stable at room temperature and are involved in thermo-oxidative degradation in the presence of oxygen gas. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging (EPRI) is a technique to determine the spatial distribution of free radicals. X-band (9.5 GHz) EPR images of PMR-15 polyimide were obtained with a spatial resolution of about 0.18 mm along a 2 mm dimension of the sample. In a polyimide sample that was not thermocycled, the radical distribution was uniform along the 2 mm dimension of the sample. For a polyimide sample that was exposed to thermocycling in air for 300 one-hour cycles at 335 C, one-dimensional EPRI showed a higher concentration of free radicals in the surface layers than in the bulk sample. A spectral-spatial two-dimensional image showed that the EPR lineshape of the surface layer remained the same as that of the bulk. These EPRI results suggest that the thermo-oxidative degradation of PMR-15 resin involves free radicals present in the oxygen-rich surface layer.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in teeth from citizens of Ozyorsk.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A; Vasilenko, E; Aladova, E; Fattibene, P; Semiochkina, N; Smetanin, M

    2014-05-01

    In 1945, within the frame of the Uranium Project for the production of nuclear weapons, the Mayak nuclear facilities were constructed at the Lake Irtyash in the Southern Urals, Russia. The nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association (MPA), who lived in the city of Ozyorsk, are the focus of epidemiological studies for the assessment of health risks due to protracted exposure to ionising radiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in tooth enamel have already been used in the past, in an effort to validate occupational external doses that were evaluated in the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. In the present study, 229 teeth of Ozyorsk citizens not employed at MPA were investigated for the assessment of external background exposure in Ozyorsk. The annually absorbed dose in tooth enamel from natural background radiation was estimated to be (0.7 ± 0.3) mGy. For citizens living in Ozyorsk during the time of routine noble gas releases of the MPA, which peaked in 1953, the average excess absorbed dose in enamel above natural background was (36 ± 29) mGy, which is consistent with the gamma dose obtained by model calculations. In addition, there were indications of possible accidental gaseous MPA releases that affected the population of Ozyorsk, during the early and late MPA operation periods, before 1951 and after 1960. PMID:24604722

  16. Identification of free radical intermediates in oxidized wine using electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ryan J; Andersen, Mogens L; Skibsted, Leif H; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2009-05-27

    Free radicals are thought to be key intermediates in the oxidation of wine, but their nature has not been established. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect and identify several free radical species in wine under oxidative conditions with the aid of spin traps. The 1-hydroxylethyl radical was the sole radical species observed when α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone was used as a spin trap in a heated (55 °C), low-sulfite (15 mg L(-1)) red wine. This radical appears to arise from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical, and this latter species was confirmed by using a high concentration (1.5 M) of the 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide spin trap, thus providing the first direct evidence of the Fenton reaction in wine. Hydroxyl radical formation in wine was corroborated by converting hydroxyl radicals to methyl radicals by its reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The novel spin trap 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl 5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide was also used in this study to identify sulfite radicals in wine for the first time. This spin trap has also been shown to trap hydroperoxyl radicals, the generation of which is predicted in wine; however, no evidence of this species was observed. PMID:19358607

  17. Optimal dielectric and cavity configurations for improving the efficiency of electron paramagnetic resonance probes.

    PubMed

    Elnaggar, Sameh Y; Tervo, Richard; Mattar, Saba M

    2014-08-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer's lambda efficiency parameter (Λ) is one of the most important parameters that govern its sensitivity. It is studied for an EPR probe consisting of a dielectric resonator (DR) in a cavity (CV). Expressions for Λ are derived in terms of the probe's individual DR and CV components, Λ1 and Λ2 respectively. Two important cases are considered. In the first, a probe consisting of a CV is improved by incorporating a DR. The sensitivity enhancement depends on the relative rather than the absolute values of the individual components. This renders the analysis general. The optimal configuration occurs when the CV and DR modes are nearly degenerate. This configuration guarantees that the probe can be easily coupled to the microwave bridge while maintaining a large Λ. It is shown that for a lossy CV with a small quality factor Q2, one chooses a DR that has the highest filling factor, η1, regardless of its Λ1 and Q1. On the other hand, if the CV has a large Q2, the optimum DR is the one which has the highest Λ1. This is regardless of its η1 and relative dielectric constant, ɛr. When the quality factors of both the CV and DR are comparable, the lambda efficiency is reduced by a factor of 2. Thus the signal intensity for an unsaturated sample is cut in half. The second case is the design of an optimum shield to house a DR. Besides preventing radiation leakage, it is shown that for a high loss DR, the shield can actually boost Λ above the DR value. This can also be very helpful for relatively low efficiency dielectrics as well as lossy samples, such as polar liquids. PMID:24937043

  18. Triplet State Delocalization in a Conjugated Porphyrin Dimer Probed by Transient Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The delocalization of the photoexcited triplet state in a linear butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimer is investigated by time-resolved and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with laser excitation. The transient EPR spectra of the photoexcited triplet states of the porphyrin monomer and dimer are characterized by significantly different spin polarizations and an increase of the zero-field splitting parameter D from monomer to dimer. The proton and nitrogen hyperfine couplings, determined using electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and X- and Q-band HYSCORE, are reduced to about half in the porphyrin dimer. These data unequivocally prove the delocalization of the triplet state over both porphyrin units, in contrast to the conclusions from previous studies on the triplet states of closely related porphyrin dimers. The results presented here demonstrate that the most accurate estimate of the extent of triplet state delocalization can be obtained from the hyperfine couplings, while interpretation of the zero-field splitting parameter D can lead to underestimation of the delocalization length, unless combined with quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, orientation-selective ENDOR and HYSCORE results, in combination with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowed determination of the orientations of the zero-field splitting tensors with respect to the molecular frame in both porphyrin monomer and dimer. The results provide evidence for a reorientation of the zero-field splitting tensor and a change in the sign of the zero-field splitting D value. The direction of maximum dipolar coupling shifts from the out-of-plane direction in the porphyrin monomer to the vector connecting the two porphyrin units in the dimer. This reorientation, leading to an alignment of the principal optical transition moment and the axis of maximum dipolar coupling, is also confirmed by magnetophotoselection experiments. PMID:25914154

  19. Effects of thermal annealing on the radiation produced electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of bovine and equine tooth enamel: Fossil and modern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Robert A.; Bogard, James S.; Elam, J. Michael; Weinand, Daniel C.; Kramer, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    The concentration of stable radiation-induced paramagnetic states in fossil teeth can be used as a measure of sample age. Temperature excursions >100 °C, however, can cause the paramagnetic state clock to differ from the actual postmortem time. We have heated irradiated enamel from both fossilized bovid and modern equine (MEQ) teeth for 30 min in 50 °C increments from 100 to 300 °C, measuring the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum after each anneal, to investigate such effects. Samples were irradiated again after the last anneal, with doses of 300-1200 Gy from 60Co photons, and measured. Two unirradiated MEQ samples were also annealed for 30 min at 300 °C, one in an evacuated EPR tube and the other in a tube open to the atmosphere, and subsequently irradiated. The data showed that hyperfine components attributed to the alanine radical were not detected in the irradiated MEQ sample until after the anneals. The spectrum of the MEQ sample heated in air and then irradiated was similar to that of the heat treated fossil sample. We conclude that the hyperfine components are due to sample heating to temperatures/times >100 °C/30 min and that similarities between fossil and MEQ spectra after the 300 °C/30 min MEQ anneal are also due to sample heating. We conclude that the presence of the hyperfine components in spectra of fossil tooth enamel indicate that such thermal events occurred either at the time of death, or during the postmortem history.

  20. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Nitrogenase and Nitrogenase Components from Clostridium pasteurianum W5 and Azotobacter vinelandii OP

    PubMed Central

    Orme-Johnson, W. H.; Hamilton, W. D.; Jones, T. L.; Tso, M.-Y. W.; Burris, R. H.; Shah, V. K.; Brill, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance of nitrogenase components, separately and together with the other reactants in the nitrogenase system (namely, reductant and Mg·ATP), have been examined at low temperatures (<20°K). The MoFe protein, component I or molybdoferredoxin, in the oxidized (but not oxygen-inactivated) state yields signals with g-values of 4.3, 3.7, and 2.01, and when reduced has no observable electron paramagnetic resonance. The Fe protein, component II, or azoferredoxin, yields a signal with g-values of 2.05, 1.94, and 1.89 in the reduced state that is converted by Mg·ATP into an axial signal with g-values near 2.05 and 1.94, and a second split signal near g = 4.3. The Fe protein has no definite electron paramagnetic resonance in the oxidized (not oxygen-denatured) state under these conditions. The Mg·ATP complex of reduced Fe protein reduces the MoFe protein, whereas dithionite alone does not reduce the MoFe protein. Reoxidation of the system by substrate leads to disappearance of the Fe protein signal and the reappearance of the MoFe protein signal. Thus Mg·ATP, which is hydrolyzed during substrate reduction, converts the Fe protein to a reductant capable of transferring electrons to MoFe protein, after which substrate reduction occurs. PMID:4343957

  1. Structural characterization of titania by X-ray diffraction, photoacoustic, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, R M; Rajeswari, B; Sengupta, Arijit; Achary, S N; Kshirsagar, R J; Natarajan, V

    2015-02-25

    A titania mineral (obtained from East coast, Orissa, India) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. XRD studies indicated the presence of rutile (91%) and anatase (9%) phases in the mineral. Raman investigation supported this information. Both rutile and anatase phases have tetragonal structure (rutile: space group P4(2)/mnm, a=4.5946(1) Å, c=2.9597(1) Å, V=62.48(1) (Å)(3), Z=2; anatase: space group I4(1)/amd, 3.7848(2) Å, 9.5098(11) Å, V=136.22(2) (Å)(3), Z=4). The deconvoluted PAS spectrum showed nine peaks around 335, 370, 415,485, 555, 605, 659, 690,730 and 785 nm and according to the ligand field theory, these peaks were attributed to the presence of V(4+), Cr(3+), Mn(4+) and Fe(3+) species. EPR studies revealed the presence of transition metal ions V(4+)(d(1)), Cr(3+)(d(3)), Mn(4+)(d(3)) and Fe(3+)(d(5)) at Ti(4+) sites. The EPR spectra are characterized by very large crystal filed splitting (D term) and orthorhombic distortion term (E term) for multiple electron system (s>1) suggesting that the transition metal ions substitute the Ti(4+) in the lattice which is situated in distorted octahedral coordination of oxygen. The possible reasons for observation of unusually large D and E term in the EPR spectra of transition metal ions (S=3/2 and 5/2) are discussed. PMID:25233027

  2. Simulation of the S2 state multiline electron paramagnetic resonance signal of photosystem II: a multifrequency approach.

    PubMed

    Ahrling, K A; Pace, R J

    1995-05-01

    The S2 state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) multiline signal of Photosystem II has been simulated at Q-band (35 Ghz), X-band (9 GHz) and S-band (4 GHz) frequencies. The model used for the simulation assumes that the signal arises from an essentially magnetically isolated MnIII-MnIV dimer, with a ground state electronic spin ST = 1/2. The spectra are generated from exact numerical solution of a general spin Hamiltonian containing anisotropic hyperfine and quadrupolar interactions at both Mn nuclei. The features that distinguish the multiline from the EPR spectra of model manganese dimer complexes (additional width of the spectrum (195 mT), additional peaks (22), internal "superhyperfine" structure) are plausibly explained assuming an unusual ligand geometry at both Mn nuclei, giving rise to normally forbidden transitions from quadrupole interactions as well as hyperfine anisotropy. The fitted parameters indicate that the hyperfine and quadrupole interactions arise from Mn ions in low symmetry environments, corresponding approximately to the removal of one ligand from an octahedral geometry in both cases. For a quadrupole interaction of the magnitude indicated here to be present, the MnIII ion must be 5-coordinate and the MnIV 5-coordinate or possibly have a sixth, weakly bound ligand. The hyperfine parameters indicate a quasi-axial anisotropy at MnIII, which while consistent with Jahn-Teller distortion as expected for a d4 ion, corresponds here to the unpaired spin being in the ligand deficient, z direction of the molecular reference axis. The fitted parameters for MnIV are very unusual, showing a high degree of anisotropy not expected in a d3 ion. This degree of anisotropy could be qualitatively accounted for by a histidine ligand providing pi backbonding into the metal dxy orbital, together with a weakly bound or absent ligand in the x direction. PMID:7612851

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of the C e3 + pair centers in YAl O3 :Ce scintillator crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryi, M.; Laguta, V. V.; Mihóková, E.; Novák, P.; Nikl, M.

    2015-12-01

    Single crystals of YAl O3 doped with Ce have been studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at the 9.4 and 34 GHz microwave bands. Besides the single-ion C e3 + spectrum, measurements have revealed many satellite lines which belong to the C e3 +-C e3 + pair centers. Their spectra have been fitted by a general effective spin Hamiltonian describing two interacting particles with the spin S =1 /2 . Corresponding g factors and spin-spin coupling constants have been determined. The spin-spin coupling constants are in the range from 0.1 up to 0.65 c m-1 for the nearest and next-nearest neighbors depending on the distance between Ce ions and their position. The exchange interaction between next-nearest neighbors (NNNs) is comparable to or even bigger than that between nearest neighbors (NNs), being in the range 0.4 -0.6 c m-1 . For a single C e3 + ion, crystal field parameters, energy sublevels of the 2F5 /2 and 2F7 /2 multiplets and principal g tensor components were obtained from the density functional theory calculation. They are in satisfactory agreement with those determined experimentally. The principal g tensor components of C e3 + pair centers are also calculated. Nevertheless, it was impossible to assign each of the satellite lines to actual positions of the six NN and 12 NNN Ce pairs in the lattice due to lack of valid information on the sign of the exchange interactions. The influence of C e3 + pairs on the luminescence efficiency is discussed as well.

  4. Structural characterization of titania by X-ray diffraction, photoacoustic, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, R. M.; Rajeswari, B.; Sengupta, Arijit; Achary, S. N.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Natarajan, V.

    2015-02-01

    A titania mineral (obtained from East coast, Orissa, India) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. XRD studies indicated the presence of rutile (91%) and anatase (9%) phases in the mineral. Raman investigation supported this information. Both rutile and anatase phases have tetragonal structure (rutile: space group P42/mnm, a = 4.5946(1) Å, c = 2.9597(1) Å, V = 62.48(1) (Å)3, Z = 2; anatase: space group I41/amd, 3.7848(2) Å, 9.5098(11) Å, V = 136.22(2) (Å)3, Z = 4). The deconvoluted PAS spectrum showed nine peaks around 335, 370, 415,485, 555, 605, 659, 690,730 and 785 nm and according to the ligand field theory, these peaks were attributed to the presence of V4+, Cr3+, Mn4+ and Fe3+ species. EPR studies revealed the presence of transition metal ions V4+(d1), Cr3+(d3), Mn4+(d3) and Fe3+(d5) at Ti4+ sites. The EPR spectra are characterized by very large crystal filed splitting (D term) and orthorhombic distortion term (E term) for multiple electron system (s > 1) suggesting that the transition metal ions substitute the Ti4+ in the lattice which is situated in distorted octahedral coordination of oxygen. The possible reasons for observation of unusually large D and E term in the EPR spectra of transition metal ions (S = 3/2 and 5/2) are discussed.

  5. Paramagnetic dipole centers in KTaO3: Electron-spin-resonance and dielectric spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguta, V. V.; Glinchuk, M. D.; Bykov, I. P.; Rosa, J.; Jastrabík, L.; Savinov, M.; Trybuła, Z.

    2000-02-01

    Electron-spin-resonance (ESR) and dielectric spectroscopy techniques have been applied to study the dipole centers connected with Mn2+ and Fe3+ impurity ions substituted for K+ in the incipient ferroelectric KTaO3. It was shown that the reorientations of paramagnetic dipole complexes Fe3+-OI (OI is the interstitial oxygen) give rise to dielectric losses near T~=185 K at the frequency 1 kHz. Their activation energy Er=0.34 eV was obtained both from dielectric and ESR measurements. The peak of dielectric losses at T~=55 K was observed in KTaO3 doped by low concentrations of Mn2+(n~0.01 at. %). At n>~0.3 at. % a pronounced peak of dielectric susceptibility similar to that in KTaO3:Li was revealed in addition to the aforementioned losses peak. The studies of electric field and temperature dependence of Mn2+ ESR intensities with respect to the local Lorentz field had shown that the dipole moment 1.4 eÅ can be associated with Mn2+ ion. The origin of this dipole moment was shown to be off-center displacement Δ~=0.9 Å of Mn2+ from the K+ site in one of six [001]-type directions. The relaxation rate of these dipoles after the polarizing electric field switching off was directly measured by the ESR method. It was described by Arrhenius law with activation energy Er=0.104 eV, which is close to the value obtained from dielectric measurements. Possible sources of dielectric losses in nominally pure KTaO3 single crystals in the vicinity of T~40 K are analyzed and discussed on the basis of both present work data and earlier results collected from the literature.

  6. Characterization of iron, manganese, and copper synthetic hydroxyapatites by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Wasowicz, T.; Howard, T.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients (e.g., Fe, Mn, Cu) into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for long-duration space missions. Separate Fe3+ (Fe-SHA), Mn2+ (Mn-SHA), and Cu2+ (Cu-SHA) containing SHA materials were synthesized by a precipitation method. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the location of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ ions in the SHA structure and to identify other Fe(3+)-, Mn(2+)-, and Cu(2+)-containing phases that formed during precipitation. The EPR parameters for Fe3+ (g=4.20 and 8.93) and for Mn2+ (g=2.01, A=9.4 mT, D=39.0 mT and E=10.5 mT) indicated that Fe3+ and Mn2+ possessed rhombic ion crystal fields within the SHA structure. The Cu2+ EPR parameters (g(z)=2.488, A(z)=5.2 mT) indicated that Cu2+ was coordinated to more than six oxygens. The rhombic environments of Fe3+ and Mn2+ along with the unique Cu2+ environment suggested that these metals substituted for the 7 or 9 coordinate Ca2+ in SHA. The EPR analyses also detected poorly crystalline metal oxyhydroxides or metal-phosphates associated with SHA. The Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu for ALS and terrestrial cropping systems.

  7. Application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Oximetry to Monitor Oxygen in Wounds in Diabetic Models.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Céline M; Lafosse, Aurore; Vériter, Sophie; Porporato, Paolo E; Sonveaux, Pierre; Dufrane, Denis; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A lack of oxygen is classically described as a major cause of impaired wound healing in diabetic patients. Even if the role of oxygen in the wound healing process is well recognized, measurement of oxygen levels in a wound remains challenging. The purpose of the present study was to assess the value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry to monitor pO2 in wounds during the healing process in diabetic mouse models. Kinetics of wound closure were carried out in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated and db/db mice. The pO2 was followed repeatedly during the healing process by 1 GHz EPR spectroscopy with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystals used as oxygen sensor in two different wound models: a full-thickness excisional skin wound and a pedicled skin flap. Wound closure kinetics were dramatically slower in 12-week-old db/db compared to control (db/+) mice, whereas kinetics were not statistically different in STZ-treated compared to control mice. At the center of excisional wounds, measurements were highly influenced by atmospheric oxygen early in the healing process. In pedicled flaps, hypoxia was observed early after wounding. While reoxygenation occurred over time in db/+ mice, hypoxia was prolonged in the diabetic db/db model. This observation was consistent with impaired healing and microangiopathies observed using intravital microscopy. In conclusion, EPR oximetry using LiPc crystals as the oxygen sensor is an appropriate technique to follow wound oxygenation in acute and chronic wounds, in normal and diabetic animals. Nevertheless, the technique is limited for measurements in pedicled skin flaps and cannot be applied to excisional wounds in which diffusion of atmospheric oxygen significantly affects the measurements. PMID:26659378

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption study of V4+ centres in YVO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, N. Y.; Stevens, K. T.; Foundos, G. K.; Halliburton, L. E.

    2004-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to characterize three distinct V4+ centres in undoped Czochralski-grown yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4) crystals. These EPR signals are observed at low temperatures, and their average c-axis splittings between adjacent 51V hyperfine lines are 40 G, 123 G, and 140 G. We refer to these centres as [V4+]A, [V4+]B, and [V4+]C, respectively. The [V4+]A and [V4+]B centres are present in as-grown crystals. Exposure at 77 K to ionizing radiation (x-rays or an ultraviolet laser beam) destroys these centres and creates the [V4+]C centres. The as-grown state of the crystal is restored upon returning to room temperature. Angular dependence data are used to determine the principal values and principal directions of the g tensor and the 51V hyperfine tensor for each of the centres. We suggest that the [V4+]A centre is a V4+ ion adjacent to an oxygen vacancy and that the [V4+]B centre is a V4+ ion substituting for a Y3+ ion (i.e. a vanadium antisite defect). The [V4+]C centre is assigned to a V4+ ion at a regular vanadium site with a nearby stabilizing defect, possibly a Zr4+ on a Y3+ site. In as-grown crystals, there is a correlation between the number of [V4+]A centres and the intensity (at 380 nm) of a broad near-edge optical absorption band. This band, now associated with oxygen vacancies, gives YVO4 a 'yellow' appearance.

  9. Tooth Retrospective Dosimetry Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Influence of Irradiated Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Céline M.; Djurkin, Andrej; Dos Santos-Goncalvez, Ana Maria; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Kobayashi, Kyo; Rychert, Kevin; Beun, Sébastien; Leprince, Julian G.; Leloup, Gaëtane; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of a major radiological accident, the medical management of overexposed individuals will rely on the determination of the dose of ionizing radiations absorbed by the victims. Because people in the general population do not possess conventional dosimeters, after the fact dose reconstruction methods are needed. Free radicals are induced by radiations in the tooth enamel of victims, in direct proportion to dose, and can be quantified using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometry, a technique that was demonstrated to be very appropriate for mass triage. The presence of dimethacrylate based restorations on teeth can interfere with the dosimetric signal from the enamel, as free radicals could also be induced in the various composites used. The aim of the present study was to screen irradiated composites for a possible radiation-induced EPR signal, to characterize it, and evaluate a possible interference with the dosimetric signal of the enamel. We investigated the most common commercial composites, and experimental compositions, for a possible class effect. The effect of the dose was studied between 10 Gy and 100 Gy using high sensitivity X-band spectrometer. The influence of this radiation-induced signal from the composite on the dosimetric signal of the enamel was also investigated using a clinical L-Band EPR spectrometer, specifically developed in the EPR center at Dartmouth College. In X-band, a radiation-induced signal was observed for high doses (25-100 Gy); it was rapidly decaying, and not detected after only 24h post irradiation. At 10 Gy, the signal was in most cases not measurable in the commercial composites tested, with the exception of 3 composites showing a significant intensity. In L-band study, only one irradiated commercial composite influenced significantly the dosimetric signal of the tooth, with an overestimation about 30%. In conclusion, the presence of the radiation-induced signal from dental composites should not

  10. Application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Oximetry to Monitor Oxygen in Wounds in Diabetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Céline M.; Lafosse, Aurore; Vériter, Sophie; Porporato, Paolo E.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Dufrane, Denis; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A lack of oxygen is classically described as a major cause of impaired wound healing in diabetic patients. Even if the role of oxygen in the wound healing process is well recognized, measurement of oxygen levels in a wound remains challenging. The purpose of the present study was to assess the value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry to monitor pO2 in wounds during the healing process in diabetic mouse models. Kinetics of wound closure were carried out in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated and db/db mice. The pO2 was followed repeatedly during the healing process by 1 GHz EPR spectroscopy with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystals used as oxygen sensor in two different wound models: a full-thickness excisional skin wound and a pedicled skin flap. Wound closure kinetics were dramatically slower in 12-week-old db/db compared to control (db/+) mice, whereas kinetics were not statistically different in STZ-treated compared to control mice. At the center of excisional wounds, measurements were highly influenced by atmospheric oxygen early in the healing process. In pedicled flaps, hypoxia was observed early after wounding. While reoxygenation occurred over time in db/+ mice, hypoxia was prolonged in the diabetic db/db model. This observation was consistent with impaired healing and microangiopathies observed using intravital microscopy. In conclusion, EPR oximetry using LiPc crystals as the oxygen sensor is an appropriate technique to follow wound oxygenation in acute and chronic wounds, in normal and diabetic animals. Nevertheless, the technique is limited for measurements in pedicled skin flaps and cannot be applied to excisional wounds in which diffusion of atmospheric oxygen significantly affects the measurements. PMID:26659378

  11. Study of nanostructural organization of ionic liquids by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Merunka, Dalibor; Peric, Mirna; Peric, Miroslav

    2015-02-19

    The X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of a stable, spherical nitroxide spin probe, perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (pDTO) has been used to study the nanostructural organization of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquids (ILs) with alkyl chain lengths from two to eight carbons. By employing nonlinear least-squares fitting of the EPR spectra, we have obtained values of the rotational correlation time and hyperfine coupling splitting of pDTO to high precision. The rotational correlation time of pDTO in ILs and squalane, a viscous alkane, can be fit very well to a power law functionality with a singular temperature, which often describes a number of physical quantities measured in supercooled liquids. The viscosity of the ILs and squalane, taken from the literature, can also be fit to the same power law expression, which means that the rotational correlation times and the ionic liquid viscosities have similar functional dependence on temperature. The apparent activation energy of both the rotational correlation time of pDTO and the viscous flow of ILs and squalane increases with decreasing temperature; in other words, they exhibit strong non-Arrhenius behavior. The rotational correlation time of pDTO as a function of η/T, where η is the shear viscosity and T is the temperature, is well described by the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) law, while the hydrodynamic probe radii are solvent dependent and are smaller than the geometric radius of the probe. The temperature dependence of hyperfine coupling splitting is the same in all four ionic liquids. The value of the hyperfine coupling splitting starts decreasing with increasing alkyl chain length in the ionic liquids in which the number of carbons in the alkyl chain is greater than four. This decrease together with the decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of the probe indicates a possible existence of nonpolar nanodomains. PMID:25594422

  12. Multiharmonic electron paramagnetic resonance for extended samples with both narrow and broad lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhelin; Tseytlin, Mark; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2015-05-01

    Multiharmonic electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was demonstrated for two samples with both narrow and broad lines: (i) α,γ-Bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl (BDPA) with ΔBpp of 0.85 G plus ultramarine blue with ΔBpp of 17 G, and (ii) a nitroxide radical immobilized in sucrose octaacetate. Modulation amplitudes up to 17 G at 41 kHz were generated with a rapid scan coil driver and Litz wire coils that provide uniform magnetic field sweeps over samples with heights of 5 mm. Data were acquired with a 2-D experiment in the Xepr software through the transient signal path of a Bruker E500T and digitized in quadrature with a Bruker SpecJet II. Signals at the modulation frequency and its harmonics were calculated by digital phase-sensitive detection. The number of harmonics with signal intensity greater than noise increases as the ratio of the modulation amplitude to the narrowest peak increases. Spectra reconstructed by the multiharmonic method from data obtained with modulation amplitudes up to five times the peak-to-peak linewidths of the narrowest features have linewidths that are broadened by up to only about 10% relative to linewidths in spectra obtained at low modulation amplitudes. The signal-to-noise improves with increasing modulation amplitude up to the point where the modulation amplitude is slightly larger than the linewidth of the narrowest features. If this high a modulation amplitude had been used in conventional methodology the linewidth of the narrowest features would have been severely broadened. The multiharmonic reconstruction methodology means that the selection of the modulation amplitude that can be used without spectral distortion is no longer tightly tied to the linewidth of the narrowest line.

  13. Study of ferroelectric phase transition in Pb5Ge3O11 by paramagnetic resonance of Gd3+ centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhenin, V. A.; Rumyantsev, E. L.; Artyomov, M. Yu.; Potapov, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the fine structure of trigonal paramagnetic Gd3+ centres in Pb5Ge3O11 was investigated in a wide temperature range in the vicinity of structural phase transition. The temperature dependence of the squared order parameter has been constructed based on the obtained data. It was shown that for the adequate description of its behaviour, the sixth-power term in polarization must be taken into account in the expansion of the thermodynamic potential. The orientational dependence of anomalous broadening of electron paramagnetic resonance signals in the vicinity of ferroelectric phase transition was studied. By comparison of the observed behaviour with the angular dependences of the line width that are characteristic of various broadening mechanisms, it was inferred that it can be attributed to defect induced statistical dispersion of fine structure triclinic parameters.

  14. Photodynamic treatment of the RIF-1 tumor with verteporfin with online monitoring of tissue oxygen using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Liu, Ke J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Swartz, Harold

    1999-06-01

    In this study, treatment of the RIF-1 tumor was examined with photodynamic therapy using Verteprofin (formerly benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD). The effects of two different optical dose rates were examined, with no detectable difference in the tumor regrowth time. Oxygen consumption during PDT could reliably be monitored with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry using an implanted paramagnetic material within the tumor. A reduction of the tumor pO2 was detected in the animals that were followed after treatment, suggesting that there was a compromise to the tumor vasculature that persisted throughout the measurements. At high total doses some of the tumors did not regrow. Altogether these results are indicative of the tumor destruction being caused by destruction of the blood vessels from the treatment.

  15. [The evaluation of mineral crystallinity of mandibular bone tissue using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in patients suffering from renal osteodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, Andrzej; Dijakiewicz, Maciej; Wandzel, Barbara; Wesołowski, Piotr; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Fiedor, Piotr; Stachowicz, Wacław; Ostrowski, Kazimierz

    2006-01-01

    Mineral crystallinity of bone tissue is subject to changes during one's development, as well as in many systemic diseases, especially renal osteodystrophy. The aim of the study was qualitative evaluation of the mandibular bone tissue in patients suffering from renal osteodytrophy, treated with renal-replacement therapy: hemo-dialysis or allogeneic kidney transplantation. The mineral crystallinity coefficient was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) based on the observation that ionizing radiation induces paramagnetic centers in hydroxyapatites. The concentration of these centers was used to establish an indicator of crystallinity rate which is a measure of the crystallinity of tissue mineral. On the basis of these results, it is possible to widen the indications for implantological treatment in specific clinical cases. PMID:17479865

  16. High-resolution mapping of 1D and 2D dose distributions using X-band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kolbun, N; Adolfsson, E; Gustafsson, H; Lund, E

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) was performed to visualise 2D dose distributions of homogenously irradiated potassium dithionate tablets and to demonstrate determination of 1D dose profiles along the height of the tablets. Mathematical correction was applied for each relative dose profile in order to take into account the inhomogeneous response of the resonator using X-band EPRI. The dose profiles are presented with the spatial resolution of 0.6 mm from the acquired 2D images; this value is limited by pixel size, and 1D dose profiles from 1D imaging with spatial resolution of 0.3 mm limited by the intrinsic line-width of potassium dithionate. In this paper, dose profiles from 2D reconstructed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) images using the Xepr software package by Bruker are focussed. The conclusion is that using potassium dithionate, the resolution 0.3 mm is sufficient for mapping steep dose gradients if the dosemeters are covering only ±2 mm around the centre of the resonator. PMID:24748487

  17. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance Studies of the Reactions of Cryogenerated Hydroperoxoferric–Hemoprotein Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The fleeting ferric peroxo and hydroperoxo intermediates of dioxygen activation by hemoproteins can be readily trapped and characterized during cryoradiolytic reduction of ferrous hemoprotein–O2 complexes at 77 K. Previous cryoannealing studies suggested that the relaxation of cryogenerated hydroperoxoferric intermediates of myoglobin (Mb), hemoglobin, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), either trapped directly at 77 K or generated by cryoannealing of a trapped peroxo-ferric state, proceeds through dissociation of bound H2O2 and formation of the ferric heme without formation of the ferryl porphyrin π-cation radical intermediate, compound I (Cpd I). Herein we have reinvestigated the mechanism of decays of the cryogenerated hydroperoxyferric intermediates of α- and β-chains of human hemoglobin, HRP, and chloroperoxidase (CPO). The latter two proteins are well-known to form spectroscopically detectable quasistable Cpds I. Peroxoferric intermediates are trapped during 77 K cryoreduction of oxy Mb, α-chains, and β-chains of human hemoglobin and CPO. They convert into hydroperoxoferric intermediates during annealing at temperatures above 160 K. The hydroperoxoferric intermediate of HRP is trapped directly at 77 K. All studied hydroperoxoferric intermediates decay with measurable rates at temperatures above 170 K with appreciable solvent kinetic isotope effects. The hydroperoxoferric intermediate of β-chains converts to the S = 3/2 Cpd I, which in turn decays to an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-silent product at temperature above 220 K. For all the other hemoproteins studied, cryoannealing of the hydroperoxo intermediate directly yields an EPR-silent majority product. In each case, a second follow-up 77 K γ-irradiation of the annealed samples yields low-spin EPR signals characteristic of cryoreduced ferrylheme (compound II, Cpd II). This indicates that in general the hydroperoxoferric intermediates relax to Cpd I during cryoanealing at low temperatures, but

  18. Scaling craters in carbonates: Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of shock damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate samples from the 8.9-Mt nuclear (near-surface explosion) crater, OAK, and a terrestrial impact crater, Meteor Crater, were analyzed for shock damage using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Samples from below the OAK apparent crater floor were obtained from six boreholes, as well as ejecta recovered from the crater floor. The degree of shock damage in the carbonate material was assessed by comparing the sample spectra to the spectra of Solenhofen and Kaibab limestone, which had been skocked to known pressures. Analysis of the OAK Crater borehole samples has identified a thin zone of allocthonous highly shocked (10-13 GPa) carbonate material underneath the apparent crater floor. This approx. 5- to 15-m-thick zone occurs at a maximum depth of approx. 125 m below current seafloor at the borehole, sited at the initial position of the OAK explosive, and decreases in depth towards the apparent crater edge. Because this zone of allocthonous shocked rock delineates deformed rock below, and a breccia of mobilized sand and collapse debris above, it appears to outline the transient crater. The transient crater volume inferred in this way is found to by 3.2 +/- 0.2 times 10(exp 6)cu m, which is in good agreement with a volume of 5.3 times 10(exp 6)cu m inferred from gravity scaling of laboratory experiments. A layer of highly shocked material is also found near the surface outside the crater. The latter material could represent a fallout ejecta layer. The ejecta boulders recovered from the present crater floor experienced a range of shock pressures from approx. 0 to 15 GPa with the more heavily shocked samples all occurring between radii of 360 and approx. 600 m. Moreover, the fossil content, lithology and Sr isotopic composition all demonstrate that the initial position of the bulk of the heavily shocked rock ejecta sampled was originally near surface rock at initial depths in the 32 to 45-m depth (below sea level) range. The EPR technique is also sensitive to

  19. Cryogen-free superconducting magnet system for multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance up to 12.1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alex I.; Smirnova, Tatyana I.; MacArthur, Ryan L.; Good, Jeremy A.; Hall, Renny

    2006-03-01

    Multifrequency and high field/high frequency (HF) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a powerful spectroscopy for studying paramagnetic spin systems ranging from organic-free radicals to catalytic paramagnetic metal ion centers in metalloproteins. Typically, HF EPR experiments are carried out at resonant frequencies ν =95-300GHz and this requires magnetic fields of 3.4-10.7T for electronic spins with g ≈2.0. Such fields could be easily achieved with superconducting magnets, but, unlike NMR, these magnets cannot operate in a persistent mode in order to satisfy a wide range of resonant fields required by the experiment. Operating and maintaining conventional passively cooled superconducting magnets in EPR laboratories require frequent transfer of cryogens by trained personnel. Here we describe and characterize a versatile cryogen-free magnet system for HF EPR at magnetic fields up to 12.1T that is suitable for ramping the magnetic field over the entire range, precision scans around the target field, and/or holding the field at the target value. We also demonstrate that in a nonpersistent mode of operation the magnetic field can be stabilized to better than 0.3ppm/h over 15h period by employing a transducer-controlled power supply. Such stability is sufficient for many HF EPR experiments. An important feature of the system is that it is virtually maintenance-free because it is based on a cryogen-free technology and therefore does not require any liquid cryogens (liquid helium or nitrogen) for operation. We believe that actively cooled superconducting magnets are ideally suited for a wide range of HF EPR experiments including studies of spin-labeled nucleic acids and proteins, single-molecule magnets, and metalloproteins.

  20. Advanced paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies of iron-sulfur proteins: Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM).

    PubMed

    Cutsail, George E; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    The advanced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques, electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies, provide unique insights into the structure, coordination chemistry, and biochemical mechanism of nature's widely distributed iron-sulfur cluster (FeS) proteins. This review describes the ENDOR and ESEEM techniques and then provides a series of case studies on their application to a wide variety of FeS proteins including ferredoxins, nitrogenase, and radical SAM enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25686535

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using a direct current-SQUID magnetometer directly coupled to an electron spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Hiraku; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Zhu, Xiaobo; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate electron spin polarization detection and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using a direct current superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) magnetometer. Our target electron spin ensemble is directly bonded to the dc-SQUID magnetometer that detects electron spin polarization induced by an external magnetic field or EPR in a micrometer-sized area. The minimum distinguishable number of polarized spins and sensing volume of the electron spin polarization detection and the EPR spectroscopy are estimated to be ˜106 and ˜10-10 cm3 (˜0.1 pl), respectively.

  2. Paramagnetic copper centers in ferroelectric lead germanate with halogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhenin, V. A.; Potapov, A. P.; Artyomov, M. Yu.; Vylkov, A. I.

    2014-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of triclinic bivalent copper centers in copper-doped Pb5Ge3O11 single crystals has been investigated. The spectrum intensity increases after thermal treatment in a chlorine- or fluorine-containing atmosphere. The parameters of the electron Zeeman, hyperfine, and nuclear quadrupole interactions have been determined. The model of the observed centers has been proposed.

  3. Cathodoluminescence, laser ablasion inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis and electron paramagnetic resonance analyses of natural sphalerite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karakus, M.; Hagni, R.D.; Koenig, A.; Ciftc, E.

    2008-01-01

    Natural sphalerite associated with copper, silver, lead-zinc, tin and tungsten deposits from various world-famous mineral deposits have been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL), laser ablasion inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the relationship between trace element type and content and the CL properties of sphalerite. In general, sphalerite produces a spectrum of CL colour under electron bombardment that includes deep blue, turquoise, lime green, yellow-orange, orange-red and dull dark red depending on the type and concentration of trace quantities of activator ions. Sphalerite from most deposits shows a bright yellow-orange CL colour with ??max centred at 585 nm due to Mn2+ ion, and the intensity of CL is strongly dependent primarily on Fe2+ concentration. The blue emission band with ??max centred at 470-490 nm correlates with Ga and Ag at the Tsumeb, Horn Silver, Balmat and Kankoy mines. Colloform sphalerite from older well-known European lead-zinc deposits and late Cretaceous Kuroko-type VMS deposits of Turkey shows intense yellowish CL colour and their CL spectra are characterised by extremely broad emission bands ranging from 450 to 750 nm. These samples are characterised by low Mn (<10 ppm) and Ag (<1 ppm), and they are enriched in Tl (1-30 ppm) and Pb (80-1500 ppm). Strong green CL is produced by sphalerite from the Balmat-Edwards district. Amber, lime-green and red-orange sphalerite produced weak orange-red CL at room temperatures, with several emission bands centred at 490, 580, 630, 680, 745, with ??max at 630 nm being the strongest. These emission bands are well correlated with trace quantities of Sn, In, Cu and Mn activators. Sphalerite from the famous Ogdensburg and Franklin mines exhibited brilliant deep blue and orange CL colours and the blue CL may be related to Se. Cathodoluminescence behaviour of sphalerite serves to characterise ore

  4. Continuous spectrum of modes for optical micro-sphere resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooramin, Amir Saman; Shahabadi, Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an improved modal analysis for the spherical dielectric resonator. This is commonly carried out by assuming an outgoing spherical Hankel function for the region surrounding the dielectric sphere. It will be shown that this assumption is incomplete and cannot lead to the entire spectrum of resonance frequencies. Following an analytical formulation, we prove that, like cylindrical resonators, the only choice for the outer region of the dielectric sphere can be a proper linear combination of an inward and an outward traveling wave. Starting from this formulation, we determine the complete spectrum of the resonance frequencies and the associated mode fields. In this analysis, the continuous spectrum of resonance frequencies is introduced and the properties of radiation modes are studied in detail. The proposed analytical formulation is thereafter employed to calculate the quality factor of the resonator due to radiation and dielectric loss.

  5. On-chip integration of high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and Hall-effect magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Quddusi, H M; Ramsey, C M; Gonzalez-Pons, J C; Henderson, J J; del Barco, E; de Loubens, G; Kent, A D

    2008-07-01

    A sensor that integrates high-sensitivity micro-Hall effect magnetometry and high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy capabilities on a single semiconductor chip is presented. The Hall-effect magnetometer (HEM) was fabricated from a two-dimensional electron gas GaAsAlGaAs heterostructure in the form of a cross, with a 50 x 50 microm2 sensing area. A high-frequency microstrip resonator is coupled with two small gaps to a transmission line with a 50 Omega impedance. Different resonator lengths are used to obtain quasi-TEM fundamental resonant modes in the frequency range 10-30 GHz. The resonator is positioned on top of the active area of the HEM, where the magnetic field of the fundamental mode is largest, thus optimizing the conversion of microwave power into magnetic field at the sample position. The two gaps coupling the resonator and transmission lines are engineered differently--the gap to the microwave source is designed to optimize the loaded quality factor of the resonator (Qresonance while enabling measurement of the transmitted signal. The large filling factor of the resonator permits sensitivities comparable to that of high-quality factor resonant cavities. The integrated sensor enables measurement of the magnetization response of micron scale samples upon application of microwave fields. In particular, the combined measurement of the magnetization change and the microwave power under cw microwave irradiation of single crystal of molecular magnets is used to determine of the energy relaxation time of the molecular spin states. In addition, real-time measurements of the magnetization dynamics upon application of fast microwave pulses are demonstrated. PMID:18681725

  6. Heteroatom-containing organic electronic oligomers and polymers: Electron paramagnetic resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Keith Richard

    Conjugated conducting polymers are organic materials which can be chemically modified or "doped" to exhibit the property of electrical conduction normally seen only in inorganic materials such as metals. Polyaniline (PAN) is of interest due to the fact that it can be switched between conducting and non-conducting forms without changing its oxidation state. Polythiophene (PT) and polypyrrole (PPy) have a conjugated structure, only the heteroatom (sulfur (S) or nitrogen (N)) is not part of the conducting backbone. However, the morphology and optimal chain length of these polymers are still matters of controversy. In order to explore these issues, X-band (9.5 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) susceptibility (X) and linewidth measurements of the undoped and aqueously camphor sulfonic acid (HCSA)-doped tetramer, octamer, and hexadecamer (oligomers) of aniline, the hexafluorophosphate (PF 6)- and trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF3SO3)-doped polymers of 3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene (EDOT) and 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene (ProDOT), and the PF6-doped polymer of 3,4-propylenedioxypyrrole (ProDOP) were undertaken. The undoped oligomer systems exhibit a spin density of ˜1 spin per 500 2-ring repeat units. The doped systems have both Pauli- and Curie-like susceptibility with chiPauli ˜ 40 x 10-6 emu/mole 2-ring repeat units and a localized spin density (nCurie) of ˜1 spin per 50 2-ring repeat units. It also is observed that both the undoped and doped oligomer samples exhibit a decreasing EPR DeltaHPP linewidth with increasing temperature and length, implying increasing delocalization with increasing temperature (intrachain motion) and oligomer length (interchain motion). The aniline oligomer data are compared to results for the undoped and the doped state of PAN. The PT and PPy systems also exhibit both Pauli- and Curie-like susceptibilities. In contrast to the aniline oligomers, it also is observed that both the PT and PPy samples exhibit an increasing EPR Delta

  7. Reactive oxygen species' role in endothelial dysfunction by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassall, Cynthia D.

    The endothelium is a single layer of cells lining the arteries and is involved in many physiological reactions which are responsible for vascular tone. Free radicals are important participants in these chemical reactions in the endothelium. Here we quantify free radicals, ex vivo, in biological tissue with continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In all of the experiments in this thesis, we use a novel EPR spin trapping technique that has been developed for tissue segments. EPR spin trapping is often considered the 'gold standard' in reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection because of its sensitivity and non-invasive nature. In all experiments, tissue was placed in physiological saline solution with 190-mM PBN (N-tert -butyl-α-phenylnitrone), 10% by volume dimethyl-sulphoxide (DMSO) for cryopreservation, and incubated in the dark for between 30 minutes up to 2 hours at 37°C while gently being stirred. Tissue and supernatant were then loaded into a syringe and frozen at -80°C until EPR analysis. In our experiments, the EPR spectra were normalized with respect to tissue volume. Conducting experiments at liquid nitrogen temperature leads to some experimental advantages. The freezing of the spin adducts renders them stable over a longer period, which allows ample time to analyze tissue samples for ROS. The dielectric constant of ice is greatly reduced over its liquid counterpart; this property of water enables larger sample volumes to be inserted into the EPR cavity without overloading it and leads to enhanced signal detection. Due to Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, the population difference goes up as the temperature goes down, so this phenomenon enhances the signal intensity as well. With the 'gold standard' assertion in mind, we investigated whether slicing tissue to assay ROS that is commonly used in fluorescence experiments will show more free radical generation than tissue of a similar volume that remains unsliced. Sliced tissue exhibited a 76

  8. Reactive oxygen species' role in endothelial dysfunction by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassall, Cynthia D.

    The endothelium is a single layer of cells lining the arteries and is involved in many physiological reactions which are responsible for vascular tone. Free radicals are important participants in these chemical reactions in the endothelium. Here we quantify free radicals, ex vivo, in biological tissue with continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In all of the experiments in this thesis, we use a novel EPR spin trapping technique that has been developed for tissue segments. EPR spin trapping is often considered the 'gold standard' in reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection because of its sensitivity and non-invasive nature. In all experiments, tissue was placed in physiological saline solution with 190-mM PBN (N-tert -butyl-α-phenylnitrone), 10% by volume dimethyl-sulphoxide (DMSO) for cryopreservation, and incubated in the dark for between 30 minutes up to 2 hours at 37°C while gently being stirred. Tissue and supernatant were then loaded into a syringe and frozen at -80°C until EPR analysis. In our experiments, the EPR spectra were normalized with respect to tissue volume. Conducting experiments at liquid nitrogen temperature leads to some experimental advantages. The freezing of the spin adducts renders them stable over a longer period, which allows ample time to analyze tissue samples for ROS. The dielectric constant of ice is greatly reduced over its liquid counterpart; this property of water enables larger sample volumes to be inserted into the EPR cavity without overloading it and leads to enhanced signal detection. Due to Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, the population difference goes up as the temperature goes down, so this phenomenon enhances the signal intensity as well. With the 'gold standard' assertion in mind, we investigated whether slicing tissue to assay ROS that is commonly used in fluorescence experiments will show more free radical generation than tissue of a similar volume that remains unsliced. Sliced tissue exhibited a 76

  9. Resonant Nanophotonic Spectrum Splitting for Ultrathin Multijunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach to spectrum splitting for photovoltaics that utilizes the resonant optical properties of nanostructures for simultaneous voltage enhancement and spatial separation of different colors of light. Using metal–insulator–metal resonators commonly used in broadband metamaterial absorbers we show theoretically that output voltages can be enhanced significantly compared to single-junction devices. However, the approach is general and works for any type of resonator with a large absorption cross section. Due to its resonant nature, the spectrum splitting occurs within only a fraction of the wavelength, as opposed to traditional spectrum splitting methods, where many wavelengths are required. Combining nanophotonic spectrum splitting with other nanophotonic approaches to voltage enhancements, such as angle restriction and concentration, may lead to highly efficient but deeply subwavelength photovoltaic devices. PMID:26322319

  10. The g-tensor of the flavin cofactor in (6-4) photolyase: a 360 GHz/12.8 T electron paramagnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, A.; Kay, C. W. M.; Schleicher, E.; Hitomi, K.; Todo, T.; Möbius, K.; Weber, S.

    2006-05-01

    The g-tensor of the neutral radical form of the flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor FADH• of (6-4) photolyase from Xenopus laevis has been determined by very high-magnetic-field/high-microwave-frequency electron-paramagnetic resonance (EPR) performed at 360 GHz/12.8 T. Due to the high spectral resolution the anisotropy of the g-tensor could be fully resolved in the frozen-solution continuous-wave EPR spectrum. By least square fittings of spectral simulations to experimental data, the principal values of the g-tensor have been established: gX = 2.00433(5), gY = 2.00368(5), gZ = 2.00218(7). A comparison of very high-field EPR data and proton and deuteron electron-nuclear double resonance measurements yielded precise information concerning the orientation of the g-tensor with respect to the molecular frame. This data allowed a comparison to be made between the principal values of the g-tensors of the FADH• cofactors of photolyases involved in the repair of two different DNA lesions: the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and the (6-4) photoproduct. It was found that gX and gZ are similar in both enzymes, whereas the gY component is slightly larger in (6-4) photolyase. This result clearly shows the sensitivity of the g-tensor to subtle differences in the protein environment experienced by the flavin.

  11. Applications of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to study interactions of iron proteins in cells with nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammack, R.; Shergill, J. K.; Ananda Inalsingh, V.; Hughes, Martin N.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide and species derived from it have a wide range of biological functions. Some applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy are reviewed, for observing nitrosyl species in biological systems. Nitrite has long been used as a food preservative owing to its bacteriostatic effect on spoilage bacteria. Nitrosyl complexes such as sodium nitroprusside, which are added experimentally as NO-generators, themselves produce paramagnetic nitrosyl species, which may be seen by EPR. We have used this to observe the effects of nitroprusside on clostridial cells. After growth in the presence of sublethal concentrations of nitroprusside, the cells show they have been converted into other, presumably less toxic, nitrosyl complexes such as (RS) 2Fe(NO) 2. Nitric oxide is cytotoxic, partly due to its effects on mitochondria. This is exploited in the destruction of cancer cells by the immune system. The targets include iron-sulfur proteins. It appears that species derived from nitric oxide such as peroxynitrite may be responsible. Addition of peroxynitrite to mitochondria led to depletion of the EPR-detectable iron-sulfur clusters. Paramagnetic complexes are formed in vivo from hemoglobin, in conditions such as experimental endotoxic shock. This has been used to follow the course of production of NO by macrophages. We have examined the effects of suppression of NO synthase using biopterin antagonists. Another method is to use an injected NO-trapping agent, Fe-diethyldithiocarbamate (Fe-DETC) to detect accumulated NO by EPR. In this way we have observed the effects of depletion of serum arginine by arginase. In brains from victims of Parkinson's disease, a nitrosyl species, identified as nitrosyl hemoglobin, has been observed in substantia nigra. This is an indication for the involvement of nitric oxide or a derived species in the damage to this organ.

  12. Design and implementation of an FPGA-based timing pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance applications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Savory, Joshua J.; Warncke, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The design, construction and implementation of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) -based pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments is described. The FPGA pulse programmer offers advantages in design flexibility and cost over previous pulse programmers, that are based on commercial digital delay generators, logic pattern generators, and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designs. The FPGA pulse progammer features a novel transition-based algorithm and command protocol, that is optimized for the timing structure required for most pulsed magnetic resonance experiments. The algorithm was implemented by using a Spartan-6 FPGA (Xilinx), which provides an easily accessible and cost effective solution for FPGA interfacing. An auxiliary board was designed for the FPGA-instrument interface, which buffers the FPGA outputs for increased power consumption and capacitive load requirements. Device specifications include: Nanosecond pulse formation (transition edge rise/fall times, ≤3 ns), low jitter (≤150 ps), large number of channels (16 implemented; 48 available), and long pulse duration (no limit). The hardware and software for the device were designed for facile reconfiguration to match user experimental requirements and constraints. Operation of the device is demonstrated and benchmarked by applications to 1-D electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and 2-D hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) experiments. The FPGA approach is transferrable to applications in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR; magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), and to pulse perturbation and detection bandwidths in spectroscopies up through the optical range. PMID:25076864

  13. Design and implementation of an FPGA-based timing pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Savory, Joshua J; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-08-01

    The design, construction and implementation of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) -based pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments is described. The FPGA pulse programmer offers advantages in design flexibility and cost over previous pulse programmers, that are based on commercial digital delay generators, logic pattern generators, and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designs. The FPGA pulse progammer features a novel transition-based algorithm and command protocol, that is optimized for the timing structure required for most pulsed magnetic resonance experiments. The algorithm was implemented by using a Spartan-6 FPGA (Xilinx), which provides an easily accessible and cost effective solution for FPGA interfacing. An auxiliary board was designed for the FPGA-instrument interface, which buffers the FPGA outputs for increased power consumption and capacitive load requirements. Device specifications include: Nanosecond pulse formation (transition edge rise/fall times, ≤3 ns), low jitter (≤150 ps), large number of channels (16 implemented; 48 available), and long pulse duration (no limit). The hardware and software for the device were designed for facile reconfiguration to match user experimental requirements and constraints. Operation of the device is demonstrated and benchmarked by applications to 1-D electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and 2-D hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) experiments. The FPGA approach is transferrable to applications in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR; magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), and to pulse perturbation and detection bandwidths in spectroscopies up through the optical range. PMID:25076864

  14. Investigation of the generation of singlet oxygen in ensembles of photoexcited silicon nanocrystals by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinova, E. A. Demin, V. A.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2008-09-15

    The generation of singlet oxygen is investigated and its concentration upon photoexcitation of silicon nanocrystals in porous silicon layers is determined using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The relaxation times of spin centers, i.e., silicon dangling bonds, in vacuum and in an oxygen atmosphere in the dark and under illumination of the samples are measured for the first time. It is revealed that the spin-lattice relaxation in porous silicon is retarded as compared to that in a single-crystal substrate. From analyzing experimental data, a microscopic model is proposed for interaction of oxygen molecules in the triplet state and spin centers at the surface of silicon nanocrystals. The results obtained have demonstrated that porous silicon holds promise for the use as a photosensitizer of molecular oxygen in biomedical applications.

  15. Determination of S-nitrosothiols in biological and clinical samples using electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry with spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Winyard, Paul G; Knight, Iona A; Shaw, Frances L; Rocks, Sophie A; Davies, Claire A; Eggleton, Paul; Haigh, Richard; Whiteman, Matthew; Benjamin, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    S-Nitroso moieties, such as the S-nitroso group within S-nitrosated albumin, constitute a potential endogenous reservoir of nitric oxide (NO.) in human tissues and other biological systems. Moreover, S-nitroso compounds are under investigation as therapeutic agents in humans. Therefore, it is important to be able to detect S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) in human extracellular fluids, such as plasma and synovial fluid, as well as other biological samples. This chapter describes a method for the determination of S-nitrosothiols in biofluids. The method is based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry, in combination with spin trapping using a ferrous ion complex of the iron chelator N-methyl-d-glucamine dithiocarbamate under alkaline conditions. This iron complex mediates the decomposition of RSNO to NO., as well as spin trapping the generated NO.. The resulting spin adduct has a unique EPR signal that can be quantified. PMID:18554533

  16. In vivo pO2 imaging of tumors: Oxymetry with very low frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    For over a century it has been known that tumor hypoxia, regions of a tumor with low levels of oxygenation, are important contributors to tumor resistance to radiation therapy and failure of radiation treatment of cancer. Recently, using novel pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oxygen imaging, near absolute images of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in tumors of living animals have been obtained. We discuss here the means by which EPR signals can be obtained in living tissues and tumors. We review development of EPR methods to image the pO2 in tumors and the potential for the pO2 image acquisition in human subjects. PMID:26477263

  17. Fluorescence properties and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of {gamma}-irradiated Sm{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluoroborate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, B. Hari; Ravi Kanth Kumar, V. V.

    2012-11-01

    The permanent photoinduced valence manipulation of samarium doped oxyfluoroborate glasses as a function of {gamma}-ray irradiation has been investigated using a steady-state fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques. An increase in SrF{sub 2} content in the glass led to the red shift of the peaks in as prepared glass, while in irradiated glasses this led to the decrease in defect formation as well as increase in photoreduction of Sm{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 2+} ion. The energy transfer mechanism of induced permanent photoreduction of Sm{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 2+} ions in oxyfluoroborate glasses has been discussed. The decay analysis shows exponential behavior before irradiation and non-exponential behavior after irradiation. The energy transfer in irradiated glasses increases with the increase in SrF{sub 2} content in the glass and also with the irradiation dose.

  18. Comparative electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes with different chemical functionalities for quantum dot attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Chuyen V.; Krueger, Michael; Eck, Michael; Weber, Stefan; Erdem, Emre

    2014-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to different chemically treated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A narrow EPR signal is visible at g = 2.0029 in both GO and CNT-Oxide from carbon-related dangling bonds. EPR signals became broader and of lower intensity after oxygen-containing functionalities were reduced and partially transformed into thiol groups to obtain thiol-functionalized reduced GO (TrGO) and thiol-functionalized CNT (CNT-SH), respectively. Additionally, EPR investigation of CdSe quantum dot-TrGO hybrid material reveals complete quenching of the TrGO EPR signal due to direct chemical attachment and electronic coupling. Our work confirms that EPR is a suitable tool to detect spin density changes in different functionalized nanocarbon materials and can contribute to improved understanding of electronic coupling effects in nanocarbon-nanoparticle hybrid nano-composites promising for various electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  19. Experimental and theoretical Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) study on the temperature-dependent structural changes of methylsulfanylmethane.

    PubMed

    Tapramaz, Recep; Türkkan, Ercan; Dereli, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (or dimethyl sulfone), a naturally produced and vitally important organosulfur compound in living organisms, was irradiated with gamma rays, and the produced radicals were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy at different temperatures. The structure and behavior of the radical changed when the temperatures varied. The hyperfine splitting of the CH(3) group was small, and the (33)S splitting was relatively high between 80 and -50 °C. When the temperature was between -50 and -160 °C, the (33)S splitting became small and the CH(3) splitting was higher. However, the group kept rotating; therefore, only the isotropic splitting values were measured, and the g-values were anisotropic. When the temperature decreased below -180 °C, the CH(3) group stopped rotating, and the hydrogen splitting values became nonequivalent due to an inhomogeneous electron distribution. The observed structures can be explained by referring to both the experimental and theoretically calculated values reported. PMID:21954334

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral study of [Mn(acs)2(2-pic)2(H2O)2] single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocakoç, Mehpeyker; Tapramaz, Recep

    2016-03-01

    Acesulfame potassium salt is a synthetic and non-caloric sweetener. It is also important chemically for its capability of being ligand in coordination compounds, because it can bind over Nitrogen and Oxygen atoms of carbonyl and sulfonyl groups and ring oxygen. Some acesulfame containing transition metal ion complexes with mixed ligands exhibit solvato and thermo chromic properties and these properties make them physically important. In this work single crystals of Mn+2 ion complex with mixed ligand, [Mn(acs)2(2-pic)2(H2O)2], was studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR parameters were determined. Zero field splitting parameters indicated that the complex was highly symmetric. Variable temperature studies showed no detectable chance in spectra.

  1. Antioxidant activity of grape skin aqueous extracts from pressurized hot water extraction combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sťavíková, Lenka; Polovka, Martin; Hohnová, Barbora; Karásek, Pavel; Roth, Michal

    2011-09-30

    Pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) was employed to prepare extracts from dried grape skin of two wine grape varieties (St. Laurent and Alibernet) at various temperatures (from 40 up to 120°C) and amounts of sample (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 g). To assess the antioxidant activity of the extracts, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was applied involving DPPH and ABTS(+) assays. Other extract characteristics including HPLC profile of anthocyanins and total phenolic compound content were obtained as well. PHWE has also been compared with earlier results of extractions of the same grape skin samples with compressed methanol and compressed ethanol under the conditions of pressurized fluid extraction (PFE). From this comparison, PHWE emerges as the more benign and efficient extraction method to recover valuable phenolic antioxidants from grape skins for the prospective use in functional food supplements. PMID:21872083

  2. X-Band Rapid-Scan Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Radiation-Induced Defects in Tooth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhelin; Romanyukha, Alexander; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    X-band rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra from tooth enamel samples irradiated with doses of 0.5, 1 and 10 Gy had substantially improved signal-to-noise relative to conventional continuous wave EPR. The radiation-induced signal in 60 mg of a tooth enamel sample irradiated with a 0.5 Gy dose was readily characterized in spectra recorded with 34 min data acquisition times. The coefficient of variance of the calculated dose for a 1 Gy irradiated sample, based on simulation of the first-derivative spectra for three replicates as the sum of native and radiation-induced signals, was 3.9% for continuous wave and 0.4% for rapid scan. PMID:26207683

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} superconductor nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Erdem, Emre E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Acar, Selcuk; Kokal, Ilkin; Häßler, Wolfgang

    2015-04-21

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbon radicals were detected. A strong reduction in the critical temperature T{sub c} was observed due to defects and crystal distortion. The symmetry effect of the latter is also reflected on the vibrational modes in the Raman spectra.

  4. Electrical and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy characterization of Mn-doped nanostructured TiO2 for capacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Reina, Rafael; Chao, Sheng; Petrovsky, Vladimir; Dogan, Fatih; Greenbaum, Steven

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 has shown promise as a dielectric material for high energy density ceramic capacitors because of its high dielectric breakdown strength and dielectric constant. Strategies to increase the insulation resistance or to reduce the leakage current of TiO2 include doping with transition metal ions. It is shown that Mn doping followed by an appropriate thermal treatment increases the grain boundary resistivity significantly and lowers the dielectric loss. Electrical measurements along with electron paramagnetic resonance and scanning electron microscopy of Mn-doped nanoscopic TiO2 demonstrate that sintering at 900 °C leads to optimal electrical properties that are correlated with a non-uniform distribution of dopant ions, concentrated at the grain boundaries. Nanostructured TiO2 dielectrics with improved insulation resistance are promising for the development of higher energy density capacitors.

  5. Theoretical and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of hyperfine interaction in nitrogen doped 4H and 6H SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Szász, K.; Gali, A.

    2014-02-21

    Motivated by recent experimental findings on the hyperfine signal of nitrogen donor (N{sub C}) in 4 H and 6 H SiC, we calculate the hyperfine tensors within the framework of density functional theory. We find that there is negligible hyperfine coupling with {sup 29}Si isotopes when N{sub C} resides at h site both in 4 H and 6 H SiC. We observe measurable hyperfine coupling to a single {sup 29}Si at k site in 4 H SiC and k{sub 1} site in 6 H SiC. Our calculations unravel that such {sup 29}Si hyperfine coupling does not occur at k{sub 2} site in 6 H SiC. Our findings are well corroborated by our new electron paramagnetic resonance studies in nitrogen doped 6 H SiC.

  6. Copper doping of ZnO crystals by transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu: An electron paramagnetic resonance and gamma spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, M. C.; McClory, J. W. Holston, M. S.; Golden, E. M.; Giles, N. C.; Halliburton, L. E.

    2014-06-28

    Transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu has been observed in a ZnO crystal irradiated with neutrons. The crystal was characterized with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) before and after the irradiation and with gamma spectroscopy after the irradiation. Major features in the gamma spectrum of the neutron-irradiated crystal included the primary 1115.5 keV gamma ray from the {sup 65}Zn decay and the positron annihilation peak at 511 keV. Their presence confirmed the successful transmutation of {sup 64}Zn nuclei to {sup 65}Cu. Additional direct evidence for transmutation was obtained from the EPR of Cu{sup 2+} ions (where {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu hyperfine lines are easily resolved). A spectrum from isolated Cu{sup 2+} (3d{sup 9}) ions acquired after the neutron irradiation showed only hyperfine lines from {sup 65}Cu nuclei. The absence of {sup 63}Cu lines in this Cu{sup 2+} spectrum left no doubt that the observed {sup 65}Cu signals were due to transmuted {sup 65}Cu nuclei created as a result of the neutron irradiation. Small concentrations of copper, in the form of Cu{sup +}-H complexes, were inadvertently present in our as-grown ZnO crystal. These Cu{sup +}-H complexes are not affected by the neutron irradiation, but they dissociate when a crystal is heated to 900 °C. This behavior allowed EPR to distinguish between the copper initially in the crystal and the copper subsequently produced by the neutron irradiation. In addition to transmutation, a second major effect of the neutron irradiation was the formation of zinc and oxygen vacancies by displacement. These vacancies were observed with EPR.

  7. Determination of the metallic/semiconducting ratio in bulk single-wall carbon nanotube samples by cobalt porphyrin probe electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cambré, Sofie; Wenseleers, Wim; Goovaerts, Etienne; Resasco, Daniel E

    2010-11-23

    A simple and quantitative, self-calibrating spectroscopic technique for the determination of the ratio of metallic to semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a bulk sample is presented. The technique is based on the measurement of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the SWCNT sample to which cobalt(II)octaethylporphyrin (CoOEP) probe molecules have been added. This yields signals from both CoOEP molecules on metallic and on semiconducting tubes, which are easily distinguished and accurately characterized in this work. By applying this technique to a variety of SWCNT samples produced by different synthesis methods, it is shown that these signals for metallic and semiconducting tubes are independent of other factors such as tube length, defect density, and diameter, allowing the intensities of both signals for arbitrary samples to be retrieved by a straightforward least-squares regression. The technique is self-calibrating in that the EPR intensity can be directly related to the number of spins (number of CoOEP probe molecules), and as the adsorption of the CoOEP molecules is itself found to be unbiased toward metallic or semiconducting tubes, the measured intensities can be directly related to the mass percentage of metallic and semiconducting tubes in the bulk SWCNT sample. With the use of this method it was found that for some samples the metallic/semiconducting ratios strongly differed from the usual 1:2 ratio. PMID:20958073

  8. Effects of MnO doping on the electronic properties of zinc oxide: 406 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and Newman superposition model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksel Price, Berat; Hardal, Gökhan; Açıkgöz, Muhammed; Repp, Sergej; Erdem, Emre

    2015-11-01

    MnO-doped ZnO ceramics have been synthesized through the conventional ceramic processing route. Mn2+ ions have been incorporated into the ZnO lattice within the limits of solid solubility. By using X-band-frequency and high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we have resolved some of the main electronic transitions for the S = 5/2, I = 5/2 high-spin system and have determined accurately the EPR spin-Hamiltonian parameters. By combining data from crystallographic X-ray diffraction and EPR with the semi-empirical Newman superposition model, we have found the local configurational position of Mn2+ and have confirmed the symmetry of the lattice. The results presented in this contribution indicate that Mn ions substitute at Zn sites in ZnO. The effect of Mn2+ ions on the intrinsic defects becomes remarkable, thus the vacancy related intrinsic defect signals cannot be visible in the EPR spectrum. MnO doping affects the band gap energy of ZnO system which was confirmed via UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  9. The use of election paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in early preformulation experiments: the impact of different experimental formulations on the release of a lipophilic spin probe into gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Bittner, B; Isel, H; Mountfield, R J

    2001-03-01

    The lipophilic spin probe TEMPOL-benzoate was dissolved in different experimental formulations, including polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400), Miglyol, glycerol monooleate (GMO), and Cremophor RH-40. Samples were measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy before and after addition to human gastric juice. The distance between the first and the third peak in the EPR spectrum (2a(N)) was measured to monitor the polarity of the spin probe's microenvironment. Moreover, the ratio between the signal amplitudes of the second and the third peak (a/b ratio) was used to monitor the mobility of the spin probe in a certain formulation. Thus, by calculating 2a(N) and the a/b ratio of the EPR spectra it was possible to determine a potential release of the spin probe from different formulations into gastric juice. It was found that oily and surface-active vehicles (Miglyol, Cremophor RH-40, and GMO) were more suitable to protect a lipophilic compound from being released within a gastric environment than PEG 400. Our results demonstrate that EPR spectroscopy seems to be a promising tool in early preformulation experiments to monitor the release of spin probes from formulations of different nature. This kind of experiment can be of value for the optimization of exploratory formulations. PMID:11226824

  10. Detection of undistorted continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2011-01-01

    A continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum is typically displayed as the first harmonic response to the application of 100 kHz magnetic field modulation, which is used to enhance sensitivity by reducing the level of 1/f noise. However, magnetic field modulation of any amplitude causes spectral broadening and sacrifices EPR spectral intensity by at least a factor of two. In the work presented here, a CW rapid-scan spectroscopic technique that avoids these compromises and also provides a means of avoiding 1/f noise is developed. This technique, termed non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR, consists of repetitively sweeping the polarizing magnetic field in a linear manner over a spectral fragment with a small coil at a repetition rate that is sufficiently high that receiver noise, microwave phase noise, and environmental microphonics, each of which has 1/f characteristics, are overcome. Nevertheless, the rate of sweep is sufficiently slow that adiabatic responses are avoided and the spin system is always close to thermal equilibrium. The repetitively acquired spectra from the spectral fragment are averaged. Under these conditions, undistorted pure absorption spectra are obtained without broadening or loss of signal intensity. A digital filter such as a moving average is applied to remove high frequency noise, which is approximately equivalent in bandwidth to use of an integrating time constant in conventional field modulation with lock-in detection. Nitroxide spectra at L- and X-band are presented. PMID:21741868

  11. Effects of MnO doping on the electronic properties of zinc oxide: 406 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and Newman superposition model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yüksel Price, Berat E-mail: muhammed.acikgoz@eng.bahcesehir.edu.tr Hardal, Gökhan; Açıkgöz, Muhammed E-mail: muhammed.acikgoz@eng.bahcesehir.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej; Erdem, Emre E-mail: muhammed.acikgoz@eng.bahcesehir.edu.tr

    2015-11-07

    MnO-doped ZnO ceramics have been synthesized through the conventional ceramic processing route. Mn{sup 2+} ions have been incorporated into the ZnO lattice within the limits of solid solubility. By using X-band-frequency and high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we have resolved some of the main electronic transitions for the S = 5/2, I = 5/2 high-spin system and have determined accurately the EPR spin-Hamiltonian parameters. By combining data from crystallographic X-ray diffraction and EPR with the semi-empirical Newman superposition model, we have found the local configurational position of Mn{sup 2+} and have confirmed the symmetry of the lattice. The results presented in this contribution indicate that Mn ions substitute at Zn sites in ZnO. The effect of Mn{sup 2+} ions on the intrinsic defects becomes remarkable, thus the vacancy related intrinsic defect signals cannot be visible in the EPR spectrum. MnO doping affects the band gap energy of ZnO system which was confirmed via UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  12. An improved approach to identify irradiated dog feed by electron paramagnetic resonance study and thermoluminescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Chawla, S. P.; Sharma, Arun

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, probably for the first time, a detailed analysis of the radiation induced radical species and thermoluminescence measurements of irradiated dog feed are reported. The EPR spectrum of non-irradiated ready-to-eat dog feed was characterized by singlet g=2.0047±0.0003. Irradiated samples exhibited a complex EPR spectrum. During high power (50.0 mW) EPR spectroscopy, a visible change in the shape of the EPR spectrum was observed and characterized by EPR spectrum simulation technique. An axially symmetric anisotropic signal with g║=2.0028 and g┴=1.9976 was identified. However, a negligible change in the matrix of irradiated edible dog chew was observed using EPR spectroscopy. Therefore, thermoluminescence study of the isolated minerals from dog chew was carried out. The composition of the poly-minerals was studied using SEM and EDX analysis and a complete verdict on identification of irradiation is proposed.

  13. Nucleon-antinucleon resonance spectrum in a potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, M.; Loiseau, B.; Moussallam, B.; Mau, R. Vinh

    1984-05-01

    We investigate the spectrum of antinucleon-nucleon resonances, using an optical potential we derived recently. An effective method to compute the S-matrix poles is presented. The corresponding phase shifts do not behave as ordinary resonances in the Argand diagram. We show, however, that the poles can be located by extrapolating the phase shifts with the aid of polynomial fits. The annihilation part of our potential is state and energy dependent and of short range. It yields a richer spectrum than that given by a longer ranged annihilation model.

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of gamma-irradiated DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Başkan, M Halim; Aydın, Murat

    2013-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of gamma irradiated powders of DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride were investigated at room temperature. The observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOC2H5, -CH2ĊHCOOH and -CH2ĊHCOOCH3 radicals, respectively. Hyperfine structure constants and g-values were determined for these three radicals. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning the possible structure of the radicals were also discussed. PMID:23680512

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of gamma-irradiated DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başkan, M. Halim; Aydın, Murat

    2013-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of gamma irradiated powders of DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride were investigated at room temperature. The observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOC2H5, -CH2ĊHCOOH and -CH2ĊHCOOCH3 radicals, respectively. Hyperfine structure constants and g-values were determined for these three radicals. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning the possible structure of the radicals were also discussed.

  16. Structural resonances in the Raman spectrum of glass microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-You; Xu, Xiao xuan; Zhang, Cun zhou

    2000-10-01

    Structural resonances have been found in the Raman spectrum of an optically levitated TiBa glass microsphere. The observed resonances could be assigned by using the well-known Lorenz-Mie Formalism. It was found that the diameter of the TiBa glass microsphere is 24.490micrometers , and the refractive index of TiBa glass is 1.895 at about 645nm.

  17. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Elementary Theory and Practical Applications, Second Edition (John A. Weil and James R. Bolton)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ffrancon

    2009-01-01

    The detection of electron magnetic resonance by Zavoiskii in the mid 1940s (1) ushered in a golden age of physical and chemical applications. Perhaps no single book did more to stimulate this development of EPR spectroscopy than the classic text by Wertz and Bolton (2) , which appeared in 1972. A revised version, with John A. Weil added as a co-author, was published by Wiley in 1994. This 2007 text is formally described as the second edition of the 1994 version. Wertz died shortly after the publication of the 1994 edition leaving Weil and Bolton as authors. In noting that the senior author (JAW) takes most of the responsibility for the content of this 2007 version, the Preface refers to it at one point as the "third edition", which of course is precisely how older readers will regard it. The main thrust of the book is decidedly on the physical aspects of EPR, so that it nicely complements the more chemical emphasis provided in the recent comprehensive text by Gerson and Hüber (3) . As the authors remark, the 2007 edition does not differ dramatically from the 1994 version. The titles of the 13 chapters remain the same except for chapter 11, which now refers to the "Noncontinuous" instead of the "Time-Dependent" Excitation of Spins. Recent developments are generally accommodated by a few extra pages in each chapter. Thus, chapter 1 on Basic Principles of Paramagnetic Resonance has been expanded from 31 to 36 pages to introduce the topics of parallel-field EPR, time-resolved EPR, "computerology", and EPR imaging. Chapter 2 on Magnetic Interactions is essentially unchanged while chapter 3 on Isotropic Hyperfine Effects has been expanded to include new sections on Deviations from the Simple Multinomial Scheme (3.7) and Some Interesting π-Type Free Radicals (3.9). Section 3.9 provides a useful corrective to the notion that the EPR method can detect and characterize almost any type of radical species. This welcome touch of realism is nicely illustrated by mentioning

  18. Characterisation and evaluation of paramagnetic fluorine labelled glycol chitosan conjugates for (19)F and (1)H magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Elena; Harvey, Peter; Chalmers, Kirsten H; Mishra, Anurag; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Wilson, J Ian; Botta, Mauro; Fekete, Marianna; Blamire, Andrew M; Parker, David

    2014-02-01

    Medium molecular weight glycol chitosan conjugates have been prepared, linked by an amide bond to paramagnetic Gd(III), Ho(III) and Dy(III) macrocyclic complexes in which a trifluoromethyl reporter group is located 6.5 Å from the paramagnetic centre. The faster relaxation of the observed nucleus allows modified pulse sequences to be used with shorter acquisition times. The polydisperse materials have been characterised by gel permeation chromatography, revealing an average molecular weight on the order of 13,800 (Gd), 14,600 (Dy) and 16,200 (Ho), consistent with the presence of 8.5, 9.5 and 13 complexes, respectively. The gadolinium conjugate was prepared for both a q = 1 monoamide tricarboxylate conjugate (r1p 11.2 mM(-1) s(-1), 310 K, 1.4 T) and a q = 0 triphosphinate system, and conventional contrast-enhanced proton MRI studies at 7 T were undertaken in mice bearing an HT-29 or an HCT-116 colorectal tumour xenograft (17 μmol/kg). Enhanced contrast was observed following injection in the tail vein in tumour tissue, with uptake also evident in the liver and kidney with a tumour-to-liver ratio of 2:1 at 13 min, and large amounts in the kidney and bladder consistent with predominant renal clearance. Parallel experiments observing the (19)F resonance in the holmium conjugate complex using a surface coil did not succeed owing to its high R2 value (750 Hz, 7 T). However, the fluorine signal in the dysprosium triphosphinate chitosan conjugate [R1/R2 = 0.6 and R1 = 145 Hz (7 T)] was sharper and could be observed in vivo at -65.7 ppm, following intravenous tail vein injection of a dose of 34 μmol/kg. PMID:23955558

  19. Identifying the Constituents of and Transformations in Diatomaceous Earth and Polysiloxane Foams Through the Use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Michael; Muenchausen, Ross; Bennett, Bryan; Smith, James; Stephens, Thomas; Cooke, Wayne

    2007-03-01

    The chemical aging of polymeric materials is largely governed by the characteristics of the storage environment. For polysiloxane foams, the diatomaceous earth (DE) filler is a small component of the foam, but it plays a large role in the handling of water in the system. The DE filler can act as either a ``source'' or a ``sink'' for water via both chemical hydroxylation/ dehydroxylation and physical adsorption/ desorption processes, depending on the processing history and storage conditions. We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to examine composite foam material as well as the DE filler alone. Intense, broad (400 Gauss) resonances were recorded at room temperature as a function of the microwave power at X-band frequency. The observed spectra have been assigned to the iron oxide compounds goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, and magnetite based upon the measured EPR spectra of these minerals. As the presence or absence of free H2O and the temperature of processing and storage also affects the interconversion of these various iron oxides, we indicate how this process can be followed by monitoring changes in the EPR spectra.

  20. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  1. One-dimensional quantum antiferromagnetism in the p -orbital CsO2 compound revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaflič, Tilen; Klanjšek, Martin; Sans, Annette; Adler, Peter; Jansen, Martin; Felser, Claudia; Arčon, Denis

    2015-05-01

    Recently, it was proposed that the orbital ordering of πx,y * molecular orbitals in the superoxide CsO2 compound leads to the formation of spin-1/2 chains below the structural phase transition occurring at Ts 1=61 K on cooling. Here we report a detailed X -band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of this phase in CsO2 powder. The EPR signal appears as a broad line below Ts 1, which is replaced by the antiferromagnetic resonance below the Néel temperature TN=8.3 K . The temperature dependence of the EPR linewidth between Ts 1 and TN agrees with the predictions for the one-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain of S =1 /2 spins in the presence of symmetric anisotropic exchange interaction. Complementary analysis of the EPR line shape, linewidth, and the signal intensity within the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) framework allows for a determination of the TLL exponent K =0.48 . Present EPR data thus fully comply with the quantum antiferromagnetic state of spin-1/2 chains in the orbitally ordered phase of CsO2, which is therefore a unique p -orbital system where such a state could be studied.

  2. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously-a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK. PMID:26133831

  3. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance, optical absorption and Raman spectral studies on a pyrite/chalcopyrite mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayabhaskar Reddy, G.; Seshamaheswaramma, K.; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2012-10-01

    Pyrite and chalcopyrite mineral samples from Mangampet barite mine, Kadapa, Andhra Pradesh, India are used in the present study. XRD data indicate that the pyrite mineral has a face centered cubic lattice structure with lattice constant 5.4179 Å. Also it possesses an average particle size of 91.9 nm. An EPR study on the powdered samples confirms the presence of iron in pyrite and iron and Mn(II) in chalcopyrite. The optical absorption spectrum of chalcopyrite indicates presence of copper which is in a distorted octahedral environment. NIR results confirm the presence of water fundamentals and Raman spectrum reveals the presence of water and sulfate ions.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Cr3+ ions in ABO3 (A = Sc, Lu, In) diamagnetic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorotynov, A. M.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Rudenko, V. V.; Vorotynova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    A magnetic resonance method is applied to the investigation of a number of isostructural diamagnetic compounds ABO3 (A = Sc, Lu, In) with small additions of Cr3+ ions ( S = 3/2) sufficient to observe single-ion spectra. It is shown that the resonance spectra for isolated Cr3+ ions can be described to a good accuracy by the ordinary axial spin Hamiltonian for 3 d ions in octahedral oxygen environment. The parameters of the spin Hamiltonian are determined. It is established that Cr3+ ions in these crystals are characterized by easy-axis-type anisotropy.

  6. An electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation of the retention mechanisms of Mn and Cu in the nanopore channels of three zeolite minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Daniel R.; Schulthess, Cristian P.; Amonette, James E.; Walter, Eric D.

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption mechanisms of divalent cations in zeolite nanopore channels can vary as a function of their pore dimensions. The nanopore inner-sphere enhancement (NISE) theory predicts that ions may dehydrate inside small nanopore channels in order to adsorb more closely to the mineral surface if the nanopore channel is sufficiently small. The results of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy study of Mn and Cu adsorption on the zeolite minerals zeolite Y (large nanopores), ZSM-5 (intermediate nanopores), and mordenite (small nanopores) are presented. The Cu and Mn cations both adsorbed via an outer-sphere mechanism on zeolite Y based on the similarity between the adsorbed spectra and the aqueous spectra. Conversely, Mn and Cu adsorbed via an inner-sphere mechanism on mordenite based on spectrum asymmetry and peak broadening of the adsorbed spectra. However, Mn adsorbed via an outer-sphere mechanism on ZSM-5, whereas Cu adsorbed on ZSM-5 shows a high degree of surface interaction that indicates that it is adsorbed closer to the mineral surface. Evidence of dehydration and immobility was more readily evident in the spectrum of mordenite than ZSM-5, indicating that Cu was not as close to the surface on ZSM-5 as it was when adsorbed on mordenite. Divalent Mn cations are strongly hydrated and are held strongly only in zeolites with small nanopore channels. Divalent Cu cations are also strongly hydrated, but can dehydrate more easily, presumably due to the Jahn-Teller effect, and are held strongly in zeolites with medium sized nanopore channels or smaller.

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Elementary Theory and Practical Applications, Second Edition (John A. Weil and James R. Bolton)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ffrancon

    2009-01-01

    The detection of electron magnetic resonance by Zavoiskii in the mid 1940s (1) ushered in a golden age of physical and chemical applications. Perhaps no single book did more to stimulate this development of EPR spectroscopy than the classic text by Wertz and Bolton (2) , which appeared in 1972. A revised version, with John A. Weil added as a co-author, was published by Wiley in 1994. This 2007 text is formally described as the second edition of the 1994 version. Wertz died shortly after the publication of the 1994 edition leaving Weil and Bolton as authors. In noting that the senior author (JAW) takes most of the responsibility for the content of this 2007 version, the Preface refers to it at one point as the "third edition", which of course is precisely how older readers will regard it. The main thrust of the book is decidedly on the physical aspects of EPR, so that it nicely complements the more chemical emphasis provided in the recent comprehensive text by Gerson and Hüber (3) . As the authors remark, the 2007 edition does not differ dramatically from the 1994 version. The titles of the 13 chapters remain the same except for chapter 11, which now refers to the "Noncontinuous" instead of the "Time-Dependent" Excitation of Spins. Recent developments are generally accommodated by a few extra pages in each chapter. Thus, chapter 1 on Basic Principles of Paramagnetic Resonance has been expanded from 31 to 36 pages to introduce the topics of parallel-field EPR, time-resolved EPR, "computerology", and EPR imaging. Chapter 2 on Magnetic Interactions is essentially unchanged while chapter 3 on Isotropic Hyperfine Effects has been expanded to include new sections on Deviations from the Simple Multinomial Scheme (3.7) and Some Interesting π-Type Free Radicals (3.9). Section 3.9 provides a useful corrective to the notion that the EPR method can detect and characterize almost any type of radical species. This welcome touch of realism is nicely illustrated by mentioning

  8. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: a tool for in situ detection, imaging and dating of biosignatures in primitive organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourier, D.; Binet, L.; Vezin, H.

    2012-04-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and imaging are based on the interaction of a microwave electromagnetic field (typically in the GHz range) with electron spins in presence of an external magnetic field. Contrary to UV-visible and Infrared light, microwave radiation can penetrate in most non conducting materials, so that EPR is sensitive to the bulk (and not to the surface) of samples. All the paramagnetic defects, impurities, point defects in the mineral matrix, radicals in carbonaceous matter of an ancient rock can be detected by this technique. As the most ancient traces of life, as old as 3.5 Gy, are recorded as carbonaceous microstructures in siliceous sedimentary structures (cherts), the radical defects of these microstructures can be probed in situ without sample preparation. By using continuous-wave EPR, the fossilized carbonaceous matter can be mapped at the sub-millimeter scale (EPR imaging)[1], and can be dated with respect to the host rock (evolution of the EPR lineshape)[2]. Thus this method could be used for contamination detection (endolithic bacteria, infiltration etc…). By using pulsed-EPR spectroscopy (instead of continuous wave), nuclear magnetic transitions of elements in and around radicals can be detected with a high resolution and sensitivity. We show that specific nuclear transitions for hydrogen (1H and 2D) and 13C (and other nuclei such as 29Si and 31P) can be identified in extraterrestrial carbonaceous matter (meteorites) and in Precambrian and younger cherts. These pulsed techniques provide molecular scale biosignatures for primitive life detection and internal probes to study the history of organic matter in the early solar system [3,4]. Paramagnetic biosignatures are not limited to the organic component of cherts. Specific EPR biosignatures of metal ions can be detected in biominerals such as MnO2 [5] or in molecular V4+ complexes [6]. EPR is thus a potential technique for the search of primitive life on Earth and

  9. Paramagnetic resonance of LaGaO3: Mn single crystals grown by floating zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhenin, V. A.; Potapov, A. P.; Artyomov, M. Yu.; Salosin, M. A.; Fokin, A. V.; Gil'mutdinov, I. F.; Mukhamedshin, I. R.

    2016-02-01

    The EPR spectrum of Mn-doped lanthanum gallate single crystals grown by floating zone melting with optical heating has been studied. In contrast to the crystals grown according to the Czochralski method, no manganese is found in these crystals even after high-temperature annealing in air. The spectral characteristics of Fe3+ and Gd3+ centers in crystals prepared by various methods have been compared in the rhombohedral phase, and the fourth-rank nondiagonal parameters of the Fe3+ trigonal centers have been determined, as well.

  10. Simultaneous electrochemical and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of carotenoid cation radicals and dications

    SciTech Connect

    Khaled, M.; Hadjipetrou, A.; Kispert, L.D. ); Allendoerfer, R.D. )

    1991-03-21

    Comproportionation equilibrium constants have been determined from simultaneous electrochemical and EPR measurements for the carotenoid cation radicals (CAR{sup {sm bullet}+}) and dications (CAR {sup 2+}) of {beta}-carotene (1), {beta}-apo-8{prime}-carotenal (2), and canthaxanthin (3). K(1){sub com} = 2.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}2}, K{sub com}(2) = 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}2}, K{sub com}(3) = 2.1 {times} 10{sup 3}. These indicated that, upon oxidation of 3, 96% CAR{sup {sm bullet}+} would be formed while 99.7% CAR{sup 2+} would be formed for 1 and 2 if the oxidation potential was 100 mV anodic of the first observed voltammetric wave. This explains the reason for the strong EPR spectrum observed for 3 and the weak EPR spectra observed for 1 and 2. Rotating disk experiments confirm that oxidation of carotenoids occurs by an EE rather than by an ECE mechanism and are highly quasireversible systems. The second oxidation peak in the CV spectrum of 2 has been shown not to be due to a dication analogous to the CV of 3 but to a radical apparently from the oxidation of a decay product of the dication from 2.