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Sample records for parameters effective radiating

  1. Theoretical study of ionization radiation effects on optical fiber parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poret, Jay C.; Suter, Joseph J.

    1994-06-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on various fiber parameters has been examined. It was demonstrated that when the real refractive index increases, the V number increases as does the numerical aperture. The percentage of power propagating in the cladding decreases with increasing real refractive index. Small changes in the refractive index will induce additional modes to form. The effect of radiation on fiber dispersion was reasoned to be negligible for short lengths of fibers (< 2 km).

  2. Fundamental radiation effects parameters in metals and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1998-03-01

    Useful information on defect production and migration can be obtained from examination of the fluence-dependent defect densities in irradiated materials, particularly when a transition from linear to sublinear accumulation is observed. Further work is needed on several intriguing reported radiation effects in metals. The supralinear defect cluster accumulation regime in thin foil irradiated metals needs further experimental confirmation, and the physical mechanisms responsible for its presence need to be established. Radiation hardening and the associated reduction in strain hardening capacity in FCC metals is a serious concern for structural materials. In general, the loss of strain hardening capacity is associated with dislocation channeling, which occurs when a high density of small defect clusters are produced (stainless steel irradiated near room temperature is a notable exception). Detailed investigations of the effect of defect cluster density and other physical parameters such as stacking fault energy on dislocation channeling are needed. Although it is clearly established that radiation hardening depends on the grain size (radiation-modified Hall-Petch effect), further work is needed to identify the physical mechanisms. In addition, there is a need for improved hardening superposition models when a range of different obstacle strengths are present. Due to a lack of information on point defect diffusivities and the increased complexity of radiation effects in ceramics compared to metals, many fundamental radiation effects parameters in ceramics have yet to be determined. Optical spectroscopy data suggest that the oxygen monovacancy and freely migrating interstitial fraction in fission neutron irradiated MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are {approximately}10% of the NRT displacement value. Ionization induced diffusion can strongly influence microstructural evolution in ceramics. Therefore, fundamental data on ceramics obtained from highly ionizing radiation sources

  3. Alternative Physical Quality Parameters Influences Effectiveness of Lower Doses Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, Abubaker Ali; Bahari, Ismail Bin; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi

    2011-03-01

    It has been proved in many studied that the absorbed dose is not good physical quality parameter to quantify the radiation effects at lower doses. However relative biological effect (RBE) is still used as a major parameter of radiation effectiveness. Whereas linear energy transfer (LET) is inadequate physical parameter, therefore the weaknesses in using RBE-LET system for radiation protection have been investigated. Secondary data of V79 has reanalyzed to help complement the inadequacy current method in assessing cell inactivation at lower doses. Results of analysis show that the effectiveness of densely ionizing radiation is better quantified using mean free path (λ).

  4. The effect of neutron radiation on the photoelectric parameters of ITO-GaSe structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalyuk, Z. D. Litovchenko, P. G.; Politanska, O. A.; Sydor, O. N.; Katerynchuk, V. N.; Lastovetsky, V. F.; Litovchenko, O. P.; Dubovoy, V. K.; Polivtsev, L. A.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of 1-MeV neutrons on the photoelectric parameters of ITO-GaSe heterostructures was studied. It is shown that the observed variations in the current-voltage characteristics are caused by the effect of penetrating radiation on both components of the structure, which brings about an increase in the resistance of the heterostructures. The presence of exciton fine structure in the photosensitivity spectra after irradiation indicates that GaSe retains high structural quality notwithstanding the introduced radiation defects. The results obtained are accounted for by spatial redistribution of doping impurity in GaSe and structural changes in the ITO films.

  5. Effect of radiation and thermal treatment on structural and transport parameters for cellulose regenerated membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Váquez, M. I.; Galán, P.; Casado, J.; Ariza, M. J.; Benavente, J.

    2004-11-01

    Modifications caused by different types of ionizing radiation and thermal treatment on transport, chemical and structural parameters of polymeric (regenerated cellulose) membranes have been studied. Particularly, the effect of different types of radiation (ultraviolet light (UV) and ionising radiation (Ir) with different doses) and heating at 60 °C on transport and electrical parameters for a cellophane membrane has been considered by determining salt permeability and electrical resistance for the different samples. These parameters were obtained from salt diffusion and impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements with the membranes in contact with NaCl solutions at different concentrations. Chemical surface and structural modifications of the polymer matrix due to the treatments have also been determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (ATR mode). Results obtained from infrared spectroscopy seem to indicate that ionising radiation modifies the proportion of OH links, which is related to the dose of irradiation. XPS analysis only shows small differences in the atomic concentration and shape of the C 1s spectra. On the other hand, an increase of salt permeability for heated and UV-treated membranes was obtained, while this parameter decreases in the case of irradiated membranes. This result could be related to a change in the packing of the polymer chains, which results in an increase of the fractional void volume in the case of heat- and UV-treated membranes and the opposite effect for the irradiated ones; for these latter, a correlation between the irradiation dose and the decrease in permeability values was also obtained. IS results show a decrease in the electrical resistance of all treated samples. This fact can be due to the most open structure of heated and UV-treated samples, previously indicated; however, due to the closer structure assumed for the irradiated sample, this point might be related to the presence of free

  6. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly α-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  7. Incident Wire Array Z-pinch Plasma Radiation Fluence Effects on the Filter Material Property & Implications on the Observed Radiation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. K.; Thornhill, J.; Velikovich, A.; Giuliani, J.; Davis, J.; Clark, R.; Ampleford, D.; Coverdale, C.; Jones, B.

    2010-11-01

    The wire array Z-pinches on the refurb. Z are marked by an intense bright emission of high energy non-LTE photons. In order to diagnose the radiation in such a hostile environment, a number of materials w/ varying composition are used to provide select optimized radiation filtering. Traditionally, the various radiation parameters are determined from the deconvolution of the actual observed values using an appropriate time invariant filter response function (FRF). Under exposure to the radiation, however, the materials may undergo significant changes. We examine the response of various filters to an intense radiation from the plasmas. A MHD+multifreq. rad. x-port code is employed to establish the time varying non-LTE radiation & to investigate the evolution of the materials subject to the field. A characterization of the material EOS/FRF is made & their effect on the radiation characteristics are quantified w/ a goal of optimized filter design/deployment.

  8. Effect of extreme radiation fluences on parameters of SiC nuclear particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. M. Lebedev, A. A.; Strokan, N. B.

    2006-10-15

    Detectors based on modern CVD-grown films were irradiated with 8 MeV protons at a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. The concentration of primary radiation defects was {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, which is three orders of magnitude higher than the concentration of the initially present uncompensated donors. The resulting deep compensation of SiC enabled measurements of detector parameters in two modes: under reverse and forward bias. The basic parameters of the detectors degraded by no more than a factor of 1.7, compared with the fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. However, there appeared a polarization voltage, which indicates that a space charge is accumulated by radiation defects.

  9. Effects of Solar Particle Event Proton Radiation on Parameters Related to Ferret Emesis

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, J. K.; Wan, X. S.; Krigsfeld, G. S.; King, G. L.; Miller, A.; Mick, R.; Gridley, D. S.; Wroe, A. J.; Rightnar, S.; Dolney, D.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of simulated solar particle event (SPE) proton radiation to induce retching and vomiting was evaluated in the ferret experimental animal model. The endpoints measured in the study included: (1) the fraction of animals that retched or vomited, (2) the number of retches or vomits observed, (3) the latency period before the first retch or vomit and (4) the duration between the first and last retching or vomiting events. The results demonstrated that γ ray and proton irradiation delivered at a high dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min induced dose-dependent changes in the endpoints related to retching and vomiting. The minimum radiation doses required to induce statistically significant changes in retching- and vomiting-related endpoints were 0.75 and 1.0 Gy, respectively, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton radiation at the high dose rate did not significantly differ from 1. Similar but less consistent and smaller changes in the retching- and vomiting-related endpoints were observed for groups irradiated with γ rays and protons delivered at a low dose rate of 0.5 Gy/h. Since this low dose rate is similar to a radiation dose rate expected during a SPE, these results suggest that the risk of SPE radiation-induced vomiting is low and may reach statistical significance only when the radiation dose reaches 1 Gy or higher. PMID:23883319

  10. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Respiratory Function Tests and Blood Parameters in Radiology Staff

    PubMed Central

    Saygin, M; Yasar, S; Kayan, M; Balci, UG; Öngel, K

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate pulmonary function tests and blood parameters and their relationship with sociodemographic data for radiology staff continuously exposed to ionizing radiation. Subjects and Method: Thirty-eight personnel from Suleyman Demirel University Training and Research Hospital, Radiology Unit, were included in this study. Sociodemographic data were evaluated by a questionnare that was developed by the researchers. Height and weight measurements were performed with a standard scale and meter. Routine blood parameters and spirometric lung function measurements of the cases were recorded. Statistical significances were determined by independent t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), bivariate correlation and Kruskal-Wallis tests using SPSS 18.0. Results: The mean age was 32.42 ± 5.5 years; 19 patients (50%) were male and 19 patients (50%) were female. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as 25.68 ± 0.47 for men and 24.58 ± 1.13 for women. Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF) and maximum mid-expiratory flow (FEF25-75) showed statistically significant differences between gender (p < 0.01). In addition, FEV1 and FEF25-75 also demonstrated statistically negatively significant difference with the type of task (p < 0.05). A statistically significant negative difference was found between FEF25-75 value and time to start smoking (p < 0.05). Among FVC, FEV1, PEF and FEF25-75 values and alcohol usage, statistically significant positive difference was detected (p < 0.05). Statistically significant positive difference was found among FVC, PEF and FEF25-75 values and sports activity (p < 0.05). According to BMI groups, statistically significant positive difference with FVC, FEV1 and PEF values were found (p < 0.05). Statistically significant correlations were found among FVC value and haemoglobin level (Hgb), haematocrit level (Hct) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV), among FEV1 value and Hgb, MCV, among

  11. Effects of gamma radiation on Clostridium botulinum type E under various parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Y.H.

    1986-01-01

    Spores of Clostridium botulinum type E strain Eklund (Eklund) was irradiated with gamma radiation and its recovery was tested on the tryptone-peptone-glucose-yeast extract-agar (TPGYA) containing various levels of NaCl and Na-thioglycollate. The presence of 0.5% or more NaCl in the media decreased the viable counts, while Na-thioglycollate of up to 0.15% did not affect the recovery of both irradiated and non-irradiated spores. Eklund spores were also irradiated under air (21% O/sub 2/), N/sub 2/O and N/sub 2/, with or without the additive of one of the following agents (additive/concentration): disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), 0.01 M; t-butanol, 0.1 M; NaCl, 0.01 M; catalyze, 10 mg/ml and DL-cysteine, 0.1 mM. Radiation process was most effective in destroying the spores when carried out under air (21% O/sub 2/), followed by N/sub 2/O and N/sub 2/. Among the additives tested, EDTA was the most efficient protector followed by t-butanol when irradiation process was carried under N/sub 2/O and N/sub 2/ gas environment. Catalase and DL-cysteine sensitized the spores when irradiated under N/sub 2/O and N/sub 2/, while NaCl only sensitized under N/sub 2/. Spores kept frozen at -75/sup 0/C for 30 days but thawed prior to irradiation were more sensitive to radiation damage than freshly prepared spores. Radiation resistance of the spores increased when 15% glycerol was added to the phosphate bugger (0.06 M, pH 7.0) and used as suspending media. When the concentration of the spore increased from 10/sup 6//ml to 10/sup 11//ml, the radiosensitivities also increased. Seven strains of C. botulinum type E were screened for plasmids by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  12. Vital parameters related low level laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Capone, Stefania

    2011-08-01

    The first work hypotesis is that biosensors on the patient detecting heart, breath rate and skin parameters, modulate laser radiation to enhance the therapeutic outcome; in the second work hypotesis: biofeedback could be effective, when integrated in the low level laser energy release.

  13. Effect of gamma radiation on the growth, survival, hematology and histological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae.

    PubMed

    Oujifard, Amin; Amiri, Roghayeh; Shahhosseini, Gholamreza; Davoodi, Reza; Moghaddam, Jamshid Amiri

    2015-08-01

    Effects of low (1, 2.5 and 5Gy) and high doses (10, 20 and 40Gy) of gamma radiation were examined on the growth, survival, blood parameters and morphological changes of the intestines of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae (103±20mg) after 12 weeks of exposure. Negative effects of gamma radiation on growth and survival were observed as radiation level and time increased. Changes were well documented at 10 and 20Gy. All the fish were dead at the dose of 40Gy. In all the treatments, levels of red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (HB) were significantly (P<0.05) declined as the irradiation levels increased, whereas the amount of mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) did not change. No significant differences (P>0.05) were found in the levels of white blood cells (WBC), lymphocytes and monocytes. Destruction of the intestinal epithelium cells was indicated as the irradiation levels increased to 1Gy and above. The highest levels of growth, survival, specific growth rate (SGR), condition factor (CF) and protein efficiency rate (PER) were obtained in the control treatment. The results showed that gamma rays can be a potential means for damaging rainbow trout cells. PMID:26141584

  14. Effects of Calendula Essential Oil-Based Cream on Biochemical Parameters of Skin of Albino Rats against Ultraviolet B Radiation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arun K; Mishra, Amrita; Verma, Anurag; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from UV-B radiation have the capacity to cause oxidative decomposition which leads to the formation of toxic components as well as lipid peroxidation. Considering this fact, the present study was performed to evaluate the effect of a cream (O/W) containing the essential oil of Calendula officinalis on biochemical parameters of the skin of albino rats against UV-B radiation. The fingerprint analysis of Calendula essential oil was performed by HPLC with special reference to 1,8-cineole and α-pinene. The results indicated that the treatment with creams containing 4% and 5% of Calendula essential oil caused a significant decrease in the malonyldialdehyde level, whereas the levels of catalase, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, ascorbic acid, and the total protein level were significantly increased after 1 month of daily irradiation and treatment when compared to untreated control groups. The results suggest that the cutaneous application of the essential oil of Calendula prevents UV-B-induced alterations in the level of antioxidants in skin tissue. PMID:23008814

  15. Radiation Parameters of Some Potential Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Zeynep; Tugrak, Mehtap; Dastan, Aysenur; Gul, Halise Inci; Yilmaz, Demet

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the radiation parameters of some potential bioactive compounds. 1-Aryl-3-dibenzylamino-propane-1-on hydrochloride type Mannich bases were synthesized via classical conventional heating method. Aryl part was changed as phenyl (C6H5), 4-methylphenyl (4-CH3C6H4), 4-fluorophenyl ( 4-FC6H4), 4-nitrophenyl (4-NO2C6H4), 4-chlorophenyl (4-ClC6H4), 4-bromophenyl (4-BrC6H4), and 2-thienyl (C4H3S-2-yl). Mass attenuation coefficient (μm), effective atomic number (Z(eff)) and effective electron density (N(el)) of compounds were determined experimentally and theoretically for at 8.040, 8.910, 13.40, 14.96, 17.48, 19.61, 22.16, 24.94, 32.19, 36.38, 44.48, 50.38 and 59.54 keV photon energies by using an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182 eV at 5.9 keV. Radiation parameters of these compounds which can be anti-cancer drug candidate were given in the tables. The results show that phenyl ring behave like thiophene ring in terms of radiation absorption. It is thought that the results of study may drive allow the development of drug candidate new compounds in medical oncology. PMID:26601355

  16. Effects of gamma radiation on the biological, physico-chemical, nutritional and antioxidant parameters of chestnuts - a review.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Amilcar L; Carocho, Márcio; Bento, Albino; Quintana, Begoña; Luisa Botelho, M; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-09-01

    Gamma radiation has been used as a post-harvest food preservation process for many years. Chestnuts are a seasonal product consumed fresh or processed, and gamma irradiation emerged recently as a possible alternative technology for their post-harvest processing, to fulfil the requirements of international phytosanitary trade laws. After harvest and storage, several problems may occur, such as the presence of infestations and development of microorganisms, namely rotting and fungi. These diminish the quality and safety of the product, decreasing the yield along the production chain. In fruits, gamma irradiation treatment is for two main purposes: conservation (ripening delay) and insect disinfestation (phytosanitary treatment). In this review, the application of gamma irradiation to chestnuts is discussed, including production data, the irradiated species and the effects on biological (sprouting, rotting, respiration rate, insects, worms and fungi), physico-chemical (color, texture, and drying rate), nutritional (energetic value, proteins, sugars and fatty acids) and antioxidant (tocopherols, ascorbic acid, phenolics, flavonoids and antioxidant activity) parameters. These changes are the basis for detecting if the food product has been irradiated or not. The validation of standards used for detection of food irradiation, as applied to chestnuts, is also discussed. PMID:22735498

  17. Chemical Effect on K Shell X-ray Fluorescence Parameters and Radiative Auger Ratios of Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz, Erhan; Bıyıklıoğlu, Zekeriya; Küp Aylıkcı, Nuray; Aylıkcı, Volkan; Apaydın, Gökhan; Tıraşoğlu, Engin; Kantekin, Halit

    2010-04-01

    The production cross-sections, intensity ratios, and radiative Auger intensity ratios of Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn elements in different complexes were measured. The chemical effects on the K shell fluorescence parameters and the radiative Auger intensity ratios of these elements were investigated and the changes in these parameters were interpreted according to the charge transfer process. The samples were excited by 59.5 keV γ-rays from a 241Am annular radioactive source. K X-rays emitted by samples were counted by an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV.

  18. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  19. Influence of late radiation effects on the immunological parameters of aging. Final technical report, September 1977-August 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Makinodan, T.

    1983-01-01

    A series of tests of immunologic function were used in assessing the immune status of individuals who survived the atomic bombs in Japan in 1945. A-bomb survivors (n=189) residing in the US were recruited to participate in the study. Survivors exposed to varying low doses of radiation (S/sub +/ group) had healthier immune responses than those exposed to O rads (S/sub 0/ group). The difference was significant for natural cytotoxicity (p = .028). Less striking differences with the same trend (i.e., S/sub +/ healthier than S/sub 0/) were observed with: the mixed lymphocyte reactions, mitogenic response to PHA, interferon production, serum interferon levels (all S/sub +/ > S/sub 0/), frequency of detectable immune complexes, rheumatoid factor, and antimitochondrial antibodies (all S/sub +/ > S/sub 0/). In order to study the Japanese A-bomb survivors, a collaborative study was initiated with the Radiation Research Effects Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan. Immunologic tests were performed on blood samples from 278 individuals including 202 survivors of whom approximately one-third each were exposed to 0, 1-99, and 100+ rads at the time of the bomb. A decrease in immune responses was observed with increasing exposure. It is interesting that, consistent with our findings on the American survivors, the Japanese survivors exposed to 1-9 rads showed a small increase in natural cytotoxicity compared to the group exposed to 0 rads. Females showed a stronger dose-related decline than males (who may have shown a slight increase) with natural cytotoxicity, and both groups showed a small effect with interleukin 2 production. With both tests males were higher than females. Natural cytotoxicity increased significantly with age, as did serum immune complex levels. In the pilot study of the murine model for plasmacytoma formation, it was shown that age and radiation may both predispose to plasmacytoma formation. 22 references, 5 tables.

  20. Modification on liquid retention property of cassava starch by radiation grafting with acrylonitrile. I. Effect of γ-irradiation on grafting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiatkamjornwong, S.; Chvajarernpun, J.; Nakason, C.

    1993-07-01

    Radiation modification on liquid retention properties of native cassava starch, gelatinized at 85°C, by graft copolymerization with acrylonitrile was carried out by mutual irradiation to gamma-rays. A thin aluminum foil was used to cover the inner wall of the reaction vessel, so that the homopolymer concentration was reduced to be less than 1.0% with a distilled water retention value of 665 g/g of the dry weight of the saponified grafted product. Confirmation of graft copolymerization and saponification reactions was made by the infrared spectrophotometric technique. The combined effect of radiation parameters in terms of an irradiation time and a dose rate to the total dose on the extent of the grafting reaction expressed in terms of grafting parameters which directly influenced liquid retention values was evaluated in conjunction with statistical analysis.

  1. Analysis of radiation parameters to control the effects of Nd:YAG laser surgery on gastric malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo-Fernández, M. L.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Hernández-González, A.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic laser surgery provides an advantageous alternative to Argon Plasma Coagulation, endoscopic tweezers or electro-ablation in gastroenterology that facilitates a selective ablation of stomach tumors with an additional hemostatic effect in the surrounding tissue. This coagulation effect can also be employed for the treatment of gastric ulcers. It is mandatory to control the laser parameters regardless of the desired effect, either cancerous tissue ablation or coagulation to prevent ulcerous bleeding, in order to avoid stomach wall perforation or an insufficient therapeutic outcome. Dosimetric models constitute an attractive tool to determine the proper light dose in order to offer a customized therapy planning that optimizes the treatment results. In this work, a model for Nd:YAG laser surgery is applied to predict both the coagulation zone in gastric ulcers and the removal in adenocarcinomas under different laser setups. Results show clear differences in the effective zone of the gastric malignancy affected by both coagulation and ablation. Therefore the current model could be employed in the clinical practice to plan the optimal laser beam parameters to treat a certain type of pathologic stomach tissue with variable morphology and without risk of perforation or undertreated parts.

  2. Gamma radiation effects on physico-chemical parameters of apple fruit during commercial post-harvest preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Hossein Ahari; Mirmajlessi, Seyed Mahyar; Mirjalili, Seyed Mohammad; Fathollahi, Hadi; Askari, Hadi

    2012-06-01

    The physico-chemical parameters (including moisture, total soluble solids, antioxidant activity, phenolic content and firmness) of cv. Red Delicious apple subjected to γ radiation were evaluated for their ability to avoid the post-harvest blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum during cold storage. Freshly harvested apples were inoculated with P. expansum. Treated fruits were irradiated at doses of 0, 300, 600, 900 and 1200 Gy and stored at 1 °C. Apples were evaluated at three month intervals. The results showed that there was a clear link between phenolic content and antioxidant activity, so that dose range of 900 Gy and higher significantly decreased phenolic content and antioxidant activity. The moisture percent of stored apples was more responsive to irradiation (at doses of 900-1200 Gy) than storage time and pathogen. Lesion diameter of pathogen-treated non-irradiated apples was significantly increased after three months. This means that storage at low temperature is not enough to avoid blue mold growth. As dose and storage time increased firmness decreased; also pathogen accelerated softening of stored apples. This study showed conclusively that low irradiation doses (300 and 600 Gy) combined with cold storage is a way to minimize apple quality losses during nine month storage period.

  3. Effect of Left Versus Right Radial Artery Approach for Coronary Angiography on Radiation Parameters in Patients With Predictors of Transradial Access Failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Binita; Burdowski, Joseph; Guo, Yu; Velez de Villa, Bryan; Huynh, Andrew; Farid, Meena; Maini, Mansi; Serrano-Gomez, Claudia; Staniloae, Cezar; Feit, Frederick; Attubato, Michael J; Slater, James; Coppola, John

    2016-08-15

    Left transradial approach (TRA) for coronary angiography is associated with lower radiation parameters than right TRA in an all-comers population. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of left versus right TRA on radiation parameters in patients with predictors of TRA failure. Patients with predictors of TRA failure (≥3 of 4 following criteria: age ≥70 years, female gender, height ≤64 inches, and hypertension) referred to TRA operators were randomized to either right (n = 50) or left (n = 50) TRA, whereas those referred to transfemoral approach (TFA) operators were enrolled in a prospective registry (n = 50). The primary end point was the radiation measure of dose-area product (DAP). In an intention-to-treat analysis, DAP (34.1 Gy·cm(2) [24.9 to 45.6] vs 41.9 Gy·cm(2) [27.3 to 58.0], p = 0.08), fluoroscopy time (3.7 minutes [2.4 to 6.3] vs 5.6 minutes [3.1 to 8.7], p = 0.07), and operator radiation exposure (516 μR [275 to 967] vs 730 μR [503 to 1,165], p = 0.06) were not significantly different between left and right TRA, but total dose (411 mGy [310 to 592] vs 537 mGy [368 to 780], p = 0.03) was significantly lower with left versus right TRA. Radiation parameters were lowest in the TFA cohort (DAP 24.5 Gy·cm(2) [15.7 to 33.2], p <0.001; fluoroscopy time 2.3 minutes [1.5 to 3.7], p <0.001; operator radiation exposure 387 μR [264 to 557]; total dose 345 mGy [250 to 468], p = 0.001). Results were similar after adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics. In conclusion, median measurements of radiation were overall not significantly different between left versus right TRA in this select population of patients with predictors of TRA failure. All measurements of radiation were lowest in the TFA group. PMID:27328954

  4. Integrated effect of gamma radiation and biocontrol agent on quality parameters of apple fruit: An innovative commercial preservation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahari Mostafavi, Hossein; Mahyar Mirmajlessi, Seyed; Fathollahi, Hadi; Shahbazi, Samira; Mohammad Mirjalili, Seyed

    2013-10-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation and biocontrol agent (Pseudomonas fluorescens) on the physico-chemical parameters (including moisture, total soluble solids, antioxidant activity, phenolic content and firmness) of cv. Golden Delicious apples were investigated for their ability to avoid the post-harvest blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum during cold storage. Freshly harvested apples were inoculated with P. expansum. Treated fruits were irradiated at doses of 0, 200, 400, 600 and 800 Gy and then inoculated with P. fluorescens suspension. Samples were evaluated at 3 month intervals. The results demonstrated a clear link between antioxidant activity and phenolic content, so that dose range of 200-400 Gy significantly increased phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Effect of P. fluorescens was similar to irradiation at 200 and 400 Gy that could prevent lesion diameter in pathogen-treated apples. As dose and storage time increased firmness decreased but, combination of P. fluorescens as well as irradiation (at 200-400 Gy) could decrease softening apple fruits during storage. In all parameters, P. fluorescens (as biocontrol agent) inhibited P. expansum similar to irradiation at 200-400 Gy. So, integrated treatment of irradiation and biocontrol agent explored the potential dual benefit of low doses (200 and 400 Gy) as a suitable method to sustain physico-chemical quality and conclusively reduce apple fruits losses during post-harvest preservation.

  5. The effects of UV-B radiation intensity on biochemical parameters and active ingredients in flowers of Qi chrysanthemum and Huai chrysanthemum.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiao-Qin; Chu, Jian-Zhou; He, Xue-Li; Si, Chao

    2014-01-01

    The article studied UV-B effects on biochemical parameters and active ingredients in flowers of Qi chrysanthemum and Huai chrysanthemum during the bud stage. The experiment included four UV-B radiation levels (CK, ambient UV-B; T1, T2 and T3 indicated a 5%, 10% and 15% increase in ambient UV-BBE, respectively) to determine the optimal UV-B radiation intensity in regulating active ingredients level in flowers of two chrysanthemum varieties. Flower dry weight of two cultivars was not affected by UV-B radiation under experimental conditions reported here. UV-B treatments significantly increased the rate of superoxide radical production, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (except for T1) and malondialdehyde concentration in flowers of Huai chrysanthemum and H2O2 concentration in flowers of Qi chrysanthemum. T2 and T3 treatments induced a significant increase in phenylalanine ammonia lyase enzyme (PAL) activity, anthocyanins, proline, ascorbic acid, chlorogenic acid and flavone content in flowers of two chrysanthemum varieties, and there were no significant differences in PAL activity, ascorbic acid, flavone and chlorogenic acid content between the two treatments. These results indicated that appropriate UV-B radiation intensity did not result in the decrease in flower yield, and could regulate PAL activity and increase active ingredients content in flowers of two chrysanthemum varieties. PMID:25112378

  6. The effect of high energy (HZE) particle radiation (Ar-40) on aging parameters of mouse hippocampus and retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Corbett, R.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Sapp, W.; Miquel, J.; Lindseth, K. A.; Benton, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Eight month old C57BL6 mice were exposed (head only) to 0.5 rad or 50 rads of Argon particles at the Lawrence Berkeley Radiation Facility, CA. Neuromotor performance was assessed monthly for six months beginning twelve weeks post-irradiation using a 'string test'. The decline in motor performance was dose-related and none of the animals was able to complete the task after four months of testing. Morphological changes were monitored six and twelve months post-irradiation by light and electron microscopy. The synaptic density in the CA-1 area of the hippocampus decreased six and twelve months after irradiation. The decrease after twelve months was less than after six months. The width of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the retina increased with increasing dose. The number of blood vessels between the ONL and the ganglion layer decreased twelve months after irradiation and this area did not show significant accumulation of age pigment.

  7. Effect of high energy (HZE) particle radiation (40Ar) on aging parameters of mouse hippocampus and retina

    SciTech Connect

    Philpott, D.E.; Sapp, W.; Miquel, J.; Kato, K.; Corbett, R.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Lindseth, K.A.; Benton, E.V.

    1985-01-01

    Eight month old C57BL6 mice were exposed (head only) to 0.5 rad or 50 rads of Argon particles at the Lawrence Berkeley Radiation Facility, CA. Neuromotor performance was assessed monthly for six months beginning twelve weeks post-irradiation using a string test. The decline in motor performance was dose-related and none of the animals was able to complete the task after four months of testing. Morphological changes were monitored six and twelve months post-irradiation by light and electron microscopy. The synaptic density in the CA-1 area of the hippocampus decreased six and twelve months after irradiation. The decrease after twelve months was less than after six months. The width of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the retina increased with increasing dose. The number of blood vessels between the ONL and the ganglion layer decreased twelve months after irradiation and this area did not show significant accumulation of age pigment.

  8. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented. (ACR)

  9. Kinetic parameters of uracil dosimeter in simulated extraterrestrial UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, G.; Gróf, P.; Bérces, A.; Patel, M. R.; Lammer, H.; Rontó, Gy.

    Studies of the solar UV environment on Earth 2.0 Gyr to 3.8 Gyr ago suggest that the terrestrial atmosphere was essentially anoxic, resulting in an ozone column abundance insufficient for protecting the planetary surface in the UV-B (280 nm - 315 nm) and the UV-C (200 nm - 280 nm) ranges. Since, short wavelength solar UV radiation in the UV-B and UV-C range penetrated through the atmosphere to the unprotected early Earth's surface, associated biological consequences may be expected. We discuss experimental data obtained as follows: Radiation sources applied were solar simulator and high power deuterium lamp, the wavelength were adjusted by interference filters (210, 230, 250 nm) and the irradiances were measured by OL754 spectroradiometer. The photo-reverse effect depends highly on the wavelength of the exposed radiation. Shorter wavelength UV radiation of about 200 nm is strongly effective in monomerization, while the longer wavelengths prefer the production of dimerization. In case of polychromatic light, like in space or on a planetary surface which is unprotected by an ozone layer the two processes run parallel. We could demonstrate experimentally, for the case of a uracil thin-layer that the photo-reaction process of the nucleotides can be both dimerization and the reverse process: monomerization. These results are important for the study of solar UV effects on organisms in the early terrestrial environment as well as for the search for life on Mars since we can show that biological harmful effects can also be reduced by shorter wavelength UV radiation, which is of importance in reducing DNA damages provoked by wavelengths longer than about 240 nm. Our earlier results showed that dimerization of the pyrimidin base uracil can be described by a first order kinetics, and this reaction gives the possibility to determine the dose of the UV source applied. This work is a theoretical and experimental approach to the relevant parameters of the first order kinetics.

  10. Gravitational Stokes parameters. [for electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anile, A. M.; Breuer, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The electromagnetic and gravitational Stokes parameters are defined in the general theory of relativity. The general-relativistic equation of radiative transfer for polarized radiation is then derived in terms of the Stokes parameters for both high-frequency electromagnetic and gravitational waves. The concept of Stokes parameters is generalized for the most general class of metric theories of gravity, where six (instead of two) independent states of polarization are present.

  11. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiation test data submitted by many testers is collated to serve as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. Total dose damage information and single event upset cross sections, i.e., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup) are presented.

  13. Radiation: Doses, Effects, Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lean, Geoffrey, Ed.

    Few scientific issues arouse as much public controversy as the effects of radiation. This booklet is an attempt to summarize what is known about radiation and provide a basis for further discussion and debate. The first four chapters of the booklet are based on the most recent reports to the United Nations' General Assembly by the United Nations…

  14. [Genetic effects of radiation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a short review of genetic effect of radiation. This includes methods and results of a large-scale genetic study on specific loci in mice and of various studies in the offspring of atomic-bomb survivors. As for the latter, there is no results obtained which suggest the effect of parental exposure to radiation. Further, in recent years, studies are conducted to the offspring born to parents who were survivors of childhood cancers. In several reports, the mean gonad dose is quite large whereas in most instances, the results do not indicate genetic effect following parental exposure to radiation. Possible reasons for the difficulties in detecting genetic effect of radiation are discussed. PMID:22514926

  15. Radiation Effects In Space

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Ram K.

    2011-06-01

    Protecting space missions from severe exposures from radiation, in general, and long duration/deep space human missions, in particular, is a critical design driver, and could be a limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues and microelectronic devices. One is required to know how every element (and all isotopes of each element) in the periodic table interacts and fragments on every other element in the same table as a function of kinetic energy ranging over many decades. In addition, the accuracy of the input information and database, in general and nuclear data in particular, impacts radiation exposure health assessments and payload penalty. After a brief review of effects of space radiation on materials and electronics, human space missions to Mars is discussed.

  16. Radiation effects in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, R. J. M.

    The radiation protection guidelines of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are under review by Scientific Committe 75 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. The re-evaluation of the current guidelines is necessary, first, because of the increase in information about radiation risks since 1970 when the original recommendations were made and second, the population at risk has changed. For example, women have joined the ranks of the astronauts. Two types of radiation, protons and heavy ions, are of particular concern in space. Unfortunately, there is less information about the effects on tissues and the induction of cancer by these radiations than by other radiations. The choice of Quality Factors (Q) for obtaining dose equivalents for these radiations, is an important aspect of the risk estimate for space travel. There are not sufficient data for the induction of late effects by either protons or by heavy ions. The current information suggests a RBE for the relative protons of about 1, whereas, -a RBE of 20 for tumor induction by heavy ions, such as iron-56, appears appropriate. The recommendations for the dose equivalent career limits for skin and the lens of the eye have been reduced but the 30-day and annual limits have been raised.

  17. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This databank is the collation of radiation test data submitted by many testers and serves as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. It contains radiation sensitivity results from ground tests and is divided into two sections. Section A lists total dose damage information, and section B lists single event upset cross sections, I.E., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup).

  18. Radiation effects in space.

    PubMed

    Fry, R J

    1986-01-01

    The radiation protection guidelines of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are under review by Scientific Committee 75 of the National Council Protection and Measurements. The re-evaluation of the current guidelines is necessary, first, because of the increase in information about radiation risks since 1970 when the original recommendations were made and second, the population at risk has changed. For example, women have joined the ranks of the astronauts. Two types of radiation, protons and heavy ions, are of particular concern in space. Unfortunately, there is less information about the effects on tissues and cancer by these radiations than by other radiations. The choice of Quality Factors (Q) for obtaining dose equivalents for these radiations, is an important aspect of the risk estimate for space travel. There are not sufficient data for the induction of late effects by either protons or by heavy ions. The current information suggests a RBE for the relative protons of about 1, whereas, a RBE of 20 for tumor induction by heavy ions, such as iron-56, appears appropriate. The recommendations for the dose equivalent career limits for skin and the lens of the eye have been reduced but the 30-day and annual limits have been raised. PMID:11537230

  19. Analysis of the selected optical parameters of filters protecting against hazardous infrared radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Owczarek, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyses the selected optical parameters of protective optic filters used for protection of the eyes against hazardous radiation within the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectrum range. The indexes characterizing transmission and reflection of optic radiation incident on the filter are compared. As it follows from the completed analysis, the newly developed interference filters provide more effective blocking of infrared radiation in comparison with the currently used protective filters. PMID:26327153

  20. Analysis of the selected optical parameters of filters protecting against hazardous infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Owczarek, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    The paper analyses the selected optical parameters of protective optic filters used for protection of the eyes against hazardous radiation within the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectrum range. The indexes characterizing transmission and reflection of optic radiation incident on the filter are compared. As it follows from the completed analysis, the newly developed interference filters provide more effective blocking of infrared radiation in comparison with the currently used protective filters. PMID:26327153

  1. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  2. Semi-empirical determination of radiative parameters for Ag II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruczkowski, J.; Elantkowska, M.; Dembczyński, J.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the values of radiative parameters for Ag II by means of a semi-empirical method. The calculated values of oscillator strengths and lifetimes are, in majority of cases, in a very good agreement with accurate experimental data. Our calculation procedures allowed us to obtain the values of transition integrals and predict the values of oscillator strengths for the transitions in a wide spectral range and radiative lifetimes for excited levels. Moreover, the predicted values will be useful when the experimental values are not known.

  3. Measurement of parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodke, A. D.; Husain, Riyasat; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Surendra; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2012-10-15

    The paper presents the measurement of optics parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, which include betatron tune, beta function, dispersion function, natural chromaticity, corrected chromaticity, central RF frequency, momentum compaction factor, and linear betatron coupling. Two methods were used for beta function measurement; a conventional quadrupole scan method and a method using the fitting of the orbit response matrix. A robust Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for nonlinear least square fitting of the orbit response matrix. In this paper, detailed methods for the parameter measurements are described. The measured results are discussed and compared with the theoretical values obtained using accelerator simulation code Accelerator Toolbox in MATLAB.

  4. Effects of radiation on carbapenems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe, Semra; Polat, Mustafa; Korkmaz, Mustafa

    In the present work, effects of gamma radiation on solid meropenem trihydrate (MPT), which is the active ingredient of carbapenem antibiotics, were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiated MPT presents an ESR spectrum consisting of many resonance peaks. Heights measured with respect to the spectrum baseline of these resonance peaks were used to explore the evolutions of the radicalic species responsible for the experimental spectrum under different conditions. Variations of the denoted 11 peak heights with microwave power, sample temperature and applied radiation doses and decay of the involved radicalic species at room and at high temperatures were studied. On the basis of the results derived from these studies, a molecular model consisting of the presence of four different radicalic species was proposed, and spectroscopic parameters of these species were calculated through spectrum simulation calculations. The dosimetric potential of MPT was also explored and it was concluded that MPT presents the characteristics of normal and accidental dosimetric materials.

  5. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  6. Thorium-232 in human tissues: Metabolic parameters and radiation doses

    SciTech Connect

    Stehney, A.F.

    1994-09-01

    Higher than environmental levels of {sup 232}Th have been found in autopsy samples of lungs and other organs from four former employees of a Th refinery. Working periods of the subjects ranged from 3 to 24 years, and times from end of work to death ranged from 6 to 31 years. Concentrations of {sup 232}Th in these samples and in tissues from two cases of non-occupational exposure were examined for compatibility with dosimetric models in Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICPP 1979a). The concentrations of {sup 232}Th in the lungs of the Th workers relative to the concentrations in bone or liver were much higher than calculated from the model for class Y aerosols of Th and the exposure histories of the subjects, and concentrations in the pulmonary lymph nodes were much lower than calculated for three of the Th workers and both non-occupational cases. Least-squares fits to the measured concentrations showed that the biological half-times of Th in liver, spleen, and kidneys are similar to the half-time in bone instead of the factor of 10 less suggested in Publication 30, and the fractions translocated from body fluids were found to be about 0.03, 0.02, and 0.005, respectively, when the fraction to bone was held at the suggested value of 0.7. Fitted values of the respiratory parameters differed significantly between cases and the differences were ascribable to aerosol differences. Average inhalation rates calculated for individual Th workers ranged from 50 to 110 Bq {sup 232}Th y{sup {minus}1}, and dose equivalents as high as 9.3 Sv to the lungs, 2.0 Sv to bone surfaces, and 1.1 Sv effective dose equivalent were calculated from the inhalation rates and fitted values of the metabolic parameters. The radiation doses were about the same when calculated from parameter values fitted with an assumed translocation fraction of 0.2 from body fluids to bone instead of 0.7.

  7. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  8. Ionization Parameter: A Diagnostic of Radiation Pressure Dominated HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry; Matzner, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    When irradiation is sufficiently intense, the structure of an HII region will be dominated by radiation pressure and stellar winds, rather than ionized gas pressure. This state is of considerable interest because of its role in the formation of massive stars, the disruption of giant molecular clouds, and the evolution of starburst galaxies. We discuss the usefulness of the ionization parameter U, as often derived from observed line ratios between species which exist only in ionized gas, as a diagnostic for the radiation pressure-dominated state. In ionization-bounded directions, U cannot exceed a maximum value Umax determined by equilibrium between radiation and gas pressure forces. Lower values of U will occur, however, when the pressure of shocked stellar winds is significant, or when neutral gas is broken into clumps with sufficiently small radii of curvature. Applying these considerations to a prominent ionized shell around 30 Doradus and to the inner starburst region of M82, along with Cloudy simulations, we conclude that both are dominated by a combination of radiation pressure and shocked winds.

  9. On equilibrium parameters of a radiation-compression model pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    Up to date, the micropinch effect in high-current axially symmetric electric discharges was the subject of extensive theoretical and experimental research. The radiation compression mechanism proved to fit the experimental data better than any other model. It assumes the pinch equilibrium to occur when the surface radiation emission replaces the surface emission mode. The aim of the present work is to show that a quasi-stationary pinch state can exist in the case of an optically thin plasma as well. 8 figs.

  10. Precision Measurement of the Undulator K Parameter using Spontaneous Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.; Arthur, J.; Emma, P.; Hastings, J.B.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.D.; Stefan, P.; Bionta, R.M.; Dejus, R.J.; Yang, B.X.; /Argonne

    2007-04-17

    Obtaining precise values of the undulator parameter, K, is critical for producing high-gain FEL radiation. At the LCLS [1], where the FEL wavelength reaches down to 1.5 {angstrom}, the relative precision of K must satisfy ({Delta}K/K){sub rms} {approx}< 0.015% over the full length of the undulator. Transverse misalignments, construction errors, radiation damage, and temperature variations all contribute to errors in the mean K values among the undulator segments. It is therefore important to develop some means to measure relative K values, after installation and alignment. We propose a method using the angle-integrated spontaneous radiation spectrum of two nearby undulator segments, and the natural shot-to-shot energy jitter of the electron beam. Simulation of this scheme is presented using both ideal and measured undulator fields. By ''leap-frogging'' to different pairs of segments with extended separations we hope to confirm or correct the values of K, including proper tapering, over the entire 130-m long LCLS undulator.

  11. Correlations between solar wind parameters and auroral kilometric radiation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Dangelo, N.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between solar wind properties and the influx of energy into the nightside auroral region as indicated by the intensity of auroral kilometric radiation is investigated. Smoothed Hawkeye satellite observations of auroral radiation at 178, 100 and 56.2 kHz for days 160 through 365 of 1974 are compared with solar wind data from the composite Solar Wind Plasma Data Set, most of which was supplied by the IMP-8 spacecraft. Correlations are made between smoothed daily averages of solar wind ion density, bulk flow speed, total IMF strength, electric field, solar wind speed in the southward direction, solar wind speed multiplied by total IMF strength, the substorm parameter epsilon and the Kp index. The greatest correlation is found between solar wind bulk flow speed and auroral radiation intensity, with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.78 for the 203 daily averages examined. A possible mechanism for the relationship may be related to the propagation into the nightside magnetosphere of low-frequency long-wavelength electrostatic waves produced in the magnetosheath by the solar wind.

  12. Effects of dimerization on the photoelectron angular distribution parameters from chiral camphor enantiomers obtained with circularly polarized vacuum-ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nahon, Laurent; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Soldi-Lose, Heloiese; Daly, Steven; Powis, Ivan

    2010-09-15

    As an intermediate state of matter between the free monomeric gas phase and the solid state, clusters may exhibit a specific electronic structure and photoionization dynamics that can be unraveled by different types of electron spectroscopies. From mass-selected ion yield scans measured for photoionization of (R)-camphor, the ionization potentials (IPs) of the monomer (8.66{+-}0.01 eV), and of the homochiral dimer ({<=}8.37{+-}0.01 eV) and trimer ({<=}8.30{+-}0.01 eV) were obtained. These spectra, combined with threshold photoelectron spectroscopy and velocity map ion imaging, allow us to show that the camphor monomer and dimer photoionization channels are decoupled, i.e., that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the dimer does not undergo a dissociative ionization process that would lead to a spurious contribution to the monomer ion channel. Therefore mass selection, as achieved in our imaging photoelectron-photoion coincidence experiments, leads to size selection of the nascent monomer or dimer species. Since both the monomer and dimer are chiral, their photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) not only involves the usual {beta} anisotropy parameter but also a chiral asymmetry parameter b{sub 1} that can generate a forward-backward asymmetry in the PAD. This has been investigated using circularly polarized light (CPL) to record the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the near-threshold vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization region. Analysis of size-selected electron images recorded with left- and right-handed CPL shows that over the first 1.5 eV above the HOMO orbital ionization potentials (IPs), the {beta} parameter is not affected by the dimerization process, while the chiral b{sub 1} parameter shows clear differences between the monomer and the dimer, confirming that PECD is a subtle long-range probe of the molecular potential.

  13. Effects of dimerization on the photoelectron angular distribution parameters from chiral camphor enantiomers obtained with circularly polarized vacuum-ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahon, Laurent; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Daly, Steven; Powis, Ivan

    2010-09-01

    As an intermediate state of matter between the free monomeric gas phase and the solid state, clusters may exhibit a specific electronic structure and photoionization dynamics that can be unraveled by different types of electron spectroscopies. From mass-selected ion yield scans measured for photoionization of (R)-camphor, the ionization potentials (IPs) of the monomer (8.66±0.01 eV), and of the homochiral dimer (⩽8.37±0.01 eV) and trimer (⩽8.30±0.01 eV) were obtained. These spectra, combined with threshold photoelectron spectroscopy and velocity map ion imaging, allow us to show that the camphor monomer and dimer photoionization channels are decoupled, i.e., that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the dimer does not undergo a dissociative ionization process that would lead to a spurious contribution to the monomer ion channel. Therefore mass selection, as achieved in our imaging photoelectron-photoion coincidence experiments, leads to size selection of the nascent monomer or dimer species. Since both the monomer and dimer are chiral, their photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) not only involves the usual β anisotropy parameter but also a chiral asymmetry parameter b1 that can generate a forward-backward asymmetry in the PAD. This has been investigated using circularly polarized light (CPL) to record the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the near-threshold vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization region. Analysis of size-selected electron images recorded with left- and right-handed CPL shows that over the first 1.5 eV above the HOMO orbital ionization potentials (IPs), the β parameter is not affected by the dimerization process, while the chiral b1 parameter shows clear differences between the monomer and the dimer, confirming that PECD is a subtle long-range probe of the molecular potential.

  14. Nanoparticles for Radiation Therapy Enhancement: the Key Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Retif, Paul; Pinel, Sophie; Toussaint, Magali; Frochot, Céline; Chouikrat, Rima; Bastogne, Thierry; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the radiosensitization strategies that use high-Z nanoparticles. It does not establish an exhaustive list of the works in this field but rather propose constructive criticisms pointing out critical factors that could improve the nano-radiation therapy. Whereas most reviews show the chemists and/or biologists points of view, the present analysis is also seen through the prism of the medical physicist. In particular, we described and evaluated the influence of X-rays energy spectra using a numerical analysis. We observed a lack of standardization in preclinical studies that could partially explain the low number of translation to clinical applications for this innovative therapeutic strategy. Pointing out the critical parameters of high-Z nanoparticles radiosensitization, this review is expected to contribute to a larger preclinical and clinical development. PMID:26155318

  15. Nonlinearity of radiation health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Pollycove, M

    1998-01-01

    The prime concern of radiation protection policy since 1959 has been to protect DNA from damage. In 1994 the United Nations Scientific Community on the Effects of Atomic Radiation focused on biosystem response to radiation with its report Adaptive Responses to Radiation of Cells and Organisms. The 1995 National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements report Principles and Application of Collective Dose in Radiation Protection states that because no human data provides direct support for the linear nonthreshold hypothesis (LNT), confidence in LNT is based on the biophysical concept that the passage of a single charged particle could cause damage to DNA that would result in cancer. Several statistically significant epidemiologic studies contradict the validity of this concept by showing risk decrements, i.e., hormesis, of cancer mortality and mortality from all causes in populations exposed to low-dose radiation. Unrepaired low-dose radiation damage to DNA is negligible compared to metabolic damage. The DNA damage-control biosystem is physiologically operative on both metabolic and radiation damage and effected predominantly by free radicals. The DNA damage-control biosystem is suppressed by high dose and stimulated by low-dose radiation. The hormetic effect of low-dose radiation may be explained by its increase of biosystem efficiency. Improved DNA damage control reduces persistent mis- or unrepaired DNA damage i.e., the number of mutations that accumulate during a lifetime. This progressive accumulation of gene mutations in stem cells is associated with decreasing DNA damage control, aging, and malignancy. Recognition of the positive health effects produced by adaptive responses to low-dose radiation would result in a realistic assessment of the environmental risk of radiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:9539031

  16. Effects of radiation on MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Herbert R.

    2011-02-01

    The sensitivity of MEMS devices to radiation is reviewed, with an emphasis on radiation levels representative of space missions. While silicon and metals generally do not show mechanical degradation at the radiation levels encountered in most missions, MEMS devices have been reported to fail at doses of as few krad, corresponding to less than one year in most orbits. Radiation sensitivity is linked primarily to the impact on device operation of radiation-induced trapped charge in dielectrics, and thus affects most strongly MEMS devices operating on electrostatic principles. A survey of all published reports of radiation effects on MEMS is presented. The different sensing and actuation physical principles and materials used in MEMS are compared, leading to suggested was to increase radiation tolerance by design, for instance by choice of actuation principle or by electrical shielding of dielectrics.

  17. Spectroscopic characterization of the effect of gamma radiation on the physical parameters of biosynthesized silver/chitosan nano-particles and their antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Mohamed E.; Eid, May M.; Khattab, Om kolthoum H.; El-Hallouty, Salwa M.; El-Marakby, Seham M.; Mahmoud, Doaa A.

    2015-09-01

    Studying the effect of pH on the biosynthesis of silver/chitosan nanoparticles (Ag/CS NPs) using Aspergillus deflectus and Penicillium pinophilum as reducing agents, showed very weak surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Ag/CS NPs at certain pH. In this paper, the effect of irradiation on the synthesis of Ag/CS at non-optimum pH was evaluated and thereby, the antimicrobial effect of the biosynthesized Ag/CS NPs. The SPR of the AgNPs was analyzed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The active groups responsible for the reduction and capping of the AgNPs were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and their shape and size were determined via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. UV/Visible spectroscopy confirmed the appearance of AgNPs’ SPR. Additionally, the FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the Ag/CS NP formation. Data also revealed that increasing both the pH and irradiation dose resulted in a decrease of the Ag/CS NPs’ size. DLS and HRTEM results showed that the best pH for biosynthesis of Ag/Cs is 7.5 at 50 kGy considering the particle size and crystallinity. Also, pH 8.5 gave the best antimicrobial activity of the Ag/CS NPs from Penicillium against both S. aureus and E. coli, while 8.5 and 7.5 were the best in the same order, for Ag/CS from Aspergillus.

  18. Physical Parameters of Hot Horizontal-Branch Stars in NGC 6752: Deep Mixing and Radiative Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moehler, S.; Sweigart, A. V.; Landsman, W. B.; Heber, U.; Catelan, M.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters (T(sub eff), log g and log n(sub He)/n(sub H-dot)) are derived for 42 hot horizontal branch (HB) stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752. For 19 stars Mg II and Fe II lines are detected indicating an iron enrichment by a factor 50 on average with respect to the cluster abundance whereas the magnesium abundances are consistent with the cluster metallicity. This finding adds to the growing evidence that radiative levitation plays a significant role in determining the physical parameters of blue HB stars. Indeed, we find that iron enrichment can explain part, but not all, of the problem of anomalously low gravities along the blue HB. Thus the physical parameters of horizontal branch stars hotter than about 11,500 K in NGC 6752, as derived in this paper, are best explained by a combination of helium mixing and radiative levitation effects.

  19. Effective Material Parameter Retrieval for Terahertz Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.-T.; Choi, Muhan; Kim, Yushin; Min, Bumki

    Metamaterials, which are generally composed of subwavelength scale metallic structures, have been the subject of intensive research in recent years. Because their effective electromagnetic properties can be engineered by designing subwavelength scale metallic structures, called `meta-atoms', these artificially constructed materials are expected to lead to many new developments in the field of photonics. Furthermore, the terahertz (THz) frequency range has many important applications such as security detection, sensing, and biomedical imaging. Because many natural materials are inherently unresponsive to THz radiation, the natural materials that can be applied in devices in order to manipulate THz waves are very limited. Accordingly, the development of metamaterials with unusual optical properties in the THz frequency range has generated intense interest among researchers. In this part, design methods for metamaterials in the terahertz frequencies are introduced. This method is based on the unit cell design and S-parameter retrieval technique. Following a brief introduction to the method, some examples of terahertz metamaterial design will be presented in the last section.

  20. Radiation effects in nanoelectronic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, D. V.; Elesin, V. V.; Petrov, G. V.; Bobrinetskii, I. I.; Nevolin, V. K.

    2010-12-15

    Radiation defects induced in planar nanosized structures by steady and pulsed ionizing radiation have been analyzed. Characteristics of test samples with a planar nanosized structure fabricated by deposition of an ultrathin titanium film onto a semi-insulating GaAs substrate and of field-effect transistor structures based on bundles of carbon nanotubes have been studied. Physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation-induced changes in characteristics of the nanoelectronic elements under consideration have been established.

  1. Adaptive Multichannel Radiation Sensors for Plant Parameter Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, Hannes; Remmler, Paul; Schuhmann, Gudrun; Lausch, Angela; Merbach, Ines; Assing, Martin; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrients such as nitrogen are playing a key role in the plant life cycle. They are much needed for chlorophyll production and other plant cell components. Therefore, the crop yield is strongly affected by plant nutrient status. Due to the spatial and temporal variability of soil characteristics or swaying agricultural inputs the plant development varies within a field. Thus, the determination of these fluctuations in the plant development is valuable for a detection of stress conditions and optimization of fertilisation due to its high environmental and economic impact. Plant parameters play crucial roles in plant growth estimation and prediction since they are used as indicators of plant performance. Especially indices derived out of remote sensing techniques provide quantitative information about agricultural crops instantaneously, and above all, non-destructively. Due to the specific absorption of certain plant pigments, a characteristic spectral signature can be seen in the visible and IR part of the electromagnetic spectrum, known as narrow-band peaks. In an analogous manner, the presence and concentration of different nutrients cause a characteristic spectral signature. To this end, an adequate remote sensing monitoring concept is needed, considering heterogeneity and dynamic of the plant population and economical aspects. This work will present the development and field investigations of an inexpensive multichannel radiation sensor to observe the incoming and reflected specific parts or rather distinct wavelengths of the solar light spectrum on the crop and facilitate the determination of different plant indices. Based on the selected sensor wavelengths, the sensing device allows the detection of specific parameters, e.g. plant vitality, chlorophyll content or nitrogen content. Besides the improvement of the sensor characteristic, the simple wavelength adaption, and the price-performance ratio, the achievement of appropriate energy efficiency as well as a

  2. Effects of Structural Errors on Parameter Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaegh, F. Y.; Bekey, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Paper introduces concept of near equivalence in probability between different parameters or mathematical models of physical system. One in series of papers, each establishes different part of rigorous theory of mathematical modeling based on concepts of structural error, identifiability, and equivalence. This installment focuses upon effects of additive structural errors on degree of bias in estimates parameters.

  3. Radiation effects on structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N.M.

    1991-06-28

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support.

  4. Radiation Effects in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Meldrum, Alkiviathes; Wang, L. M.; Weber, William J.; Corrales, Louis R.

    2003-12-11

    The widespread distribution of zircon in the continental crust, its tendency to concentrate trace elements, particularly lanthanides and actinides, its use in age-dating, and its resistance to chemical and physical degradation have made zircon the most important accessory mineral in geologic studies. Because zircon is highly refractory, it also has important industrial applications, including its use as a lining material in high-temperature furnaces. However, during the past decade, zircon has also been proposed for advanced technology applications, such as a durable material for the immobilization of plutonium or, when modified by ion-beam irradiation, as an optic waveguide material. In all of these applications, the change in properties as a function of increasing radiation dose is of critical importance. In this chapter, we summarize the state-of-knowledge on the radiation damage accumulation process in zircon.

  5. Ultraviolet radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.

    1989-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet testing was not developed which will provide highly accelerated (20 to 50X) exposures that correlate to flight test data. Additional studies are required to develop an exposure methodology which will assure that accelerated testing can be used for qualification of materials and coatings for long duration space flight. Some conclusions are listed: Solar UV radiation is present in all orbital environments; Solar UV does not change in flux with orbital altitude; UV radiation can degrade most coatings and polymeric films; Laboratory UV simulation methodology is needed for accelerated testing to 20 UV solar constants; Simulation of extreme UV (below 200 nm) is needed to evaluate requirements for EUV in solar simulation.

  6. Radiation effects on corrosion of zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1989-06-01

    From the wide use of zirconium alloys as components in nuclear reactors, has come clear evidence that reactor radiation is a major corrosion parameter. The evidence emerges from comparisons of zirconium alloy corrosion behavior in different reactor types, for example, BWRs versus PWRs and in corresponding reactor loop chemistries; also, oxidation rates differ with location along components such as fuel rods and reactor pressure tubes. In most respects, oxidation effects on power reactor components are paralleled by oxidation behavior on specimens exposed to radiation in reactor loops.

  7. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  8. The Dosimetric Effect of Intrafraction Prostate Motion on Step-and-Shoot Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans: Magnitude, Correlation With Motion Parameters, and Comparison With Helical Tomotherapy Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Katja M.; Chauhan, Bhavin; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the daily and cumulative dosimetric effects of intrafraction prostate motion on step-and-shoot (SNS) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, to evaluate the correlation of dosimetric effect with motion-based metrics, and to compare on a fraction-by-fraction basis the dosimetric effect induced in SNS and helical tomotherapy plans. Methods and Materials: Intrafraction prostate motion data from 486 fractions and 15 patients were available. A motion-encoded dose calculation technique was used to determine the variation of the clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 95%} values with respect to the static plan for SNS plans. The motion data were analyzed separately, and the correlation coefficients between various motion-based metrics and the dosimetric effect were determined. The dosimetric impact was compared with that incurred during another IMRT technique to assess correlation across different delivery techniques. Results: The mean ({+-}1 standard deviation [SD]) change in D{sub 95%} in the CTV over all 486 fractions was 0.2 {+-} 0.5%. After the delivery of five and 12 fractions, the mean ({+-}1 SD) changes over the 15 patients in CTV D{sub 95%} were 0.0 {+-} 0.2% and 0.1 {+-} 0.2%, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the CTV D{sub 95%} changes and the evaluated motion metrics were, in general, poor and ranged from r = -0.2 to r = -0.39. Dosimetric effects introduced by identical motion in SNS and helical tomotherapy IMRT techniques were poorly correlated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.32 for the CTV. Conclusions: The dosimetric impact of intrafraction prostate motion on the CTV is, in general, small. In only 4% of all fractions did the dosimetric consequence exceed 1% in the CTV. As expected, the cumulative effect was further reduced with fractionation. The poor correlations between the calculated motion parameters and the subsequent dosimetric effect implies that motion-based thresholds are of limited value in

  9. INTERACTION BETWEEN METHYL MERCURY AND RADIATION EFFECTS ON NERVOUS SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between methyl mercury and ionizing radiation was investigated in a series of experiments using rats, hamsters, and squirrel monkeys to study the effects produced and possible mechanisms of action. Parameters evaluated included several measurements of behavior, br...

  10. Design considerations and test facilities for accelerated radiation effects testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Miller, C. G.; Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Test design parameters for accelerated dose rate radiation effects tests for spacecraft parts and subsystems used in long term mission (years) are detailed. A facility for use in long term accelerated and unaccelerated testing is described.

  11. Space Radiation Effects Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

  12. Harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-21

    Tanning for cosmetic purposes by sunbathing or by using artificial tanning devices is widespread. The hazards associated with exposure to ultraviolet radiation are of concern to the medical profession. Depending on the amount and form of the radiation, as well as on the skin type of the individual exposed, ultraviolet radiation causes erythema, sunburn, photodamage (photoaging), photocarcinogenesis, damage to the eyes, alteration of the immune system of the skin, and chemical hypersensitivity. Skin cancers most commonly produced by ultraviolet radiation are basal and squamous cell carcinomas. There also is much circumstantial evidence that the increase in the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma during the past half century is related to increased sun exposure, but this has not been proved. Effective and cosmetically acceptable sunscreen preparations have been developed that can do much to prevent or reduce most harmful effects to ultraviolet radiation if they are applied properly and consistently. Other safety measures include (1) minimizing exposure to ultraviolet radiation, (2) being aware of reflective surfaces while in the sun, (3) wearing protective clothing, (4) avoiding use of artificial tanning devices, and (5) protecting infants and children.

  13. Radiation effects on human heredity.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori; Suyama, Akihiko; Noda, Asao; Kodama, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    In experimental organisms such as fruit flies and mice, increased frequencies in germ cell mutations have been detected following exposure to ionizing radiation. In contrast, there has been no clear evidence for radiation-induced germ cell mutations in humans that lead to birth defects, chromosome aberrations, Mendelian disorders, etc. This situation exists partly because no sensitive and practical genetic marker is available for human studies and also because the number of people exposed to large doses of radiation and subsequently having offspring was small until childhood cancer survivors became an important study population. In addition, the genome of apparently normal individuals seems to contain large numbers of alterations, including dozens to hundreds of nonfunctional alleles. With the number of mutational events in protein-coding genes estimated as less than one per genome after 1 gray (Gy) exposure, it is unsurprising that genetic effects from radiation have not yet been detected conclusively in humans. PMID:23988120

  14. Prediction of Geospace Radiation Environment and Solar Wind Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balikhin, Michael; Arber, Tony; Erdelyi, Robertus; Ganushkina, Natalya; van der Holst, Bart; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Liemohn, Michael; Pakhotin, Ivan; Shprits, Yuri; Walker, Simon; Wik, Magnus; Wintoft, Peter; Yatsenko, Vitaliy

    2015-04-01

    Energetic electrons within the inner magnetosphere can cause both deep and surface charging of spacecraft operating at GEO and MEO orbits. Reliable forecast of the fluences of these electrons can assist in the mitigation of undesirable effects on spacecraft. Previous forecasts of these fluences exploited either system science or first principles based methodologies. The first, system science approach provides accurate forecasts of electron fluxes but is limited to regions in which continuous data are available, i.e. GEO. The second, based on physical principles, provides good coverage throughout the whole inner magnetosphere but with significantly lower accuracy. The combination of both approaches, as used in the SNB3GEO electron flux model (which combines the data driven NARMAX and physical VERB models), can overcome many of the short comings of the two individual models, generating improved short term forecasts for the whose RB region. Long term RB forecasts require the estimation of solar wind parameters at L1 based on remote solar observations. PROGRESS, a new Horizon 2020 funded project, aims to address these issues. This talk will provide a review of PROGRESS achievements, current status and aims for future development.

  15. Radiation dosimetry and biophysical models of space radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Shavers, Mark R.; George, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the biological risks from space radiation remains a difficult problem because of the many radiation types including protons, heavy ions, and secondary neutrons, and the absence of epidemiology data for these radiation types. Developing useful biophysical parameters or models that relate energy deposition by space particles to the probabilities of biological outcomes is a complex problem. Physical measurements of space radiation include the absorbed dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. In contrast to conventional dosimetric methods, models of radiation track structure provide descriptions of energy deposition events in biomolecules, cells, or tissues, which can be used to develop biophysical models of radiation risks. In this paper, we address the biophysical description of heavy particle tracks in the context of the interpretation of both space radiation dosimetry and radiobiology data, which may provide insights into new approaches to these problems.

  16. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  17. Radiation Effects in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The requirements for a solid moderator are reviewed and the reasons that graphite has become the solid moderator of choice discussed. The manufacture and properties of some currently available near-isotropic and isotropic grades are described. The major features of a graphite moderated reactors are briefly outlined. Displacement damage and the induced structural and dimensional changes in graphite are described. Recent characterization work on nano-carbons and oriented pyrolytic graphites that have shed new light on graphite defect structures are reviewed, and the effect of irradiation temperature on the defect structures is highlighted. Changes in the physical properties of nuclear graphite caused by neutron irradiation are reported. Finally, the importance of irradiation induced creep is presented, along with current models and their deficiencies.

  18. Radiation Effects on Polymer Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Winslow, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Report compiles data on effects of radiation on physical properties of synthetic organic materials. Emphasis on materials of interest to nuclear-equipment and nuclear-reactor designers. Data covers five categories of polymeric materials: Insulators, elastomeric seals and gaskets, lubricants, adhesives, and coatings. More than 250 materials represented.

  19. Radiation effects on video imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Bujnosek, J.J.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Walton, R.B.; Martinez, T.M.; Black, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of several photoconductive, photoemissive, and solid state silicon-based video imagers was measured by analyzing stored photocharge induced by irradiation with continuous and pulsed sources of high energy photons and neutrons. Transient effects as functions of absorbed dose, dose rate, fluences, and ionizing particle energy are presented.

  20. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  1. Radiatively important parameters best estimate (RIPBE) value-added product (VAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Shippert,T.; Jensen,M.; McFarlane, S.; Mather, J.; Flynn, C.; Mlawer, E.; Delamere, J.; Oreopoulos, L.; Turner, D.; Xie, S.

    2010-03-15

    Currently, to calculate radiative heating rate profiles for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) product, radiatively important parameters (water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, aerosol properties, and cloud properties) from multiple VAPs and datastreams are combined into input text files that are then used to run the RRTM radiative transfer codes. These input parameters have different temporal and spatial scales and are difficult to extract from the text files to be used for other purposes such as running other radiative transfer codes, analyzing results, or error tracking. The purpose of the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP is to improve this process by creating a clearly identified set of inputs for BBHRP (and other radiation codes) on a uniform vertical and temporal grid. This process will decouple the input/output portion of the BBHRP from the core physics (the RRTM radiative transfer model) and will add error tracking and version information to the input data set. Critical parameters (which must exist for the radiation code to be run) will be designated; for other parameters, climatological or fixed values will be used when the preferred values are missing. This should increase the number of cases for which radiative transfer calculations can be run. In all cases, flags will clearly identify the source for each parameter. RIPBE will serve multiple functions: (1) it will provide a clearly identifiable set of inputs for BBHRP, (2) it will facilitate the use of BBHRP as a retrieval and radiation code development testbed by providing a vehicle for easily extracting and swapping input parameters needed to conduct radiative transfer calculations, and (3) it will be a complement to the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) VAP and will provide a significantly expanded set of parameters for model evaluation in a showcase data set form. At the ASR meeting, we will present examples and evaluation of the initial RIPBE dataset at SGP.

  2. Bayesian parameter estimation for effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesolowski, Sarah; Klco, Natalie; Furnstahl, Richard; Phillips, Daniel; Thapilaya, Arbin

    2015-10-01

    We present a procedure based on Bayesian statistics for effective field theory (EFT) parameter estimation from experimental or lattice data. The extraction of low-energy constants (LECs) is guided by physical principles such as naturalness in a quantifiable way and various sources of uncertainty are included by the specification of Bayesian priors. Special issues for EFT parameter estimation are demonstrated using representative model problems, and a set of diagnostics is developed to isolate and resolve these issues. We apply the framework to the extraction of the LECs of the nucleon mass expansion in SU(2) chiral perturbation theory from synthetic lattice data.

  3. Mitigation of Space Radiation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwell, William

    2012-02-01

    During low earth orbit and deep space missions, humans and spacecraft systems are exposed to high energy particles emanating from basically three sources: geomagnetically-trapped protons and electrons (Van Allen Belts), extremely high energy galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), and solar proton events (SPEs). The particles can have deleterious effects if not properly shielded. For humans, there can be a multitude of harmful effects depending on the degree of exposure. For spacecraft systems, especially electronics, the effects can range from single event upsets (SEUs) to catastrophic effects such as latchup and burnout. In addition, some materials, radio-sensitive experiments, and scientific payloads are subject to harmful effects. To date, other methods have been proposed such as electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding, but these approaches have not proven feasible due to cost, weight, and safety issues. The only method that has merit and has been effective is bulk or parasitic shielding. In this paper, we discuss in detail the sources of the space radiation environment, spacecraft, human, and onboard systems modeling methodologies, transport of these particles through shielding materials, and the calculation of the dose effects. In addition, a review of the space missions to date and a discussion of the space radiation mitigation challenges for lunar and deep space missions such as lunar outposts and human missions to Mars are presented.

  4. Atmospheric effects on radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurica, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two essentially distinct regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are discussed: (1) the scattering region in which the radiation energy is provided by the incident solar flux; and (2) the infrared region in which emission by the earth's surface and atmospheric gases supply radiative energy. In each of these spectral regions the atmosphere performs its dual function with respect to a remote sensing measurement of surface properties. The atmosphere acts both as a filter and as a noise generator removing and obscuring sought after information. Nevertheless, with proper application of concepts such as have been considered, it will be possible to remove these unwanted atmospheric effects and to improve identification techniques being developed.

  5. Radiation effects in spacecraft electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, James P.

    1989-01-01

    Effects on the internal spacecraft electronics due to exposure to the natural and enhanced space radiation environment will be reviewed. The emphasis will be placed on the description of the nature of both the exposure environment and failure mechanisms in semiconductors. Understanding both the system environment and device effects is critical in the use of laboratory simulation environments to obtain the data necessary to design and qualify components for successful application.

  6. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters from INSAT-3D: a feasibility study using radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinya, John; Bipasha, Paul S.

    2016-05-01

    Clouds strongly modulate the Earths energy balance and its atmosphere through their interaction with the solar and terrestrial radiation. They interact with radiation in various ways like scattering, emission and absorption. By observing these changes in radiation at different wavelength, cloud properties can be estimated. Cloud properties are of utmost importance in studying different weather and climate phenomena. At present, no satellite provides cloud microphysical parameters over the Indian region with high temporal resolution. INSAT-3D imager observations in 6 spectral channels from geostationary platform offer opportunity to study continuous cloud properties over Indian region. Visible (0.65 μm) and shortwave-infrared (1.67 μm) channel radiances can be used to retrieve cloud microphysical parameters such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and cloud effective radius (CER). In this paper, we have carried out a feasibility study with the objective of cloud microphysics retrieval. For this, an inter-comparison of 15 globally available radiative transfer models (RTM) were carried out with the aim of generating a Look-up- Table (LUT). SBDART model was chosen for the simulations. The sensitivity of each spectral channel to different cloud properties was investigated. The inputs to the RT model were configured over our study region (50°S - 50°N and 20°E - 130°E) and a large number of simulations were carried out using random input vectors to generate the LUT. The determination of cloud optical thickness and cloud effective radius from spectral reflectance measurements constitutes the inverse problem and is typically solved by comparing the measured reflectances with entries in LUT and searching for the combination of COT and CER that gives the best fit. The products are available on the website www.mosdac.gov.in

  7. Radiative reactions in halo effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupak, Gautam

    2016-03-01

    In this article we review the recent progress in radiative reaction calculations in halo effective field theory. We look at radiative capture and breakup processes that involve a halo nucleus with a single valence neutron or proton. Looking at 7Li(n,γ) 8Li,14C(n,γ)15C and related reactions, the dominant source of theoretical uncertainty in s- and p-wave halo nuclei reaction calculations is quantified in a model-independent framework. The analysis for neutron halos is extended to proton halo systems. The effective field theory results quantify which observable parameters of the strong interaction at low energy need to be determined more precisely for accurate cross-section calculations.

  8. Longwave radiation budget parameters computed from ISCCP and HIRS2/MSU products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man L. C.; Chang, Lang-Ping

    1992-01-01

    The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) retrieved cloud fields and the high-resolution radiation sounder 2 (HIRS2) retrieved cloud fields yield similar outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) due to the cancelation effect of cloud-top altitudes and cloud amount on OLR. For the large regional discrepancies of the order of 30 W/sq m found over northern Africa are largely due to surface temperature differences, and extensive discrepancies over the ocean are due to humidity differences. Harmonic analysis is applied to OLR, clear-sky OLR, and cloud-radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere using the ISCCP products. The diurnal variations of these parameters from 60 deg S to 60 deg N are larger over land than over the ocean. The clear-sky OLR peaks around 1500 LST, usually over land areas, and is associated with the surface/air temperature maximum. The OLR over cloudy regions shows a similar diurnal phase as the cloud top pressure. The cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere has maximum value near 2100 LST mountain areas and near 0000 and 0300 LST over equatorial regions. The ISCCP-computed longwave cloud radiative forcing has smaller diurnal variations over the ocean than the HIRS2-computed longwave cloud radiative forcing. The global mean bias of OLR is around 0.74 W/sq m, and locally, the bias can be as large as 5 to 10 W/sq m. This appears to indicate that the twice-a-day measurements of the HIRS2/MSU (around 0315 and 1515 LST, which are the equatorial cross times at nadir track) can be used to derive monthly mean OLR without significant bias.

  9. [Health effects of ultraviolet radiation].

    PubMed

    Ohnaka, T

    1993-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) occurs from both natural and artificial sources. The main natural source is the sun. On the other hand, artificial UVR sources are widely used in industry and also used in hospitals, laboratories, etc. because of their germicidal properties. They are even used for cosmetic purposes. UVR can be classified into three regions according to its wavelength: as UVA (320-400nm), UVB (320-280nm) and UVC (280-200nm). The UVC has the greatest health effect on humans among the three. The sun radiates a wide range of spectrum of electromagnetic radiation including the UVR, however the radiation below 290 nm in wavelength does not reach the surface of the earth for effective absorption by the stratospheric ozone layer. As a result, UVR from a natural source consists of only UVA and a part of UVB. On the other hand, artificial UVR sources include UVC region and have serious effects on the human body, especially on the skin and eyes. The health effects of UVR on humans can be beneficial or detrimental, depending on the amount and form of UVR, as well as on the skin type of the individual exposed. It has been acknowledged that a long period of UVR deficiency may have harmful effects on the human body, such as the development of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children due to a disturbance in the phosphorus and calcium metabolism. Appropriate measures to increase the amount of exposure to UVR, especially to UVB radiation by the use of sun bathing, the exposure to artificial UVR sources, etc. have shown to prevent disease states caused by UVR deficiency. The harmful effects of UVR consist of erythema, sunburn, photodamage (photoaging), photocarcinogenesis, damage to the eyes, alteration of the immune system of the skin, and chemical hypersensitivity. Skin cancer is commonly produced by UVR. In this review, various states of UV from solar radiation and the degree of exposure to UVR are introduced. The benefits and harmful health effects of

  10. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-10-21

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation.

  11. Effects of contamination on radioligand binding parameters.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Birdsall, N J

    2000-02-01

    Radioligand binding studies are used to provide quantitative estimates of parameters such as the receptor density of a tissue and the affinity values of labelled and unlabelled ligands. The presence of an unlabelled competing contaminant, which might be present because of actual contamination, inadequate radioligand purification or the breakdown of the radioligand to an active species, has surprising effects on these estimates: the apparent affinity of the radioligand is increased but the Ki values of unlabelled ligands are unaffected. The most striking and sensitive effects are on radioligand association kinetics, which become independent of radioligand concentration at high radioligand concentrations. PMID:10664609

  12. The Effect of Directional Radiation Models on the Interpretation of Earth Radiation Budget Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Richard N.

    1980-10-01

    A parameter estimation technique is presented to estimate the radiative flux density distribution over the earn from a set of radiometer measurements at satellite altitude. The technique analyzes measurements from a wide field of view, horizon to horizon. nadir pointing sensor with a mathematical technique to derive the radiative flux density estimates at the top of the atmosphere for resolution elements smaller than the sensor field of view. A computer simulation of the data analysis technique is presented for both earth-emitted and reflected radiation.The errors resulting from the assumed directional radiation model, spatial model and random measurement error have little effect an the global mean radiation. Zonal estimates were found to be more sensitive, to the spatial model than to the directional radiation model. Results from analysing medium field of view measurements showed a much greater sensitivity to the directional radiation model, even on a global scale.

  13. Bayesian parameter estimation for effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesolowski, S.; Klco, N.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Phillips, D. R.; Thapaliya, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present procedures based on Bayesian statistics for estimating, from data, the parameters of effective field theories (EFTs). The extraction of low-energy constants (LECs) is guided by theoretical expectations in a quantifiable way through the specification of Bayesian priors. A prior for natural-sized LECs reduces the possibility of overfitting, and leads to a consistent accounting of different sources of uncertainty. A set of diagnostic tools is developed that analyzes the fit and ensures that the priors do not bias the EFT parameter estimation. The procedures are illustrated using representative model problems, including the extraction of LECs for the nucleon-mass expansion in SU(2) chiral perturbation theory from synthetic lattice data.

  14. Assessing the impact of radiative parameter uncertainty on plant growth simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viskari, T.; Serbin, S.; Dietze, M.; Shiklomanov, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Current Earth system models do not adequately project either the magnitude or the sign of carbon fluxes and storage associated with the terrestrial carbon cycle resulting in significant uncertainties in their potential feedbacks on the future climate system. A primary reason for the current uncertainty in these models is the lack of observational constraints of key biomes at relevant spatial and temporal scales. There is an increasingly large and highly resolved amount of remotely sensed observations that can provide the critical model inputs. However, effectively incorporating these data requires the use of radiative transfer models and their associated assumptions. How these parameter assumptions and uncertainties affect model projections for, e.g., leaf physiology, soil temperature or growth has not been examined in depth. In this presentation we discuss the use of high spectral resolution observations at the near surface to landscape scales to inform ecosystem process modeling efforts, particularly the uncertainties related to properties describing the radiation regime within vegetation canopies and the impact on C cycle projections. We illustrate that leaf and wood radiative properties and their associated uncertainties have an important impact on projected forest carbon uptake and storage. We further show the need for a strong data constraint on these properties and discuss sources of this remotely sensed information and methods for data assimilation into models. We present our approach as an efficient means for understanding and correcting implicit assumptions and model structural deficiencies in radiation transfer in vegetation canopies. Ultimately, a better understanding of the radiation balance of ecosystems will improve regional and global scale C and energy balance projections.

  15. Radiative Corrections to Asymmetry Parameter in the {Omega}{sup -{yields}{Lambda}}+K{sup -} Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Queijeiro, A.

    2010-07-29

    We compute the radiative corrections, to first order in the fine structure constant {alpha}, to the asymmetry parameter {alpha}{sub {Omega}}of the {Omega}{sup -{yields}{Lambda}}+K{sup -} decay. We use previous results where Sirlin's procedure is used to separate the radiative corrections into two parts, one independent model contribution and a model dependent one.

  16. Effect of microwave radiation on Jayadhar cotton fibers: WAXS studies

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjana, A. R. Mahesh, S. S. Divakara, S. Somashekar, R.

    2014-04-24

    Thermal effect in the form of micro wave energy on Jayadhar cotton fiber has been investigated. Microstructural parameters have been estimated using wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) data and line profile analysis program developed by us. Physical properties like tensile strength are correlated with X-ray results. We observe that the microwave radiation do affect significantly many parameters and we have suggested a multivariate analysis of these parameters to arrive at a significant result.

  17. Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE): An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, S; Shippert, T; Mather, J

    2011-06-30

    The Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to create a complete set of clearly identified set of parameters on a uniform vertical and temporal grid to use as input to a radiative transfer model. One of the main drivers for RIPBE was as input to the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP, but we also envision using RIPBE files for user-run radiative transfer codes, as part of cloud/aerosol retrieval testbeds, and as input to averaged datastreams for model evaluation.

  18. [MODIFICATION OF THE PROTON BEAM PHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS BY ELEMENTS OF SPACECRAFT RADIATION PROTECTION].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Molokanov, A G; Shurshakov, V A; Bulynina, T M; Liakhova, K N; Severiukhin, Yu S; Abrosimova, A N; Ushakov, I B

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was performed with outbred ICR (CD-1). female mice (SPF). The animals were irradiated by 171 MeV protons at a dose of 20 cGy. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a "protective blind", and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Physical obstacles on the path of 171 MeV protons increase their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, two types of obstacles together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. Rationalization of physical methods of spacecrew protection should be based as on knowledge in physical dosimetry (ionizing chambers, thermoluminescent, track detectors etc.), so the radiobiological criteria established in experiments with animals. PMID:26738306

  19. Effects of different doses of low power continuous wave he-ne laser radiation on some seed thermodynamic and germination parameters, and potential enzymes involved in seed germination of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Perveen, Rashida; Ali, Qasim; Ashraf, Muhammad; Al-Qurainy, Fahad; Jamil, Yasir; Raza Ahmad, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    In this study, water-soaked seeds of sunflower were exposed to He-Ne laser irradiation of different energies to determine whether or not He-Ne laser irradiation caused changes to seed thermodynamic and germination parameters as well as effects on the activities of germination enzymes. The experiment comprised four energy levels: 0 (control), 100, 300 and 500mJ of laser energy and each treatment replicated four times arranged in a completely randomized design. The experimentation was performed under the greenhouse conditions in the net-house of the Department of Botany, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. The seed thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to seed germination thermograms determined with a calorimeter at 25.8°C for 72h. Various thermodynamic parameters of seed (ΔH, (ΔS)(e), (ΔS)(c), (ΔS)(e) /Δt and (ΔS)(c) /Δt) were affected significantly due to presowing laser treatment. Significant changes in seed germination parameters and enzyme activities were observed in seeds treated with He-Ne laser. The He-Ne laser seed treatment resulted in increased activities of amylase and protease. These results indicate that the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser light seed treatment has considerable biological effects on seed metabolism. This seed treatment technique can be potentially employed to enhance agricultural productivity. PMID:20670360

  20. Parameter estimation applied to Nimbus 6 wide-angle longwave radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Smith, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    A parameter estimation technique was used to analyze the August 1975 Nimbus 6 Earth radiation budget data to demonstrate the concept of deconvolution. The longwave radiation field at the top of the atmosphere is defined from satellite data by a fifth degree and fifth order spherical harmonic representation. The variations of the major features of the radiation field are defined by analyzing the data separately for each two-day duty cycle. A table of coefficient values for each spherical harmonic representation is given along with global mean, gradients, degree variances, and contour plots. In addition, the entire data set is analyzed to define the monthly average radiation field.

  1. RADIATION EFFECTS IN MATERIAL MICROSTRUCTURE.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.

    2007-05-30

    Next generation nuclear power systems, high-power particle accelerators and space technology will inevitably rely on higher performance materials that will be able to function in the extreme environments of high irradiation, high temperatures, corrosion and stress. The ability of any material to maintain its functionality under exposure to harsh conditions is directly linked to the material structure at the nano- and micro-scales. Understanding of the underlying processes is key to the success of such undertakings. This paper presents experimental results of the effects of radiation exposure on several unique alloys, composites and crystals through induced changes in the physio-mechanical macroscopic properties.

  2. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, P.; Snead, C. L.; Ward, T.

    The Neutral Particle Beam Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the SDIO through the Defense Nuclear Agency and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The operation started in October 1986. The REF is capable of delivering pulsed H(-), H(0), and H(+) beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy at up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5-micron to 500-micron length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 sigma), resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRad (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives. This paper describes the REF, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned.

  3. [Estimation of Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation for Winter Wheat Based on Hyperspectral Characteristic Parameters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Cai, Huan-jie; Li, Zhi-jun

    2015-09-01

    Estimating fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) precisely has great importance for detecting vegetation water content, energy and carbon cycle balance. Based on this, ASD FieldSpec 3 and SunScan canopy analyzer were applied to measure the canopy spectral reflectance and photosynthetically active radiation over whole growth stage of winter wheat. Canopy reflectance spectral data was used to build up 24 hyperspectral characteristic parameters and the correlation between FPAR and different spectral characteristic parameters were analyzed to establish the estimation model of FPAR for winter wheat. The results indicated that there were extremely significant correlations (p<0.01) between FPAR and hyperspectral characteristic parameters except the slope of blue edge (Db). The correlation coefficient between FPAR and the ratio of red edge area to blue edge area (VI4) was the highest, reaching at 0.836. Seven spectral parameters with higher correlation coefficient were selected to establish optimal linear and nonlinear estimation models of FPAR, and the best estimating models of FPAR were obtained by accuracy analysis. For the linear model, the inversin model between green edge and FPAR was the best, with R2, RMSE and RRMSE of predicted model reaching 0.679, 0.111 and 20.82% respectively. For the nonlinear model, the inversion model between VI2 (normalized ratio of green peak to red valley of reflectivity) and FPAR was the best, with R2, RMSE and RRMSE of predicted model reaching 0.724, 0.088 and 21.84% for. In order to further improve the precision of the model, the multiple linear regression and BP neural network methods were used to establish models with multiple high spectral parameters BP neural network model (R2=0.906, RMSE=0.08, RRMSE=16.57%) could significantly improve the inversion precision compared with the single variable model. The results show that using hyperspectral characteristic parameters to estimate FPAR of winter wheat is

  4. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  5. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  6. Estimating stellar effective temperatures and detected angular parameters using stochastic particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuan-Xin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Wei; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Considering features of stellar spectral radiation and sky surveys, we established a computational model for stellar effective temperatures, detected angular parameters and gray rates. Using known stellar flux data in some bands, we estimated stellar effective temperatures and detected angular parameters using stochastic particle swarm optimization (SPSO). We first verified the reliability of SPSO, and then determined reasonable parameters that produced highly accurate estimates under certain gray deviation levels. Finally, we calculated 177 860 stellar effective temperatures and detected angular parameters using data from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) catalog. These derived stellar effective temperatures were accurate when we compared them to known values from literatures. This research makes full use of catalog data and presents an original technique for studying stellar characteristics. It proposes a novel method for calculating stellar effective temperatures and detecting angular parameters, and provides theoretical and practical data for finding information about radiation in any band.

  7. Salivary biochemical markers as potential acute toxicity parameters for acute radiation injury: A study on small experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Soni, S; Agrawal, P; Kumar, N; Mittal, G; Nishad, D K; Chaudhury, N K; Bhatnagar, A; Basu, M; Chhillar, N

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have been evaluating several biodosimetric/screening approaches to assess acute radiation injury, related to mass causality. Keeping in mind this background, we hypothesized that effect of whole-body irradiation in single fraction in graded doses can affect the secretion of various salivary components that could be used as acute radiation injury/toxicity marker, which can be used in screening of large population at the time of nuclear accidents/disaster. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats treated with whole-body cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of dose 1-5 Gy (dose rate: 0.95 Gy/min) were included in this study. Whole mixed saliva was collected from all animals before and after radiation up to 72 h postradiation. Saliva was analyzed for electrolytes, total protein, urea, and amylase. Intragroup comparison of salivary parameters at different radiation doses showed significant differences. Potassium was significantly increased as the dose increased from 1 Gy to 5 Gy (p < 0.01) with effect size of difference (r > 0.5). Sodium was significantly altered after 3-5 Gy (p < 0.01, r > 0.5), except 1 and 2 Gy, whereas changes in sodium level were nonsignificant (p > 0.5). Urea, total protein, and amylase levels were also significantly increased as the radiation dose increased (p < 0.01) with large effect size of difference (r > 0.5). This study suggests that salivary parameters were sensitive toward radiation even at low radiation dose which can be used as a predictor of radiation injury. PMID:25813962

  8. Effects of process parameters on hydrothermal carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Md. Helal

    In recent years there has been increased research activity in renewable energy, especially upgrading widely available lignicellulosic biomass, in a bid to counter the increasing environmental concerns related with the use of fossil fuels. Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC), also known as wet torrefaction or hot water pretreatment, is a process for pretreatment of diverse lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, where biomass is treated under subcritical water conditions in short contact time to produce high-value products. The products of this process are: a solid mass characterized as biochar/biocoal/biocarbon, which is homogeneous, energy dense, and hydrophobic; a liquid stream composed of five and six carbon sugars, various organic acids, and 5-HMF; and a gaseous stream, mainly CO2. A number of process parameters are considered important for the extensive application of the HTC process. Primarily, reaction temperature determines the characteristics of the products. In the solid product, the oxygen carbon ratio decreases with increasing reaction temperature and as a result, HTC biochar has the similar characteristics to low rank coal. However, liquid and gaseous stream compositions are largely correlated with the residence time. Biomass particle size can also limit the reaction kinetics due to the mass transfer effect. Recycling of process water can help to minimize the utility consumption and reduce the waste treatment cost as a result of less environmental impact. Loblolly pine was treated in hot compressed water at 200 °C, 230 °C, and 260 °C with 5:1 water:biomass mass ratio to investigate the effects of process parameters on HTC. The solid product were characterized by their mass yields, higher heating values (HHV), and equilibrium moisture content (EMC), while the liquid were characterized by their total organic carbon content and pH value.

  9. Effective UV radiation from model calculations and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feister, Uwe; Grewe, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Model calculations have been made to simulate the effect of atmospheric ozone and geographical as well as meteorological parameters on solar UV radiation reaching the ground. Total ozone values as measured by Dobson spectrophotometer and Brewer spectrometer as well as turbidity were used as input to the model calculation. The performance of the model was tested by spectroradiometric measurements of solar global UV radiation at Potsdam. There are small differences that can be explained by the uncertainty of the measurements, by the uncertainty of input data to the model and by the uncertainty of the radiative transfer algorithms of the model itself. Some effects of solar radiation to the biosphere and to air chemistry are discussed. Model calculations and spectroradiometric measurements can be used to study variations of the effective radiation in space in space time. The comparability of action spectra and their uncertainties are also addressed.

  10. Radiation effects in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B.; Yazzie, A.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T.; Leavitt, C.P.

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  11. Occupational exposure and its effect on some immune parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Tuschl, H.; Steger, F.; Kovac, R.

    1995-01-01

    Some immunological parameters were investigated in a group of workers exposed to external radiation (1.4 to 9.8 mSy) and inhalation of tritium (comm. eff. dose equiv. 1.2 to 2.8 mSv). The present investigations indicate the differential radiosensitivity of lymphocytic subsets: CD8 positive suppressor T cells were found to be the most sensitive subpopulation in the peripheral blood of radiation exposed workers. CD4/CD8 ratios were increased mainly due to an increase in absolute numbers of CD4 positive helper T cells indicating a selective cell renewal after irradiation. Results obtained after phytohaemugglutinin stimulation of lymphocytes showed individual variation, though there seems to be a trend towards an inverse correlation between absolute T cell numbers in peripheral blood and the number of S phases observed after stimulation, low T cell numbers leading to a high rate of stimulation. The calculation of the committed effective dose equivalents show that radiation protection against internal tritium contaminants should not be neglected. 21 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  13. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  14. Rapid calculation of terrain parameters for radiation modeling from digital elevation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Frew, James

    1990-01-01

    Digital elevation models are now widely used to calculate terrain parameters to determine incoming solar and longwave radiation for use in surface climate models, interpretation of remote-sensing data, and parameters in hydrologic models. Because of the large number of points in an elevation grid, fast algorithms are useful to save computation time. A description is given of rapid methods for calculating slope and azimuth, solar illumination angle, horizons, and view factors for radiation from sky and terrain. Calculation time is reduced by fast algorithms and lookup tables.

  15. A survey of space radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of space radiation and its significance for space missions, as they increase in scope, duration, and complexity are discussed. Type of radiation hazard may depend on location or on special equipment used. It is emphasized that it is necessary to search for potential radiation problems in the design stage of a mission. Problem areas such as radiation damage to solar cells and the revolutionary advances are discussed. Radiation effect to electronics components other than solar cells, and several specialized areas such as radioactivity and luminescence are also examined.

  16. Dosimetry and Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanyár, B.; Köteles, G. J.

    The extension of the use of ionizing radiation and the new biological information on the effects of radiation exposure that is now becoming available, present new challenges to the development of concepts and methodology in determination of doses and assessment of hazards for the protection of living systems. Concise information is given on the deterministic and stochastic effects, on the debate concerning the effects of low doses, the detection of injuries by biological assays, and the radiation sickness.

  17. Beam Echo Effect for Generation of Short-Wavelength Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation starting with a relatively small initial energy modulation of the beam. After presenting the concept of the EEHG, we address several practically important issues, such as the effect of coherent and incoherent synchrotron radiation in the dispersion sections. Using a representative realistic set of beam parameters, we show how the EEHG scheme enhances the FEL performance and allows one to generate a fully (both longitudinally and transversely) coherent radiation. We then discuss application of the echo modulation for generation of attosecond pulses of radiation, and also using echo for generation of terahertz radiation. We present main parameters of a proof-of-principle experiment currently being planned at SLAC for demonstration of the echo modulation mechanism.

  18. Potential health effects of space radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.

    1993-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be exposed to radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, and possibly solar particle events. The potential health hazards due to these space radiations must be considered carefully to ensure the success of space exploration. Because there is no human radioepidemiological data for acute and late effects of high-LET (Linear-Energy-Transfer) radiation, the biological risks of energetic charged particles have to be estimated from experimental results on animals and cultured cells. Experimental data obtained to date indicate that charged particle radiation can be much more effective than photons in causing chromosome aberrations, cell killing, mutation, and tumor induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) varies with biological endpoints and depends on the LET of heavy ions. Most lesions induced by low-LET radiation can be repaired in mammalian cells. Energetic heavy ions, however, can produce large complex DNA damages, which may lead to large deletions and are irreparable. For high-LET radiation, therefore, there are less or no dose rate effects. Physical shielding may not be effective in minimizing the biological effects on energetic heavy ions, since fragments of the primary particles can be effective in causing biological effects. At present the uncertainty of biological effects of heavy particles is still very large. With further understanding of the biological effects of space radiation, the career doses can be kept at acceptable levels so that the space radiation environment need not be a barrier to the exploitation of the promise of space.

  19. Space radiation parameters for EUI and the Sun Sensor of Solar Orbiter, ESIO, and JUDE instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Laurence; Jacques, Lionel; Halain, Jean-Philippe; Renotte, Etienne; Thibert, Tanguy; Grodent, Denis

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents predictions of space radiation parameters for four space instruments performed by the Centre Spatial de Liège (ULg - Belgium); EUI, the Extreme Ultra-violet Instrument, on-board the Solar Orbiter platform; ESIO, Extreme-UV solar Imager for Operations, and JUDE, the Jupiter system Ultraviolet Dynamics Experiment, which was proposed for the JUICE platform. For Solar Orbiter platform, the radiation environment is defined by ESA environmental specification and the determination of the parameters is done through ray-trace analyses inside the EUI instrument. For ESIO instrument, the radiation environment of the geostationary orbit is defined through simulations of the trapped particles flux, the energetic solar protons flux and the galactic cosmic rays flux, taking the ECSS standard for space environment as a guideline. Then ray-trace analyses inside the instrument are performed to predict the particles fluxes at the level of the most radiation-sensitive elements of the instrument. For JUICE, the spacecraft trajectory is built from ephemeris files provided by ESA and the radiation environment is modeled through simulations by JOSE (Jovian Specification Environment model) then ray-trace analyses inside the instrument are performed to predict the particles fluxes at the level of the most radiation-sensitive elements of the instrument.

  20. Controlling the Radiation Parameters of a Resonant Medium Excited by a Sequence of Ultrashort Superluminal Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Babushkin, I.; Tolmachev, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of controlling the radiation parameters of a spatially periodic one-dimensional medium consisting of classical harmonic oscillators by means of a sequence of ultrashort pulses that propagate through the medium with a superluminal velocity. We show that, in the spectrum of the transient process, in addition to the radiation at a resonant frequency of oscillators, new frequencies arise that depend on the period of the spatial distribution of the oscillator density, the excitation velocity, and the angle of observation. We have examined in detail the case of excitation of the medium by a periodic sequence of ultrashort pulses that travel with a superluminal velocity. We show that it is possible to excite oscillations of complex shapes and to control the radiation parameters of the resonant medium by changing the relationship between the pulse repetition rate, the medium resonant frequency, and the new frequency.

  1. Aging and Radiation Effects in Stockpile Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E.F.

    1999-03-25

    It is likely that aging is affecting the radiation hardness of stockpile electronics, and we have seen apparent examples of aging that affects the electronic radiation hardness. It is also possible that low-level intrinsic radiation that is inherent during stockpile life will damage or in a sense age electronic components. Both aging and low level radiation effects on radiation hardness and stockpile reliability need to be further investigated by using both test and modeling strategies that include appropriate testing of electronic components withdrawn from the stockpile.

  2. Use of hematological parameters to assess the efficiency of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) leaf extract in alleviation of the effect of ultraviolet--A radiation on African catfish Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822).

    PubMed

    Osman, Alaa G M; Koutb, Mostafa; Sayed, Alaa El-Din H

    2010-04-01

    The present study aimed to elucidate the negative impacts of UVA on some biochemical and hematological variables of the economically important African catfish, Clarias gariepinus and investigates the putative role of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) leaf extract in protection and/or alleviation of such negative impacts. Changes in the hematological and blood biochemical values often reflect alteration of physiological state. Blood parameters can be useful for the measurement of physiological disturbances in stressed fish and thus provide information about the level of damage in the fish. We found a significant (P<0.05) decrease in the red blood cell counts, hemoglobin and hematocrit in the groups exposed to UVA compared to the control groups. Exposure to UVA induced marked red cell shrinkage (increased mean cell hemoglobin concentration) and showed an elevation in mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin in the blood of the exposed fish compared to the control. A significant (P<0.05) reduction in the total white blood cells was recorded in the exposed fish compared to the control. The biochemical parameters (blood glucose, total plasma protein, blood cholesterol, plasma creatinine, aspartic amino transferase and alanine amino transferase) exhibited a significant increase in the blood of fish exposed to UVA. Methanolic extract of quince leaf before ripening of the fruits was analyzed by GC/MS. To investigate the biological impact of this extract and its biologically active components, this extract was tested for its putative role in alleviation of UVA effect on catfish. Quince leaf extract had the ability to prevent hematotoxic stress induced by UVA and resulted in enhancement of the immune system of catfish represented by significant (P<0.05) increase in the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes of the catfish. Quince extract also protected the red blood cells from UVA damage. To our knowledge this is the first report of the effect of quince leaf extract on

  3. Retrieving high-resolution surface solar radiation with cloud parameters derived by combining MODIS and MTSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W.; Qin, J.; Yang, K.; Liu, S.; Lu, N.; Niu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud parameters (cloud mask, effective particle radius and liquid/ice water path) are the important inputs in determining surface solar radiation (SSR). These parameters can be derived from MODIS with high accuracy but their temporal resolution is too low to obtain high temporal resolution SSR retrievals. In order to obtain hourly cloud parameters, the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is applied in this study to directly construct a functional relationship between MODIS cloud products and Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) geostationary satellite signals. Meanwhile, an efficient parameterization model for SSR retrieval is introduced and, when driven with MODIS atmospheric and land products, its root mean square error (RMSE) is about 100 W m-2 for 44 Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations. Once the estimated cloud parameters and other information (such as aerosol, precipitable water, ozone and so on) are input to the model, we can derive SSR at high spatio-temporal resolution. The retrieved SSR is first evaluated against hourly radiation data at three experimental stations in the Haihe River Basin of China. The mean bias error (MBE) and RMSE in hourly SSR estimate are 12.0 W m-2 (or 3.5 %) and 98.5 W m-2 (or 28.9 %), respectively. The retrieved SSR is also evaluated against daily radiation data at 90 China Meteorological Administration (CMA) stations. The MBEs are 9.8 W m-2 (5.4 %); the RMSEs in daily and monthly-mean SSR estimates are 34.2 W m-2 (19.1 %) and 22.1 W m-2 (12.3 %), respectively. The accuracy is comparable or even higher than other two radiation products (GLASS and ISCCP-FD), and the present method is more computationally efficient and can produce hourly SSR data at a spatial resolution of 5 km.

  4. Retrieving high-resolution surface solar radiation with cloud parameters derived by combining MODIS and MTSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenjun; Qin, Jun; Yang, Kun; Liu, Shaomin; Lu, Ning; Niu, Xiaolei

    2016-03-01

    Cloud parameters (cloud mask, effective particle radius, and liquid/ice water path) are the important inputs in estimating surface solar radiation (SSR). These parameters can be derived from MODIS with high accuracy, but their temporal resolution is too low to obtain high-temporal-resolution SSR retrievals. In order to obtain hourly cloud parameters, an artificial neural network (ANN) is applied in this study to directly construct a functional relationship between MODIS cloud products and Multifunctional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) geostationary satellite signals. In addition, an efficient parameterization model for SSR retrieval is introduced and, when driven with MODIS atmospheric and land products, its root mean square error (RMSE) is about 100 W m-2 for 44 Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations. Once the estimated cloud parameters and other information (such as aerosol, precipitable water, ozone) are input to the model, we can derive SSR at high spatiotemporal resolution. The retrieved SSR is first evaluated against hourly radiation data at three experimental stations in the Haihe River basin of China. The mean bias error (MBE) and RMSE in hourly SSR estimate are 12.0 W m-2 (or 3.5 %) and 98.5 W m-2 (or 28.9 %), respectively. The retrieved SSR is also evaluated against daily radiation data at 90 China Meteorological Administration (CMA) stations. The MBEs are 9.8 W m-2 (or 5.4 %); the RMSEs in daily and monthly mean SSR estimates are 34.2 W m-2 (or 19.1 %) and 22.1 W m-2 (or 12.3 %), respectively. The accuracy is comparable to or even higher than two other radiation products (GLASS and ISCCP-FD), and the present method is more computationally efficient and can produce hourly SSR data at a spatial resolution of 5 km.

  5. Some characteristics and effects of natural radiation.

    PubMed

    Mc Laughlin, J P

    2015-11-01

    Since life first appeared on the Earth, it has, in all its subsequent evolved forms including human, been exposed to natural radiation in the environment both from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources. Being an environmental mutagen, ionising natural radiation may have played a role of some significance in the evolution of early life forms on Earth. It has been estimated by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation that at the present time, exposure to natural radiation globally results in an annual average individual effective dose of about 2.4 mSv. This represents about 80 % of the total dose from all sources. The three most important components of natural radiation exposure are cosmic radiation, terrestrial radioactivity and indoor radon. Each of these components exhibits both geographical and temporal variabilities with indoor radon exposure being the most variable and also the largest contributor to dose for most people. In this account, an overview is given of the characteristics of the main components of the natural radiation environment and some of their effects on humans. In the case of cosmic radiation, these range from radiation doses to aircrew and astronauts to the controversial topic of its possible effect on climate change. In the case of terrestrial natural radiation, accounts are given of a number of human exposure scenarios. PMID:25904693

  6. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    William j. Weber; Lumin Wang; Jonathan Icenhower

    2004-07-09

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials.

  7. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2016-06-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  8. Dependence of erythemally weighted UV radiation on geographical parameters in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinli; Gao, Wei; Davis, John; Olson, Becky; Janson, George; Slusser, James

    2007-09-01

    The relationship between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface and geographical parameters is helpful in estimating the spatial distribution of UV radiation, which provides useful information to evaluate the potential impacts of enhanced UV levels on human health, agriculture, environment, and ecosystems for sustainable development. Measurements of erythemally weighted UV radiation at the sites of the United States Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVBMRP) monitoring network were analyzed to investigate the geographical distribution and seasonal variations. Twenty nine observation sites, which had continuous measurements during the recent six years, are selected for this study; twenty seven of them are distributed in the United States, including one in Hawaii and one in Alaska, and two of them are located in Canada along the United States border. The measurements were taken using the Yankee Environmental Systems Inc. (YES) UVB-1 ultraviolet pyranometer. This work focuses the data from the recent six years of 2001-2006 and the measurements during summer months (June-August) are emphasized. For each day, the measurements are integrated from sunrise to sunset to produce the daily UV dosage, which is then averaged for different seasons or for the whole year over the six years to generate the average daily UV dosage. A multivariable regression technique is exploited to characterize the dependence of UV dosages on geographical parameters, including latitude and altitude. The results show that, although there are many factors, such as clouds, ozone, aerosols, air pollutants, and haze, that affect the UV radiation intensity at a location, the latitude and altitude of the site are the primary factors that regulate the average daily UV dosage. On average over the last six years in the United States, more than 95% of the variability in averaged daily UV dosages can be explained by the latitude and altitude. Longitude is

  9. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detectors: Material parameters, radiation hardness, charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, S.

    1991-01-01

    For nearly two decades now hydrogenated amorphous silicon has generated considerable interest for its potential use in various device applications namely, solar cells, electrolithography, large-area electronics etc. The development of efficient and economic solar cells has been on the forefront of this research. This interest in hydrogenated amorphous silicon has been motivated by the fact that amorphous silicon can be deposited over a large area at relatively low cost compared to crystalline silicon. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon, frequently abbreviated as a-Si:H, used in solar-cell applications is a micron or less thick. The basic device structure is a p-i-n diode where the i layer is the active layer for radiation to interact. This is so because intrinsic a-Si:H has superior electrical properties in comparison to doped a-Si:H which serves the purpose of forming a potential barrier on either end of the i layer. The research presented in this dissertation was undertaken to study the properties of a-Si:H for radiation detection applications in physics and medicine.

  10. Overview of ICRP Committee 1: radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Morgan, W F

    2016-06-01

    This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The author passed away on 13 November 2015.Committee 1 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) addresses issues pertinent to tissue reactions, risks of cancer and heritable diseases, radiation dose responses, effects of dose rate, and radiation quality. In addition, it reviews data on the effects of radiation on the embryo/fetus, genetic factors in radiation response, and uncertainties in providing judgements on radiation-induced health effects. Committee 1 advises the Main Commission on the biological basis of radiation-induced health effects, and how epidemiological, experimental, and theoretical data can be combined to make quantitative judgements on health risks to humans. The emphasis is on low radiation doses, in the form of detriment-adjusted nominal risk coefficients, where there are considerable uncertainties in terms of the biology and the epidemiology. Furthermore, Committee 1 reviews data from radiation epidemiology studies and publications on the molecular and cellular effects of ionising radiation relevant to updating the basis of the 2007 Recommendations published in ICRP Publication 103 This paper will provide an overview of the activities of Committee 1, the updated work of the Task Groups and Working Parties, and the future activities being pursued. PMID:26635336

  11. The biological effects of UVA radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Urbach, F.; Gange, R.

    1986-01-01

    Interest in the biological effects of longwave radiation has increased dramatically in the last few years. The contributors to this state of the art volume discuss the most current knowledge of biological effects of UVA and provide guidelines regarding acceptable human exposure to this type of radiation. Contents include: historical aspects of UVA effects; mechanisms of UVA photosensitization; photorecovery by UVA; photoaugmentation of UVB effects by UVA; effects of UVA radiation on tissues of the eye; new UVA sunscreen; and recommendations for future research and possible actions.

  12. Managing the adverse effects of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Berkey, Franklin J

    2010-08-15

    Nearly two thirds of patients with cancer will undergo radiation therapy as part of their treatment plan. Given the increased use of radiation therapy and the growing number of cancer survivors, family physicians will increasingly care for patients experiencing adverse effects of radiation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to significantly improve symptoms of depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy, although they have little effect on cancer-related fatigue. Radiation dermatitis is treated with topical steroids and emollient creams. Skin washing with a mild, unscented soap is acceptable. Cardiovascular disease is a well-established adverse effect in patients receiving radiation therapy, although there are no consensus recommendations for cardiovascular screening in this population. Radiation pneumonitis is treated with oral prednisone and pentoxifylline. Radiation esophagitis is treated with dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, and viscous lidocaine. Radiation-induced emesis is ameliorated with 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and steroids. Symptomatic treatments for chronic radiation cystitis include anticholinergic agents and phenazopyridine. Sexual dysfunction from radiation therapy includes erectile dysfunction and vaginal stenosis, which are treated with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and vaginal dilators, respectively. PMID:20704169

  13. Air Temperature estimation from Land Surface temperature and solar Radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarini, Michele; Eissa, Yehia; Marpu, Prashanth; Ghedira, Hosni

    2013-04-01

    Air Temperature (AirT) is a fundamental parameter in a wide range of applications such as climate change studies, weather forecast, energy balance modeling, efficiency of Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells, etc. Air temperature data are generally obtained through regular measurements from meteorological stations. The distribution of these stations is normally sparse, so the spatial pattern of this parameter cannot be accurately estimated by interpolation methods. This work investigated the relationship between Air Temperature measured at meteorological stations and spatially contiguous measurements derived from Remote Sensing techniques, such as Land Surface Temperature (LST) maps, emissivity maps and shortwave radiation maps with the aim of creating a continuous map of AirT. For LST and emissivity, MSG-SEVIRI LST product from Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) has been used. For shortwave radiation maps, an Artificial Neural Networks ensemble model has been developed and previously tested to create continuous maps from Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) point measurements, utilizing six thermal channels of MSG-SEVIRI. The testing sites corresponded to three meteorological stations located in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where in situ measurements of Air Temperature were available. From the starting parameters, energy fluxes and net radiation have been calculated, in order to have information on the incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation and the incoming short-wave radiation. The preliminary analysis (day and Night measurements, cloud free) showed a strong negative correlation (0.92) between Outgoing long-wave radiation - GHI and LST- AirT, with a RMSE of 1.84 K in the AirT estimation from the initial parameters. Regression coefficients have been determined and tested on all the ground stations. The analysis also demonstrated the predominant impact of the incoming short-wave radiation in the AirT hourly variation, while the incoming

  14. Protective effects in radiation modification of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głuszewski, Wojciech; Zagórski, Zbigniew P.; Rajkiewicz, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Saturated character of ethylene/octene thermoplastic elastomers demands an application of nonconventional methods of crosslinking connections between chains of molecules. These are organic peroxides, usually in the presence of coagents or an application of ionizing radiation. Several approaches (radiation, peroxide, peroxide/plus radiation and radiation/plus peroxide) were applied in crosslinking of elastomere Engage 8200. Attention was directed to the protection effects by aromatic peroxides and by photo- and thermostabilizers on radiolysis of elastomers. Role of dose of radiation, dose rate of radiation as well as the role of composition of elastomere on the radiation yield of hydrogen and absorbtion of oxygen was investigated. DRS method was used to follow postirradiation degradation. Influence of crosslinking methods on properties of elastomers is described. Results were interpreted from the point of view of protective actions of aromatic compounds.

  15. Effects of Radiation on Commercial Power Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selva, Luis; Becker, Heidi; Chavez, Rosa; Scheick, Leif

    2006-01-01

    The effects of radiation on various commercial power devices are presented. The devices have proved to be very fragile to single event effects, with some of the devices actually succumbing to catastrophic SEE with protons.

  16. SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J.; Saul, L.; Wurz, P.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Frisch, P.; Gruntman, M.; Mueller, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Lyα. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (μ) has increased slightly from μ = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to μ = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

  17. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  18. Radiation Pneumonitis After Hypofractionated Radiotherapy: Evaluation of the LQ(L) Model and Different Dose Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; Ishikawa, Masayori; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the linear quadratic (LQ) model for hypofractionated radiotherapy within the context of predicting radiation pneumonitis (RP) and to investigate the effect if a linear (L) model in the high region (LQL model) is used. Methods and Materials: The radiation doses used for 128 patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy were converted to the equivalent doses given in fractions of 2 Gy for a range of {alpha}/{beta} ratios (1 Gy to infinity) according to the LQ(L) model. For the LQL model, different cut-off values between the LQ model and the linear component were used. The Lyman model parameters were fitted to the events of RP grade 2 or higher to derive the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The lung dose was calculated as the mean lung dose and the percentage of lung volume (V) receiving doses higher than a threshold dose of xGy (V{sub x}). Results: The best NTCP fit was found if the mean lung dose, or V{sub x}, was calculated with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The NTCP fit of other {alpha}/{beta} ratios and the LQL model were worse but within the 95% confidence interval of the NTCP fit of the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The V{sub 50} NTCP fit was better than the NTCP fit of lower threshold doses. Conclusions: For high fraction doses, the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy was the best method for converting the physical lung dose to predict RP.

  19. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices. [Review

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given.

  20. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  1. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  2. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V 100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V 100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  3. Ionization Parameter as a Diagnostic of Radiation and Wind Pressures in H II Regions and Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2012-10-01

    The ionization parameter {\\cal U} is potentially useful as a tool to measure radiation pressure feedback from massive star clusters, as it directly reflects the ratio of radiation to gas pressure and is readily derived from mid-infrared line ratios. We consider a number of physical effects which combine to determine the apparent value of {\\cal U} in observations encompassing one or many H II regions. An upper limit is set by the compression of gas by radiation pressure, when this is important. The pressure of shocked stellar winds and the presence of neutral clumps both tend to reduce {\\cal U} for a given intensity of irradiation. The most intensely irradiated regions are selectively dimmed by internal dust absorption of ionizing photons, leading to a bias for observations on galactic scales. We explore these effects in analytical and numerical models for dusty H II regions and use them to interpret previous observational results. We find that radiation pressure confinement sets the upper limit log _{10} {\\cal U}\\simeq -1 seen in individual regions. Unresolved starbursts are known to display a maximum value of ~= - 2.3. While lower, this is also consistent with a large portion of their H II regions being radiation pressure dominated, given the different technique used to interpret unresolved regions, and given the bias caused by dust absorption. We infer that many individual, strongly illuminated regions cannot be significantly overpressured by stellar winds, and that even when averaged on galactic scales, the shocked wind pressure cannot be large compared to radiation pressure. Therefore, most H II regions cannot be adiabatic wind bubbles. Our models imply a metallicity dependence in the physical structure and dust attenuation of radiation-dominated regions, both of which should vary strongly across a critical metallicity of about one-twentieth solar.

  4. IONIZATION PARAMETER AS A DIAGNOSTIC OF RADIATION AND WIND PRESSURES IN H II REGIONS AND STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2012-10-01

    The ionization parameter U is potentially useful as a tool to measure radiation pressure feedback from massive star clusters, as it directly reflects the ratio of radiation to gas pressure and is readily derived from mid-infrared line ratios. We consider a number of physical effects which combine to determine the apparent value of U in observations encompassing one or many H II regions. An upper limit is set by the compression of gas by radiation pressure, when this is important. The pressure of shocked stellar winds and the presence of neutral clumps both tend to reduce U for a given intensity of irradiation. The most intensely irradiated regions are selectively dimmed by internal dust absorption of ionizing photons, leading to a bias for observations on galactic scales. We explore these effects in analytical and numerical models for dusty H II regions and use them to interpret previous observational results. We find that radiation pressure confinement sets the upper limit log{sub 10}U{approx_equal}-1 seen in individual regions. Unresolved starbursts are known to display a maximum value of {approx_equal} - 2.3. While lower, this is also consistent with a large portion of their H II regions being radiation pressure dominated, given the different technique used to interpret unresolved regions, and given the bias caused by dust absorption. We infer that many individual, strongly illuminated regions cannot be significantly overpressured by stellar winds, and that even when averaged on galactic scales, the shocked wind pressure cannot be large compared to radiation pressure. Therefore, most H II regions cannot be adiabatic wind bubbles. Our models imply a metallicity dependence in the physical structure and dust attenuation of radiation-dominated regions, both of which should vary strongly across a critical metallicity of about one-twentieth solar.

  5. Tidal radiation. [relativistic gravitational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1977-01-01

    The general theory of tides is developed within the framework of Einstein's theory of gravitation. It is based on the concept of Fermi frame and the associated notion of tidal frame along an open curve in spacetime. Following the previous work of the author an approximate scheme for the evaluation of tidal gravitational radiation is presented which is valid for weak gravitational fields. The emission of gravitational radiation from a body in the field of a black hole is discussed, and for some cases of astrophysical interest estimates are given for the contributions of radiation due to center-of-mass motion, purely tidal deformation, and the interference between the center of mass and tidal motions.

  6. Variability and trend of mean cloud parameters and outgoing longwave radiation determined by satellite sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, G. I.; Susskind, J.

    2005-12-01

    Global energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system may change due to natural and man-made climate variations. For example, changes in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) can be regarded as a crucial indicator of climate variations. Clouds play an important role -still insufficiently assessed-, in the global energy balance on all spatial and temporal scales, and satellites can provide an ideal platform to measure cloud and large-scale atmospheric variables simultaneously. This is extremely important for developing more reliable cloud models, which could help to improve the representation of cloud-climate feedbacks (probably the least known ones, still hindering global warming predictions, for example) in global general circulation models. The TOVS series of satellites were the first to provide this type of information since 1979 on. OLR [Mehta and Susskind, 1999], cloud cover and cloud top pressure [Susskind et al., 1997] are among the key climatic parameters computed by the TOVS Path A algorithm using mainly the retrieved temperature and moisture profiles. Here we present validation efforts and preliminary trend analyses of TOVS-retrieved cloud top pressures [Pc] and "effective" (Aeff, a product of infrared emissivity at 11 μm and physical cloud cover or Ac) cloud fractions. For example, the TOVS and ISCCP [available since 1983] cloud top pressures correlate strongly. Decadal trends in Pc and Aeff/Ac are also similar. However, validation of the TOVS Aeff time series requires further effort, since the ISCCP provides the Ac time series only. We are also presenting encouraging agreements between MODIS and AIRS [which can be regarded as the "new and improved TOVS"] Pc and Aeff interannual variabilities for selected Months. We also present TOVS and AIRS OLR validation effort results and (for the longer-term TOVS) trend analyses. OLR interannual spatial variabilities from the available state-of-the-art CERES measurements and both from the AIRS [Susskind et al., 2003

  7. Flare loop radiative hydrodynamics. III - Nonlocal radiative transfer effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Fisher, G. H.; Mcclymont, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    The study has three goals. The first is to demonstrate that processes exist whose intrinsic nonlocal nature cannot be represented by local approximations. The second is to elucidate the physical nature and origins of these nonlocal processes. The third is to suggest that the methods and results described here may prove useful in constructing semiempirical models of the chromosphere by means more efficient than trial and error. Matrices are computed that describe the effect of a temperature perturbation at an arbitrary point in the loop on density, hydrogen ionized fraction, total radiative loss rate, and radiative loss rate of selected hydrogen lines and continua at all other points. It is found that the dominant nonlocal radiative transfer effects can be separated into flux divergence coefficient effects and upper level population effects. The former are most important when the perturbation takes place in a region of significant opacity. Upper level population effects arise in both optically thick and thin regions in response to nonlocal density, ionization, and interlocking effects.

  8. Effect of gamma radiation on honey quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, A.; Almeida-Muradian, L. B.; Sabato, S. F.

    2009-07-01

    Honey is one of the most complex substances produced by bees, mainly from the nectar of flowers. Gamma radiation is a technique that can be used to decrease the number of microbiological problems associated with food and increase the shelf life of certain products. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 (10 kGy) on some parameters used in honey quality control. Seven samples of pure honey were obtained from local markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2007. The methods used are in accordance with Brazilian Regulations. The physicochemical parameters analyzed were: moisture, HMF, free acidity, pH, sugars and ash. The results showed that gamma radiation, in the dose mentioned above, did not cause significant physicochemical alterations.

  9. Evaluation and optimization of the structural parameter of diesel nozzle basing on synchrotron radiation imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, H.; Li, L.

    2016-04-01

    Lacking of efficient methods, industry currently uses one only parameter—fuel flow rate—to evaluate the nozzle quality, which is far from satisfying the current emission regulations worldwide. By utilizing synchrotron radiation high energy X-ray in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), together with the imaging techniques, the 3D models of two nozzles with the same design dimensions were established, and the influence of parameters fluctuation in the azimuthal direction were analyzed in detail. Results indicate that, due to the orifice misalignment, even with the same design dimension, the inlet rounding radius of orifices differs greatly, and its fluctuation in azimuthal direction is also large. This difference will cause variation in the flow characteristics at orifice outlet and then further affect the spray characteristics. The study also indicates that, more precise investigation and insight into the evaluation and optimization of diesel nozzle structural parameter are needed.

  10. Overview of radiation effects research in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Robert C.; Cohn, Lewis M.; Taylor, Edward W.; Greenwell, Roger A.

    1995-05-01

    A brief overview of ongoing radiation effects research in photonics is presented focusing on integrated optic and acousto-optic components. A short summary of radiation-induced effects in electro-optic modulators, detector arrays, and other photonic technologies is presented along with extensive references. The coordinated radiation effects studies among researchers within the Tri-Service Organizations and international experimental teams are beginning to demonstrate consistent measurements of radiation-induced effects in photonic components and confirming earlier reported data. This paper will present an overview of these coordinated investigations and focus on key research being conducted with the AFMC Phillips Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, Defence Nuclear Agency, NATO Nuclear Effects Task Group, and the Tri-Service Photonics Coordinating Committee.

  11. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  12. Radiation effects in the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Coggle, J E; Lambert, B E; Moores, S R

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the principles of radiobiology that can explain the time of onset, duration, and severity of the complex reactions of the lung to ionizing radiation. These reactions have been assayed biochemically, cell kinetically, physiologically, and pathologically. Clinical and experimental data are used to describe the acute and late reactions of the lung to both external and internal radiation including pneumonitis, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. Acute radiation pneumonitis, which can be fatal, develops in both humans and animals within 6 months of exposure to doses greater than or equal to 8 Gy of low LET radiation. It is divisible into a latent period lasting up to 4 weeks; an exudative phase (3-8 weeks) and with an acute pneumonitic phase between 2 and 6 months. The latter is an inflammatory reaction with intra-alveolar and septal edema accompanied by epithelial and endothelial desquamation. The critical role of type II pneumonocytes is discussed. One favored hypothesis suggests that the primary response of the lung is an increase in microvascular permeability. The plasma proteins overwhelm the lymphatic and other drainage mechanisms and this elicits the secondary response of type II cell hyperplasia. This, in its turn, produces an excess of surfactant that ultimately causes the fall in compliance, abnormal gas exchange values, and even respiratory failure. The inflammatory early reaction may progress to chronic fibrosis. There is much evidence to suggest that pneumonitis is an epithelial reaction and some evidence to suggest that this early damage may not be predictive of late fibrosis. However, despite detailed work on collagen metabolism, the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis remains unknown. The data on radiation-induced pulmonary cancer, both in man and experimental animals from both external and internal irradiation following the inhalation of both soluble and insoluble alpha and beta emitting radionuclides are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on

  13. Measures of GCM Performance as Functions of Model Parameters Affecting Clouds and Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Mu, Q.; Sen, M.; Stoffa, P.

    2002-05-01

    This abstract is one of three related presentations at this meeting dealing with several issues surrounding optimal parameter and uncertainty estimation of model predictions of climate. Uncertainty in model predictions of climate depends in part on the uncertainty produced by model approximations or parameterizations of unresolved physics. Evaluating these uncertainties is computationally expensive because one needs to evaluate how arbitrary choices for any given combination of model parameters affects model performance. Because the computational effort grows exponentially with the number of parameters being investigated, it is important to choose parameters carefully. Evaluating whether a parameter is worth investigating depends on two considerations: 1) does reasonable choices of parameter values produce a large range in model response relative to observational uncertainty? and 2) does the model response depend non-linearly on various combinations of model parameters? We have decided to narrow our attention to selecting parameters that affect clouds and radiation, as it is likely that these parameters will dominate uncertainties in model predictions of future climate. We present preliminary results of ~20 to 30 AMIPII style climate model integrations using NCAR's CCM3.10 that show model performance as functions of individual parameters controlling 1) critical relative humidity for cloud formation (RHMIN), and 2) boundary layer critical Richardson number (RICR). We also explore various definitions of model performance that include some or all observational data sources (surface air temperature and pressure, meridional and zonal winds, clouds, long and short-wave cloud forcings, etc...) and evaluate in a few select cases whether the model's response depends non-linearly on the parameter values we have selected.

  14. Neutron flux spectra and radiation damage parameters for the Russian Bor-60 and SM-2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasiov, A.V.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to compare neutron irradiation conditions in Russian reactors and similar US facilities. Neutron fluence and spectral information and calculated radiation damage parameters are presented for the BOR-60 (Fast Experimental Reactor - 60 MW) and SM-2 reactors in Russia. Their neutron exposure characteristics are comparable with those of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (ERB-II), the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States.

  15. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels.

  16. Influence of gamma radiation on microbiological parameters of the ethanolic fermentation of sugar-cane must

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcarde, A. R.; Walder, J. M. M.; Horii, J.

    2003-04-01

    The influence of gamma radiation on reducing the population of some bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus that usually contaminate the sugar-cane must and its effects on acidity of the medium and viability of the yeast during fermentation were evaluated. The treatment with gamma radiation reduced the bacterial load of the sugar-cane must. Consequently, the volatile acidity produced during the fermentation of the must decreased and the viability of the yeast afterwards added increased.

  17. Effect of radiative heat transfer on the convective stability of a fluid in a slot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kural, O.

    1988-06-01

    A fluid, confined between two vertical flat plates, with a linear temperature gradient decreasing upwards, is investigated analytically for convective stability under the influence of radiative heat transfer. The effect of radiative transfer is accounted for by use of the Milne-Eddington differential approximation. It is shown that three dimensionless parameters influence the stability: the optical thickness, tau, a parameter A which compares radiative and conductive fluxes, and E, which combines the effects of boundary surface properties with the 'color' properties of the medium. It is shown that radiative heat transfer has a stabilizing effect on the system and that A and tau exert strong influences.

  18. Assurance Against Radiation Effects on Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: The Space Radiation Environment. The Effects on Electronics. The Environment in Action. NASA Approaches to Commercial Electronics: the mission mix, flight projects, and proactive research. Final Thoughts: atomic interactions, direct ionization, interaction with nucleus.

  19. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this multidisciplinary, multi-institutional research effort is to develop a fundamental understanding at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels of radiation effects in glass and ceramics that provides the underpinning science and models for evaluation an...

  20. Effects of solar radiation on glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Kinser, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation of selected glasses are reported. Optical property degradation is studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Strength changes are measured using a concentric ring bend test. Direct fracture toughness measurements using an indentation test are planned.

  1. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  2. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Mammalian Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaglow, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effects of radiation on dividing cells and factors influencing these effects; also briefly reviews the radical mechanism for radiation damage. Emphasizes the importance of oxygen in radiation effects. (CS)

  3. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We update previously published Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 data set. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux data sets. Our results clearly show that the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave, and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles, to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance data sets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  4. Fast Neutron Radiation Effects on Bacillus Subtili

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Ren, Zhenglong; Zhang, Jianguo; Zheng, Chun; Tan, Bisheng; Yang, Chengde; Chu, Shijin

    2009-06-01

    To examine the sterilizing effect and mechanism of neutron radiation, Bacillus subtilis var. niger. strain (ATCC 9372) spores were irradiated with the fast neutron from the Chinese fast burst reactor II(CFBR-II). The plate-count results indicated that the D10 value was 384.6 Gy with a neutron radiation dose rate of 7.4 Gy/min. The rudimental catalase activity of the spores declined obviously with the increase in the radiation dose. Meanwhile, under the scanning electron microscope, no visible influence of the neutron radiation on the spore configuration was detected even if the dose was increased to 4 kGy. The content and distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by neutron radiation at different doses were measured and quantified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Further analysis of the DNA release percentage (PR), the DNA breakage level (L), and the average molecular weight, indicated that DNA fragments were obviously distributed around the 5 kb regions at different radiation doses, which suggests that some points in the DNA molecule were sensitive to neutron radiation. Both PR and L varied regularly to some extent with the increase in radiation dose. Thus neutron radiation has a high sterilization power, and can induce falling enzyme activity and DNA breakage in Bacillus subtilis spores

  5. Radiation effects on polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    It is important to study changes in properties of polymeres after irradiation with charged particles, with ultraviolet radiation, and with combinations of both. An apparatus for this purpose has been built at the NASA Langley Research Center. It consists of a chamber 9 inches in diameter and 9 inches high with a port for an electron gun, another port for a mass spectrometer, and a quartz window through which an ultraviolet lamp can be focused. The chamber, including the electron gun and the mass spectrometer, can be evacuated to a pressure of 10 to the 8th power torr. A sample placed in the chamber can be irradiated with electrons and ultraviolet radiation separately, sequentially, or simultaneously, while volatile products can be monitored during all irradiations with the mass spectrometer. The apparatus described above has been used to study three different polymer films: lexan; a polycarbonate; P1700, a polysulfone; and mylar, a polyethylene terephthalate. All three polymers had been studied extensively with both electrons and ultraviolet radiation separately, but not simultaneously. Also, volatile products had not been monitored during irradiation for the materials. A high electron dose rate of 530 Mrads/hr was used so that a sufficient concentration of volatile products would be formed to yield a reasonable mass spectrum.

  6. Cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, J.; Chai, A.-T.; Mo, T.; Green, A. E. O.

    1977-01-01

    An Eppley radiometer and a Robertson-Berger sunburn meter are employed along with an all-sky camera setup to study cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation at the ground level. Semiempirical equations to allow for cloud effects presented in previous work are compared with the experimental data. The study suggests a means of defining eigenvectors of cloud patterns and correlating them with the radiation at the ground level.

  7. Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, S.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2010-12-14

    For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers such as LCLS and TESLA FEL, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is the emission of incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for frequencies comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension. If the emitted coherent energy becomes comparable to that of the incoherent emission, it has to be included in the taper as well. However, the coherent loss depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the practical operation of Free-Electron Lasers, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator radiation and transition undulator radiation for LCLS, and estimate whether the resulting energy losses are significant for the operation of LCLS.

  8. Effect-specific analysis of propagation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortgies, G.; Ruecker, F.; Dintelmann, F.; Jakoby, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of propagation measurements with the satellite OLYMPUS carried out at 12.5, 20, and 30 GHz at the Research Center of the Deutsche Bundespost Telekom are discussed. In particular, attenuation, scintillation, and depolarization measurements are analyzed with special emphasis on frequency scaling of the various effects.

  9. Effects of clouds on the Earth radiation budget; Seasonal and inter-annual patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, Harbans L.

    1992-01-01

    Seasonal and regional variations of clouds and their effects on the climatological parameters were studied. The climatological parameters surface temperature, solar insulation, short-wave absorbed, long wave emitted, and net radiation were considered. The data of climatological parameters consisted of about 20 parameters of Earth radiation budget and clouds of 2070 target areas which covered the globe. It consisted of daily and monthly averages of each parameter for each target area for the period, Jun. 1979 - May 1980. Cloud forcing and black body temperature at the top of the atmosphere were calculated. Interactions of clouds, cloud forcing, black body temperature, and the climatological parameters were investigated and analyzed.

  10. Application of neural networks for determining optical parameters of strongly scattering media from the intensity profile of backscattered radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotova, S P; Maiorov, I V; Maiorova, A M

    2007-01-31

    We analyse the possibilities of simultaneous measuring three optical parameters of scattering media, namely, the scattering and absorption coefficients and the scattering anisotropy parameter by the intensity profile of backscattered radiation by using the neural network inversion method and the method of adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system. The measurement errors of the absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy parameter are 20%, 5%, and 10%, respectively. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  11. Radiation transport and density effects in non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Vladimir I.; Fisher, Dimitri V.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2007-05-01

    We describe a model for self-consistent computations of ionic level populations and the radiation field in transient non-equilibrium plasmas. In this model, the plasma density effects are described using the effective-statistical-weights (ESW) formalism based on the statistics of the microscopic environment of individual ions. In comparison to earlier work, the ESW formalism is expanded to a self-consistent treatment of the radiative transfer. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the atomic-kinetics and radiative transfer computations may be performed for an arbitrary distribution of the free electrons. A plasma is presented by a finite number of cells, each with uniform thermodynamic parameters. The radiation field in each cell is computed by accounting for the radiation of entire plasma and of external sources. To demonstrate the predictions of the ESW approach and their difference from those of the traditional approach we apply the model to high-density plasmas. Based on hydrodynamic simulations of a laser-matter interaction, we use the model to analyze spectral line shapes, where the effects caused by the spatial dependence of the plasma flow velocity are demonstrated. In single-cell simulations, for acceleration of the computations, the model utilizes recently derived formula for the cell volume-average and direction-average specific intensity of radiation.

  12. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  13. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Corrales, L. Rene; Ness, Nancy J.; Williford, Ralph E.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Song, Jakyoung; Park, Byeongwon; Jiang, Weilin; Begg, Bruce D.; Birtcher, R. B.; Chen, X.; Conradson, Steven D.

    2000-10-02

    Radiation effects from the decay of radionuclides may impact the long-term performance and stability of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. In an effort to address these concerns, the objective of this project was the development of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, particularly on solid-state radiation effects and their influence on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study has employed experimental, theoretical and computer simulation methods to obtain new results and insights into radiation damage processes and to initiate the development of predictive models. Consequently, the research that has been performed under this project has significant implications for the High-Level Waste and Nuclear Materials focus areas within the current DOE/EM mission. In the High-Level Waste (HLW) focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. Ultimately, this research could result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  14. Radiation thermometer size-of-source effect testing using aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Liebmann, F.; Kolat, T.

    2013-09-11

    Size-of-source effect is an important attribute of any radiation thermometer. The effects of this attribute may be quantified in a number of different ways to include field-of-view, distance ratio, or size-of-source effect. These parameters provide needed information for the user of a radiation thermometer, as they aid in determining whether the measured object is large enough for adequate radiation thermometry measurement. Just as important, these parameters provide needed information for calibration. This information helps to determine calibration geometry, and it is needed for calibration uncertainty determination. For determination of size-of-source effect, there are a limited number of test methods furnished by the standards available today. The test methods available may be cumbersome to perform due to the cost of the required equipment and the time needed to set-up and perform the test. Other methods have been proposed. This paper discusses one such method. This method uses a circular aperture such as that used in radiation thermometer calibration. It describes the method both theoretically and mechanically. It then discusses testing done to verify this method comparing the results to those obtained while performing steps in current standards. Finally, based on this testing, the basis for a new standard test method is presented.

  15. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Rozhko, T V

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1--absence of effects (stress recognition), 2--activation (adaptive response), and 3--inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. PMID:25644753

  16. Effects of solar radiation on hair and photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Dario, Michelli F; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the negative effects of solar radiation (ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths) on hair properties like color, mechanical properties, luster, protein content, surface roughness, among others, will be discussed. Despite knowing that radiation damages hair, there are no consensus about the particular effect of each segment of solar radiation on the hair shaft. The hair photoprotection products are primarily targeted to dyed hair, specially auburn pigments, and gray shades. They are usually based on silicones, antioxidants and quaternary chemical UV filters that have more affinity for negatively charged hair surface and present higher efficacy. Unfortunately, there are no regulated parameters, like for skin photoprotection, for efficacy evaluation of hair care products, which makes impossible to compare the results published in the literature. Thus, it is important that researchers make an effort to apply experimental conditions similar to a real level of sun exposure, like dose, irradiance, time, temperature and relative humidity. PMID:26454659

  17. Radiation effect on rocket engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Huei-Huang

    1988-01-01

    The effects of radiation on the performance of modern rocket propulsion systems operating at high pressure and temperature were recognized as a key issue in the design and operation of various liquid rocket engines of the current and future generations. Critical problem areas of radiation coupled with combustion of bipropellants are assessed and accounted for in the formulation of a universal scaling law incorporated with a radiation-enhanced vaporization combustion model. Numerical algorithms are developed and the pertaining data of the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) and Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are used to conduct parametric sensitivity studies to predict the principal intercoupling effects of radiation. The analysis reveals that low enthalpy engines, such as the VTE, are vulnerable to a substantial performance set back by the radiative loss, whereas the performance of high enthalpy engines such as the SSME, are hardly affected over a broad range of engine operation. Additionally, combustion enhancement by the radiative heating of the propellant has a significant impact in those propellants with high absorptivity. Finally, the areas of research related with radiation phenomena in bipropellant engines are identified.

  18. On the measurement of in situ antenna radiation parameters from scattering measurements using a general scattering parametric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Enrique Alberto

    The new concept of antenna radiation center (ARC) is introduced and an empirical method to measure it from complex scattering data is presented. This concept is different from the well-known antenna phase center utilized in reflector antenna applications. A novel and efficient procedure based on a General Parametric Scattering Model (GSPM) is utilized to extract in-situ antenna radiation properties from complex antenna scattering data. This model based measurement approach has the advantage that it only requires two swept frequency scattering measurements in order to obtain antenna RCS, antenna gain and antenna radiation center in its integrated operational environment. The GSPM structure required to accurately extract arbitrary target scattering data is developed based on basic electromagnetic principles. The mathematical model structure consists of an early time response based on a point scattering model and on a late time response based on the Singularity Expansion Method (SEM). Both of these methods are implemented to take into account the target dispersion in a general fashion. Robust signal processing algorithms are utilized to extract the model parameters by exploiting the model symmetry properties in the time and frequency domains. In particular, super-resolution algorithms such as ESPRIT and MUSIC are utilized to extract scattering center location and resonance frequency information, while Least Squares techniques are used to estimate the different model amplitude coefficients as a function of time or frequency in an optimal (i.e. mean square sense) fashion. Theoretical derivations are provided to demonstrate that the GSPM can be utilized to extract antenna gain and radiation center information from scattering data. Synthetic and measured antenna scattering data are utilized to demonstrate the GSPM superior gain and radiation center results over traditional Fourier techniques. Gain transfer measurements results are also compared to the GSPM derived gain

  19. Occupational health effects of nonionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, M.G. )

    1992-07-01

    Nonionizing radiation includes electromagnetic energy distributed as near-ultraviolet and visible light, infrared radiation, microwaves, radio frequencies, and very low frequency and extremely low frequency alternating electric and magnetic fields, and almost every member of modern society is exposed to it in some form. Usually the intensity of exposure is low in the general population but can be greatly increased in the workplace. The forms of nonionizing radiation are described and their physical characteristics, occupational sources, biologic effects, and exposure criteria are delineated.90 references.

  20. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  1. Computed tomography imaging parameters for inhomogeneity correction in radiation treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Cao, Minsong; Johnstone, Peter A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate dosimetry in heterogeneous media (such as a patient' body) with the help of tissue characterization based on computed tomography (CT) number. However, CT number depends on the type of scanner, tube voltage, field of view (FOV), reconstruction algorithm including artifact reduction and processing filters. The impact of these parameters on CT to electron density (ED) conversion had been subject of investigation for treatment planning in various clinical situations. This is usually performed with a tissue characterization phantom with various density plugs acquired with different tube voltages (kilovoltage peak), FOV reconstruction and different scanners to generate CT number to ED tables. This article provides an overview of inhomogeneity correction in the context of CT scanning and a new evaluation tool, difference volume dose-volume histogram (DVH), dV-DVH. It has been concluded that scanner and CT parameters are important for tissue characterizations, but changes in ED are minimal and only pronounced for higher density materials. For lungs, changes in CT number are minimal among scanners and CT parameters. Dosimetric differences for lung and prostate cases are usually insignificant (<2%) in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and < 5% for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with CT parameters. It could be concluded that CT number variability is dependent on acquisition parameters, but its dosimetric impact is pronounced only in high-density media and possibly in IMRT. In view of such small dosimetric changes in low-density medium, the acquisition of additional CT data for financially difficult clinics and countries may not be warranted. PMID:27051164

  2. Computed tomography imaging parameters for inhomogeneity correction in radiation treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Das, Indra J; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Cao, Minsong; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2016-01-01

    Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate dosimetry in heterogeneous media (such as a patient' body) with the help of tissue characterization based on computed tomography (CT) number. However, CT number depends on the type of scanner, tube voltage, field of view (FOV), reconstruction algorithm including artifact reduction and processing filters. The impact of these parameters on CT to electron density (ED) conversion had been subject of investigation for treatment planning in various clinical situations. This is usually performed with a tissue characterization phantom with various density plugs acquired with different tube voltages (kilovoltage peak), FOV reconstruction and different scanners to generate CT number to ED tables. This article provides an overview of inhomogeneity correction in the context of CT scanning and a new evaluation tool, difference volume dose-volume histogram (DVH), dV-DVH. It has been concluded that scanner and CT parameters are important for tissue characterizations, but changes in ED are minimal and only pronounced for higher density materials. For lungs, changes in CT number are minimal among scanners and CT parameters. Dosimetric differences for lung and prostate cases are usually insignificant (<2%) in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and < 5% for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with CT parameters. It could be concluded that CT number variability is dependent on acquisition parameters, but its dosimetric impact is pronounced only in high-density media and possibly in IMRT. In view of such small dosimetric changes in low-density medium, the acquisition of additional CT data for financially difficult clinics and countries may not be warranted. PMID:27051164

  3. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation - charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis. PMID:24160185

  4. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation – charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis. PMID:24160185

  5. The application of distance transformation on parameter optimization of inverse planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-01-01

    In inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the dose specification and related weighting factor of an objective function for involved organs is usually predefined by a single value and then iteratively optimized, subject to a set of dose-volume constraints. Because the actual dose distribution is essentially non-uniform and considerably affected by the geometric shape and distribution of the anatomic structures involved, the spatial information regarding those structures should be incorporated such that the predefined parameter distribution is made to approach the clinically expected distribution. Ideally, these parameter distributions should be predefined on a voxel basis in a manual method. However, such an approach is too time-consuming to be feasible in routine use. In the present study, we developed a computer-aided method to achieve the goal described above, producing a non-uniform parameter distribution based on spatial information about the anatomic structures involved. The method consists of two steps: Use distance transformation technique to calculate the distance distribution of the structures. Based on the distance distribution, produce the parameter distribution via a function guided by prior knowledge. We use two simulated cases to examine the effectiveness of the method. The results indicate that application of a non-uniform parameter distribution produced by distance transformation clearly improves dose-sparing of critical organs without compromising dose coverage of the planning target. PMID:18714279

  6. Effect of processing parameters on autoclaved PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of processing parameters on the processability and properties of autoclaved fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites. Composites were fabricated from commercially available graphite fabric and glass fabric PMR polyimide prepreg materials. Process parameters investigated included degree of resin advancement, heating rate, and cure pressure. Composites were inspected for porosity by ultrasonic C scan and photomicrographic examination. Processing characteristics for each set of process parameters and the effect of process parameters on composite mechanical properties at room temperature and 600 F are described.

  7. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Hunter, Hamilton T.; Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.

    2002-07-01

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  8. Radiative heating and cooling in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus and responses to atmospheric and spectroscopic parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2015-11-01

    A sophisticated radiative transfer model that considers absorption, emission, and multiple scattering by gaseous and particulate constituents over the broad spectral range 0.125-1000 μm is applied to calculate radiative fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km). Responses of these quantities to spectroscopic and atmospheric parameter variations are examined in great detail. Spectroscopic parameter studies include the definition of an optimum spectral grid for monochromatic calculations as well as comparisons for different input data with respect to spectral line databases, continuum absorption, line shape factors, and solar irradiance spectra. Atmospheric parameter studies are based on distinct variations of an initial model data set. Analyses of actual variations of the radiative energy budget using atmospheric features that have been recently retrieved from Venus Express data will be subject of a subsequent paper. The calculated cooling (heating) rates are very reliable at altitudes below 95 (85) km with maximum uncertainties of about 0.25 K/day. Heating uncertainties may reach 3-5 K/day at 100 km. Using equivalent Planck radiation as solar insolation source in place of measured spectra is not recommended. Cooling rates strongly respond to variations of atmospheric thermal structure, while heating rates are less sensitive. The influence of mesospheric minor gas variations is small, but may become more important near the cloud base and in case of episodic SO2 boosts. Responses to cloud mode 1 particle abundance changes are weak, but variations of other mode parameters (abundances, cloud top and base altitudes) may significantly alter radiative temperature change rates up to 50% in Venus' lower mesosphere and upper troposphere. A new model for the unknown UV absorber for two altitude domains is proposed. It is not directly linked to cloud particle modes and permits an investigation of radiative effects regardless of

  9. Plutonium, Mineralogy and Radiation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    During the past fifty years, more than 1,800 metric tonnes of Pu and substantial quantities of other "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. Some of these transuranic elements can be a source of energy in fission reactions (e.g., 239Pu), a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np), or are of environmental concern because of their long half- lives and radiotoxicity (e.g., 239Pu, t1/2 = 24,100 years, and 237Np, t1/2 = 2.1 million years). There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these elements: 1.) to "burn" or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; 2.) to "sequester" the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of actinide-bearing minerals, such as zircon or isometric pyrochlore, A2B2O7 (A = rare earths; B = Ti, Zr, Sn, Hf; Fd3m; Z=8), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium. One of the principal concerns has been the accumulation of structural damage caused by alpha-decay events, particularly from the recoil nucleus. Systematic ion beam irradiation studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B = Zr, Hf) are stable to very high fluences of alpha-decay event damage. Some compositions, Gd2Ti2O7, are amorphized at relatively low doses (0.2 displacements per atom, dpa, at room temperature), while other compositions, Gd2Zr2O7, do not amorphize (even at doses of > 40 dpa at 25K), but instead disorder to a defect fluorite structure. By changing the composition of the A-site (e.g., substitution of different rare earth elements), the temperature above which the pyrochlore composition can no longer be amorphized, Tc, varies by >600 K (e.g., Lu2Ti2O7: Tc = 480 K; Gd2Ti2O7: Tc = 1120 K). The variation in response to irradiation as a function of composition can be used to model the long

  10. Neutron Fluences and Radiation Damage Parameters for the HFIR-MFE-RB-17J Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Glasgow, David C.; Baldwin, Charles A.

    2010-08-23

    The HFIR-MFE-RB-17J experiment was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of HFIR with a Eu2O2 shield. The irradiation was conducted from April 27, 2004, to May 18, 2005. The total exposure was for 353.6 FPD (full power days). Reactor dosimetry capsules were analyzed and the activation data were used to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluences and radiation damage parameters as a function of height relative to midplane of the reactor.

  11. Radiation effects in LDD MOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, R.L.; Adams, J.R.

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the response of lightly doped drain (LDD) n-channel transistors to ionizing radiation. Transistors were fabricated with conventional (non-LDD) and lightly doped drain (LDD) structures using both standard (non-hardened) and radiation hardened gate oxides. Characterization of the transistors began with a correlation of the total-dose effects due to 10 keV x-rays with Co-60 gamma rays. The authors find that for the gate oxides and transistor structures investigated in this work, 10 keV x-rays produce more fixed-charge guild-up in the gate oxide, and more interface charge than do Co-60 gamma rays. They determined that the radiation response of LDD transistors is similar to that of conventional (non-LDD) transistors. In addition, both standard and radiation-hardened transistors subjected to hot carrier stress before irradiation show a similar radiation response. After exposure to 1.0 x 10/sup 6/ rads(Si), non-hardened transistors show increased susceptibility to hot-carrier graduation, while the radiation-hardened transistors exhibit similar hot-carrier degradation to non-irradiated devices. The authors have demonstrated a fully-integrated radiation hardened process tht is solid to 1.0 x 10/sup 6/ rads(Si), and shows promise for achieving 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ rad(Si) total-dose capability.

  12. Retrieval of atmospheric parameters and radiative properties using Far-Infrared remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Maryam; Milz, Mathias; Martín-Torres, Javier; Palchetti, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The far-infrared (FIR) spectral region, covering wavelengths between 15 μm (667 cm‑1) and about 1 μm (10,000 cm‑1) plays a critical role in the climate system. A good knowledge of the radiation processes in this spectral region is of high interest for observations and understanding of heating and cooling rates, and global energy balance. Even though approximately 50% of terrestrial radiation occurs in the FIR and despite the critical FIR contribution to the Earth's energy balance, this spectral region has been only studied by a few number of instruments. Also the full FIR spectral region has not ever been directly observed from space. High spectral resolution observations in this region can help to enlighten its role for the global energy budget and atmospheric radiation processes. Among others, the reasons for this lack of measurements are: (i) the decreasing intensity of the radiation towards longer wavelengths; and, then (ii) the high sensitivity and cooling of the detectors requirements. These requirements are now overcome and future space missions will have the capability to measure the full FIR and then open fully one-half of the Earth's spectrum, and accordingly improve our ability to model and assess climate processes. The aim of the study is to assess the use of FIR remote sensing instruments for retrievals of atmospheric parameters and radiative properties such as heating and cooling rates. Case studies with simulated spectra, together with ground based measurements in the FIR at Dome C over the Antarctic Plateau at 3,230 m a.s.l. (above sea level) in clear-sky conditions, which been observed almost continuously since 2012, are used to assess the potential of remote sensing instruments in the far-infrared region. Appropriate selection of spectral channels to directly measure the far-infrared spectra as needed for future space missions and recommended.

  13. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Mode locking in solid-state lasers by self-focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Kalosha, V. P.; Mikhailov, V. P.; Poloiko, I. G.

    1995-11-01

    The self-consistent ABCD method is used to analyse the fundamental eigenmode of a four-mirror cavity with an active element and an aperture. Practical titanium-activated sapphire lasers with Kerr-lens mode locking are considered. The ranges of the cavity parameters are found in which the diffraction losses on an aperture are small and decrease with increase in the cavity field intensity as a result of self-focusing. These parameters of a four-mirror cavity are used to demonstrate that the investigated mechanism of discrimination of the radiation fluctuations should make it possible to generate a stable train of ultrashort pulses under conditions of cw and pulsed flashlamp pumping.

  14. Effect of correlated observation error on parameters, predictions, and uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, Claire R.; Green, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Correlations among observation errors are typically omitted when calculating observation weights for model calibration by inverse methods. We explore the effects of omitting these correlations on estimates of parameters, predictions, and uncertainties. First, we develop a new analytical expression for the difference in parameter variance estimated with and without error correlations for a simple one-parameter two-observation inverse model. Results indicate that omitting error correlations from both the weight matrix and the variance calculation can either increase or decrease the parameter variance, depending on the values of error correlation (ρ) and the ratio of dimensionless scaled sensitivities (rdss). For small ρ, the difference in variance is always small, but for large ρ, the difference varies widely depending on the sign and magnitude of rdss. Next, we consider a groundwater reactive transport model of denitrification with four parameters and correlated geochemical observation errors that are computed by an error-propagation approach that is new for hydrogeologic studies. We compare parameter estimates, predictions, and uncertainties obtained with and without the error correlations. Omitting the correlations modestly to substantially changes parameter estimates, and causes both increases and decreases of parameter variances, consistent with the analytical expression. Differences in predictions for the models calibrated with and without error correlations can be greater than parameter differences when both are considered relative to their respective confidence intervals. These results indicate that including observation error correlations in weighting for nonlinear regression can have important effects on parameter estimates, predictions, and their respective uncertainties.

  15. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanatt, Sweetie R.; Chawla, S. P.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour.

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation on CCD's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartsell, G. A.; Robinson, D. A.; Collins, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of 1.2 MeV gamma radiation and 20 MeV electrons on the operational characteristics of CCDs are studied. The effects of ionizing radiation on the charge transfer efficiency, dark current, and input/output circuitry are described. The improved radiation hardness of buried channel CCDs is compared to surface channel results. Both ion implanted and epitaxial layer buried channel device results are included. The advantages of using a single thickness SiO2 gate dielectric are described. The threshold voltage shifts and surface state density changes of dry, steam, and HCl doped oxides are discussed. Recent results on the recovery times and total dose effects of high dose rate pulses of 20 MeV electrons are reported.

  17. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  18. Maximum entropy inference of seabed attenuation parameters using ship radiated broadband noise.

    PubMed

    Knobles, D P

    2015-12-01

    The received acoustic field generated by a single passage of a research vessel on the New Jersey continental shelf is employed to infer probability distributions for the parameter values representing the frequency dependence of the seabed attenuation and the source levels of the ship. The statistical inference approach employed in the analysis is a maximum entropy methodology. The average value of the error function, needed to uniquely specify a conditional posterior probability distribution, is estimated with data samples from time periods in which the ship-receiver geometry is dominated by either the stern or bow aspect. The existence of ambiguities between the source levels and the environmental parameter values motivates an attempt to partially decouple these parameter values. The main result is the demonstration that parameter values for the attenuation (α and the frequency exponent), the sediment sound speed, and the source levels can be resolved through a model space reduction technique. The results of this multi-step statistical inference developed for ship radiated noise is then tested by processing towed source data over the same bandwidth and source track to estimate continuous wave source levels that were measured independently with a reference hydrophone on the tow body. PMID:26723313

  19. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices, volume 1. [radiation resistance of components for the Galileo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Martin, K. E.; Nichols, D. K.; Gauthier, M. K.; Brown, S. F.

    1981-01-01

    Steady-state, total-dose radiation test data are provided in graphic format, for use by electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. Data are presented by JPL for various NASA space programs on diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, silicon-controlled rectifiers, and optical devices. A vendor identification code list is included along with semiconductor device electrical parameter symbols and abbreviations.

  20. Effects of space environment on composites: An analytical study of critical experimental parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Carroll, W. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1979-01-01

    A generalized methodology currently employed at JPL, was used to develop an analytical model for effects of high-energy electrons and interactions between electron and ultraviolet effects. Chemical kinetic concepts were applied in defining quantifiable parameters; the need for determining short-lived transient species and their concentration was demonstrated. The results demonstrates a systematic and cost-effective means of addressing the issues and show qualitative and quantitative, applicable relationships between space radiation and simulation parameters. An equally important result is identification of critical initial experiments necessary to further clarify the relationships. Topics discussed include facility and test design; rastered vs. diffuse continuous e-beam; valid acceleration level; simultaneous vs. sequential exposure to different types of radiation; and interruption of test continuity.

  1. Radiation damage effects in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin; Salje, Ekhard

    2002-03-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO_4, is important for geology and geochronology, and has been proposed as a host material to immobilize highly radioactive materials from dismantled weapons and nuclear waste from power stations [1]. In these applications zircon is exposed to alpha-irradiation. Computer simulations have started to be employed to simulate radiation damage in zircon [2], but the origin and microscopic mechanisms of the most important structural changes in zircon - unit cell expansion and large macroscopic swelling at higher doses, strong shear deformation of the crystalline lattice, and polymerization of SiOn units [3], remain unknown. Here, we perform the molecular dynamics simulation of highly energetic recoils in zircon. Basing on the simulation results, we propose the simple picture of the density change in the damaged region that consists of the depleted and densified matter. We find that the experimentally observed structural changes originate from the interaction of the damaged region with the surrounding crystalline lattice: the shear of the lattice around the damaged region causes shear deformation and expansion of the unit cells. The polymers of connected SiOn polyhedra are most commonly present in the densified shell at the periphery of the damaged region. [1] R C Ewing et al, J. Mater. Res. 10, 243 (1995); W J Weber et al, B E Burakov et al, in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XIX, 25-32 and 33-40 (Plenum, New York, 1996); R C Ewing, et al in Crystalline Ceramics: Waste Forms for the Disposal of Weapons Plutonium, NATO Workshop Proceedings 65 (Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1996). [2] B Park et al, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 174108 (1-16) (2001); J P Crocombette and D Ghaleb, J. Nucl. Mater., 295, 167 (2001); K Trachenko et al, J. Appl. Phys., 87, 7702 (2000); K Trachenko et al, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt., 13, 1947 (2001). [3] T Murakami et al, Am. Min., 76, 1510 (1991); H D Holland and D Gottfried, Acta Cryst. 8, 291 (1955).; W J Weber, J. Am

  2. Significance of certain rustler aquifer parameters for predicting long-term radiation doses from WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Wofsy, C

    1980-09-01

    This report considers some aspects of the radionuclide transport modeling presented in documents published by the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) nuclear waste repository proposed for development in Southeastern New Mexico. The radionuclide transport modeling is used to predict worst possible consequences of a WIPP repository breach event in which waste enters groundwater. The aim of this report is to determine whether plausible changes in the parameters used by DOE to describe the flow of groundwater near the WIPP site could result in: (a) significantly faster radionuclide movement in groundwater; and (b) significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides in Pecos River water and correspondingly higher radiation doses than predicted by DOE. The conclusion reached is that while plausible changes in hydrologic conditions and waste-rock interactions might result in a significant reduction in the time it takes for radionuclides to reach the Pecos River, the shorter travel times do not result in significant increases in the estimated concentrations of radionuclides in the Pecos River nor in the radiation doses associated with the use of such water. Other ways in which parameter changes might affect these concentrations and doses are mentioned in the Conclusions section of the report, but are not the subject of this analysis.

  3. DECOHERENCE EFFECTS OF MOTION-INDUCED RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    P. NETO; D. DALVIT

    2000-12-01

    The radiation pressure coupling with vacuum fluctuations gives rise to energy damping and decoherence of an oscillating particle. Both effects result from the emission of pairs of photons, a quantum effect related to the fluctuations of the Casimir force. We discuss different alternative methods for the computation of the decoherence time scale. We take the example of a spherical perfectly-reflecting particle, and consider the zero and high temperature limits. We also present short general reviews on decoherence and dynamical Casimir effect.

  4. Effects of radiation reaction in relativistic laser acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hadad, Y.; Labun, L.; Rafelski, J.; Elkina, N.; Klier, C.; Ruhl, H.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this paper is twofold: to explore the response of classical charges to electromagnetic force at the level of unity in natural units and to establish a criterion that determines physical parameters for which the related radiation-reaction effects are detectable. In pursuit of this goal, the Landau-Lifshitz equation is solved analytically for an arbitrary (transverse) electromagnetic pulse. A comparative study of the radiation emission of an electron in a linearly polarized pulse for the Landau-Lifshitz equation and for the Lorentz force equation reveals the radiation-reaction-dominated regime, in which radiation-reaction effects overcome the influence of the external fields. The case of a relativistic electron that is slowed down by a counterpropagating electromagnetic wave is studied in detail. We further show that when the electron experiences acceleration of order unity, the dynamics of the Lorentz force equation, the Landau-Lifshitz equation and the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation all result in different radiation emission that could be distinguished in experiment. Finally, our analytic and numerical results are compared with those appearing in the literature.

  5. Radiation Effects on Current Field Programmable Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; LaBel, K.; Wang, J. J.; Cronquist, B.; Koga, R.; Penzin, S.; Swift, G.

    1997-01-01

    Manufacturers of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAS) take different technological and architectural approaches that directly affect radiation performance. Similar y technological and architectural features are used in related technologies such as programmable substrates and quick-turn application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). After analyzing current technologies and architectures and their radiation-effects implications, this paper includes extensive test data quantifying various devices total dose and single event susceptibilities, including performance degradation effects and temporary or permanent re-configuration faults. Test results will concentrate on recent technologies being used in space flight electronic systems and those being developed for use in the near term. This paper will provide the first extensive study of various configuration memories used in programmable devices. Radiation performance limits and their impacts will be discussed for each design. In addition, the interplay between device scaling, process, bias voltage, design, and architecture will be explored. Lastly, areas of ongoing research will be discussed.

  6. Monte Carlo study of the measurement of the Michel parameters in the radiative decay of the τ at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Aihara, H.; Epifanov, D.

    2016-07-01

    Michel parameters are kinematic values defined as bilinear combinations of the coupling terms in the general matrix element of the Fermi interaction where all possible Lorentz-invariant scalar, vector and tensor terms are included. The leptonic τ decays provide an excellent laboratory in which to measure the Michel parameters. Any deviation of these parameters from the Standard Model expectation would indicate New Physics. Two Michel parameters, η bar and ξκ, can only be measured in the radiative leptonic decay. These parameters have previously been measured in the radiative decay of the muon but as yet have not been measured in τ decays. We report the results of a feasibility study of the measurement of η bar and ξκ in radiative leptonic τ decays at Belle and Belle II.

  7. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Siemann, D.W.; Shapiro, D.L.; Van Houtte, P.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve.

  8. GENETIC AND CELLULAR EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was initiated with the overall objective of determining genetic and cellular effects from exposure of unicellular organisms to selected frequencies of CW and pulsed microwave radiation which is prevalent in the biosphere. Several tester strains of the bacter...

  9. Effects of fast neutron radiation on polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, S.; Laghari, J.R. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1989-08-01

    Capacitor-grade polypropylene films were irradiated in a 2-MW thermal nuclear reactor and exposed to fast neutron radiation at a flux rate of 2.6 x 10/sup 12/ neutron/cm/sup 2/s and gamma radiation at a level of 10/sup 7/ rad/h. The postirradiation effects on changes in the electrical and chemical properties of the films were studied for irradiation times up to 10 h. The electrical properties were dc and ac breakdown voltages, life under pulsed voltage stress, dielectric permittivity, dielectric losses, and volume resistivity. Chemical analysis was performed using the infrared spectroscopy technique. The results are discussed in this paper.

  10. Radiation damage effects in polarized deuterated ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    P.M. McKee

    2003-07-01

    Solid polarized targets utilizing deuterated ammonia, {sup 15}ND{sub 3}, offer an attractive combination of high polarization, high dilution factor and high resistance to polarization losses from radiation damage. Jefferson Laboratory Experiment E93-026 used {sup 15}ND{sub 3} as a target material in a five-month form factor measurement, allowing a detailed study of it's performance. The dependence of the deuteron polarization on received dose by the ammonia and the effectiveness of annealing the material to recover performance lost to radiation damage will be discussed.

  11. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  12. Inverse Faraday effect driven by radiation friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseykina, T. V.; Popruzhenko, S. V.; Macchi, A.

    2016-07-01

    A collective, macroscopic signature to detect radiation friction in laser–plasma experiments is proposed. In the interaction of superintense circularly polarized laser pulses with high density targets, the effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of a quasistatic axial magnetic field. This peculiar ‘inverse Faraday effect’ is investigated by analytical modeling and three-dimensional simulations, showing that multi-gigagauss magnetic fields may be generated at laser intensities \\gt {10}23 {{{W}}{{cm}}}-2.

  13. The absorption of solar radiation by the Arctic atmosphere during the haze season and its effects on the radiation balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, F. P. J.; Ackerman, T. P.; Gore, W. J. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of broadband spectral absorption of solar radiation by the Arctic atmosphere during haze events are reported. A preliminary analysis of the data indicates that large changes occur in the radiative transfer processes in the Arctic during haze events. For example, the planetary albedo is estimated to increase by 2.5 percent over the ocean and to decrease by 9 percent over the ice cap. Changes of such magnitude in the radiative parameters have the potential for significant climatic effects. The need for further experimental and modeling efforts is emphasized.

  14. LDEF solar cell radiation effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rives, Carol J.; Azarewicz, Joseph L.; Massengill, Lloyd

    1993-01-01

    Because of the extended time that the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission stayed in space, the solar cells on the satellite experienced greater environments than originally planned. The cells showed an overall degradation in performance that is due to the combined effects of the various space environments. The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the effect of the accumulated radiation on the solar cells, thereby helping Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to unravel the relative power degradation from the different environments.

  15. Inlet contour and flow effects on radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ville, J. M.; Silcox, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sound radiation from inlets with different contours with and without flow is being conducted to study the possibility of reducing noise radiated by aircraft engines. For each inlet configuration, complex directivity patterns and complex pressure reflection coefficients are measured as a function of a single space-time structure of the wave (up to a frequency of 4000Hz and an azimuthal wave number 6) and of flow velocity (up to Mach number 0.4) in a cylindrical duct located downstream the inlet. Experimental results of radiation from an unflanged duct are compared with theory. Effect of inlet contour and flow are deduced by comparing respectively unflanged duct and bellmouth measurements and, no flow and flow measurements with the bellmouth. Results are presented which indicate that the contour effect is significant near the cut-on frequency of a mode and emphasize the necessity for taking into account the inlet geometry in a radiation prediction. These results show also that internal flow has a weak effect on the amplitude of the directivity pattern

  16. Inlet contour and flow effects on radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ville, J. M.; Silcox, R. J.

    1980-06-01

    An experimental investigation of sound radiation from inlets with different contours with and without flow is being conducted to study the possibility of reducing noise radiated by aircraft engines. For each inlet configuration, complex directivity patterns and complex pressure reflection coefficients are measured as a function of a single space-time structure of the wave (up to a frequency of 4000Hz and an azimuthal wave number 6) and of flow velocity (up to Mach number 0.4) in a cylindrical duct located downstream the inlet. Experimental results of radiation from an unflanged duct are compared with theory. Effect of inlet contour and flow are deduced by comparing respectively unflanged duct and bellmouth measurements and, no flow and flow measurements with the bellmouth. Results are presented which indicate that the contour effect is significant near the cut-on frequency of a mode and emphasize the necessity for taking into account the inlet geometry in a radiation prediction. These results show also that internal flow has a weak effect on the amplitude of the directivity pattern

  17. Terahertz Radiation Effects and Biological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramundo Orlando, Alfonsina; Gallerano, Gian Piero

    2009-12-01

    We present a brief overview of the literature on biological applications and experimental data on the effects of THz radiation. The region of the electromagnetic spectrum from 0.1 to 10 THz is a frontier area for research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. This area has recently begun to be filled by a variety of sources of high quality radiation with a wide range of new technologies related to it. New sources have led to new science in many areas, as scientists begin to become aware of the opportunities for research progress in their fields using THz radiation. Therefore the opportunities for THz science in chemistry and biology are wide ranging. Some of them will extend the range of already established work, many others have not yet been realized but show great promise, and the rest fall somewhere in between.

  18. Radiation effects and crystallinity in polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, A.; Ungar, G.

    A survey is presented of a series of works on the influence of crystallinity on the radiation induced effects, cross-linking in particular, in polyethylene and paraffins. The principal theme is that the usual conception of random introduction of cross-links into a random assembly of chains needs to be modified in the presence of crystallinity in general and chain folding in particular. A long series of varied investigations on polyethylene have indeed demonstrated through a series of conspicuous effects that not only the ordering intrinsic to crystals and the increased intrachain contacts due to chain folding, but the higher level morphology, the nature and mutual arrangement in particular, have a major influence on the effectivity of the radiation leading to networks. Extension of the works to paraffins identified unsuspected mobility of both the radiation precursor species and the paraffin molecule itself (cross-linked and uncross-linked) within the crystal lattice, leading to phase segregation of the cross-linked species into microscopically identifiable domains together with identifying a trend for the cross-links themselves to form non-randomly in groups. The latter phenomenon, observed also in the molten state, indicates that the departure from randomness in the cross-linking process is much more deep-rooted than originally anticipated, and calls for a general reassessment of our knowledge of cross-linking. Other topics included as part of the general enquiry are the destruction of crystallinity, the promotion of hexagonal phase through radiation, the effect of morphology on chain scission and the general, still unsolved issue of how to assess cross-links by a direct analytical method (involving NMR). The hope is expressed that the bringing together of these varied pieces of work will serve the unification of presently widely diverse areas of experience and might influence developments in the radiation studies of paraffinoid substances.

  19. Effect of viscoplastic material parameters on polymer indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, V.; Needleman, A.

    2012-09-01

    The effect of material parameters characterizing viscoplastic flow on the indentation response of polymers is investigated using three-dimensional finite element analyses and a one-dimensional expanding spherical cavity model. The polymer is characterized by a finite strain elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation and two indenter shapes are considered; a conical indenter and a pyramidal indenter. The ability of the simpler expanding spherical cavity model to reproduce the trends obtained from the finite element solutions is assessed for both indenter shapes. Within the range of parameter variations considered, it is found that two material stress parameters characterizing the plastic flow resistance have the largest effect on the value of the indentation hardness although variations in other material parameters can lead to significant variations.

  20. Working group written presentation: Trapped radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vampola, Alfred L.; Stuckey, Wayne K.; Coulter, D.; Friebele, E. J.; Hand, K. J.; Hardy, D. A.; Higby, P.; Kolasinski, W. A.; Santoro, R. T.; Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the Trapped Radiation Effects Panel for the Space Environmental Effects on Materials Workshop are presented. The needs of the space community for new data regarding effects of the space environment on materials, including electronics are listed. A series of questions asked of each of the panels at the workshop are addressed. Areas of research which should be pursued to satisfy the requirements for better knowledge of the environment and better understanding of the effects of the energetic charged particle environment on new materials and advanced electronics technology are suggested.

  1. Hyper fast radiative transfer for the physical retrieval of surface parameters from SEVIRI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Blasi, M. G.; Venafra, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the theoretical aspects of a fast scheme for the physical retrieval of surface temperature and emissivity from SEVIRI data, their implementation and some sample results obtained. The scheme is based on a Kalman Filter approach, which effectively exploits the temporal continuity in the observations of the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) platform, on which SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) operates. Such scheme embodies in its core a physical retrieval algorithm, which employs an hyper fast radiative transfer code highly customized for this retrieval task. Radiative transfer and its customizations are described in detail. Fastness, accuracy and stability of the code are fully documented for a variety of surface features, showing a peculiar application to the massive Greek forest fires in August 2007.

  2. [On Individualization of Therapeutic Doses of Optical Radiation according to Changes in Parameters of Blood Oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Zalesskaya, G A

    2015-01-01

    The effect of in vivo laser irradiation by optical radiation on blood from different patients is studied. The objects of research were three series of blood samples from patients whose treatment course included extracorporeal UV blood irradiation, intravenous laser blood irradiation and supra-venous blood laser irradiation. Before and after irradiation the results on optic oximetry and gas content of venous blood were compared. The results of positive and negative influence of blood irradiation on characteristics of an oxygen exchange in separate patients and on the maintenance of some products of metabolism are represented. It is shown that at the same power dose, their changes depend on individual, initial values of hemoglobin oxygen saturation of venous blood and its photoinduced changes which objectively reflect individual sensitivity of patients to the action of optical radiation on blood and can be used for assessment of the efficiency of phototherapy. PMID:26349218

  3. An automatic and effective parameter optimization method for model tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Li, L.; Lin, Y.; Xue, W.; Xie, F.; Xu, H.; Huang, X.

    2015-11-01

    Physical parameterizations in general circulation models (GCMs), having various uncertain parameters, greatly impact model performance and model climate sensitivity. Traditional manual and empirical tuning of these parameters is time-consuming and ineffective. In this study, a "three-step" methodology is proposed to automatically and effectively obtain the optimum combination of some key parameters in cloud and convective parameterizations according to a comprehensive objective evaluation metrics. Different from the traditional optimization methods, two extra steps, one determining the model's sensitivity to the parameters and the other choosing the optimum initial value for those sensitive parameters, are introduced before the downhill simplex method. This new method reduces the number of parameters to be tuned and accelerates the convergence of the downhill simplex method. Atmospheric GCM simulation results show that the optimum combination of these parameters determined using this method is able to improve the model's overall performance by 9 %. The proposed methodology and software framework can be easily applied to other GCMs to speed up the model development process, especially regarding unavoidable comprehensive parameter tuning during the model development stage.

  4. Neural network radiative transfer solvers for the generation of high resolution solar irradiance spectra parameterized by cloud and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Kazadzis, S.; Keramitsoglou, I.; Kiranoudis, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a neural network (NN) model for instantaneous and accurate estimation of solar radiation spectra and budgets geared toward satellite cloud data using a ≈2.4 M record, high-spectral resolution look up table (LUT) generated with the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Two NN solvers, one for clear sky conditions dominated by aerosol and one for cloudy skies, were trained on a normally-distributed and multiparametric subset of the LUT that spans a very broad class of atmospheric and meteorological conditions as inputs with corresponding high resolution solar irradiance target spectra as outputs. The NN solvers were tested by feeding them with a large (10 K record) "off-grid" random subset of the LUT spanning the training data space, and then comparing simulated outputs with target values provided by the LUT. The NN solvers demonstrated a capability to interpolate accurately over the entire multiparametric space. Once trained, the NN solvers allow for high-speed estimation of solar radiation spectra with high spectral resolution (1 nm) and for a quantification of the effect of aerosol and cloud optical parameters on the solar radiation budget without the need for a massive database. The cloudy sky NN solver was applied to high spatial resolution (54 K pixel) cloud data extracted from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation 3 (MSG3) satellite and demonstrated that coherent maps of spectrally-integrated global horizontal irradiance at this resolution can be produced on the order of 1 min.

  5. Key Parameters for the Inconsistencies of the Incoming Solar Radiation Boundary Condition in Global Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, Yoko; Raschke, Ehrhard; Kinne, Stefan; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Bakan, Stefan; Emori, Seita; Giorgetta, Marco; Kopp, Greg; Saito, Fuyuki; Timm, Oliver; Wild, Martin

    2009-03-01

    By a comparison of the insolation, computed by 19 different climate models for the International Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC-AR4) test period from 1980 to 1999, it is shown that those models used different values for the solar constant and for its solar cycle variations. Meridional profiles for the monthly incoming radiation displayed diversities of up to ±10 Wm-2, especially during the transient seasons. Sensitivity studies with minima and maxima for the assumed orbital parameters of the Earth show almost no change. However, the different temporal partitioning for onset and length of individual months based on different calendars (e.g. simplifications such as 30 days for each month) results in the difference in the insolation, which is strongly resemble in amount and in zonal pattern the observed diversity of the insolation in IPCC models. Contributing error sources are also different assumptions for cut-off angles at low sun-elevations and differences in increment-difference during spatial and temporal integrations. Possible impacts of these contributing errors in climate modeling are investigated within a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. It is found that monthly radiative fluxes, humidity, and temperature have a difference between the two vernal equinox experiments. Although it remained within the magnitude of the inter-model difference, the difference is systematic.

  6. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L; Ye, Y; Boyd, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) and aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly improves

  7. Estimation of Microphysical and Radiative Parameters of Precipitating Cloud Systems Using mm-Wavelength Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.

    2009-03-01

    A remote sensing approach is described to retrieve cloud and rainfall parameters within the same precipitating system. This approach is based on mm-wavelength radar signal attenuation effects which are observed in a layer of liquid precipitation containing clouds and rainfall. The parameters of ice clouds in the upper part of startiform precipitating systems are then retrieved using the absolute measurements of radar reflectivity. In case of the ground-based radar location, these measurements are corrected for attenuation in the intervening layer of liquid hydrometers.

  8. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  9. Drosophila Melanogaster Show a Threshold Effect in Response to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Antosh, Michael; Fox, David; Hasselbacher, Thomas; Lanou, Robert; Neretti, Nicola; Cooper, Leon N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the biological effects of radiation using adult Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism, focusing on gene expression and lifespan analysis to determine the effect of different radiation doses. Our results support a threshold effect in response to radiation: no effect on lifespan and no permanent effect on gene expression is seen at incident radiation levels below 100 J/kg. We also find that it is more appropriate to compare radiation effects in flies using the absorbed energy rather than incident radiation levels. PMID:25552957

  10. An Effective Parameter Screening Strategy for High Dimensional Watershed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Y. P.; Martinez, C. J.; Munoz-Carpena, R.

    2014-12-01

    Watershed simulation models can assess the impacts of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on natural systems. These models have become important tools for tackling a range of water resources problems through their implementation in the formulation and evaluation of Best Management Practices, Total Maximum Daily Loads, and Basin Management Action Plans. For accurate applications of watershed models they need to be thoroughly evaluated through global uncertainty and sensitivity analyses (UA/SA). However, due to the high dimensionality of these models such evaluation becomes extremely time- and resource-consuming. Parameter screening, the qualitative separation of important parameters, has been suggested as an essential step before applying rigorous evaluation techniques such as the Sobol' and Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) methods in the UA/SA framework. The method of elementary effects (EE) (Morris, 1991) is one of the most widely used screening methodologies. Some of the common parameter sampling strategies for EE, e.g. Optimized Trajectories [OT] (Campolongo et al., 2007) and Modified Optimized Trajectories [MOT] (Ruano et al., 2012), suffer from inconsistencies in the generated parameter distributions, infeasible sample generation time, etc. In this work, we have formulated a new parameter sampling strategy - Sampling for Uniformity (SU) - for parameter screening which is based on the principles of the uniformity of the generated parameter distributions and the spread of the parameter sample. A rigorous multi-criteria evaluation (time, distribution, spread and screening efficiency) of OT, MOT, and SU indicated that SU is superior to other sampling strategies. Comparison of the EE-based parameter importance rankings with those of Sobol' helped to quantify the qualitativeness of the EE parameter screening approach, reinforcing the fact that one should use EE only to reduce the resource burden required by FAST/Sobol' analyses but not to replace it.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Inversion Approaches of the Radiative Transfer Model for Estimation of Crop Biophysical Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, Nilimesh; Sahoo, Rabi N.; Sehgal, Vinay K.; Krishna, Gopal; Pargal, Sourabh; Pradhan, Sanatan; Gupta, Vinod K.; Kumar, Dasika Nagesh

    2015-04-01

    The inversion of canopy reflectance models is widely used for the retrieval of vegetation properties from remote sensing. This study evaluates the retrieval of soybean biophysical variables of leaf area index, leaf chlorophyll content, canopy chlorophyll content, and equivalent leaf water thickness from proximal reflectance data integrated broadbands corresponding to moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer, thematic mapper, and linear imaging self scanning sensors through inversion of the canopy radiative transfer model, PROSAIL. Three different inversion approaches namely the look-up table, genetic algorithm, and artificial neural network were used and performances were evaluated. Application of the genetic algorithm for crop parameter retrieval is a new attempt among the variety of optimization problems in remote sensing which have been successfully demonstrated in the present study. Its performance was as good as that of the look-up table approach and the artificial neural network was a poor performer. The general order of estimation accuracy for parameters irrespective of inversion approaches was leaf area index > canopy chlorophyll content > leaf chlorophyll content > equivalent leaf water thickness. Performance of inversion was comparable for broadband reflectances of all three sensors in the optical region with insignificant differences in estimation accuracy among them.

  12. Hourly global and diffuse radiation of Lagos, Nigeria-correlation with some atmospheric parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chendo, M.A.C.; Maduekwe, A.A.L. )

    1994-03-01

    The influence of four climatic parameters on the hourly diffuse fraction in Lagos, Nigeria, has been studied. Using data for two years, new correlations were established. The standard error of the Liu and Jordan-type equation was reduced by 12.83% when solar elevation, ambient temperature, and relative humidity were used together as predictor variables for the entire data set. Ambient temperature and relative humidity proved to be very important variables for predicting the diffuse fraction of the solar radiation passing through the humid atmosphere of the coastal and tropic city of Lagos. Seasonal analysis carried out with the data showed improvements on the standard errors for the new seasonal correlations. In the case of the dry season, the improvement was 18.37%, whole for the wet season, this was 12.37%. Comparison with existing correlations showed that the performance of the one parameter model (namely K[sub t]), of Orgill and Hollands and Reindl, Beckman, and Duffie were very different from the Liu and Jordan-type model obtained for Lagos.

  13. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  14. Structuring of material parameters in lithium niobate crystals with low-mass, high-energy ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peithmann, K.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Goetze, J.; Haaks, M.; Hattermann, H.; Haubrich, S.; Hinterberger, F.; Jentjens, L.; Mader, W.; Raeth, N. L.; Schmid, H.; Zamani-Meymian, M.-R.; Maier, K.

    2011-10-01

    Ferroelectric lithium niobate crystals offer a great potential for applications in modern optics. To provide powerful optical components, tailoring of key material parameters, especially of the refractive index n and the ferroelectric domain landscape, is required. Irradiation of lithium niobate crystals with accelerated ions causes strong structured modifications in the material. The effects induced by low-mass, high-energy ions (such as 3He with 41 MeV, which are not implanted, but transmit through the entire crystal volume) are reviewed. Irradiation yields large changes of the refractive index Δn, improved domain engineering capability within the material along the ion track, and waveguiding structures. The periodic modification of Δn as well as the formation of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) (supported by radiation damage) is described. Two-step knock-on displacement processes, 3He→Nb and 3He→O causing thermal spikes, are identified as origin for the material modifications.

  15. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  16. An automatic and effective parameter optimization method for model tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Li, L.; Lin, Y.; Xue, W.; Xie, F.; Xu, H.; Huang, X.

    2015-05-01

    Physical parameterizations in General Circulation Models (GCMs), having various uncertain parameters, greatly impact model performance and model climate sensitivity. Traditional manual and empirical tuning of these parameters is time consuming and ineffective. In this study, a "three-step" methodology is proposed to automatically and effectively obtain the optimum combination of some key parameters in cloud and convective parameterizations according to a comprehensive objective evaluation metrics. Different from the traditional optimization methods, two extra steps, one determines parameter sensitivity and the other chooses the optimum initial value of sensitive parameters, are introduced before the downhill simplex method to reduce the computational cost and improve the tuning performance. Atmospheric GCM simulation results show that the optimum combination of these parameters determined using this method is able to improve the model's overall performance by 9%. The proposed methodology and software framework can be easily applied to other GCMs to speed up the model development process, especially regarding unavoidable comprehensive parameters tuning during the model development stage.

  17. Radiation damage effects in CZT drift strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe; Jensen, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    At DSRI, in collaboration with the cyclotron facility at Copenhagen University Hospital, we have performed a study of radiation effects exposing a 2.7 mm thick CZT drift strip detector to 30 MeV protons. The detector characteristics were evaluated after exposure to a number of dose loads in the range from 2*108 to 60*108 p+/cm2. Even for the highest dose loads, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as function of depth inside the detector material. A numerical model that emulates the physical processes of the charge transport in the CZT detector was used to derive the charge trapping parameter , μτe (the product of charge mobility and trapping time) as function of dose. The analysis showed that the electron trapping increased proportional with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (μτe)-1rad =(2.5±0.2)*10-7*Φ (V/cm2) with the proton fluence, Φ in p+/cm2. The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well the damage profile calculated using the standard Monte Carlo simulations, TRIM for the proton induced radiation effects. The present results suggest that proton induced nuclear reactions contribute significantly to the radiation damage. Further work will elaborate on these effects. The detector energy resolution was investigated as function of proton dose. It was found that the observed degradation is well explained by the decrease of μτe when the fluctuations of the electron path length are taken into account. The proton irradiation produced In meta stable isotopes in the CZT material. Their decay and production yield as function of depth were analyzed.

  18. Transverse effects of microbunch radiative interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Shiltsev, V.D.

    1996-06-03

    In this article the authors study effects of microbunch cooperative electromagnetic radiation in a bend on transverse beam dynamics. An overtaking radiative interaction between different parts of the bunch results in three major forces variable along the bunch. Longitudinal force leads to energy loss and causes the bunch emittance growth in the bend due to the dispersion effect. Radial force consists of logarithmically large ``Talman`` centrifugal force and smaller centripetal force. Due to general radius-energy dependence in the bend, the ``Talman`` force does not affect beam dynamics while the centripetal force leads to projected emittance growth. Finally, radial and vertical focusing forces lead to trajectory distortions which vary along the bunch. These cooperative forces significantly affect the dynamics of short high-populated bunch in bends.

  19. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-05-17

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

  20. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Konzek, G.J.

    1983-07-01

    Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

  1. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan Allen; Marshall, Paul W.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Gordon, Michael S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Schwank, James R.; Dodds, Nathaniel A.; Castaneda, Carlos M.; Berg, Melanie D.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; Seidleck, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  2. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, J. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.; LaBel, K. A.; Schwank, J. R.; Dodds, N. A.; Castaneda, C. M.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.; Seidleck, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  3. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  4. Space Radiation Effects in Advanced Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    Memory storage requirements in space systems have steadily increased, much like storage requirements in terrestrial systems. Large arrays of dynamic memories (DRAMs) have been used in solid-state recorders, relying on a combination of shielding and error-detection-and correction (EDAC) to overcome the extreme sensitivity of DRAMs to space radiation. For example, a 2-Gbit memory (with 4-Mb DRAMs) used on the Clementine mission functioned perfectly during its moon mapping mission, in spite of an average of 71 memory bit flips per day from heavy ions. Although EDAC worked well with older types of memory circuits, newer DRAMs use extremely complex internal architectures which has made it increasingly difficult to implement EDAC. Some newer DRAMs have also exhibited catastrophic latchup. Flash memories are an intriguing alternative to DRAMs because of their nonvolatile storage and extremely high storage density, particularly for applications where writing is done relatively infrequently. This paper discusses radiation effects in advanced flash memories, including general observations on scaling and architecture as well as the specific experience obtained at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in evaluating high-density flash memories for use on the NASA mission to Europa, one of Jupiter's moons. This particular mission must pass through the Jovian radiation belts, which imposes a very demanding radiation requirement.

  5. Coloured noise effects on deformation parameters of permanent GPS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razeghi, S. M.; Amiri-Simkooei, A. R.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Deformation analysis in general and strain analysis in particular using permanent GPS networks require proper analysis of time-series in which all functional effects are taken into consideration and all stochastic effects are captured using an appropriate noise model. This contribution addresses both issues when considering the strain parameters of a GPS network. Estimates of spatial correlation, time correlated noise, and multivariate power spectrum for daily position time-series of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) stations collected between 1996 and 2011 are obtained. Significant signals with periods of 13.63 d and those related to the GPS draconitic year are identified in these time-series. We aim to assess the effect of a realistic noise model of the series on the uncertainties of the strain parameters including displacements, normal and shear strains, and rotations. For the SCIGN network considered, the following results are highlighted. Contrary to the common belief, the uncertainties of the displacements parameters become smaller when taking a realistic noise model into account. This however was not the case when assessing the noise characteristics of the normal and shear strain, and rotation parameters. The uncertainties increase nearly by a factor of two, in agreement to what is expected. Some of the significant deformation parameters of the white noise model become less significant in case of the realistic noise model.

  6. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  7. Estimation of effective hydrogeological parameters in heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-Tsung; Tan, Yih-Chi; Chen, Chu-Hui; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Wu, Shih-Ching; Ke, Kai-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    SummaryObtaining reasonable hydrological input parameters is a key challenge in groundwater modeling. Analysis of temporal evolution during pump-induced drawdown is one common approach used to estimate the effective transmissivity and storage coefficients in a heterogeneous aquifer. In this study, we propose a Modified Tabu search Method (MTM), an improvement drawn from an alliance between the Tabu Search (TS) and the Adjoint State Method (ASM) developed by Tan et al. (2008). The latter is employed to estimate effective parameters for anisotropic, heterogeneous aquifers. MTM is validated by several numerical pumping tests. Comparisons are made to other well-known techniques, such as the type-curve method (TCM) and the straight-line method (SLM), to provide insight into the challenge of determining the most effective parameter for an anisotropic, heterogeneous aquifer. The results reveal that MTM can efficiently obtain the best representative and effective aquifer parameters in terms of the least mean square errors of the drawdown estimations. The use of MTM may involve less artificial errors than occur with TCM and SLM, and lead to better solutions. Therefore, effective transmissivity is more likely to be comprised of the geometric mean of all transmissivities within the cone of depression based on a precise estimation of MTM. Further investigation into the applicability of MTM shows that a higher level of heterogeneity in an aquifer can induce an uncertainty in estimations, while the changes in correlation length will affect the accuracy of MTM only once the degree of heterogeneity has also risen.

  8. Jupiters radiation belts and their effects on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. H.; Divita, E. L.; Gigas, G.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of electron and proton radiation on spacecraft which will operate in the trapped radiation belts of the planet Jupiter are described, and the techniques and results of the testing and simulation used in the radiation effects program are discussed. Available data from the Pioneer 10 encounter of Jupiter are compared with pre-encounter models of the Jupiter radiation belts. The implications that the measured Jovian radiation belts have for future missions are considered.

  9. On the effect of response transformations in sequential parameter optimization.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Tobias; Wessing, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Parameter tuning of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) is attracting more and more interest. In particular, the sequential parameter optimization (SPO) framework for the model-assisted tuning of stochastic optimizers has resulted in established parameter tuning algorithms. In this paper, we enhance the SPO framework by introducing transformation steps before the response aggregation and before the actual modeling. Based on design-of-experiments techniques, we empirically analyze the effect of integrating different transformations. We show that in particular, a rank transformation of the responses provides significant improvements. A deeper analysis of the resulting models and additional experiments with adaptive procedures indicates that the rank and the Box-Cox transformation are able to improve the properties of the resultant distributions with respect to symmetry and normality of the residuals. Moreover, model-based effect plots document a higher discriminatory power obtained by the rank transformation. PMID:22129277

  10. 47 CFR 95.855 - Transmitter effective radiated power limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transmitter effective radiated power limitation. The effective radiated power (ERP) of each CTS and RTU shall... with an ERP exceeding 20 watts. No mobile RTU may transmit with an ERP exceeding 4 watts....

  11. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of ground and airborne stations... peak ERP of airborne mobile station transmitters must not exceed 12 Watts. (b) The peak ERP of...

  12. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage

  13. Quantifying Morphological Parameters of the Terminal Branching Units in a Mouse Lung by Phase Contrast Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeongeun; Kim, Miju; Kim, Seunghwan; Lee, Jinwon

    2013-01-01

    An effective technique of phase contrast synchrotron radiation computed tomography was established for the quantitative analysis of the microstructures in the respiratory zone of a mouse lung. Heitzman’s method was adopted for the whole-lung sample preparation, and Canny’s edge detector was used for locating the air-tissue boundaries. This technique revealed detailed morphology of the respiratory zone components, including terminal bronchioles and alveolar sacs, with sufficiently high resolution of 1.74 µm isotropic voxel size. The technique enabled visual inspection of the respiratory zone components and comprehension of their relative positions in three dimensions. To check the method’s feasibility for quantitative imaging, morphological parameters such as diameter, surface area and volume were measured and analyzed for sixteen randomly selected terminal branching units, each consisting of a terminal bronchiole and a pair of succeeding alveolar sacs. The four types of asymmetry ratios concerning alveolar sac mouth diameter, alveolar sac surface area, and alveolar sac volume are measured. This is the first ever finding of the asymmetry ratio for the terminal bronchioles and alveolar sacs, and it is noteworthy that an appreciable degree of branching asymmetry was observed among the alveolar sacs at the terminal end of the airway tree, despite the number of samples was small yet. The series of efficient techniques developed and confirmed in this study, from sample preparation to quantification, is expected to contribute to a wider and exacter application of phase contrast synchrotron radiation computed tomography to a variety of studies. PMID:23704918

  14. Radiation and transmutation effects relevant to solid nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, E.R.; Roy, R.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1981-03-15

    Radiation effects in insulating solids are discussed in a general way as an introduction to the quite sparse published work on radiation effects in candidate nuclear waste forms other than glasses. Likely effects of transmutation in crystals and the chemical mitigation strategy are discussed. It seems probable that radiation effects in solidified HLW will not be serious if the actinides can be wholly incorporated in such radiation-resistant phases as monazite or uraninite.

  15. Radiation effects on high performance polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Polymer matrix materials are candidates for use in large space antennas and space platforms that may be deployed in geosynchronous orbit 22,500 miles above the Earth. A principal concern is the long term effects of an environment that is hostile to organic polymers, including high energy electromagnetic radiation, bombardment by charged particles, and large abrupt changes in temperature. Two polyarylene ethers which might be utilized as models for polymers in space applications were subjected to dosages of 70 keV electrons up to 3.4 x 10 to the 10th power rad. The irradiated films were then examined to determine the effects of the high-energy electrons.

  16. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  17. Effects of cutting parameters during turning 100C6 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, R.; Chibane, H.

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the paper is to evaluate the effects of cutting parameters in terms of cutting speed, depth of cut and feed rate on the influence of the surface roughness, consumed power, cutting time and tool vibrations during turning process. The material chosen in this case was 100C6 steel in dry conditions. The effects of the selected process parameters have been investigated using full factorial design of experiments (33) and the multiple linear regression (MLR). Thus, first-order empirical models were established. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to check the validity of the developed models within the limits of the factors that were being investigated and to test the significance of the above parameters. Results indicate that the feed rate is the only significant factor affecting the surface roughness. The cutting speed and feed rate are the most influential factors on cutting time. Estimated tool vibrations are functions of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut in decreasing order. Finally, the models obtained can be used for determination of optimal settings of cuttings parameters and this methodology should help us to obtain the best process parameters for dry turning of 100C6 steel.

  18. Effect of circumsolar radiation on performance of focusing collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bendt, P.; Rabl, A.

    1980-04-01

    Circumsolar radiation is one of several factors, along with optical errors (contour, tracking, etc.), that determine the size and shape of the solar image at the receiver of a concentrating collector. The sensitivity of a collector to circumsolar radiation depends on insolation conditions and on collector parameters; it increases with geometrical concentration ratio and decreases with operating threshold. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) circumsolar data are used to develop fast computational procedures for calculating the effect of circumsolar radiation on both the instantaneous and the long-term average performance of focusing collectors. For predictions of long-term average performance, a standard synthetic circumsolar scan has been developed that describes the brightness distribution of the solar disk (limb darkening) and of the circumsolar region. The radiation intercepted by a receiver is calculated separately for the solar portion and for the circumsolar portion of this standard sun shape, and these two contributions are then weighted according to the long-term average circumsolar ratio for the location and period under study.

  19. Radiation effects on power integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Darwish, M.N.; Dolly, M.C.; Goodwin, C.A.; Titus, J.L

    1988-12-01

    A study was initiated to investigate the effects of gamma (total ionizing dose), prompt gamma (gamma dot), and neutron radiation on commercially available power integrated circuits (PIC's). A Dielectric Isolated (DI) Bipolar-CMOS-DMOS (BCDMOS) technology developed at AT and T Bell Laboratories was selected for this characterization. Total ionizing dose testing resulted in device failure at 30 krads (Si). Gamma dot testing (30 ns pulsewidth) resulted in device failure due to transient upset of the CMOS logic at 1.0 E+09 rads(Si)/s. Neutron testing resulted in severe degradation in performance, but devices remained functional after receiving a fluence of 2.0 E+14 n/cm/sup 2/. Also, an attempt was made to harden the BCDMOS technology to gamma radiation. Devices from eight processing splits were characterized to determine if specific process changes would improve their performance.

  20. PDSOI and Radiation Effects: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgione, Joshua B.

    2005-01-01

    Bulk silicon substrates are a common characteristic of nearly all commercial, Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS), integrated circuits. These devices operate well on Earth, but are not so well received in the space environment. An alternative to bulk CMOS is the Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI), in which a &electric isolates the device layer from the substrate. SO1 behavior in the space environment has certain inherent advantages over bulk, a primary factor in its long-time appeal to space-flight IC designers. The discussion will investigate the behavior of the Partially-Depleted SO1 (PDSOI) device with respect to some of the more common space radiation effects: Total Ionized Dose (TID), Single-Event Upsets (SEUs), and Single-Event Latchup (SEL). Test and simulation results from the literature, bulk and epitaxial comparisons facilitate reinforcement of PDSOI radiation characteristics.

  1. Radiation effects on thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, C.F.; Anspaugh, B.E.; Potter, R.R.; Tanner, D.P.

    1984-05-01

    A study has been undertaken to assess the effects of 1 MeV electron radiation on two types of thin film solar cells, thin-film silicon:hydrogen alloy (TFS) and copper indium diselenide (CIS). Using TFS devices with efficiencies between 8-9% AM 0 (9-10% AM 1.5), and CIS devices with efficiencies between 7-8% AM 0 (8-9% AM 1.5), the results show the devices are more stable to electron radiation than the typical crystalline silicon aerospace cells. In fact the CIS showed no degradation at all and with low temperature annealing the TFS could be restored to within 97% of initial power output.

  2. 47 CFR 80.765 - Effective radiated power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Effective radiated power. 80.765 Section 80.765 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.765 Effective radiated power. Effective radiated...

  3. 47 CFR 22.535 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.535 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service Paging Operation § 22.535 Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels listed in §...

  4. Estimating hydraulic parameters when poroelastic effects are significant.

    PubMed

    Berg, Steven J; Hsieh, Paul A; Illman, Walter A

    2011-01-01

    For almost 80 years, deformation-induced head changes caused by poroelastic effects have been observed during pumping tests in multilayered aquifer-aquitard systems. As water in the aquifer is released from compressive storage during pumping, the aquifer is deformed both in the horizontal and vertical directions. This deformation in the pumped aquifer causes deformation in the adjacent layers, resulting in changes in pore pressure that may produce drawdown curves that differ significantly from those predicted by traditional groundwater theory. Although these deformation-induced head changes have been analyzed in several studies by poroelasticity theory, there are at present no practical guidelines for the interpretation of pumping test data influenced by these effects. To investigate the impact that poroelastic effects during pumping tests have on the estimation of hydraulic parameters, we generate synthetic data for three different aquifer-aquitard settings using a poroelasticity model, and then analyze the synthetic data using type curves and parameter estimation techniques, both of which are based on traditional groundwater theory and do not account for poroelastic effects. Results show that even when poroelastic effects result in significant deformation-induced head changes, it is possible to obtain reasonable estimates of hydraulic parameters using methods based on traditional groundwater theory, as long as pumping is sufficiently long so that deformation-induced effects have largely dissipated. PMID:21204832

  5. Estimating Hydraulic Parameters When Poroelastic Effects Are Significant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, S.J.; Hsieh, P.A.; Illman, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    For almost 80 years, deformation-induced head changes caused by poroelastic effects have been observed during pumping tests in multilayered aquifer-aquitard systems. As water in the aquifer is released from compressive storage during pumping, the aquifer is deformed both in the horizontal and vertical directions. This deformation in the pumped aquifer causes deformation in the adjacent layers, resulting in changes in pore pressure that may produce drawdown curves that differ significantly from those predicted by traditional groundwater theory. Although these deformation-induced head changes have been analyzed in several studies by poroelasticity theory, there are at present no practical guidelines for the interpretation of pumping test data influenced by these effects. To investigate the impact that poroelastic effects during pumping tests have on the estimation of hydraulic parameters, we generate synthetic data for three different aquifer-aquitard settings using a poroelasticity model, and then analyze the synthetic data using type curves and parameter estimation techniques, both of which are based on traditional groundwater theory and do not account for poroelastic effects. Results show that even when poroelastic effects result in significant deformation-induced head changes, it is possible to obtain reasonable estimates of hydraulic parameters using methods based on traditional groundwater theory, as long as pumping is sufficiently long so that deformation-induced effects have largely dissipated. ?? 2011 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2011 National Ground Water Association.

  6. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect of primordial recombination radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholupenko, E. E.; Balashev, S. A.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Varshalovich, D. A.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that recombination radiation of primordial hydrogen-helium plasma leads to the distortions of the Planckian spectrum shape of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. We discuss the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect with taking into account primordial recombination radiation (PRR). Since in the thermal SZ effect the redistribution of the photons depends on the derivatives of the spectrum, the value of relative correction to SZ effect due to PRR is significantly larger than relative corrections due to PRR to the initial spectrum. Calculations of corrections to the thermal SZ effect due to PRR show that depending on the cluster parameters: (1) In the range of frequencies ν = 0.3-700 GHz, where CMB dominates and spectrum is very close to the Planckian one, the relative corrections due to PRR have an order of 10-9-10-6 of classical SZ effect (i.e. SZ effect for Planckian CMB spectrum). The difference of temperature deviations arising due to PRR coming from different directions (through intracluster and near intercluster medium) reaches values up to 7.6 nKcmb at ν ≃ 0.307 GHz (maximum in considered range). (2) In the range of frequencies ν = 700-5000 GHz, where cosmic infrared background (CIB) becomes significant or even dominates, the relative corrections due to PRR can reach 10-8-10-5 of main SZ effect (i.e. SZ effect for CIB). Corresponding intensity difference reaches values up to 25 mJy sr-1 (at ν ≃ 1700 GHz). In addition we suggest a modification of the method of electron gas temperature determination using corrections of the SZ effect due to PRR. Such modification allows one to simplify the determination of the cluster electron gas temperature in comparison with known methods.

  7. Experimental research on transient radiation effects in microprocessors based on SPARC-V8 architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanfu, Zhao; Hongchao, Zheng; Long, Fan; Suge, Yue; Maoxin, Chen; Shougang, Du

    2015-11-01

    An experimental system is developed for the transient radiation effects testing of an anti-radiation hardened processor. Based on this system, the transient radiation effects in a microprocessor based on SPARC-V8 architecture was investigated. The dose-rate-soft-error index parameters of the processor were determined according to the test results, as were the influences on the function and timing parameters of the processor. The power supply balance is affected, which caused the system to reset and be the main source of soft errors. The results showed the circuit recovery time is primarily determined by the internal PLL, while the core power and the output-low-IO ports are more sensitive to the transient dose rate effect. The power-integrity-hardened design is proposed to mitigate the transient radiation effect.

  8. Computer and laboratory modeling of radiation-acoustic detector for charged particles pulse beams and plasma parameters measuring

    SciTech Connect

    Kresnin, Yu.A.; Stervoedov, N.G.

    1996-12-31

    Model investigations and laboratory tests of detectors for charged particles pulse beams and plasma parameters measuring are presented. Detector represents combination of classic Faraday cup with electrical way of signal getting and radiation-acoustic meter of pulse beams parameters. Radiation-acoustic meter consists of two parts--thin detector, transparent for beams of high energy particles, and thick detector with full absorption. Ultrasonic oscillations, which arise during interaction of charged particles pulse beams or plasma with detector material, are transformed by piezoelectric detector into electric signals, whose amplitude-frequency and time characteristics functionally depended on beams parameters. All the signals come into microcontroller device Intel MSC51. This device produces calculations of following beam parameters: average energy, pulse charge, pulse currents, density, beam size and pulse time. Calculated characteristics of meter well coincide with experimental measurements, carried out at accelerators in particles energy range from 1 to 100 Mev.

  9. Radiation Effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, De-Xin; AbdulMazid, M. D.; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, several DC-DC converters were designed and built. The converters are Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, Flyback, and full-bridge zero-voltage switched. The total ionizing dose radiation and single event effects on the converters were investigated. The experimental results for the TID effects tests show that the voltages of the Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, and Flyback converters increase as total dose increased when using power MOSFET IRF250 as a switching transistor. The change in output voltage with total dose is highest for the Buck converter and the lowest for Flyback converter. The trend of increase in output voltages with total dose in the present work agrees with those of the literature. The trends of the experimental results also agree with those obtained from PSPICE simulation. For the full-bridge zero-voltage switch converter, it was observed that the dc-dc converter with IRF250 power MOSFET did not show a significant change of output voltage with total dose. In addition, for the dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation-hardened power MOSFET, the output voltage did not change significantly with total dose. The experimental results were confirmed by PSPICE simulation that showed that FB-ZVS converter with IRF250 power MOSFET's was not affected with the increase in total ionizing dose. Single Event Effects (SEE) radiation tests were performed on FB-ZVS converters. It was observed that the FB-ZVS converter with the IRF250 power MOSFET, when the device was irradiated with Krypton ion with ion-energy of 150 MeV and LET of 41.3 MeV-square cm/mg, the output voltage increased with the increase in fluence. However, for Krypton with ion-energy of 600 MeV and LET of 33.65 MeV-square cm/mg, and two out of four transistors of the converter were permanently damaged. The dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation hardened power MOSFET's did not show significant change at the output voltage with fluence while being irradiated by Krypton with ion energy of 1.20 GeV and LET of 25

  10. Structural and parameter uncertainty in Bayesian cost-effectiveness models

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher H; Sharples, Linda D; Thompson, Simon G

    2010-01-01

    Health economic decision models are subject to various forms of uncertainty, including uncertainty about the parameters of the model and about the model structure. These uncertainties can be handled within a Bayesian framework, which also allows evidence from previous studies to be combined with the data. As an example, we consider a Markov model for assessing the cost-effectiveness of implantable cardioverter defibrillators. Using Markov chain Monte Carlo posterior simulation, uncertainty about the parameters of the model is formally incorporated in the estimates of expected cost and effectiveness. We extend these methods to include uncertainty about the choice between plausible model structures. This is accounted for by averaging the posterior distributions from the competing models using weights that are derived from the pseudo-marginal-likelihood and the deviance information criterion, which are measures of expected predictive utility. We also show how these cost-effectiveness calculations can be performed efficiently in the widely used software WinBUGS. PMID:20383261

  11. Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanorods: Effect of Synthesis Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Zeeshan Ur; Heo, Si-Nae; Cho, Hyeon Ji; Koo, Bon Heun

    2016-06-01

    This report is devoted to the synthesis of high quality nanorods using spin coating technique for seed layer growth. Effect of different parameter i.e., spins coating counts, spin coating speed, and the effect of temperature during the drying process was analyzed. Hot plate and furnace technique was used for heating purpose and the difference in the morphology was carefully observed. It is worthy to mention here that there is a substantial effect of all the above mentioned parameters on the growth and morphology of the ZnO nanostructure. The ZnO nanorods were finally synthesized using wet chemical method. The morphological properties of the obtained nanostructures were analyzed by using FESEM technique. PMID:27427752

  12. The effect of welding parameters on penetration in GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shirali, A.A. ); Mills, K.C. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of various welding parameters on the penetration of GTA welds has been investigated. Increases in welding speed were found to reduce penetration; however, increases in welding current were observed to increase the penetration in high sulfur (HS) casts and decrease penetration in low sulfur (LS) steels. Plots of penetration as a function of increasing linear energy (the heat supplied per unit length of weld) revealed a similar trend with increased penetration in HS casts, but the penetration in LS casts was unaffected by increases in linear energy. These results support the Burgardt-Heiple proposition that changes in welding parameters on penetration can be explained in terms of their effect, sequentially, on the temperature gradient and the Marangoni forces operating in the weld pool. Increases in arc length were found to decrease weld penetration regardless of the sulfur concentration of the steel, and the effects of electrode geometry and welding position on weld penetration were also investigated.

  13. Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-10-09

    Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

  14. Integration and scaling of UV-B radiation effects on plants: from DNA to leaf.

    PubMed

    Suchar, Vasile Alexandru; Robberecht, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    A process-based model integrating the effects of UV-B radiation through epidermis, cellular DNA, and its consequences to the leaf expansion was developed from key parameters in the published literature. Enhanced UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly delayed cell division, resulting in significant reductions in leaf growth and development. Ambient UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly reduced the leaf growth of species with high relative epidermal absorbance at longer wavelengths and average/low pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers (CPD) photorepair rates. Leaf expansion was highly dependent on the number of CPD present in the DNA, as a result of UV-B radiation dose, quantitative and qualitative absorptive properties of epidermal pigments, and repair mechanisms. Formation of pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts (6-4PP) has no effect on the leaf expansion. Repair mechanisms could not solely prevent the UV-B radiation interference with the cell division. Avoidance or effective shielding by increased or modified qualitative epidermal absorptance was required. Sustained increased UV-B radiation levels are more detrimental than short, high doses of UV-B radiation. The combination of low temperature and increased UV-B radiation was more significant in the level of UV-B radiation-induced damage than UV-B radiation alone. Slow-growing leaves were more affected by increased UV-B radiation than fast-growing leaves. PMID:26257869

  15. Integration and scaling of UV-B radiation effects on plants: from DNA to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Suchar, Vasile Alexandru; Robberecht, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    A process-based model integrating the effects of UV-B radiation through epidermis, cellular DNA, and its consequences to the leaf expansion was developed from key parameters in the published literature. Enhanced UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly delayed cell division, resulting in significant reductions in leaf growth and development. Ambient UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly reduced the leaf growth of species with high relative epidermal absorbance at longer wavelengths and average/low pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers (CPD) photorepair rates. Leaf expansion was highly dependent on the number of CPD present in the DNA, as a result of UV-B radiation dose, quantitative and qualitative absorptive properties of epidermal pigments, and repair mechanisms. Formation of pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts (6-4PP) has no effect on the leaf expansion. Repair mechanisms could not solely prevent the UV-B radiation interference with the cell division. Avoidance or effective shielding by increased or modified qualitative epidermal absorptance was required. Sustained increased UV-B radiation levels are more detrimental than short, high doses of UV-B radiation. The combination of low temperature and increased UV-B radiation was more significant in the level of UV-B radiation-induced damage than UV-B radiation alone. Slow-growing leaves were more affected by increased UV-B radiation than fast-growing leaves. PMID:26257869

  16. Effects of primary selective laser trabeculoplasty on anterior segment parameters

    PubMed Central

    Guven Yilmaz, Suzan; Palamar, Melis; Yusifov, Emil; Ates, Halil; Egrilmez, Sait; Yagci, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) on the main numerical parameters of anterior segment with Pentacam rotating Scheimpflug camera in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Pentacam measurements of 45 eyes of 25 (15 females and 10 males) patients (12 with OHT, 13 with POAG) before and after SLT were obtained. Measurements were taken before and 1 and 3mo after SLT. Pentacam parameters were compared between OHT and POAG patients, and age groups (60y and older, and younger than 60y). RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 57.8±13.9 (range 20-77y). Twelve patients (48%) were younger than 60y, while 13 patients (52%) were 60y and older. Measurements of pre-SLT and post-SLT 1mo were significantly different for the parameters of central corneal thickness (CCT) and anterior chamber volume (ACV) (P<0.05). These parameters returned back to pre-SLT values at post-SLT 3mo. Decrease of ACV at post-SLT 1mo was significantly higher in younger than 60y group than 60y and older group. There was no statistically significant difference in Pentacam parameters between OHT and POAG patients at pre- and post-treatment measurements (P>0.05). CONCLUSION SLT leads to significant increase in CCT and decrease in ACV at the 1st month of the procedure. Effects of SLT on these anterior segment parameters, especially for CCT that interferes IOP measurement, should be considered to ensure accurate clinical interpretation. PMID:26558208

  17. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  18. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  19. Effect of Different Psychoactive Substances on Serum Biochemical Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sanli, Dilek Beker; Bilici, Rabia; Suner, Ozgur; Citak, Serhat; Kartkaya, Kazim; Mutlu, Fezan Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychoactive substances affect mainly central nervous system and brain function causing changes in behavior. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different psychoactive substances on serum biochemical parameters. Patients and Methods: The study included 324 drug dependents, and 69 controls. The patient group was determined according to DSM-IV (The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition) criteria. All patients and control subjects were tested for routine biochemical parameters and urine toxicology parameters for psychoactive substance use. Cases and controls with accompanying diseases like diabetes, cancer, metabolic disorders etc. are excluded from the study. Moreover, an association between urine toxicology results and changes in biochemical parameters was evaluated for statistical significance. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT), uric acid, creatinine, urea, albumin, Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) medians between the dependent and control groups (P < 0.05). We found a statistically significant difference in sodium and albumin levels between the opium-dependent and control groups (P < 0.05). In the benzodiazepin dependent group, we found a significant difference in GGT, urea, glucose, sodium, T protein, and AST levels (P < 0.05). Moreover, a statistically significant difference was observed in triglyceride and GGT levels between the ethyl glucuronide and control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In psychoactive substance dependents, serum routine biochemistry parameters can be used to predict the need for intensive monitoring and treatment programs. PMID:26405680

  20. The effect of urban design parameters on the local microclimate

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoniti, Androula; Georgiou, Gregoria; Neophytou, Marina; Marakkos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-22

    Two-dimensional steady-state simulations have been performed using the standard k-e turbulence model coupled with the heat transfer models available in the CFD software FLUENT 6.1, in order to examine the impact of radiation on the Urban Heat Island phenomenon. Specifically, the impact of radiation in three typical urban areas of Cyprus during the summer period is examined. The first geometry considered represents a typical suburban area and is termed as the reference geometry. The second geometry represents an area at the centre of a town with higher buildings and relatively narrower roads. The third geometry, on the other hand, describes a suburban area with wider roads and larger houses than the reference model. Computed values for air temperature in the urban street canyon have indicated that the increase in temperature associated with radiative heat transfer can be reduced by optimising the canyon geometry and, ultimately, help to mitigate the human thermal discomfort. The present study has also revealed that the selection of construction materials can be optimised to offer further reductions in the air temperature of the urban environment. It can be concluded that the combined effect of these remedies can lead to reductions in the energy consumption for building air-conditioning over the summer period.

  1. The effect of urban design parameters on the local microclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakoniti, Androula; Georgiou, Gregoria; Marakkos, Konstantinos; Neophytou, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional steady-state simulations have been performed using the standard k-e turbulence model coupled with the heat transfer models available in the CFD software FLUENT 6.1, in order to examine the impact of radiation on the Urban Heat Island phenomenon. Specifically, the impact of radiation in three typical urban areas of Cyprus during the summer period is examined. The first geometry considered represents a typical suburban area and is termed as the reference geometry. The second geometry represents an area at the centre of a town with higher buildings and relatively narrower roads. The third geometry, on the other hand, describes a suburban area with wider roads and larger houses than the reference model. Computed values for air temperature in the urban street canyon have indicated that the increase in temperature associated with radiative heat transfer can be reduced by optimising the canyon geometry and, ultimately, help to mitigate the human thermal discomfort. The present study has also revealed that the selection of construction materials can be optimised to offer further reductions in the air temperature of the urban environment. It can be concluded that the combined effect of these remedies can lead to reductions in the energy consumption for building air-conditioning over the summer period.

  2. Effects of UV radiation on phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Cullen, John J.

    1995-07-01

    It is now widely documented that reduced ozone will result in increased levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, especially UV-B (280-320nm), incident at the surface of the earth [Watson, 1988; Anderson et al., 1991; Schoeberl and Hartmann, 1991; Frederick and Alberts, 1991; WMO, 1991; Madronich, 1993; Kerr and McElroy, 1993], and there is considerable and increasing evidence that these higher levels of UV-B radiation may be detrimental to various forms of marine life in the upper layers of the ocean. With respect to aquatic ecosystems, we also know that this biologically- damaging mid-ultraviolet radiation can penetrate to ecologically- significant depths in marine and freshwater systems [Jerlov, 1950; Lenoble, 1956; Smith and Baker, 1979; Smith and Baker, 1980; Smith and Baker, 1981; Kirk et al., 1994]. This knowledge, plus the dramatic decline in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic continent each spring, now known to be caused by anthropogenically released chemicals [Solomon, 1990; Booth et al., 1994], has resulted in increased UV-environmental research and a number of summary reports. The United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) has provided recent updates with respect to the effects of ozone depletion on aquatic ecosystems (Hader, Worrest, Kumar in UNEP 1989, 1991, Hader, Worrest, Kumar and Smith UNEP 1994) and the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) has provided [SCOPE, 1992] a summary of the effects of increased UV radiation on biological systems. SCOPE has also reported [SCOPE, 1993] on the effects of increased UV on the biosphere. In addition, several books have recently been published reviewing various aspects of environmental UV photobiology [Young et al., 1993], UV effects on humans, animals and plants [Tevini, 1993], the biological effects of UV radiation in Antarctica [Weiler and Penhale, 1994], and UV research in freshwater ecosystems [Williamson and Zagarese, 1994]. Several other reviews are relevant [NAS, 1984; Caldwell

  3. Effect of infrared radiation on the lens

    PubMed Central

    Aly, Eman Mohamed; Mohamed, Eman Saad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Infrared (IR) radiation is becoming more popular in industrial manufacturing processes and in many instruments used for diagnostic and therapeutic application to the human eye. Aim: The present study was designed to investigate the effect of IR radiation on rabbit’s crystalline lens and lens membrane. Materials and Methods: Fifteen New Zealand rabbits were used in the present work. The rabbits were classified into three groups; one of them served as control. The other two groups were exposed to IR radiation for 5 or 10 minutes. Animals from these two irradiated groups were subdivided into two subgroups; one of them was decapitated directly after IR exposure, while the other subgroup was decapitated 1 hour post exposure. IR was delivered from a General Electric Lamp model 250R 50/10, placed 20 cm from the rabbit and aimed at each eye. The activity of Na+-K+ ATPase was measured in the lens membrane. Soluble lens proteins were extracted and the following measurements were carried out: estimation of total soluble protein, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. For comparison between multiple groups, analysis of variance was used with significance level set at P < 0.001. Results: The results indicated a change in the molecular weight of different lens crystalline accompanied with changes in protein backbone structure. These changes increased for the groups exposed to IR for 10 minutes. Moreover, the activity of Na+-K+ ATPase significantly decreased for all groups. Conclusions: The protein of eye lens is very sensitive to IR radiation which is hazardous and may lead to cataract. PMID:21350278

  4. Synergistic Effect of Triple Ion Beams on Radiation Damage in CLAM Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Da-Qing; Zheng, Yong-Nan; Zuo, Yi; Fan, Ping; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Qiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Qiang; Cui, Bao-Qun; Chen, Li-Hua; Jiang, Wei-Sheng; Wu, Yi-Can; Huang, Qun-Ying; Peng, Lei; Cao, Xing-Zhong; Wang, Bao-Yi; Wei, Long; Zhu, Sheng-Yun

    2014-04-01

    The synergistic effect of triple ion beams is investigated by simultaneous and sequential irradiations of gold, hydrogen and helium ions on the low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) developed in China. The depth profile measurements of the positron annihilation Doppler broadening S parameter are carried out as a function of slow-positron beam energy to examine the produced radiation damage. The synergistic effect of displacement damage and hydrogen and helium on the formation of radiation damage is clearly observed. In the preset case, this effect suppresses the radiation damage in the CLAM steel due to the helium and/or hydrogen filling of vacancy clusters.

  5. Effects of heat treatment parameters on liquid whole egg proteins.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Reyhan Selin; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Soykut, Esra Acar; Ertaş, Nusret

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of heat treatment parameters on liquid whole egg (LWE) proteins by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Heat treatment (at 60-68°C for 1-5min) was applied to LWE. Treated LWE was centrifuged and supernatant was taken for measurement of UV-VIS spectroscopy and CE. The change in UV absorbance showed loss of protein solubility depending on heat treatments parameters. Electropherograms of samples demonstrated the effect of treatment parameters on composition of LWE proteins. It was found that conalbumin and lysozyme were influenced by the treatment, while ovalbumin and ovomucoid were not affected. CE combined with principal component analysis (PCA) was used for classification of samples untreated or treated and treated at different treatment parameters. The results of the study revealed that the extent of heat treatment in LWE samples could be determined with PCA of the CE measurements. PMID:27596410

  6. Effect of postural changes on cardiovascular parameters across gender

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kieran; Rössler, Andreas; Lackner, Helmut Karl; Trozic, Irhad; Laing, Charles; Lorr, David; Green, David A; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Goswami, Nandu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We investigated the effect of postural changes on various cardiovascular parameters across gender. Twenty-eight healthy subjects (16 male, 12 female) were observed at rest (supine) and subjected to 3 interventions; head-down tilt (HDT), HDT with lower body negative pressure (HDT+ LBNP at −30 mm Hg), and head-up tilt (HUT), each for 10 minutes separated by a 10 minutes recovery period. Methods: Measurements were recorded for heart rate (HR), standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals, root mean square of successive differences between the normal-to-normal intervals, heart rate variability-low frequency (LFRRI), heart rate variability-high frequency (HFRRI), low frequency/high frequency ratio (LFRRI/HFRRI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total peripheral resistance index (TPRI), stroke index (SI), cardiac index (CI), index of contractility (IC), left ventricular work index, and left ventricular ejection time. Results: Across all cardiovascular parameters, there was a significant main effect of the intervention applied but there was no significant main effect of gender across all parameters. Conclusions: The results suggest that there are no specific gender differences in regards to the measured variables under the conditions of this study. Furthermore, these results suggest that in healthy subjects, there appears to be evidence that LBNP partially elicits similar cardiovascular responses to HUT, which supports the use of LBNP as an intervention to counteract the effects of central hypovolemia. PMID:27428203

  7. Transition Flow Effects On Plume Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgin, James B.

    1983-07-01

    A calculational comparison of a free molecular plume code (HAPAIR: High Altitude Plume-Atmosphere Interaction Radiation) and a Monte-Carlo Plume Code (TRAMP: Transitional and Rarefied Axisymmetric Monte-carlo Plume) is made for a selected sequence of cases going from a free molecular (Kn = 15) to a highl transitional (Kn = 0.07) flow regime. Results are presented which document the breakdown of free molecular flow assumptions in the transition regime and show the effect on the critical physical processes responsible for plume emission.

  8. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  9. Biological Effects of Space Radiation and Development of Effective Countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronaut exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronaut health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronaut vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation. PMID:25258703

  10. Biological Effects of Space Radiation and Development of Effective Countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronaut exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronaut health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronaut vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation. PMID:25258703

  11. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  12. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human mission to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  13. 47 CFR 22.593 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.593 Section... power limits. The effective radiated power of fixed stations operating on the channels listed in § 22.591 must not exceed 150 Watts. The equivalent isotropically radiated power of existing fixed...

  14. 47 CFR 22.659 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.659 Section 22.659 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC... radiated power limits. The purpose of the rules in this section, which limit effective radiated power...

  15. 47 CFR 22.627 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.627 Section 22.627 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC... radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels...

  16. Hysteresis effects of changing the parameters of noncooperative games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Harré, Michael; Olbrich, Eckehard; Bertschinger, Nils; Jost, Jürgen

    2012-03-01

    We adapt the method used by Jaynes to derive the equilibria of statistical physics to instead derive equilibria of bounded rational game theory. We analyze the dependence of these equilibria on the parameters of the underlying game, focusing on hysteresis effects. In particular, we show that by gradually imposing individual-specific tax rates on the players of the game, and then gradually removing those taxes, the players move from a poor equilibrium to one that is better for all of them.

  17. Effects of nature of cooling surface on radiator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R; Kleinschmidt, R V

    1921-01-01

    This report discusses the effects of roughness, smoothness, and cleanness of cooling surfaces on the performance of aeronautic radiators, as shown by experimental work, with different conditions of surface, on (1) heat transfer from a single brass tube and from a radiator; (2) pressure drop in an air stream in a single brass tube and in a radiator; (3) head resistance of a radiator; and (4) flow of air through a radiator. It is shown that while smooth surfaces are better than rough, the surfaces usually found in commercial radiators do not differ enough to show marked effect on performance, provided the surfaces are kept clean.

  18. Effects of tree morphometry on net snow cover radiation on forest floor for varying vegetation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyednasrollah, Bijan; Kumar, Mukesh

    2013-11-01

    a forest radiation model, this paper explores the effects of tree morphometric parameters and shape on net snow cover radiation on the forest floor. Results show that tree shape, height and crown size and density have significant effects on the amount of radiation on forest floor and its variation with vegetation density. In clear sky conditions, where net radiation frequently shows a nonmonotonic decreasing then increasing trend with increasing vegetation density, a smaller radiation minimum is obtained for taller trees, larger and denser crowns, and cylindrical-shaped crowns. The obtained radiation minimum is also expressed at a smaller vegetation density for these tree configurations. In contrast, trees with smaller crown dimensions show propensity for a monotonically decreasing trend in net radiation with increasing vegetation density. The sensitivity to tree morphometric parameters, especially tree height and crown width and density, on forest floor radiation are however relatively modest for interspersed cloudy conditions. The results will facilitate identification of forest management strategies to minimize or maximize net radiation in snow-dominated forested watersheds and will allow intercomparison of snowmelt rates between forests with different vegetation densities and morphological characteristics.

  19. The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan

    2012-11-20

    The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

  20. Effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation induces some effects that are seen at birth and others that cannot be detected until later in life. Data from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki show a diminished number of births after exposure under 4 wk of gestational age. Although a wide array of congenital malformations has been found in animal experimentation after such exposure to x rays, in humans only small head size (exposure at 4-17 wk) and mental retardation (exposure primarily at 8-15 wk) have been observed. In Hiroshima, small head size occurred after doses of 0.10-0.19 Gy or more, and an excess of mental retardation at 0.2-0.4 Gy or more. Intelligence test scores were reduced among A-bomb survivors exposed at 8-15 wk of gestational age by 21-29 IQ points per Gy. Other effects of in-utero exposure to atomic radiation include long-lasting complex chromosome abnormalities.

  1. MEDICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF UV RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Organisms living on the earth are exposed to solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components (for general reviews, the reader is referred to Smith [1] and Young et al. [2]). UV wavelength regions present in sunlight are frequently designated as UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). In today's solar spectrum, UVA is the principal UV component, with UVB present at much lower levels. Ozone depletion will increase the levels of UVB reaching the biosphere, but the levels of UVA will not be changed significantly [3]. Because of the high efficiency of UVB in producing damage in biological organisms in the laboratory experiments, it has sometimes been assumed that UVA has little or no adverse biological effects. However, accumulating data [4, 5], including action spectra (efficiency of biological damage as a function of wavelength of radiation; see Section 5) for DNA damage in alfalfa seedlings [6], in human skin [7], and for a variety of plant damages (Caldwell, this volume) indicate that UVA can induce damage in DNA in higher organisms. Thus, understanding the differential effects of UVA and UVB wavebands is essential for estimating the biological consequences of stratospheric ozone depletion.

  2. Effect of maternal anthropometry and metabolic parameters on fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subarna; Misra, Sujata; Nayak, Prasanta K.; Sahoo, Jaya Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal anthropometry and metabolic parameters on neonatal anthropometry. Materials and Methods: This observational cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2008 to June 2009 at a single tertiary care center. Maternal anthropometry and metabolic parameters like fasting serum insulin, lipid profile, and random blood glucose were estimated in 50 pregnant women at term. Detailed anthropometry of the neonates was performed. Results: Large for gestational age (LGA) babies had higher maternal body mass index (BMI), fasting serum insulin, and cord blood insulin levels, and lower maternal high density lipoprotein (HDL) compared to appropriate for gestational age (AGA) group (P < 0.001). Among the maternal parameters, BMI, gestational age, fasting serum insulin, and random blood sugar (RBS) had significant positive correlation, while HDL had negative correlation with birth weight (P < 0.05). However, only maternal BMI was the significant predictor of neonatal birth weight on multiple regression analysis (ß = 0.340, P = 0.01). Conclusion: The BMI of glucose-tolerant mother is more important than metabolic parameters in determining the birth weight of term babies. PMID:23087859

  3. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces

  4. Radiation effects in SYNROC-D

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Guinan, M.W.

    1981-09-30

    This paper describes SYNROC-D and the irradiation it will be subjected to over the first million years of storage. This will include about 8 x 10/sup 24/ alpha decays per m/sup 3/ and a total ionization dose of about 1 x 10/sup 11/ rads. Methods of simulating the radiation effects are discussed. Previous work by others is reviewed and compared on a dpa basis. /sup 238/Pu doping experiments to simulate internal alpha decay are described, and the progress is discussed. It is concluded that dose rate effects on swelling and metamictization of perovskite and zirconolite are small over a wide range of dose rate, and that swelling and metamictization in these minerals does not anneal significantly over geological time periods.

  5. Enhancement of radiation effects by acyclovir

    SciTech Connect

    Sougawa, M.; Akagi, K.; Murata, T.; Kawasaki, S.; Sawada, S.; Yoshii, G.; Tanaka, Y.

    1986-08-01

    Acyclovir (ACV), a new antiviral drug, was used to investigate its effect of radiosensitivity in tumors in vivo. In in vivo experiments with Sarcoma-180 transplanted into the ICR mouse and FM3A transplanted into the C/sub 3/H mouse, ACV enhanced the radiosensitivity of both tumors. In S-180, radiation effects were enhanced by treatment with 100 mg/kg of ACV from 30 min before to 60 min after irradiation. In S-180 treated by 400 mg/kg of ACV, the enhancement ratio was approximately 2.0, as evaluated by the growth delay method. In the FM3A tumor treated by 20 mg/kg of ACV, the enhancement ratio was approximately 1.3, as evaluated by tumor cure (TCD50 assay). ACV is already clinically used as an antiviral drug. Its ability to radiosensitize tumors could therefore have clinical potential when combined with radiotherapy.

  6. Posterior uncertainty of GEOS-5 L-band radiative transfer model parameters and brightness temperatures after calibration with SMOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lannoy, G. J.; Reichle, R. H.; Vrugt, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Simulated L-band (1.4 GHz) brightness temperatures are very sensitive to the values of the parameters in the radiative transfer model (RTM). We assess the optimum RTM parameter values and their (posterior) uncertainty in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) land surface model using observations of multi-angular brightness temperature over North America from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. Two different parameter estimation methods are being compared: (i) a particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach, and (ii) an MCMC simulation procedure using the differential evolution adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm. Our results demonstrate that both methods provide similar "optimal" parameter values. Yet, DREAM exhibits better convergence properties, resulting in a reduced spread of the posterior ensemble. The posterior parameter distributions derived with both methods are used for predictive uncertainty estimation of brightness temperature. This presentation will highlight our model-data synthesis framework and summarize our initial findings.

  7. Effect of Methylphenidate on Sleep Parameters in Children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Heon; Sung, Hyung Mo; Choi, Tae Young; Kim, So Yeun; Choi, So-Jeong; Koo, Bon Hoon; Lee, Jong Hun

    2012-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of this study was to investigate the acute impact of methylphenidate (MPH) on sleep parameters in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children. The second aim was to investigate the different effects of intermediate- and longacting MPH on sleep parameters. The third aim was to test the different effects of dose and age on sleep parameters. Methods Ninety-three ADHD children were enrolled and randomized to two different MPH preparations. Baseline and daily sleep diaries were evaluated for four weeks after taking medication. Weekday and weekend bedtimes, wake-up times, sleep latencies and total sleep times were compared by weeks. Results After taking MPH, there was a significant delay in bedtimes and a significant reduction of total sleep time (TST) both on weekdays and at weekends. There was also a significant delay in wake-up time on weekdays. However, the difference was applied to younger age group children only. There was no difference in changes of TST between metadate-CD and OROS-MPH. There also was no difference in changes of TST with different doses of MPH. Conclusion MPH had negative impacts on sleep among young ADHD children, but different preparations and doses did not affect the result. PMID:23251204

  8. Minimizing Load Effects on NA4 Gear Vibration Diagnostic Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2001-01-01

    NA4 is a vibration diagnostic parameter, developed by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, for health monitoring of gears in helicopter transmissions. The NA4 reacts to the onset of gear pitting damage and continues to react to the damage as it spreads. This research also indicates NA4 reacts similarly to load variations. The sensitivity of NA4 to load changes will substantially affect its performance on a helicopter gearbox that experiences continuously changing load throughout its flight regimes. The parameter NA4 has been used to monitor gear fatigue tests at constant load. At constant load, NA4 effectively detects the onset of pitting damage and tracks damage severity. Previous research also shows that NA4 reacts to changes in load applied to the gears in the same way it reacts to the onset of pitting damage. The method used to calculate NA4 was modified to minimize these load effects. The modified NA4 parameter was applied to four sets of experimental data. Results indicate the modified NA4 is no longer sensitive to load changes, but remains sensitive to pitting damage.

  9. Some Physical Parameters to Effect the Production of Heamatococcus pluvialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpolat, O.; Eristurk, S.

    The aim of this study is to optimize the physical parameters affecting the production of Haematococcus pluvialis in photobioreactors and to simulate the process. Heamatococcus pluvialis is a green microalgea to have a great interest for production of natural astaxanthin and it can be cultivated in a closed photobiorector system under controlled conditions. Biomass composition, growth rate and high value product spectra like polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments, poly saccariydes or vitamins depend on strongly the parameters of cultivation process. These are composition of cultivation medium, mixing model and aeration rate, hydrodynamic stress of medium which can be changed by adding some chemicals, cultivation temperature, pH, carbon dioxide and oxygen supply and most important of all: illumination. One of the most important problems during the cultivation is that cells have sensitivity to shear stress very much and the shear stress created by aeration and mixing effects the growth rate of the cell negatively and decreases yield. In this study, physical parameters such as; the rate of the air fed into the reactor, the mixing type, the reduction of the hydrodynamic stress by CMC addition, the effect of the cell size on the cell production and the flocculation speed of the culture, were investigated.

  10. Effects of Malaria Parasite Density on Blood Cell Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kotepui, Manas; Piwkham, Duangjai; PhunPhuech, Bhukdee; Phiwklam, Nuoil; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Duangmano, Suwit

    2015-01-01

    Changes in blood cell parameters are already a well-known feature of malarial infections. To add to this information, the objective of this study was to investigate the varying effects that different levels of parasite density have on blood cell parameters. Patients diagnosed with malaria at Phobphra Hospital, Tak Province, Thailand between January 1st 2009 and January 1st 2012 were recruited as subjects for data collection. Blood cell parameters of 2,024 malaria-infected patients were evaluated and statistically analyzed. Neutrophil and platelet counts were significantly higher, however, RBC count was significantly lower in patients with P. falciparum infection compared to those with P. vivax infection (p<0.0001). Leukocyte counts were also significantly higher in patients with high parasitemia compared to those with low and moderate parasitemia. In terms of differential leukocyte count, neutrophil count was significantly higher in patients with high parasitemia compared to those with low and moderate parasitemia (p<0.0001). On the other hand, both lymphocyte and monocyte counts were significantly lower in patients with high parasitemia (p<0.0001). RBC count and Hb concentration, as well as platelet count were also significantly reduced (p<0.05) and (p<0.0001), respectively. To summarize, patients infected with different malaria parasites exhibited important distinctive hematological parameters, with neutrophil and eosinophil counts being the two hematological parameters most affected. In addition, patients infected with different malarial densities also exhibited important changes in leukocyte count, platelet count and hemoglobin concentration during the infection. These findings offer the opportunity to recognize and diagnose malaria related anemia, help support the treatment thereof, as well as relieve symptoms of severe malaria in endemic regions. PMID:25807235

  11. Radiation effects in generic populations inhabiting a limiting environment.

    PubMed

    Sazykina, T G; Kryshev, A I

    2012-05-01

    A generic population model is formulated for radiation risk assessment of natural biota. The model demonstrates that effects of radiation on the population survival do not follow directly the effects on individual organisms. Dose rates resulting in population extinction can be analytically calculated. Besides individual radiosensitivity, two key parameters were found to determine the survival potential of a population under chronic radiation stress: the ratio “biomass losses/biomass synthesis,” and the lump amount of limiting resource in the environment. A benchmark scenario “Population response to chronic irradiation” developed within the IAEA Programme EMRAS II was calculated for generic populations of mice, hare/rabbit, wolf/wild dog, and deer/goat chronically exposed to different levels of ionizing radiation. In the conditions of the benchmark scenario, model populations survived normally (>90% of the control value) at dose rates below the following levels: 3 mGy day(-1) for wolf/wild dog; 10 mGy day(-1) for deer/goat; 14 mGy day(-1) for hare/rabbit; and 20 mGy day(-1) for mice. The model predictions showed a relatively high survival potential of short-lived and productive species such as mice. At the same time, populations of long-lived animals with slow and radiosensitive reproduction such as wolf/wild dog were candidates to extinction at chronic exposures above 5 mGy day(-1). Recovery of short-lived and productive species took a much shorter time compared with long-lived and slow reproductive species. PMID:22302184

  12. Effects of very high radiation on SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heering, A.; Musienko, Yu; Ruchti, R.; Wayne, M.; Karneyeu, A.; Postoev, V.

    2016-07-01

    During the last 5 years we have successfully completed R&D for the instrumentation of silicon photo multipliers (SiPMs) for the CMS HCAL Phase 1 upgrade in 2018. Much focus was put on radiation damage during these years. For the HCAL we expect a maximum total dose of 1012 n/cm2 for a total lifetime integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. Good correlation between cell size and performance with high radiation was found during this R&D. To evaluate the possibility of using the SiPMs in the wider CMS environment we have exposed the current state of the art smallest cell SiPMs to radiation of 6×1012 p/cm2 in 62 MeV LIF beam line in 2014 at UCL Belgium and up to 1.3×1014 p/cm2 in the CERN PS 23 GeV proton beam in late 2014. The SiPM's main parameters were measured before and after irradiation. Here we report on the effects of noise increase and breakdown voltage shift due to the extremely high dose.

  13. Effective Parameters on Seismic Design of Rectangular Underground Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri, G. Ghodrati; Maddah, N.; Mohebi, B.

    2008-07-08

    Underground structures are a significant part of the transportation in the modern society and in the seismic zones should withstand against both seismic and static loadings. Embedded structures should conform to ground deformations during the earthquake but almost exact evaluation of structure to ground distortion is critical. Several two-dimensional finite difference models are used to find effective parameters on racking ratio (structure to ground distortion) including flexibility ratio, various cross sections, embedment depth, and Poisson's ratio of soil. Results show that influence of different cross sections, by themselves is negligible but embedment depth in addition to flexibility ratio and Poisson's ratio is known as a consequential parameter. A comparison with pseudo-static method (simplified frame analysis) is also performed. The results show that for a stiffer structure than soil, racking ratio decreases as the depth of burial decreases; on the other hand, shallow and flexible structures can suffer greater distortion than deeper ones up to 30 percents.

  14. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on defect formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is a perspective method for manufacturing automotive parts, aviation and space technology. One of the major problems is the formation of welding defects and weld around the welding zone. The formation of defect is the main reason failure of the joint. A possible way to obtain defect-free welded joints is the selection of the correct welding parameters. Experimental results describing the effect of friction stir welding process parameters on the defects of welded joints on aluminum alloy AMg5M have been shown. The weld joint defects have been characterized using the non-destructive radioscopic and ultrasound phase array methods. It was shown how the type and size of defects determine the welded joint strength.

  15. Evaluation of hail suppression programme effectiveness using radar derived parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Satyanarayana; Paulitsch, Helmut; Teschl, Reinhard; Süsser-Rechberger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is evaluating "the operational hail suppression programme" in the province of Styria, Austria "for the year 2015". For the evaluation purpose the HAILSYS software tool was developed by integrating single polarization C-band weather radar data, aircraft trajectory, radiosonde freezing level data, hail events and crop damages information from the ground. The hail related radar derived parameters are: hail mass aloft, hail mass flux, probability of hail, vertical integrated hail mass, hail kinetic energy flux, and storm severity index. The spatial maps of hail kinetic energy and hail mass were developed to evaluate the seeding effect. The time history plots of vertical integrated hail mass, hail mass aloft and the probability of hail are drawn over an entire cell lifetime. The sensitivity and variation of radar hail parameters over time and associated changes due to cloud seeding will be presented.

  16. Orbital flux integrations: Parameter values for effective computer time reductions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    To improve computer utilization and to reduce the cost of orbital flux integrations, the effects of integration parameters 'duration' (T) and 'stepsize' (delta t) on integration results were investigated. Over given ranges of T and delta t, and within specified acceptable accuracy restraints, optimal values of these parameters were established for circular subsynchronous trajectories, in terms of the variables altitude (H) and inclination (i). It is shown that (1) above a certain statistically important value, duration is independent of both h and i; (2) stepsize has a relative altitude dependence; and (3) stepsize is not a function of inclination. The substantial savings in computer time are discussed along with the possibility of greater savings by relaxing accuracy restrictions while not exceeding the minimum model-associated uncertainty factors of the environments.

  17. Physical parameter effects on radar backscatter using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Hean T.; Teh, K. B.

    1994-12-01

    This paper contains a sensitivity analysis of the effects of physical parameters on radar backscatter coefficients from a vegetation canopy using the method of principal component analysis. A Monte Carlo forward scattering model is used to generate the necessary data set for such analysis. The vegetation canopy is modeled as a layer of randomly distributed circular disks bounded below by a Kirchhoff rough surface. Data reduction is accomplished by the statistical principal component analysis technique in which only three principal components are found to be sufficient, containing 97% of the information in the original set. The first principal component can be interpreted as volume-volume backscatter, while the second and the third as surface backscatter and surface-volume backscatter, respectively. From the correlation matrix obtained, the sensitivity of radar backscatter due to various physical parameters is investigated. These include wave frequency, moisture content, scatterer's size, volume fraction, ground permittivity and surface roughness.

  18. Study on the effect of parameters on source kinematic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, J.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    Based on observed seismic waveform data, kinematics inversion is the most effective way to research seismic source. Many kinematics inversion methods have been developed. However, the inversion results from different researchers have big difference, even for the same earthquake. To study how various factors impact on the source inversion, we refer 2010 Haiti earthquake to establish a source model and use the numerical experiments to study how these factors affect the inversion results in multi time window inversion method. Our research indicates: (1) The size of each subfault should be more than half wavelength of S wave, meanwhile, in order to guarantee the accuracy of computation, the Green's function of each subfault should get from the superposition of Green's function of uniformly distributed point source, which has a lag, in this subfault. (2) Too much time windows will increase the non-uniqueness of inverse problem and reduce the rank of coefficient matrix. If single time window could do better, we'd better use single time window in seismic source inversion. (3) Moreover, the change of rupture velocity caused by multi time window will be influenced by the epicenter distance of subfault. Only when the distance is moderate, the change is reasonable. Smaller half width of time window will be good for closer subfaults, and farther subfaults need bigger time windows which have bigger half width. (4) In a word, increasing constraints could increases the rank of coefficient matrix and reduce non-uniqueness of inverse problem. The bigger the weight of time smoothing, the bigger the model fitting parameter; when the weight of space smoothing is about 0.5, the model fitting parameter gets the maximal; the model fitting parameter changes with the weight of moment minimization similar to with the weight of time smoothing. Furthermore, the difference of the waveform fitting parameter with different weight is very small, and the trend of the waveform fitting parameter

  19. Polarization effects in radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Konchatnij, M. I. Korchin, A. Yu.; Merenkov, N. P.

    2015-02-15

    The polarization effects in the one-meson radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton, τ → π{sup −}γν{sub τ}, are investigated. The inner bremsstrahlung and structural amplitudes are taken into account. The asymmetry of the differential decay width caused by the τ-lepton polarization and the Stokes parameters of the emitted photon itself are calculated depending on the polarization of the decaying τ lepton. These physical quantities are estimated numerically for an arbitrary direction of the τ lepton polarization 3-vector in the rest frame. The vector and axial-vector form factors describing the structure-dependent part of the decay amplitude are determined using the chiral effective theory with resonances (RχT)

  20. Radiation effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dexin; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    DC-DC switching converters are circuits that can be used to convert a DC voltage of one value to another by switching action. They are increasing being used in space systems. Most of the popular DC-DC switching converters utilize power MOSFETs. However power MOSFETs, when subjected to radiation, are susceptible to degradation of device characteristics or catastrophic failure. This work focuses on the effects of total ionizing dose on converter performance. Four fundamental switching converters (buck converter, buck-boost converter, cuk converter, and flyback converter) were built using Harris IRF250 power MOSFETs. These converters were designed for converting an input of 60 volts to an output of about 12 volts with a switching frequency of 100 kHz. The four converters were irradiated with a Co-60 gamma source at dose rate of 217 rad/min. The performances of the four converters were examined during the exposure to the radiation. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the converters increases as total dose increases. However, the increases of the output voltage were different for the four different converters, with the buck converter and cuk converter the highest and the flyback converter the lowest. We observed significant increases in output voltage for cuk converter at a total dose of 24 krad (si).

  1. The Dosimetric Parameters Investigation of the Pulsed X-ray and Gamma Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchebrov, S. G.; Miloichikova, I. A.; Shilova, X. O.

    2016-01-01

    The most common type of radiation used for diagnostic purposes are X-rays. However, X-rays methods have limitations related to the radiation dose for the biological objects. It is known that the use of the pulsed emitting source synchronized with the detection equipment for internal density visualization of objects significant reduces the radiation dose to the object. In the article the analysis of the suitability of the different dosimetric equipment for the radiation dose estimation of the pulsed emitting sources is carried out. The approbation results on the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 of the dosimetry systems workability with the pulse radiation and its operation range are presented. The results of the dose field investigation of the portable betatron OB-4 are demonstrated. The depth dose distribution in the air, lead and water of the pulsed bremsstrahlung generated by betatron are shown.

  2. The Greenhouse Effect - Determination From Accurate Surface Longwave Radiation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipona, R.

    Longwave radiation measurements have been drastically improved in recent years. Uncertainty levels down to s2 Wm-2 are realistic and achieved during long-term ´ longwave irradiance measurements. Longwave downward irradiance measurements together with temperature and humidity measurements at the station are used to sepa- rate clear-sky from cloudy-sky situations. Longwave net radiation separated between clear-sky and all-sky situations allows to determine the longwave cloud radiative forc- ing at the station. For clear-sky situations radiative transfer models demonstrate a lin- ear relation between longwave downward radiation and the greenhouse radiative flux. Clear-sky longwave radiation, temperature and humidity for different atmospheres and different altitudes were modeled with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code and compared to longwave radiation, temperature and humidity measured at 4 radiation stations of the Alpine Surface Radiation Budget (ASRB) network at similar altitude and with corresponding atmospheres. At the 11 ASRB stations the clear-sky green- house effect was determined by using clear-sky longwave downward measurements and MODTRAN model calculations. The all-sky greenhouse effect was determined by adding the longwave cloud radiative forcing to the clear-sky greenhouse radiative flux. The altitude dependence of annual and seasonal mean values of the greenhouse effect will be shown for the altitude range of 400 to 3600 meter a.s.l. in the Alps.

  3. New Approach to Microclimate Parameter Selection for the Production Area with Heat Supply Systems Based on Gas Infrared Radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilenko, N. I.; Kurilenko, E. Yu.; Mamontov, G. Ya

    2016-02-01

    There presented experimental research results for the heat transfer behavior in the areas with the radiant heating systems based on the gas infrared radiators. The model of heat-gravitational convection is formulated, that conforms to the transformation conditions of radiant energy coming from the radiators. A new approach to the parameter selection of the indoor climate with the radiant heating systems is developed based on the analysis and collation of experimental data for the temperature patterns and that of the heat flows of the object of research.

  4. Effect of combined heat and radiation on microbial destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. A.; Pflug, I. J.

    1977-01-01

    A series of experiments at several levels of relative humidity and radiation dose rates was carried out using spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger to evaluate the effect of heat alone, radiation alone, and a combination of heat and radiation. Combined heat and radiation treatment of microorganisms yields a destruction rate greater than the additive rates of the independent agents. The synergistic mechanism shows a proportional dependency on radiation dose rate, an Arrhenius dependence on temperature, and a dependency on relative humidity. Maximum synergism occurs under conditions where heat and radiation individually destroy microorganisms at approximately equal rates. Larger synergistic advantage is possible at low relative humidities rather than at high relative humidities.

  5. Calcium induced ATP synthesis: Isotope effect, magnetic parameters and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Kuznetsov, D. A.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Shchegoleva, L. N.; Arkhangelsky, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    ATP synthesis by creatine kinase with calcium ions is accompanied by 43Ca/ 40Ca isotope effect: the enzyme with 43Ca 2+ was found to be 2.0 ± 0.3 times more active than enzymes, in which Ca 2+ ions have nonmagnetic nuclei 40Ca. The effect demonstrates that primary reaction in ATP synthesis is electron transfer between reaction partners, Сa( HO)n2+ ( n ⩽ 3) and Ca 2+(ADP) 3-. It generates ion-radical pair, in which spin conversion results in the isotope effect. Magnetic parameters (g-factors and HFC constants a( 43Ca) and a( 31P)) confirm that namely terminal oxygen atom of the ADP ligand in the complex Ca 2+(ADP) 3- donates electron to the Ca( HO)n2+ ion.

  6. Focused Ion Beam Induced Effects on MOS Transistor Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, Marsha T.; Antoniou, Nicholas; Campbell, Ann N.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Hembree, Charles E.; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.; Swanson, Scot E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Vanderlinde, William E.

    1999-07-28

    We report on recent studies of the effects of 50 keV focused ion beam (FIB) exposure on MOS transistors. We demonstrate that the changes in value of transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, V{sub t}) are essentially the same for exposure to a Ga+ ion beam at 30 and 50 keV under the same exposure conditions. We characterize the effects of FIB exposure on test transistors fabricated in both 0.5 {micro}m and 0.225 {micro}m technologies from two different vendors. We report on the effectiveness of overlying metal layers in screening MOS transistors from FIB-induced damage and examine the importance of ion dose rate and the physical dimensions of the exposed area.

  7. Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture on radiation protection and measurements: what makes particle radiation so effective?

    PubMed

    Blakely, Eleanor A

    2012-11-01

    The scientific basis for the physical and biological effectiveness of particle radiations has emerged from many decades of meticulous basic research. A diverse array of biologically relevant consequences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism level have been reported, but what are the key processes and mechanisms that make particle radiation so effective, and what competing processes define dose dependences? Recent studies have shown that individual genotypes control radiation-regulated genes and pathways in response to radiations of varying ionization density. The fact that densely ionizing radiations can affect different gene families than sparsely ionizing radiations, and that the effects are dose- and time-dependent, has opened up new areas of future research. The complex microenvironment of the stroma and the significant contributions of the immune response have added to our understanding of tissue-specific differences across the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. The importance of targeted versus nontargeted effects remains a thorny but elusive and important contributor to chronic low dose radiation effects of variable LET that still needs further research. The induction of cancer is also LET-dependent, suggesting different mechanisms of action across the gradient of ionization density. The focus of this 35th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture is to chronicle the step-by-step acquisition of experimental clues that have refined our understanding of what makes particle radiation so effective, with emphasis on the example of radiation effects on the crystalline lens of the human eye. PMID:23032880

  8. LAURISTON S. TAYLOR LECTURE ON RADIATION PROTECTION AND MEASURMENTS: WHAT MAKES PARTICLE RADIATION SO EFFECTIVE?

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2012-01-01

    The scientific basis for the physical and biological effectiveness of particle radiations has emerged from many decades of meticulous basic research. A diverse array of biologically relevant consequences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism level have been reported, but what are the key processes and mechanisms that make particle radiation so effective, and what competing processes define dose dependences? Recent studies have shown that individual genotypes control radiation-regulated genes and pathways in response to radiations of varying ionization density. The fact that densely ionizing radiations can affect different gene families than sparsely ionizing radiations, and that the effects are dose- and time-dependent has opened up new areas of future research. The complex microenvironment of the stroma, and the significant contributions of the immune response have added to our understanding of tissue-specific differences across the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. The importance of targeted vs. nontargeted effects remain a thorny, but elusive and important contributor to chronic low dose radiation effects of variable LET that still needs further research. The induction of cancer is also LET-dependent, suggesting different mechanisms of action across the gradient of ionization density. The focus of this 35th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture is to chronicle the step-by-step acquisition of experimental clues that have refined our understanding of what makes particle radiation so effective, with emphasis on the example of radiation effects on the crystalline lens of the human eye. PMID:23032880

  9. Effect of water vapor on the distribution of the parameters of a turbulent wake

    SciTech Connect

    Pilyugin, N.N.; Tikhomirov, S.G.

    1985-07-01

    In the experimental study of phenomena occurring in the flow of air round models flying along a aeroballistic range with hypersonic velocities, the question arises of the effect of water vapor along the range on the measurements of the gas parameters, for example, on the electron concentration or on the intensity of the radiation. Water vapor is usually present in atmospheric air and, in the absence of special measures to remove it, it may have an influence on the results of measurements. In an earlier paper, a theoretical study was made of the effect of chemical reactions involving the participation of water vapor in the air on the chemiluminescent radiation in the wake alone. In particular, there was no consideration of the effect of water vapor on the electron concentration. In the present study, the results are given of calculations of the distributions of the nonequilibrium parameters in the wake, with allowance for the occurrence of chemical reactions in the air and water vapor under conditions characteristic of aeroballistic experiments.

  10. Dynamical quantum Hall effect in the parameter space

    PubMed Central

    Gritsev, V.; Polkovnikov, A.

    2012-01-01

    Geometric phases in quantum mechanics play an extraordinary role in broadening our understanding of fundamental significance of geometry in nature. One of the best known examples is the Berry phase [M.V. Berry (1984), Proc. Royal. Soc. London A, 392:45], which naturally emerges in quantum adiabatic evolution. So far the applicability and measurements of the Berry phase were mostly limited to systems of weakly interacting quasi-particles, where interference experiments are feasible. Here we show how one can go beyond this limitation and observe the Berry curvature, and hence the Berry phase, in generic systems as a nonadiabatic response of physical observables to the rate of change of an external parameter. These results can be interpreted as a dynamical quantum Hall effect in a parameter space. The conventional quantum Hall effect is a particular example of the general relation if one views the electric field as a rate of change of the vector potential. We illustrate our findings by analyzing the response of interacting spin chains to a rotating magnetic field. We observe the quantization of this response, which we term the rotational quantum Hall effect. PMID:22493228

  11. Predicted levels of human radiation tolerance extrapolated from clinical studies of radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Results of clinical studies of radiation effects on man are used to evaluate space radiation hazards encountered during manned space travel. Considered are effects of photons as well as of mixed fission neutrons and gamma irradiations in establishing body radiosensitivity and tolerance levels. Upper and lower dose-response-time relations for acute radiation syndromes in patients indicate that man is more than sufficiently radioresistant to make the risks of an early radiation effect during one short space mission intangibly small in relation to the other nonradiation risks involved.

  12. The effect of abdominal fat parameters on percutaneous nephrolithotomy success

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Ozgur; Tarhan, Huseyin; Cimen, Sertac; Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Akarken, Ilker; Oztekin, Ozgur; Can, Ertan; Suelozgen, Tufan; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity has been suggested to lower the success of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, the relationship between abdominal fat parameters, such as visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, and PCNL success remained unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of abdominal fat parameters on PCNL success. Methods: A total of 150 patients who underwent PCNL were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Group 1 consisted of patients who had no residual stones or residual stone fragments <3 mm in diameter while group 2 included patients with residual stone fragments ≥3 mm. PCNL procedure was defined as successful if all stones were eliminated or if there were residual stone fragments <3 mm in diameter confirmed by non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) performed postoperatively. Preoperative NCCT was used to determine abdominal fat parameters. Results: Group 1 consisted of 117 (78.0%) patients while group 2 included 33 (22.0%) patients. On univariate analysis, stone number, stone surface area (SSA), visceral fat area (VFA), abdominal circumference on computerized tomography (ACCT), and duration of procedure were found to be predictive factors affecting PCNL success. Logistic regression analysis revealed that ACCT and SSA were independent prognostic factors for PCNL success. Conclusions: PCNL success was not affected by VFA, subcutaneous fat area (SFA) and body mass index (BMI) in our series. However, ACCT and SSA had negative associations with PCNL success. We conclude that both ACCT and SSA can be used as tools for predicting PCNL outcomes. PMID:27330587

  13. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response

    PubMed Central

    Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Best, Serena M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1) surface topography, (2) pore size and geometry, (3) porous networks, and (4) macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications. PMID:26501056

  14. Effects of primary rotor parameters on flapping dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T. N.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of flapping dynamics of four main rotor design features that influence the agility, stability, and operational safety of helicopters are studied. The parameters include flapping hinge offset, flapping hinge restraint, pitch-flap coupling, and blade lock number. First, the flapping equations of motion are derived that explicitly contain the design parameters. The dynamic equations are then developed for the tip-path plane, and the influence of individual and combined variations in the design parameters determined. The steady state flapping response is examined with respect to control input and aircraft angular rate which leads to a feedforward control law for control decoupling through cross feed, and a feedback control law to decouple the steady state flapping response. The condition for achieving perfect decoupling of the flapping response due to aircraft pitch and roll rates without using feedback control is also found for the hover case. It is indicated that the frequency of the regressing flapping mode of the rotor system can become low enough to require consideration in the assessment of handling characteristics.

  15. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  16. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad. PMID:27367099

  17. MHD mixed convection flow of a power law nanofluid over a vertical stretching sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aini Mat, Nor Azian; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Nazar, Roslinda; Ismail, Fudziah; Bachok, Norfifah

    2013-09-01

    A similarity solution of the steady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection boundary layer flow due to a stretching vertical heated sheet in a power law nanofluid with thermal radiation effect is theoretically studied. The governing system of partial differential equations is first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the shooting method. The influence of pertinent parameters such as the nanoparticle volume fraction parameter, the magnetic parameter, the buoyancy or mixed convection parameter and the radiation parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics is discussed. Comparisons with published results are also presented.

  18. UV RADIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBES AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) region of solar radiation is defined as wavelengths in the range of 200 to 400 nm. In contrast to visible radiation (400 - 800 nm), which has a well-defined role as the energy source for most of the Earth's primary production, the effects of UV radiation on b...

  19. Paradoxical effect of radiation on tumor incidence in the rat: implications for radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, S.; Moloney, W.C.; Meissner, W.A.

    1982-02-01

    The high incidence of leukemia in the Fischer rat is reduced by radiation to an incidence below that seen spontaneously. Fractionating the radiation decreased this effect. In contrast, mammary tumors increased with dose until reaching a plateau at the highest doses. Fractionation had little effect. These results are consistent with a hypothesis suggesting that tumor incidence due to radiation is the result of competing processes of tumor induction and cell killing.

  20. A novel parameter, cell-cycle progression index, for radiation dose absorbed estimation in the premature chromosome condensation assay.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tomisato; Nakata, Akifumi; Kasai, Kosuke; Nakano, Manabu; Abe, Yu; Tsushima, Eiki; Ossetrova, Natalia I; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A; Blakely, William F

    2014-06-01

    The calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay is a simple and useful method for assessing the cell-cycle distribution in cells, since calyculin A induces chromosome condensation in various phases of the cell cycle. In this study, a novel parameter, the cell-cycle progression index (CPI), in the PCC assay was validated as a novel biomarker for biodosimetry. Peripheral blood was drawn from healthy donors after informed consent was obtained. CPI was investigated using a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) ex vivo irradiation ((60)Co-gamma rays: ∼0.6 Gy min(-1), or X ray: 1.0 Gy min(-1); 0-10 Gy) model. The calyculin A-induced PCC assay was performed for chromosome preparation. PCC cells were divided into the following five categories according to cell-cycle stage: non-PCC, G1-PCC, S-PCC, G2/M-PCC and M/A-PCC cells. CPI was calculated as the ratio of G2/M-PCC cells to G1-PCC cells. The PCC-stage distribution varied markedly with irradiation doses. The G1-PCC cell fraction was significantly reduced, and the G2/M-PCC cell fraction increased, in 10-Gy-irradiated PBL after 48 h of culture. CPI levels were fitted to an exponential dose-response curve with gamma-ray irradiation [y = 0.6729 + 0.3934 exp(0.5685D), r = 1.0000, p < 0.0001] and X-ray irradiation [y = -0.3743 + 0.9744 exp(0.3321D), r = 0.9999, p < 0.0001]. There were no significant individual (p = 0.853) or gender effects (p = 0.951) on the CPI in the human peripheral blood ex vivo irradiation model. Furthermore, CPI measurements are rapid (< 15 min per case). These results suggest that the CPI is a useful screening tool for the assessment of radiation doses received ranging from 0 to 10 Gy in radiation exposure early after a radiation event, especially after a mass-casualty radiological incident. PMID:24743756

  1. A case study of the radiative effect of aerosols over Europe: EUCAARI-LONGREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteve, Anna R.; Highwood, Eleanor J.; Ryder, Claire L.

    2016-06-01

    The radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols over Europe during the 2008 European Integrated Project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions Long Range Experiment (EUCAARI-LONGREX) campaign has been calculated using measurements collected by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft and radiative transfer modelling. The aircraft sampled anthropogenically perturbed air masses across north-western Europe under anticyclonic conditions with aerosol optical depths ranging from 0.047 to 0.357. For one specially designed "radiative closure" flight, simulated irradiances have been compared to radiation measurements for a case of aged European aerosol in order to explore the validity of model assumptions and the degree of radiative closure that can be attained given the spatial and temporal variability of the observations and their measurement uncertainties. Secondly, the diurnally averaged aerosol radiative effect throughout EUCAARI-LONGREX has been calculated. The surface radiative effect ranged between -3.9 and -22.8 W m-2 (mean -11 ± 5 W m-2), whilst top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) values were between -2.1 and -12.0 W m-2 (mean -5 ± 3 W m-2). We have quantified the uncertainties in our calculations due to the way in which aerosols and other parameters are represented in a radiative transfer model. The largest uncertainty in the aerosol radiative effect at both the surface and the TOA comes from the spectral resolution of the information used in the radiative transfer model (˜ 17 %) and the aerosol description (composition and size distribution) used in the Mie calculations of the aerosol optical properties included in the radiative transfer model (˜ 7 %). The aerosol radiative effect at the TOA is also highly sensitive to the surface albedo (˜ 12 %).

  2. 2.3.1 Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Subsection '2.3.1 Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations' of the Section '2.3 Biological Effects' of the Chapter '2 Radiation and Biological Effects' with the comtents:

  3. A Sensitivity Study of Radiative Fluxes at the Top of Atmosphere to Cloud-Microphysics and Aerosol Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; McFarlane, Sally A.; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Ben; Ma, Po-Lun; Yan, Huiping; Bao, Jie

    2013-11-08

    In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of net radiative fluxes (FNET) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) to 16 selected uncertain parameters mainly related to the cloud microphysics and aerosol schemes in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). We adopted a quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) sampling approach to effectively explore the high dimensional parameter space. The output response variables (e.g., FNET) were simulated using CAM5 for each parameter set, and then evaluated using generalized linear model analysis. In response to the perturbations of these 16 parameters, the CAM5-simulated global annual mean FNET ranges from -9.8 to 3.5 W m-2 compared to the CAM5-simulated FNET of 1.9 W m-2 with the default parameter values. Variance-based sensitivity analysis was conducted to show the relative contributions of individual parameter perturbation to the global FNET variance. The results indicate that the changes in the global mean FNET are dominated by those of cloud forcing (CF) within the parameter ranges being investigated. The size threshold parameter related to auto-conversion of cloud ice to snow is confirmed as one of the most influential parameters for FNET in the CAM5 simulation. The strong heterogeneous geographic distribution of FNET variation shows parameters have a clear localized effect over regions where they are acting. However, some parameters also have non-local impacts on FNET variance. Although external factors, such as perturbations of anthropogenic and natural emissions, largely affect FNET variations at the regional scale, their impact is weaker than that of model internal parameters in terms of simulating global mean FNET in this study. The interactions among the 16 selected parameters contribute a relatively small portion of the total FNET variations over most regions of the globe. This study helps us better understand the CAM5 model behavior associated with parameter uncertainties, which will aid the next step of reducing model

  4. Parameters of type IIP SN 2012A and clumpiness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Chugai, N. N.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The explosion energy and the ejecta mass of a type IIP supernova (SN IIP) derived from hydrodynamic simulations are principal parameters of the explosion theory. Few SNe IIP have been studied by hydrodynamic modeling so far, however. Some doubts exist about the reliability of the derived SN IIP parameters. Aims: We studied the well-observed type IIP SN 2012A with hydrodynamic modeling. We examined its early spectra for ejecta clumpiness. We also explored other observational effects of clumpiness. Methods: We determined the supernova parameters by means of standard hydrodynamic modeling. We used the early hydrogen Hα and Hβ lines as clumpiness diagnostics. We used a modified hydrodynamic code to study the clumpiness effect in the light curve and expansion kinematics. Results: We found that SN 20012A is the result of the explosion of a red supergiant with a radius of 715 ± 100 R⊙. The explosion energy is (5.25 ± 0.6) × 1050 erg, the ejecta mass is 13.1 ± 0.7 M⊙, and the total 56Ni mass is 0.012 ± 0.002 M⊙. The estimated mass of a progenitor, a main-sequence star, is 15 ± 1 M⊙. The Hα and Hβ lines in early spectra indicate that outer ejecta are clumpy. Hydrodynamic simulations show that the clumpiness modifies the early light curve and increases the maximum velocity of the outer layers. Conclusions: The pre-SN 2012A was a normal red supergiant with the progenitor mass of ≈ 15 M⊙. The outer layers of ejecta indicate the clumpy structure. The clumpiness of the external layers can increase the maximum expansion velocity.

  5. Effect of fractal parameters on absorption properties of soot in the infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna, S.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.

    2014-11-01

    Absorption coefficient of soot aggregates in the infrared region is investigated using multi-sphere T matrix algorithm. As the refractive index of soot is relatively high, the interaction between neighboring particles is important and Rayleigh approximation is invalid. The absorption cross section of soot is much higher than the Rayleigh approximation prediction. The effect of fractal parameters, dimension Df and prefactor kf, on absorption can be substantial and varies strongly with optical size parameter x and refractive index m. Families of fractal structures having similar absorption cross sections have been identified. It is noted that the fractal structures from the same family have similar particle distance correlation functions. Following this, an empirical model for absorption of soot as a function of m, x and fractal parameters has been developed. The model successfully predicts the absorption within ±5% for various fractal structures. Compared to Rayleigh approximation, the absorption enhancement can be as high as 200% at low temperatures and 120% at high temperatures. Effects of fractal parameters on absorption enhancement are important for low temperature applications but are not significant at high temperatures. This is mainly due to high refractive indices of soot at long wavelengths and shift of emitted radiation towards short wavelengths with increase in temperature.

  6. Treatment Parameters and Outcome in 680 Treatments of Internal Radiation With Resin {sup 90}Y-Microspheres for Unresectable Hepatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Andrew S. McNeillie, Patrick M.S.; Dezarn, William A.; Nutting, Charles; Sangro, Bruno; Wertman, Dan; Garafalo, Michael; Liu, David; Coldwell, Douglas; Savin, Michael; Jakobs, Tobias; Rose, Steven; Warner, Richard; Carter, Dennis; Sapareto, Stephen; Nag, Subir; Gulec, Seza; Calkins, Allison; Gates, Vanessa L.; Salem, Riad

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Radioembolization (RE) using {sup 90}Y-microspheres is an effective and safe treatment for patients with unresectable liver malignancies. Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is rare after RE; however, greater understanding of radiation-related factors leading to serious liver toxicity is needed. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of radiation parameters was performed. All data pertaining to demographics, tumor, radiation, and outcomes were analyzed for significance and dependencies to develop a predictive model for RILD. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events Version 3.0 scale. Results: A total of 515 patients (287 men; 228 women) from 14 US and 2 EU centers underwent 680 separate RE treatments with resin {sup 90}Y-microspheres in 2003-2006. Multifactorial analyses identified factors related to toxicity, including activity (GBq) Selective Internal Radiation Therapy delivered (p < 0.0001), prescribed (GBq) activity (p < 0.0001), percentage of empiric activity (GBq) delivered (p < 0.0001), number of prior liver treatments (p < 0.0008), and medical center (p < 0.0001). The RILD was diagnosed in 28 of 680 treatments (4%), with 21 of 28 cases (75%) from one center, which used the empiric method. Conclusions: There was an association between the empiric method, percentage of calculated activity delivered to the patient, and the most severe toxicity, RILD. A predictive model for RILD is not yet possible given the large variance in these data.

  7. Aerosol radiative effects over BIMSTEC regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumit; Kar, S. C.; Mupparthy, Raghavendra S.

    Aerosols can have variety of shapes, composition, sizes and other properties that influence their optical characteristics and thus the radiative impact. The visible impact of aerosol is the formation of haze, a layer of particles from vehicular, industrial emissions and biomass burning. The characterization of these fine particles is important for regulators and researchers because of their potential impact on human health, their ability to travel thousands of kilometers crossing international borders, and their influence on climate forcing and global warming. The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) with Member Countries Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand has emerged as an important regional group for technical and economic Cooperation. Continuing the quest for a deeper understanding of BIMSTEC countries weather and climate, in this paper we focused on aerosols and their direct radiative effects. Because of various contrasts like geophysical, agricultural practices, heterogeneous land/ocean surface, population etc these regions present an excellent natural laboratory for studying aerosol-meteorology interactions in tropical to sub-tropical environments. We exploited data available on multiple platforms (such as MISR, MODIS etc) and models (OPAC, SBDART etc) to compute the results. Ten regions were selected with different surface characteristics, also having considerable differences in the long-term trends and seasonal distribution of aerosols. In a preliminary analysis pertaining to pre-monsoon (March-April-May) of 2013, AOD _{555nm} is found to be maximum over Bangladesh (>0.52) and minimum over Bhutan (0.22), whereas other regions have intermediate values. Concurrent to these variability of AOD we found a strong reduction in incoming flux at surface of all the regions (> -25 Wm (-2) ), except Bhutan and Sri Lanka (< -18Wm (-2) ). The top of the atmosphere (TOA) forcing values are

  8. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmo-logical radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative trans-fer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  9. Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cai Xuwei; Shedden, Kerby; Hayman, James A.; Yuan Shuanghu; Ritter, Timothy; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Kong Fengming

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

  10. Antitumor effects of combining tumor radiation with the antivascular action of ultrasound stimulated microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: More and more evidence indicates tumor vasculature plays an important role in tumor radiation response. In this study, we investigated ultrasound stimulated microbubbles to enhance the effects of radiation. Methods: Human bladder cancer HT-1376 xenografts in severe combined immuno-deficient mice were used. High-frequency (25 MHz) ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human bladder xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were treated using microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. Results: There existed a synergistic effect in vivo with combined single treatments of ultrasound-stimulated microbubble vascular perturbation and radiation inducing an over 10-fold greater cell kill with combined treatments. We further demonstrate that induction of ceramide-related endothelial cell apoptosis, leading to vascular disruption, is a causative mechanism. In vivo experiments with ultrasound and bubbles permit radiation doses to be decreased significantly for comparable effect. Conclusion: We envisage this unique combined ultrasound-based vascular perturbation and radiation treatment method being used to enhance the effects of radiation in a tumor, leading to greater tumor eradication. PMID:26617705

  11. Aharonov-Bohm effect in cyclotron and synchrotron radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Gitman, D. M.; Levin, A.; Tlyachev, V. B.

    2001-07-01

    We study the impact of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid on the radiation of a charged particle moving in a constant uniform magnetic field. With this aim in view, exact solutions of Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are found in the magnetic-solenoid field. Using such solutions, we calculate exactly all the characteristics of one-photon spontaneous radiation both for spinless and spinning particle. Considering non-relativistic and relativistic approximations, we analyze cyclotron and synchrotron radiations in detail. Radiation peculiarities caused by the presence of the solenoid may be considered as a manifestation of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the radiation. In particular, it is shown that new spectral lines appear in the radiation spectrum. Due to angular distribution peculiarities of the radiation intensity, these lines can in principle be isolated from basic cyclotron and synchrotron radiation spectra.

  12. Genetic effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Verschaeve, L. . E-mail: luc.verschaeve@vito.be

    2005-09-01

    The possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on the genetic material of cells are considered very important since damage to the DNA of somatic cells can be linked to cancer development or cell death whereas damage to germ cells can lead to genetic damage in next and subsequent generations. This is why the scientific literature reports many investigations on the subject. According to a number of review papers, the conclusion so far is that there is little evidence that RFR is directly mutagenic and that adverse effects that were reported in some of the papers are predominantly the result of hyperthermia. Yet, some subtle indirect effects on DNA replication and/or transcription of genes under relatively restricted exposure conditions cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, the possibility of combined effects of RFR with environmental carcinogens/mutagens merits further attention. The present paper takes into account more recent investigations but the conclusion remains the same. A majority of studies report no increased (cyto)genetic damage but yet, a considerable number of investigations do. However, many studies were not sufficiently characterized, are therefore difficult to replicate and cannot be compared to others. Experimental protocols were very different from one study to another and investigations from a single laboratory were very often limited in the sample size or number of cells investigated, preventing a robust statistical analysis. Subtle, but significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed cells cannot be found in such conditions. For the above reasons, it was concluded at a workshop in Loewenstein (November 2002) that further investigations by individual laboratories most probably will not add much to the discussion of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) genotoxicity. Large, well coordinated, international collaborative studies involving participation of several experienced scientists are considered an alternative of uttermost importance

  13. Genetic effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR).

    PubMed

    Verschaeve, L

    2005-09-01

    The possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on the genetic material of cells are considered very important since damage to the DNA of somatic cells can be linked to cancer development or cell death whereas damage to germ cells can lead to genetic damage in next and subsequent generations. This is why the scientific literature reports many investigations on the subject. According to a number of review papers, the conclusion so far is that there is little evidence that RFR is directly mutagenic and that adverse effects that were reported in some of the papers are predominantly the result of hyperthermia. Yet, some subtle indirect effects on DNA replication and/or transcription of genes under relatively restricted exposure conditions cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, the possibility of combined effects of RFR with environmental carcinogens/mutagens merits further attention. The present paper takes into account more recent investigations but the conclusion remains the same. A majority of studies report no increased (cyto)genetic damage but yet, a considerable number of investigations do. However, many studies were not sufficiently characterized, are therefore difficult to replicate and cannot be compared to others. Experimental protocols were very different from one study to another and investigations from a single laboratory were very often limited in the sample size or number of cells investigated, preventing a robust statistical analysis. Subtle, but significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed cells cannot be found in such conditions. For the above reasons, it was concluded at a workshop in Löwenstein (November 2002) that further investigations by individual laboratories most probably will not add much to the discussion of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) genotoxicity. Large, well coordinated, international collaborative studies involving participation of several experienced scientists are considered an alternative of uttermost importance

  14. Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of: (1) peripheral leukocyte distribution, (2) plasma cytokine levels and (3) cytokine production profiles following whole blood mitogenic stimulation

  15. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  16. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, M B; Davis, M V

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10/sup 4/ rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10/sup 5/ rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects.

  17. Calculation of the Electronic Parameters of an Al/DNA/p-Si Schottky Barrier Diode Influenced by Alpha Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2015-01-01

    Many types of materials such as inorganic semiconductors have been employed as detectors for nuclear radiation, the importance of which has increased significantly due to recent nuclear catastrophes. Despite the many advantages of this type of materials, the ability to measure direct cellular or biological responses to radiation might improve detector sensitivity. In this context, semiconducting organic materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA have been studied in recent years. This was established by studying the varying electronic properties of DNA-metal or semiconductor junctions when exposed to radiation. In this work, we investigated the electronics of aluminium (Al)/DNA/silicon (Si) rectifying junctions using their current-voltage (I-V) characteristics when exposed to alpha radiation. Diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance were determined for different irradiation times. The observed results show significant changes with exposure time or total dosage received. An increased deviation from ideal diode conditions (7.2 to 18.0) was observed when they were bombarded with alpha particles for up to 40 min. Using the conventional technique, barrier height values were observed to generally increase after 2, 6, 10, 20 and 30 min of radiation. The same trend was seen in the values of the series resistance (0.5889–1.423 Ω for 2–8 min). These changes in the electronic properties of the DNA/Si junctions could therefore be utilized in the construction of sensitive alpha particle detectors. PMID:25730484

  18. Calculation of the electronic parameters of an Al/DNA/p-Si Schottky barrier diode influenced by alpha radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Mohd Amin, Yusoff; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2015-01-01

    Many types of materials such as inorganic semiconductors have been employed as detectors for nuclear radiation, the importance of which has increased significantly due to recent nuclear catastrophes. Despite the many advantages of this type of materials, the ability to measure direct cellular or biological responses to radiation might improve detector sensitivity. In this context, semiconducting organic materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA have been studied in recent years. This was established by studying the varying electronic properties of DNA-metal or semiconductor junctions when exposed to radiation. In this work, we investigated the electronics of aluminium (Al)/DNA/silicon (Si) rectifying junctions using their current-voltage (I-V) characteristics when exposed to alpha radiation. Diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance were determined for different irradiation times. The observed results show significant changes with exposure time or total dosage received. An increased deviation from ideal diode conditions (7.2 to 18.0) was observed when they were bombarded with alpha particles for up to 40 min. Using the conventional technique, barrier height values were observed to generally increase after 2, 6, 10, 20 and 30 min of radiation. The same trend was seen in the values of the series resistance (0.5889-1.423 Ω for 2-8 min). These changes in the electronic properties of the DNA/Si junctions could therefore be utilized in the construction of sensitive alpha particle detectors. PMID:25730484

  19. Anisotropic Effects on Constitutive Model Parameters of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Nachhatter; Joshi, Vasant

    2011-06-01

    Simulation of low velocity impact on structures or high velocity penetration in armor materials heavily rely on constitutive material models. The model constants are required input to computer codes (LS-DYNA, DYNA3D or SPH) to accurately simulate fragment impact on structural components made of high strength 7075-T651 aluminum alloys. Johnson-Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration into 1' thick Al-7075-T651plates. When simulations go well beyond minor parameter tweaking and experimental results are drastically different it is important to determine constitutive parameters from the actual material used in impact/penetration experiments. To investigate anisotropic effects on the yield/flow stress of this alloy we performed quasi-static and high strain rate tensile tests on specimens fabricated in the longitudinal, transverse, and thickness directions of 1' thick Al7075-T651 plate. Flow stresses at a strain rate of ~1100/s in the longitudinal and transverse direction are similar around 670MPa and decreases to 620 MPa in the thickness direction. These data are lower than the flow stress of 760 MPa measured in Al7075-T651 bar stock.

  20. The Space Weather Effect of Interplanetary Shock Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changxing; Wang, Chi

    The ring current is the key element in the magnetic storms in the near-Earth space which absorbs and stores geomagnetic storm energy and then releases it slowly over subsequent days and weeks Understanding the structure and property of the ring current can lead to more accurate predictions of the space environment of the inner magnetosphere for the ongoing rapid development of human activities When a sudden increase in the solar wind dynamic pressure following an interplanetary shock IPS compresses the Earth magnetosphere the inner magnetospheric currents significantly intensify especially the ring current However how the interplanetary shock triggers the magnetic storm and how it affects the intensification and the decay of the ring current are not fully understood For this purpose we statistically study how critical parameters of an IPS such as the orientation and the strength of the IPS correlate with the geomagnetic indices such as Dst SYM and ASY which relate to the disturbances in the ring current In order to investigate the effectiveness of an IPS on the near Earth space environment we apply Gaussian wavelet transform method to the solar wind plasma and the interplanetary magnetic field data from WIND and ACE satellites to determine the critical parameters of the IPS We have successfully identified more than 300 IPSs from the archives of WIND and ACE measurements The initial results have shows that 1 Gaussian wavelet transform method has good responses to the changing features of interplanetary shocks 2 The lag time

  1. On the effects of subsurface parameters on evaporite dissolution (Switzerland).

    PubMed

    Zidane, Ali; Zechner, Eric; Huggenberger, Peter; Younes, Anis

    2014-05-01

    Uncontrolled subsurface evaporite dissolution could lead to hazards such as land subsidence. Observed subsidences in a study area of Northwestern Switzerland were mainly due to subsurface dissolution (subrosion) of evaporites such as halite and gypsum. A set of 2D density driven flow simulations were evaluated along 1000 m long and 150 m deep 2D cross sections within the study area that is characterized by tectonic horst and graben structures. The simulations were conducted to study the effect of the different subsurface parameters that could affect the dissolution process. The heterogeneity of normal faults and its impact on the dissolution of evaporites is studied by considering several permeable faults that include non-permeable areas. The mixed finite element method (MFE) is used to solve the flow equation, coupled with the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) and the discontinuous Galerkin method (DG) to solve the diffusion and the advection parts of the transport equation. Results show that the number of faults above the lower aquifer that contains the salt layer is considered as the most important factor that affects the dissolution compared to the other investigated parameters of thickness of the zone above the halite formation, a dynamic conductivity of the lower aquifer, and varying boundary conditions in the upper aquifer. PMID:24650646

  2. Effect of radio frequency discharge power on dusty plasma parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2009-08-01

    The parameters of a two-dimensional dusty plasma consisting of six, 9 mum diameter particles trapped inside a radio frequency (rf) plasma sheath have been measured as a function of rf power in a 13.5 mtorr (1.8 Pa) argon discharge. The center-of-mass and breathing frequencies are found by projecting the cluster's Brownian motion onto the associated normal mode. The center-of-mass frequency (i.e., radial confinement) is insensitive to rf power. The Debye shielding parameter kappa, as found from the breathing frequency, increases from approx =0.5 to 2 as the square root of rf power. The Debye length decreases from approx =2.7 to 0.7 mm as the inverse of the square root of rf power. The average particle charge qapprox =-17 000e is effectively independent of rf power. These results are consistent with an electron temperature that is independent of rf power and an ion density that is directly proportional to rf power, where the Debye length is determined by the ion density in combination with the electron temperature.

  3. Anisotropic effects on constitutive model parameters of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Nachhatter S.; Joshi, Vasant S.

    2012-03-01

    Simulation of low velocity impact on structures or high velocity penetration in armor materials heavily rely on constitutive material models. Model constants are determined from tension, compression or torsion stress-strain at low and high strain rates at different temperatures. These model constants are required input to computer codes (LS-DYNA, DYNA3D or SPH) to accurately simulate fragment impact on structural components made of high strength 7075-T651 aluminum alloy. Johnson- Cook model constants determined for Al7075-T651 alloy bar material failed to simulate correctly the penetration into 1' thick Al-7075-T651plates. When simulation go well beyond minor parameter tweaking and experimental results show drastically different behavior it becomes important to determine constitutive parameters from the actual material used in impact/penetration experiments. To investigate anisotropic effects on the yield/flow stress of this alloy quasi-static and high strain rate tensile tests were performed on specimens fabricated in the longitudinal "L", transverse "T", and thickness "TH" directions of 1' thick Al7075 Plate. While flow stress at a strain rate of ~1/s as well as ~1100/s in the thickness and transverse directions are lower than the longitudinal direction. The flow stress in the bar was comparable to flow stress in the longitudinal direction of the plate. Fracture strain data from notched tensile specimens fabricated in the L, T, and Thickness directions of 1' thick plate are used to derive fracture constants.

  4. Fundamental remote sensing science research program. Part 1: Scene radiation and atmospheric effects characterization project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. E.; Deering, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Brief articles summarizing the status of research in the scene radiation and atmospheric effect characterization (SRAEC) project are presented. Research conducted within the SRAEC program is focused on the development of empirical characterizations and mathematical process models which relate the electromagnetic energy reflected or emitted from a scene to the biophysical parameters of interest.

  5. Thermal Orbital Environmental Parameter Study on the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) Using Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, John R.; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The natural thermal environmental parameters used on the Space Station Program (SSP 30425) were generated by the Space Environmental Effects Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) utilizing extensive data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), a series of satellites which measured low earth orbit (LEO) albedo and outgoing long-wave radiation. Later, this temporal data was presented as a function of averaging times and orbital inclination for use by thermal engineers in NASA Technical Memorandum TM 4527. The data was not presented in a fashion readily usable by thermal engineering modeling tools and required knowledge of the thermal time constants and infrared versus solar spectrum sensitivity of the hardware being analyzed to be used properly. Another TM was recently issued as a guideline for utilizing these environments (NASA/TM-2001-211221) with more insight into the utilization by thermal analysts. This paper gives a top-level overview of the environmental parameters presented in the TM and a study of the effects of implementing these environments on an ongoing MSFC project, the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), compared to conventional orbital parameters that had been historically used.

  6. Investigation of temperature feedback signal parameters during neoplasms treatment by diode laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Gelfond, Mark L.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Semyashkina, Yulia V.

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of temperature signal in operation area and laser power at nevus, papilloma, and keratoma in vivo removal by a 980+/-10 nm diode laser with "blackened" tip operating in continuous (CW) mode and with temperature feedback (APC) mode are presented. Feedback allows maintaining temperature in the area of laser treatment at a preset level by regulating power of diode laser radiation (automatic power control). Temperature in the area of laser treatment was controlled by measuring the amplitude of thermal radiation, which occurs when tissue is heated by laser radiation. Removal of neoplasm was carried out in CW mode with laser radiation average power of 12.5+/-0.5 W; mean temperature in the area of laser treatment was 900+/-10°C for nevus, 800+/-15°C for papilloma, and 850+/-20°C for keratoma. The same laser radiation maximal power (12.5 W) and targeted temperature (900°C) were set for nevus removal in APC mode. The results of investigation are real time oscillograms of the laser power and temperature in the area of laser treatment at neoplasms removal in two described above modes. Simultaneously with the measurement of laser power and the temperature in the area of laser treatment video recording of surgeon manipulations was carried out. We discuss the correlation between the power of the laser radiation, the temperature in the area of laser treatment and consistency of surgeon manipulation. It is shown that the method of removal (excision with or without traction, scanning) influences the temperature in the area of laser treatment. It was found, that at removal of nevus with temperature feedback (APC) mode to achieve comparable with CW mode temperature in the area of laser treatment (900+/-10°C) 20-50% less laser power is required. Consequently, removing these neoplasms in temperature feedback mode can be less traumatic than the removal in CW mode.

  7. System electrical parameters and their effects on bearing currents

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, D.; Erdman, J.; Kerkman, R.J.; Schlegel, D.; Skibinski, G.

    1997-03-01

    This paper examines ac motor shaft voltages and resulting bearing currents when operated under pulse width modulation (PWM) voltage source inverters. The paper reviews the electrical characteristics of bearings and motors that cause shaft voltages and bearing currents. A brief review of previous work is presented, including a system model for electrical analysis of bearing currents. Relying on the work of a companion paper, the propensity for electric discharge machining (EDM) is determined by a design equation that is a function of system components. Pertinent machine parameters and their formulas are presented and values calculated for machines from 5 to 1,000 hp. The effects of system elements on shaft voltages and bearing currents are evaluated experimentally and the results compared to theory. Finally, the paper will present quantitative results for one solution to the shaft voltage and bearing current problem.

  8. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    PubMed

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters. PMID:26506651

  9. Parameter studies of candidate lattices for the 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1986-01-13

    This document discusses the implications of various collective phenomena on the required performance of candidate lattices for the LBL 1 to 2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source. The performance issues considered include bunch length, emittance growth, and beam lifetime. In addition, the possible use of the 1 to 2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source as a high-gain FEL is explored briefly. Generally, the differences between lattices are minor. It appears that the most significant feature distinguishing the various alternatives will be the beam lifetime.

  10. Effective-medium model of wire metamaterials in the problems of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Mirmoosa, M. S. Nefedov, I. S. Simovski, C. R.; Rüting, F.

    2014-06-21

    In the present work, we check the applicability of the effective medium model (EMM) to the problems of radiative heat transfer (RHT) through so-called wire metamaterials (WMMs)—composites comprising parallel arrays of metal nanowires. It is explained why this problem is so important for the development of prospective thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Previous studies of the applicability of EMM for WMMs were targeted by the imaging applications of WMMs. The analogous study referring to the transfer of radiative heat is a separate problem that deserves extended investigations. We show that WMMs with practically realizable design parameters transmit the radiative heat as effectively homogeneous media. Existing EMM is an adequate tool for qualitative prediction of the magnitude of transferred radiative heat and of its effective frequency band.

  11. The mechanism of the effect of a plasma layer with negative permittivity on the antenna radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chunsheng Liu, Hui; Jiang, Binhao; Li, Xueai

    2015-06-15

    A model of a plasma–antenna system is developed to study the mechanism of the effect of the plasma layer on antenna radiation. Results show a plasma layer with negative permittivity is inductive, and thus affects the phase difference between electric and magnetic fields. In the near field of antenna radiation, a plasma layer with proper parameters can compensate the capacitivity of the vacuum and enhance the radiation power. In the far field of antenna radiation, the plasma layer with negative permittivity increases the inductivity of the vacuum and reduces the radiation power.

  12. Survey of Radiation Effects in Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, Louis K

    2008-08-01

    Information on radiation effects in titanium alloys has been reviewed. Only sparse experimental data from fission reactor and charged particle irradiations is available, none of which is directly applicable to the SNS. Within this limited data it is found that although mechanical properties are substantially degraded, several Ti alloys may retain acceptable properties to low or moderate doses. Therefore, it is recommended that titanium alloys be examined further for application to the SNS target. Since information directly relevant to the SNS mercury target environment and irradiation conditions is not available, it is recommended that ORNL generate the necessary experimental data using a graded approach. The first testing would be for cavitation erosion resistance using two different test devices. If the material performs acceptably the next tests should be for long term mercury compatibility testing of the most promising alloys. Irradiation tests to anticipated SNS displacement doses followed by mechanical property measurements would be the last stage in determining whether the alloys should be considered for service in the SNS target module.

  13. Radiation model for row crops: I. Geometric view factors and parameter optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Row crops with partial cover result in different radiation partitioning to the soil and canopy compared with full cover; however, methods to account for partial cover have not been adequately investigated. The objectives of this study were to: (i) develop geometric view factors to account for the sp...

  14. ANNUAL REPORT. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study will provide the underpinning science to develop improved gl...

  15. Radiation effects on the surfaces of the Galilean satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Carlson, R. W.; Cooper, J. F.; Paranicas, C.; Moore, M. H.; Wong, M. C.

    Early observations and results; Charged particle bombardment, variability; Dose vs.depth: radiation and regolith formation, trapping and escape; Radiation effects: irradiation of ice, irradiation of SO2 and sulfur - pure and in ice, irradiation of CO2 and carbon species in ice, irradiation of salts and acids, adsorption; Summary of satellite irradiation effects: Metis, Amalthea and Thebe, Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto.

  16. PROGRESS REPORT. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study will provide the underpinning science to develop improved gl...

  17. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    SciTech Connect

    Auxier, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed. (ACR)

  18. Enhancements in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation following volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, A. M.; Ackerman, T. P.; Turco, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to estimate the changes in biologically effective radiation (UV-BE) at the earth's surface produced by the El Chichon (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991) eruptions. It is found that in both cases surface intensity can increase because the effect of ozone depletion outweighs the increased scattering.

  19. Radiation tolerant silicon nitride insulated gate field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.

    1969-01-01

    Metal-Insulated-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor /MISFET/ device uses a silicon nitride passivation layer over a thin silicon oxide layer to enhance the radiation tolerance. It is useful in electronic systems exposed to space radiation environment or the effects of nuclear weapons.

  20. Seismic response of arch dams considering infinite radiation damping and joint opening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjia; Xu, Yanjie; Wang, Guanglun; Zhang, Chuhan

    2002-06-01

    Effects of two important factors on earthquake response of high arch dams are considered and combined into one program. These factors are: effects of radiation damping of the infinite canyon and local non-linearity of the contraction joint opening between the dam monoliths. For modeling of rock canyon, the discrete parameters are obtained based on a curve fitting, thus allowing the nonlinear dam system to be solved in the time domain. The earthquake uniform free-field input at the dam-canyon interface is used. An engineering example is given to demonstrate the significant effects of the radiation damping on the structure response.

  1. Combined effects of radiation and trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerschmidt, Otfried

    Injuries, caused by both whole-body irradiation and wounds or burns, have been relatively little studied. Possibly because many investigators think that these injuries are just modified radiation-induced diseases for which the same treatment principles are valid. Other authors had the impression that, for instance, the radiation burn trauma is a new kind of disease which differs significantly from either radiation syndrome alone or from burn disease. There are many experimental data on animals which suggest that the pathology of combined injuries differs significantly from that of radiation-induced disease or of thermal or mechanical traumas. Wounds or burns which, in general, do not cause septicaemia could become entrance ports for bacteria when animals are exposed to whole-body irradiation. Thrombocytopenia is the reason for hemorrhages in wounds. The susceptibility to shock is increased considerably in combined injuries and the formation of callus in the bone fractures is significantly delayed. The healing of wounds and burns in the initial phase of the radiation syndrome does not always differ from healing in the non-irradiated organism. However, a few days or weeks later very serious wound infections and hemorrhages can occur. The additional injuries almost always worsen the development and prognosis of radiation-induced disease. The recommended treatment for combined injuries will differ in many respects from the treatment of wounds and burns or the radiation syndrome.

  2. The effect of space radiation of the nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Grant E.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Yang, Tracy; Whitney, Monroe

    The long-term effects of irradiation by accelerated heavy ions on the structure and function of the nervous system have not been studied extensively. Although the adult brain is relatively resistant to low LET radiation, cellular studies indicate that individual heavy ions can produce serious membrane lesions and multiple chromatin breaks. Capillary hemorrhages may follow high LET particle irradiation of the developing brain as high RBE effects. Evidence has been accumulating that the glial system and blood-brain barrier (BBB) are relatively sensitive to injury by ionizing radiation. While DNA repair is active in neural systems, it may be assumed that a significant portion of this molecular process is misrepair. Since the expression of cell lethality usually requires cell division, and nerve cells have an extremely low rate of division, it is possible that some of the characteristic changes of premature aging may represent a delayed effect of chromatin misrepair in brain. Altered microcirculation, decreased local metabolism, entanglement and reduction in synaptic density, premature loss of neurons, myelin degeneration, and glial proliferation are late signs of such injuries. HZE particles are very efficient in producing carcinogenic cell transformation, reaching a peak for iron particles. The promotion of viral transformation is also efficient up to an energy transfer of approximately 300 keV/micron. The RBE for carcinogenesis in nerve tissues remains unknown. On the basis of available information concerning HZE particle flux in interplanetary space, only general estimates of the magnitude of the effects of long-term spaceflight on some nervous system parameters may be constructed.

  3. Multidimensional radiative effects in supercritical shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Lanz, T.; Stehlé, C.; Michaut, C.; Korĉáková, D.

    Recent radiative shocks experiments performed on the LULI laser at Ecole Polytechnique in France (Fleury et al., Lasers and Particle Beams 20, 263, 2002) put in evidence a supercritical shock wave in a xenon gas cell. The structure of these shocks is quite similar to those of accretion shock wave in the case of stellar formation, as indicated in Stehlé and Chieze (SF2A - Paris proceedings, 2002). Some points require further studies like the contribution of the gas excitation/ionization energy to the compression ratio and the understanding of the discrepancy, which was noted between the velocity of the radiative precursor in the experiment and in the 1D simulation. Thus, to understand the physics of the radiative shock waves, the academic case of the stationary shock is particularly interesting. We have thus studied the structure of a radiative shock wave which propagates in an ionized gas. We study the extended Rankine Hugoniot equations in various media with inclusion of radiation pressure and energy and study also the extension of the radiative precursor in the diffusion approximation. We also study the equations of multidimensional radiative transfer for a snapshot of the experimental shock in xenon in order to quantify the radiative losses in the finite experimental cell. This academic approach will help to improve the knowledge of the physical processes which take place in radiative shocks of astrophysical interest, like in the birth and death of stars, and prepare ourselves to define appropriate experiments on future high power lasers like LIL and LMJ in Bordeaux.

  4. Stepglue, AN Effective Method for Parameter Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Geochemical Models with Wide Parameter Dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, A.; Kalin, L.; Hantush, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) method is a practical tool for evaluating parameter uncertainty and distinguishing behavioral parameter sets, which are deemed acceptable in reproducing observed behavior of a system, from non-behavioral sets. When a conventional GLUE methodology is applied to a complex geochemical model, depending on the type of observed constituent used for model verification, parameters effecting more than one process might end up having different behavioral distributions. To overcome this problem, we propose a Stepwise GLUE procedure (StepGLUE), which can better identify the behavioral distributions of the model parameters regardless of the data being used for model verification. StepGLUE method uses a three step approach for identifying parameter behavioral domains that produce optimal results for all model constituents. In step 0, model parameters are divided into two groups: group A consisting of parameters exclusive to a single constituent (e.g. denitrification rate, which only effects nitrate pool) and group B consisting of parameters affecting more than constituent (e.g. nitrification rate which engages both ammonia and nitrate related processes). In step 1, for each constituent (like nitrate), we identify the most sensitive parameters through Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test, using a single-constituent likelihood measure. If any of the parameters listed in group A end up being sensitive, new parameter values are generated for them according to their behavioral distributions. This process is necessary to avoid carrying over parameter uncertainty of one constituent to other constituents in the model. At the end of step one, new series of Monte Carlo simulations are performed with modified parameters. In step 2 (parameter oriented phase), we re-evaluate constituent sensitivity to all model parameters using KS test, however, this time the focus is on parameters in group B. For each of the group B parameters that show up in

  5. Effect of radiation heat transfer on thermal diffusivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, N.

    1990-03-01

    Experimental data on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of a semitransparent material generally include an error due to the radiation heat transfer. This error varies in accordance with the experimental conditions such as the temperature level of the sample and the measuring method. In this paper, research on the influence of radiation heat transfer on thermal diffusivity are reviewed, and as an example, the method to correct the radiation component in the apparent thermal diffusivity measured by the stepwise heating technique is presented. The transient heat transfer by simultaneous thermal conduction and radiation in a semitransparent material is analyzed when the front surface is subjected to stepwise heating. The apparent thermal diffusivity, which includes the radiation component, is calculated for various parameters.

  6. Disentangling the eruption source parameters that control the climate effects of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Lauren; Schmidt, Anja; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Kenneth; Dhomse, Sandip; Haywood, Jim; Jones, Andy

    2016-04-01

    Climatic cooling in the 1-2 years following a major volcanic eruption does not scale linearly with the mass of SO2 injected into the atmosphere. The injection height of the emissions, the latitude of the volcano, the season and large scale atmospheric circulations, also influence the climatic response. Complex couplings exist between stratospheric chemistry and circulations, and aerosol induced heating and aerosol microphysical processes such as condensation and evaporation. As yet, there has been no systematic assessment of these relationships when considering different eruption source parameters. A series of simulations with a global composition-climate model with interactive stratospheric chemistry and aerosol microphysics are conducted, in which the eruption latitude and injection height are varied. Parameter combinations are chosen such that injections sample areas in the atmosphere where different chemical and dynamical influences are important (e.g. tropical vs. high latitude eruptions, injections near the tropopause vs. injections in the upper stratosphere). Each experiment is repeated for varying SO2 injection magnitudes. We focus on the analysis of aerosol properties such as the stratospheric aerosol optical depth, effective radius and heating rates, and resultant perturbations to radiative fluxes. Initial results demonstrate the non-linearity in the climatic response as the injection magnitude is increased. Future work will focus on disentangling the contribution of each parameter to the climatic response with additional simulations to investigate the effect of season and the Quasi Biennial Oscillation. Results will aid in the understanding of the impact of past, present and future volcanic eruptions. By analysing sulfate deposition to the polar ice caps, we will assess the uncertainty in, and validity of, the historic volcanic radiative forcing deduced from ice cores.

  7. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Effects on Rat Bones Using Synchrotron Radiation Computed Microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, Liebert Parreiras; Braz, Delson

    2011-12-13

    In this work, we investigated the consequences of irradiation in the femora and ribs of rats submitted to radiation doses of 5 Gy. Three different sites in femur specimens (head, distal metaphysis and distal epiphysis) and one in ribs (ventral) were imaged using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography to assess trabecular bone microarchitecture. Histomorphometric quantification was calculated directly from the 3D microtomographic images using synchrotron radiation. The 3D microtomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. A better understanding of the biological interactions that occur after exposure to photon radiation is needed in order to optimize therapeutic regimens and facilitate development and strategies that decrease radiation-induced side effects in humans. Results showed significant differences between irradiated and non-irradiated specimens, mostly in head and distal metaphysis bone sites.

  8. Iso-effect table for radiation tolerance of the human spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.; Creditor, M.

    1981-07-01

    Available literature on radiation injury to the human spinal cord was collected into a comprehensive data set relating the incidence of myelopathy to dosage, number of fractions and total treatment time. The data was analyzed using a search program (RAD3) to derive best-fitting cell kinetic parameters on the assumption that radiation myelopathy arises from cellular depletion in the irradiated tissues. From these parameters iso-effect tables were constructed for a wide range of treatment schedules, including daily treatment as well as fractionation at longer intervals. The tables provide a set of limiting doses, above which the risk of radiation injury to the spinal cord becomes substantial. General application of NSD tolerance limits could lead to systematic overdosage of the spinal cord, especially with large individual fractions or short treatment times. We conclude that the computed iso-effect tables provide a more reliable clinical guide than conventional time-dose equations.

  9. Investigation of bias radiation effect on PV cell measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuebo; Quan, Chenggen; Chan, Joanne; Ng, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells are photo-electrical devices that convert light energy directly into electricity through the photovoltaic effect. PV cell assemblies are used to make solar modules employed in a variety of ways ranging from space applications to domestic energy consumption. Characterisation and performance testing of PV cells are critical to the development of PV technologies and growth of the solar industry. As new solar products are being developed, its energy conversion efficiency and other critical parameters must be accurately measured and tested against globally recognised metrological standards. The differential spectral responsivity (DSR) measurement is one of the primary methods for calibrating reference PV cells. This is done by calculating its spectral responsivities through measuring the AC short-circuit current produced by a PV cell under a modulated monochromatic radiation and different levels of steady-state broadband bias light radiation. It is observed that different types of bias light source will produce different signal-to-noise levels and significantly influence measurement accuracy. This paper aims to investigate the noise sources caused by different types of bias light sources (e.g. xenon arc and tungsten-halogen lamps) and the relevant measurement uncertainties so as to propose a guideline for selection of bias light source which can improve the signal-to-noise level and measurement uncertainty. The DSRs of the PV cells are measured using a commercial DSR measurement system under different levels of bias radiation from 0 to 1 kWm-2. The data analysis and uncertainty evaluation are presented in this paper using experimental data and mathematical tools.

  10. Radiation effect on viscous flow of a nanofluid and heat transfer over a nonlinearly stretching sheet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we study the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a viscous nanofluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet in the presence of thermal radiation, included in the energy equation, and variable wall temperature. A similarity transformation was used to transform the governing partial differential equations to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. An efficient numerical shooting technique with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme was used to obtain the solution of the boundary value problem. The variations of dimensionless surface temperature, as well as flow and heat-transfer characteristics with the governing dimensionless parameters of the problem, which include the nanoparticle volume fraction ϕ, the nonlinearly stretching sheet parameter n, the thermal radiation parameter NR, and the viscous dissipation parameter Ec, were graphed and tabulated. Excellent validation of the present numerical results has been achieved with the earlier nonlinearly stretching sheet problem of Cortell for local Nusselt number without taking the effect of nanoparticles. PMID:22520273

  11. The effects of ionizing radiation on avian erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.W.; Ducoff, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation were examined in terminally differentiated cells using nucleated chicken erythrocytes (RBCs) as the model. We used a hemolytic assay to score radiation damage to RBCs. Chicken RBCs received 0 to 100 Gy of radiation at dose rate of 10 Gy/min. Radiation-induced hemolysis occurred in a dose-dependent manner but not immediately after irradiation. Hemolysis became apparent at 24 h after treatment. A threshold for radiation dose response was observed. At doses below 30 Gy, hemolysis in irradiated samples was indistinguishable from that in nonirradiated controls. A total dose of 100 Gy was used for the split-dose experiments. The results showed that chicken RBCs were able to repair radiation damage and that the half-time for maximum recovery was approximately 30 min at 36{degrees}C. Recovery from {gamma} radiation was also affected by the interfraction temperature. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  12. The effect of gas parameters on HVOF coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.A.; White, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    The use of propane as a fuel gas for HVOF has been investigated in a series of spray tests to determine the effect of gas related parameters on the performance of WC-Co coatings. The effects of total gas flow (oxygen plus fuel gas) and oxygen/fuel ratio have been related to coating microstructure, oxide content, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance. The use of alternative fuel gas supply options for propane (or propylene) i.e. vapor withdrawal and liquid withdrawal via a vaporizer unit, have demonstrated potential problems with the former system. Reduced pressures resulting from the temperature reduction caused during vaporization in the vapor withdrawal method would lead to inferior coating performance. Additionally, vapor withdrawal will result in a changing composition of the gas supply as the cylinder contents are used up. This would be especially relevant to mixed fuel gas systems or fuels containing significant levels of other hydrocarbon impurities such as in the case of butane in propane. The liquid withdrawal supply option ensures adequate and consistent fuel gas pressure and flow rate and constant composition.

  13. Effect of laser parameters and mode on pulp surgery outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Peavy, George M.; Kurosaki, Tom

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of localized laser pulp surgery in the canine model. Effects of laser parameters on treatment outcome were also investigated. Pulpal exposure 3 mm in diameter were prepared in healthy teeth and left open to infection from the oral cavity for 72 hours. Pulpal tissue was then removed using high speed handpiece with sterile irrigation, or a CO2 laser. Teeth were monitored clinically, radiographically for 3 months. Results for each criterion were evaluated on a scale of 0-(-2). After sacrifice, histological assessment was made soft and hard tissue response. Results for each category were evaluated on a standard scale of 0-(-2). All evaluations were performed by 1 blinded, pre-standardized clinician. Statistical assessment using the chi-square test and Fisher's Exact Test associated laser treatment with a significantly better clinical, radiographic and histological treatment outcome. NIH RRO1192, seed grant funding form Loma Linda University, the Edna P. Jacobsen Charitable Trust for Animals, Inc.

  14. Effect of mechanical parameters on dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintake, Jun; Rosset, Samuel; Floreano, Dario; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-04-01

    Soft robotics may provide many advantages compared to traditional robotics approaches based on rigid materials, such as intrinsically safe physical human-robot interaction, efficient/stable locomotion, adaptive morphology, etc. The objective of this study is to develop a compliant structural actuator for soft a soft robot using dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES). DEMES consist of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) bonded to an initially planar flexible frame, which deforms into an out-of-plane shape which allows for large actuation stroke. Our initial goal is a one-dimensional bending actuator with 90 degree stroke. Along with frame shape, the actuation performance of DEMES depends on mechanical parameters such as thickness of the materials and pre-stretch of the elastomer membrane. We report here the characterization results on the effect of mechanical parameters on the actuator performance. The tested devices use a cm-size flexible-PCB (polyimide, 50 μm thickness) as the frame-material. For the DEA, PDMS (approximately 50 μm thickness) and carbon black mixed with silicone were used as membrane and electrode, respectively. The actuators were characterized by measuring the tip angle and the blocking force as functions of applied voltage. Different pre-stretch methods (uniaxial, biaxial and their ratio), and frame geometries (rectangular with different width, triangular and circular) were used. In order to compare actuators with different geometries, the same electrode area was used in all the devices. The results showed that the initial tip angle scales inversely with the frame width, the actuation stroke and the blocking force are inversely related (leading to an interesting design trade-off), using anisotropic pre-stretch increased the actuation stroke and the initial bending angle, and the circular frame shape exhibited the highest actuation performance.

  15. Radiation 101: Effects on Hardware and Robotic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    We present basic information on different types of radiation effects, including total ionizing dose, displacement damage, and single-event effects. The content is designed to educate space weather professionals, space operations professionals, and other science and engineering stakeholders.

  16. MHD heat and mass transfer flow over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2016-06-01

    The steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effects is investigated. The similarity transformation is introduced to transform the governing partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations before being solved numerically using a shooting method. The results are obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number as well as the velocity, temperature and the concentration profiles for some values of the governing parameters, namely, suction/injection parameter S, stretching/shrinking parameter λ, magnetic parameter M, radiation parameter R, heat source/sink Q and chemical rate parameter K. For the shrinking case, there exist two solutions for a certain range of parameters, but the solution is unique for the stretching case. The stability analysis verified that the upper branch solution is linearly stable and physically reliable while the lower branch solution is not. For the reliable solution, the skin friction coefficient increases in the present of magnetic field. The heat transfer rate at the surface decreases in the present of radiation.

  17. Radiation effects on scientific CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanfu, Zhao; Liyan, Liu; Xiaohui, Liu; Xiaofeng, Jin; Xiang, Li

    2015-11-01

    A systemic solution for radiation hardened design is presented. Besides, a series of experiments have been carried out on the samples, and then the photoelectric response characteristic and spectral characteristic before and after the experiments have been comprehensively analyzed. The performance of the CMOS image sensor with the radiation hardened design technique realized total-dose resilience up to 300 krad(Si) and resilience to single-event latch up for LET up to 110 MeV·cm2/mg.

  18. Radiation attenuation characteristics of pyrolysis volatiles of solid fuels and their effect for radiant ignition model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yupeng; Yang, Lizhong; Dai, Jiakun; Wang, Yafei; Deng, Zhihua

    2010-01-15

    Radiation attenuation characteristics of pyrolysis volatiles from heated solid fuels, a neglected physical effect in radiant ignition process, are studied by simulated experiment and mathematical models. Firstly, it is experimentally found the radiation attenuation of an incident heat flux when pine or Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) is heated occurs before flaming ignition (6-14%), especially for the one in the experiment of the Cone Calorimeter style apparatus with a shorter test radiation distance (D < 100 mm). Then, a more reasonable parameter using Beer's law for determining the radiation absorptivity of pyrolysis volatiles of different fuels is presented. It is found the radiation absorptivity of pyrolysis volatiles of PMMA is actually larger than the one of pine and the ignition of PMMA more depends on the gas-phase heating by radiation absorption. Finally, the calculated results with the experimental radiation attenuation data illustrates that consideration of the radiation attenuation by pyrolysis volatiles in radiant ignition models is necessary. A constant radiation attenuation coefficient G = 0.1 is approximately accepted for the general calculation of radiant ignition model. (author)

  19. The influence of excitation radiation parameters on photosensitized generation of singlet oxygen in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, A. D.; Glazov, A. L.; Semenova, I. V.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2016-06-01

    Photosensitized generation of singlet oxygen with the aid of Radahlorin® photosensitizer has been investigated. The dependences of the intensity of singlet oxygen phosphorescence and photosensitizer fluorescence on the excitation radiation wavelength in the range of 350-440 nm and on the irradiation dose have been obtained. The dependence of the ratio of the sensitizer fluorescence intensity at about 670 nm to the singlet oxygen phosphorescence intensity at a wavelength of 1270 nm on the excitation radiation wavelength is found to be nonmonotonic and have a minimum near the center of the absorption band on its red wing. The results obtained can be used to monitor the singlet oxygen concentration in solutions.

  20. Space radiation effects on plant and mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Macaeva, E.; Quintens, R.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms is related to different research aims. The current review emphasizes the studies on the effects of different doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation on living organisms, with the final purpose of highlighting specific and common effects of space radiation in mammals and plants. This topic is extremely relevant in the context of radiation protection from space environment. The response of different organisms to ionizing radiation depends on the radiation quality/dose and/or the intrinsic characteristics of the living system. Macromolecules, in particular DNA, are the critical targets of radiation, even if there is a strong difference between damages encountered by plant and mammalian cells. The differences in structure and metabolism between the two cell types are responsible for the higher resistance of the plant cell compared with its animal counterpart. In this review, we report some recent findings from studies performed in Space or on Earth, simulating space-like levels of radiation with ground-based facilities, to understand the effect of ionizing radiation on mammalian and plant cells. In particular, our attention is focused on genetic alterations and repair mechanisms in mammalian cells and on structures and mechanisms conferring radioresistance to plant cells.

  1. Effects of Spectral and Temporal Variations in Gamma Ray Burst Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejzak, L. M.; Melott, A. L.; Thomas, B. C.; Medvedev, M. V.

    2005-12-01

    It has previously been shown that a typical gamma ray burst could have significant effects on the Earth, including such considerations as ozone depletion and production of odd nitrogen compounds. These effects in turn contribute to processes such as DNA damage in organisms, increasing opacity of the atmosphere, and nitric acid rain. Our interest lies in the role that these processes may play in mass extinction events, in particular the Ordovician mass extinction 443 Mya. Here we investigate variations in certain burst parameters and the resulting variation in the severity of effect that the burst radiation has on the Earth's atmosphere. We extend the range of photon energies used in the model beyond the range used in previous studies, and model bursts with a number of different peak energies. We also alter the temporal profile of the radiation during the burst itself. This research is conducted with support from NASA's Astrobiology: Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology Program and in collaboration with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and with supercomputer support from NCSA.

  2. Radiation effect studies on anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin for radiation sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, L.; Dodke, P. B.

    2004-12-01

    Two anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide (CPH) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOXO), in powder form were exposed to a range of doses of 60Co gamma and electron beam radiation to study the effects of ionizing radiation. Pharmacopoeia tests, discolouration, degradation products, effect of irradiation temperature and dose rate were investigated. CPH undergoes less than 2% degradation at 30 kGy. Chromatographic studies revealed formation of several trace level degradation products, discolouration and free radicals in the irradiated CPH. N, N-bis (2-chloroethyl) group in the molecule is particularly sensitive to radiation degradation. Irradiation to 5 kGy at low temperature (77 K) did not result in significant changes. DOXO was observed to be quite radiation resistant and did not undergo significant changes in its physico-chemical properties and degradation product profile. It can be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy.

  3. Review of radiation effects in solid-nuclear-waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Radiation effects on the stability of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms are an important consideration in the development of technology to immobilize high-level radioactive waste because such effects may significantly affect the containment of the radioactive waste. Since the required containment times are long (10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 6/ years), an understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of radiation damage on the waste forms is essential. Radiation damage of nuclear waste forms can result in changes in volume, leach rate, stored energy, structure/microstructure, and mechanical properties. Any one or combination of these changes might significantly affect the long-term stability of the nuclear waste forms. This report defines the general radiation damage problem in nuclear waste forms, describes the simulation techniques currently available for accelerated testing of nuclear waste forms, and reviews the available data on radiation effects in both glass and ceramic (primarily crystalline) waste forms. 76 references.

  4. Effects of geliogeophysical disturbances in haemorheological parameters of human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionova, V.; Sergeenko, N.; Sazanova, E.

    The changes of the rheological characteristics of blood at healthy people and patients with cerebrum-vascular pathology during 23 geomagnetic disturbances were studied. The analysis of dynamics of haemorheological parameters of both human groups has shown that the most of parameters are beginning statistically authentically to fall outside the normal limits already prior the beginning of the magnetic disturbance, others - per day of a beginning of disturbance. This fact specifies at an increase of variability for functional activity of blood cell in conditions of geomagnetic disturbance and allows to assume presence of direct influences of an environmental physical processes at the blood cell. The deterioration of deformation properties of erythrocytes is observed in the blood of people. The analysis of the data has resulted in occurrence of a hypothesis about appearance of instability at thrombosis-vascular part of haemostasis under influence of variation of electromagnetic field in during of magnetospheric disturbances. Such effect can be caused as direct and indirect action of an electrîmagnetic field of the Earth on the cells of blood. Haemoglobin of erythrocytes includes atoms of iron, having a deflection of the magnetic moment. In the cells, which had their erythrocytes membrane under influence of an electrîmagnetic field, had diminution of electrical mobility, that can influence the dynamics of physiological process of aggregation --disaggregation of erythrocytes in a stream of blood. Another channel of influence of geomagnetic disturbances on rheological property of blood can be connected with the action of electrîmagnetic fields through synchronization of rhythms of electromagnetic oscillations of cells of central nervous system. From the entire spectrum of an electrîmagnetic field apparent on the surface of the Earth, biologically effective factor is in a range of ultralow frequencies from 0,0001 up to 100 Ãö. The biorhythms of the brain, such as an

  5. Do Fractal Models of Clouds Produces the Right 3D Radiative Effects?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stochastic fractal models of clouds are often used to study 3D radiative effects and their influence on the remote sensing of cloud properties. Since it is important that the cloud models produce a correct radiative response, some researchers require the model parameters to match observed cloud properties such as scale-independent optical thickness variability. Unfortunately, matching these properties does not necessarily imply that the cloud models will cause the right 3D radiative effects. First, the matched properties alone only influence the 3D effects but do not completely determine them. Second, in many cases the retrieved cloud properties have been already biased by 3D radiative effects, and so the models may not match the true real clouds. Finally, the matched cloud properties cannot be considered independent from the scales at which they have been retrieved. This paper proposes an approach that helps ensure that fractal cloud models are realistic and produce the right 3D effects. The technique compares the results of radiative transfer simulations for the model clouds to new direct observations of 3D radiative effects in satellite images.

  6. Effect Of Clock Mode On Radiation Hardness Of An ADC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon I.; Rax, Bernie G.; Johnston, Allan H.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses techniques for testing and evaluating effects of total dosages of ionizing radiation on performances of high-resolution successive-approximation analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), without having to test each individual bit or transition. Reduces cost of testing by reducing tests to few critical parametric measurements, from which one determines approximate radiation failure levels providing good approximations of responses of converters for purpose of total-dose-radiation evaluations.

  7. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M.

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  8. Basic mechanisms of radiation effects in the natural space radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Schwank, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Four general topics are covered in respect to the natural space radiation environment: (1) particles trapped by the earth`s magnetic field, (2) cosmic rays, (3) radiation environment inside a spacecraft, (4) laboratory radiation sources. The interaction of radiation with materials is described by ionization effects and displacement effects. Total-dose effects on MOS devices is discussed with respect to: measurement techniques, electron-hole yield, hole transport, oxide traps, interface traps, border traps, device properties, case studies and special concerns for commercial devices. Other device types considered for total-dose effects are SOI devices and nitrided oxide devices. Lastly, single event phenomena are discussed with respect to charge collection mechanisms and hard errors. (GHH)

  9. Effect of Epicatechin against Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Jang Hee; Oh, Young-Taek; Park, Keun Hyung; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC), a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and changes in the signaling pathway were investigated. In vivo therapeutic effects of EC for oral mucositis were explored in a rat model. Rats were monitored by daily inspections of the oral cavity, amount of oral intake, weight change and survival rate. For histopathologic evaluation, hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL staining were performed. Results EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, change of MMP, and intracellular ROS generation in HaCaT cells. EC treatment markedly attenuated the expression of p-JNK, p-38, and cleaved caspase-3 after irradiation in the HaCaT cells. Rats with radiation-induced oral mucositis showed decreased oral intake, weight and survival rate, but oral administration of EC significantly restored all three parameters. Histopathologic changes were significantly decreased in the EC-treated irradiated rats. TUNEL staining of rat oral mucosa revealed that EC treatment significantly decreased radiation-induced apoptotic cells. Conclusions This study suggests that EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes and rat oral mucosa and may be a safe and effective candidate treatment for the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. PMID:23874895

  10. The biological effect of prolonged radiation and ways of selecting new anti-radiation drugs effective in this kind of radiation injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogozkin, V. D.; Chertkov, K. S.; Nikolov, I.

    1974-01-01

    The basic characteristics of prolonged radiation - increased tolerance of radiation injury - are attributed to cellular kinetics; as dose rate is reduced, the population rate is not disturbed, particularly that of stem cells which makes it possible for the organism to tolerate higher radiation loads. It is concluded that this effect makes approved radio protectors, whose effect contains an established cytostatic component, unsuitable for prolonged radiation. It is better to correct the stem pool formation process by either accelerating the proliferation of cells or limiting the effect of stimuli causing cells to lose colony forming properties.

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, F.; Bradley, D. A.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve (⩽20% strain), from 23±18 kPa for controls to 57±22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy ( p=0.01, α=0.05). At larger strain (⩾20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92±0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31±0.56 MPa ( p=0.01, α=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626±65 kPa, irradiated 474±121 kPa ( p=0.02, α=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400±194 cP for controls to 1500±88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s -1 and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  12. Effects of radiation on DNA's double helix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The blueprint of life, DNA's double helix is found in the cells of everything from bacteria to astronauts. Exposure to radiation(depicted at right) such as X-rays (upper) or heavy ion particles (lower), can damage DNA and cause dire consequences both to the organism itself and to future generations. One of NASA's main goals is to develop better radiation shielding materials to protect astronauts from destructive radiation in space. This is particularly important for long space missions. NASA has selected researchers to study materials that provide better shielding. This research is managed by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research and is supported by the Microgravity Science and Applications Department at NASA's Marshall Center. During International Space Station Expedition Six, the Extravehicular Activity Radiation Monitoring (EVARM) will continue to measure radiation dosage encountered by the eyes, internal organs and skin during specific spacewalks, and relate it to the type of activity, location and other factors. An analysis of this information may be useful in mitigating potential exposure to space walkers in the future. (Illustration by Dr. Frank Cucinotta, NASA/Johnson Space Center, and Prem Saganti, Lockheed Martin)

  13. Effects of Dairy on Metabolic Syndrome Parameters: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Christine E.; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), characterized by central obesity, dyslipidemias, hypertension, and hyperglycemia, impacts 34 percent of the U.S. adult population. MetS has been demonstrated to be affected by dietary components. Data from epidemiological studies and clinical interventions suggest that one or more dairy components might directly affect MetS parameters. For example, calcium has been postulated to reduce body weight by modulating vitamin D concentrations in plasma and therefore attenuating intracellular calcium effects in activating genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and reducing those involved in lipolysis. Peptides present in milk have been associated with the inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme and, therefore, with blood pressure reductions. Branched chain amino acids may increase post-prandial insulin secretion and regulate plasma glucose levels, and leucine, an abundant amino acid in milk, may be responsible for decreased plasma glucose through modulation of mTOR. Through different proposed mechanisms, dairy nutrients may target all components of MetS. PMID:24910559

  14. Effect of Machining Parameters on Oxidation Behavior of Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, P.; Shekhar, S.; Mondal, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to find out a correlation between machining parameters, resultant microstructure, and isothermal oxidation behavior of lathe-machined mild steel in the temperature range of 660-710 °C. The tool rake angles "α" used were +20°, 0°, and -20°, and cutting speeds used were 41, 232, and 541 mm/s. Under isothermal conditions, non-machined and machined mild steel samples follow parabolic oxidation kinetics with activation energy of 181 and ~400 kJ/mol, respectively. Exaggerated grain growth of the machined surface was observed, whereas, the center part of the machined sample showed minimal grain growth during oxidation at higher temperatures. Grain growth on the surface was attributed to the reduction of strain energy at high temperature oxidation, which was accumulated on the sub-region of the machined surface during machining. It was also observed that characteristic surface oxide controlled the oxidation behavior of the machined samples. This study clearly demonstrates the effect of equivalent strain, roughness, and grain size due to machining, and subsequent grain growth on the oxidation behavior of the mild steel.

  15. Effect of hyperthermic water bath on parameters of cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Blazícková, S; Rovenský, J; Koska, J; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Effects of hyperthermic water bath on selected immune parameters (lymphocyte subpopulations, natural killer (NK) cell counts and their activity) were studied in a group of 10 volunteers. Application of hyperthermic water bath (both topical and whole-body) was followed by a significant reduction of relative B lymphocyte counts. Whole-body hyperthermic water bath reduced relative total T lymphocyte counts, increased relative CD8+ T lymphocyte and NK cell counts and increased NK activity. Whole-body hyperthermic bath increased somatotropic hormone (STH) activity in eight out of 10 volunteers; higher relative counts of CD8+ lymphocytes and NK cells were observed compared with the group of volunteers not responding to hyperthermic water bath by STH secretion. In five volunteers STH was released in response to local hyperthermic water bath and the NK activity of lymphocytes also increased but their relative counts did not. The results suggest that these increases in CD8+ lymphocyte and NK cell counts are probably dependent on increased STH production. PMID:11146901

  16. Definition of parameters for quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fogliata, A.; Garcia, R.; Knoeoes, T.; Nicolini, G.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Khamphan, C.; Cozzi, L.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy clinical practice. Such beams present fundamental differences with respect to the standard filter flattened (FF) beams, making the generally used dosimetric parameters and definitions not always viable. The present study will propose possible definitions and suggestions for some dosimetric parameters for use in quality assurance of FFF beams generated by medical linacs in radiotherapy. Methods: The main characteristics of the photon beams have been analyzed using specific data generated by a Varian TrueBeam linac having both FFF and FF beams of 6 and 10 MV energy, respectively. Results: Definitions for dose profile parameters are suggested starting from the renormalization of the FFF with respect to the corresponding FF beam. From this point the flatness concept has been translated into one of 'unflatness' and other definitions have been proposed, maintaining a strict parallelism between FFF and FF parameter concepts. Conclusions: Ideas for quality controls used in establishing a quality assurance program when introducing FFF beams into the clinical environment are given here, keeping them similar to those used for standard FF beams. By following the suggestions in this report, the authors foresee that the introduction of FFF beams into a clinical radiotherapy environment will be as safe and well controlled as standard beam modalities using the existing guidelines.

  17. Uncertainty-accounted calculational-experimental approach for improved conservative evaluations of VVER RPV radiation loading parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borodkin, P.G.; Borodkin, G.I.; Khrennikov, N.N.

    2011-07-01

    The approach of improved uncertainty-accounted conservative evaluation of vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor (VVER) (reactor-) pressure-vessel (RPV) radiation loading parameters has been proposed. This approach is based on the calculational-experimental procedure, which takes into account C/E ratio, depending on over- or underestimation, and uncertainties of measured and calculated results. An application of elaborated approach to the full-scale ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments on Russian VVERs combined with neutron-transport calculations has been demonstrated in the paper. (authors)

  18. Assessment of MRI Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers for Radiation Necrosis in the Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Silun; Tryggestad, Erik; Zhou Tingting; Armour, Michael; Wen Zhibo; Fu Dexue; Ford, Eric; Zijl, Peter C.M. van; Zhou Jinyuan

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation necrosis is a major complication of radiation therapy. We explore the features of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat, using multiple MRI approaches, including T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion constant (ADC), cerebral blood flow (CBF), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), and amide proton transfer (APT) of endogenous mobile proteins and peptides. Methods and Materials: Adult rats (Fischer 344; n = 15) were irradiated with a single, well-collimated X-ray beam (40 Gy; 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 mm{sup 2}) in the left brain hemisphere. MRI was acquired on a 4.7-T animal scanner at {approx}25 weeks' postradiation. The MRI signals of necrotic cores and perinecrotic regions were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance. Histological evaluation was accomplished with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results: ADC and CBF MRI could separate perinecrotic and contralateral normal brain tissue (p < 0.01 and < 0.05, respectively), whereas T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and APT could not. MRI signal intensities were significantly lower in the necrotic core than in normal brain for CBF (p < 0.001) and APT (p < 0.01) and insignificantly higher or lower for T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and ADC. Histological results demonstrated coagulative necrosis within the necrotic core and reactive astrogliosis and vascular damage within the perinecrotic region. Conclusion: ADC and CBF are promising imaging biomarkers for identifying perinecrotic regions, whereas CBF and APT are promising for identifying necrotic cores.

  19. A study of the 3D radiative transfer effect in cloudy atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okata, M.; Teruyuki, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of the effect of clouds in the atmosphere is a significant problem in the Earth's radiation budget study with their large uncertainties of microphysics and the optical properties. In this situation, we still need more investigations of 3D cloud radiative transer problems using not only models but also satellite observational data.For this purpose, we have developed a 3D-Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is implemented with various functions compatible with the OpenCLASTR R-Star radiation code for radiance and flux computation, i.e. forward and backward tracing routines, non-linear k-distribution parameterization (Sekiguchi and Nakajima, 2008) for broad band solar flux calculation, and DM-method for flux and TMS-method for upward radiance (Nakajima and Tnaka 1998). We also developed a Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as a method for a construction of 3D cloud field with MODIS/AQUA and CPR/CloudSat data. We then selected a best-matched radar reflectivity factor profile from the library for each of off-nadir pixels of MODIS where CPR profile is not available, by minimizing the deviation between library MODIS parameters and those at the pixel. In this study, we have used three cloud microphysical parameters as key parameters for the MIDPM, i.e. effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness and top of cloud temperature, and estimated 3D cloud radiation budget. We examined the discrepancies between satellite observed and mode-simulated radiances and three cloud microphysical parameter's pattern for studying the effects of cloud optical and microphysical properties on the radiation budget of the cloud-laden atmospheres.

  20. EFFECT OF PARAMETERS OF FILTRATION ON DUST CLEANING FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes 4 years of laboratory and large-scale tests on the dust filtration process and the basic filtration parameters that determine performance. Physical parameters describing fabric and dust cake structure were defined and three basic dust filtration mechanisms w...

  1. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  2. Drift in interference filters. 2: radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Title, A M

    1974-11-01

    Studies of peak transmission drift in narrow-band interference filters have shown that there exist two mechanisms that cause drift toward shorter wavelengths. One is dependent on the thermal history of the filter and is discussed in Part 1 of this paper. The other is dependent on the exposure of the filter to radiation. For ZnS-cryolite filters of the design [(HL)(4)H(8)(LH)(4)L](3)L(-1), it is experimentally demonstrated that the filters are most sensitive to radiation in a 100-A band centered at approximately 3900 A. The drift rate in the focal plane of an f/20 solar image is approximately 3 A/100 h of exposure. Further, it is also shown by model calculations that the observed radiation-induced drift is consistent with the hypothesis that the optical thickness of ZnS decreases in proportion to the radiant energy absorbed. PMID:20134754

  3. Radiation parameters of the x-ray binary A 0535 + 26 = HDE 245770 based on polarization and photometric data

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of the observations of Shakhovskaya et al. has led to the identification in the radiation of the x-ray binary system A 0535 + 26 = HDE 245770 of two components associated with an optical 09 III star and an accretion disk around a neutron star. The parameters of the interstellar polarization agree with Serkowski's formula and the observations of neighboring stars. The variability of the brightness of the system observed in the optical and infrared ranges can be explained by changes in the contribution of the accretion disk to the total emission of the system. The values obtained for the parameters of the intrinsic polarization, interpreted in the framework of the proposed model, suggest directions of the polarization vectors in the infrared and x-ray range.

  4. Total heart volume as a function of clinical and anthropometric parameters in a population of external beam radiation therapy patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadège Ilembe Badouna, Audrey; Veres, Cristina; Haddy, Nadia; Bidault, François; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chavaudra, Jean; Bridier, André; de Vathaire, Florent; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine anthropometric parameters leading to the least uncertain estimate of heart size when connecting a computational phantom to an external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) patient. From computed tomography images, we segmented the heart and calculated its total volume (THV) in a population of 270 EBRT patients of both sexes, aged 0.7-83 years. Our data were fitted using logistic growth functions. The patient age, height, weight, body mass index and body surface area (BSA) were used as explanatory variables. For both genders, good fits were obtained with both weight (R2 = 0.89 for males and 0.83 for females) and BSA (R2 = 0.90 for males and 0.84 for females). These results demonstrate that, among anthropometric parameters, weight plays an important role in predicting THV. These findings should be taken into account when assigning a computational phantom to a patient.

  5. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G.; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-01

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  6. Recent radiation effects activities at JPL: Coping with COTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Johnston, A.; Lee, C.; Swift, G.; Rax, B.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation effects and testing programs on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) devices and circuits, which are important for NASA programs, are discussed. Demands for increased performance levels in spacecraft systems is stimulating the use of electronic and photonic devices. Some advances in electronics to reach high performance will result in the miniaturization of devices, which will lead to increased radiation vulnerability.

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on selected optical materials: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1992-07-30

    This report gives an overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on optical materials that may be used in spacecraft sensors. It introduces the relevant phenomena and indicates were more detailed information can be found. The topics covered include radiation induced absorption in ultraviolet transmitting materials, ordinary optical glasses, cerium stabilized optical glasses, and infrared transmitting materials; bleaching and annealing, and radioluminesence.

  8. Parameters Favorable to Intraprostatic Radiation Dose Escalation in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Housri, Nadine; Ning, Holly; Ondos, John; Choyke, Peter; Camphausen, Kevin; Citrin, Deborah; Arora, Barbara; Shankavaram, Uma; Kaushal, Aradhana

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To identify , within the framework of a current Phase I trial, whether factors related to intraprostatic cancer lesions (IPLs) or individual patients predict the feasibility of high-dose intraprostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Endorectal coil MRI scans of the prostate from 42 men were evaluated for dominant IPLs. The IPLs, prostate, and critical normal tissues were contoured. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated with the goal of delivering 75.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the prostate, with IPLs receiving a simultaneous integrated boost of 3.6 Gy per fraction to a total dose of 151.2 Gy, 200% of the prescribed dose and the highest dose cohort in our trial. Rectal and bladder dose constraints were consistent with those outlined in current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocols. Results: Dominant IPLs were identified in 24 patients (57.1%). Simultaneous integrated boosts (SIB) to 200% of the prescribed dose were achieved in 12 of the 24 patients without violating dose constraints. Both the distance between the IPL and rectum and the hip-to-hip patient width on planning CT scans were associated with the feasibility to plan an SIB (p = 0.002 and p = 0.0137, respectively). Conclusions: On the basis of this small cohort, the distance between an intraprostatic lesion and the rectum most strongly predicted the ability to plan high-dose radiation to a dominant intraprostatic lesion. High-dose SIB planning seems possible for select intraprostatic lesions.

  9. The effects of space radiation on flight film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, Mark H.

    1995-01-01

    The Shuttle and its cargo are occasionally exposed to an amount of radiation large enough to create non-image forming exposures (fog) on photographic flight film. The television/photography working group proposed a test plan to quantify the sensitivity of photographic films to space radiation. This plan was flown on STS-37 and was later incorporated into a detailed supplementary objective (DSO) which was flown on STS48. This DSO addressed the effects of significant space radiation on representative samples of six highly sensitive flight films. In addition, a lead-lined bag was evaluated as a potential shield for flight film against space radiation.

  10. The effects of space radiation on flight film

    SciTech Connect

    Holly, M.H.

    1995-09-01

    The Shuttle and its cargo are occasionally exposed to an amount of radiation large enough to create non-image forming exposures (fog) on photographic flight film. The television/photography working group proposed a test plan to quantify the sensitivity of photographic films to space radiation. This plan was flown on STS-37 and was later incorporated into a detailed supplementary objective (DSO) which was flown on STS48. This DSO addressed the effects of significant space radiation on representative samples of six highly sensitive flight films. In addition, a lead-lined bag was evaluated as a potential shield for flight film against space radiation.

  11. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  12. On Linsley Effect and Electromagnetic Radiation from Large EAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Manab Jyoti

    The aim of the present work was to study the following aspects of EAS : i) Detection and determination of air showers parameters by measuring the particle densities. ii) Measurement of inclination of shower axis by recording arrival time distribution of shower front particles. iii) Measurement of FWHM of pulses photographed and study of Linsley effect. iv) Characteristics of Cherenkov radiation from air showers. v) Characteristics of low frequency (120 KHz) radio signal from showers. The experiments based on the above investigations were carried out at the Cosmic Ray Research Laboratory, Gauhati University, India, since September 91 to March, 1994. Electromagnetic radiation both optical Cherenkov radiation and radio frequency (120 KHz) as well as pulses associated with extensive air showers (EAS) of energy ranging from 1.5 X 1015ev to 2.1 X 10 18ev and zenith angles 15° < 0 < 60° were selected for the present analysis. The lateral distribution of Cherenkov pulses were assumed to have an exponential form fitted with an exponential law with an exponent reflecting the depth of shower maxima (Xm). The variation of rise time (FWHM) with core distance (R) was studied from pulses photographed. The high field associated with low frequency radio signal (120KHz) and its variation with primary energy (Ep), core distance and zenith angle (0) were observed. The thesis consists of the following five chapters: 1. INTRODUCTION - This chapter contains a brief history of cosmic rays, its composition, development of EAS, emission of electromagnetic radiation from EAS, a brief introduction to the present work including review of the earlier works and aim of the experiment. 2. THEORY - This chapter mainly reviews the theories and numerical calculations. 3. EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP - This chapter describes in detail the instrumentation developed, working principle, calibration etc. 4. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS - This chapter includes data collection, selection of data for required

  13. Soret and Dufour effects on MHD slip flow with thermal radiation over a porous rotating infinite disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjali Devi, S. P.; Uma Devi, R.

    2011-04-01

    In this investigation, thermal radiation effect over an electrically conducting, Newtonian fluid in a steady laminar magnetohydrodynamic convective flow over a porous rotating infinite disk with the consideration of heat and mass transfer in the presence of Soret and Dufour diffusion effects is investigated. The partial differential equations governing the problem under consideration are transformed by a similarity transformation into a system of ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically using fourth order Runge-Kutta based shooting method. The effects of the magnetic interaction parameter, slip flow parameter, Soret number, Dufour number, Schmidt number, radiation parameter, Prandtl number and suction parameter on the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration distributions in the regime are depicted graphically and are analyzed in detail. The corresponding skin-friction coefficients, the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number are also calculated and displayed in tables showing the effects of various parameters on them.

  14. Radiation effects on science instruments in Grand Tour type missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The extent of the radiation effects problem is delineated, along with the status of protective designs for 15 representative science instruments. Designs for protecting science instruments from radiation damage is discussed for the various instruments to be employed in the Grand Tour type missions. A literature search effort was undertaken to collect science instrument components damage/interference effects data on the various sensitive components such as Si detectors, vidicon tubes, etc. A small experimental effort is underway to provide verification of the radiation effects predictions.

  15. Effect of acquisition parameters on digital breast tomosynthesis: Total angular range and number of projection views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Wook; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-seul; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Jae-Gu

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different acquisition parameters and to determine the optimal set of acquisition parameters of projection views (PVs) for the new developed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system. The DBT imaging parameters were optimized using 32 different acquisition sets with six angular ranges (±5°, ±10°, ±13°, ±17°, ±21°, and ±25°) and eight projection views (5, 11, 15, 21, 25, 31, 41, and 51 prjections). In addition to the contrastto-noise ratio (CNR), the artifact spread function (ASF) was used to quantify the in-focus plane artifacts along the z-direction in order to explore the relationship between the acquisition parameters and the image quality. A commercially, available breast-mimicking phantom was imaged to qualitatively verify our results. Our results show that a wide angular range improved the reconstructed image quality in the z-direction. If a large number of projections are acquired, then the electronic noise may dominate the CNR due to reduce the radiation dose per projection. Although increasing angular range was found to improve the vertical resolution, due to greater effective breast thickness, the image quality of microcalcifications in the in-focus plane was also found not to be improved by increasing the noise. Therefore, potential trade-offs of these physical imaging properties must be considered to optimize the acquisition configuration of a DBT system. Our results suggest possible directions for further improvements in DBT systems for high quality imaging.

  16. Hawking radiation of scalars from accelerating and rotating black holes with NUT parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Khush; Gohar, H.

    2014-03-01

    We study the quantum tunneling of scalars from charged accelerating and rotating black hole with NUT parameter. For this purpose we use the charged Klein-Gordon equation. We apply WKB approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi method to solve charged Klein-Gordon equation. We find the tunneling probability of outgoing charged scalars from the event horizon of this black hole, and hence the Hawking temperature for this black hole

  17. Multi-Variable Model-Based Parameter Estimation Model for Antenna Radiation Pattern Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cravey, Robin L.

    2002-01-01

    A new procedure is presented to develop multi-variable model-based parameter estimation (MBPE) model to predict far field intensity of antenna. By performing MBPE model development procedure on a single variable at a time, the present method requires solution of smaller size matrices. The utility of the present method is demonstrated by determining far field intensity due to a dipole antenna over a frequency range of 100-1000 MHz and elevation angle range of 0-90 degrees.

  18. Effect of combined heat and radiation on microbial destruction.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, D A; Pflug, I J

    1977-01-01

    A series of experiments at several levels of relative humidity and radiation dose rates was carried out using spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger to evaluate the effect of heat alone, radiation alone, and a combination of heat and radiation. Combined heat and radiation treatment of microorganisms yields a destruction rate greater than the additive rates of the independence agents. The synergistic mechanism shows a proportional dependency on radiation dose rate an Arrhenius dependency on temperature, and a dependency on relative humidity. Maximum synergism occurs under conditions where heat and radiation individually destroy microorganisms at approximately equal rates. Larger synergistic advantage is possible at low relative humidities rather than at high relative humidities. PMID:406843

  19. Effect of radiation energy and intracellular iron dose on iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Thompson, Ella S.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are one of several high-Z materials currently being investigated for their ability to enhance the cytotoxic effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation. Studies with iron oxide, silver, gold, and hafnium oxide suggest radiation dose, radiation energy, cell type, and the type and level of metallic nanoparticle are all critical factors in achieving radiation enhancement in tumor cells. Using a single 4 Gy radiation dose, we compared the level of tumor cell cytotoxicity at two different intracellular iron concentrations and two different radiation energies in vitro. IONPs were added to cell culture media at concentrations of 0.25 mg Fe/mL and 1.0 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and cells were irradiated at either 662 keV or 10 MV. At the 0.25 mg Fe/mL dose (4 pg Fe/cell), radiation energy did not affect the level of cytotoxicity. However with 1.0 mg Fe/mL (9 pg Fe/cell), the higher 10 MV radiation energy resulted in 50% greater cytotoxicity as compared to cells without IONPs irradiated at this energy. These results suggest IONPs may be able to significantly enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiation and improve therapeutic ratio if they can be selectively associated with cancer cells and/or tumors. Ongoing in vivo studies of IONP radiation enhancement in a murine tumor model are too immature to draw conclusions from at this time, however preliminary data suggests similar effectiveness of IONP radiation enhancement at 6 MV and 18 MV energy levels. In addition to the IONP-based radiation enhancement demonstrated here, the use of tumor-localized IONP with an externally delivered, non-toxic alternating magnetic field affords the opportunity to selectively heat and kill tumor cells. Combining IONP-based radiation sensitization and heat-based cytotoxicity provides a unique and potentially highly effective opportunity for therapeutic ratio enhancement.

  20. Thermal and concentration stratifications effects in radiative flow of Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet.

    PubMed

    Hayat, T; Hussain, Tariq; Shehzad, S A; Alsaedi, A

    2014-01-01

    In this article we investigate the heat and mass transfer analysis in mixed convective radiative flow of Jeffrey fluid over a moving surface. The effects of thermal and concentration stratifications are also taken into consideration. Rosseland's approximations are utilized for thermal radiation. The nonlinear boundary layer partial differential equations are converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations via suitable dimensionless variables. The solutions of nonlinear ordinary differential equations are developed by homotopic procedure. Convergence of homotopic solutions is examined graphically and numerically. Graphical results of dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration are presented and discussed in detail. Values of the skin-friction coefficient, the local Nusselt and the local Sherwood numbers are analyzed numerically. Temperature and concentration profiles are decreased when the values of thermal and concentration stratifications parameters increase. Larger values of radiation parameter lead to the higher temperature and thicker thermal boundary layer thickness. PMID:25275441

  1. Thermal and Concentration Stratifications Effects in Radiative Flow of Jeffrey Fluid over a Stretching Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Hussain, Tariq; Shehzad, S. A.; Alsaedi, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we investigate the heat and mass transfer analysis in mixed convective radiative flow of Jeffrey fluid over a moving surface. The effects of thermal and concentration stratifications are also taken into consideration. Rosseland's approximations are utilized for thermal radiation. The nonlinear boundary layer partial differential equations are converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations via suitable dimensionless variables. The solutions of nonlinear ordinary differential equations are developed by homotopic procedure. Convergence of homotopic solutions is examined graphically and numerically. Graphical results of dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration are presented and discussed in detail. Values of the skin-friction coefficient, the local Nusselt and the local Sherwood numbers are analyzed numerically. Temperature and concentration profiles are decreased when the values of thermal and concentration stratifications parameters increase. Larger values of radiation parameter lead to the higher temperature and thicker thermal boundary layer thickness. PMID:25275441

  2. The relative effects of entry parameters on thermal protection system weight. [space shuttle orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirasaki, P. N.

    1971-01-01

    Shielding a spacecraft from the severe thermal environment of an atmospheric entry requires a sophisticated thermal protection system (TPS). Thermal computer program models were developed for two such TPS designs proposed for the space shuttle orbiter. The multilayer systems, a reusable surface insulation TPS, and a re-radiative metallic skin TPS, were sized for a cross-section of trajectories in the entry corridor. This analysis indicates the relative influence of the entry parameters on the weight of each TPS concept. The results are summarized graphically. The trajectory variables considered were down-range, cross-range, orbit inclination, entry interface velocity and flight path angle, maximum heating rate level, angle of attack, and ballistic coefficient. Variations in cross-range and flight path angle over the ranges considered had virtually no effect on the required entry TPS weight. The TPS weight was significantly more sensitive to variations in angle of attack than to dispersions in the other trajectory considered.

  3. Uncertainty Quantification of GEOS-5 L-band Radiative Transfer Model Parameters Using Bayesian Inference and SMOS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in L-band (1.4 GHz) radiative transfer modeling (RTM) affect the simulation of brightness temperatures (Tb) over land and the inversion of satellite-observed Tb into soil moisture retrievals. In particular, accurate estimates of the microwave soil roughness, vegetation opacity and scattering albedo for large-scale applications are difficult to obtain from field studies and often lack an uncertainty estimate. Here, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation method is used to determine satellite-scale estimates of RTM parameters and their posterior uncertainty by minimizing the misfit between long-term averages and standard deviations of simulated and observed Tb at a range of incidence angles, at horizontal and vertical polarization, and for morning and evening overpasses. Tb simulations are generated with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) and confronted with Tb observations from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The MCMC algorithm suggests that the relative uncertainty of the RTM parameter estimates is typically less than 25 of the maximum a posteriori density (MAP) parameter value. Furthermore, the actual root-mean-square-differences in long-term Tb averages and standard deviations are found consistent with the respective estimated total simulation and observation error standard deviations of m3.1K and s2.4K. It is also shown that the MAP parameter values estimated through MCMC simulation are in close agreement with those obtained with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO).

  4. Effect of changes in technical parameters in radiological safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño, Ge; Fernandez, C.

    2007-11-01

    This work analyzes the generation of secondary radiation that affects the professionals of health during interventional X ray procedures in first level hospitals. The research objectives were, on the one hand, to quantify the amount of radiation and to compare it with norms in force with respect to magnitudes, and on the other hand to evaluate the elements of protection used. The measurements will help to improve the radiological safety, to assess the eventuality of risks and, in the last term, to the possibility of norms modification for the improvement of the protection, especially that of the personnel who daily make a certain amount of interventional procedures guided by radiation, like angiographic cine applications, using continuous or pulsed fluoroscopy. The motivation of the study is in the suspicion that present interventionism is made with a false sensation of safety, based only in the use of lead apron and protection elements incorporated in the equipment by the manufacturer, nevertheless not always the health personnel are conscious that an excessive proximity with the tube and the patient body becomes a risky source of secondary and scattered radiation. The obtained results allow us to demonstrate the existence of conditions of risk, even possible iatrogenic events, in particular when the procedures imply the use of certain techniques of radiographic exploration, thus reaching the conclusion that the radiographic methodology must be changed in order to rationalize so much?. In order to achieve this we propose modifications to the present norms and legislation referred to the radiological safety in Chile.

  5. Seismic attenuation parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    We estimate frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany. The parameter estimations are based on fitting synthetic envelopes modeled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different methods yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Results suggest, that intrinsic seismic attenuation is larger than attenuation due to scattering of seismic energy in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. From the elastic simulations we conclude, that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the strength of forward scattering is not resolvable. The elastic approach shows smaller errors in the parameter estimation compared to the results of the acoustic simulations. The frequency dependence of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. However the parameters describing this random medium, fluctuation strength and correlation length, cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. We furthermore conclude from the results of the elastic simulations, that it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  6. Effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on marine phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Behrenfeld, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Losses in the ozone layer increase ultraviolet B radiation at the earth's surface. Effects of UVBR on phytoplankton carbon fixation were determined from open ocean exposure studies conducted off the coast of Washington state. Photoinhibition of carbon fixation was a linear function of cumulative UVBR dose weighted by an exponential action spectrum. Comparison of the dose-response for UVBR inhibition of carbon uptake with results of earlier research indicates that a common, short-term photoinhibition response to UVBR may occur. Short-term photoinhibition was also measured for nitrogen uptake by natural plankton assemblages from the North Pacific. Ammonium uptake was inhibited by UVBR exposure to a greater extent than nitrate uptake. The action spectrum for ammonium uptake inhibition had a lower slope and greater relative contribution from wavelengths >320 nm to total biologically effective dose than the action spectrum for total UVR (290-347 nm) inhibition of carbon fixation. Inhibition of ammonium uptake was a linear function of biologically effective UVR dose. Comparison between dose-responses and action spectra for ammonium and carbon uptake suggest deeper water-column penetration of UVR effects on ammonium uptake than carbon uptake. Influence of nutritional status on the photoinhibitory effects of UVBR on phytoplankton growth rates and biomass were investigated using monocultures of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Specific growth rates and biomass were inhibited from 2% to 16% by UVBR during nutrient-replete growth. However, no effect of UVBR was detectable when inhibition of growth rate and biomass by nutrient limitation exceeded the potential for inhibition by UVBR. Results suggest that phytoplankton in nutrient-rich areas of the ocean may be most susceptible to UVBR inhibition of growth and biomass, while these parameters may not be appropriate for measuring UVBR stress in regions of nutrient limitation.

  7. Effect of Running Parameters on Flow Boiling Instabilities in Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zong, Lu-Xiang; Xu, Jin-Liang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Flow boiling instability (FBI) in microchannels is undesirable because they can induce the mechanical vibrations and disturb the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, the synchronous optical visualization experimental system was set up. The pure acetone liquid was used as the working fluid, and the parallel triangle silicon microchannel heat sink was designed as the experimental section. With the heat flux ranging from 0-450 kW/m2 the microchannel demand average pressure drop-heater length (Δp(ave)L) curve for constant low mass flux, and the demand pressure drop-mass flux (Δp(ave)G) curve for constant length on main heater surface were obtained and studied. The effect of heat flux (q = 188.28, 256.00, and 299.87 kW/m2), length of main heater surface (L = 4.5, 6.25, and 8.00 mm), and mass flux (G = 188.97, 283.45, and 377.94 kg/m2s) on pressure drops (Ap) and temperatures at the central point of the main heater surface (Twc) were experimentally studied. The results showed that, heat flux, length of the main heater surface, and mass flux were identified as the important parameters to the boiling instability process. The boiling incipience (TBI) and critical heat flux (CHF) were early induced for the lower mass flux or the main heater surface with longer length. With heat flux increasing, the pressure drops were linearly and slightly decreased in the single liquid region but increased sharply in the two phase flow region, in which the flow boiling instabilities with apparent amplitude and long period were more easily triggered at high heat flux. Moreover, the system pressure was increased with the increase of the heat flux. PMID:26353523

  8. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  9. The effect of selected parameters of the honing process on cylinder liner surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlus, P.; Dzierwa, A.; Michalski, J.; Reizer, R.; Wieczorowski, M.; Majchrowski, R.

    2014-04-01

    Many truck cylinder liners made from gray cast iron were machined. Ceramic and diamond honing stones were used in the last stages of operation: coarse honing and plateau honing. The effect of honing parameters on the cylinder liner surface topography was studied. Selected surface topography parameters were response variables. It was found that parameters from the Sq group were sensitive to honing parameter change. When plateau honing time varied, the Smq parameter increased, while the other parameters, Spq and Svq, were stable.

  10. Effect of processing parameters on reaction bonding of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, M. H.; Gregory, O. J.; Magida, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    Reaction bonded silicon nitride was developed. The relationship between the various processing parameters and the resulting microstructures was to design and synthesize reaction bonded materials with improved room temperature mechanical properties.

  11. Effect of plasma surface interactions on PLT plasma parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Meservey, E.B.; Arunasalam, V.; Barnes, C.

    1980-07-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the geometry and parameters of the PLT tokamak, reviews some of the last four years' results that are particularly relevant to plasma-boundary interactions, and then concentrates on two specific problems.

  12. Design of Si-photonic structures to evaluate their radiation hardness dependence on design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, M.; Detraz, S.; Olantera, L.; Pezzullo, G.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Sigaud, C.; Soos, C.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.

    2016-01-01

    Particle detectors for future experiments at the HL-LHC will require new optical data transmitters that can provide high data rates and be resistant against high levels of radiation. Furthermore, new design paths for future optical readout systems for HL-LHC could be opened if there was a possibility to integrate the optical components with their driving electronics and possibly also the silicon particle sensors themselves. All these functionalities could potentially be combined in the silicon photonics technology which currently receives a lot of attention for conventional optical link systems. Silicon photonic test chips were designed in order to assess the suitability of this technology for deployment in high-energy physics experiments. The chips contain custom-designed Mach-Zehnder modulators, pre-designed ``building-block'' modulators, photodiodes and various other passive test structures. The simulation and design flow of the custom designed Mach-Zehnder modulators and some first measurement results of the chips are presented.

  13. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  14. Accessing Topographic Effects on Solar Radiation Distribution and Ecohydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y.; Niu, G. Y.; Troch, P. A. A.; Paniconi, C.; Durcik, M.; Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    Solar radiation is the driving force for terrestrial ecohydrological processes. In mountainous regions, solar radiation reaching the land surface is strongly affected by topographic conditions (e.g., terrain slope and aspect) resulting in unevenly distributed solar radiation. This further affects ecohydrological processes including evapotranspiration, snowmelt, and runoff. However, most distributed hydrological models directly use measured or directly interpolated (e.g. IDW) solar radiation as inputs, not accounting for the topographic effects on solar radiation distribution. In this study, we first implemented a solar radiation spatial interpolation scheme to a fully integrated catchment-scale ecohydrological model by taking into account the topographic effects on direct (shading), diffuse (scattering) and reflected solar radiation. The resulting spatial distribution is more realistic than the direct interpolation. We applied the scheme to Marshall Gulch in Arizona, a mountainous catchment at different spatial resolutions. We will present some modeling results to show the topographic effects on solar radiation distribution, snow mass, vegetation growth, and runoff production, as well as the model sensitivity to modeling resolutions.

  15. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-01-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  16. Internally Consistent MODIS Estimate of Aerosol Clear-Sky Radiative Effect Over the Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2004-01-01

    Modern satellite remote sensing, and in particular the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), offers a measurement-based pathway to estimate global aerosol radiative effects and aerosol radiative forcing. Over the Oceans, MODIS retrieves the total aerosol optical thickness, but also reports which combination of the 9 different aerosol models was used to obtain the retrieval. Each of the 9 models is characterized by a size distribution and complex refractive index, which through Mie calculations correspond to a unique set of single scattering albedo, assymetry parameter and spectral extinction for each model. The combination of these sets of optical parameters weighted by the optical thickness attributed to each model in the retrieval produces the best fit to the observed radiances at the top of the atmosphere. Thus the MODIS Ocean aerosol retrieval provides us with (1) An observed distribution of global aerosol loading, and (2) An internally-consistent, observed, distribution of aerosol optical models that when used in combination will best represent the radiances at the top of the atmosphere. We use these two observed global distributions to initialize the column climate model by Chou and Suarez to calculate the aerosol radiative effect at top of the atmosphere and the radiative efficiency of the aerosols over the global oceans. We apply the analysis to 3 years of MODIS retrievals from the Terra satellite and produce global and regional, seasonally varying, estimates of aerosol radiative effect over the clear-sky oceans.

  17. Quantifying Aerosol influences on the Cloud Radiative Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Sena, Elisa; Yamaguchi, Takanobu

    2016-04-01

    Although evidence of aerosol influences on the microphysical properties of shallow liquid cloud fields abounds, a rigorous assessment of aerosol effects on the radiative properties of these clouds has proved to be elusive because of adjustments in the evolving cloud system. We will demonstrate through large numbers of idealized large eddy simulation and 14 years of surface-based remote sensing at a continental US site that the existence of a detectable cloud microphysical response to aerosol perturbations is neither a necessary, nor a sufficient condition for detectability of a radiative response. We will use a new framework that focuses on the cloud field properties that most influence shortwave radiation, e.g., cloud fraction, albedo, and liquid water path. In this framework, scene albedo is shown to be a robust function of cloud fraction for a variety of cloud systems, and appears to be insensitive to averaging scale. The albedo-cloud fraction framework will be used to quantify the cloud radiative effect of shallow liquid clouds and to demonstrate (i) the primacy of cloud field properties such as cloud fraction and liquid water path for driving the cloud radiative effect; and (ii) that the co-variability between meteorological and aerosol drivers has a strong influence on the detectability of the cloud radiative effect, regardless of whether a microphysical response is detected. A broad methodology for systematically quantifying the cloud radiative effect will be presented.

  18. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  19. Effects of different footwear on vertical jump and landing parameters.

    PubMed

    LaPorta, Joe W; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Galpin, Andrew J; Tufano, James J; Cazas, Vanessa L; Tan, Jeremy G

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of different footwear on anaerobic performance variables. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different footwear on vertical jumping and landing parameters. Ten men and 10 women participated. After a dynamic warm-up, subjects performed a vertical jump (VJ), depth drop (DD), and Bosco test on a force plate in 3 different conditions, on 3 separate days: bare feet (BF), minimalist footwear (MF), and tennis shoes (TS). Bare feet had greater relative peak power (relPP) in the VJ (men: BF, 59.87 ± 5.09 W⋅kg(-1); MF, 58.39 ± 5.69 W·kg(-1); TS, 57.70 ± 6.54 W·kg(-1); women: BF, 45.26 ± 4.10 W·kg(-1); MF, 45.06 ± 3.53 W·kg(-1); TS, 44.77 ± 4.55 W·kg(-1)), while for men, jump height (JH) was also greater in BF and MF (BF, 44.5 ± 4.46 cm; MF, 43.47 ± 5.5 cm; TS, 41.47 ± 14.45 cm). Results of the Bosco test revealed average relPP was greatest in BF compared with MF and TS (men: BF, 19.70 ± 3.01 W·kg(-1); MF, 19.28 ± 3.00 W·kg(-1); TS, 18.93 ± 3.33 W·kg(-1); women: BF, 14.68 ± 1.41 W·kg(-1); MF, 13.97 ± 1.56 W·kg(-1); TS 13.62 ± 1.67 W·kg(-1)), while for JH, BF and MF were greater than TS (men: BF, 28.62 ± 5.0 cm; MF, 27.78 ± 5.09 cm; TS, 26.54 ± 5.1 cm; women: BF, 18.60 ± 1.97 cm; MF, 17.86 ± 6.35 cm; TS, 17.35 ± 2.47 cm). No differences in relative impact force were seen during the DD between conditions. Therefore, athletes and coaches interested in enhancing single and multiple VJs might consider either BF or minimalist shoes. PMID:23254549

  20. Gas phase radiative effects in diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedir, Hasan

    Several radiation models are evaluated for a stagnation point diffusion flame of a solid fuel in terms of accuracy and computational time. Narrowband, wideband, spectral line weighted sum of gray gases (SLWSGG), and gray gas models are included in the comparison. Radiative heat flux predictions by the nongray narrowband, wideband, and SLWSGG models are found to be in good agreement with each other, whereas the gray gas models are found to be inaccurate. The narrowband model, the most complex among the models evaluated, is then applied first to a solid fuel and second to a pure gaseous diffusion flame. A polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) diffusion flame in a stagnation point geometry is solved with the narrowband model with COsb2, Hsb2O, and MMA vapor included in participating species. A detailed account of the emission and absorption from these species as well as the radiative heat fluxes are given as a function of the stretch rate. It is found that at low stretch rate the importance of radiation is increased due to an increase in the optical thickness, and a decrease in the conductive heat flux. Results show that COsb2 is the biggest emitter and absorber in the flame, MMA vapor is the second and Hsb2O is the least important. A pure gaseous flame in an opposed jet configuration is solved with the narrowband radiation model with CO as the fuel, and Osb2 as the oxidizer. Detailed. chemical kinetics and transport are incorporated into the combustion model with the use of the CHEMKIN and TRANSPORT software packages. The governing equations are solved with a modified version of the OPPDIF code. Dry and wet CO flames as well as COsb2 dilution are studied. Comparison of the results with and without the consideration of radiation reveals that the radiation is important for the whole flammable range of dry CO flames and for the low stretch rates of wet flames. Without the consideration of radiation the temperature and the species mole fractions (especially of minor species

  1. Effects of Nuclear Interactions on Accuracy of Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts and electronic equipments is one major obstacle in long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials. These results tell us at what energies nuclear cross sections are the most important for radiation risk evaluations, and how uncertainties in our knowledge about nuclear fragmentations relate to uncertainties in space transport predictions.

  2. Biological effects of radiation, metabolic and replication kinetics alterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, J.

    1972-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation upon normal and cancerous tissues were studied. A macromolecular precursor of DNA, 3ETdR, was incorporated into the cell nucleus during synthesis and provided intranuclear beta radiation. Tritium labeled cells were studied with autoradiographic methods; cell cycle kinetics were determined and cell functions modified by radiation dosage or by drugs were also evaluated. The long term program has included; (1) effects of radiation on cell replication and the correlation with incorporated dose levels, (2) radiation induced changes in cell function, viz., the response of beta irradiated spleen lymphocytes to antigenic stimulation by sheep red blood cells (SRBC), (3) kinetics of tumor and normal cell replication; and (4) megakaryocyte formation and modification by radiomimetic drugs.

  3. COMPARING THE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEMES ON CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre

    2012-11-10

    We examine the effect of different radiative transfer schemes on the properties of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of near-surface stellar convection in the superadiabatic layer, where energy transport transitions from fully convective to fully radiative. We employ two radiative transfer schemes that fundamentally differ in the way they cover the 3D domain. The first solver approximates domain coverage with moments, while the second solver samples the 3D domain with ray integrations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere.

  4. Investigation of land use effects on Nash model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, Faegheh; Fakheri Fard, Ahmad; Nourani, Vahid; Goodrich, David; Gupta, Hoshin

    2015-04-01

    Flood forecasting is of great importance in hydrologic planning, hydraulic structure design, water resources management and sustainable designs like flood control and management. Nash's instantaneous unit hydrograph is frequently used for simulating hydrological response in natural watersheds. Urban hydrology is gaining more attention due to population increases and associated construction escalation. Rapid development of urban areas affects the hydrologic processes of watersheds by decreasing soil permeability, flood base flow, lag time and increase in flood volume, peak runoff rates and flood frequency. In this study the influence of urbanization on the significant parameters of the Nash model have been investigated. These parameters were calculated using three popular methods (i.e. moment, root mean square error and random sampling data generation), in a small watershed consisting of one natural sub-watershed which drains into a residentially developed sub-watershed in the city of Sierra Vista, Arizona. The results indicated that for all three methods, the lag time, which is product of Nash parameters "K" and "n", in the natural sub-watershed is greater than the developed one. This logically implies more storage and/or attenuation in the natural sub-watershed. The median K and n parameters derived from the three methods using calibration events were tested via a set of verification events. The results indicated that all the three method have acceptable accuracy in hydrograph simulation. The CDF curves and histograms of the parameters clearly show the difference of the Nash parameter values between the natural and developed sub-watersheds. Some specific upper and lower percentile values of the median of the generated parameters (i.e. 10, 20 and 30 %) were analyzed to future investigates the derived parameters. The model was sensitive to variations in the value of the uncertain K and n parameter. Changes in n are smaller than K in both sub-watersheds indicating

  5. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3–100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3– 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects. PMID:23833705

  6. Effects Of Radiation On Electronics-Additional References

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Bibliography abstracts summarizing literature on effects of radiation on new electronic devices. This and second volume cover years 1984 and 1985. Third volume, covers 1982 and 1983 (previously published).

  7. Space Radiation Effects on Electronics: Simple Concepts and New Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the following topics: 1) The Space Radiation Environment; 2) The Effects on Electronics; 3) The Environment in Action; 4) NASA Approaches to Commercial Electronics; 5) Final Thoughts.

  8. CRRES: Combined release and radiation effects satellite program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layman, Laura D.; Miller, George P.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments that comprise the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite Program (CRRES) (Apr. 1990 - Jul. 1992) are presented. The experiments are as follows: PEGSAT; El Coqui; the Kwajalein Campaign; and experiments G1 - G14.

  9. Long-term radiation effects on GaAs solar cell characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Doviak, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    This report investigates preliminary design considerations which should be considered for a space experiment involving Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) solar cells. The electron radiation effects on GaAs solar cells were conducted in a laboratory environment, and a statistical analysis of the data is presented. In order to augment the limited laboratory data, a theoretical investigation of the effect of radiation on GaAs solar cells is also developed. The results of this study are empirical prediction equations which can be used to estimate the actual damage of electrical characteristics in a space environment. The experimental and theoretical studies also indicate how GaAs solar cell parameters should be designed in order to withstand the effects of electron radiation damage.

  10. A Novel Biological Dosimetry Method for Monitoring Occupational Radiation Exposure in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Wards: From Radiation Dosimetry to Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Heydarheydari, S.; Haghparast, A.; Eivazi, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Professional radiation workers are occupationally exposed to long-term low levels of ionizing radiation. Occupational health hazards from radiation exposure, in a large occupational segment of the population, are of special concern. Biological dosimetry can be performed in addition to physical dosimetry with the aim of individual dose assessment and biological effects. Methods In this biodosimetry study, some hematological parameters have been examined in 40 exposed and 40 control subjects who were matched by gender, age and occupational records (±3 years) in Kermanshah hospitals in Iran (2013-2014). The occupational radiation dose was measured by personal dosimetry device (film badges). The data was analyzed using SPSS V.20 and statistical tests such as two-sided Student’s t-test. Results Exposed subjects had a median exposure of 0.68±1.58 mSv/year by film badge dosimetry. Radiation workers with at least a 10-year record showed lower values of Mean Hemoglobin (Hb) and Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV) compared to the control group (p<0.05). The mean value of Red Blood Cells (RBCs) in personnel working in Radiology departments seemed to show decrease in comparison with other radiation workers. Conclusion Although the radiation absorbed doses were below the permissible limits based on the ICRP, this study showed the role of low-level chronic exposure in decreasing Hb and MCV in the blood of radiation workers with at least 10 years records. Therefore, the findings from the present study suggest that monitoring of hematological parameters of radiation workers can be useful as biological dosimeter, and also the exposed medical personnel should carefully follow the radiation protection instructions and radiation exposure should be minimized as possible. PMID:27026951

  11. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdollah

    2011-12-01

    A variety of oil recovery methods have been developed and applied to mature and depleted reservoirs in order to improve the efficiency. Microwave radiation oil recovery method is a relatively new method and has been of great interest in the recent years. Crude oil is typically co-mingled with suspended solids and water. To increase oil recovery, it is necessary to remove these components. The separation of oil from water and solids using gravitational settling methods is typically incomplete. Oil-in-water and oil-water-solid emulsions can be demulsified and separated into their individual layers by microwave radiation. The data also show that microwave separation is faster than gravity separation and can be faster than conventional heating at many conditions. After separation of emulsion into water and oil layers, water can be discharged and oil is collected. High-frequency microwave recycling process can recover oil and gases from oil shale, residual oil, drill cuttings, tar sands oil, contaminated dredge/sediments, tires and plastics with significantly greater yields and lower costs than are available utilizing existing known technologies. This process is environmentally friendly, fuel-generating recycler to reduce waste, cut emissions, and save energy. This paper presents a critical review of Microwave radiation method for oil recovery.

  12. Effects of parental radiation exposure on developmental instability in grasshoppers

    PubMed Central

    BEASLEY, D. E.; BONISOLI-ALQUATI, A.; WELCH, S. M.; MØLLER, A. P.; MOUSSEAU, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutagenic and epigenetic effects of environmental stressors and their transgenerational consequences are of interest to evolutionary biologists because they can amplify natural genetic variation. We studied the effect of parental exposure to radioactive contamination on offspring development in lesser marsh grasshopper Chorthippus albomarginatus. We used a geometric morphometric approach to measure fluctuating asymmetry (FA), wing shape and wing size. We measured time to sexual maturity to check whether parental exposure to radiation influenced offspring developmental trajectory and tested effects of radiation on hatching success and parental fecundity. Wings were larger in early maturing individuals born to parents from high radiation sites compared to early maturing individuals from low radiation sites. As time to sexual maturity increased, wing size decreased but more sharply in individuals from high radiation sites. Radiation exposure did not significantly affect FA or shape in wings nor did it significantly affect hatching success and fecundity. Overall, parental radiation exposure can adversely affect offspring development and fitness depending on developmental trajectories although the cause of this effect remains unclear. We suggest more direct measures of fitness and the inclusion of replication in future studies to help further our understanding of the relationship between developmental instability, fitness and environmental stress. PMID:22507690

  13. Effective UV radiation dose in polyethylene exposed to weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Mota, R.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Rosales-Candelas, I.; Calero Marín, S. P.; Vega-Durán, J. T.; Moreno-Virgen, R.

    2009-09-01

    In this work we quantified the effective UV radiation dose in orange and colorless polyethylene samples exposed to weather in the city of Aguascalientes, Ags. Mexico. The spectral distribution of solar radiation was calculated using SMART 2.9.5.; the samples absorption properties were measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy and the quantum yield was calculated using samples reflectance properties. The determining factor in the effective UV dose is the spectral distribution of solar radiation, although the chemical structure of materials is also important.

  14. Evident Biological Effects of Space Radiation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2004-01-01

    Though cancer risks are the primary concern for astronauts exposed to space radiation and a number of astronauts have developed cancer, identifying a direct association or cause of disease has been somewhat problematic due to a lack of statistics and a lack of an appropriate control group. However, several bio,logical effects observed in astronauts are believed to be primarily due to exposure to space radiation. Among those are, light flashes experienced by astronauts from early missions, cataract development in the crewmembers and excess chromosome aberrations detected in astronauts' lymphocytes postmission. The space radiation environment and evident biological effects will be discussed.

  15. Real-Time Cloud, Radiation, and Aircraft Icing Parameters from GOES over the USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Nguyen, Louis; Smith, William, Jr.; Young, David; Khaiyer, Mandana; Palikonda, Rabindra; Spangenberg, Douglas; Doelling, Dave; Phan, Dung; Nowicki, Greg

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary new, physically based method for realtime estimation of the probability of icing conditions has been demonstrated using merged GOES-10 and 12 data over the continental United States and southern Canada. The algorithm produces pixel-level cloud and radiation properties as well as an estimate of icing probability with an associated intensity rating Because icing depends on so many different variables, such as aircraft size or air speed, it is not possible to achieve 100% success with this or any other type of approach. This initial algorithm, however, shows great promise for diagnosing aircraft icing and putting it at the correct altitude within 0.5 km most of the time. Much additional research must be completed before it can serve as a reliable input for the operational CIP. The delineation of the icing layer vertical boundaries will need to be improved using either the RUC or balloon soundings or ceilometer data to adjust the cloud base height, a change that would require adjustment of the cloud-top altitude also.

  16. Ethylene vinyl acetate based radiation grafted hydrophilic matrices: Process parameter standardization, grafting kinetics and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Mondal, R. K.; Dubey, K. A.; Grover, V.; Panicker, L.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Varshney, L.

    2016-08-01

    A transparent, elastomeric, grafted matrix for several potential applications was synthesized by single-step simultaneous radiation grafting of methacrylic acid onto ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). CuSO4 was found to be the most suitable homo-polymerization inhibitor among different inhibitors tried. The grafting kinetics was found to be a strong function of dose rate (D) and monomer content (M) and an equation relating grafting rate Rg=Kg [M]1.13D0.23 was deduced. Crystallinity of the grafted matrices as assessed from XRD and DSC measurements indicated decrease in crystalline content with increase in grafting yield, suggesting crystalline domain of EVA get disrupted on grafting. Elastic modulus increased linearly with the increase in grafting yield, though elongation at break decreased precipitously from 900% to 30% at even ~9% grafting. Thermo-gravimetric analysis showed three step weight loss of the grafted EVA matrix. The grafting of MAA resulted in increase in surface energy mainly due to enhanced polar component.

  17. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  18. Materials and characterization using acoustic nonlinearity parameters and harmonic generation - Effects of crystalline and amorphous structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of material structure on the nonlinearity parameters are reviewed. Problems discussed include definition of nonlinearity parameters, square-law nonlinearity and collinear beam-mixing, structure dependence of the nonlinearity parameters, negative nonlinearity parameters, and implications for materials characterization.

  19. Evaluation of the effects of mediastinal radiation therapy on autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hoca, Ayse; Yildiz, Metin; Ozyigit, Gokhan

    2012-12-01

    In this prospective study, the effects of mediastinal radiation therapy (RT) on autonomic nervous system (ANS) were investigated by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis that is accepted as a non-invasive indicator of ANS. Study was performed with the eligible patients had a histopathologically confirmed diagnosis of malignant disease with no known congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, valvular cardiac disease or arrhythmia history. Electrocardiograms of 14 voluntary patients were recorded for duration of 5 min just before and after irradiation for the first and the 15th fractions. ANS-related HRV analysis parameters were calculated as which were recommended by Task Force of ESC/NASPE (Circulation 93:1043-1065, 1996). HRV parameters that belong to pre- and post-RT treatment of patients were compared statistically. We found that there is not effect of single-dose radiation on HRV parameter. The mean RRI (782.29 ± 115.65-738.93 ± 111.01, P < 0.014) and HF power of HRVs PSD (156.94 ± 229.37-60.71 ± 77.99, P < 0.045) decreased, and LF/HF ratio (1.38 ± 0.79-2.03 ± 1.25, P < 0.039) increased significantly with 28-Gy external radiation dose. As the effect of cumulative dose was investigated on HRV parameters, the above changes were continued to increase with 30-Gy external radiation dose. We found that mediastinal RT involving heart directly in the radiation field decreased vagal and sympathetic ANS activities, and autonomic balance shifted toward sympathetic dominance. PMID:22528518

  20. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  1. Mathematical model of radiation effects on thrombopoiesis in rhesus macaques and humans.

    PubMed

    Wentz, J M; Vainstein, V; Oldson, D; Gluzman-Poltorak, Z; Basile, L A; Stricklin, D

    2015-10-21

    A mathematical model that describes the effects of acute radiation exposure on thrombopoiesis in primates and humans is presented. Thrombopoiesis is a complex multistage dynamic process with potential differences between species. Due to known differences in cellular radiosensitivities, nadir times, and cytopenia durations, direct extrapolation from rhesus to human platelet dynamics is unrealistic. Developing mathematical models of thrombopoiesis for both humans and primates allows for the comparison of the system's response across species. Thus, data obtained in primate experiments can be extrapolated to predictions in humans. Parameter values for rhesus macaques and humans were obtained either from direct experimental measurements or through optimization procedures using dynamic data on platelet counts following radiation exposure. Model simulations accurately predict trends observed in platelet dynamics: at low radiation doses platelet counts decline after a time lag, and nadir depth is dose dependent. The models were validated using data that was not used during the parameterization process. In particular, additional experimental data was used for rhesus, and accident and platelet donor data was used for humans. The model aims to simulate the average response in rhesus and humans following irradiation. Variation in platelet dynamics due to individual variability can be modeled using Monte Carlo simulations in which parameter values are sampled from distributions. This model provides insight into the time course of the physiological effects of radiation exposure, information which could be valuable for disaster planning and survivability analysis and help in drug development of radiation medical countermeasures. PMID:26232694

  2. A general model for estimation of daily global solar radiation using air temperatures and site geographic parameters in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mao-Fen; Fan, Li; Liu, Hong-Bin; Guo, Peng-Tao; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of daily global solar radiation (Rs) from routinely measured temperature data has been widely developed and used in many different areas of the world. However, many of them are site specific. It is assumed that a general model for estimating daily Rs using temperature variables and geographical parameters could be achieved within a climatic region. This paper made an attempt to develop a general model to estimate daily Rs using routinely measured temperature data (maximum (Tmax, °C) and minimum (Tmin, °C) temperatures) and site geographical parameters (latitude (La, °N), longitude (Ld, °E) and altitude (Alt, m)) for Guizhou and Sichuan basin of southwest China, which was classified into the hot summer and cold winter climate zone. Comparison analysis was carried out through statistics indicators such as root mean squared error of percentage (RMSE%), modeling efficiency (ME), coefficient of residual mass (CRM) and mean bias error (MBE). Site-dependent daily Rs estimating models were calibrated and validated using long-term observed weather data. A general formula was then obtained from site geographical parameters and the better fit site-dependent models with mean RMSE% of 38.68%, mean MBE of 0.381 MJ m-2 d-1, mean CRM of 0.04 and mean ME value of 0.713.

  3. The chemical and radiative effects of the Mount Pinatubo eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinneson, Douglas E.; Grant, Keith E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To clarify the mechanisms leading to effects on stratospheric ozone, time-dependent stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment II (SAGE II) and cryogenic limb array elaton spectrometer (CLAES) aerosol optical extinction data and SAGE II surface area density are used as parameters in a two-dimensional (2-D) zonally averaged chemical radiative transport model. The model was integrated with time from before the eruption through December 1993. The modeled impact on global ozone results from increased rates of heterogeneous reactions on sulfate aerosols and from the increased radiative heating and scattering caused by these aerosols. When the aerosol heating is allowed to modify the temperature distribution, the maximum change calculated in equatorial column ozone is -1.6%. The calculated equatorial temperature change and peak local ozone change in October 1991 are +6K and -4%, respectively. When aerosol heating perturbs the circulation in the model, the maximum change in equatorial column ozone is -6%. Increased heterogeneous processing on sulfate aerosols is calculated to have changed equatorial column ozone in late 1991 by -1.5%. Global column ozone in the model in 1992 and 1993 changed by -2.8% and -2.4%, respectively. The relationship of ozone-controlling processes in the lower stratosphere is altered as well; HO(x) becomes the most important catalytic cycle, followed by ClO(x) and NO(x). This is driven by significant changes in trace gas concentrations. In October 1991, lower stratospheric, equatorial NO(x) decreased by 40%, ClO(x) increased by 60%, and HO(x) increased by 25%. When the effect of heterogeneous chemical processing on sulfate aerosols is combined with aerosol heating, modifying either circulation or temperature, dramatically different ozone fingerprints with time and latitude are predicted. Model-derived changes in the equatorial region in column ozone best represented the observed data when perturbed circulation was combined with heterogeneous

  4. Spatial interpolation of biologically effective UV radiation over Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walawender, J.; Ustrnul, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The ultraviolet(UV) radiation plays an important role in the Earth-Atmosphere System. It has a positive influence on both human health and natural environment but it may also be very harmful if UV exposure exceeds "safe" limits. For that reason knowledge about spatial distribution of biologically effective UV doses seems to be crucial in minimization or complete elimination of the negative UV effects. The main purpose of this study is to find the most appropriate interpolation method in order to create reliable maps of the biologically effective UV radiation over Poland. As the broadband UV measurement network in Poland is very sparse, erythemaly weighted UV radiation data reconstructed from homogeneous global solar radiation records were used. UV reconstruction model was developed in Centre of Aerology (Institute of Meteorology and Water Management) within COST Action 726 - ‘Long term changes and climatology of UV radiation over Europe'. The model made it possible to reconstruct daily erythemal UV doses for 21 solar radiation measurement stations in the period 1985 - 2008. Mapping methodology included the following processing steps: exploratory spatial data analysis, verification of additional variables, selection and parameterization of interpolation model, accuracy assessment and cartographic visualization. Several different stochastic and deterministic interpolation methods along with various empirical semivariogram models were tested. Multiple regression analysis was performed in order to examine statistical relationship between UV radiation and additional environmental variables such as: elevation, latitude, stratospheric ozone content and cloud cover. The data were integrated, processed and visualized within GIS environment.

  5. Effects of solar radiation on collagen and chitosan films.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, Alina

    2006-01-01

    Photo-aging and photo-degradation are the deleterious effect of chronic exposure to sun light of many materials made of natural polymers. The resistance of the products on the action of solar radiation is very important for material scientists. The effect of solar radiation on two natural polymers: collagen and chitosan as well as collagen/chitosan blends in the form of thin films has been studied by UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy. It was found that UV-Vis spectra, which characterise collagen and collagen/chitosan films, were significantly altered by solar radiation. FTIR spectra of collagen and collagen/chitosan films showed that after solar irradiation the positions of amide A and amide I bands were shifted to lower wavenumbers. There was not any significant alteration of chitosan UV-Vis and FTIR spectra after solar radiation. In the condition of the experiment chitosan films were resistant to the action of solar radiation. The effect of solar UV radiation in comparison to artificial UV radiation has been discussed. PMID:16219470

  6. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in linear integrated circuits. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    A successful diagnostic technique was developed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a precision tool to determine ionization effects in integrated circuits. Previous SEM methods radiated the entire semiconductor chip or major areas. The large area exposure methods do not reveal the exact components which are sensitive to radiation. To locate these sensitive components a new method was developed, which consisted in successively irradiating selected components on the device chip with equal doses of electrons /10 to the 6th rad (Si)/, while the whole device was subjected to representative bias conditions. A suitable device parameter was measured in situ after each successive irradiation with the beam off.

  7. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokosz, Anita; Koziczak, Renata; Gonciarz, Marta; Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with γ-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min -1 in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect.

  8. Turbulent Radiation Effects in HSCT Combustor Rich Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert J.; Vranos, Alexander; Yu, Weiduo

    1998-01-01

    A joint UTRC-University of Connecticut theoretical program was based on describing coupled soot formation and radiation in turbulent flows using stretched flamelet theory. This effort was involved with using the model jet fuel kinetics mechanism to predict soot growth in flamelets at elevated pressure, to incorporate an efficient model for turbulent thermal radiation into a discrete transfer radiation code, and to couple die soot growth, flowfield, and radiation algorithm. The soot calculations used a recently developed opposed jet code which couples the dynamical equations of size-class dependent particle growth with complex chemistry. Several of the tasks represent technical firsts; among these are the prediction of soot from a detailed jet fuel kinetics mechanism, the inclusion of pressure effects in the soot particle growth equations, and the inclusion of the efficient turbulent radiation algorithm in a combustor code.

  9. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved.

  10. Generating Effective Models and Parameters for RNA Genetic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chelsea Y; Varner, Jeffrey D; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-08-21

    RNA genetic circuitry is emerging as a powerful tool to control gene expression. However, little work has been done to create a theoretical foundation for RNA circuit design. A prerequisite to this is a quantitative modeling framework that accurately describes the dynamics of RNA circuits. In this work, we develop an ordinary differential equation model of transcriptional RNA genetic circuitry, using an RNA cascade as a test case. We show that parameter sensitivity analysis can be used to design a set of four simple experiments that can be performed in parallel using rapid cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) reactions to determine the 13 parameters of the model. The resulting model accurately recapitulates the dynamic behavior of the cascade, and can be easily extended to predict the function of new cascade variants that utilize new elements with limited additional characterization experiments. Interestingly, we show that inconsistencies between model predictions and experiments led to the model-guided discovery of a previously unknown maturation step required for RNA regulator function. We also determine circuit parameters in two different batches of TX-TL, and show that batch-to-batch variation can be attributed to differences in parameters that are directly related to the concentrations of core gene expression machinery. We anticipate the RNA circuit models developed here will inform the creation of computer aided genetic circuit design tools that can incorporate the growing number of RNA regulators, and that the parametrization method will find use in determining functional parameters of a broad array of natural and synthetic regulatory systems. PMID:26046393

  11. Effects of microwave radiation on living tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Surrell, J.A.; Alexander, R.C.; Cohle, S.D.; Lovell, F.R. Jr.; Wehrenberg, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    Prompted by an alleged case of child abuse resulting from microwave oven burns and the discovery of one other case, an animal model was chosen to explore microwave burn characteristics upon living, perfusing tissue. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to radiation from a standard household microwave oven for varying lengths of time, sufficient to result in full-thickness skin and visceral burns. Characteristic burn patterns were grossly identified. Biopsies studied with both light and electron microscopy demonstrated a pattern of relative layered tissue sparing. Layered tissue sparing is characterized by burned skin and muscle, with relatively unburned subcutaneous fat between these two layers. These findings have important forensic and patient care implications.

  12. The effect of clouds on the earth's radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziskin, Daniel; Strobel, Darrell F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) over Indonesia for the months of June and July of 1985 and 1986 were analyzed to determine the cloud sensitivity coefficients. The method involved a linear least squares regression between co-incident flux and cloud coverage measurements. The calculated slope is identified as the cloud sensitivity. It was found that the correlations between the total cloud fraction and radiation parameters were modest. However, correlations between cloud fraction and IR flux were improved by separating clouds by height. Likewise, correlations between the visible flux and cloud fractions were improved by distinguishing clouds based on optical depth. Calculating correlations between the net fluxes and either height or optical depth segregated cloud fractions were somewhat improved. When clouds were classified in terms of their height and optical depth, correlations among all the radiation components were improved. Mean cloud sensitivities based on the regression of radiative fluxes against height and optical depth separated cloud types are presented. Results are compared to a one-dimensional radiation model with a simple cloud parameterization scheme.

  13. More Abstracts on Effects of Radiation on Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1987-01-01

    Second volume of bibliography summarizes literature on radiation effects on new electronic devices. Includes those of protons, electrons, neutrons, gamma rays, and cosmic rays at energies up to about 20 GeV. Volume contains 219 abstracts from unclassified sources. Organized into four sections: dose-rate effects, new technology, post-irradiaton effects, and test environments.

  14. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Souza, D. N.

    2011-10-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide "Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment." In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  15. Effective impedance boundary optimization and its contribution to dipole radiation and radiation pattern control.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Zhong, Xu; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen; Johnson, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Radiation pattern control has generated much interest recently due to its potential applications. Here we report the observation of high-efficiency dipole-like radiation of sound with broad bandwidth through a decorated plate with periodical two-dimensional Helmholtz resonators on both sides and a single slit at the centre. The decorated plate was optimally designed to adjust the effective impedance of the boundary, and the underlying mechanism of radiation pattern control is attributed to wave vector tailoring. The high radiation efficiency is due to the Fabry-Perot resonances associated with waveguide modes in the centre slit. The method to obtain a collimated beam without any sidelobes is also provided. Our findings should have an impact on acoustic applications. PMID:24458333

  16. Gamma radiation effect on gas production in anion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traboulsi, A.; Labed, V.; Dauvois, V.; Dupuy, N.; Rebufa, C.

    2013-10-01

    Radiation-induced decomposition of Amberlite IRA400 anion exchange resin in hydroxide form by gamma radiolysis has been studied at various doses in different atmospheres (anaerobic, anaerobic with liquid water, and aerobic). The effect of these parameters on the degradation of ion exchange resins is rarely investigated in the literature. We focused on the radiolysis gases produced by resin degradation. When the resin was irradiated under anaerobic conditions with liquid water, the liquid phase over the resin was also analyzed to identify any possible water-soluble products released by degradation of the resin. The main products released are trimethylamine (TMA), molecular hydrogen (H2g) and carbon dioxide (CO2g). TMA and H2g are produced in all the irradiation atmospheres. However, TMA was in gaseous form under anaerobic and aerobic conditions and in aqueous form in presence of liquid water. In the latter conditions, TMAaq was associated with aqueous dimethylamine (DMAaq), monomethylamine (MMAaq) and ammonia (NH). CO2g is formed in the presence of oxygen due to oxidation of organic compounds present in the system, in particular the degradation products such as TMAg.

  17. Effects of radiation on parotid salivary function

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.E.; Davis, C.C.; Gottsman, V.L.

    1981-08-01

    Postoperative electron beam irradiation of patients with parotid cancer has been used regularly at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology to spare the opposite parotid and to preserve salivary function. Only anecdotal reports of amount of radiation required to ablate salivary function exist. To establish a dose-response curve for the human parotid, selective measurements of right and left parotid salivary flow were done for 15 age-matched control patients whose parotids were not irradiated, 17 patients who had both parotids irradiated, and 12 whose parotids were irradiated by unilateral electron beam technique. Point calculations of absorbed dose 1 cm below the surface were done for all 88 parotids and correlated with stimulated parotid salivary flow, pH, and secretory IgA (SIgA). Increasing doses of radiation resulted in progressive reduction of parotid salivary flow, pH, and SIgA. The technique, dosimetry, and clinical application of unilateral electron beam irradiation to spare the opposite parotid will be discussed.

  18. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    PubMed

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand recombination (strand displacement/assimilation model), and shift plus-strand recombination towards the 3' end of the genome. However, we found that while gamma irradiation of virions reduced the amount of recoverable viral RNA, it did not primarily cause breaks. Thus, the frequency of selected recombinants was not significantly altered with greater doses of radiation. In spite of this, the irradiation did decrease the number of recombinants with only one internal template switch. As a result, the average number of additional internal template switches in the recombinant proviruses increased from 0.7 to 1.4 as infectivity decreased to 6%. The unselected internal template switches tended to be 5' of the selected crossover even in the recombinants from irradiated viruses, inconsistent with a plus-strand recombination mechanism. PMID:1602553

  19. Inverse planning in the age of digital LINACs: station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have seen a number of technical and clinical advances which give rise to a need for innovations in dose optimization and delivery strategies. Technically, a new generation of digital linac has become available which offers features such as programmable motion between station parameters and high dose-rate Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams. Current inverse planning methods are designed for traditional machines and cannot accommodate these features of new generation linacs without compromising either dose conformality and/or delivery efficiency. Furthermore, SBRT is becoming increasingly important, which elevates the need for more efficient delivery, improved dose distribution. Here we will give an overview of our recent work in SPORT designed to harness the digital linacs and highlight the essential components of SPORT. We will summarize the pros and cons of traditional beamlet-based optimization (BBO) and direct aperture optimization (DAO) and introduce a new type of algorithm, compressed sensing (CS)-based inverse planning, that is capable of automatically removing the redundant segments during optimization and providing a plan with high deliverability in the presence of a large number of station control points (potentially non-coplanar, non-isocentric, and even multi-isocenters). We show that CS-approach takes the interplay between planning and delivery into account and allows us to balance the dose optimality and delivery efficiency in a controlled way and, providing a viable framework to address various unmet demands of the new generation linacs. A few specific implementation strategies of SPORT in the forms of fixed-gantry and rotational arc delivery are also presented.

  20. Health effects of low level radiation: carcinogenesis, teratogenesis, and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ritenour, E.R.

    1986-04-01

    The carcinogenic effects of radiation have been demonstrated at high dose levels. At low dose levels, such as those encountered in medical diagnosis, the magnitude of the effect is more difficult to quantify. Three reasons for this difficulty are (1) the effects in human populations are small compared with the natural incidence of cancer in the populations; (2) it is difficult to transfer results obtained in animal studies to the human experience; and (3) the effects of latency period and plateau increase the complexity of population studies. In spite of these difficulties, epidemiologic studies of human populations exposed to low levels of radiation still play a valuable role in the determination of radiation carcinogenecity. They serve to provide upper estimates of risk and to rule out the appearance of new effects that may be masked by the effects of high doses. While there is evidence for mutagenic effects of radiation in experimental animals, no conclusive human data exist at the present. It is not possible to rule out the presence of genetic effects of radiation in humans, however, because many problems exist with regard to the epidemiologic detection of small effects when the natural incidence is relatively large. In animals, subtle effects (eg, a decrease in the probability of survival from egg to adult) may occur with greater frequency than more dramatic disorders in irradiated populations. However, these types of genetic abnormalities are difficult to quantitate. Current risk estimates are based primarily upon data pertaining to dominant mutations in rodents. Some specific locus studies also permit identification of recessive mutation rates. The embryo and fetus are considered to be at greater risk for adverse effects of radiation than is the adult.