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Sample records for paranitrophenol-an xrd tem

  1. Changes in the surfaces on DDOAB organoclays adsorbed with paranitrophenol-An XRD, TEM and TG study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qin; He Hongping; Frost, Ray L. Xi Yunfei

    2008-12-01

    The adsorption of paranitrophenol on organoclays synthesised by the ion exchange of the surfactant molecule dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDOAB) of formula (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}){sub 2}NBr(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis. The expansion of the montmorillonite depends on the loading of the montmorillonite with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide and is related to the arrangement of the surfactant molecules within the clay interlayer. This expansion is altered by the adsorbed paranitrophenol and is observed in the transmission electron microscopic images of the organoclay with adsorbed paranitrophenol. Changes in the surfactant molecular arrangements were analysed by thermogravimetry. The paranitrophenol is sublimed simultaneously with the loss of surfactant. The dehydroxylation temperature of the montmorillonite is decreased upon adsorption of the paranitrophenol indicating a bonding between the paranitrophenol and the hydroxyl units of the montmorillonite.

  2. Characterization of crystallite morphology for doped strontium fluoride nanophosphors by TEM and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, J. H.; Lee, M. E.; Yagoub, M. Y. A.; Swart, H. C.; Coetsee, E.

    2016-01-01

    Crystallite morphology for Eu-doped and undoped SrF2 nanophosphors have been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The values for average crystallite size obtained by the application of the Scherrer equation and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) values for XRD peaks are compared to the results obtained using the hollow cone dark field (HCDF) TEM imaging technique. In the case of the TEM analysis, a bimodal crystallite size distribution was revealed with one of the distributions having a measured range of crystallite sizes which was in good agreement with the XRD data. HCDF in combination with FIB specimen preparation was found to be a promising technique for the determination of crystallite size distributions in nanophosphors which might facilitate a better understanding of their scintillation properties.

  3. TEM, XRD and nanoindentation characterization of Xenon ion irradiation damage in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. F.; Li, J. J.; Li, D. H.; Liu, R. D.; Lei, G. H.; Huang, Q.; Yan, L.

    2014-11-01

    Cross-sectional and bulk specimens of a 20% cold-worked 316 austenitic stainless steel (CW 316 SS) has been characterized by TEM, XRD and nanoindentation to determine the microstructural evolution and mechanical property changes of 316 SS after irradiation with 7 MeV Xe26+ ions. TEM results reveal the presence of dislocation loops with a number density of approximately 3 × 1022 m-3 and sizes between 3 to 10 nm due to the collapse of vacancy rich cores inside displacement cascades. Peak broadening observed in XRD diffraction patters reveal systematic changes to lattice parameters due to irradiation. The calculated indentation values in irradiated 316 SS were found to be much higher in comparison to the unirradiated specimen, indicating the dose dependent effect of irradiation on hardness. The relationship between irradiation induced microstructural evolution and the changes to the mechanical properties of CW 316 SS are discussed in the context of fluence and irradiation temperature.

  4. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  5. Swelling induced by alpha decay in monazite and zirconolite ceramics: A XRD and TEM comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschanels, X.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A. M.; Magnin, V.; Mesbah, A.; Tribet, M.; Moloney, M. P.; Serruys, Y.; Peuget, S.

    2014-05-01

    Zirconolite and monazite matrices are potential ceramics for the containment of actinides (Np, Cm, Am, Pu) which are produced over the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides decay mainly through the emission of alpha particles, which in turn causes most ceramics to undergo structural and textural changes (amorphization and/or swelling). In order to study the effects of alpha decays on the above mentioned ceramics two parallel approaches were set up. The first involved the use of an external irradiation source, Au, which allowed the deposited recoil energy to be simulated. The second was based on short-lived actinide doping with 238Pu, (i.e. an internal source), via the incorporation of plutonium oxide into both the monazite and zirconolite structures during synthesis. In both types of irradiation experiments, the zirconolite samples became amorphous at room temperature with damage close to 0.3 dpa; corresponding to a critical dose of 4 × 1018 α g-1 (i.e. ∼1.3 × 1021 keV cm-3). Both zirconolite samples also showed the same degree of macroscopic swelling at saturation (∼6%), with ballistic processes being the predominant damaging effect. In the case of the monazite however, the macroscopic swelling and amorphization were dependent on the nature of the irradiation. Externally, (Au), irradiated samples became amorphous while also demonstrating a saturation swelling of up to 8%. In contrast to this, the swelling of the 238Pu doped samples was much smaller at ∼1%. Also, unlike the externally (Au) irradiated monazite these 238Pu doped samples remained crystalline up to 7.5 × 1018 α g-1 (0.8 dpa). XRD, TEM and swelling measurements were used to fully characterize and interpret this behavior. The low swelling and the conservation of the crystalline state of 238Pu doped monazite samples indicates that alpha annealing took place within this material.

  6. Swelling of ion-irradiated 3C-SiC characterized by synchrotron radiation based XRD and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yan-Ru; Ho, Chun-Yu; Chuang, Wei-Tsung; Ku, Ching-Shun; Kai, Ji-Jung

    2014-12-01

    An experimental technique was established to characterize irradiation-induced volume swelling through a combined utilization of synchrotron radiation-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). 3C-SiC specimens were irradiated by Si2+ ions (5 MeV) with fluences up to 5 × 1017 ion/cm2 at 1000 °C. In order to avoid the accumulation of implanted Si ions in the SiC layer, specific thicknesses of the epitaxy layer and implanted ion energy were chosen. Unresolvable black spot defects were studied by TEM, and the average size and density were calculated. XRD radial scan results of surface (0 0 2), (1 1 1), (0 2 2), (1 1 3), and (2 0 0) including peak shift and asymmetry peak broadening were observed. Different interplanar spacing information of single crystal SiC can be obtained from this XRD measurement method, making it possible to investigate the lattice expansion and volume swelling more precisely. While TEM provided a direct visualization of the microstructures and the interplanar spacing was measured from HRTEM images. It is suggested that irradiation induced point defects and compressive stress from the Si substrate were the cause of anisotropic (a = b < c) volume swelling of irradiated 3C-SiC in this study.

  7. Mössbauer, TEM/SAED and XRD investigation on waste dumps of the Valea lui Stan gold mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, Serban Grigore; Udubasa, Sorin S.; Udubasa, Gheorghe; Kuncser, Victor; Popescu-Pogrion, Nicoleta; Mercioniu, Ionel; Feder, Marcel

    2012-03-01

    The complementary investigation techniques, Mössbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy with selected area electron diffraction (TEM/SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to investigate the fate of the Valea lui Stan, Romania, gold-ore nanoscale-minerals during the long time of residence in the waste dumps. The preliminary investigations showed such waste dumps to contain significant amount of metals which cannot be identified by conventional methods. An intense research activity started up in order to evaluate the possibilities to recycle Valea lui Stan waste dumps and to recover metals by chemical or phytoextraction procedures. The waste dumps naturally show different mineral constituents with clay minerals as major phases, observed by XRD-technique. Although the waste dumps materials have whitish-yellowish colours, MÖSSBAUER technique evidences the presence of the finely dispersed iron bearing minerals. The authors are focusing to inspect and analyze Fe-compounds in the samples collected from Valea lui Stan's waste dumps in order to identify the magnetic phases by Mössbauer technique.

  8. NGR, XRD and TEM/SAED investigations on waste dumps materials with a view to recover precious metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udubasa, S. S.; Constantinescu, S.; Popescu-Pogrion, N.; Feder, M.; Udubasa, G.

    2010-03-01

    Two types of ores were selected for the investigation of the fate of the ore minerals during relatively long time of residence in the waste dumps (active mining: 25 years ago in the Badeanca Valley and some 50 years ago in the Valea lui Stan area). The pentametallic ores (Co-Ni-Bi-Ag-U) in the Leaota Mts. contain a great number of primary minerals of Cu, As etc. Although the waste dumps materials have whitish-yellowish colors their NGR spectra show the presence of iron minerals very finely dispersed. In the gold ores of Valea lui Stan deposit numerous minerals were identified, such as arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, etc., as major gold bearing sulfides. The waste dumps materials naturally show different mineral constituents, with clay minerals as major phases. Detailed NGR investigations show however Mössbauer spectra pointing out the presence of finely dispersed iron or iron-bearing minerals. Under supergene conditions gold is commonly sequestrated by iron hydroxydes; further TEM/SAED and XRD investigations are contributing to localize the gold. In some samples Mössbauer spectra resembling those of greigite have been obtained. Greigite is also a principal concentrator of gold under supergene conditions.

  9. Formation of TEM- and XRD-undetectable gold clusters accompanying big gold particles on TiO 2-SiO 2 supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanchikova, N.; Pestryakov, A.; Farias, M. H.; Diaz, J. A.; Avalos, M.; Navarrete, J.

    2008-07-01

    Sol-gel method allows obtaining complex Ti-Si oxide supports possessing the effect of strong metal-support interaction and favouring the stabilisation of gold in the form of small charged gold clusters. TEM and XRD measurements show the samples containing big gold particles with average size more than 90 nm. However, Rietveld XRD refinement revealed a very low (≤5%) relative amount of large particles on mixed oxide supports. Highly dispersed gold species undetectable by XRD and TEM on TiSi supports provide the main contribution to total amount of gold due to extremely high surface area of these mixed oxides. The combination of DRS, Rietveld XRD analysis and XPS methods was effective for registration and characterisation of these dispersed gold species. The formation of such gold species should be taken into account when studying the nature of gold active sites, as they can be the participants of the catalytic process instead of TEM-detectable metal particles or along with them.

  10. Crystal structure of La 0.4Sr 0.6CoO 2.71 investigated by TEM and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gspan, C.; Grogger, W.; Bitschnau, B.; Bucher, E.; Sitte, W.; Hofer, F.

    2008-11-01

    The structure of the oxygen-deficient perovskite La 0.4Sr 0.6CoO 3-δ ( δ=0.29) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Domains between 50 and 250 nm in size were observed in the electron microscope. Weak superstructure reflections were found with both X-ray and electron diffraction. Investigations of these superstructure reflections by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) showed that the domains in a crystal are orientated in a 90° relationship. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images from the domain boundary also revealed a 90° orientation dependency. Using the symmetry of CBED patterns, the point group 4/ mmm was determined. By comparing reflections from the SAED pattern with possible reflections, the space group I4/ mmm (No. 139) could be isolated and finally the crystal structure was refined by Rietveld refinement.

  11. Crystal structure of La{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2.71} investigated by TEM and XRD

    SciTech Connect

    Gspan, C. Grogger, W.; Bitschnau, B.; Bucher, E.; Sitte, W.; Hofer, F.

    2008-11-15

    The structure of the oxygen-deficient perovskite La{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} ({delta}=0.29) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Domains between 50 and 250 nm in size were observed in the electron microscope. Weak superstructure reflections were found with both X-ray and electron diffraction. Investigations of these superstructure reflections by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) showed that the domains in a crystal are orientated in a 90 deg. relationship. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images from the domain boundary also revealed a 90 deg. orientation dependency. Using the symmetry of CBED patterns, the point group 4/mmm was determined. By comparing reflections from the SAED pattern with possible reflections, the space group I4/mmm (No. 139) could be isolated and finally the crystal structure was refined by Rietveld refinement. - Graphical abstract: Two adjacent domains show different orientation of the c-axis of the tetragonal unit cell in the according convergent beam electron diffraction patterns.

  12. Alteration history of mudrock samples from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drill hole: a TEM-XRD study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, A. M.; van der Pluijm, B. A.; Warr, L. N.

    2006-12-01

    Studying rock alteration in active fault zones is key to understanding fault history and the interaction with mechanical, hydrological and mineralogical processes. In the SAFOD mudrocks at 3064 and 3436 m depths, abundant clay mineral phases, including mixed-layered varieties, occur in the matrix. At present, little is known about the mechanism and timing of their formation in relation to the faulting process. Based on a detailed TEM-XRD study, a preliminary assessment of the alteration history of the clay-rich rock chips is made by studying mineral character, hydration behavior, fabric and textural relationships. The mudrocks contain detrital grains of chlorite, muscovite and biotite, along with a range of authigenic illite, illite-smectite, chlorite- smectite and smectite. The predominant clay minerals are small illite packets (20-30 nm thickness) of a 1Md polytype. The illite constitutes about 75 percent of the illite-smectite mixed layer particles, showing a long- range ordering (R greater than 3). These authigenic mineral phases are probably formed during the movement of aqueous fluids along permeable fractures and veins by dissolution-precipitation reactions, and partly at the expense of larger (about 150 nm thick), deformed, detrital packets. The chlorite-smectite mixed layered phases formed via similar mechanisms, but in this case by direct alteration of detrital chlorite and biotite grains. Preliminary DTA heat flow results from a whole rock mudstone indicate a total loss of about 6 percent of total volatiles (about 2 percent interlayer water, about 4 percent crystalline water), most of which occurs during the dehydroxylation of clays (400-600 C). The timing of authigenic mineral growth in the matrix assemblages is considered to be coeval or older than localized mineralization along open fractures. The fracture precipitations are notably smectite rich and can be taken as an indication of more recent low temperature fluids of varying composition or more

  13. Temperature-dependent XRD, IR, magnetic, SEM and TEM studies of Jahn–Teller distorted NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders

    SciTech Connect

    Ptak, M. Maczka, M.; Gągor, A.; Pikul, A.; Macalik, L.; Hanuza, J.

    2013-05-15

    In the present work we report detailed structural, magnetic and phonon properties of NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders synthesized via a simple coprecipitation method. Temperature-dependent XRD as well as temperature-dependent IR studies reveal that cubic to tetragonal phase transition is lowered due to size effects. Observed changes in the IR spectra indicate that the paramagnetic–ferrimagnetic phase transition taking place at 74 K is related to further lowering of symmetry to orthorhombic system. Assignment of modes was proposed and factor group analyses in three possible symmetries were carried out. Our results show strong anomalies due to the Jahn–Teller tetragonal distortion and weak due to the orthorhombic distortion and onset of collinear ferrimagnetic order. Shifts of wavenumbers observed below 31 K, where the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering occurs, were attributed to spin–phonon interactions. - Graphical abstract: XRD pattern of NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sample synthesized via a coprecipitation method followed by calcination at 1000 {sup o}C. - Highlights: • NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} starts to crystallize near 750 °C. • Coexistence of cubic and tetragonal phases of NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was revealed. • Temperature of the Jahn–Teller distortion is lowered due to the size effects. • Evidences of tetragonal and orthorhombic distortions were found. • Weak spin–phonon interactions were evidenced.

  14. Temperature-dependent XRD, IR, magnetic, SEM and TEM studies of Jahn-Teller distorted NiCr2O4 powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, M.; Maczka, M.; Gągor, A.; Pikul, A.; Macalik, L.; Hanuza, J.

    2013-05-01

    In the present work we report detailed structural, magnetic and phonon properties of NiCr2O4 powders synthesized via a simple coprecipitation method. Temperature-dependent XRD as well as temperature-dependent IR studies reveal that cubic to tetragonal phase transition is lowered due to size effects. Observed changes in the IR spectra indicate that the paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic phase transition taking place at 74 K is related to further lowering of symmetry to orthorhombic system. Assignment of modes was proposed and factor group analyses in three possible symmetries were carried out. Our results show strong anomalies due to the Jahn-Teller tetragonal distortion and weak due to the orthorhombic distortion and onset of collinear ferrimagnetic order. Shifts of wavenumbers observed below 31 K, where the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering occurs, were attributed to spin-phonon interactions.

  15. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  16. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  17. Characterization of magnetite in silico-aluminous fly ash by SEM, TEM, XRD, magnetic susceptibility, and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, S.; Francois, M.; Abdelmoula, M.; Refait, P.; Pellissier, C.; Evrard, O.

    1999-11-01

    Spinel magnetite contained in a silico-aluminous fly ash (originating from la Maxe's power plant, near Metz in the east of France) issued from bituminous coal combustion has been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy linked with energy dispersive spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction, susceptibility measurements, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The results show that in this magnetite Mg is strongly substituted for Fe and the chemical formula is closer to MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} than Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Magnetite also contains Mn, Ca, and Si elements, but at a lower proportion. The results are compatible with the chemical formula Fe{sub 2.08}Mg{sub 0.75}Mn{sub 0.11}Ca{sub 0.04}Si{sub 0.02}O{sub 4} and crystallochemical formula [Fe{sup 2{minus}}{sub 0.92}Ca{sup 2+}{sub 0.06}Si{sup 4+}{sub 0.02}]{sup tetra}[Fe{sup 3+}Fe{sup 2+}{sub 0.16}Mg{sup 2+}{sub 0.73}Mn{sup 2+}{sub 0.11}]{sup octa}O{sub 4}, showing the cation distribution on octahedral and tetrahedral sites of the spinel structure. The reason Mg element is not incorporated in soluble surface salt and in glass composition of the silico-aluminous fly ashes is now understood.

  18. Evolution of extended defects in polycrystalline UO2 under heavy ion irradiation: combined TEM, XRD and Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, C.; Sabathier, C.; Palancher, H.; Carlot, G.; Miro, S.; Serruys, Y.; Desgranges, L.; Legros, M.

    2016-05-01

    A well-suited way to understand the behavior under irradiation of the UO2 nuclear fuel is to use ion implantations and further analyze the microstructure. The present work is focused on the characteristics of extended defects created by Kr implantations in UO2 polycrystals. The influence of many parameters on these extended defects has been studied separately: irradiation temperature (room temperature, 500 and 600 °C), ion fluence (5 × 1015 and 1.26 × 1017 i/cm2), ion energy (4 and 27 MeV) and conditions of subsequent thermal annealing. The evolution of extended defects characteristics and density was determined using transmission electron microscopy and additional damage characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained by the different analytical techniques are shown to be in excellent agreement and to complement literature data. In addition, this work presents the extended defect transformation induced by fluence (dislocation loops and lines → tangled dislocation network) and shows that temperature influences directly their evolution kinetics. Moreover we demonstrate that the temperature to allow extended defects mobility is different during irradiation and under thermal annealing conditions. Finally dislocation line density and swelling obtained from this study are found in the same order of magnitude as the ones obtained from in pile irradiations.

  19. Cluster formation, evolution and size distribution in Fe-Cu alloy: Analysis by XAFS, XRD and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammelli, S.; Degueldre, C.; Cervellino, A.; Abolhassani, S.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2010-03-01

    Fe-Cu alloys containing 1.3 at.% copper were studied as model systems for cluster formation in reactor pressure vessel steels. The samples were annealed at 775 K for different times and subsequently analyzed using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Cu-K-edge, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that copper cluster formation might occur even with short annealing times. These clusters of about 1 nm size can switch easily from bcc iron-like structures to fcc copper, if the local copper concentration is high enough. While a short annealing time of 2.5 h at 775 K maintains a good dilution of copper in the bcc iron matrix, annealing for 312 h leads to large fcc copper precipitates. A linear combination analysis suggests that in the sample annealed 8 h, copper clusters are mostly formed with the same structure as the matrix. A co-existence of bcc and fcc clusters is obtained for 115 h of annealing. Transmission electron microscopy indicates the presence of precipitates as large as 60 nm size for an annealing time of 312 h, and X-ray diffraction provided complementary data about the clusters size distributions in all of the four samples.

  20. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Phil

    1991-01-01

    The Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7) test was a full-scale, full duration static test firing of a high performance motor-configuration solid rocket motor with nozzle vectoring. The final test report documents the procedures, performance, and results of the static test firing of TEM-7. All observations, discussions, conclusions, and recommendations included in the report are complete and final except for the TEM-7 fixed housing unbond investigation. A presentation and discussion of TEM-7 performance, anomalies, and test result concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0107, Rev A, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7) Static Fire Test Plan are included.

  1. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10) was static fired on 27 Apr. 1993 at the Thiokol Corporation full-scale motor static test bay, T-24. This final test report documents the procedures, performance, and results of the static test firing of TEM-10. All observations, discussions, conclusions, and recommendations contained are final. Included is a presentation and discussion of TEM-10 performance, anomalies, and test results in concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0110, Revision D, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10) Static Fire Test Plan.

  2. Technical Evaluation Motor no. 5 (TEM-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor No. 5 (TEM-5) was static test fired at the Thiokol Corporation Static Test Bay T-97. TEM-5 was a full scale, full duration static test fire of a high performance motor (HPM) configuration solid rocket motor (SRM). The primary purpose of TEM static tests is to recover SRM case and nozzle hardware for use in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) flight program. Inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the TEM-5 static test firing was successful. The ambient temperature during the test was 41 F and the propellant mean bulk temperature (PMBT) was 72 F. Ballistics performance values were within the specified requirements. The overall performance of the TEM-5 components and test equipment was nominal. Dissembly inspection revealed that joint putty was in contact with the inner groove of the inner primary seal of the ignitor adapter-to-forward dome (inner) joint gasket; this condition had not occurred on any previous static test motor or flight RSRM. While no qualification issues were addressed on TEM-5, two significant component changes were evaluated. Those changes were a new vented assembly process for the case-to-nozzle joint and the installation of two redesigned field joint protection systems. Performance of the vented case-to-nozzle joint assembly was successful, and the assembly/performance differences between the two field joint protection system (FJPS) configurations were compared.

  3. Analysis of Open TEM-Waveguide Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambousky, R.; Garbe, H.

    This work belongs to a research project on the analysis and characterization of higher order modes occurring in open TEM-waveguide structures. An open TEM waveguide, derived from a conventional GTEM cell by removing the sidewalls, is investigated. The intrinsic resonances of the electromagnetic field occurring in the test volume of the waveguide are analyzed in frequency domain by computer simulation and measurement. This resonance behavior is compared to that of more simplified wire models, describing just the planar septum of the original TEM waveguide. The influence of the number of wires used in the wire model is investigated with respect to the resonant behavior. The use of wire structures is a prerequisite for application of transmission-line super theory (TLST) for further analysis.

  4. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-07)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugh, Phil

    1991-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor Number 7 (TEM-7) was a full scale, full-duration static test firing of a high performance motor (HPM) configuration solid rocket motor (SRM) with nozzle vectoring. The static test fire occurred on 11 December 1990 at the Thiokol Corporation Static Test Bay T-97. Documented here are the procedures, performance, and results available through 22 January 1991. Critical post test hardware activities and assessment of the test data are not complete. A completed test report will be submitted 60 days after the test date. Included here is a presentation and discussion of the TEM-7 performance, anomalies, and test result concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0107 Revision A, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor number 7 (TEM-07) Static Fire Test Plan.

  5. TEM-nanoindentation studies of semiconducting structures.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, E; Patriarche, G

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of nanoindentation coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigations of the plastic behaviour of semiconducting structures and its implication for device design. Instrumented nanoindentation has been developed to extract the mechanical behaviour of small volumes scaled to those encountered in semiconductor heterostructures. We illustrate that TEM is a powerful complementary tool for the study of local plasticity induced by nanoindentation. TEM-nanoindentation allows for detailed understanding of the plastic deformation in semiconducting structures and opens practical routes for improvement of devices. Performances of heterostructures are deteriously affected by dislocations that relax the lattice mismatched layers. Different ways to obtain compliant substructures are being developed in order to concentrate the plastic relaxation underneath the heterostructure. Such approaches allow for mechanical design of micro- and opto-electronic devices to be considered throughout the fabrication process. PMID:16901706

  6. Simple XRD algorithm for direct determination of cotton crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongliang; Thibodeaux, Devron; Gamble, Gary; Bauer, Philip; VanDerveer, Don

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, XRD had been used to study the crystalline structure of cotton celluloses. Despite considerable efforts in developing the curve-fitting protocol to evaluate the crystallinity index (CI), in its present state, XRD measurement can only provide a qualitative or semi-quantitative assessment of the amounts of crystalline and amorphous cellulosic components in a sample. The greatest barrier to establish quantitative XRD is the lack of appropriate cellulose standards needed to calibrate the measurements. In practical, samples with known CIs are very difficult to be prepared or determined. As an approach, we might assign the samples with reported CIs from FT-IR procedure, in which the threeband ratios were first calculated and then were converted into CIs within a large and diversified pool of cotton fibers. This study reports the development of simple XRD algorithm, over time-consuming and subjective curve-fitting process, for direct determination of cotton cellulose CI by correlating XRD with the FT-IR CI references.

  7. Silver Trees: Chemistry on a TEM Grid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The copper/carbon substrate of a TEM grid reacted with aqueous silver nitrate solution within minutes to yield spectacular tree-like silver dendrites, without using any added capping or reducing reagents. These results demonstrate a facile, aqueous, room temperature synthesis of...

  8. Test for English Majors (TEM) in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Yan; Fan, Jinsong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the Test for English Majors (TEM) is to measure the English proficiency of Chinese university undergraduates majoring in English Language and Literature and to examine whether these students meet the required levels of English language abilities as specified in the National College English Teaching Syllabus for English Majors…

  9. LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.

    1996-09-10

    On Sept. 10, 1996, LLNL hosted a workshop aimed at answering the question: Is it possible to carry out transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on plutonium metal in an electron microscope located outside the LLNL plutonium facility. The workshop focused on evaluation of a proposed plan for Pu microscopy both from a technical and environment, health, and safety point of view. After review and modification of the plan, workshop participants unanimously concluded that: (1) the technical plan is sound, (2) this technical plan, including a proposal for a new TEM, provides significant improvements and unique capabilities compared with the effort at LANL and is therefore complementary, (3) there is no significant environment, health, and safety obstacle to this plan.

  10. FTIR and XRD study of PMMA/PCTFE blend films

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, S. Shripathi, T.; Tripathi, J.; Agrawal, A.; Sharma, A.

    2014-04-24

    The results are reported on solution cast PMMA-PCTFE blend films characterized using x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The nanocrystalline nature of PMMA is still seen in the blends, however, the bond modifications are clearly observed. The addition of PCTFE results in the modification in structural properties, as reflected in the XRD and FTIR spectra showing modifications in bonding as a function of PCTFE percentage.

  11. Technical Evaluation Motor 3 (TEM-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garecht, Diane

    1989-01-01

    A primary objective of the technical evaluation motor program is to recover the case, igniter and nozzle hardware for use on the redesigned solid rocket motor flight program. Two qualification objectives were addressed and met on TEM-3. The Nylok thread locking device of the 1U100269-03 leak check port plug and the 1U52295-04 safe and arm utilizing Krytox grease on the barrier-booster shaft O-rings were both certified. All inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the TEM-3 static test firing conducted 23 May 1989 was successful. The test was conducted at ambient conditions with the exception of the field joints (set point of 121 F, with a minimum of 87 F at the sensors), igniter joint (set point at 122 F with a minimum of 87 F at sensors) and case-to-nozzle joint (set point at 114 F with a minimum of 87 F at sensors). Ballistics performance values were within specification requirements. Nozzle performance was nominal with typical erosion. The nozzle and the case joint temperatures were maintained at the heaters controlling set points while electrical power was supplied. The water and the CO2 quench systems prevented damage to the metal hardware. All other test equipment performed as planned, contributing to a successful motor firing. All indications are that the test was a success, and all expected hardware will be refurbished for the RSRM program.

  12. Graphene nanoscrolls and live TEM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokkapati, Venkata; Mirsaidov, Utkur; Matsudaira, Paul; Oezyilmaz, Barbaros; Graphene research laboratory Team; Centerbio-imaging sciences/Mechanobiology institute Team

    2013-03-01

    It has been theoretically hypothesized and predicted that graphene when in contact with water, wraps itself around the droplets and forms graphene nanoscrolls. Studying the applications of these nanoscrolls can open a new area of research especially in the bio-medical field. Here we present a method where partially suspended graphene nanoscrolls were fabricated on carbon mesh attached to a gold TEM grid. The process involves sandwiching of two graphene layers with water being encapsulated within these nanoscrolls. Gold nanoparticles were encapsulated and live imaging of water and gold nanoparticles was carried out under the TEM. The dynamics of the encapsulated water and nanobubbles is being studied. The encapsulated water within these graphene nanoscrolls lasted for more than three months (till the date of publication). It was also realized that the formation/abundance of these nanoscrolls is concentration dependent of the etching solution (Ammonium persulfate) with a saturation point. Large area, uniform, monolayer graphene films can also be produced by varying the concentration of Ammonium persulfate. Further studies are being carried out to live image TMV/protein and liposome encapsulated drugs using nanoscrolls and films respectively. The authors would like to acknowledge A*Star for funding this research

  13. Qualitative soil mineral analysis by EDXRF, XRD and AAS probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Virendra; Agrawal, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    Soil minerals study is vital in terms of investigating the major soil forming compounds and to find out the fate of minor and trace elements, essential for the soil-plant interaction purpose. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been a popular technique to search out the phases for different types of samples. For the soil samples, however, employing XRD is not so straightforward due to many practical problems. In the current approach, principal component analysis (PCA) has been used to have an idea of the minerals present, in qualitative manner, in the soil under study. PCA was used on the elemental concentrations data of 17 elements, determined by the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. XRD analysis of soil samples has been done also to identify the minerals of major elements. Some prior treatments, like removal of silica by polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) slurry and grinding with alcohol, were given to samples to overcome the peak overlapping problems and to attain fine particle size which is important to minimize micro-absorption corrections, to give reproducible peak intensities and to minimize preferred orientation. A 2θ step of 0.05°/min and a longer dwell time than normal were used to reduce interferences from background noise and to increase the counting statistics. Finally, the sequential extraction procedure for metal speciation study has been applied on soil samples. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to find the concentrations of metal fractions bound to various forms. Applying all the three probes, the minerals in the soils can be studied and identified, successfully.

  14. Silver Accumulation in the Green Microalga Coccomyxa actinabiotis: Toxicity, in Situ Speciation, and Localization Investigated Using Synchrotron XAS, XRD, and TEM.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, Thomas; Farhi, Emmanuel; Pouget, Stéphanie; Motellier, Sylvie; Boisson, Anne-Marie; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Rébeillé, Fabrice; den Auwer, Christophe; Rivasseau, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are good candidates for toxic metal remediation biotechnologies. This study explores the cellular processes implemented by the green microalga Coccomyxa actinabiotis to take up and cope with silver over the concentration range of 10(-7) to 10(-2) M Ag(+). Understanding these processes enables us to assess the potential of this microalga for applications for bioremediation. Silver in situ speciation and localization were investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Silver toxicity was evaluated by monitoring microalgal growth and photochemical parameters. Different accumulation mechanisms were brought out depending on silver concentration. At low micromolar concentration, microalgae fixed all silver initially present in solution, trapping it inside the cells into the cytosol, mainly as unreduced Ag(I) bound with molecules containing sulfur. Silver was efficiently detoxified. When concentration increased, silver spread throughout the cell and particularly entered the chloroplast, where it damaged the photosystem. Most silver was reduced to Ag(0) and aggregated to form crystalline silver nanoparticles of face-centered cubic structure with a mean size of 10 nm. An additional minor interaction of silver with molecules containing sulfur indicated the concomitant existence of the mechanism observed at low concentration or nanoparticle capping. Nanoparticles were observed in chloroplasts, in mitochondria, on the plasma membrane, on cytosolic membrane structures, and in vacuoles. Above 10(-4) M Ag(+), damages were irreversible, and photosynthesis and growth were definitely inhibited. However, high silver amounts remained confined inside microalgae, showing their potential for the bioremediation of contaminated water. PMID:26606242

  15. 4-D XRD for strain in many grains using triangulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Hanan, Jay C.; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2006-12-31

    Determination of the strains in a polycrystalline materialusing 4-D XRD reveals sub-grain and grain-to-grain behavior as a functionof stress. Here 4-D XRD involves an experimental procedure usingpolychromatic micro-beam X-radiation (micro-Laue) to characterizepolycrystalline materials in spatial location as well as with increasingstress. The in-situ tensile loading experiment measured strain in a modelaluminum-sapphire metal matrix composite using the Advanced Light Source,Beam-line 7.3.3. Micro-Laue resolves individual grains in thepolycrystalline matrix. Results obtained from a list of grains sorted bycrystallographic orientation depict the strain states within and amongindividual grains. Locating the grain positions in the planeperpendicular to the incident beam is trivial. However, determining theexact location of grains within a 3-D space is challenging. Determiningthe depth of the grains within the matrix (along the beam direction)involved a triangulation method tracing individual rays that producespots on the CCD back to the point of origin. Triangulation wasexperimentally implemented by simulating a 3-D detector capturingmultiple diffraction images while increasing the camera to sampledistance. Hence by observing the intersection of rays from multiple spotsbelonging to the corresponding grain, depth is calculated. Depthresolution is a function of the number of images collected, grain to beamsize ratio, and the pixel resolution of the CCD. The 4DXRD methodprovides grain morphologies, strain behavior of each grain, andinteractions of the matrix grains with each other and the centrallylocated single crystal fiber.

  16. Quantifying Nonspecific TEM β-Lactamase (blaTEM) Genes in a Wastewater Stream▿

    PubMed Central

    Lachmayr, Karen L.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; DiRienzo, A. Gregory; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Ford, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    To control the antibiotic resistance epidemic, it is necessary to understand the distribution of genetic material encoding antibiotic resistance in the environment and how anthropogenic inputs, such as wastewater, affect this distribution. Approximately two-thirds of antibiotics administered to humans are β-lactams, for which the predominant bacterial resistance mechanism is hydrolysis by β-lactamases. Of the β-lactamases, the TEM family is of overriding significance with regard to diversity, prevalence, and distribution. This paper describes the design of DNA probes universal for all known TEM β-lactamase genes and the application of a quantitative PCR assay (also known as Taqman) to quantify these genes in environmental samples. The primer set was used to study whether sewage, both treated and untreated, contributes to the spread of these genes in receiving waters. It was found that while modern sewage treatment technologies reduce the concentrations of these antibiotic resistance genes, the ratio of blaTEM genes to 16S rRNA genes increases with treatment, suggesting that bacteria harboring blaTEM are more likely to survive the treatment process. Thus, β-lactamase genes are being introduced into the environment in significantly higher concentrations than occur naturally, creating reservoirs of increased resistance potential. PMID:18997031

  17. A Combined XRD/XRF Instrument for Lunar Resource Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Blacic, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Robotic surface missions to the Moon should be capable of measuring mineral as well as chemical abundances in regolith samples. Although much is already known about the lunar regolith, our data are far from comprehensive. Most of the regolith samples returned to Earth for analysis had lost the upper surface, or it was intermixed with deeper regolith. This upper surface is the part of the regolith most recently exposed to the solar wind; as such it will be important to resource assessment. In addition, it may be far easier to mine and process the uppermost few centimeters of regolith over a broad area than to engage in deep excavation of a smaller area. The most direct means of analyzing the regolith surface will be by studies in situ. In addition, the analysis of the impact-origin regolith surfaces, the Fe-rich glasses of mare pyroclastic deposits, are of resource interest, but are inadequately known; none of the extensive surface-exposed pyroclastic deposits of the Moon have been systematically sampled, although we know something about such deposits from the Apollo 17 site. Because of the potential importance of pyroclastic deposits, methods to quantify glass as well as mineral abundances will be important to resource evaluation. Combined x ray diffraction (XRD) and x ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis will address many resource characterization problems on the Moon. XRF methods are valuable for obtaining full major-element abundances with high precision. Such data, collected in parallel with quantitative mineralogy, permit unambiguous determination of both mineral and chemical abundances where concentrations are high enough to be of resource grade. Collection of both XRD and XRF data from a single sample provides simultaneous chemical and mineralogic information. These data can be used to correlate quantitative chemistry and mineralogy as a set of simultaneous linear equations, the solution of which can lead to full characterization of the sample. The use of

  18. A-10/TF34 Turbine Engine Monitoring System (TEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    The hardware and software development of the A-10/TF34 turbine engine monitoring system (TEMS) is described. The operation and interfaces of the A-10/TF34 TEMS hardware are discussed with particular emphasis on function, capabilities, and limitations. The TEMS data types are defined and the various data acquisition modes are explained. Potential data products are also discussed.

  19. SIMS and TEM Analysis of Niobium Bicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, P; Griffis, D P; Stevie, F A; Zhou, C; Ciovati, G; Myneni, R; Spradlin, J K

    2011-07-01

    The behaviour of interstitial impurities(C,O,N,H) on the Nb surface with respect to grain boundaries may affect cavity performance. Large grain Nb makes possible the selection of bicrystal samples with a well defined grain boundary. In this work, Dynamic SIMS was used to analyze two Nb bicrystal samples, one of them heat treated and the other non heat treated (control). H levels were found to be higher for the non heat treated sample and a difference in the H intensity and sputtering rate was also observed across the grain boundary for both the samples. TEM results showed that the bicrystal interface showed no discontinuity and the oxide layer was uniform across the grain boundary for both the samples. TOF-SIMS imaging was also performed to analyze the distribution of the impurities across the grain boundary in both the samples. C was observed to be segregated along the grain boundary for the control sample, while H and O showed a difference in signal intensity across the grain boundary. Crystal orientation appears to have an important role in the observed sputtering rate and impurity ion signal differences both across the grain boundary and between samples

  20. Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Andreas Karl; Andresen, Nord

    2010-12-14

    The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

  1. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  2. Reactivity of some vanadium oxides: An EPR and XRD study

    SciTech Connect

    Occhiuzzi, Manlio

    2005-05-15

    V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, VO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 3} fresh samples and at different times after purchase or preparation (aged samples) were investigated by chemical analysis, redox treatments, XRD and EPR. The ageing process through a reaction with water and oxygen slowly oxidize crystalline VO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 3}, leading to a quasi-amorphous phase with bariandite structure (V{sub 10}O{sub 24}.12H{sub 2}O). The role of water is the progressive demolition of the compact structures and formation of hydrated phase. Kinetic study of VO{sub 2} oxidation by O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O mixture indicates that increasing the temperature up to 723K the effect of water becomes less important. The reaction leads to partially oxidized products with decreasing water content: bariandite at room temperature, V{sub 3}O{sub 7}.H{sub 2}O at 383K and V{sub 3}O{sub 7} at 723K. Kinetic investigation of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} reduction by CO at 633-723K showed that the reduction process proceeds trough the formation of V{sup 4+} and of electrons delocalized in the conduction band.

  3. RBS and XRD Characterization of Yttrium Iron Garnet Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, M.; Roumie, M.; Abdel Samad, B.; Basma, H.; Korek, M.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic materials such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG or Y3Fe5O12) present a great importance for their magneto-optic properties. They are potential materials used for applications in the domain of optical telecommunications for example. In this work, we have investigated YIG thin films deposited on substrates of quartz and GGG (gadolinium gallium garnet or Gd3Ga5O12). Using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) we characterized the performed layers (thickness and stoichiometry) in order to correlate the films preparation conditions with the quality of the final material. We determined the optimal energy of the alpha particles beam used for RBS measurements and we fitted the experimental spectra using the SIMNRA simulated code. Our RBS results showed that the films have a stoichiometry close to that of the starting material. In addition, we found that the film thickness is proportional to deposition time but inversely proportional to the substrate temperature. Moreover, using x-ray diffraction (XRD) we determined the annealing effect on the structure of the profile of our thin films.

  4. Substitution of Thr for Ala-237 in TEM-17, TEM-12 and TEM-26: alterations in beta-lactam resistance conferred on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Giakkoupi, P; Hujer, A M; Miriagou, V; Tzelepi, E; Bonomo, R A; Tzouvelekis, L S

    2001-07-10

    Non-naturally occurring mutants of TEM-17 (E104K), TEM-12 (R164S) and TEM-26 (E104K:R164S) extended-spectrum (ES) beta-lactamases bearing threonine at position 237 were constructed by site-specific mutagenesis and expressed under isogenic conditions in Escherichia coli. Quantification of beta-lactamase activities and immunoblotting indicated that Ala-237-->Thr did not significantly affect expression levels of these ES enzymes. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics showed that the presence of threonine at position 237 exerted a dominant effect increasing the enzymes' preference for various early generation cephalosporins over penicillins. Activity against broad-spectrum oxyimino-beta-lactams was also changed. The effect of Ala-237-->Thr on the activity against ceftazidime, aztreonam, cefepime and cefpirome of all three ES TEM enzymes was detrimental. Introduction of Thr-237 improved activity against cefotaxime and ceftriaxone in TEM-12 and TEM-26, but not in TEM-17. PMID:11445164

  5. XRD studies of chitin-based polyurethane elastomers.

    PubMed

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad; Barikani, Mehdi; Zuber, Mohammad; Sheikh, Munir Ahmad

    2008-08-15

    Chitin-based polyurethane elastomers (PUEs) were synthesized by step growth polymerization techniques using poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) varying diisocyanate and chain extender structures. The viscosity average molecular weight (M(v)) of chitin was deduced from the intrinsic viscosity and found; M(v)=6.067 x 10(5). The conventional spectroscopic characterization of the samples with FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR were in accordance with proposed PUEs structure. The crystalline behavior of the synthesized polymers were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and loss tangent curves (tan delta peaks). The observed patterns of the crystalline peaks for the lower angle for chitin in the 2theta range were indexed as 9.39 degrees, 19.72 degrees, 20.73 degrees, 23.41 degrees and 26.39 degrees. Results showed that crystallinity of the synthesized PUEs samples was affected by varying the structure of the diisocyanate and chain extender. Crystallinity decreased from aliphatic to aromatic characters of the diisocyanates used in the final PU. The presence of chitin also favors the formation of more ordered structure, as higher peak intensities was obtained from the PU extended with chitin than 1,4-butane diol (BDO). The value of peak enthalpy (DeltaH) of chitin was found to be 47.13 J g(-1). The higher DeltaH value of 46.35 J g(-1) was found in the samples extended with chitin than BDO (39.73 J g(-1)). PMID:18495239

  6. XRD and Mössbauer studies on Pt Fe nano-particles synthesized by polyol method for cathode catalyst of PEFCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriyama, T.; Kawahara, N.; Maeda, Y.; Suruga, T.; Wakabayashi, H.; Takagi, Y.

    2008-04-01

    Pt50 Fe50 nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemically wet process for developing a new high efficiency cathode catalyst in PEFCs. The particle morphology and crystal structure of as synthesized Pt Fe particles, and electronic state of Fe atoms in them were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy(TEM), X-ray diffraction(XRD) and transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), respectively. They are confirmed to be of chemically disordered fcc structure from XRD pattern and the average diameter of them was estimated to be 3.1 nm from both TEM and the width of (111) peak in XRD pattern. From TMS spectrum, it was concluded to consist of mainly the component of Fe oxides connected with the organic ligands according to XPS results mentioned below. But, probably it contains the component for superparamagnetic Pt Fe nanoparticles. Also the electrocatalytic activity and a hydrogen adsorption/desorption behavior for as synthesized Pt Fe nanoparticles was observed by cyclic voltammetry and the oxidation of Fe atoms in as synthesized Pt Fe nanoparticles, Fe metal and Fe oxides were measured.

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Sample Preparation of Si(1-x)Gex in c-Plane Sapphire Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Sang H.; Bae, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Tae Woo

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-invented X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, including the total defect density measurement method and the spatial wafer mapping method, have confirmed super hetero epitaxy growth for rhombohedral single crystalline silicon germanium (Si1-xGex) on a c-plane sapphire substrate. However, the XRD method cannot observe the surface morphology or roughness because of the method s limited resolution. Therefore the authors used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with samples prepared in two ways, the focused ion beam (FIB) method and the tripod method to study the structure between Si1-xGex and sapphire substrate and Si1?xGex itself. The sample preparation for TEM should be as fast as possible so that the sample should contain few or no artifacts induced by the preparation. The standard sample preparation method of mechanical polishing often requires a relatively long ion milling time (several hours), which increases the probability of inducing defects into the sample. The TEM sampling of the Si1-xGex on sapphire is also difficult because of the sapphire s high hardness and mechanical instability. The FIB method and the tripod method eliminate both problems when performing a cross-section TEM sampling of Si1-xGex on c-plane sapphire, which shows the surface morphology, the interface between film and substrate, and the crystal structure of the film. This paper explains the FIB sampling method and the tripod sampling method, and why sampling Si1-xGex, on a sapphire substrate with TEM, is necessary.

  8. The Structural Bases of Antibiotic Resistance in the Clinically Derived Mutant beta-Lactamases TEM-30, TEM-32, and TEM-34

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Widespread use of {beta}-lactam antibiotics has promoted the evolution of {beta}-lactamase mutant enzymes that can hydrolyze ever newer classes of these drugs. Among the most pernicious mutants are the inhibitor-resistant TEM {beta}-lactamases (IRTs), which elude mechanism-based inhibitors, such as clavulanate. Despite much research on these IRTs, little is known about the structural bases of their action. This has made it difficult to understand how many of the resistance substitutions act as they often occur far from Ser-130. Here, three IRT structures, TEM-30 (R244S), TEM-32 (M69I/M182T), and TEM-34 (M69V), are determined by x-ray crystallography at 2.00, 1.61, and 1.52 {angstrom}, respectively. In TEM-30, the Arg-244 {yields} Ser substitution (7.8 {angstrom} from Ser-130) displaces a conserved water molecule that usually interacts with the {beta}-lactam C3 carboxylate. In TEM-32, the substitution Met-69 {yields} Ile (10 {angstrom} from Ser-130) appears to distort Ser-70, which in turn causes Ser-130 to adopt a new conformation, moving its O{gamma} further away, 2.3 {angstrom} from where the inhibitor would bind. This substitution also destabilizes the enzyme by 1.3 kcal/mol. The Met-182 {yields} Thr substitution (20 {angstrom} from Ser-130) has no effect on enzyme activity but rather restabilizes the enzyme by 2.9 kcal/mol. In TEM-34, the Met-69 {yields} Val substitution similarly leads to a conformational change in Ser-130, this time causing it to hydrogen bond with Lys-73 and Lys-234. This masks the lone pair electrons of Ser-130 O{gamma}, reducing its nucleophilicity for cross-linking. In these three structures, distant substitutions result in accommodations that converge on the same point of action, the local environment of Ser-130. TEM-1 {beta}-lactamase is the predominant source of resistance to {beta}-lactams, such as the penicillins. TEM-1 and related class A {beta}-lactamases confer resistance by hydrolyzing the {beta}-lactam ring of these antibiotics

  9. XRD measurement of mean crystallite thickness of illite and illite/smectite: Reappraisal of the Kubler index and the Scherrer equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drits, V.; Srodon, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    The standard form of the Scherrer equation, which has been used to calculate the mean thickness of the coherent scattering domain (CSD) of illite crystals from X-ray diffraction (XRD) full width data at half maximum (FWHM) intensity, employs a constant, Ksh, of 0.89. Use of this constant is unjustified, even if swelling has no effect on peak broadening, because this constant is valid only if all CSDs have a single thickness. For different thickness distributions, the Scherrer "constant" has very different values. Analysis of fundamental particle thickness data (transmission electron microscopy, TEM) for samples of authigenic illite and illite/smectite from diagenetically altered pyroclastics and filamentous illites from sandstones reveals a unique family of lognormal thickness distributions for these clays. Experimental relations between the distributions' lognormal parameters and mean thicknesses are established. These relations then are used to calculate the mean thickness of CSDs for illitic samples from XRD FWHM, or from integral XRD peak widths (integrated intensity/maximum intensity). For mixed-layer illite/smectite, the measured thickness of the CSD corresponds to the mean thickness of the mixed-layer crystal. Using this measurement, the mean thickness of the fundamental particles that compose the mixed-layer crystals can be calculated after XRD determination of precent smectitic interlayers. The effect of mixed layering (swelling) on XRD peak width for these samples is eliminated by using the 003 reflection for glycolated samples, and the 001, 002 or 003 reflection for dehydrated, K-saturated samples. If this technique is applied to the 001 reflection of air-dried samples (Kubler index measurement), mean CSD thicknesses are underestimated due to the mixed-layering effect. The technique was calibrated using NEWMOD ??-simulated XRD profiles of illite, and then tested on well-characterized illite and illite/smectite smaples. The XRD measurements are in good

  10. Recognition and Resistance in TEM [superscript beta]-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Blazquez, Jesus; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Developing antimicrobials that are less likely to engender resistance has become an important design criterion as more and more drugs fall victim to resistance mutations. One hypothesis is that the more closely an inhibitor resembles a substrate, the more difficult it will be to develop resistant mutations that can at once disfavor the inhibitor and still recognize the substrate. To investigate this hypothesis, 10 transition-state analogues, of greater or lesser similarity to substrates, were tested for inhibition of TEM-1 beta-lactamase, the most widespread resistance enzyme to penicillin antibiotics. The inhibitors were also tested against four characteristic mutant enzymes: TEM-30, TEM-32, TEM-52, and TEM-64. The inhibitor most similar to the substrate, compound 10, was the most potent inhibitor of the WT enzyme, with a K(i) value of 64 nM. Conversely, compound 10 was the most susceptible to the TEM-30 (R244S) mutant, for which inhibition dropped by over 100-fold. The other inhibitors were relatively impervious to the TEM-30 mutant enzyme. To understand recognition and resistance to these transition-state analogues, the structures of four of these inhibitors in complex with TEM-1 were determined by X-ray crystallography. These structures suggest a structural basis for distinguishing inhibitors that mimic the acylation transition state and those that mimic the deacylation transition state; they also suggest how TEM-30 reduces the affinity of compound 10. In cell culture, this inhibitor reversed the resistance of bacteria to ampicillin, reducing minimum inhibitory concentrations of this penicillin by between 4- and 64-fold, depending on the strain of bacteria. Notwithstanding this activity, the resistance of TEM-30, which is already extant in the clinic, suggests that there can be resistance liabilities with substrate-based design.

  11. Multiplexed TEM Specimen Preparation and Analysis of Plasmonic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Sėan K; Speir, Jeffrey A; Razinkov, Ivan; Cheng, Anchi; Crum, John; Jain, Tilak; Duggan, Erika; Liu, Er; Nolan, John P; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S

    2015-08-01

    We describe a system for rapidly screening hundreds of nanoparticle samples using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The system uses a liquid handling robot to place up to 96 individual samples onto a single standard TEM grid at separate locations. The grid is then transferred into the TEM and automated software is used to acquire multiscale images of each sample. The images are then analyzed to extract metrics on the size, shape, and morphology of the nanoparticles. The system has been used to characterize plasmonically active nanomaterials. PMID:26223550

  12. Multiplexed TEM Specimen Preparation and Analysis of Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Anchi; Crum, John; Jain, Tilak; Duggan, Erika; Liu, Er; Nolan, John P.; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a system for rapidly screening hundreds of nanoparticle samples using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The system uses a liquid handling robot to place up to 96 individual samples onto a single standard TEM grid at separate locations. The grid is then transferred into the TEM and automated software is used to acquire multi-scale images of each sample. The images are then analyzed to extract metrics on the size, shape, and morphology of the nanoparticles. The system has been used to characterize plasmonically-active nanomaterials. PMID:26223550

  13. Novel Sample-handling Approach for XRD Analysis with Minimal Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrazin, P.; Chipera, S.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Feldman, S.; Vaniman, D.; Bryson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Sample preparation and sample handling are among the most critical operations associated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. These operations require attention in a laboratory environment, but they become a major constraint in the deployment of XRD instruments for robotic planetary exploration. We are developing a novel sample handling system that dramatically relaxes the constraints on sample preparation by allowing characterization of coarse-grained material that would normally be impossible to analyze with conventional powder-XRD techniques.

  14. Instability of nanoscale metallic particles under electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhang, S. G.; Xia, M. X.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The stability of nano metallic glass under electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) was investigated. The most common voltage of TEM used in metallic materials characterization was either 200 kV or 300 kV. Both situations were investigated in this work. An amorphous metallic particle with a dimension of a few hundred nanometers was tested under 300 keV electron irradiation. New phase decomposed from the parent phase was observed. Moreover, a crystal particle with the same composition and dimension was tested under 200 keV irradiation. Decomposition process also occurred in this situation. Besides, crystal orientation modification was observed during irradiation. These results proved that the electron beam in TEM have an effect on the stability of nanoscale samples during long time irradiation. Atomic displacement was induced and diffusion was enhanced by electron irradiation. Thus, artifacts would be induced when a nanoscale metallic sample was characterized in TEM.

  15. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  16. Preparation of carbon-free TEM microgrids by metal sputtering.

    PubMed

    Janbroers, S; de Kruijff, T R; Xu, Q; Kooyman, P J; Zandbergen, H W

    2009-08-01

    A new method for preparing carbon-free, temperature-stable Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) grids is presented. An 80% Au/20% Pd metal film is deposited onto a 'holey' microgrid carbon supported on standard mixed-mesh Au TEM grids. Subsequently, the carbon film is selectively removed using plasma cleaning. In this way, an all-metal TEM film is made containing the 'same' microgrid as the original carbon film. Although electron transparency of the foil is reduced significantly, the open areas for TEM inspection of material over these areas are maintained. The metal foil can be prepared with various thicknesses and ensures good electrical conductivity. The new Au/Pd grids are stable to at least 775K under vacuum conditions. PMID:19450927

  17. TEM Study of Internal Crystals in Supernova Graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Bernatowicz, T.; Stadermann, F. J.; Messenger, S.; Amari, S.

    2003-03-01

    A coordinated TEM and isotopic study of ten supernova (SN) graphites from the Murchison meteorite has revealed many internal grains, mostly titanium carbides (TiCs) and TiC-kamacite composite grains, which were accreted during the graphite growth.

  18. Phase velocity of the TEM (1,0)+TEM (0,1) mode laser and electron accelerations in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Kong, Q.; Ho, Y. K.; Wang, P. X.; Xu, J. J.; Lin, D.; Kawata, S.

    2007-04-01

    Unlike at any single TEM (n, m) mode laser, there is a subluminous phase velocity region located along the central region of a TEM (1,0)+TEM (0,1) mode laser. In conjunction with the high longitudinal electric field in this region, it forms another acceleration channel, which also locates inside the transverse ponderomotive potential trap. Through simulation, it is found that relativistic electrons injected into this acceleration channel can stand at the acceleration phase for a long time and be synchronously accelerated to high energies. Also, the accelerated electrons can be well confined inside the trap avoiding the transverse scattering problem.

  19. Experimental verification of the SP-100 TEM pump analytical models

    SciTech Connect

    Salamah, S.A.; Miller, D.D.; Sinha, U.N.; Narkiewicz, R.S. )

    1993-01-15

    Validation of the TEM pump analytical model is conducted via experimental verification of the model prediction. Two key tests that have provided essential information toward this objective are the Magnetic Bench Test (MBT) and the ElectroMagnetic Integration Test (EMIT). The tests are briefly described and experimental results are compared with predictions of simulation models that form part of overall TEM pump performance model.

  20. Remote In-Situ Quantitative Mineralogical Analysis Using XRD/XRF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Bish, D.; Vaniman, D.; Chipera, S.; Sarrazin, P.; Collins, S. A.; Elliott, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is the most direct and accurate method for determining mineralogy. The CHEMIN XRD/XRF instrument has shown promising results on a variety of mineral and rock samples. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin K; Barker, Trevor M; Crozier, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. PMID:25974880

  2. Detecting flaws in Portland cement concrete using TEM horn antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qadi, Imad L.; Riad, Sedki M.; Su, Wansheng; Haddad, Rami H.

    1996-11-01

    To understand the dielectric properties of PCC and better correlate them with type and severity of PCC internal defects, a study was conducted to evaluate PCC complex permittivity and magnetic permeability over a wideband of frequencies using both time domain and frequency domain techniques. Three measuring devices were designed and fabricated: a parallel plate capacitor, a coaxial transmission line, and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antennae. The TEM horn antenna covers the microwave frequencies. The measurement technique involves a time domain setup that was verified by a frequency domain measurement. Portland cement concrete slabs, 60 by 75 by 14 cm, were cast; defects include delamination, delamination filled with water, segregation, and chloride contamination. In this paper, measurements using the TEM horn antennae and the feasibility of detecting flaws at microwave frequency are presented.

  3. Complete Tem-Tomography: 3D Structure of Gems Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, J.; Miyake, A.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are considered to be one of the ubiquitous and fundamental building blocks of solids in the Solar System. They have been considered to be interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk but the elemental and isotopic composition measurements suggest that most of them have been formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas. This formation model is also supported by the formation of GEMS-like grains with respect to the size, mineral assemblage, texture and infrared spectrum by condensation experiments from mean GEMS composition materials. Previous GEMS studies were performed only with 2D observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). However, the 3D shape and structure of GEMS grains and the spatial distribution of Fe/FeS's has critical information about their formation and origin. Recently, the 3D structure of GEMS grains in ultrathin sections of cluster IDPs was revealed by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL). However, CT images of thin sections mounted on Cu grids acquired by conventional TEM-tomography are limited to low tilt angles (e. g., less than absolute value of 75 deg. In fact, previous 3D TEM observations of GEMS were affected by some artifacts related to the limited tilt range in the TEM used. Complete tomographic images should be acquired by rotating the sample tilt angle over a range of more than absolute value of 80 deg otherwise the CT images lose their correct structures. In order to constrain the origin and formation process of GEMS grains more clearly, we performed complete electron tomography for GEMS grains. Here we report the sample preparation method we have developed for this study, and the preliminary results.

  4. Below-Band-Gap Laser Ablation Of Diamond For TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Foote, Marc C.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Fortier, Edward P.; Posthill, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Thin, electron-transparent layers of diamond for examination in transmission electron microscope (TEM) fabricated from thicker diamond substrates by using laser beam to ablate surface of substrate. Involves use of photon energy below band gap. Growing interest in use of diamond as bulk substrate and as coating material in variety of applications has given rise to increasing need for TEM for characterization of diamond-based materials. Below-band-gap laser ablation method helps to satisfy this need. Also applied in general to cutting and etching of diamonds.

  5. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  6. Imaging and diffraction of protein crystallization using TEM.

    PubMed

    Gomery, Kathryn; Humphrey, Elaine C; Herring, Rodney

    2013-06-01

    Structural biology relies on good-quality protein crystals in order for structure determination. Many factors affect the growth process of a protein crystal including the way it nucleates and the types of damage and contamination during its growth. Although the nucleation process and quality of a crystal is vital to structure determination, they are both under-studied areas of research. Our research begins to explore ways of measuring the quality of protein crystals, using TEM, thus overcoming the problems associated with viewing wet specimens in a vacuum. Our current understanding of nucleation is that it is a two-step mechanism involving the formation of nuclei from dense liquid clusters; however; it is still unclear whether nuclei first start as amorphous aggregates or as crystalline lattices. Potentially, electron diffraction may be capable of uncovering this process. Using TEM imaging and diffraction of lysozyme as a model protein crystal, we report the internal two-dimensional strain and the density of crystallites in a protein crystal, at a resolution never seen before. The TEM diffraction shows unique features of crystal mosaicity that can be directly correlated to TEM images. PMID:23250893

  7. RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED RERTR FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B.D. Miller; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The recent development on TEM work of irradiated RERTR fuels includes microstructural characterization of the irradiated U-10Mo/alloy-6061 monolithic fuel plate, the RERTR-7 U-7Mo/Al-2Si and U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plates. It is the first time that a TEM sample of an irradiated nuclear fuel was prepared using the focused-ion-beam (FIB) lift-out technical at the Idaho National Laboratory. Multiple FIB TEM samples were prepared from the areas of interest in a SEM sample. The characterization was carried out using a 200kV TEM with a LaB6 filament. The three dimensional orderings of nanometer-sized fission gas bubbles are observed in the crystalline region of the U-Mo fuel. The co-existence of bubble superlattice and dislocations is evident. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of these fuels are discussed.

  8. Unexpected Enzyme TEM-126: Role of Mutation Asp179Glu

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, J.; Robin, F.; Bittar, F.; Chanal, C.; Bonnet, R.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical isolate Escherichia coli CF884 exhibited low-level resistance to ceftazidime (4 μg/ml) by a positive double-disk synergy test and apparent susceptibility to cefuroxime, cefotaxime, cefepime, cefpirome, and aztreonam. The enzyme implicated in this phenotype was a novel 180-kb plasmid-encoded TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase designated TEM-126 which harbors the mutations Asp179Glu and Met182Thr. TEM-126 exhibited significant hydrolytic activity (kcat, 2 s−1) and a Km value of 82 μM against ceftazidime. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the substitution Asp179Glu induces subtle conformational changes to the omega loop which may favor the insertion of ceftazidime in the binding site and the correct positioning of the crucial residue Glu166. Overall, these results highlight the remarkable plasticity of TEM enzymes, which can expand their activity against ceftazidime by the addition of one carbon atom in the side chain of residue 179. PMID:16189109

  9. Dopant profiling in the TEM, progress towards quantitative electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, David; Truche, Robert; Chabli, Amal; Twitchett-Harrison, Alison C.; Midgley, Paul A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2007-09-26

    Off-axis electron holography has been used to characterise the dopant potential in GaAs p-n junctions. We show that the measured potential across the junctions is affected by both FIB specimen preparation and by charging in the TEM and suggest methods that can be used to minimise these problems.

  10. Properties of linear microwave plasma sustained by coaxial TEM waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Moon-Ki; Seo, Kwon-Sang; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2013-09-01

    A linear 2.45GHz microwave plasma sustained by coaxial circular TEM waveguide has been developed for the low temperature large area plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition application. TE-TEM microwave power coupling was achieved by copper rod located at λg/4 from short-end of TE10 waveguide. TEM waveguide consists of quartz tube surrounded by plasma and copper rod electrode. TEM waveguide is 60 cm in length and 3 cm in diameter, which is terminated with shorted metal cap. For the operation condition of 300 W input power and Ar pressure of 200 mTorr, a clear standing wave pattern with wavelength of 10 cm was observed. Measured plasma density and temperature at 5 cm from quartz wall was 1.2 × 1017/cm3 and 1.7 eV respectively. Density non-uniformity was less than 6% along quartz tube in spite of standing wave set-up. In addition, properties of the microwave source are also investigated through electromagnetic field simulation coupled with drift-diffusion approximation of plasma. Calculated and measured standing wave pattern was almost identical. Electron density and temperature distribution show similar behavior with experimental results. S11 value of input port of TE10 waveguide was calculated as 17dB.

  11. A versatile and inexpensive XRD sample holder for highly radioactive or hazardous samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.); Schaef, Herbert T.); Schweiger, Michael J.); Simmons, Kevin L.); Woodcock, Leslie J.); Krouse, Michael K.)

    2003-03-15

    Two XRD sample holders have been designed for use with highly radioactive samples. An injection mold that allows us to produce the holders inexpensively has been constructed for one of the holders. These holders are suitable for single-time use. The ease of use and the disposable nature have resulted in a dramatic reduction in personnel exposure and an uncontaminated XRD unit. A second holder, based on the design of the first, is used to obtain XRD patterns from powders where preferred orientation is an issue and from clays. Both holders result in negligible background, since the sample is essentially levitated in the x-ray beam. This is a benefit over other methods, such as collodion, that introduce significant background to the XRD pattern.

  12. Hollow nitrogen-containing core/shell fibrous carbon nanomaterials as support to platinum nanocatalysts and their TEM tomography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cuifeng; Liu, Zongwen; Du, Xusheng; Mitchell, David Richard Graham; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Yan, Yushan; Ringer, Simon

    2012-03-01

    Core/shell nanostructured carbon materials with carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the core and a nitrogen (N)-doped graphitic layer as the shell were synthesized by pyrolysis of CNF/polyaniline (CNF/PANI) composites prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline on CNFs. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared and Raman analyses indicated that the PANI shell was carbonized at 900°C. Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles were reduced by formic acid with catalyst supports. Compared to the untreated CNF/PANI composites, the carbonized composites were proven to be better supporting materials for the Pt nanocatalysts and showed superior performance as catalyst supports for methanol electrochemical oxidation. The current density of methanol oxidation on the catalyst with the core/shell nanostructured carbon materials is approximately seven times of that on the catalyst with CNF/PANI support. TEM tomography revealed that some Pt nanoparticles were embedded in the PANI shells of the CNF/PANI composites, which might decrease the electrocatalyst activity. TEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping confirmed that the Pt nanoparticles in the inner tube of N-doped hollow CNFs could be accessed by the Nafion ionomer electrolyte, contributing to the catalytic oxidation of methanol.

  13. Hollow nitrogen-containing core/shell fibrous carbon nanomaterials as support to platinum nanocatalysts and their TEM tomography study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Core/shell nanostructured carbon materials with carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the core and a nitrogen (N)-doped graphitic layer as the shell were synthesized by pyrolysis of CNF/polyaniline (CNF/PANI) composites prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline on CNFs. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared and Raman analyses indicated that the PANI shell was carbonized at 900°C. Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles were reduced by formic acid with catalyst supports. Compared to the untreated CNF/PANI composites, the carbonized composites were proven to be better supporting materials for the Pt nanocatalysts and showed superior performance as catalyst supports for methanol electrochemical oxidation. The current density of methanol oxidation on the catalyst with the core/shell nanostructured carbon materials is approximately seven times of that on the catalyst with CNF/PANI support. TEM tomography revealed that some Pt nanoparticles were embedded in the PANI shells of the CNF/PANI composites, which might decrease the electrocatalyst activity. TEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping confirmed that the Pt nanoparticles in the inner tube of N-doped hollow CNFs could be accessed by the Nafion ionomer electrolyte, contributing to the catalytic oxidation of methanol. PMID:22385930

  14. In situ TEM studies of carbon and gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas Garcia, Gilberto

    Properties of matter change as structures go down in size to the nanoscale, creating new possibilities for creating new functional materials with better properties than the bulk. In situ TEM techniques were used to probe the properties of two different materials: atomic carbon chains and gold nanoparticles. Carbon chains were synthesized by in situ TEM electron beam irradiation from few-layers-graphene (FLG) flakes. Several chains up to 5 nm long were observed. Aberration corrected TEM confirmed the dimerization of the linear chain as predicted by Peierls. Moreover, it was observed that two linear carbon chains can cross-bond every 9 atoms, and it was confirmed by DFT calculations. Five-fold nanoparticles are not supposed to be stable beyond 5 nm size. Here, decahedra with high index facets in the order of 300 nm were studied by TEM. It was found that the high index facets were only stable by adding a capping agent, otherwise, smooth edges were observed. In this case, a (5x1) hexagonal surface reconstruction was observed on the {001} surfaces, with the hexagonal strings along a [110] and a [410] direction. Additionally, mechanical properties of gold nanoparticles, with and without twin boundaries, under 100 nm were measured by in situ TEM compression experiments. All of the nanoparticles presented yield strengths in the order of GPa. Multi twinned nanoparticles were found to be more malleable, reaching real compressing strains of 100 %, while the single crystal nanoparticle presented less plastic flow. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the twin boundaries contribute to the malleability of the nanoparticles, at the same time it provides a mechanism to stop dislocations, hence, strain hardening the nanoparticle at later stages of compression. Finally, the behavior of a single grain boundary was studied by in situ TEM manipulation of nanoparticles. A liquid-like behavior of a grain boundary is observed after two 40 nm gold nanoparticles are brought to

  15. The mineralogy and chemistry analyser (MARS-XRD) for the ExoMars 2018 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinangeli, L.; Hutchinson, I. B.; Stevoli, A.; Adami, G.; Ambrosi, R.; Amils, R.; Assis Fernandes, V.; Baliva, A.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Benedix, G.; Bland, P.; Böttger, A. J.; Bridges, J.; Caprarelli, G.; Cressey, G.; Critani, F.; D'Alessandro, N.; Delhez, R.; Domeneghetti, C.; Fernandez-Remolar, D.; Filippone, R.; Fioretti, A. M.; Garcia Ruiz, J. M.; Gilmore, M.; Hansford, G. M.; Iezzi, G.; Ingley, R.; Ivanov, M.; Marseguerra, G.; Moroz, L.; Pelliciari, C.; Petrinca, P.; Piluso, E.; Pompilio, L.; Sykes, J.; Westall, F.

    2011-10-01

    The Mineralogy and Chemistry Analyser (MARSXRD) is a miniaturised X-ray diffraction and fluorescence (XRD/XRF) spectrometer aimed to the mineralogical characterisation of Martian rocks. Simultaneously, MARS-XRD is able to acquire the diffraction pattern for mineralogical phases identification and the X-ray fluorescence spectrum for the chemical species, providing a complete rock characterization. The X-ray diffractometer (XRD) is the routine instrument used in every Earth Science laboratory to provide the mineralogical composition of rocks. XRD produces unequivocal results because it is based on the recognition of the geometrical properties of the crystal lattice. This kind of investigation is an extremely useful tool to define the textural and petro-mineralogical characteristics of the Martian rocks or soils and provide information on the past Martian environment conditions related to life. The analytic range we plan to cover includes all the silicate minerals, from clays or other phyllosilicates characterised by high interplanar lattice distance, to oxide and carbonates or evaporates (mainly sulphates). This rock spectrum is what we expect to be the target for exobiological exploration. These data will be integrated with those obtained by elemental analysis, in order to determine the exact elemental chemistry characterization of rock components. As mineralogy can be unambiguously derived from XRD analysis, it is probably our most powerful tool for distinguishing targets of biologic importance. In summary, the main scientific objectives of the proposed XRD/XRF instrument, Mars-XRD, are: - In situ determination of the mineral paragenesis of rock samples; - The characterization of the origin of rock samples; - Determination of alteration processes; - Understanding the exobiological potential of the samples. The hardware is developed by the Thales Alenia Space Italia with an important contribution of the Univ. of Leicester for the detection system.

  16. Effects of diagnostic ionizing radiation on pregnancy via TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, W. H.; Artoli, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    In Sudan, X-rays are routinely used at least once for measurements of pelvis during the gestation period, though this is highly prohibited worldwide, except for a few life threatening cases. To demonstrate the effect of diagnostic ionizing radiation on uterus, fetus and neighboring tissues to the ovaries, two independent experiments on pregnant rabbits were conducted. The first experiment was a proof of concept that diagnostic ionizing radiation is hazardous throughout the gestation period. The second experiment was done through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the morphological changes in the ultra structure of samples taken from irradiated pregnant rabbits. This study uses TEM to test the effect of diagnostic radiation of less than 0.6 Gray on the cellular level. Morphological changes have been captured and the images were analyzed to quantify these effects.

  17. Development of an analytical environmental TEM system and its application.

    PubMed

    Kishita, Keisuke; Sakai, Hisashi; Tanaka, Hiromochi; Saka, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Kotaro; Sakamoto, Masayuki; Watabe, Akira; Kamino, Takeo

    2009-12-01

    Many automotive materials, such as catalysts and fuel cell materials, undergo significant changes in structure or properties when subjected to temperature change or the addition of a gas. For this reason, in the development of these materials, it is important to study the behavior of the material under controlled temperatures and gaseous atmospheres. Recently, a new environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for observation with a high resolution at high temperatures and under gaseous atmospheres, thus making it possible to analyze reaction processes in details. Also, the new TEM provides a high degree of reproducibility of observation conditions, thus making it possible to compare and validate observation of various specimens under a given set of conditions. Furthermore, easiness of gas condition and temperature control can provide a powerful tool for the studying of the mechanism of material change, such as oxidation and reduction reactions. PMID:19520735

  18. Plastic deformation in zirconium nitride observed by nanoindentation and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, G. W.; Wheeler, K.; Peralta, P.; McClellan, K. J.; Maloy, S. A.; Bond, G. M.

    2011-09-01

    A study on zirconium nitride using TEM and nanoindentation was performed to assess the significant surface plasticity found to be introduced by sample polishing. Cross-sectional TEM results show strong evidence of plasticity via dislocations produced directly from surface grinding and polishing. These dislocations were found to glide on the {0 1 1}<0 1¯ 1> slip system. Using nanoindentation to observe the effects of surface dislocation density, a critical shear stress was found that relates to dislocations nucleation and multiplication. Continued chemo-mechanical polishing increased the critical shear stress to approximately 1600 mN by reducing surface dislocations. It is postulated that vacancy clusters and oxide microcrystallites produced during surface processing provide dislocation nucleation and/or multiplication sites. Gentle chemo-mechanical polishing for several hours greatly reduced or eliminated preexisting dislocations such that the critical shear stress for nucleation approaches the theoretical limit (˜ G/5).

  19. Comparing Time Domain Electromagnetics (TEM) and Early-Time TEM for Mapping Highly Conductive Groundwater in Mars Analog Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernsletten, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of (diffusive) Time Domain Electromagnetics (TEM) for sounding of subsurface water in conductive Mars analog environments. To provide a baseline for such studies, I show data from two field studies: 1) Diffusive sounding data (TEM) from Pima County, Arizona; and 2) Shallower sounding data using the Fast-Turnoff TEM method from Peña de Hierro in the Rio Tinto region of Spain. The latter is data from work conducted under the auspices of the Mars Analog Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). Pima County TEM Survey: A TEM survey was carried out in Pima County, Arizona, in January 2003. Data was collected using 100 m Tx loops and a ferrite-cored magnetic coil Rx antenna, and processed using commercial software. The survey used a 16 Hz sounding frequency, which is sensitive to slightly salty groundwater. Prominent features in the data from Arizona are the ~500 m depth of investigation and the ~120 m depth to the water table, confirmed by data from four USGS test wells surrounding the field area. Note also the conductive (~20-40 ω m) clay-rich soil above the water table. Rio Tinto Fast-Turnoff TEM Survey: During May and June of 2003, a Fast-Turnoff (early time) TEM survey was carried out at the Peña de Hierro field area of the MARTE project, near the town of Nerva, Spain. Data was collected using 20 m and 40 m Tx loop antennae and 10 m loop Rx antennae, with a 32 Hz sounding frequency. Data from Line 4 (of 16) from this survey, collected using 40 m Tx loops, show ~200 m depth of investigation and a conductive high at ~90 m depth below Station 20 (second station of 10 along this line). This is the water table, matching the 431 m MSL elevation of the nearby pit lake. The center of the "pileup" below Station 60 is spatially coincident with the vertical fault plane located here. Data from Line 15 and Line 14 of the Rio Tinto survey, collected using 20 m Tx loops, achieve ~50 m depth of investigation and

  20. Microstructural Study of Superhard Coatings With TEM And SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Tsiaoussis, I.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.; Kolaklieva, L.; Kakanakov, R.

    2007-04-23

    In the present work, TiN was deposited on stainless steel (SS420) using the cathode-spot arc method and the effect of the N2 flow and the chamber pressure on the coating microstructure was studied. TEM examination showed a columnar growth of TiN crystals with different size, while the average thickness was about 0.7 to 1.05 {mu}m and increased as the chamber pressure increased.

  1. Characterization of some biological specimens using TEM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Smith, Don W.

    2009-05-01

    The advent of novel techniques using the Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes improved observation on various biological specimens to characterize them. We studied some biological specimens using Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes. We followed negative staining technique with Phosphotungstic acid using bacterial culture of Bacillus subtilis. Negative staining is very convenient technique to view the structural morphology of different samples including bacteria, phage viruses and filaments in a cell. We could observe the bacterial cell wall and flagellum very well when trapped the negative stained biofilm from bacterial culture on a TEM grid. We cut ultra thin sections from the fixed root tips of Pisum sativum (Garden pea). Root tips were pre fixed with osmium tetroxide and post fixed with uranium acetate and placed in the BEEM capsule for block making. The ultrathin sections on the grid under TEM showed the granular chromatin in the nucleus. The protein bodies and large vacuoles with the storage materials were conspicuous. We followed fixation, critical point drying and sputter coating with gold to view the tissues with SEM after placing on stubs. SEM view of the leaf surface of a dangerous weed Tragia hispida showed the surface trichomes. These trichomes when break on touching releases poisonous content causing skin irritation. The cultured tissue from in vitro culture of Albizia lebbeck, a tree revealed the regenerative structures including leaf buds and stomata on the tissue surface. SEM and TEM allow investigating the minute details characteristic morphological features that can be used for classroom teaching.

  2. Application of particle analysis to transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DaPonte, J.; Sadowski, T.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Day, D.; Lehman, A. H.; Krishna, D.; Marinella, L.; Munhutu, P.; Sawicki, M.

    2007-04-01

    Nanoparticles, particles with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers (nm), are of interest in many applications including device fabrication, quantum computing, and sensing because their size may give them properties that are very different from bulk materials. Further advancement of nanotechnology cannot be obtained without an increased understanding of nanoparticle properties such as size (diameter) and size distribution frequently evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the past, these parameters have been obtained from digitized TEM images by manually measuring and counting many of these nanoparticles, a task that is highly subjective and labor intensive. More recently, computer imaging particle analysis has emerged as an objective alternative by counting and measuring objects in a binary image. This paper will describe the procedures used to preprocess a set of gray scale TEM images so that they could be correctly thresholded into binary images. This allows for a more accurate assessment of the size and frequency (size distribution) of nanoparticles. Several preprocessing methods including pseudo flat field correction and rolling ball background correction were investigated with the rolling ball algorithm yielding the best results. Examples of particle analysis will be presented for different types of materials and different magnifications. In addition, a method based on the results of particle analysis for identifying and removing small noise particles will be discussed. This filtering technique is based on identifying the location of small particles in the binary image and removing them without affecting the size of other larger particles.

  3. TEM and XPS studies on CdS/CIGS interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun-feng; Liao, Cheng; Cha, Li-mei; Jiang, Tao; Xie, Hua-mu; Zhao, Kui; Besland, M.-P.

    2014-12-01

    Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) was deposited by metallic precursors sputtering and subsequently submitted to a selenization process. The upper CdS layers were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The CdS/CIGS interfaces were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). As checked by XPS analysis, the CIGS surface exhibited a hydroxide-terminated CdSe layer when treated with Cd Partial Electrolyte solution (Cd PE). Its thickness was roughly estimated to several nanometers. A 100 nm thick CdS layer was deposited onto CIGS surface. The TEM images revealed a clear and sharp interface between CdS and CIGS. XPS analysis showed a CIGS surface covered by a pinhole free and homogeneous CdS layer. XPS depth profile measurement of the CdS/CIGS interface did not evidence elemental inter-diffusion between the CIGS and CdS layers, in very good agreement with TEM observations.

  4. Observations from TEM Analysis of Swift Creek Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Samples analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) from suspended sediments in Swift Creek have unique characteristics compared to other naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) sites across the country. Our first introduction to the uniqueness of the Swift Creek site came about when we analyzed soil sediments by polarized light microscopy (PLM) and found relatively low or nonexistent levels of chrysotile asbestos. Upon submission of these samples for TEM analysis, we found that the samples were literally filled with small chrysotile fibers and bundles. We also notice a high number of dark, rounded particles which were not asbestiform. Out of curiosity, we viewed the surface features of one of these particles using scanning electron microscopy to find compacted chrysotile fibers bundled inside these particles. These particles contained the vast majority of chrysotile in the sample. This finding began our approach to provide more advanced TEM/SEM methods for identifying and characterizing complex arrangements of asbestos from NOA sites. We will present some of our experiences and methods for characterizing these types of particles common to NOA sites.

  5. A TEM study of samples from acid mine drainage systems: metal-mineral association with implications for transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochella, Michael F.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Golla, Ute; Putnis, Andrew

    1999-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy/electron energy loss spectroscopy (EFTEM/EELS), as well as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), have been used to study bed sediments from two acid mine drainage (AMD) sites in western Montana, USA. TEM and associated techniques, including sample preparation via epoxy impregnation and ultramicrotome sectioning, afford the opportunity to better interpret and understand complex water-rock interactions in these types of samples. For the sample taken from the first site (Mike Horse mine), ferrihydrite is the dominant phase, Si and Zn are the most abundant elements sorbed to ferrihydrite surfaces, and Pb is notably absent from ferrihydrite association. Three additional important metal-containing phases (gahnite, hydrohetaerolite, and plumbojarosite), that were not apparent in the powder XRD pattern because of their relatively low concentration, were identified in the TEM. The presence of these phases is important, because, for example, gahnite and plumbojarosite act as sinks for Zn and Pb, respectively. Therefore, the mobility of Pb from this part of the drainage system depends on the stability of plumbojarosite and the ability of ferrihydrite to sorb the released Pb. From thermodynamic data in the literature, we predict that Pb will be released by the dissolution of plumbojarosite above a pH of 4 to 5, but it will then be recaptured by ferrihydrite if the pH continues to rise to 5.5 and higher, irrespective of competition effects from other metals. Therefore, only a relatively narrow pH window exists in which Pb can escape this portion of the system as an aqueous species. For the sample taken from the other site included in this study (the Carbonate mine), jarosite and quartz are the dominant phases. Interestingly, however, the jarosites are both Pb-poor and Pb-enriched. In addition, TEM reveals the

  6. Response Time Measurements of the NIF DANTE XRD-31 X-Ray Diodes (Pre-print)

    SciTech Connect

    Don Pellinen and Michael Griffin

    2009-01-23

    The XRD-31 is a fast, windowless X-ray vacuum photodiode developed by EG&G. It is currently the primary fast X-ray detector used to diagnose the X-rays on NIF and OMEGA on the multichannel DANTE spectrometer. The XRD-31 has a dynamic range of less than 1e-12 amps to more than 10 amps. A technique is described to measure the impulse response of the diodes to a 150 fs pulse of 200 nm laser light and a method to calculate the “risetime” for a square pulse and compare it with the computed electron transit time from the photocathode to the anode. Measured response time for 5 XRD-31s assembled in early 2004 was 149.7 ps +-2.75 ps.

  7. Definitive Mineralogical Analysis of Mars Analog Rocks Using the CheMin XRD/XRF Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bish, D. L.; Feldman, S.; Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Collins, S.

    2004-01-01

    Mineral identification is a critical component of Mars Astrobiological missions. Chemical or elemental data alone are not definitive because a single elemental or chemical composition or even a single bonding type can represent a range of substances or mineral assemblages. Minerals are defined as unique structural and compositional phases that occur naturally. There are about 15,000 minerals that have been described on Earth, all uniquely identifiable via diffraction methods. There are likely many minerals yet undiscovered on Earth, and likewise on Mars. If an unknown phase is identified on Mars, it can be fully characterized by structural (X-ray Diffraction, XRD) and elemental analysis (X-ray Fluorescence, XRF) without recourse to other data because XRD relies on the principles of atomic arrangement for its determinations. XRD is the principal means of identification and characterization of minerals on Earth.

  8. Data acquisition and control software for XRD beamline at Indus-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Sanjeev R.; Garg, C. K.; Sinha, A. K.

    2010-06-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) beamline is under commissioning on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation facility. The experimental setup of XRD beamline consists of a six-circle diffractometer and various detector systems such as scintillation detector, ionization chamber and image plate. The diffractometer can be controlled via EIA232 serial interface or Ethernet. Standard data acquisition software with a graphical user interface has been developed using LabVIEW. A firm safety and error handling scheme is implemented for failsafe operation of the experimental station. This paper describes in detail the data acquisition and control software for the experimental station.

  9. Data acquisition and control software for XRD beamline at Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Sanjeev R.; Garg, C. K.; Sinha, A. K.

    2010-06-23

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) beamline is under commissioning on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation facility. The experimental setup of XRD beamline consists of a six-circle diffractometer and various detector systems such as scintillation detector, ionization chamber and image plate. The diffractometer can be controlled via EIA232 serial interface or Ethernet. Standard data acquisition software with a graphical user interface has been developed using LabVIEW. A firm safety and error handling scheme is implemented for failsafe operation of the experimental station. This paper describes in detail the data acquisition and control software for the experimental station.

  10. Hydride phase formation in carbon supported palladium hydride nanoparticles by in situ EXAFS and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, A. L.; Guda, A. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Lazzarini, A.; Srabionyan, V. V.; Vitillo, J. G.; Piovano, A.; Groppo, E.; Bugaev, L. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. P.; Pellegrini, R.; van Bokhoven, J. A.; Lamberti, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the current work we present a detailed analysis of the hydride phase formation in industrial Pd/C nanocatalysts by means of combined in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and volumetric measurements for the temperatures from - 10 to 50 °C in the hydrogen pressure range from 0 to 1000 mbar. α- and β- hydride phases are clearly distinguished in XRD. For the first time, H/Pd atomic ratio were obtained by theoretical fitting of the near-edge region of the absorption spectra (XANES) and compared with volumetric measurements.

  11. TEM Pump With External Heat Source And Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesmith, Bill J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed thermoelectric/electromagnetic (TEM) pump driven by external source of heat and by two or more heat pipe radiator heat sink(s). Thermoelectrics generate electrical current to circulate liquid metal in secondary loop of two-fluid-loop system. Intended for use with space and terrestrial dual loop liquid metal nuclear reactors. Applications include spacecraft on long missions or terrestrial beacons or scientific instruments having to operate in remote areas for long times. Design modified to include multiple radiators, converters, and ducts, as dictated by particular application.

  12. Preparation of TEM samples for hard ceramic powders.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Kumar, Vikas; de Kruijff, Tom; Jansen, Jacob; Zandbergen, Henny W

    2008-12-01

    It is challenging to prepare a good sample for high-resolution electron microscopy of polycrystalline ceramic powders containing hard particles or particles with a strong preferential cleavage. Here we demonstrate that embedding the particles in a Cu matrix in a pressed pellet allows for straightforward conventional ion milling. The method is applied to powders of Mg10Ir19B16 and Na0.5CoO2 to show its feasibility, whereby transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples with crystalline areas thinner than 10 nm can be obtained easily. PMID:18722061

  13. Modeling of planar quasi-TEM superconducting transmission lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsos, Dimitrios; Chew, Wilbert; Riley, A. L.; Hunt, Brian D.; Foote, Marc C.; Bajuk, Louis J.; Rascoe, Daniel L.; Cooley, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    An application of the phenomenological loss equivalence method (Lee and Itoh, 1989) in modeling the microwave behavior of planar quasi-TEM superconducting transmission lines is presented. For validation of the model, data are used from measurements of a YBCO superconducting thin-film coplanar-waveguide lowpass filter on a lanthanum aluminate substrate. Measured and modeled S-parameters of an existing superconducting coplanar waveguide lowpass filter agree to within 0.3 dB in magnitude and 0.5 radians in phase. Extracted values for penetration depth and real part of the conductivity of the superconducting film are within 10 percent of other researchers' findings.

  14. Performance of membrane filters used for TEM analysis of asbestos.

    PubMed

    Webber, James S; Czuhanich, Alex G; Carhart, Laurie J

    2007-10-01

    This article presents findings related to characteristics of membrane filters that can affect the recovery of asbestos and the quality of preparations for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Certain applications and preparation steps can lead to unacceptable performance of membrane filters used in analysis of asbestos by TEM. Unless substantial care is used in the collapsing of mixed-cellulose ester (MCE) filters with an acetone hot block, grid preparations can suffer and fiber recoveries can be compromised. Calibration of the etching depth of MCE filters, especially at differing locations in an asher's chamber, is critical for reliable fiber recovery. Excessive etching of MCE filters with aerosol-deposited asbestos can lead to loss of short fibers, while insufficient etching of MCE filters with aqueous-deposited asbestos can, paradoxically, also lead to loss of short fibers. Interlaboratory precision on MCE filters is improved by aerosol-deposited asbestos, as opposed to aqueous deposition. In comparison, straightforward preparation, improved solvents, and reduced contamination make PC filters an increasingly acceptable alternative. Variations in the geometric configuration during application of carbon films can lead to fiber loss and unacceptable grid quality for either type of filter. PMID:17763069

  15. TEM investigations on the local microstructure of electrodeposited galfenol nanowires.

    PubMed

    Pohl, D; Damm, C; Pohl, D; Schultz, L; Schlörb, H

    2016-01-22

    The local microstructure of Fe-Ga nanowires is investigated considering dependence on the deposition technique. Using a complexed electrolyte, smooth and homogeneous Fe80Ga20 nanowires are deposited into anodic aluminum oxide templates by either applying pulse potential or potentiostatic deposition technique. At optimized deposition conditions the wires show the desired composition of Fe80±2Ga20±2 without a gradient along the growth direction. Composition distribution, structure and microstructure are examined in detail and reveal only minor differences. Line EELS and crystal lattice measurements reveal a negligible oxygen content for both preparation routines. Neither Fe/Ga oxides nor hydroxides were found. Both potentiostatically deposited as well as pulse deposited nanowires exhibit a preferred 〈110〉orientation, the latter with slightly larger crystals. Different contrast patterns were found by TEM that appear more pronounced in the case of pulse deposited wires. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis and comparison of differently prepared focused ion beam lamellas reveal that these contrasts are caused by defects in the alternating potential deposition itself and are not induced during the TEM preparation process. The alternating potential mode causes periodic growth thereby inducing different layers with reduced wire thickness/defects at the layer interfaces. PMID:26651087

  16. TEM investigations on the local microstructure of electrodeposited galfenol nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, D.; Damm, C.; Pohl, D.; Schultz, L.; Schlörb, H.

    2016-01-01

    The local microstructure of Fe-Ga nanowires is investigated considering dependence on the deposition technique. Using a complexed electrolyte, smooth and homogeneous Fe80Ga20 nanowires are deposited into anodic aluminum oxide templates by either applying pulse potential or potentiostatic deposition technique. At optimized deposition conditions the wires show the desired composition of Fe80±2Ga20±2 without a gradient along the growth direction. Composition distribution, structure and microstructure are examined in detail and reveal only minor differences. Line EELS and crystal lattice measurements reveal a negligible oxygen content for both preparation routines. Neither Fe/Ga oxides nor hydroxides were found. Both potentiostatically deposited as well as pulse deposited nanowires exhibit a preferred <110> orientation, the latter with slightly larger crystals. Different contrast patterns were found by TEM that appear more pronounced in the case of pulse deposited wires. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis and comparison of differently prepared focused ion beam lamellas reveal that these contrasts are caused by defects in the alternating potential deposition itself and are not induced during the TEM preparation process. The alternating potential mode causes periodic growth thereby inducing different layers with reduced wire thickness/defects at the layer interfaces.

  17. Studying dynamic processes in liquids by TEM/STEM/DTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellan, Patricia; Evans, James; Woehl, Taylor; Jungjohann, Katherine; Parent, Lucas; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William; Browning, Nigel; Mater. Sci. Group Team; Microsc. Group Team; Catal. Sci. Group Collaboration; Ristenpart Res. Group Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    In order to study dynamic phenomena such as corrosion or catalysis, extreme environmental conditions must be reproduced around the specimen - these include high-temperatures, high-pressures, specific oxidizing/reducing atmospheres or a liquid environment. The use of environmental stages specifically designed to fit in any transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows us to apply the distinct capabilities of each instrument to study dynamic processes. Localized gas/fluid conditions are created around the sample and separated from the high vacuum inside the microscope using hermetically sealed windowed-cells. Advanced capabilities of these techniques include spatial resolutions of ~1 Angstrom or better in aberration corrected instruments or temporal resolutions in the microsecond-nanosecond range in a dynamic TEM (DTEM). Here, unique qualities of the DTEM that benefit the in-situ experiments with gas/fluid environmental cells will be discussed. We also present our results with a liquid stage allowing atomic resolution imaging of nanomaterials in a colloidal suspension, core EEL spectra acquisition, continuous flow, controlled growth of nanocrystals and systematic calibration of the effect of the electron dose on silver nuclei formation.

  18. (S)TEM analysis of functional transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Miaofang

    Perovskite vanadates (AVO3) form an ideal family to study the structure-property relationships in transition metal oxides because their physical properties can easily be tailored by varying the A-site cations. (S)TEM is an ideal tool for this type of study due to its capacity for simultaneous imaging and chemical analysis. Determination of the oxidation state of vanadium in complex oxides have been carried out by electron energy loss spectroscopy. SrVO3/LaAlO3 is then studied both experimentally and theoretically as a prototype system. Extra electrons have been detected on the interface layer, and further proven to originate mainly from a change in the local bonding configuration of V at the La-O terminated substrate surface. Cr-containing stainless steel deposited with a LaCrO3 thin-film layer is a promising interconnect material of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). Our investigation on its microstructural evolution reveals that the LaCrO 3 thin film plays a role in inhibiting the growth of an oxide layer on the metal surface and thus protects the surface of the stainless steel. Ca-doped LaCoO3 is a promising SOFC cathode material. The domain structures and the oxidation state of Co in Ca-doped LaCoO3, which are directly related to its mechanical properties and electronic conductivity, are investigated by in-situ TEM and EELS. The formation of microcracks is observed during thermal cycles. Ca-doping in LaCoO3 is shown to not only improve the electronic conductivity of the material, but is also likely to strengthen the grain boundaries. The realization of its application in SOFCs depends on depressing the ferroelastisity to reduce strain formation during thermal cycles. The application of the (S)TEM techniques used for studying the perovskite systems are further extended to other compounds containing transition metal elements. The refractory minerals from Comet 81 P/Wild-2 are studied to investigate the formation of the early solar system. A relatively high Ti3+/Ti 4

  19. TEM observations of hydrogen nanobubbles in implanted amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.M.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Williamson, D.L.; Acco, S.

    1996-12-31

    Over the last two decades extensive studies on the optical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) have been reported. However, less attention was given to the structural characterization of this material partly due to the insensitivity to hydrogen of structural probes such as x-rays and electron diffraction. From a recent set of experiments, results on the solubility limit of hydrogen in a special type of a-Si:H and the characterization of hydrogen induced complexes or nanobubbles has been reported. In this study, we report TEM observations of the structural morphology of hydrogen related defects that support these recent measurements obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS).

  20. Examination of subaerially altered basaltic glass with TEM and EELS

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.-S.

    1998-06-17

    We have examined the weathered surfaces of 720 year old Hawaiian basalt glasses that were recovered from a subaerial environment with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy filtered imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques. Whereas the alteration products (palagonite) were physically detached from the underlying glass in most samples, a gel-like amorphous layer was observed adjacent to the glass in a few samples. To our knowledge, this is the first time a gel layer has been observed on weathered basalt. This is significant because analogous gel layers have been observed on nuclear waste glasses reacted in laboratory tests, and this demonstrates an important similarity in the mechanisms of the weathering of basalt and the corrosion of waste glasses.

  1. Localized ion milling of metallic and ceramic TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.T.; Bentley, J.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of localized ion milling in the preparation of metallic and ceramic specimens for TEM and AEM is being evaluated from the standpoint of optimizing procedures and identifying limitations and milling characteristics. The equipment used was a Gatan model 645 precision ion milling system (PIMS). This device is a scanning ion beam instrument with which selected areas of a sample can be imaged by either secondary electron or secondary ion signals and selectively ion milled in a small region within the imaged area. The 1 to 10 keV ion beam can be focussed to a 2 ..mu..m spot. Specimens are thinned without removing them from the electron microscope specimen holder.

  2. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssière, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  3. Identification of cooked bone using TEM imaging of bone collagen.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hannah E C

    2012-01-01

    Mild heating (≤100° C, 1 h)-typical of cooking-does not lead to detectable changes in any biochemical parameter yet measured; consequently bones that have been cooked, but which have not reached a temperature that will induce charring go undetected. We have used a microscopy based approach to investigate changes in the organization of the bone protein, collagen, as it is heated, using bone from heating experiments, short term burials, and archaeological sites. The work has revealed that the presence of a mineral matrix stabilizes the collagen enabling the damage to accumulate, but preventing it from causing immediate gelatinization. Once the mineral is removed, the damage can be observed using appropriate visualization methods. This chapter describes the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique that has been used to detect cooked bone by visualizing minor heat-induced damage at the level of the collagen fibril. PMID:22907413

  4. Analysis of the Tem Mode Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janaswamy, R.; Schaubert, D. H.; Pozar, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the radiation characteristics of the TEM mode Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) is presented. The theory presented is valid for antennas with air dielectric and forms the basis for analysis of the more popular dielectric-supported antennas. The method of analysis involves two steps. In the first step, the aperture distribution in the flared slot is determined. In the second step, the equivalent magnetic current in the slot is treated as radiating in the presence of a conducting half-plane and the far-field components are obtained. Detailed comparison with experiment is made and excellent agreement is obtained. Design curves for the variation of the 3 dB and 10 dB beamwidths as a function of the antenna length, with the flare angle as a parameter, are presented.

  5. FIM/IAP/TEM studies of ion implanted nickel emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Walck, S.D.; Hren, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate depth profiling of implanted hydrogen and its isotopes in metals is extremely important. Field ion microscopy and atom-probe techniques provide the most accurate depth profiling analytical method of any available. In addition, they are extremely sensitive to hydrogen. This paper reports our early work on hydrogen trapping at defects in metals using the Field Ion Microscope/Imaging Atom Probe (FIM/IAP). Our results deal primarily with the control experiments required to overcome instrumental difficulties associated with in situ implantation and the influence of a high electric field. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used extensively to independently examine the influence of high electric fields on emitters. 11 references, 7 figures.

  6. Correlation Analysis of TEM Images of Nanocrystal Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Micheel, Christine; Zanchet, Daniele; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-05-21

    Quantitative characterizataion of images of naocrystals and nanostructures is a challenging but important task. The development and optimization of methods for the construction of complex nanostructures rely on imaging techniques. Computer programs were developed to quantify TEM images of nanocrystal/DNA nanostructures, and results are presented for heterodimers annd trimers of gold nanocrystals. The programs presented here have also been used to analyze more complex trimers and tetramers linked by branched DNA, as well as for structures made from attaching gold nanocrystals to CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots. This work has the additional goal of enabling others to quickly and easily adapt the methods for their own use.

  7. A TEM analysis of nanoparticulates in a Polar ice core

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, E.V.; Murr, L.E

    2004-03-15

    This paper explores the prospect for analyzing nanoparticulates in age-dated ice cores representing times in antiquity to establish a historical reference for atmospheric particulate regimes. Analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques were utilized to observe representative ice-melt water drops dried down on carbon/formvar or similar coated grids. A 10,000-year-old Greenland ice core was melted, and representative water drops were transferred to coated grids in a clean room environment. Essentially, all particulates observed were aggregates and either crystalline or complex mixtures of nanocrystals. Especially notable was the observation of carbon nanotubes and related fullerene-like nanocrystal forms. These observations are similar with some aspects of contemporary airborne particulates including carbon nanotubes and complex nanocrystal aggregates.

  8. An alternative to the TEM (Transformed Eulerian Mean) equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaßmann, Almut

    2013-04-01

    The TEM equations constitute a powerful means to get access to the residual circulation. However, due to their foundation on the wave perspective, they deliver only a zonally averaged picture without access to the three-dimensional structure or the local origins of the residual circulation. Therefore it is worth to investigate whether there are alternatives. The pathway followed here is to perform a transformation of the momentum and the potential temperature equation before taking the zonal mean. This is done by removing the steady state ideal wind solution vid = ?×?B-(?±P) from the equations (? - potential temperature, B - Bernoulli function, P - Ertel's potential vorticity EPV, ?± - density). The advantage of that approach is that the total EPV-flux does no longer contain an explicitly visible 'do-nothing-flux'. This flux, ?? ×?B, does only vanish when averaging on isentropic surfaces, but not on other isosurfaces. Here we find the reason why the conventional zonal mean on isentropes delivers a direct overturning cell on each hemisphere, whereas on other isosurfaces we obtain the typical three-cell structure with Headley, Ferrel, and polar cells. It will be demonstrated and made visible through idealized climate experiments with the ICON-IAP model that the zonal averages of the nonideal wind components vnid = v - vid and wnid = w - wid constitute similar direct overturning cells on non-isentropic surfaces as obtained with the TEM-generated v* and w*. It is also interesting to inspect fields of local nonideal wind components, the very origin of the residual circulation.

  9. Enabling direct nanoscale observations of biological reactions with dynamic TEM

    PubMed Central

    Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    Biological processes occur on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales: from femtoseconds to hours and from angstroms to meters. Many new biological insights can be expected from a better understanding of the processes that occur on these very fast and very small scales. In this regard, new instruments that use fast X-ray or electron pulses are expected to reveal novel mechanistic details for macromolecular protein dynamics. To ensure that any observed conformational change is physiologically relevant and not constrained by 3D crystal packing, it would be preferable for experiments to utilize small protein samples such as single particles or 2D crystals that mimic the target protein's native environment. These samples are not typically amenable to X-ray analysis, but transmission electron microscopy has imaged such sample geometries for over 40 years using both direct imaging and diffraction modes. While conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have visualized biological samples with atomic resolution in an arrested or frozen state, the recent development of the dynamic TEM (DTEM) extends electron microscopy into a dynamic regime using pump-probe imaging. A new second-generation DTEM, which is currently being constructed, has the potential to observe live biological processes with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution by using pulsed electron packets to probe the sample on micro- and nanosecond timescales. This article reviews the experimental parameters necessary for coupling DTEM with in situ liquid microscopy to enable direct imaging of protein conformational dynamics in a fully hydrated environment and visualize reactions propagating in real time. PMID:23315566

  10. TEM-EDS study of metals' partition at particle level after their sorption in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Peter; Kovács Kis, Viktória; Németh, Tibor; Balázs, Réka

    2016-04-01

    Association of soil mineral particles could significantly modify the sorption capacity of the individual soil components. We studied this phenomena using single element and competitive batch Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn sorption experiments on six soil samples with contrasting characteristics. Their sorption properties were characterized by XRD and FTIRS analyses, as well as sorption curve evaluation. TEM-EDS analyses were used to characterize the soil mineral particle associations and their metal sorption capacities. Submicron sized smectite particles were found to be associated to tiny ferryhidrite and goethite patches in the acidic forest soil samples, whereas the alkaline meadow soils could be characterized by goethite and smectite particles attached to large carbonate grains. Point chemical analyses carried out on such associations showed that significant metal separation may occur at particle level within the mineral associations observed. This is primarily obvious for Cu and Pb, which are preferentially sorbed by iron oxides over clay mineral particles. This phenomenon is more pronounced in competitive situation. Highest affinity to clay minerals was found for Zn and it may be also characteristic for Cd in acid conditions. However, decrease in available sorption sites and increase in pH may result in enhanced precipitation for the studied metals. Our results suggest that estimation of the role of soil components in metals' sorption can not be adequate enough when the sorption properties of a set of bulk soils are studied exclusively. Direct observation of metals' partition at particle level may result in a deeper insight into soil-metal interaction. This study was financially supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA K105009).

  11. Applying high resolution SyXRD analysis on sulfate attacked concrete field samples

    SciTech Connect

    Stroh, J.; Schlegel, M.-C.; Irassar, E.F.; Meng, B.; Emmerling, F.

    2014-12-15

    High resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SyXRD) was applied for a microstructural profile analysis of concrete deterioration after sulfate attack. The cement matrices consist of ordinary Portland cement and different amounts of supplementary cementitious materials, such as fly ash, natural pozzolana and granulated blast furnace slag. The changes of the phase composition were determined along the direction of sulfate ingress. This approach allows the identification of reaction fronts and zones of different phase compositions and conclusions about the mechanisms of sulfate attack. Two reaction fronts were localized in the initial 4 mm from the sample surface. The mechanism of deterioration caused by the exposition in the sulfate-bearing soil is discussed. SyXRD is shown to be a reliable method for investigation of cementitious materials with aggregates embedded in natural environments.

  12. Combined synchrotron XRD/Raman measurements: in situ identification of polymorphic transitions during crystallization processes.

    PubMed

    Klimakow, Maria; Leiterer, Jork; Kneipp, Janina; Rössler, Ernst; Panne, Ulrich; Rademann, Klaus; Emmerling, Franziska

    2010-07-01

    A combination of two analytical methods, time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, is presented as a novel tool for crystallization studies. An acoustic levitator was employed as sample environment. This setup enables the acquisition of XRD and Raman data in situ simultaneously within a 20 s period and hence permits investigation of polymorphic phase transitions during the crystallization process in different solvents (methanol, ethanol, acetone, dichloromethane, acetonitrile). These real time measurements allow the determination of the phase content from the onset of the first crystalline molecular assemblies to the stable system. To evaluate the capability of this approach, the setup was applied to elucidate the crystallization process of the polymorphic compound nifedipine. The results indicate the existence of solvent-dependent transient phases during the crystallization process. The quality of the data allowed the assignment of the lattice constants of the hitherto unknown crystal structure of the beta-polymorph. PMID:20222693

  13. Characterising palladium-silver and palladium-nickel alloy membranes using SEM, XRD and PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuler, J. N.; Lorenzen, L.; Sanderson, R. D.; Prozesky, V.; Przybylowicz, W. J.

    1999-10-01

    Palladium alloy membranes were prepared by successive electroless plating steps on an alumina-zirconia support membrane. Palladium, silver and nickel were deposited in layers and then the metal films were heat treated for 5 h in a hydrogen atmosphere at 650°C. The topography of the metal coatings and cross-sections of the films (before and after heating) were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD was used to determine the crystal phase of the alloy coatings. Both SEM and XRD provide only surface information and therfore micro-PIXE was used to extract depth information of the alloy coating. Concentration profiles across the thickness of the films were constructed to determine penetration of the coating into the support membrane pores during electroless plating and to investigate diffusion of coated layers during the heating step.

  14. A Raman, IR and XRD analysis of the deterioration on historical monuments: case study from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ostrooumov, Mikhail

    2009-08-01

    Raman, infrared and XRD analysis have been applied to the examination of deterioration on historical monuments (Morelia, Mexico). Forty-three samples pyroclastic volcanic rocks (ignimbrites) have been studied, all originating from two ex-convents San Francisco and San Agustin, which were the first architectonic complexes in the city of Morelia. Several new mineral neoformation such as sulfates, carbonates, halides, and phosphates were identified in these samples with spectrometric and XRD technique. The observed Raman and infrared spectra are reported and some mineral compound assignments in unaltered and deteriorated volcanic rocks have been made. This survey is the first Raman and infrared spectrometric examination of the environmental mineralogy in Mexico under conditions of urban weathering that are characterized mainly by one secondary alteration formations of low scale. PMID:19201254

  15. Lattice Expansion of LSCF-6428 Cathodes Measured by In-situ XRD during SOFC Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Edwards, Danny J.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-01-03

    A new capability has been developed for analyzing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This paper describes the initial results of in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) of the cathode on an operating anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell. It has been demonstrated that XRD measurements of the cathode can be performed simultaneously with electrochemical measurements of cell performance or electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). While improvements to the technique are still to be made, the XRD pattern of a lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode with the composition La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF-6428) was found to continually but gradually change over the course of more than 60 hours of operation in air under typical SOFC operating conditions. It was determined that the most significant change was a gradual increase in the cubic lattice parameters of the LSCF from 3.92502 Å (as determined from the integration of the first 20 hours of XRD patterns) to 3.92650 Å (from the integration of the last 20 hours). This analysis also revealed that there were several peaks from unidentified minor phases that increased in intensity over this timeframe. After a temporary loss of airflow early in the test, the cell generated between 225 and 250 mW/cm2 for the remainder of the test. A large low frequency arc in the impedance spectra suggests the cell performance was gas diffusion limited and that there is room for improvement in air delivery to the cell.

  16. Phase analysis of aluminium modified GeSbTe bulk prepared from XRD of samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Sharanjit; Singh, D.; Kumar, S.; Thangaraj, R.

    2016-05-01

    Various compositions of Aluminium modified GST as Alx(Ge2Sb2Te5)1-x x= 0, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30 are prepared to study as a phase change material. Bulk prepared is studied with XRD scans for various phases formed. Phases other than Ge2Sb2Te5 do come in but dominated one is Ge2Sb2Te5 hexagonal phase.

  17. Validation of enhanced stabilization of municipal solid waste under controlled leachate recirculation using FTIR and XRD.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sapna; Kothiyal, N C; Nema, Arvind K

    2012-07-01

    Leachate recirculation at neutral PH accompanied with buffer/nutrients addition has been used successfully in earlier stabilization of municipal solid waste in bioreactor landfills. In the present study, efforts were made to enhance the stabilization rate of municipal solid waste (MSW) and organic solid waste (OSW) in simulated landfill bioreactors by controlling the pH of recirculated leachate towards slightly alkaline side in absence of additional buffer and nutrients addition. Enhanced stabilization in waste samples was monitored with the help of analytical tools like Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Predominance of bands assigned to inorganic compounds and comparatively lower intensities of bands for organic compounds in the FTIR spectra of waste samples degraded with leachate recirculation under controlled pH confirmed higher rate of biodegradation and mineralization of waste than the samples degraded without controlled leachate recirculation. XRD spectra also confirmed to a greater extent of mineralization in the waste samples degraded under leachate recirculation with controlled pH. Comparison of XRD spectra of two types of wastes pointed out higher degree of mineralization in organic solid waste as compared to municipal solid waste. PMID:24749191

  18. XRD investigation of the strain/stress state of ion-irradiated crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debelle, Aurélien; Declémy, Alain

    2010-05-01

    In this work, it is demonstrated that XRD is a powerful technique for the study of ion-irradiated materials. For this purpose, XRD experiments have been performed under different configurations on a <1 0 0>-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia single crystal implanted with 300 keV caesium-ions at 3 × 10 14 cm -2. Initially, it is demonstrated that the depth strain profile can be determined from the refinement of a symmetric θ-2 θ scan. Moreover, in order to explore the whole XRD data, a model that describes the strain/stress state of the damaged layer is proposed. This model takes into account the elastic response of the bulk material (substrate) underneath the irradiated layer. The measured elastic strain is then the sum of a free strain due to the formation of radiation-induced defects and of an additional strain arising from the substrate elastic reaction. Application of this model allowed the calculation of the different strain contributions and the stress experienced by the irradiated layer. It is shown that these parameters may reach large values (respectively 0.7% and -1.9 GPa) despite the low radiation damage level.

  19. Synchronizing flash-melting in a diamond cell with synchrotron X ray diffraction (XRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karandikar, Amol; Boehler, Reinhard; Meng, Yue; Rod, Eric; Shen, Guoyin

    2013-06-01

    The major challenges in measuring melting temperatures in laser heated diamond cells are sample instability, thermal runaway and chemical reactions. To circumvent these problems, we developed a ``flash heating'' method using a modulated CW fiber laser and fast X ray detection capability at APS (Pilatus 1M detector). As an example, Pt spheres of 5 micron diameter were loaded in a single crystal sapphire encapsulation in the diamond cell at 65 GPa and heated in a single flash heating event for 20 ms to reach a desired temperature. A CCD spectrometer and the Pilatus were synchronized to measure the temperature and the XRD signal, respectively, when the sample reached the thermal steady state. Each successive flash heating was done at a higher temperature. The integrated XRD pattern, collected during and after (300 K) each heating, showed no chemical reaction up to 3639 K, the highest temperature reached in the experiment. Pt111 and 200 peak intensity variation showed gradual recrystalization and complete diminishing at about 3600 K, indicating melting. Thus, synchronized flash heating with novel sample encapsulation circumvents previous notorious problems and enables accurate melting temperature measurement in the diamond cell using synchrotron XRD probe. Affiliation 2: Geowissenschaeften, Goethe-Universitaet, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M., Germany.

  20. Effect of detrital muscovite on illite crystallinity measurement by x-ray diffraction (XRD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gundy, L.

    1987-08-01

    Illite crystallinity measurement by XRD can determine shale geothermometry and be used to map anchimetamorphic or diagenetic zones. A problem occurs in accuracy of XRD peak measurement because detrital muscovite from higher temperature source rocks constitutes a small percentage in many shales. The (001) XRD peaks coincide for diagenetic illite and detrital muscovite. The muscovite peak is very sharp, whereas the illite peak becomes sharper with increasing diagenetic grade. Thermal history, detrital muscovite, and sample preparation techniques will affect illite crystallinity measurements. Natural and artificially mixed samples can be used to show this effect quantitatively. Pegmatitic muscovite ground to clay size simulates this detrital component. When mixed with clay fractions from illitic shales, the induced error becomes insignificant for shales with a high-temperature history. Small detrital muscovite fractions adversely affect determination of lower diagenetic grades. Separation techniques that presume the coarser detrital fraction can be removed are not effective for siliceous shales, which must be ground. Calcareous and organic-rich shales may require disaggregation by chemical treatment, which may alter illite peak sharpness. Shales with 1 to 7% detrital muscovite showed higher illite crystallinity on x-ray diffractograms if the coarser fraction was not removed. At trace amounts of muscovite, the difference was negligible . By accurately estimating detrital percentages, a decision may be made to abandon tedious separation procedures. A correction factor may also be applied to crystallinity measurements to allow for the amount of detrital muscovite.

  1. Effects and efficiency of consolidation treatments on Palaeolithic reindeer antler. Multi-analytical study by means of XRD, FT-IR microspectroscopy, SEM, TEM and μ-PIXE/PIGE analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadefaux, C.; Vignaud, C.; Menu, M.; Reiche, I.

    2008-07-01

    Bone materials record information on palaeodiets and palaeoenvironment, contained in their chemical and isotopic composition. Therefore, it is very important, while preserving these objects, to keep an open access to this information. In the present paper, we characterise the effects of consolidation treatments on the structure and chemical composition of archaeological reindeer antler at different hierarchical scales. X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy and microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an X-ray analysing system and proton-induced X-ray and γ-ray emission were used to reveal the state of preservation of reindeer antler and to evaluate the effectiveness of their consolidation treatments. These treatments are shown not to affect the chemical composition, but the crystallinity of the solid phase, as far as Palaeolithic material is concerned. In terms of penetration, the most efficient treatment, among those tested, seems to be the Rhodopas 15% single-bath treatment.

  2. TEM characterization of microstructure and chemistry in magnesium diboride superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ye

    MgB2 is a superconductor with promising properties, but to meet application requirements, the properties of MgB2 have to be improved through microstructure modifications: chemical doping, introduction of precipitates, and atomic-scale control of defects. The small length scale of these modifications means that structure and chemistry characterization using the transmission electron microscope (TEM) are required to better understand the correlation between MgB2's superconducting properties and its microstructure. We have used TEM-based techniques to characterize microstructures of pure MgB2 bulks, SiC-doped MgB2 tapes, pure and C-doped MgB2 thin films prepared by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) method with different carbon precursors, degraded pure HPCVD thin films, and O-doped MgB2 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Characterization results and effects of microstructure on superconducting properties are discussed for each material. We have found that in pure MgB2 the main contaminating current-blocking phases are MgO grains and amorphous MgO + boron + BxO y phases. Both second phase nano-segregations and grain boundaries are effective pinning defects in MgB2, which can enhance Jc(H) at high fields. However, second phases also act as current-blocking phases that reduce the measured Jc, which suggests that MgB2 samples with small grain size and without any boundary second phases are desirable to achieve higher Jc. Extensive studies have been made to understand the Hc 2 enhancement mechanisms in MgB2. Both carbon dopant and grain boundaries in MgB2 can cause more electron scattering that increases Hc2. Degradation in MgB 2 leads to the formation of the amorphous boundary phase which also enhances Hc2 by introducing electron scattering. The over 60 T Hc2 ||ab obtained in C-doped HPCVD MgB 2 films is caused by the two-band nature and strong pi-band scattering of MgB2. We believe that the strain fields generated from c-axis tilt boundaries

  3. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A.; Rolli, R.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  4. TEM in situ lithiation of tin nanoneedles for battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mackay, David T.; Liu, Yang; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Carter, C. Barry; Norton, M. Grant

    2015-08-12

    Materials such as tin (Sn) and silicon that alloy with lithium (Li) have attracted renewed interest as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. Although their superior capacity to graphite and other intercalation materials has been known for decades, their mechanical instability due to extreme volume changes during cycling has traditionally limited their commercial viability. This limitation is changing as processes emerge that produce nanostructured electrodes. The nanostructures can accommodate the repeated expansion and contraction as Li is inserted and removed without failing mechanically. Recently, one such nano-manufacturing process, which is capable of depositing coatings of Sn “nanoneedles” at low temperature with no template and at industrial scales, has been described. The present work is concerned with observations of the lithiation and delithiation behavior of these Sn nanoneedles during in situ experiments in the transmission electron microscope, along with a brief review of how in situ TEM experiments have been used to study the lithiation of Li-alloying materials. Individual needles are successfully lithiated and delithiated in solid-state half-cells against a Li-metal counter-electrode. Furthermore the microstructural evolution of the needles is discussed, including the transformation of one needle from single-crystal Sn to polycrystalline Sn–Li and back to single-crystal Sn.

  5. TEM in situ lithiation of tin nanoneedles for battery applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mackay, David T.; Liu, Yang; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Carter, C. Barry; Norton, M. Grant

    2015-08-12

    Materials such as tin (Sn) and silicon that alloy with lithium (Li) have attracted renewed interest as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. Although their superior capacity to graphite and other intercalation materials has been known for decades, their mechanical instability due to extreme volume changes during cycling has traditionally limited their commercial viability. This limitation is changing as processes emerge that produce nanostructured electrodes. The nanostructures can accommodate the repeated expansion and contraction as Li is inserted and removed without failing mechanically. Recently, one such nano-manufacturing process, which is capable of depositing coatings of Sn “nanoneedles” at low temperature withmore » no template and at industrial scales, has been described. The present work is concerned with observations of the lithiation and delithiation behavior of these Sn nanoneedles during in situ experiments in the transmission electron microscope, along with a brief review of how in situ TEM experiments have been used to study the lithiation of Li-alloying materials. Individual needles are successfully lithiated and delithiated in solid-state half-cells against a Li-metal counter-electrode. Furthermore the microstructural evolution of the needles is discussed, including the transformation of one needle from single-crystal Sn to polycrystalline Sn–Li and back to single-crystal Sn.« less

  6. Aquifer characterisation in East Timor, with ground TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley-Cooper, A.

    2011-12-01

    An assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Groundwater Resources in East Timor led by Geosciences Australia is aimed at assisting East Timor's government to better understand and manage their groundwater resources. Form the current known information most aquifers in Timor-Leste are recharged by rainfall during the wet season. There is a concern that without a regular recharge, the stored groundwater capacity will decrease. Timor's population increase has caused a higher demand for groundwater which is currently been met by regulated pumping bores which are taped into deep aquifers, plus the sprouting of unregulated spear point bores in the shallow aquifers . Both groundwater recharge and the aquifers morphology need to be better understood in order to ensure supply and so groundwater can be managed for the future. Current weather patterns are expected to change and this could cause longer periods of drought or more intense rainfall, which in turn, would affect the availability and quality of groundwater. Salt water intrusions pose a threat on the low-lying aquifers as sea level rises. Australia's CSIRO has undertaken a series hydrogeophysical investigations employing ground TEM to assist in the characterisation of three aquifers near Dili, Timor Leste's capital. Interpreting ground water chemistry and dating; jointly with EM data has enhanced the understanding of the aquifers architecture, groundwater quality and helped identify potential risks of seawater intrusions.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  8. Determination of phosphorus speciation in dairy manure using XRD and XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Kerem; Jürgensen, Astrid; Karthikeyan, K G

    2007-01-01

    Intensive manure application is an important source of diffuse phosphorus (P) pollution. Phosphorus availability from animal manure is influenced by its chemical speciation. The major objective of this study was to investigate the P speciation in raw and anaerobically digested dairy manure with an emphasis on the calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) phosphate phases. Influent and effluent from an on-farm digester in Wisconsin were sampled and sieved, and the 25 to 53 microm size fraction was dried for X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and P K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses. Struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) was identified in both the raw (influent) and anaerobically digested (effluent) manure using XRD. Qualitative analysis of P K-edge XANES spectra indicated that the Ca orthophosphate phases, except dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) or monetite (CaHPO4), were not abundant in dairy manure. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the P standard compounds showed that 57.0 and 43.0% of P was associated with DCPA and struvite, respectively, in the raw manure. In the anaerobically digested sample, 78.2% of P was present as struvite and 21.8% of P was associated with hydroxylapatite (HAp). The P speciation shifted toward Mg orthophosphates and least soluble Ca orthophosphates following anaerobic digestion. Similarity between the aqueous orthophosphate (aq-PO4), newberyite (MgHPO4.3H2O), and struvite spectra can cause inaccurate P speciation determination when dairy manure is analyzed solely using P K-edge XANES spectroscopy; however, XANES can be used in conjunction with XRD to quantify the distribution of inorganic P species in animal manure. PMID:17965388

  9. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study. PMID:25269317

  10. The XRD Amorphous Component in John Klein Drill Fines at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Ming,, Douglas W.; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Bish, David L; Chipera, Steve; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Gellert, Ralf; Campbell, Iain; Treiman, Alan H.; Achilles, Cherie; Bristow, Thomas; Crisp, Joy A.; McAdam, Amy; Archer, Paul Douglas; Sutter, Brad; Rampe, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Drill fines of mudstone (targets John Klein and Cumberland) from the Sheepbed unit at Yel-lowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL payload elements including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin), APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments. CheMin XRD results show a variety of crystalline phases including feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, oxides, oxyhydroxides, sulfates, sulfides, a tri-octahedral smectite, and XRD amorphous material. The drill fines are distinctly different from corresponding analyses of the global soil (target Rocknest) in that the mudstone samples contained detectable phyllosilicate. Here we focus on John Klein and combine CheMin and APXS data to calculate the chemical composition and concentration of the amorphous component. The chemical composition of the amorphous plus smectite component for John Klein was calculated by subtracting the abundance-weighted chemical composition of the individual XRD crystalline components from the bulk composition of John Kline as measured by APXS. The chemical composition of individual crystalline components was determined either by stoichiometry (e.g., hematite and magnetite) or from their unit cell parameters (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene). The chemical composition of the amorphous + smectite component (approx 71 wt.% of bulk sample) and bulk chemical composition are similar. In order to calculate the chemical composition of the amorphous component, a chemical composition for the tri-octahedral smectite must be assumed. We selected two tri-octahedral smectites with very different MgO/(FeO + Fe2O3) ratios (34 and 1.3 for SapCa1 and Griffithite, respectively). Relative to bulk sample, the concentration of amorphous and smectite components are 40 and 29 wt.% for SapCa1 and 33 and 36 wt.% for Griffithite. The amount of smectite was calculated by requiring the MgO concentration to be approx 0 wt.% in the amorphous component. Griffithite is the preferred smectite because

  11. IN-SITU XRD OF OPERATING LSFC CATHODES: DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-11-19

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) research capability has been developed that facilitates measuring the electrochemical performance of an operating SOFC while simultaneously performing x-ray diffraction on its cathode. The evolution of this research tool’s development is discussed together with a description of the instrumentation used for in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of operating SOFC cathodes. The challenges that were overcome in the process of developing this capability, which included seals and cathode current collectors, are described together with the solutions that are presently being applied to mitigate them.

  12. Characterization of Mo/C catalysts by XRD, XPS, and TOF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rondon, S.; Wilkinson, W.R.; Proctor, A.; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M.

    1995-11-09

    The objective of this work is to undertake a detailed study of the Mo/C system. This will include (a) study of the adsorption of Mo oxyanions from aqueous solutions of ammonium heptamolybdate onto activated carbon and (b) characterization of a series of Mo/C catalysts obtained by the equilibrium absorption method, using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The structural information thus obtained will be used to evaluate the Mo speciation proposed earlier. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Analytical electron microscopy of Mg-SiO smokes - A comparison with infrared and XRD studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy conducted for Mg-SiO smokes (experimentally obtained from samples previously characterized by IR spectroscopy) indicates that the microcrystallinity content of unannealed smokes increases with increased annealing for up to 30 hr. The growth of forsterite microcrystallites in the initially nonstoichiometric smokes may give rise to the contemporaneous growth of the SiO polymorph tridymite and MgO; after 4 hr of annealing, these react to form enstatite. It is suggested that XRD analysis and IR spectroscopy should be conducted in conjunction with detailed analytical electron microscopy for the detection of emerging crystallinity in vapor-phase condensates.

  14. A mathematical method for XRD pattern interpretation in clay containing nano composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khederlou, Kh.; Bagheri, R.; Shojaei, A.

    2014-11-01

    X-ray diffraction and rheological measurements were used to characterize nanoparticle dispersion in LDPE/LLDPE/nanoclay hybrid nanocomposites. XRD patterns were interpreted with a novel distribution formula and rheological measurements were used to confirm the results. Results of these two methods indicated that increasing clay in all the prepared nanocomposites exhibited a significant improvement in filler-matrix interaction because of increasing the probability of polymer diffusion but further exfoliation need more compatibilizing situations. It seems that this mathematical method could be used for predicting the overall change in clay gallery d-spacing and the extent of intercalation-exfoliation of nanoclay in these systems.

  15. The XRD Amorphous Component in John Klein Drill Fines at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S.; Downs, R.; Morrison, S.; Gellert, R.; Campbell, I.; Treiman, A. H.; Achilles, C.; Bristow, T.; Crisp, J. A.; McAdam, A.; Archer, P. D.; Sutter, B.; Rampe, E. B.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drill fines of mudstone (targets John Klein and Cumberland) from the Sheepbed unit at Yel-lowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL payload elements including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin), APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments. CheMin XRD results show a variety of crystalline phases including feldspar, pyrox-ene, olivine, oxides, oxyhydroxides, sulfates, sulfides, a tri-octahedral smectite, and XRD amorphous material. The drill fines are distinctly different from corresponding analyses of the global soil (target Rocknest) in that the mudstone samples contained detectable phyllosilicate. Here we focus on John Klein and combine CheMin and APXS data to calculate the chemical composition and concentration of the amorphous component. The chemical composition of the amorphous plus smectite component for John Klein was cal-culated by subtracting the abundance-weighted chemical composition of the individual XRD crystalline components from the bulk composition of John Kline as measured by APXS. The chemical composition of individual crystalline components was determined either by stoichiome-try (e.g., hematite and magnetite) or from their unit cell parameters (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene). The chemical composition of the amorphous + smectite component (~71 wt.% of bulk sample) and bulk chemical compositon are similar. In order to calculate the chemical composition of the amorphous component, a chemical composition for the tri-octahedral smectite must be assumed. We selected two tri-octahedral smectites with very different MgO/(FeO + Fe2O3) ratios (34 and 1.3 for SapCa1 and Griffithite, respectively). Relative to bulk sample, the concentration of amorphous and smectite components are 40 and 29 wt.% for SapCa1 and 33 and 36 wt.% for Griffithite. The amount of smectite was calculated by requiring the MgO concentration to be~0 wt.% in the amporphous component. Griffithite is the preferred smectite because the position

  16. XRD, lead equivalent and UV-VIS properties study of Ce and Pr lead silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Alias, Nor Hayati Abdullah, Wan Shafie Wan Isa, Norriza Mohd Isa, Muhammad Jamal Md Zali, Nurazila Mat; Abdullah, Nuhaslinda Ee; Muhammad, Azali

    2014-02-12

    In this work, Cerium (Ce) and Praseodymium (Pr) containing lead silicate glasses were produced with 2 different molar ratios low (0.2 wt%) and high (0.4wt%). These types of glasses can satisfy the characteristics required for radiation shielding glasses and minimize the lead composition in glass. The radiation shielding properties of the synthesized glasses is explained in the form of lead equivalent study. The XRD diffraction and UV-VIS analysis were performed to observe the structural changes of the synthesis glasses at 1.5 Gy gamma radiation exposures.

  17. Study of dislocations in copper by weak beam, stereo, and in situ straining TEM

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, R. J.; Misra, A.; Mitchell, T. E.

    2002-01-01

    Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been an invaluable tool for verifjhg and developing dislocation theories since the first direct observations of dislocations were made using a TEM in the 1950s. Several useful techniques and technological advancements have been made since, helping fbrther the advancement of dislocation knowledge. The present paper concerns two studies of dislocations in copper made by coupling several of these techniques, specifically weak beam, in situ straining, and stereo TEM. Stereo-TEM coupled with in situ straining TEM was used for tracking 3D dislocation motion and interactions in low dislocation density copper foils. A mechanism by which dislocations in a pileup bypass a dislocation node is observed and discussed. Weak beam TEM is used in conjunction with stereo-TEM to analyze the dislocation content of a dense dislocation wall (DDW).

  18. In-situ TEM characterization of Copper Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelberg, Daniel T.

    In-situ liquid experiments in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) allow dynamic phenomena to be imaged at the nanoscale. This opens the opportunity to view electrochemical depositions at the nano scale in real time. However, there are a number of issues regarding in situ imaging that prevent a straightforward approach. This thesis addresses two issues regarding in-situ experiments; the fabrication of electron transparent windows and the nucleation of a metal from an electrolyte as a result of beam damage. Silicon chips that were 2.6mm x 2.6mm with 50mum x 50mum windows consisting of 50nm S3N 4 were fabricated with the goal of minimizing fabrication complexity at a cost significantly below commercial prices. These silicon nitride windows were used to sandwich a small volume of CuSO4 solution and observe copper nucleation as a result of the radiolysis damage of water due to the electron beam. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was used to image growth, and reducing species are shown to diffuse on the order of hundreds of nanometers in solution. Copper nanoparticle growth was compared to Oswald ripening, and diffusion limited growth was observed at high electron dose rates. The diffusion limited growth was suppressed and led to a slower growth rate, with a calculated diffusion coefficient for Cu 2+ of 2 x 10--10 m2/s. Low electron dose rates corresponding to low magnifications in STEM yielded kinetic limited or mixed growth and yielded faceted nanoparticles. Atomic resolution was achieved in copper film deposited at low magnifications, and lattice fringes corresponding to the copper <111> were observed.

  19. Three Dimensional TEM Forward Modeling Using FDTD Accelerated by GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional inversion of transient electromagnetic (TEM) data is still challenging. The inversion speed mostly depends on the forward modeling. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is one of the popular forward modeling scheme. In an explicit type, which is based on the Du Fort-Frankel scheme, the time step is under the constraint of quasi-static approximation. Often an upward-continuation boundary condition (UCBC) is applied on the earth-air surface to avoid time stepping in the model air. However, UCBC is not suitable for models with topography and has a low parallel efficiency. Modeling without UCBC may cause a much smaller time step because of the resistive attribute of the air and the quasi-static constraint, which may also low the efficiency greatly. Our recent research shows that the time step in the model air is not needed to be constrained by the quasi-static approximation, which can let the time step without UCBC much closer to that with UCBC. The parallel performance of FDTD is then largely released. On a computer with a 4-core CPU, this newly developed method is obviously faster than the method using UCBC. Besides, without UCBC, this method can be easily accelerated by Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). On a computer with a CPU of 4790k@4.4GHz and a GPU of GTX 970, the speed accelerated by CUDA is almost 10 times of that using CPU only. For a model with a grid size of 140×140×130, if the conductivity of the model earth is 0.02S/m, and the minimal space interval is 15m, it takes only 80 seconds to evolve the field from excitation to 0.032s.

  20. XRD and FTIR structural investigation of gadolinium-zinc-borate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Borodi, G.; Pascuta, P.; Dan, V.; Pop, V.; Stefan, R.; Radulescu, D.

    2013-11-13

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements have been employed to investigate the (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}⋅(B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub (60−x)}⋅(ZnO){sub 40} glass ceramics system, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%. After heat treatment applied at 860 °C for 2 h, some structural changes were observed and new crystalline phases appeared in the structure of the samples. In these glass ceramics four crystalline phases were identified using powder diffraction files (PDF 2), namely ZnB{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Zn{sub 4}O(B{sub 6}O{sub 12}), Zn{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} and GdBO{sub 3}. From the XRD data, the average unit-cell parameter and the quantitative ratio of the crystallographic phases in the studied samples were evaluated. FTIR data revealed that the BO{sub 3}, BO{sub 4} and ZnO{sub 4} are the main structural units of these glass ceramics network. The compositional dependence of the different structural units which appear in the studied samples was followed.

  1. XRD characterisation of composite Ni-based coatings prepared by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarkowski, L.; Indyka, P.; Bełtowska-Lehman, E.

    2012-08-01

    The present work is aimed at XRD investigation of structural parameters that influence the functional properties of Ni-W/Al2O3 electrodeposit coatings. The relationship between electrodeposition parameters and structural properties of the coatings deposited on steel substrates has been determined. XRD investigations were performed on a Bruker D8 Discover diffractometer equipped with a position-sensitive linear detector. The modified sin2ψ X-ray diffraction method was used to determine the macroscopic residual stresses of deposits. The crystallite size and lattice strain of the coatings were evaluated by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns (Rietveld analysis). The crystallographic texture was analysed using the orientation distribution function (ODF) calculated from the incomplete pole figures. It was shown that the structural properties of the deposits were strongly correlated with chemical composition. X-ray diffraction patterns of all Ni-W coatings exhibit mainly the fcc phase structure of the Ni-W solid solution with a lattice parameter intermediate between those of Ni and W, which rises when the tungsten content increases. At the same time the crystallite dimension (the size of the coherent domains) was gradually reduced. It was found that Ni-W coatings containing about 40 wt.% W revealed the tensile residual stresses (2300-1200 MPa), depending on deposition conditions.

  2. XRD and AFM characterization of epitaxial Nb films before and after hydrogen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Monica; Heuser, Brent; Durfee, Curtis

    2001-03-01

    Epitaxial Nb films have been characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) before and after hydrogenation at 100 C and 760 Torr. Two 1000 Angstrom epitaxial Nb films were grown on a-plane sapphire with two different miscut angles, 0.08 and 1.4 degrees. Both Nb films were capped with a 100 Angstrom thick Pd layer to facilitate molecular hydrogen dissociation. While the as-grow film mosaic did not depend on miscut angle, the surface morphology was significantly different. In particular, the high miscut film exhibited a fingered topography that was absent in the low miscut film. Hydrogen absorption under the conditions stated above induce a complete conversion of Nb to the alpha prime hydride phase. The Nb hydride phase transformation process is known to create dislocations as incoherent phase boundaries pass through the lattice. The surface morphology and lattice mosaic from post-hydrogen AFM and XRD measurements, respectively, show the extreme effect of the phase transformation process. Discussion will focus on the lattice mosaic broadening, residual strain, and surface features after hydrogen exposure.

  3. Structural investigations in helium implanted cubic zirconia using grazing incidence XRD and EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Degueldre, C.; Bertsch, J.; Döbeli, M.

    2010-06-01

    The crystal structure and local atom arrangements surrounding Zr atoms were determined for a helium implanted cubic stabilized zirconia (CSZ) using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, respectively, measured at glancing angles. The implanted specimen was prepared at a helium fluence of 2 × 10 16 cm -2 using He + beams at two energies (2.54 and 2.74 MeV) passing through a 8.0 μm Al absorber foil. XRD results identified the formation of a new rhombohedral phase in the helium embedded layer, attributed to internal stress as a result of expansion of the CSZ-lattice. Zr K-edge EXAFS data suggested loss of crystallinity in the implanted lattice and disorder of the Zr atoms environment. EXAFS Fourier transforms analysis showed that the average first-shell radius of the Zr sbnd O pair in the implanted sample was slightly larger than that of the CSZ standard. Common general disorder features were explained by rhombohedral type short-range ordered clusters. The average structural parameters estimated from the EXAFS data of unimplanted and implanted CSZ are compared and discussed. Potential of EXAFS as a local probe of atomic-scale structural modifications induced by helium implantation in CSZ is demonstrated.

  4. Microstructure analysis of melt-spun Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallics by XRD and EXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Barrera, E.V.; Frazier, W.E.

    1997-12-31

    In an effort to expand the composition range over which Al{sub 3}Ti is stable, various amounts of niobium were substituted for titanium and processed by melt-spinning. Several samples were annealed both at 600 C and 1,000 C for 24 hours. The effects of processing parameters such as wheel speed, the amount of niobium, and annealing temperatures on the structure were investigated by XRD and EXAFS. XRD showed that for all the samples the only structure present was DO{sub 22}. The DO{sub 22} structure was stable even after the high temperature heat treatments. By means of EXAFS, niobium atoms were observed to occupy titanium sites in the DO{sub 22} structure. Furthermore, in the unannealed samples, increasing wheel speed of the melt spinning process or the niobium concentration tended to distort the crystal structure. It was observed that Ti EXAFS had different results from the Nb EXAFS beyond their occupying similar sites, which suggested there may exist some composition zones, i.e., rich Nb zone or rich Ti zones, although the structures present were still DO{sub 22}. The samples were found to experience different distortions as a function of annealing temperatures.

  5. The use of micro-XRD for the study of glaze color decorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradell, T.; Molina, G.; Molera, J.; Pla, J.; Labrador, A.

    2013-04-01

    The compounds responsible for the colors and decorations in glass and glazed ceramics include: coloring agents (transition-metal ions), pigments (micro- and nanoprecipitates of compounds that either do not dissolve or recrystallize in the glassy matrix) and opacifiers (microcrystalline compounds with high light scattering capability). Their composition, structure and range of stability are highly dependent not only on the composition but also on the procedures followed to obtain them. Chemical composition of the colorants and crystallites may be obtained by means of SEM-EDX and WDX. Synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray diffraction (SR-micro-XRD) has a small beam size adequate (10 to 50 microns footprint size) to obtain the structural information of crystalline compounds and high brilliance, optimal for determining the crystallites even when present in low amounts. In addition, in glass decorations the crystallites often appear forming thin layers (from 10 to 100 micrometers thick) and they show a depth-dependent composition and crystal structure. Their nature and distribution across the glass/glaze decorations gives direct information on the technology of production and stability and may be related to the color and appearance. A selection of glass and glaze coloring agents and decorations are studied by means of SR-micro-XRD and SEM-EDX including: manganese brown, antimony yellow, red copper lusters and cobalt blue. The selection includes Medieval (Islamic, and Hispano Moresque) and Renaissance tin-glazed ceramics from the 10th to the 17th century AD.

  6. An Integrated XRF/XRD Instrument for Mars Exobiology and Geology Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppel, L. N.; Franco, E. D.; Kerner, J. A.; Fonda, M. L.; Schwartz, D. E.; Marshall, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    By employing an integrated x-ray instrument on a future Mars mission, data obtained will greatly augment those returned by Viking; details characterizing the past and present environment on Mars and those relevant to the possibility of the origin and evolution of life will be acquired. A combined x-ray fluorescence/x-ray diffraction (XRF/XRD) instrument was breadboarded and demonstrated to accommodate important exobiology and geology experiment objectives outlined for MESUR and future Mars missions. Among others, primary objectives for the exploration of Mars include the intense study of local areas on Mars to establish the chemical, mineralogical, and petrological character of different components of the surface material; to determine the distribution, abundance, and sources and sinks of volatile materials, including an assessment of the biologic potential, now and during past epoches; and to establish the global chemical and physical characteristics of the Martian surface. The XRF/XRD breadboard instrument identifies and quantifies soil surface elemental, mineralogical, and petrological characteristics and acquires data necessary to address questions on volatile abundance and distribution. Additionally, the breadboard is able to characterize the biogenic element constituents of soil samples providing information on the biologic potential of the Mars environment. Preliminary breadboard experiments confirmed the fundamental instrument design approach and measurement performance.

  7. Trace elemental analysis of Indian natural moonstone gems by PIXE and XRD techniques.

    PubMed

    Venkateswara Rao, R; Venkateswarulu, P; Kasipathi, C; Sivajyothi, S

    2013-12-01

    A selected number of Indian Eastern Ghats natural moonstone gems were studied with a powerful nuclear analytical and non-destructive Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. Thirteen elements, including V, Co, Ni, Zn, Ga, Ba and Pb, were identified in these moonstones and may be useful in interpreting the various geochemical conditions and the probable cause of their inceptions in the moonstone gemstone matrix. Furthermore, preliminary XRD studies of different moonstone patterns were performed. The PIXE technique is a powerful method for quickly determining the elemental concentration of a substance. A 3MeV proton beam was employed to excite the samples. The chemical constituents of moonstones from parts of the Eastern Ghats geological formations of Andhra Pradesh, India were determined, and gemological studies were performed on those gems. The crystal structure and the lattice parameters of the moonstones were estimated using X-Ray Diffraction studies, trace and minor elements were determined using the PIXE technique, and major compositional elements were confirmed by XRD. In the present work, the usefulness and versatility of the PIXE technique for research in geo-scientific methodology is established. PMID:24055999

  8. XRD studies of beta-chitin from squid pen with calcium solvent.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, H; Higuchi, T; Jayakumar, R; Furuike, T; Tamura, H

    2008-05-01

    The crystalline structure of beta-chitin from squid pen was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The purified beta-chitin was prepared from bigfin reefsquid pen. beta-Chitin was treated with saturated calcium chloride dihydrate/alchohol (CaCl(2).2H(2)O/MeOH) solvent system at different conditions for XRD studies. The change of crystallinity of beta-chitin from squid pen was studied by using the fiber photographs on imaging plates. The results showed that the diffraction peak (010) was shifted. It means that the lattice plane (010) interplanarilly spreaded to 3.4A, when the squid pen was washed with water after treatment of Ca solvent. Furthermore, when the squid pen was dried after treatment of Ca solvent and washing with water, interplanar spacing of (010) inversely shrank to 1.1A. These results suggested that Ca solvent especially influences the plane (010) of beta-chitin structure. PMID:18036656

  9. [FTIR and XRD analysis of hydroxyapatite from fossil human and animal teeth in Jinsha Relict, Chengdu].

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-min; Zhang, Qing; Bai, Song; Wang, Cheng-shan

    2007-12-01

    Diagenetic effect during burial on the hydroxyapatite in enamel and dentin from fossil human and animal teeth was examined, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For the enamel and dentin of all fossil teeth, XRD patterns exhibit bulge line and overlap between major reflections of hydroxyapatite, and the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite is low. For each infrared spectrum, H2O and OH(-) have distinct peaks of absorbance, and PO4(3-) and CO3(2-) ions have intensive infrared vibration modes at the fundamental wave numbers. The component of hydroxyapatite of all fossil teeth is similar to the modern biological hydroxyapatite. Furthermore, the index (PCI) which reflects the hydroxyapatite crystallinity of each sample ranges from 2.4 to 4.0 while the index (BPI) reflecting the amount of type B carbonate to phosphate indicates that the values of CO3(2-) content in hydroxyapatite are rather high, accordingly the crystallinity of all fossil hydroxyapatites are poor. It could be concluded that little alteration of hydroxyapatites from fossil human and animal teeth occurred in the process of diagenesis in Jinsha Relict, Chengdu, China. PMID:18330282

  10. XRD and FTIR structural investigation of gadolinium-zinc-borate glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodi, G.; Pascuta, P.; Stefan, R.; Dan, V.; Pop, V.; Radulescu, D.

    2013-11-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements have been employed to investigate the (Gd2O3)xṡ(B2O3)(60-x)ṡ(ZnO)40 glass ceramics system, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%. After heat treatment applied at 860 °C for 2 h, some structural changes were observed and new crystalline phases appeared in the structure of the samples. In these glass ceramics four crystalline phases were identified using powder diffraction files (PDF 2), namely ZnB4O7, Zn4O(B6O12), Zn3(BO3)2 and GdBO3. From the XRD data, the average unit-cell parameter and the quantitative ratio of the crystallographic phases in the studied samples were evaluated. FTIR data revealed that the BO3, BO4 and ZnO4 are the main structural units of these glass ceramics network. The compositional dependence of the different structural units which appear in the studied samples was followed.

  11. Development of 89Zr-Ontuxizumab for in vivo TEM-1/endosialin PET applications

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sara E.S.; Zheleznyak, Alex; Studer, Matthew; O'Shannessy, Daniel J.; Lapi, Suzanne E.; Van Tine, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The complexity of sarcoma has led to the need for patient selection via in vivo biomarkers. Tumor endothelial marker-1 (TEM-1) is a cell surface marker expressed by the tumor microenvironment. Currently MORAb-004 (Ontuxizumab), an anti-TEM-1 humanized monoclonal antibody, is in sarcoma clinical trials. Development of positron emission tomography (PET) for in vivo TEM-1 expression may allow for stratification of patients, potentially enhancing clinical outcomes seen with Ontuxizumab. Results Characterization of cell lines revealed clear differences in TEM-1 expression. One high expressing (RD-ES) and one low expressing (LUPI) cell line were xenografted, and mice were injected with 89Zr-Ontuxizumab. PET imaging post-injection revealed that TEM-1 was highly expressed and readily detectable in vivo only in RD-ES. In vivo biodistribution studies confirmed high radiopharmaceutical uptake in tumor relative to normal organs. Experimental Design Sarcoma cell lines were characterized for TEM-1 expression. Ontuxizumab was labeled with 89Zr and evaluated for immunoreactivity preservation. 89Zr-Ontuxizumab was injected into mice with high or null expressing TEM-1 xenografts. In vivo PET imaging experiments were performed. Conclusion 89Zr-Ontuxizumab can be used in vivo to determine high versus low TEM-1 expression. Reliable PET imaging of TEM-1 in sarcoma patients may allow for identification of patients that will attain the greatest benefit from anti-TEM-1 therapy. PMID:26909615

  12. Seismicity triggered by the olivine-spinel transition: new insights from combined XRD and acoustic emission monitoring during deformation experiments in Mg2GeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Hilairet, N.; Brunet, F.; Gasc, J.; Cordier, P.; Wang, Y.; Green, H. W.

    2012-04-01

    Polycrystalline Mg2GeO4-olivine has been deformed (strain rates from 2.10-4/s to 10-5/s) in the deformation-DIA in 13-BM-D at GSECARS (Advanced Photon Source) at ca. 2 GPa confining pressure for temperatures between 973 and 1573 K (i.e., in the Mg2GeO4-ringwoodite field). Stress, advancement of transformation, and strain were measured in-situ using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and imaging, and acoustic emissions (AE) were recorded simultaneously. When differential stress is applied (ca. 1- to 2 GPa) and temperature is increased, the very beginning of the transformation to the ringwoodite structure (as evidenced by in situ XRD) is accompanied by AE bursts which locate within the sample. At high strain rates (>10-4/s) and low temperatures (800-900 degrees C), the number of AEs is comparable, if not larger, to that observed during the cold compression of quartz grains. The largest events always occur at a temperature slightly below that of appearance of the ringwoodite-structure phase on the XRD images patterns. This suggests that AEs are generated while the transition is still nucleation controlled (pseudo-martensitic stage). During stress-relaxation periods, the rate of AE triggering decreases, but does not completely vanish. Importantly, we still observed very large AEs at strain rates as low as approx. 10-5/ s, while at these early stages of the transformation, the samples did not show any macroscopic rheological weakening. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed that they are all of shear type, some being even pure double couple. They radiate about the same amount of energy as typically recorded during fast crack propagation in amorphous glass material. Microstructural analysis (SEM, EBSD and TEM) highlights the presence of thin transformation bands, with plausible evidence of shear (grain distortion and grain size reduction). These bands are made of incoherent spinel and olivine nano-grains which run across germanium-olivine grain boundaries. These bands

  13. Seismicity triggered by the olivine-spinel transition: new insights from combined XRD and acoustic emission monitoring during deformation experiments in Mg2GeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A. J.; Hilairet, N.; Brunet, F.; Héripré, E.; Cordier, P.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Polycrystalline Mg2GeO4-olivine has been deformed (strain rates from 2.10-4/s to 10-5/s) in the deformation-DIA in 13-BM-D at GSECARS (Advanced Photon Source) at ca. 2 GPa confining pressure for temperatures between 973 and 1573 K (i.e., in the Mg2GeO4-ringwoodite field). Stress, advancement of transformation, and strain were measured in-situ using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and imaging, and acoustic emissions (AE) were recorded simultaneously. When differential stress is applied (ca. 1- to 2 GPa) and temperature is increased, the very beginning of the transformation to the ringwoodite structure (as evidenced by in situ XRD) is accompanied by AE bursts which locate within the sample. At high strain rates (>10-4/s) and low temperatures (800-900 degrees C), the number of AEs is comparable, if not larger, to that observed during the cold compression of quartz grains. The largest events always occur at a temperature slightly below that of appearance of the ringwoodite-structure phase on the XRD images patterns. This suggests that AEs are generated while the transition is still nucleation controlled (pseudo-martensitic stage). During stress-relaxation periods, the rate of AE triggering decreases, but does not completely vanish. Importantly, we still observed very large AEs at strain rates as low as approx. 10-5/ s, while at these early stages of the transformation, the samples did not show any macroscopic rheological weakening. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed that they are all of shear type, some being even pure double couple. They radiate about the same amount of energy as typically recorded during fast crack propagation in amorphous glass material. Microstructural analysis (SEM, EBSD and TEM) highlights the presence of thin transformation bands, with plausible evidence of shear (grain distortion and grain size reduction). These bands are made of incoherent spinel and olivine nano-grains which run across germanium-olivine grain boundaries. These bands

  14. Carbonate Mineral Assemblages as Inclusions in Yakutian Diamonds: TEM Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Wirth, R.; Sobolev, N. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate mineral inclusions are quite rare in diamonds from the upper mantle, but are evidence for a carbonate abundance in the mantle. It is believed that such carbonatitic inclusions originated from high-density fluids (HDFs) that were enclosed in diamond during its growth. Using TEM and EPMA, several kinds of carbonate inclusions have been identified in Yakutian diamonds : aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, Ba-, Sr-, and Fe-rich carbonates. Most of them are represented by multi-phase inclusions of various chemically distinct carbonates, rich in Ca, Mg, and K and associated with minor amounts of silicate, oxide, saline, and volatile phases. Volatiles, leaving some porosity, played a significant role in the diamond growth. A single crystal of aragonite (60μm) is herein reported for the first time. This inclusion is located in the center of a diamond from the Komsomolskaya pipe. Careful CL imaging reveals the total absence of cracks around the aragonite inclusion - i.e., closed system. This inclusion has been identified by X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. At temperatures above 1000 0C, aragonite is only stable at high pressures of 5-6 GPa. Inside this aragonite, we observed nanocrystalline inclusions of titanite, Ni-rich sulfide, magnetite, water-bearing Mg-silicate, and fluid bubbles. Dolomite is common in carbonate multi-phase inclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes. Alluvial diamonds of the northeastern Siberian Platform are divided into two groups based on the composition of HDFs: 1) Mg-rich multi-phase inclusions (60% magnesite + dolomite + Fe-spinel + Ti-silicate + fluid bubbles); and 2) Ca-rich multi-phase inclusions (Ca,Ba-, Ca,Sr-, Ca,Fe-carbonates + Ti-silicate + Ba-apatite + fluid bubbles). High-density fluids also contain K. Volatiles in the fluid bubbles are represented by water, Cl, F, S, CO2, CH4, and heavy hydrocarbons. Origin of the second group of HDFs may be related to the non

  15. Evolution of the Mobile Information SysTem (MIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Thompson, Shelby; Archer, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    The Mobile Information SysTem (MIST) had its origins in the need to determine whether commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies could improve intervehicular activities (IVA) on International Space Station (ISS) crew maintenance productivity. It began with an exploration of head mounted displays (HMDs), but quickly evolved to include voice recognition, mobile personal computing, and data collection. The unique characteristic of the MIST lies within its mobility, in which a vest is worn that contains a mini-computer and supporting equipment, and a headband with attachments for a HMD, lipstick camera, and microphone. Data is then captured directly by the computer running Morae(TM) or similar software for analysis. To date, the MIST system has been tested in numerous environments such as two parabolic flights on NASA's C-9 microgravity aircraft and several mockup facilities ranging from ISS to the Altair Lunar Sortie Lander. Functional capabilities have included its lightweight and compact design, commonality across systems and environments, and usefulness in remote collaboration. Human Factors evaluations of the system have proven the MIST's ability to be worn for long durations of time (approximately four continuous hours) with no adverse physical deficits, moderate operator compensation, and low workload being reported as measured by Corlett Bishop Discomfort Scale, Cooper-Harper Ratings, and the NASA Total Workload Index (TLX), respectively. Additionally, through development of the system, it has spawned several new applications useful in research. For example, by only employing the lipstick camera, microphone, and a compact digital video recorder (DVR), we created a portable, lightweight data collection device. Video is recorded from the participants point of view (POV) through the use of the camera mounted on the side of the head. Both the video and audio is recorded directly into the DVR located on a belt around the waist. This data is then transferred to

  16. Evaluation of rock powdering methods to obtain fine-grained samples for CHEMIN, a combined XRD/XRF instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Sarrazin, P.; Feldman, S.; Blake, D.; Bearman, G. H.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2004-01-01

    A miniature XRD/XRD (X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence) instrument, CHEMIN, is currently being developed for definite mineralogic analysis of soils and rocks on Mars. One of the technical issues that must be addressed to enable remote XRD analysis is how best to obtain a representative sample powder for analysis. For powder XRD analyses, it is beneficial to have a fine-grained sample to reduce preferred orientation effects and to provide a statistically significant number of crystallites to the X-ray beam. Although a two-dimensional detector as used in the CHEMIN instrument produces good results even with poorly prepared powder, the quality of the data improves and the time required for data collection is reduced if the sample is fine-grained and randomly oriented. A variety of methods have been proposed for XRD sample preparation. Chipera et al. presented grain size distributions and XRD reuslts from powders generated with an Ultrasonic/Sonic Driller/Corer (USDC) currently being developed at JPL. The USDC was shown to be an effective instrument for sampling rock to produce powder suitable for XRD. In this paper, they compare powder prepared using the USDC with powder obtained with a miniaturized rock crusher developed at JPL and with powder obtained with a rotary tungsten carbide bit to powders obtained from a laboratory bench-scale Retsch mill (provides benchmark mineralogical data). These comparisons will allow assessment of the suitability of these methods for analysis by an XRD/XRD instrument such as CHEMIN.

  17. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragoi, D.; Kanik, I.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sherrit, S.; Tsapin, A.; Kulleck, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe an analytical method for determining the presence of organic compounds in rocks, limestone, and other composite materials. Our preliminary laboratory experiments on different rocks/limestone show that the organic component in mineralogical matrices is a minor phase on order of hundreds of ppm and can be better detected using high precision liquid chromatography (HPLC). The matrix, which is the major phase, plays an important role in embedding and protecting the organic molecules from the harsh Martian environment. Some rocks bear significant amounts of amino acids therefore, it is possible to identify these phases using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) by crystallizing the organic. The method of detection/analysis of organics, in particular amino acids, that have been associated with life will be shown in the next section.

  18. Powder XRD and dielectric studies of gel grown calcium pyrophosphate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Bharat; Parikh, Ketan; Joshi, Mihir

    2013-06-01

    Formation of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in soft tissues such as cartilage, meniscus and synovial tissue leads to CPPD deposition diseases. The appearance of these crystals in the synovial fluid can give rise to an acute arthritic attack with pain and inflammation of the joints, a condition called pseudo-gout. The growth of CPP crystals has been carried out, in the present study, using the single diffusion gel growth technique, which can broadly mimic in vitro the condition in soft tissues. The crystals were characterized by different techniques. The FTIR study revealed the presence of various functional groups. Powder XRD study was also carried out to verify the crystal structure. The dielectric study was carried out at room temperature by applying field of different frequency from 500 Hz to 1 MHz. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and a.c. resistivity decreased as frequency increased, whereas the a.c. conductivity increased as frequency increased.

  19. SHI Induced Modifications in CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} Thin Film: XRD Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Rajesh A.; Taur, Vidya S.; Sharma, Ramphal; Ghule, Anil V.

    2011-07-15

    CuInSe{sub 2}(CIS nanostructured) thin films were prepared by ion exchange method at room temperature on ITO coated glass substrates in an alkaline medium. The as prepared thin films were irradiated by 120 MeV Au{sup 9+} swift heavy ion (SHI) at 5x10{sup 11} and 5x10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence respectively. To study the effect of irradiation, the pristine and irradiated nanostructured thin films were characterized by X ray Diffraction (XRD) and analyzed the improvement in crystalline quality and crystallite size. The observed structural modifications discussed considering the high electronic energy deposition by 120 MeV gold heavy (Au{sup 9+}) ions in CuInSe{sub 2} thin films.

  20. Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Brown, Heather M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Holladay, John E.

    2007-03-21

    Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining macrofibrils studied with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) under various magnifications. The crystal region (microfibril bundles) in the macrofibrils was not altered by hydrolysis, and only amorphous cellulose was hydrolyzed and leached out from the macrofibrils. The diameter of microfibril bundles was 20-30 nm after the amorphous cellulose was removed by hydrolysis. XRD experiments confirm the unaltered diameter of the microfibrils after hydrolysis. The strong stability of these microfibril bundles in hydrolysis limits both the total sugar monomer yield and the size of nano particles or rods produced in hydrolysis. The large surface potential on the remaining microfibril bundles drives the agglomeration of macrofibrils.

  1. A high-pressure study of PbCO3 by XRD and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Feng; Liu, Jing; Qin, Zhen-Xing; Lin, Chuan-Long; Xiong, Lun; Li, Rui; Bai, Li-Gang

    2013-03-01

    The pressure-induced phase transitions of PbCO3 are studied using synchrotron radiation in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The XRD measurement indicates that PbCO3 with an initial phase of aragonite-type structure undergoes two phase transitions at ~7.8 GPa and ~15.7 GPa, respectively. The higher-pressure phase appearing at ~15.7 GPa is stable up to 51.8 GPa. The two phase transitions are further confirmed by Raman scattering up to 23.3 GPa. During the decompression process, the high-pressure phases of PbCO3 are gradually recovered to the starting aragonite-type structure, but exhibit some hysteresis. The bulk modulus B0 of the aragonite-type structure is obtained to be 63±(3) GPa by fitting the volume-pressure data to the Birch—Murnaghan equation of states with B'0 fixed to 4.

  2. High temperature XRD of Cu{sub 2}GeSe{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Premkumar, D. S.; Malar, P.; Chetty, Raju; Mallik, Ramesh Chandra

    2015-06-24

    The Cu{sub 2}GeSe{sub 3} is prepared by solid state synthesis method. The high temperature XRD has been done at different temperature from 30 °C to 450 °C. The reitveld refinement confirms Cu{sub 2}GeSe{sub 3} phase and orthorhombic crystal structure. The lattice constants are increasing with increase in the temperature and their rate of increase with respect to temperature are used for finding the thermal expansion coefficient. The calculation of the linear and volume coefficient of thermal expansion is done from 30 °C to 400 °C. Decrease in the values of linear expansion coefficients with temperature are observed along a and c axis. Since thermal expansion coefficient is the consequence of the distortion of atoms in the lattice; this can be further used to find the minimum lattice thermal conductivity at given temperature.

  3. Thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2: insights from TGA and in situ XRD analysis.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perejon, Antonio; Medina, Santiago; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2015-11-28

    Thermal decomposition of dolomite in the presence of CO2 in a calcination environment is investigated by means of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The in situ XRD results suggest that dolomite decomposes directly at a temperature around 700 °C into MgO and CaO. Immediate carbonation of nascent CaO crystals leads to the formation of calcite as an intermediate product of decomposition. Subsequently, decarbonation of this poorly crystalline calcite occurs when the reaction is thermodynamically favorable and sufficiently fast at a temperature depending on the CO2 partial pressure in the calcination atmosphere. Decarbonation of this dolomitic calcite occurs at a lower temperature than limestone decarbonation due to the relatively low crystallinity of the former. Full decomposition of dolomite leads also to a relatively low crystalline CaO, which exhibits a high reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO. Under CO2 capture conditions in the Calcium-Looping (CaL) process, MgO grains remain inert yet favor the carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO especially in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase. The fundamental mechanism that drives the crystallographic transformation of dolomite in the presence of CO2 is thus responsible for its fast calcination kinetics and the high carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO, which makes natural dolomite a potentially advantageous alternative to limestone for CO2 capture in the CaL technology as well as SO2in situ removal in oxy-combustion fluidized bed reactors. PMID:26506285

  4. XRD and EPR structural investigation of some zinc borate glasses doped with iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Razvan; Pascuta, Petru; Popa, Adriana; Raita, Oana; Indrea, Emil; Culea, Eugen

    2012-02-01

    Glasses in the system xFe2O3·(100-x) [45ZnO·55B2O3] (0≤x≤10 mol%) have been prepared by melting at 1200 °C and rapidly cooling at room temperature. The obtained samples were submitted to an additional thermal treatment at 570 °C for 12 h in order to relax the glass structure as well as to improve the local order. The as cast and heat treated samples were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The XRD patterns of all the studied samples show their vitreous nature. Structural modifications occurring in the heat treated samples compared to the untreated ones have been pointed out. EPR spectra of untreated and heat treated samples revealed resonance absorptions centered at g≈2.0, g≈4.3 and g≈6.4. The compositional variation of the line intensity and linewidth of the absorptions from g≈4.3 and g≈2.0 have been interpreted in terms of the variation in the concentration of the Fe3+ ions and the interaction between the iron ions. The EPR spectra of the untreated samples containing 5 mol% Fe2O3 have been studied at different temperatures (110-290 K). The line intensity of the resonance signals decreases with increase in temperature whereas the linewidth is found to be independent of temperature. It was also found that the temperature variation of reciprocal line intensity obeys the Boltzmann law.

  5. Exploring the potential reservoirs of non specific TEM beta lactamase (blaTEM) gene in the Indo-Gangetic region: A risk assessment approach to predict health hazards.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gulshan; Vajpayee, Poornima; Rani, Neetika; Amoah, Isaac Dennis; Stenström, Thor Axel; Shanker, Rishi

    2016-08-15

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria is an important public health and environmental contamination issue. Antimicrobials of β-lactam group accounts for approximately two thirds, by weight, of all antimicrobials administered to humans due to high clinical efficacy and low toxicity. This study explores β-lactam resistance determinant gene (blaTEM) as emerging contaminant in Indo-Gangetic region using qPCR in molecular beacon format. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) approach was adopted to predict risk to human health associated with consumption/exposure of surface water, potable water and street foods contaminated with bacteria having blaTEM gene. It was observed that surface water and sediments of the river Ganga and Gomti showed high numbers of blaTEM gene copies and varied significantly (p<0.05) among the sampling locations. The potable water collected from drinking water facility and clinical settings exhibit significant number of blaTEM gene copies (13±0.44-10200±316 gene copies/100mL). It was observed that E.crassipes among aquatic flora encountered in both the rivers had high load of blaTEM gene copies. The information on prevalence of environmental reservoirs of blaTEM gene containing bacteria in Indo-Gangetic region and risk associated will be useful for formulating strategies to protect public from menace of clinical risks linked with antimicrobial resistant bacteria. PMID:27111425

  6. Final Report - SRNL Agreement #AC51296V SEM, FIB, TEM Studies of CZT Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J; Dai, Z R; Graham, G A; Teslich, N E

    2007-08-28

    The aims of this study are: (1) to characterize the surfaces of samples 3-7-8-3 and 4-1-3 using SEM, FIB and TEM techniques; (2) identify raised surface features; (3) prepare FIB-TEM lift-out sections from identified raised surfaces; and (4) perform detailed TEM characterization of FIB Sections. Focusing on the composition and crystallinity of the phases within the sections, including impurities.

  7. Retrofit implementation of Zernike phase plate imaging for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Michael; Leith, ArDean; Hsieh, Chyongere; Danev, Radostin

    2011-01-01

    In-focus phase-plate imaging is particularly beneficial for cryo-TEM because it offers a substantial overall increase in image contrast, without an electron dose penalty, and it simplifies image interpretation. We show how phase-plate cryo-TEM can be implemented with an appropriate existing TEM, and provide a basic practical introduction to use of thin-film (carbon) phase plates. We point out potential pitfalls of phase-plate operation, and discuss solutions. We provide information on evaluating a particular TEM for its suitability. PMID:21272647

  8. Modal Mineralogy of CV3 Chondrites by PSD-XRD: Mineralogic Insights into a Complex Evolutionary History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, K. T.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.; Cressey, G.

    2009-03-01

    CV3 chondrites Vigarano, Efremovka, Allende, Mokoia, Grosnaja and Kaba are amongst the most studied rocks in existence. By XRD we define the first quantitative modal mineralogy of these samples and explore implications of our data to petrogenesis.

  9. Spectral studies on a series of metal ion complexes derived from pyrimidine nucleus, TEM, biological and γ-irradiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ashqer, Sawsan; Abou-Melha, Khlood S.; Al-Hazmi, G. A. A.; Saad, Fawaz A.; El-Metwaly, Nashwa M.

    2014-11-01

    A series of thiouracil complexes was prepared, all the prepared compounds are investigated by all possible tools. The ligand coordinates towards two central atoms as a neutral hexadentate mode. The octahedral structure was proposed with Ni(II), Pt(IV) and UO2(II) complexes. Square-pyramidal and square planar with VO(II) and Pd(II) complexes, respectively. VO(II) complex was irradiated by using Gamma radiation to through a light on the probability of geometry changes with the effect of radiation. The parameters calculated from ESR spectra before and after γ-irradiation reflect the rigidity of the complex towards the effect. Such may discuss the unaffected biological behavior before and after irradiation. XRD patterns were carried out to emphasis on the nature of the particles and the purity of products. The ligand, Pt(IV) and Pd(II) are found in nanometer range. TEM is a sensitive tool used to justify on the microstructure and surface morphology. All the investigated compounds are in nanorange. TG curves reflect a lower thermal stability of all investigated complexes due to the presence of water of crystallization. Finally, a toxic effect was observed with all investigated complexes towards Gram positive bacterium as well as a resistant behavior was observed with Gram negative bacteria.

  10. Application of Mythen detector: In-situ XRD study on the thermal expansion behavior of metal indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Rong; Chen, ZhongJun; Cai, Quan; Fu, JianLong; Gong, Yu; Wu, ZhongHua

    2016-07-01

    A Mythen detector has been equipped at the beamline 4B9A of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), which is expected to enable BSRF to perform time-resolved measurement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) full-profiles. In this paper, the thermal expansion behavior of metal indium has been studied by using the in-situ XRD technique with the Mythen detector. The indium was heated from 303 to 433 K with a heating rate of 2 K/min. The in-situ XRD full-profiles were collected with a rate of one profile per 10 seconds. Rietveld refinement was used to extract the structural parameters. The results demonstrate that these collected quasi-real-time XRD profiles can be well used for structural analysis. The metal indium was found to have a nonlinear thermal expansion behavior from room temperature to the melting point (429.65 K). The a-axis of the tetragonal unit cell expands with a biquadratic dependency on temperature, while the c-axis contracts with a cubic dependency on temperature. By the time-resolved XRD measurements, it was observed that the [200] preferred orientation can maintain to about 403.15 K. While (110) is the last and detectable crystal plane just before melting of the polycrystalline indium foil. This study is not only beneficial to the application of metal indium, but also exhibits the capacity of in-situ time-resolved XRD measurements at the X-ray diffraction station of BSRF.

  11. The proposed icy mineralogy package (XRD/XRF) for TandEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Andrew Dominic; Wood, Ian G.; Dobson, David P.; Fewster, Paul F.; Coustenis, Athena; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    Introduction: Understanding the geology of Titan's crust, and its interaction with the atmosphere, requires determination of the chemistry and mineralogy of surface materials which can only be achieved unambiguously using a combination of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Here we describe an icy mineralogy package (IMP) consisting of a miniaturised XRD/XRF instrument designed primarily with Titan (and the TandEM ESA Cosmic Vision proposal [1]) in mind; however, the instrument is not predicated upon an a priori knowledge of surface mineralogy and consequently is applicable with little modification to any solar system body (rocky or icy). The proposed instrument is well suited to integration with other analytical tools, such as IR and UV Raman spectrometers. Instrument design: Two design concepts are currently under study, which differ in the complexity of the sample handling system, and the range of Bragg angles which may be observed. Both are focusing cameras, one (IMP senior) working in transmission, and the other (IMP junior) working in back-reflection. IMP jnr is intended for deployment on a static surface probe with no sample acquisition capability, collecting a single diffraction pattern through a window in the probe's underside. IMP snr is intended for deployment on a balloon with a sample collection arm able to deliver scoops of surface material to a rotating specimen stage. The latter may therefore be used to analyse many samples at geographically dispersed points. In each case we will use X-rays generated by high specific-activity radioisotope sources, 55 Fe and 241 Am. Our paper will present the results of the following activities: (a) compilation of a crystallographic database of materials expected on Titan's surface; (b) simulation of single-phase and polyphase diffraction data to illustrate the ease with which substances may be distinguished (even in complex mixtures); (c) blind tests of peak-matching software against

  12. XRD Analysis of Cement Paste Samples Exposed to the Simulated Environment of a Deep Repository - 12239

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Eduardo G.A.; Marumo, Julio T.; Vicente, Roberto; Gobbo, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    Portland cement materials are widely used as engineered barriers in repositories for radioactive waste. The capacity of such barriers to avoid the disposed of radionuclides to entering the biosphere in the long-term depends on the service life of those materials. Thus, the performance assessment of structural materials under a series of environmental conditions prevailing at the environs of repositories is a matter of interest. The durability of cement paste foreseen as backfill in a deep borehole for disposal of disused sealed radioactive sources is investigated in the development of the repository concept. Results are intended to be part of the body of evidence in the safety case of the proposed disposal technology. This paper presents the results of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Analysis of cement paste exposed to varying temperatures and simulated groundwater after samples received the radiation dose that the cement paste will accumulate until complete decay of the radioactive sources. The XRD analysis of cement paste samples realized in this work allowed observing some differences in the results of cement paste specimens that were submitted to different treatments. The cluster analysis of results was able to group tested samples according to the applied treatments. Mineralogical differences, however, are tenuous and, apart from ettringite, are hardly observed. The absence of ettringite in all the seven specimens that were kept in dry storage at high temperature had hardly occurred by natural variations in the composition of hydrated cement paste because ettringite is observed in all tested except the seven specimens. Therefore this absence is certainly the result of the treatments and could be explained by the decomposition of ettringite. Although the temperature of decomposition is about 110-120 deg. C, it may be initially decomposed to meta-ettringite, an amorphous compound, above 50 deg. C in the absence of water. Influence of irradiation on the mineralogical

  13. Modal mineralogy of CV3 chondrites by X-ray diffraction (PSD-XRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, K. T.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.; Cressey, G.

    2010-09-01

    Using position sensitive detector X-ray diffraction (PSD-XRD) we determine a complete modal mineralogy for all phases present in abundances greater than 1 wt% in Vigarano, Efremovka, Mokoia, Grosnaja, Kaba and Allende. Reduced CV3 samples are comprised of (vol%): olivine (83-85%); enstatite (6.5-8.1%); anorthite (1.1-1.2%); magnetite (1.4-1.8%); sulphide (2.4-5.1%); Fe, Ni metal (2-2.2%). The oxidized samples are comprised of: olivine (76.3-83.9%); enstatite (4.8-7.8%); anorthite (1.1-1.7%); magnetite (0.3-6.1%); sulphide (2.9-8.1%); Fe, Ni metal (0.2-1.1%); Fe-oxide (0-2.7%) and phyllosilicate (1.9-4.2%). When our modal data is used to calculate a bulk chemistry that is compared to literature data a near 1:1 correlation is observed. PSD-XRD data indicates that olivine compositions may span almost the entire Fe-Mg solid solution series in all CV samples and that these contain a component (4-13%) of fine-grained olivine that is more Fe-rich (>Fa 60) than is typically reported. Modal mineralogy shows that there are mineralogic differences between CV3 samples classified as oxidized and reduced but that these sub-classes are most clearly distinguished by the relative abundance of metal and Ni content of sulphide, rather than abundance of magnetite. The most significant difference in modal mineralogy observed is the relative absence of phyllosilicate in reduced CV that essentially escaped aqueous alteration. Fayalite, ferrous olivine and magnetite are typically considered secondary alteration products. The abundances of these minerals overlap in oxidized and reduced samples and correlate positively supporting common conditions of formation in a relatively oxidizing environment. The abundances of fayalite, ferrous olivine and magnetite show no relationship to petrographic type and if these abundances were used as a proxy for alteration, Allende would be the least altered CV - contrary to all previous data. The implication is that thermal metamorphism on the parent body

  14. Data from the Mars Science Laboratory CheMin XRD/XRF Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, David; Blake, David; Bristow, Tom; DesMarais, David; Achilles, Cherie; Anderson, Robert; Crips, Joy; Morookian, John Michael; Spanovich, Nicole; Vasavada, Ashwin; Yen, Albert; Bish, David; Chipera, Steve; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Farmer, Jack; Grotzinger, John; Stolper, Edward; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard; Rampe, Elizabeth; Treiman, Allan; Sarrazin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity uses a Co tube source and a CCD detector to acquire mineralogy from diffracted primary X-rays and chemical information from fluoresced X-rays. CheMin has been operating at the MSL Gale Crater field site since August 5, 2012 and has provided the first X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses in situ on a body beyond Earth. Data from the first sample collected, the Rocknest eolian soil, identify a basaltic mineral suite, predominantly plagioclase (approx.An50), forsteritic olivine (approx.Fo58), augite and pigeonite, consistent with expectation that detrital grains on Mars would reflect widespread basaltic sources. Minor phases (each <2 wt% of the crystalline component) include sanidine, magnetite, quartz, anhydrite, hematite and ilmenite. Significantly, about a third of the sample is amorphous or poorly ordered in XRD. This amorphous component is attested to by a broad rise in background centered at approx.27deg 2(theta) (Co K(alpha)) and may include volcanic glass, impact glass, and poorly crystalline phases including iron oxyhydroxides; a rise at lower 2(theta) may indicate allophane or hisingerite. Constraints from phase chemistry of the crystalline components, compared with a Rocknest bulk composition from the APXS instrument on Curiosity, indicate that in sum the amorphous or poorly crystalline components are relatively Si, Al, Mg-poor and enriched in Ti, Cr, Fe, K, P, S, and Cl. All of the identified crystalline phases are volatile-free; H2O, SO2 and CO2 volatile releases from a split of this sample analyzed by the SAM instrument on Curiosity are associated with the amorphous or poorly ordered materials. The Rocknest eolian soil may be a mixture of local detritus, mostly crystalline, with a regional or global set of dominantly amorphous or poorly ordered components. The Rocknest sample was targeted by MSL for "first time analysis" to demonstrate that a loose deposit could be scooped, sieved to

  15. XRD monitoring of α self-irradiation in uranium-americium mixed oxides.

    PubMed

    Horlait, Denis; Lebreton, Florent; Roussel, Pascal; Delahaye, Thibaud

    2013-12-16

    The structural evolution under (241)Am self-irradiation of U(1-x)Am(x)O(2±δ) transmutation fuels (with x ≤ 0.5) was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Samples first underwent a preliminary heat treatment performed under a reducing atmosphere (Ar/H2(4%)) aiming to recover the previously accumulated structural defects. Over all measurements (carried out over up to a full year and for integrated doses up to 1.5 × 10(18) α-decay events·g(-1)), only fluorite U(1-x)Am(x)O(2±δ) solid solutions were observed. Within a few days after the end of the heat treatment, each of the five studied samples was slowly oxidized as a consequence of their move to air atmosphere, which is evidenced by XRD by an initial sharp decrease of the unit cell parameter. For the compounds with x ≤ 0.15, this oxidation occurred without any phase transitions, but for U0.6Am0.4O(2±δ) and U0.5Am0.5O(2±δ), this process is accompanied by a transition from a first fluorite solid solution to a second oxidized one, as the latter is thermodynamically stable in ambient conditions. In the meantime and after the oxidation process, (241)Am α self-irradiation caused a structural swelling up to ∼0.8 vol %, independently of the sample composition. The kinetic constants of swelling were also determined by regression of experimental data and are, as expected, dependent on x and thus on the dose rate. The normalization of these kinetic constants by sample α-activity, however, leads to very close swelling rates among the samples. Finally, evolutions of microstrain and crystallite size were also monitored, but for the considered dose rates and cumulated doses, α self-irradiation was found, within the limits of the diffractometer used, to have almost no impact on these characteristics. Microstrain was found to be influenced instead by the americium content in the materials (i.e., by the impurities associated with americium starting material and the increase of cationic charge heterogeneity with

  16. Spectroscopic and XRD characterisation of zeolite catalysts active for the oxidative methylation of benzene with methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebajo, Moses O.; Long, Mervyn A.; Frost, Ray L.

    2004-03-01

    The benzene methylation with methane over zeolite catalysts was previously shown in our laboratory to require the presence of oxygen. Thus, a two-step mechanism involving the intermediate formation of methanol by partial oxidation of methane followed by the methylation of benzene with methanol in the second step, was postulated. This paper now reports the results of the characterisation of the zeolite catalysts used for the oxidative benzene methylation reaction in order to provide some information about their composition, structure, properties and their behaviour before and after the reaction. The catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), FT-IR and solid state NMR. XRD results indicate that the crystalline structures of all the ZSM-5 and H-beta catalysts remained unchanged after batch reaction of benzene with methane over the catalysts in agreement with the observation that the catalysts recovered from the reactor could be reused without loss of activity. Elemental analyses and FT-IR data show that as the level of metal ion exchange increases, the Brönsted acid concentration decreases but this metal ion exchange does not totally remove Brönsted acidity. FT-IR results further show that only a small amount of acid sites is actually necessary for a catalyst to be active since used catalysts containing highly reduced Brönsted acidity are found to be reusable without any loss of their activity. 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR together with FT-IR spectra also show that all the active zeolites catalysts contain some extra-framework octahedral aluminium in addition to the normal tetrahedral framework aluminium. The presence of this extra-lattice aluminium does not, however, have any adverse effect on the crystallinity of the catalysts both before and after oxidative benzene methylation reaction. There appears also to be no significant dealumination

  17. XRD Technique: A way to disseminate structural changes in iron-based amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K; Lian, T; Day, D; Farmer, J

    2007-05-24

    Prevention of corrosion is a vital goal for the Department of Defense when billions of dollars are spent every year. Corrosion resistant materials have applications in all sort of military vehicles, and more importantly in naval vessels and submarines which come in contact with the seawater. It is known that corrosion resistance property can be improved by the used of structurally designed materials in the amorphous state where the atoms are arranged in a non-periodic fashion and specific atoms, tailored to the required properties can be interjected into the matrix for specific application. The XRD techniques reported here is to demonstrate the optimal conditions for characterization of these materials. The samples, which normally contain different compositions of Fe, Cr, B, Mo, Y, Mn, Si and W, are in the form of powders, ribbons and coatings. These results will be compared for the different forms of the sample which appears to correlate to the cooling rate during sample processing. In most cases, the materials are amorphous or amorphous with very small amount of crystallinity. In the ribbon samples for different compositions we observed that the materials are essentially amorphous. In most cases, starting from an amorphous powder sample, the coatings are also observed to be amorphous with a small amount of iron oxide on the surface, probably due to exposure to air.

  18. Radiometric, SEM and XRD investigation of the Chituc black sands, southern Danube Delta, Romania.

    PubMed

    Margineanu, R M; Blebea-Apostu, Ana-Maria; Celarel, Aurelia; Gomoiu, Claudia-Mariana; Costea, C; Dumitras, Delia; Ion, Adriana; Duliu, O G

    2014-12-01

    The black sand of the Chituc marine sand bank, northern of the city of Navodari (Romania), presents anomalous high radioactivity. Field measurements recorded in some places dose rate up to 200 nSv/h, significantly overpassing the average value of 44 ± 20 nSv/h along the entire Southern sector of Romanian Black Sea shore. Gamma ray spectrometry performed on both Slanic-Prahova Underground Low Background Laboratory and Geological Institute of Romania Radiometric Facilities showed with clarity the dominance of (228)Ac radioisotope in the 50 microns fraction together with the (226)Ra and traces of (40)K. No significant amount of anthropogenic (137)Cs was identified. Based on radiometric as well as on SEM-EDAX and XRD determinations we come to the conclusion that the evidenced radioactivity could be attributed to both uranium and thorium series in the zircon and monazite fractions and to a lesser extent to potassium in the feldspars. PMID:25181034

  19. Correlative Characterization of Li-S Batteries Using In situ TXM and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Johanna; Misra, Sumohan; Yang, Yuan; Jackson, Ariel; Cui, Yi; Andrews, Joy; Toney, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Sulfur is an attractive Li-ion battery cathode material candidate because of its high specific energy (2600 Wh/kg); however, it is well known that Li-S batteries suffer from capacity loss or fading. It is generally accepted that this is due to the loss of active material and the formation of nonconducting Li2S as a thin film coating the electrode. Both phenomena stem from the dissolution of active sulfur particles in the non-aqueous electrolyte as soluble long chain polysulfides form during the early stages of cell discharge. Using in situ, high resolution transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) at SSRL beam line 6-2 and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) at beam line 11-3, we have explored initial discharge and charge cycle of Li-S batteries in real time. By combining these complementary methods, we can characterize the morphological changes of the active material as well as changes in crystallinity and crystal structure. We can then correlate these changes and the electrochemistry to better understand the reduction of elemental sulfur and various adaptations employed to retain battery capacity over many cycles.

  20. FTIR spectroscopic, thermal and XRD characterization of hydroxyapatite from new natural sources.

    PubMed

    Shaltout, Abdallah A; Allam, Moussa A; Moharram, Mohamed A

    2011-12-01

    The inorganic constituents of 5 different plants (leaves and stalks) were investigated by using Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis including thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). These plants are Catha edulis (Khat), basil, mint, green tea and trifolium. The absorption bands of carbonate ions CO(3)(2-) was exhibited at 1446 cm(-1), and the phosphate ions PO(4)(3-) was assigned at 1105 and 1035 cm(-1). At high temperatures (600, 700 and 600°C) further absorption bands of the phosphate ions PO(4)(3-) was assigned at the frequencies 572, 617, 962, 1043 and 1110 cm(-1) and the vibrational absorption band of the carbonate ions CO(3)(2-) was assigned at 871, 1416 and 1461 cm(-1). X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis confirm the obtained results of FITR. Results showed that the main inorganic constituents of C. edulis and basil leaves are hydroxyapatite whereas the hydroxyapatite content in the other plant samples is less than that in case of C. edulis and basil plant leaves. PMID:21903453

  1. XRD and XAS structural study of CuAlO2 under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Porres, J; Segura, A; Ferrer-Roca, Ch; Polian, A; Munsch, P; Kim, D

    2013-03-20

    We present the results of x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments in CuAlO(2) under high pressure. We discuss the polarization dependence of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure at the Cu K-edge. XRD under high pressure evidences anisotropic compression, the a-axis being more compressible than the c-axis. EXAFS yields the copper-oxygen bond length, from which the only internal parameter of the delafossite structure is deduced. The combination of anisotropic compression and the internal parameter decrease results in a regularization of the AlO(6) octahedra. The anisotropic compression is related to the chemical trends observed in the lattice parameters when Al is substituted by other trivalent cations. Both experiments evidence the existence of an irreversible phase transition that clearly manifests at 35 ± 2 GPa. The structure of the high-pressure polymorph could not be determined, but it implies a change of the Cu environment, which remains anisotropic. Precursor effects are observed from the lowest pressures, which are possibly related to crystal breaking at a submicroscopic scale with partial reorientation of the crystallites. PMID:23423689

  2. Modeling the PbI2 formation in perovskite solar cells using XRD/XPS patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Elyasi, Majid; Aldosari, Marouf; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of prolonged irradiation and air humidity on the stability of perovskite solar cells is modeled using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy patterns reported in the literature. Light or air-moisture causes the formation of a thin PbI2 or oxide defective layers (in nanoscale) at the interface of perovskite/hole-transport-layer or at the junction with metallic back contact. This thin layer blocks the carrier transport/passivation at the interfaces and cause degradation of device parameters. Variation in thickness of defective layers, changes the XRD and XPS peaks. This allows detection and estimation of the type, crystallinity and thickness of the defective layer. A simple model is developed here to extract the thickness of such thin defective layers formed in nanometer scale at the back region of several perovskite devices. Based on this information, corrected energy band diagram of every device before and after degradation/aging is drawn and discussed in order to obtain insight into the carrier transport and charge collection at the barrier region. In addition, graphene contacted perovskite devices are investigated showing that honey-comb network of graphene contact reduces the effect of aging leading to formation of a thinner defective layer at the perovskite surface compared to perovskite devices with conventional inorganic contacts i.e. Au, Al.

  3. FTIR spectroscopic, thermal and XRD characterization of hydroxyapatite from new natural sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Allam, Moussa A.; Moharram, Mohamed A.

    2011-12-01

    The inorganic constituents of 5 different plants (leaves and stalks) were investigated by using Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis including thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). These plants are Catha edulis (Khat), basil, mint, green tea and trifolium. The absorption bands of carbonate ions CO 32- was exhibited at 1446 cm -1, and the phosphate ions PO 43- was assigned at 1105 and 1035 cm -1. At high temperatures (600, 700 and 600 °C) further absorption bands of the phosphate ions PO 43- was assigned at the frequencies 572, 617, 962, 1043 and 1110 cm -1 and the vibrational absorption band of the carbonate ions CO 32- was assigned at 871, 1416 and 1461 cm -1. X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis confirm the obtained results of FITR. Results showed that the main inorganic constituents of C. edulis and basil leaves are hydroxyapatite whereas the hydroxyapatite content in the other plant samples is less than that in case of C. edulis and basil plant leaves.

  4. XRD, Electron Microscopy and Vibrational Spectroscopy Characterization of Simulated SB6 HLW Glasses - 13028

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovsky, S.V.; Nikonov, B.S.; Omelianenko, B.I.; Choi, A.; Marra, J.C.

    2013-07-01

    Sample glasses have been made using SB6 high level waste (HLW) simulant (high in both Al and Fe) with 12 different frit compositions at a constant waste loading of 36 wt.%. As follows from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data, all the samples are composed of primarily glass and minor concentration of spinel phases which form both isometric grains and fine cubic (∼1 μm) crystals. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) spectra of all the glasses within the range of 400-1600 cm{sup -1} consist of the bands due to stretching and bending modes in silicon-oxygen, boron-oxygen, aluminum-oxygen and iron-oxygen structural groups. Raman spectra showed that for the spectra of all the glasses within the range of 850-1200 cm{sup -1} the best fit is achieved by suggestion of overlapping of three major components with maxima at 911-936 cm{sup -1}, 988-996 cm{sup -1} and 1020-1045 cm{sup -1}. The structural network is primarily composed of metasilicate chains and rings with embedded AlO{sub 4} and FeO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Major BO{sub 4} tetrahedra and BO{sub 3} triangles form complex borate units and are present as separate constituents. (authors)

  5. μ-XRF/μ-RS vs. SR μ-XRD for pigment identification in illuminated manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Snickt, G.; de Nolf, W.; Vekemans, B.; Janssens, K.

    2008-07-01

    For the non-destructive identification of pigments and colorants in works of art, in archaeological and in forensic materials, a wide range of analytical techniques can be used. Bearing in mind that every method holds particular limitations, two complementary spectroscopic techniques, namely confocal μ-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and μ-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μ-XRF), were joined in one instrument. The combined μ-XRF and μ-RS device, called PRAXIS unites both complementary techniques in one mobile setup, which allows μ- and in situ analysis. μ-XRF allows one to collect elemental and spatially-resolved information in a non-destructive way on major and minor constituents of a variety of materials. However, the main disadvantages of μ-XRF are the penetration depth of the X-rays and the fact that only elements and not specific molecular combinations of elements can be detected. As a result μ-XRF is often not specific enough to identify the pigments within complex mixtures. Confocal Raman microscopy (μ-RS) can offer a surplus as molecular information can be obtained from single pigment grains. However, in some cases the presence of a strong fluorescence background limits the applicability. In this paper, the concrete analytical possibilities of the combined PRAXIS device are evaluated by comparing the results on an illuminated sheet of parchment with the analytical information supplied by synchrotron radiation μ-X-ray diffraction (SR μ-XRD), a highly specific technique.

  6. High pressure study of group-IV clathrate by XRD and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Shigeo

    2013-06-01

    Group-IV clathrates, which are open-structured Si, Ge, and Sn cage-like compounds, have attracted increasing attention because of their potential applications for thermoelectric devices due to the behavior of phonon-glass and electron-crystal. One of the keys for the intriguing properties is so called rattling vibrations of guests. The direct observation of the rattling is important for understanding of the clathrate properties. Furthermore, the systematic observations of the rattling vibrations as a function of the cage size controlled by pressure are very significant to investigate the guest-host interaction. The pressurization also throws light on the structural stability of the clathrate, which is improved by the guest atoms. The clathrate structure with sp3 network is preserved up to very high pressure. Instead of the structural change, the doped Si clathrates undergo an isostructural phase transition. This paper is concerned with the structural stabilities under high pressure and the rattling vibrations of the guest as a function of the cage size, investigated for various semiconductor clathrates (Sr8Ga16Ge30, Eu8Ga16Ge30 and so on) by means of Raman and XRD experiments. On the basis of the recent data, the guest-host interaction is discussed.

  7. A 4-(o-chlorophenyl)-2-aminothiazole: Microwave assisted synthesis, spectral, thermal, XRD and biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajmane, S. V.; Ubale, V. P.; Lawand, A. S.; Nalawade, A. M.; Karale, N. N.; More, P. G.

    2013-11-01

    A 4-(o-chlorophenyl)-2-aminothiazole (CPAT) has been synthesized by reacting o-chloroacetophenone, iodine and thiourea under microwave irradiation as a green chemistry approach. The reactions proceed selectively and within a couple of minutes giving high yields of the products. The compound was characterized by elemental, spectral (UV-visible, IR, NMR and GC-MS), XRD and thermal analyses. The TG curve of the compound was analyzed to calculate various kinetic parameters (n, E, Z, ΔS and ΔG) by using Coats-Redfern (C.R.), MacCallum-Tanner (M.T.) and Horowitz-Metzger (H.M.) method. The compound was tested for the evaluation of antibacterial activity against B. subtilis and E. coli and antifungal activity against A. niger and C. albicans. The compound was evaluated for their in vitro nematicidal activity on plant parasitic nematode Meloidogyne javanica and molluscicidal activity on fresh water helminthiasis vector snail Lymnea auricularia. The compound is biologically active in very low concentration. X-ray diffraction study suggests a triclinic crystal system for the compound.

  8. Material Characterization of Electrodeposited Copper-Nickel Nanolaminated Alloy by SEM, EDS, and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Irene Cheryl

    Electrodeposited nanolaminated copper-nickel alloys (Cu-Ni) exhibit excellent mechanical properties due to their modulated structure and nanocrystalline microstructure. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize the composition, grain size, phases, and laminate structure of a nanolaminated deposit to explore structure-process-property relationships. The processing method of interest was pulse current electrodeposition of Cu-Ni a rotating disk electrode (RDE) with increased rotation speed during deposition of Cu-rich layers. Although copper content was enhanced in this way, it also caused macroscopic swirls in the deposit's surface, which were reflected microstructurally as Cu-rich streaks, non-planar layers, and other inhomogeneous morphology in the nanolaminate coating. Bulk composition of the nanolaminate was calculated from XRD spectra as being over 67wt%Ni overall, with over 91wt% Ni in Ni-rich layers and over 43wt% Ni in Cu-rich layers. EDS data of the same deposit differed significantly from these values, suggesting an overall composition closer to 55 wt% Ni, with a Ni-rich layer composition of 81 wt% Ni and 8.4 wt% Ni in the Cu-rich layers. Grain sizes of 15.8--22.3 nm were calculated for the nanolaminated deposit compared to 13--19 nm grains in a monolithic Ni-rich deposit of Cu-Ni.

  9. Multielemental analyses of isomorphous Indian garnet gemstones by XRD and external pixe techniques.

    PubMed

    Venkateswarulu, P; Srinivasa Rao, K; Kasipathi, C; Ramakrishna, Y

    2012-12-01

    Garnet gemstones were collected from parts of Eastern Ghats geological formations of Andhra Pradesh, India and their gemological studies were carried out. Their study of chemistry is not possible as they represent mixtures of isomorphism nature, and none of the individual specimens indicate independent chemistry. Hence, non-destructive instrumental methodology of external PIXE technique was employed to understand their chemistry and identity. A 3 MeV proton beam was employed to excite the samples. In the present study geochemical characteristics of garnet gemstones were studied by proton induced X-ray emission. Almandine variety of garnet is found to be abundant in the present study by means of their chemical contents. The crystal structure and the lattice parameters were estimated using X-Ray Diffraction studies. The trace and minor elements are estimated using PIXE technique and major compositional elements are confirmed by XRD studies. The technique is found very useful in characterizing the garnet gemstones. The present work, thus establishes usefulness and versatility of the PIXE technique with external beam for research in Geo-scientific methodology. PMID:23041780

  10. Mechanical Properties of Polycrystalline Titanium Nitride Films Measured by XRD Tensile Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazu, Takahiro; Inoue, Shozo; Takemoto, Hideki; Koterazawa, Keiji

    This paper describes measurement of mechanical properties of micron-thin polycrystalline titanium nitride (TiN) films. We developed a novel tensile test technique that can directly measure lateral elastic strain of a microscale single/poly-crystalline specimen by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), which enables evaluation of not only Young's modulus but also Poisson's ratio of TiN films. TiN films having thicknesses of 0.5 μm to 1.6 μm are deposited onto the top and bottom surfaces of a microscale single crystal silicon (Si) specimen. The deposition is carried out by r.f. reactive magnetron sputtering under Ar partial pressure ranging from 0.7 Pa to 1.0 Pa. Average values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for the Si monolayer specimen are found to be 169 GPa and 0.35, respectively, which are in close agreement with analytical values. TiN films deposited under an Ar partial pressure of 0.7 Pa have average Young's modulus of 290 GPa and Poisson's ratio of 0.36. These values gradually decrease with increasing Ar partial pressure, but are independent of TiN film thickness. Fracture strength of a TiN/Si/TiN composite specimen shows dependence on film thickness, regardless of Ar partial pressure.

  11. Synchrotron Radiation XRD Analysis of Indialite in Y-82094 Ungrouped Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Sawa, N.; Kimura, M.; Ohsumi, K.; Komatsu, M.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Y-82094 is an ungrouped type 3.2 carbonaceous chondrite, with abundant chondrules making 78 vol.% of the rock. Among these chondrules, an unusual porphyritic Al-rich magnesian chondrule is reported that consists of a cordierite-like phase, Al-rich orthopyroxene, cristobalite, and spinel surrounded by an anorthitic mesostasis. The reported chemical formula of the cordierite-like phase is Na(0.19)Mg(1.95)Fe(0.02)Al(3.66)Si(5.19)O18, which is close to stoichiometric cordierite (Mg2Al3[AlSi5O18]). Although cordierite can be present in Al-rich chondrules, it has a high temperature polymorph (indialite) and it is therefore necessary to determine whether it is cordierite or indialite in order to better constrain its formation conditions. In this abstract we report on our synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) study of the cordierite-like phase in Y-82094.

  12. Evaluation of Rock Powdering Methods to Obtain Fine-grained Samples for CHEMIN, a Combined XRD/XRF Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Sarrazin, P.; Feldman, S.; Blake, D. F.; Bearman, G.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature XRD/XRF (X-ray diffraction / X-ray fluorescence) instrument, CHEMIN, is currently being developed for definitive mineralogic analysis of soils and rocks on Mars. One of the technical issues that must be addressed to enable remote XRD analysis is how best to obtain a representative sample powder for analysis. For powder XRD analyses, it is beneficial to have a fine-grained sample to reduce preferred orientation effects and to provide a statistically significant number of crystallites to the X-ray beam. Although a two-dimensional detector as used in the CHEMIN instrument will produce good results even with poorly prepared powder, the quality of the data will improve and the time required for data collection will be reduced if the sample is fine-grained and randomly oriented. A variety of methods have been proposed for XRD sample preparation. Chipera et al. presented grain size distributions and XRD results from powders generated with an Ultrasonic/Sonic Driller/Corer (USDC) currently being developed at JPL. The USDC was shown to be an effective instrument for sampling rock to produce powder suitable for XRD. In this paper, we compare powder prepared using the USDC with powder obtained with a miniaturized rock crusher developed at JPL and with powder obtained with a rotary tungsten carbide bit to powders obtained from a laboratory bench-scale Retsch mill (provides benchmark mineralogical data). These comparisons will allow assessment of the suitability of these methods for analysis by an XRD/XRF instrument such as CHEMIN.

  13. Chemical bioimaging for the subcellular localization of trace elements by high contrast TEM, TEM/X-EDS, and NanoSIMS.

    PubMed

    Penen, Florent; Malherbe, Julien; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Bertalan, Ivo; Gontier, Etienne; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    Chemical bioimaging offers an important contribution to the investigation of biochemical functions, biosorption and bioaccumulation processes of trace elements via their localization at the cellular and even at the subcellular level. This paper describes the combined use of high contrast transmission electron microscopy (HC-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (X-EDS), and nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) applied to a model organism, the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. HC-TEM providing a lateral resolution of 1nm was used for imaging the ultrastructure of algae cells which have diameters of 5-10μm. TEM coupled to X-EDS (TEM/X-EDS) combined textural (morphology and size) analysis with detection of Ca, P, K, Mg, Fe, and Zn in selected subcellular granules using an X-EDS probe size of approx. 1μm. However, instrumental sensitivity was at the limit for trace element detection. NanoSIMS allowed chemical imaging of macro and trace elements with subcellular resolution (element mapping). Ca, Mg, and P as well as the trace elements Fe, Cu, and Zn present at basal levels were detected in pyrenoids, contractile vacuoles, and granules. Some metals were even localized in small vesicles of about 200nm size. Sensitive subcellular localization of trace metals was possible by the application of a recently developed RF plasma oxygen primary ion source on NanoSIMS which has shown good improvements in terms of lateral resolution (below 50nm), sensitivity, and stability. Furthermore correlative single cell imaging was developed combining the advantages of TEM and NanoSIMS. An advanced sample preparation protocol provided adjacent ultramicrotome sections for parallel TEM and NanoSIMS analyses of the same cell. Thus, the C. reinhardtii cellular ultrastructure could be directly related to the spatial distribution of metals in different cell organelles such as vacuoles and chloroplast. PMID:27288221

  14. Transient Measurements Under Simulated Mantle Conditions - Simultaneous DTF-Ultrasonic Interferometry, X-Radiography, XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.; Schilling, F. R.; Lathe, C.; Wunder, B.

    2004-12-01

    The interpretation of seismic data from the Earth's deep interior requires measurements of the physical properties of Earth materials under experimental simulated mantle conditions. Elastic wave velocity measurement by ultrasonic interferometry is an important tool for the determination of the elastic properties in multi-anvil devices. Whereas the classical sweep method is very time-consuming, the ultrasonic data transfer function technique (DTF), simultaneously generating all the frequencies used in the experiment, first described by Li et al. (2002), requires just few seconds to save the response of the system. The success of the technique substantially depends on the excitation function and the resolution used for saving the DTF (Mueller et al., 2004a). Background discussion as well as high pressure AƒA_A,A¿A,A 1/2 high temperature results demonstrate how to optimize the technique. All Ultrasonic interferometry allows highly precise travel time measurement at a sample enclosed in a high-pressure multi-anvil device. But under high pressure conditions the influence of sample deformation on the frequencies for destructive and constructive interference used for the evaluation of the elastic properties might be stronger than that from the shift of the elastic moduli. Consequently ultrasonic interferometry requires the exact sample length measurement under in situ conditions. X-ray imaging using brillant synchrotron radiation, called X-radiography, produces grey-scale images of the sample under in situ conditions by converting the X-ray image to an optical one by a CE-YAG-crystal. Saving the optical image by a CCD-camera after redirection by a mirrow, also requires few seconds. To derive the sample length, the different brightness of sample, buffer rod and reflector at the electronic image is evaluated (Mueller et al., 2004b). Contrary to XRD measurements, imaging the sample by X-rays requires a beam diameter larger than the sample length. Therefore the fixed

  15. Quantitative shock stage assessment in olivine and pyroxene bearing meteorites via in situ micro-XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCausland, P. J.; Flemming, R. L.; Izawa, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Shock metamorphism is observed in most meteorites and impact structures [1]. Qualitative petrographic observations underpin a shock classification system [1-3] based on the deformation features in common silicates and on textural relations such as the development of maskelynite from feldspars, mobility of sulphides and metal in veins and local Fe-reduction in silicates. Shock deformation of minerals produces streaks (mosaicity) rather than discrete spots in 2D X-ray diffraction patterns, representing the progressive disruption of the crystal lattice into a mosaic of rotated domains [4,5]. Here we use in situ micro-XRD [5,6] to measure the mosaicity of olivine and pyroxene in ordinary chondrites of increasing shock stages S1 to S5 and then apply the method to achondrites with qualitatively low to high shock. X-ray diffraction data were collected in situ on polished thin sections and slab cut surfaces using a Bruker D8 Discover micro X-ray diffractometer [5], operated using CuKα radiation generated at 40 kV and 40 mA with a beam diameter of 500 μm. Diffracted X-rays were recorded with a 2D detector, giving images with information in both the 2-theta and chi dimensions, in which each lattice plane (hkl) will have a diffraction spot or streak lying along an arc in chi of radius 2-theta (hkl). Individual reflections can be indexed and then integrated as a function of chi angle, allowing examination of the peak shape and quantitative analysis of the mosaic peak FWHM along chi. We find that both forsterite and enstatite exhibit greater mosaicity in chi with increasing shock stage: Forsterite chi ranges from <1° for S1 to >6° for S5. Enstatite chi values from the same meteorites show a more subdued growth of streak length with shock state, from ~1° to ~4°. A slab of the olivine shergottite DaG 476 exhibits forsterite mosaicity of 6.9°+/-1.1°, indicating that it has experienced shock stage S5, with shock pressures 30-45 GPa [1,4], consistent with the 40-45 GPa shock

  16. Annealing dynamics of WO{sub 3} by in situ XRD

    SciTech Connect

    Righettoni, Marco; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Flame-made WO{sub 3} nanoparticles with closely controlled crystal and grain size. • Dynamic phase transition of annealing of pure and Si-doped WO{sub 3} by in situ XRD. • Irreversible evolution of WO{sub 3} crystallinity by heating/cooling during its annealing. • Si-doping alters the WO{sub 3} crystallinity dynamics and stabilizes nanosized WO{sub 3}. • Flame-made nano-WO{sub 3} can sense NO at the ppb level. - Abstract: Tungsten trioxide is a semiconductor with distinct applications in gas sensors, catalysis, batteries and pigments. As such the transition between its different crystal structures during its annealing are of interest, especially for sensor applications. Here, WO{sub 3} nanoparticles with closely controlled crystal and grain size (9–15 nm) and phase composition are made by flame spray pyrolysis and the formation of different WO{sub 3} phases during annealing is investigated. Most notably, the dynamic phase transition and crystal size evolution of WO{sub 3} during heating and cooling is monitored by in situ X-ray diffraction revealing how metastable WO{sub 3} phases can be captured stably. The effect of Si-doping is studied since it is used in practise to control crystal growth and phase transition during metal oxide synthesis and processing. Finally the influence of annealing on the WO{sub 3} sensing performance of NO, a lung inflammation tracer in the human breath, is explored at the ppb-level.

  17. Geoelectrical characterization by joint inversion of VES/TEM in Paraná basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, C. A.; Couto, M. A.; Almeida, E. R.; Porsani, J. L.; Santos, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    For many years electrical (DC) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings have been used in a great number of environmental, hydrological and mining exploration studies. The data of both methods are interpreted usually by individual 1D models resulting in many cases in ambiguous models. This can be explained by how the two different methodologies sample the subsurface. The vertical electrical sounding (VES) is good on marking very resistive structures, while the transient electromagnetic sounding (TEM) is very sensitive to map conductive structures. Another characteristic is that VES is more sensitive to shallow structures, while TEM soundings can reach deeper structures. A Matlab program for joint inversion of VES and TEM soundings, by using CRS algorithm was developed aiming explore the best of the both methods. Initially, the algorithm was tested with synthetic data and after it was used to invert experimental data from Paraná sedimentary basin. We present the results of a re-interpretation of 46 VES/TEM soundings data set acquired in Bebedouro region in São Paulo State - Brazil. The previous interpretation was based in geoelectrical models obtained by single inversion of the VES and TEM soundings. In this work we present the results with single inversion of VES and TEM sounding inverted by the Curupira Program and a new interpretation based in the joint inversion of both methodologies. The goal is increase the accuracy in determining the underground structures. As a result a new geoelectrical model of the region is obtained.

  18. Elucidation of reaction mechanism involved in the formation of LaNiO3 from XRD and TG analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, Dipti V.; Athawale, Anjali A.

    2013-06-01

    The present work is focused on the synthesis and elucidation of reaction mechanism involved in the formation of LaNiO3 with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. LaNiO3 was synthesized by hydrothermal method by heating at 160°C under autogenous pressure for 6h. Pure phase product was obtained after calcining the hydrothermally activated product for 6h at 700°C. The various phases of the product obtained after hydrothermal treatment and calcination followed by the formation of pure phase nanocrystalline lanthanum nickel oxide could be determined from XRD analysis of the samples. The reaction mechanism and phase formation temperature has been interpreted by thermogravimetric analysis of the hydrothermally synthesized product and XRD analysis.

  19. Thermal Analysis of SRF Cavity Couplers Using Parallel Multiphysics Tool TEM3P

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V; Lee, L.-Q.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.-K.; Ko, K.; Cheng, G.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-05-20

    SLAC has developed a multi-physics simulation code TEM3P for simulating integrated effects of electromagnetic, thermal and structural loads. TEM3P shares the same software infrastructure with SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic codes, thus enabling all physics simulations within a single framework. The finite-element approach allows high-fidelity, high-accuracy simulations and the parallel implementation facilitates large-scale computation with fast turnaround times. In this paper, TEM3P is used to analyze thermal loading at coupler end of the JLAB SRF cavity.

  20. Thermal Analysis of SRF Cavity Couplers Using Parallel Multiphysics Tool TEM3P

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V, Lee, L.-Q., Li, Z., Ng, C.-K., Ko, K.,Cheng, G., Rimmer, R., Wang, H.

    2009-05-01

    SLAC has developed a multi-physics simulation code TEM3P for simulating integrated effects of electromagnetic, thermal and structural loads. TEM3P shares the same software infrastructure with SLAC’s paralell finite element electromagnetic codes, thus enabling all physics simulations within a single framework. The finite-element approach allows high fidelity, high-accuracy simulations and the parallel implementation facilitates large-scale computation with fast turnaround times. In this paper, TEM3P is used to analyze thermal loading at coupler end of the JLAB SRF cavity.

  1. XRD and XPS analysis of the degradation of the polymer electrolyte in H 2-O 2 fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengde; Seng Tan, Kim; Lin, Jianyi; Lee Tan, Kuang

    2003-03-01

    Nafion ® is frequently used as electrolyte membrane in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). In this Letter the degradation of the Nafion ® polymer electrolyte was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD showed that the electrode potential and low gas humidification temperature could decrease the crystallinity of Nafion ®. XPS analysis indicated that the Nafion ® was decomposed in the hydrogen potential region of the fuel cell, through the interaction of the hydrophobic (CF 2) n groups of the membrane with H or/and C atoms.

  2. ESR and XRD investigation of effects induced by gamma radiation on PVA-TiO2 membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todica, Mihai; Stefan, Traian; Trandafir, Diana; Simon, Simion

    2013-07-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on the local structure of PVA membranes containing TiO2 were investigated by ESR and XRD methods. An intense ESR signal is observed after irradiation at 16 KGy dose. This signal appears only for irradiated samples and it is associated with the breaking of the polymeric chain, followed by local reorganization of the polymeric segments and the apparition of the unpaired electrons and free radicals. The intensity of the signal decreases with the concentration of TiO2, indicating a shielding effect of the dopand. That the modification of local order of the polymeric chains has been modified after irradiation is confirmed by XRD method.

  3. Interaction of selenite with reduced Fe and/or S species: An XRD and XAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, Nicolas; Dardenne, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction between selenite and either Fe(II)aq or S(- II)aq in solution, and the results were used to investigate the interaction between Se(IV)aq and FeS in suspension. The reaction products were characterized by a combination of methods (SEM, XRD and XAS) and the reaction mechanisms were identified. In a first experiment, Se(IV)aq was reduced to Se(0) by interaction with Fe(II)aq which was oxidized to Fe(III), but the reaction was only partial. Subsequently, some Fe(III) produced akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and the release of proton during that reaction decreased the pH. The pH decrease changed the Se speciation in solution which hindered further Se(IV) reduction by Fe(II)aq. In a second experiment, Se(IV)aq was quantitatively reduced to Se(0) by S(- II)aq and the reaction was fast. Two sulfide species were needed to reduce one Se(IV), and the observed pH increase was due to a proton consumption. For both experiments, experimental results are consistent with expectations based on the oxidation reduction potential of the various species. Upon interaction with FeS, Se(IV)aq was reduced to Se(0) and minute amounts of pyrite were detected, a consequence of partial mackinawite oxidation at surface sulfur sites. These results are of prime importance with respect to safe deep disposal of nuclear waste which contains the long-lived radionuclide 79Se. This study shows that after release of 79Se(IV) upon nuclear waste matrix corrosion, selenite can be reduced in the near field to low soluble Se(0) by interaction with Fe(II)aq and/or S(- II)aq species. Because the solubility of Se(0) species is significantly lower than that of Se(IV), selenium will become much less (bio)available and its migration out of deep HLW repositories may be drastically hindered.

  4. Interaction of selenite with reduced Fe and/or S species: An XRD and XAS study.

    PubMed

    Finck, Nicolas; Dardenne, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction between selenite and either Fe((II))aq or S((-II))aq in solution, and the results were used to investigate the interaction between Se((IV))aq and FeS in suspension. The reaction products were characterized by a combination of methods (SEM, XRD and XAS) and the reaction mechanisms were identified. In a first experiment, Se((IV))aq was reduced to Se((0)) by interaction with Fe((II))aq which was oxidized to Fe((III)), but the reaction was only partial. Subsequently, some Fe((III)) produced akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and the release of proton during that reaction decreased the pH. The pH decrease changed the Se speciation in solution which hindered further Se((IV)) reduction by Fe((II))aq. In a second experiment, Se((IV))aq was quantitatively reduced to Se((0)) by S((-II))aq and the reaction was fast. Two sulfide species were needed to reduce one Se((IV)), and the observed pH increase was due to a proton consumption. For both experiments, experimental results are consistent with expectations based on the oxidation reduction potential of the various species. Upon interaction with FeS, Se((IV))aq was reduced to Se((0)) and minute amounts of pyrite were detected, a consequence of partial mackinawite oxidation at surface sulfur sites. These results are of prime importance with respect to safe deep disposal of nuclear waste which contains the long-lived radionuclide (79)Se. This study shows that after release of (79)Se((IV)) upon nuclear waste matrix corrosion, selenite can be reduced in the near field to low soluble Se((0)) by interaction with Fe((II))aq and/or S((-II))aq species. Because the solubility of Se((0)) species is significantly lower than that of Se((IV)), selenium will become much less (bio)available and its migration out of deep HLW repositories may be drastically hindered. PMID:27010738

  5. TEM00 mode Nd:YAG solar laser by side-pumping a grooved rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vistas, Cláudia R.; Liang, Dawei; Almeida, Joana; Guillot, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    A simple TEM00 mode solar laser system with a grooved Nd:YAG rod pumped through a heliostat-parabolic mirror system is reported here. The radiation coupling capacity of a fused silica tube lens was combined with the multipass pumping ability of a 2 V-shaped cavity to provide efficient side-pumping along a 4.0 mm diameter grooved Nd:YAG single-crystal rod. TEM00 mode solar laser power of 3.4 W was measured by adopting an asymmetric large-mode laser resonant cavity. Record TEM00 mode solar laser collection efficiency of 3.4 W/m2and slope efficiency of 1.9% was achieved, which corresponds to 1.8 and 2.4 times more than the previous TEM00 mode Nd:YAG solar laser using the PROMES-CNRS heliostat-parabolic mirror system, respectively.

  6. METHOD FOR CALCULATING ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS IN TEM CELLS AT ELF (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method is presented whereby the electric and magnetic field distributions within rectangular strip transmission lines (TEM cells) can be calculated. Quasi-static approximations are employed, thereby restricting the validity of the results to operational frequencies well below t...

  7. Jet thinning of germanium for TEM using automatic termination of polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Kestel, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an automated jet electropolishing technique, using modified commercial equipment, for the production of germanium TEM specimens. This technique allows rapid and reliable thinning of large areas and results in clean surfaces.

  8. Phase-locking of oscillating images using laser-induced spin-polarized pulse TEM.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Makoto; Nambo, Yoshito; Kusunoki, Soichiro; Jin, Xiuguang; Saitoh, Koh; Asano, Hidefumi; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Pulse-mode operation was realized in spin-polarized transmission electron microscopy (SP-TEM) using a laser-driven electron gun with a GaAs-GaAsP strained-layer-superlattice photocathode. TEM images were acquired with a pulsed electron beam with a 5-μs pulse duration. Phase locking of wobbling TEM images was demonstrated using a pulsed beam with a 1-kHz repetition frequency, which matched the image wobbling frequency. It was found that in composite images formed by superimposing 2 × 10(4) separate single-pulse exposures, the amount of image blurring due to wobbling was a linear function of the pulse duration. These results suggest the possibility of pump-probe measurements in SP-TEM using the pulsed electron beam as a probe, allowing nanometer-scale time-resolved spin mapping. PMID:23797969

  9. A comparison of TEM and DLS methods to characterize size distribution of ceramic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, T. G. F.; Ciminelli, V. S. T.; Mohallem, N. D. S.

    2016-07-01

    The accuracy of dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements are compared with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies for characterization of size distributions of ceramic nanoparticles. It was found that measurements by DLS using number distribution presented accurate results when compared to TEM. The presence of dispersants and the enlargement of size distributions induce errors to DLS particle sizing measurements and shifts its results to higher values.

  10. In situ TEM tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a MEMS device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changhong; Howe, Jane Y.; Perovic, Doug; Filleter, Tobin; Sun, Yu

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a monolithic TEM compatible microelectromechanical system device. The set-up allows direct on-chip nanosheet thickness mapping, high resolution electron beam linking of a pre-fractured nanosheet, and mechanical tensile testing of the nanosheet. This technique enables simultaneous mechanical and high energy electron beam characterization of 2D nanomaterials.

  11. In situ TEM tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a MEMS device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changhong; Howe, Jane Y; Perovic, Doug; Filleter, Tobin; Sun, Yu

    2016-07-15

    This paper reports in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a monolithic TEM compatible microelectromechanical system device. The set-up allows direct on-chip nanosheet thickness mapping, high resolution electron beam linking of a pre-fractured nanosheet, and mechanical tensile testing of the nanosheet. This technique enables simultaneous mechanical and high energy electron beam characterization of 2D nanomaterials. PMID:27256541

  12. Novel freestanding nanotube devices for combining TEM and electron diffraction with Raman and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jannik C.; Obergfell, Dirk; Roth, Siegmar; Paillet, Matthieu; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Neumann, Anita; Duesberg, Georg

    2005-09-27

    A versatile procedure for combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction with Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements on the very same nanotube is presented. For this we prepare free-standing structures on the corner of a substrate by electron beam lithography and an etching process. Further, this procedure makes possible a TEM quality control of nanotubes grown directly on the substrate.

  13. Kinetic Study of the Effect of Histidines 240 and 164 on TEM-149 Enzyme Probed by β-Lactam Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Alisia; Celenza, Giuseppe; Bottoni, Carlo; Bellio, Pierangelo; Sabatini, Alessia; Di Pietro, Letizia; Brisdelli, Fabrizia; Segatore, Bernardetta; Amicosante, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we performed a detailed kinetic analysis of the enzymes TEM-149, TEM-149H240, and TEM-149H164-H240 versus a large panel of inhibitors/inactivators, including penicillins, penems, carbapenems, monobactams, cephamycin, and carbacephem. These compounds behaved as poor substrates versus TEM-149, TEM-149H240, and TEM-149H164-H240 β-lactamases, and the Ki (inhibition constant), K (dissociation constant of the Henri-Michaelis complex), k+2 and k+3 (first-order acylation and deacylation constants, respectively), and k+2/K values were calculated. PMID:25092695

  14. Benchmarking of a novel contactless characterisation method for micro thermoelectric modules (μTEMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, S.; Punch, J.; Jeffers, N.

    2014-07-01

    Significant challenges exist in the thermal control of Photonics Integrated Circuits (PICs) for use in optical communications. Increasing component density coupled with greater functionality is leading to higher device-level heat fluxes, stretching the capabilities of conventional cooling methods using thermoelectric modules (TEMs). A tailored thermal control solution incorporating micro thermoelectric modules (μTEMs) to individually address hotspots within PICs could provide an energy efficient alternative to existing control methods. Performance characterisation is required to establish the suitability of commercially-available μTEMs for the operating conditions in current and next generation PICs. The objective of this paper is to outline a novel method for the characterisation of thermoelectric modules (TEMs), which utilises infra-red (IR) heat transfer and temperature measurement to obviate the need for mechanical stress on the upper surface of low compression tolerance (~0.5N) μTEMs. The method is benchmarked using a commercially-available macro scale TEM, comparing experimental data to the manufacturer's performance data sheet.

  15. Correlation between full width at half maximum (FWHM) of XRD peak with residual stress on ground surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashista, M.; Paul, S.

    2012-11-01

    The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of XRD profiles is used to characterize different material properties and surface integrity features. However, there is no literature available that discusses the nature of the correlation between the FWHM of XRD peaks with induced surface residual stress upon grinding with simultaneous occurrence of plastic deformation, formation of white layer, grain elongation, change in microhardness, etc. AISI 1060 steel samples were ground under different grinding domains, i.e. conventional abusive grinding, conventional grinding, cBN grinding and high speed grinding with moderately deep cut. Induction of tensile and compressive residual stress, microstructural changes, white layer formation, grain refinement, plastic deformation, grain elongation and change in microhardness were observed upon grinding AISI 1060 steel. A correlation was established between the FWHM of XRD peaks and surface residual stress when simultaneous changes in microhardness and microstructure, grain elongation, plastic deformation and formation of white layer take place due to grinding. The correlation between FWHM of XRD peak and residual stress appears to be nonlinear due to simultaneous change in other aspects of surface integrity.

  16. Structure and Output Characteristics of a TEM Array Fitted to a Fin Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Chen, L. N.; Chen, Z. J.; Xiao, G. Q.; Liu, Z. J.

    2015-06-01

    In the design of a thermoelectric generator, both the heat transfer area and the number of thermoelectric modules (TEMs) should be increased accordingly as the generator power increases; crucially, both aspects need to be coordinated. A kilowatt thermoelectric generator with a fin heat exchanger is proposed for use in a constant-speed diesel generator unit. Interior fins enhance convective heat transfer, whereas an exterior fin segment increases the heat transfer area. The heat transfer surface is double that of a plane heat exchanger, and the temperature field over the exterior fins is constrained to a one-dimensional distribution. Between adjoining exterior fins, there is a cooling water channel with trapezoid cross-section, enabling compact TEMs and cooling them. Hence, more TEMs are built as a series-parallel array of TEMs with lower resistance and more stable output current. Under nonuniform conditions, to prevent circulation and energy loss, bypass diodes and antidiodes are added. Experiments and numerical calculations show that, with matching and optimization of the heat exchanger and TEM array, a stable maximum output power is obtainable from the interior of the thermoelectric generator system, which can be connected to an external maximum power point tracking system.

  17. Developing of an environmental cell TEM holder for dynamic in situ observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataineh, Khaled M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the subject of "in situ" development of environmental-transmission electron microscope (E-TEM) holder assemblies. In E-TEM, the sample is continuously subjected to gases as opposed to conventional TEM where the sample is under high vacuum. E-TEM offers the possibility of achieving a new level of material analysis. E-TEM allows obtaining information about chemical information during the reaction at atomic level. Rarefied gas dynamics analysis is used to assess the proposed design. The analysis is focused on determining the molecular distribution inside the vacuum chamber and calculating the impingement rate on the target surface of the specimen. Simulations are performed to predict the molecular interaction with the specimen at given pressures to determine the proper position of a specimen within a vacuum chamber to optimize and predict reaction characteristics. Results of direct simulation Monte Carlo show that the two sides of the sample operate at different temperatures due to the gas flow and experience different molecular distributions.

  18. Developing of an environmental cell TEM holder for dynamic in situ observation.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Khaled M

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the subject of "in situ" development of environmental-transmission electron microscope (E-TEM) holder assemblies. In E-TEM, the sample is continuously subjected to gases as opposed to conventional TEM where the sample is under high vacuum. E-TEM offers the possibility of achieving a new level of material analysis. E-TEM allows obtaining information about chemical information during the reaction at atomic level. Rarefied gas dynamics analysis is used to assess the proposed design. The analysis is focused on determining the molecular distribution inside the vacuum chamber and calculating the impingement rate on the target surface of the specimen. Simulations are performed to predict the molecular interaction with the specimen at given pressures to determine the proper position of a specimen within a vacuum chamber to optimize and predict reaction characteristics. Results of direct simulation Monte Carlo show that the two sides of the sample operate at different temperatures due to the gas flow and experience different molecular distributions. PMID:26931858

  19. As-rigid-as-possible mosaicking and serial section registration of large ssTEM datasets

    PubMed Central

    Saalfeld, Stephan; Cardona, Albert; Hartenstein, Volker; Tomančák, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Tiled serial section Transmission Electron Microscopy (ssTEM) is increasingly used to describe high-resolution anatomy of large biological specimens. In particular in neurobiology, TEM is indispensable for analysis of synaptic connectivity in the brain. Registration of ssTEM image mosaics has to recover the 3D continuity and geometrical properties of the specimen in presence of various distortions that are applied to the tissue during sectioning, staining and imaging. These include staining artifacts, mechanical deformation, missing sections and the fact that structures may appear dissimilar in consecutive sections. Results: We developed a fully automatic, non-rigid but as-rigid-as-possible registration method for large tiled serial section microscopy stacks. We use the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) to identify corresponding landmarks within and across sections and globally optimize the pose of all tiles in terms of least square displacement of these landmark correspondences. We evaluate the precision of the approach using an artificially generated dataset designed to mimic the properties of TEM data. We demonstrate the performance of our method by registering an ssTEM dataset of the first instar larval brain of Drosophila melanogaster consisting of 6885 images. Availability: This method is implemented as part of the open source software TrakEM2 (http://www.ini.uzh.ch/∼acardona/trakem2.html) and distributed through the Fiji project (http://pacific.mpi-cbg.de). Contact: tomancak@mpi-cbg.de PMID:20529937

  20. Non-destructive and in situ identification of rice paper, seals and pigments by FT-IR and XRD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Na, Na; Ouyang, Qi-Ming; Ma, Hui; Ouyang, Jin; Li, Yanping

    2004-11-15

    This paper studied the chemical characteristics of rice paper, pigments and seals on Chinese calligraphies and traditional Chinese paintings. The techniques used here were Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FT-IR allows good identification of the substances present in pigments and inkpads and differentiates each era of rice paper. This can be the base of estimating the age of rice paper. Different crystalline phases can be identified by XRD, which is further evidence to separate different kinds of pigments or inkpads. Both of these methods were non-destructive in situ analysis and can be used in the identification in calligraphies and traditional Chinese paintings. These results confirmed that the applied techniques are relatively quicker and more reliable than traditional approaches authenticated by years of experience. PMID:18969703

  1. Preparation and XRD analyses of Na-doped ZnO nanorod arrays based on experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. P.; Lu, J. G.; Zhang, H. H.; Chen, Y.; Kan, B. T.; Zhang, J.; Huang, J.; Lu, B.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Ye, Z. Z.

    2012-03-01

    ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) with different Na contents were prepared by thermal evaporation. Sodium pyrophosphate was adopted as the Na source. The Na contents in NRAs were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectra to be 0, 6.1, and 9.4 at.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of Na-doped ZnO NRAs were performed in experiment and by first-principle calculation with the assumption of Na substitutions. A couple of typical changes were found in XRD patterns of Na-doped ZnO. The simulation results well agreed with the experimental data, which revealed that Na mainly located at the substitutional sites in Na-doped ZnO NRAs.

  2. Leonardo da Vinci's drapery studies: characterization of lead white pigments by µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Victor; Calligaro, Thomas; Pichon, Laurent; Wallez, Gilles; Mottin, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the composition and microstructure of the lead white pigment employed in a set of paintworks, using a combination of µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF, directly applied on five drapery studies attributed to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Département des Arts Graphiques, Musée du Louvre and in the Musée des Beaux- Arts de Rennes. Trace elements present in the composition as well as in the lead white highlights were imaged by 2D scanning XRF. Mineral phases were determined in a fully noninvasive way using a special µ-XRD diffractometer. Phase proportions were estimated by Rietveld refinement. The analytical results obtained will contribute to differentiate lead white qualities and to highlight the artist's technique.

  3. An exploratory method to detect tephras from quantitative XRD scans: Examples from Iceland and east Greenland marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, John T.; Eberl, D.D.; Kristjansdottir, G.B.

    2006-01-01

    Tephras, mainly from Iceland, are becoming increasingly important in interpreting leads and lags in the Holocene climate system across NW Europe. Here we demonstrate that Quantitative Phase Analysis of x-ray diffractograms of the 150 um fraction and identify these same peaks in XRD scans - two of these correlate geochemically and chronologically with Hekla 1104 and 3. At a distal site to the WNW of Iceland, on the East Greenland margin (core MD99-2317), the weight% of volcanic glass reaches values of 11% at about the time of the Saksunarvatn tephra. The XRD method identifies the presence of volcanic glass but not its elemental composition; hence it will assist in focusing attention on specific sections of sediment cores for subsequent geochemical fingerprinting of tephras. ?? 2006 SAGE Publications.

  4. Characterization of pre-Hispanic pottery from Teotihuacan, Mexico, by a combined PIXE-RBS and XRD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruvalcaba-Sil, J. L.; Ontalba Salamanca, M. A.; Manzanilla, L.; Miranda, J.; Cañetas Ortega, J.; López, C.

    1999-04-01

    A combined analysis of IBA techniques (Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS)) and a complementary study by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were performed to characterize pottery corresponding to the Epiclassic period (A.D. 700-900) from Teotihuacan, Mexico. Elemental compositions of pottery samples were measured by simultaneous PIXE and RBS using 2.6 MeV protons. Red, white and brown pottery pigments were studied by non-vacuum PIXE and a proton beam of 3 MeV. The various mineralogical phases of the pottery were identified by XRD. From pottery elemental compositions and its mineralogical phases, some differences among the pottery samples and groups were established.

  5. On the Development of Thermally Stable Semi-IPNs of PVA and PAN using IR, DSC and XRD Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Deepti S.; Bajpai, R.; Bajpai, A. K.

    2011-07-01

    A novel biopolymer based Semi-IPN of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polycrylonitrile (PAN) were synthesized in various proportions by redox polymerization and analyzed thermally by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC thermograms shows good thermal stability, as a result of incorporation of acrylonitrile as the second network. The structural and morphological study of these semi-IPNs by FTIR and XRD technique, respectively, were correlated. The approach seems to be beneficial for various biomedical applications.

  6. In-Situ Study of Gaseous Reduction of Magnetite Doped with Alumina Using High-Temperature XRD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapelyushin, Yury; Sasaki, Yasushi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jeong, Sunkwang; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    The reduction of magnetite of technical grade and magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 was studied in situ using high-temperature XRD (HT-XRD) analysis. Magnetite was reduced by CO-CO2 gas (80 vol pct CO) at 1023 K (750 °C). Reduction of magnetite doped with alumina occurred from the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution which has a miscibility gap with critical temperature of 1133 K (860 °C). The degree of reduction of magnetite was derived using Rietveld refinement of the HT-XRD spectra; the compositions of the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution and the concentrations of carbon in γ-iron were determined from the lattice constants of the solutions. The reduction of magnetite progressed topochemically with the formation of a dense iron shell. The reduction of alumina-containing magnetite started along certain lattice planes with the formation of a network-like structure. Reduction of alumina-containing magnetite was faster than that of un-doped magnetite; this difference was attributed to the formation of the network-like structure. Hercynite content in the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution in the process of reduction of magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 increased from 5.11 to 20 mass pct, which is close to the miscibility gap at 1023 K (750 °C). The concentration of carbon in γ-Fe (0.76 mass pct) formed in the reduced sample of magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 was close to the equilibrium value with 80 vol pct CO to 20 vol pct CO2 gas used in the HT-XRD experiments.

  7. Theoretical Study the Error Caused by Dipole Hypothesis of Large-loop TEM Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S.; Xue, G.; Zhou, N.

    2010-12-01

    Transient electromagnetic method (Transient Electromagnetic Field is TEM for short) is an time domain artificial sources of electromagnetic detection method based on the principle of electromagnetic induction. This method has higher sensitivity for the anomalous body of low resistivity , a stimulating can cover the required frequency bands and greatly improve the work efficiency by using a rich spectrum component pulse waveform . Also because send magnetic moment is relatively large, so the loop source system TEM has been very widely used in geological exploration, engineering, geothermal and environmental exploration which belong to medium depth ( less than 2000m) exploration [1], especially the central-loop system TEM has become the preferred method in Coalfield Hydrogeology Exploration and metal ore exploration . In order to obtain greater depth of exploration, the launch frame side of loop system commonly use large-scale form , Now the imported equipments with a large number of applications are large-loop system which shall be accounted for about 80% of the share of middle-depth exploration on the ground , sush as V-5, V8, GDP-32, PROTEM, SIROTEM, PEM, etc. If only one point be observed in the frame center to move the whole system when the side of loop system reach to hundreds of meters, the work efficiency of TEM will be greatly reduced. In order to increase the production efficiency, we will observe the points from center of loop to 0ne third of loop in the actual production, which is to think that the field in this region is approximately homogeneous. So, we can derive large-loop center-model TEM system which is different from the center-loop TEM system in the conventional sense as well as large-loop source TEM system. Fixed loop source TEM sysetm has been built based on the theory of dipole infinitesimal, which can not show more correct character in near-field area, even though this kind of theory has played more important guide in TEM study. There exist

  8. High-power TEM00 and Laguerre-Gaussian mode generation in double resonator configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    A simple method for controlling the spatial gain distribution in an end-pumped solid-state laser to allow the selective excitation of the fundamental Gaussian (TEM00) and the first-order Laguerre-Gaussian doughnut (LG01) modes is reported. This approach has been applied to a Nd:YAG laser yielding 2.21 W of the TEM00 mode output and 1.62 W of the LG01 mode output at 1064 nm for 7.36 W of incident pump power at 808 nm. The corresponding slope efficiencies with respect to incident pump power were 40 and 32 % for the TEM00 and LG01 modes, respectively. The underlying mechanism and the prospects for further improvement in laser performance are discussed.

  9. Two-in-one sample preparation for plan-view TEM.

    PubMed

    Sáfrán, György; Szász, Noémi; Sáfrán, Eszter

    2015-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample preparation requires special skills, it is time consuming and costly, hence, an increase of the efficiency is of primary importance. This article describes a method that duplicates the yield of the conventional mechanical and ion beam preparation of plan-view TEM samples. As a modification of the usual procedures, instead of one two different samples are comprised in a single specimen. The two pre-cut slabs, one from each samples, are embedded side by side in the window of a 3 mm dia Ti disk and the specimen is thinned mechanically and by ion milling until perforation that occurs at the interface of the two different slabs. That, with proper implementation, provides acceptable size thin area for the TEM study of both samples. The suitability of the two-in-one method has been confirmed through examples. PMID:25989619

  10. Generation of entangled TEM01 modes with periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong-Guo, Yang; Jing-jing, Wang; Jing, Zhang; Heng-Xin, Sun

    2016-07-01

    Spatial quantum optics based on the high-order transverse mode is important for the super-resolution measurement and quantum image beyond the shot noise level. Quantum entanglement of the transverse plane Hermite–Gauss TEM01 mode has been demonstrated experimentally in this paper. Two squeezed TEM01 modes, which are generated by a pair of degenerate optical parametric amplifiers (DOPA) with the nonlinear crystals of periodically poled KTiOPO4, have been combined to produce TEM01 mode entanglement using a beam splitter. The 1.5 dB for the sum of amplitude and 1.2 dB for the difference of phase below shot-noise level is achieved with the measurement system of a Bell state detection. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11504218 and 61108003) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013021005-2).

  11. TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED U3SI2/AL DISPERSION FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B. Miller; D. Keiser; A. Robinson; P. Medvedev; D. Wachs

    2010-10-01

    The silicide dispersion fuel of U3Si2/Al has been recognized as a reasonably good performance fuel for nuclear research and test reactors except that it requires the use of high enrichment uranium. An irradiated U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel (~75% enrichment) from the high flux side of a RERTR-8 (U0R040) plate was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fuel plate was irradiated in the advanced test reactor (ATR) for 105 days. The average irradiation temperature and fission density of the fuel particles for the TEM sample are estimated to be approximately ~110 degrees C and 5.4 x 10-21 f/cm3. The characterization was performed using a 200KV TEM with a LaB6 filament. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of this silicide fuel are discussed.

  12. Combined AES, LEED, SEM and TEM characterizations of CuSi(100) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbücken, M.; Métois, J. J.; Mathiez, P.; Salvan, F.

    1985-10-01

    CuSi(100) interfaces prepared under UHV at different substrate temperatures ( TS) have been characterized using in-situ Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) as well as ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). At room temperature (RT), the film grows in a layer by layer like mode. With increasing TS, the intensity of the Cu M 2,3VV (61 eV) Auger transition decreases and at TS = 500°C no Cu Auger signal could be measured below θ ˜ 100. Yet SEM and TEM observations of these deposits show islands in epitaxial relation with the substrate. It can be determined from TEM images that these islands are covered with a Si skin ( ˜ 50 Å; thick) and that they are deeply implanted in the Si substrate. This explains the AES measurements.

  13. XRD (x-ray diffraction) and HREM (high resolution electron microscopy) studies of nanocrystalline Cu and Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Siegel, R.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Consolidated powders of nanocrystalline Cu and Pd have been studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) as part of an investigation of the mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline pure metals. XRD line broadening measurements were made to estimate grain size, qualitative grain size distribution and average long range strains in a number of samples. Mean grain sizes range from 4--60 nm and have qualitatively narrow grain size distributions. Long range lattice strains are of the order of 0.2--3% in consolidated samples. These strains apparently persist and even increase in Cu samples after annealing at 0.35 Tm (498K) for 2h, accompanied by an apparent increase in grain size of {ge}2x. Grain size, grain size distribution width and internal strains vary somewhat among samples produced under apparently identical processing conditions. HREM studies show that twins, stacking faults and low-index facets are abundant in as-consolidated nanocrystalline Cu samples. Methodology, results, and analysis of XRD and HREM experiments are presented. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. TEM and SHV Genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from Cockroaches and Their Antimicrobial Resistance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Doosti, Abbas; Pourabbas, Mohammad; Arshi, Asghar; Chehelgerdi, Mohammad; Kabiri, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Klebsiella pneumoniae is a gram-negative rod bacterium, a known cause of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and is an important hospital-acquired pathogen that causes severe morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify the TEM and SHV genes in K. pneumoniae isolated from cockroaches obtained from hospitals. Methods In this study, 250 cockroaches were collected from different hospitals in the province of Chaharmahal Va Bakhtiari, which is located in southwest Iran. The samples were examined for the presence of K. pneumoniae by plating onto a combination of culture media, and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolated K. pneumoniae from samples were evaluated using the disk diffusion test. In addition, from the culture, genomic bacterial DNA was extracted, and sequence-specific targets (TEM and SHV genes) were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results Out of 250 cockroach samples collected from various hospitals, 179 samples (71.60%) were positive for K. pneumoniae. PCR reaction was performed using specific oligonucleotide primers (TEM-F, TEM-R and SHV-F, SHV-R) for the amplification of each gene, and amplified products were visualized on 1% agarose gel electrophoresis. Of all the specimens amplified by PCR in this research, 32 samples (17.87%) were positive for TEM and 15 samples (8.37%) were positive for SHV. Conclusion Detection of TEM and SHV genes using molecular methods and their pattern of antimicrobial resistance can provide useful information about the epidemiology of and risk factors associated with K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:25737824

  15. 2.5D Modeling of TEM Data Applied to Hidrogeological Studies in PARANÁ Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, C. A.; Porsani, J. L.; Santos, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The transient electromagnetic method (TEM) is used all over the world and has shown great potential in hydrological, hazardous waste site characterization, mineral exploration, general geological mapping, and geophysical reconnaissance. However, the behavior of TEM fields are very complex and is not yet fully understood. Forward modeling is one of the most common and effective methods to understand the physical behavior and significance of the electromagnetics responses of a TEM sounding. Until now, there are a limited number of solutions for the 2D forward problem for TEM. More rare are the descriptions of a three-component response of a 3D source over 2D earth, which is the so-called 2.5D. The 2.5D approach is more realistic than the conventional 2D source previous used, once normally the source cannot be realistic represented for a 2D approximation (normally source are square loops). At present the 2.5D model represents the only way of interpreting TEM data in terms of a complex earth, due to the prohibitive amount of computer time and storage required for a full 3D model. In this work we developed a TEM modeling program for understanding the different responses and how the magnetic and electric fields, produced by loop sources at air-earth interface, behave in different geoelectrical distributions. The models used in the examples are proposed focusing hydrogeological studies, once the main objective of this work is for detecting different kinds of aquifers in Paraná sedimentary basin, in São Paulo State - Brazil. The program was developed in MATLAB, a widespread language very common in the scientific community.

  16. Effectiveness of Shield Termination Techniques Tested with TEM Cell and Bulk Current Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the effectiveness of various shield termination techniques. Each termination technique is evaluated by two independent noise injection methods; transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell operated from 3 MHz 400 MHz, and bulk current injection (BCI) operated from 50 kHz 400 MHz. Both single carrier and broadband injection tests were investigated. Recommendations as to how to achieve the best shield transfer impedance (i.e. reduced coupled noise) are made based on the empirical data. Finally, the noise injection techniques themselves are indirectly evaluated by comparing the results obtained from the TEM Cell to those from BCI.

  17. TEM and Moessbauer Study of Nano Sized Fe{sub 2}MnAl Flakes

    SciTech Connect

    Vinesh, A.; Sudheesh, V. D.; Lakshmi, N.; Venugopalan, K.

    2011-07-15

    Magnetic and structural properties of L21 ordered Fe{sub 2}MnAl Heusler alloy have been studied by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Moessbauer spectroscopy and DC magnetization. Structural texturing induced by ball milling is destroyed on heating while Moessbauer and DC magnetization studies show magnetic texturing persists after thermal treatment. TEM shows large distribution in particle size with an average size of 27 nm. Thermal annealing of ball milled sample results L2{sub 1} ordering and the needle shaped particle contributes spin texturing.

  18. SANS and TEM studies of carbide precipitation and creep damage in type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Ogle, J.C.; Schneibel, J.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were performed to characterize the carbide (M/sub 23/C/sub 6/) precipitation and creep damage induced in type 304 stainless steel in the primary creep stage. The size distribution of matrix carbides evaluated from SANS analyses was consistent with TEM data, and the expected accelerated kinetics of precipitation under applied stress was confirmed. Additional SANS measurements after the postcreep solution annealing were made in order to differentiate cavities from the carbides. Potential advantages and difficulties associated with characterization of creep-induced cavitation by the SANS techniques are discussed.

  19. Immuno-PET imaging of tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8).

    PubMed

    Kuo, Frank; Histed, Stephanie; Xu, Biying; Bhadrasetty, Veerendra; Szajek, Lawrence P; Williams, Mark R; Wong, Karen; Wu, Haitao; Lane, Kelly; Coble, Vincent; Vasalatiy, Olga; Griffiths, Gary L; Paik, Chang H; Elbuluk, Osama; Szot, Christopher; Chaudhary, Amit; St Croix, Brad; Choyke, Peter; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2014-11-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) is a cell surface receptor that is highly expressed in a variety of human tumors and promotes tumor angiogenesis and cell growth. Antibodies targeting TEM8 block tumor angiogenesis in a manner distinct from the VEGF receptor pathway. Development of a TEM8 imaging agent could aid in patient selection for specific antiangiogenic therapies and for response monitoring. In these studies, L2, a therapeutic anti-TEM8 monoclonal IgG antibody (L2mAb), was labeled with (89)Zr and evaluated in vitro and in vivo in TEM8 expressing cells and mouse xenografts (NCI-H460, DLD-1) as a potential TEM8 immuno-PET imaging agent. (89)Zr-df-L2mAb was synthesized using a desferioxamine-L2mAb conjugate (df-L2mAb); (125)I-L2mAb was labeled directly. In vitro binding studies were performed using human derived cell lines with high, moderate, and low/undetectable TEM8 expression. (89)Zr-df-L2mAb in vitro autoradiography studies and CD31 IHC staining were performed with cryosections from human tumor xenografts (NCI-H460, DLD-1, MKN-45, U87-MG, T-47D, and A-431). Confirmatory TEM8 Western blots were performed with the same tumor types and cells. (89)Zr-df-L2mAb biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed in NCI-H460 and DLD-1 xenografts in nude mice. (125)I-L2mAb and (89)Zr-df-L2mAb exhibited specific and high affinity binding to TEM8 that was consistent with TEM8 expression levels. In NCI-H460 and DLD-1 mouse xenografts nontarget tissue uptake of (89)Zr-df-L2mAb was similar; the liver and spleen exhibited the highest uptake at all time points. (89)Zr-L2mAb was highly retained in NCI-H460 tumors with <10% losses from day 1 to day 3 with the highest tumor to muscle ratios (T:M) occurring at day 3. DLD-1 tumors exhibited similar pharmacokinetics, but tumor uptake and T:M ratios were reduced ∼2-fold in comparison to NCI-H460 at all time points. NCI-H460 and DLD-1 tumors were easily visualized in PET imaging studies despite low in vitro TEM8 expression

  20. High-Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy at High Pressure: A Novel Liquid Cell for the TEM

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Mihaela; Winterstein, Jonathan; Sharma, Renu; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Holland, Glenn; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and imaging resolution of Ag nanoparticles in liquid down to 0.24 nm, in both transmission and scanning-transmission modes, in a novel, monolithic liquid cell developed for the transmission electron microscope (TEM). At typical SiN membrane thicknesses of 50 nm the liquid layer thickness has a maximum change of only 30 nm for the entire TEM viewing area of 200 μm × 200 μm. PMID:26650072

  1. Immuno-PET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) is a cell surface receptor that is highly expressed in a variety of human tumors and promotes tumor angiogenesis and cell growth. Antibodies targeting TEM8 block tumor angiogenesis in a manner distinct from the VEGF receptor pathway. Development of a TEM8 imaging agent could aid in patient selection for specific antiangiogenic therapies and for response monitoring. In these studies, L2, a therapeutic anti-TEM8 monoclonal IgG antibody (L2mAb), was labeled with 89Zr and evaluated in vitro and in vivo in TEM8 expressing cells and mouse xenografts (NCI-H460, DLD-1) as a potential TEM8 immuno-PET imaging agent. 89Zr-df–L2mAb was synthesized using a desferioxamine–L2mAb conjugate (df–L2mAb); 125I-L2mAb was labeled directly. In vitro binding studies were performed using human derived cell lines with high, moderate, and low/undetectable TEM8 expression. 89Zr-df–L2mAb in vitro autoradiography studies and CD31 IHC staining were performed with cryosections from human tumor xenografts (NCI-H460, DLD-1, MKN-45, U87-MG, T-47D, and A-431). Confirmatory TEM8 Western blots were performed with the same tumor types and cells. 89Zr-df–L2mAb biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed in NCI-H460 and DLD-1 xenografts in nude mice. 125I-L2mAb and 89Zr-df–L2mAb exhibited specific and high affinity binding to TEM8 that was consistent with TEM8 expression levels. In NCI-H460 and DLD-1 mouse xenografts nontarget tissue uptake of 89Zr-df–L2mAb was similar; the liver and spleen exhibited the highest uptake at all time points. 89Zr-L2mAb was highly retained in NCI-H460 tumors with <10% losses from day 1 to day 3 with the highest tumor to muscle ratios (T:M) occurring at day 3. DLD-1 tumors exhibited similar pharmacokinetics, but tumor uptake and T:M ratios were reduced ∼2-fold in comparison to NCI-H460 at all time points. NCI-H460 and DLD-1 tumors were easily visualized in PET imaging studies despite low in vitro TEM8 expression in

  2. On the structural affinity of macromolecules with different biological properties: molecular dynamics simulations of a series of TEM-1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Giampaolo, Alessia Di; Mazza, Fernando; Daidone, Isabella; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Perilli, Mariagrazia; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2013-07-12

    Molecular Dynamics simulations have been carried out in order to provide a molecular rationalization of the biological and thermodynamic differences observed for a class of TEM β-lactamases. In particular we have considered the TEM-1(wt), the single point mutants TEM-40 and TEM-19 representative of IRT and ESBL classes respectively, and TEM-1 mutant M182T, TEM-32 and TEM-20 which differ from the first three for the additional of M182T mutation. Results indicate that most of the thermodynamic, and probably biological behaviour of these systems arise from subtle effects which, starting from the alterations of the local interactions, produce drastic modifications of the conformational space spanned by the enzymes. The present study suggests that systems showing essentially the same secondary and tertiary structure may differentiate their chemical-biological activity essentially (and probably exclusively) on the basis of the thermal fluctuations occurring in their physiological environment. PMID:23770365

  3. Transmission X-ray Diffraction (XRD) Patterns Relevant to the MSL Chemin Amorphous Component: Sulfates And Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Graff, T. G.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) CheMin instrument on the Curiosity rover is a transmission X-ray diffractometer (Co-Kalpha radiation source and a approx.5deg to approx.52deg 2theta range) where the analyzed powder samples are constrained to have discrete particle diameters <150 microns by a sieve. To date, diffraction patterns have been obtained for one basaltic soil (Rocknest (RN)) and four drill fines of coherent rock (John Klein (JK), Cumberland (CB), Windjana (WJ), and Confidence Hills (CH)). The CheMin instrument has detected and quantified the abundance of both primary igneous (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene) and secondary (e.g., Ca-sulfates, hematite, akaganeite, and Fe-saponite) minerals. The diffraction patterns of all CheMin samples are also characterized by a broad diffraction band centered near 30deg 2theta and by increasing diffraction intensity (scattering continuum) from approx.15deg to approx.5deg, the 2theta minimum. Both the broad band and the scattering continuum are attributed to the presence of an XRD amorphous component. Estimates of amorphous component abundance, based on the XRD data itself and on mass-balance calculations using APXS data crystalline component chemistry derived from XRD data, martian meteorites, and/or stoichiometry [e.g., 6-9], range from approx.20 wt.% to approx.50 wt.% of bulk sample. The APXSbased calculations show that the amorphous component is rich in volatile elements (esp. SO3) and is not simply primary basaltic glass, which was used as a surrogate to model the broad band in the RN CheMin pattern. For RN, the entire volatile inventory (except minor anhydrite) is assigned to the amorphous component because no volatile-bearing crystalline phases were reported within detection limits [2]. For JK and CB, Fesaponite, basanite, and akaganeite are volatile-bearing crystalline components. Here we report transmission XRD patterns for sulfate and silicate phases relevant to interpretation of MSL-CheMin XRD amorphous

  4. Characterizing the Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Phases Found by MSL Using Laboratory XRD and EGA Measurements of Natural and Synthetic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Bish, David L.; Bristow, Thomas; Archer, Paul Douglas; Blake, David; Achilles, Cherie; Ming, Douglas W.; Vaniman, David; Crisp, Joy A.; DesMarais, David J.; Downs, Robert; Farmer, Jack D.; Morookian, John Michael; Morrison, Shaunna; Sarrazin, Philippe; Spanovich, Nicole; Treiman, Allan H.; Yen, Albert S.

    2013-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed on the Peace Vallis alluvial fan in Gale crater on August 5, 2012. A primary mission science objective is to search for past habitable environments, and, in particular, to assess the role of past water. Identifying the minerals and mineraloids that result from aqueous alteration at Gale crater is essential for understanding past aqueous processes at the MSL landing site and hence for interpreting the site's potential habitability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument and evolved gas analyses (EGA) from the SAM instrument have helped the MSL science team identify phases that resulted from aqueous processes: phyllosilicates and amorphous phases were measure in two drill samples (John Klein and Cumberland) obtained from the Sheepbed Member, Yellowknife Bay Fm., which is believed to represent a fluvial-lacustrine environment. A third set of analyses was obtained from scoop samples from the Rocknest sand shadow. Chemical data from the APXS instrument have helped constrain the chemical compositions of these secondary phases and suggest that the phyllosilicate component is Mg-enriched and the amorphous component is Fe-enriched, relatively Si-poor, and S- and H-bearing. To refine the phyllosilicate and amorphous components in the samples measured by MSL, we measured XRD and EGA data for a variety of relevant natural terrestrial phyllosilicates and synthetic mineraloids in laboratory testbeds of the CheMin and SAM instruments. Specifically, Mg-saturated smectites and vermiculites were measured with XRD at low relative humidity to understand the behavior of the 001 reflections under Mars-like conditions. Our laboratory XRD measurements suggest that interlayer cation composition affects the hydration state of swelling clays at low RH and, thus, the 001 peak positions. XRD patterns of synthetic amorphous materials, including allophane, ferrihydrite, and hisingerite were used in full-pattern fitting (FULLPAT) models to help

  5. A tem study of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductor material prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J.; Qiao, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was made on Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors prepared by plasma spraying which is a useful technique in forming and manufacturing of brittle materials. Amophous region and transitional phases with certain orientation relationship were found between YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ grains.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures. In-situ TEM Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiaoqing

    2015-06-30

    The goal of this project was to explore the structure and dynamic behaviors of ferroelectric domains in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques in close collaboration with phase field modeling. The experimental techniques used include aberration-corrected sub-Å resolution TEM and in-situ TEM using a novel scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) - TEM holder that allows the direct observation of nucleation and dynamic evolution of ferroelectric domains under applied electric field. Specifically, this project was aimed to (1) to study the roles of static electrical boundary conditions and electrical charge in controlling the equilibrium domain structures of BiFeO3 thin films with controlled substrate constraints, (2) to explore the fundamental mechanisms of ferroelectric domain nucleation, growth, and switching under an applied electric field in both uniform thin films and nanostructures, and to understand the roles of crystal defects such as dislocations and interfaces in these processes, (3) to understand the physics of ferroelectric domain walls and the influence of defects on the electrical switching of ferroelectric domains.

  7. Occurrence of Siliceous Impact Melt in Netschaëvo IIE? A FIB-TEM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, C.; Van Roosbroek, N.; Greshake, A.; Pittarello, L.; Hecht, L.; Debaille, V.; Wirth, R.; Claeys, Ph.

    2015-07-01

    A silicate inclusion in a sample of the Netschaëvo IIE iron meteorite was studied with FIB-TEM. We present petrographic features indicating that this inclusion is quenched impact melt and suggest that Netschaëvo is an impact melt breccia.

  8. Mistranslation drives the evolution of robustness in TEM-1 β-lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Bratulic, Sinisa; Gerber, Florian; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    How biological systems such as proteins achieve robustness to ubiquitous perturbations is a fundamental biological question. Such perturbations include errors that introduce phenotypic mutations into nascent proteins during the translation of mRNA. These errors are remarkably frequent. They are also costly, because they reduce protein stability and help create toxic misfolded proteins. Adaptive evolution might reduce these costs of protein mistranslation by two principal mechanisms. The first increases the accuracy of translation via synonymous “high fidelity” codons at especially sensitive sites. The second increases the robustness of proteins to phenotypic errors via amino acids that increase protein stability. To study how these mechanisms are exploited by populations evolving in the laboratory, we evolved the antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 in Escherichia coli hosts with either normal or high rates of mistranslation. We analyzed TEM-1 populations that evolved under relaxed and stringent selection for antibiotic resistance by single molecule real-time sequencing. Under relaxed selection, mistranslating populations reduce mistranslation costs by reducing TEM-1 expression. Under stringent selection, they efficiently purge destabilizing amino acid changes. More importantly, they accumulate stabilizing amino acid changes rather than synonymous changes that increase translational accuracy. In the large populations we study, and on short evolutionary timescales, the path of least resistance in TEM-1 evolution consists of reducing the consequences of translation errors rather than the errors themselves. PMID:26392536

  9. High-resolution TEM study of Mg-doped Aluminum Nitride Epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Bo; Nakarmi, Mim

    2013-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been employed to study the threading dislocations in Mg-doped Aluminum Nitride (AlN) epilayers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The Mg-doped AlN epilayer samples were grown on high quality AlN/Sapphire template of AlN thickness ~ 1 μm. Atomic Force Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction were employed to characterize the surface morphology and the crystalline properties respectively. In the AlN template layers, TEM revealed that the dominant threading dislocation is the edge type dislocation with the average dislocation density of screw and edge dislocation in the order of 107 and 109 cm-2 respectively. In this study, we present our investigation of the threading dislocations associated with Mg-doping in AlN by analyzing the plan-view and cross-section view of TEM images taken under two-beam conditions. We will also use high-resolution dark field and bright field TEM images to investigate the origin and nature of the threading dislocations. Implementation of our finding to improve the quality of Mg-doped AlN epilayers will also be discussed. This work was supported by Student Technology Fee funds of CUNY Graduate Center.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations and morphology analysis of TEM imaged PVDF nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jiayuan; Reneker, Darrell; Tsige, Mesfin; Taylor, Philip

    With the goal of elucidating the structure of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed, and the results compared with structures observed in high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at the molecular level. Simulation shows that the stability of the β-phase component in a PVDF nanofiber is influenced by its thickness and processing history. When exposed to irradiation, as in a TEM observation, the structure is then further modified by the effects of chain scission. The transformation from the β phase into a paraelectric phase can explain the spindle formation and serpentine motion of molecular segments observed by Zhong et al. (Polymer, 54, 2013, 3745-3756) in irradiated PVDF nanofibers. From a comparison between simulated and experimental TEM images it was possible to identify numerous features that are useful in unveiling the inherent structure of PVDF nanofibers. The experimental TEM images appear to match well with those predicted by a model based on α-phase PVDF, while also being consistent with an alternative model (Nanoscale 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01619c). Work supported by the Petroleum Research Fund of the ACS.

  11. Localised corrosion in aluminium alloy 2024-T3 using in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Malladi, Sairam; Shen, Chenggang; Xu, Qiang; de Kruijff, Tom; Yücelen, Emrah; Tichelaar, Frans; Zandbergen, Henny

    2013-11-28

    An approach to carry out chemical reactions using aggressive gases in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), at ambient pressures of 1.5 bar using a windowed environmental cell, called a nanoreactor, is presented here. The nanoreactor coupled with a specially developed holder with platinum tubing permits the usage of aggressive chemicals like hydrochloric acid (HCl). PMID:24127075

  12. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N. R.; Brown, D. R.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 Å = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  13. Time-frequency Analysis on low-resistivity Shielding Layer in TEM Soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xianxin; Wu, Kai

    The transient electromagnetic (TEM) method will be influenced by shielding effect of the low-resistivity overburden layer. By adopting the smooth pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWD), the responses simulated with a finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) of D- and G-type models by a 2D line source and H-, A-, K- and Q-type models by a loop source are transformed to the time-frequency (T-F) plane. It is indicated that in low-resistivity, the TEM wave aggregates and will consume more energy, it transmits faster in high-resistivity layers but slower in low-resistivity ones. For A-type models widely in distribution of the North China type coalfield of our country, energy of the TEM field has been almost depleted when arriving at the bottom interface (interfaces of Ordovician limestone and coal series) during the TEM exploration in this area, influence of the low resistive shielding layer shall be taken into full consideration, and relatively longer observing time window shall be selected to ensure the detection depth and high-power instruments shall be adopted to increase the signal-noise ratio during construction design.

  14. In situ TEM straining of nanograined free-standing thin films reveals various unexpected deformation mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Clark, Blythe G.; Hattar, Khalid M.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2010-04-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) straining experiments provide direct detailed observation of the deformation and failure mechanisms active at a length scale relevant to nanomaterials. This presentation will detail continued investigations into the active mechanisms governing high purity nanograined pulsed-laser deposited (PLD) nickel, as well as recent work into dislocation-particle interactions in nanostructured PLD aluminum-alumina alloys. Straining experiments performed on nanograined PLD free-standing nanograined Ni films with an engineered grain size distribution revealed that the addition of ductility with limited decrease in strength, reported in such metals, can be attributed to the simultaneous activity of three deformation mechanisms in front of the crack tip. At the crack tip, a grain agglomeration mechanism occurs where several nanograins appear to rotate, resulting in a very thin, larger grain immediately prior to failure. In the classical plastic zone in front of the crack tip, a multitude of mechanisms were found to operate in the larger grains including: dislocation pile-up, twinning, and stress-assisted grain growth. The region outside of the plastic zone showed signs of elasticity with limited indications of dislocation activity. The insight gained from in-situ TEM straining experiments of nanograined PLD Ni provides feedback for models of the deformation and failure in nanograined FCC metals, and suggests a greater complexity in the active mechanisms. The investigation into the deformation and failure mechanisms of FCC metals via in-situ TEM straining experiments has been expanded to the effect of hard particles on the active mechanisms in nanograined aluminum with alumina particles. The microstructures investigated were developed with varying composition, grain size, and particle distribution via tailoring of the PLD conditions and subsequent annealing. In order to develop microstructures suitable for in-situ deformation testing

  15. Development and Application of Operando TEM to a Ruthenium Catalyst for CO Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Benjamin Kyle

    Operando transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an extension of in-situ TEM in which the performance of the material being observed is measured simultaneously. This is of great value, since structure-performance relationships lie at the heart of materials science. For catalyst materials, like the SiO2-supported Ru nanoparticles studied, the important performance metric, catalyst activity, is measured inside the microscope by determining the gas composition during imaging. This is accomplished by acquisition of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) of the gas in the environmental TEM while catalysis is taking place. In this work, automated methods for rapidly quantifying low-loss and core-loss EELS of gases were developed. A new sample preparation method was also established to increase catalytic conversion inside a differentially-pumped environmental TEM, and the maximum CO conversion observed was about 80%. A system for mixing gases and delivering them to the environmental TEM was designed and built, and a method for locating and imaging nanoparticles in zone axis orientations while minimizing electron dose rate was determined. After atomic resolution images of Ru nanoparticles observed during CO oxidation were obtained, the shape and surface structures of these particles was investigated. A Wulff model structure for Ru particles was compared to experimental images both by manually rotating the model, and by automatically determining a matching orientation using cross-correlation of shape signatures. From this analysis, it was determined that most Ru particles are close to Wulff-shaped during CO oxidation. While thick oxide layers were not observed to form on Ru during CO oxidation, thin RuO2 layers on the surface of Ru nanoparticles were imaged with atomic resolution for the first time. The activity of these layers is discussed in the context of the literature on the subject, which has thus far been inconclusive. We conclude that disordered oxidized ruthenium

  16. [Research on characteristics of soil clay mineral evolution in paddy field and dry land by XRD spectrum].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-dan; Li, Qiao; Luo, Xiang-li; Jiang, Hai-chao; Zheng, Qing-fu; Zhao, Lan-po; Wang, Ji-hong

    2014-08-01

    The present paper took the typical saline-alkali soil in Jilin province as study object, and determinated the soil clay mineral composition characteristics of soil in paddy field and dry land. Then XRD spectrum was used to analyze the evolutionary mechanism of clay mineral in the two kinds of soil. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better than those in dry land, and paddy field would promote the weathering of mineral particles in saline-alkali soil and enhance the silt content. Paddy field soil showed a strong potassium-removal process, with a higher degree of clay mineral hydration and lower degree of illite crystallinity. Analysis of XRD spectrum showed that the clay mineral composition was similar in two kinds of soil, while the intensity and position of diffraction peak showed difference. The evolution process of clay mineral in dry land was S/I mixture-->vermiculite, while in paddy field it was S/I mixture-->vermiculite-->kaolinite. One kind of hydroxylated 'chlorite' mineral would appear in saline-alkali soil in long-term cultivated paddy field. Taking into account that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better then those in dry land, we could know that paddy field could help much improve soil structure, cultivate high-fertility soil and improve saline-alkali soil. This paper used XRD spectrum to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two'kinds of land use comparatively, and was a new perspective of soil minerals study. PMID:25474976

  17. [Research on characteristics of soil clay mineral evolution in paddy field and dry land by XRD spectrum].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-dan; Li, Qiao; Luo, Xiang-li; Jiang, Hai-chao; Zheng, Qing-fu; Zhao, Lan-po; Wang, Ji-hong

    2014-08-01

    The present paper took the typical saline-alkali soil in Jilin province as study object, and determinated the soil clay mineral composition characteristics of soil in paddy field and dry land. Then XRD spectrum was used to analyze the evolutionary mechanism of clay mineral in the two kinds of soil. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better than those in dry land, and paddy field would promote the weathering of mineral particles in saline-alkali soil and enhance the silt content. Paddy field soil showed a strong potassium-removal process, with a higher degree of clay mineral hydration and lower degree of illite crystallinity. Analysis of XRD spectrum showed that the clay mineral composition was similar in two kinds of soil, while the intensity and position of diffraction peak showed difference. The evolution process of clay mineral in dry land was S/I mixture-->vermiculite, while in paddy field it was S/I mixture-->vermiculite-->kaolinite. One kind of hydroxylated 'chlorite' mineral would appear in saline-alkali soil in long-term cultivated paddy field. Taking into account that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better then those in dry land, we could know that paddy field could help much improve soil structure, cultivate high-fertility soil and improve saline-alkali soil. This paper used XRD spectrum to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two'kinds of land use comparatively, and was a new perspective of soil minerals study. PMID:25508755

  18. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26687421

  19. Astrobiological Significance of Definitive Mineralogical Analysis of Martian Surface Samples Using the CheMin XRD/XRF Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, S. M.; Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Collins, S.

    2004-01-01

    The search for evidence of habitability, or of extant or extinct life on Mars, will initially be a search for evidence of past or present conditions supportive of life. The three key requirements for the emergence of life are thought to be liquid water; a suitable energy source; and chemical building blocks. CheMin is a miniaturized XRD/XRF (X-Ray diffraction / X-ray fluorescence) instrument which has been developed for definitive mineralogic analysis of soils and rocks on the Martian surface. The CheMin instrument can provide information that is highly relevant to each of these habitability requirements as summarized below.

  20. Rapid characterisation of archaeological midden components using FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM-EDX and micro-XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillito, Lisa-Marie; Almond, Matthew J.; Nicholson, James; Pantos, Manolis; Matthews, Wendy

    2009-07-01

    Samples taken from middens at the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in Turkey have been analysed using IR spectroscopy backed up by powder XRD and SEM-EDX. Microcomponents studied include fossil hackberries (providing evidence of ancient diet and seasonality), mineral nodules (providing evidence of post-depositional change) and phytoliths (mineralised plant cells, providing evidence of usage of plant species). Finely laminated ashy deposits have also been investigated allowing chemical and mineralogical variations to be explored. It is found that many layers which appear visually to be quite distinctive have, in fact, very similar mineralogy.

  1. Comparative investigation of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) in the determination of cotton fiber crystallinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite considerable efforts in developing the curve-fitting protocol to evaluate the crystallinity index (CI) from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement, in its present state XRD procedure can only provide a qualitative or semi-quantitative assessment of the amounts of crystalline or amorphous po...

  2. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of high purity CaSO4:Dy TL material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, Nadira; Abdullah, Wan Saffiey Wan; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Dollah, Mohd Taufik

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the characterization and TL properties of dysprosium (Dy) doped calcium sulfate (CaSO4) TL material produced by co-precipitation technique with 0.5mol% concentration of dopant. The morphology of the produced TL material was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the micrograph shows that rectangular parallelepiped shaped crystal with the average of 150 μm in length were produced. The crystallinity of the produced powder was studied using x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The XRD spectra show that the TL material produced is high purity anhydrite CaSO4 with average crystallite size of 74 nm with orthorhombic crystal system. The TL behavior of produced CaSO4:Dy was studied using a TLD reader after exposure to gamma ray by Co60 source with the doses of 1,5 and 10 Gy. The glow curve shows linear response with glow peak around 230°C which is desired development in the field of radiation dosimetry.

  3. Process monitoring and control with CHEMIN, a miniaturized CCD-based instrument for simultaneous XRD/XRF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaniman, David T.; Bish, D.; Guthrie, G.; Chipera, S.; Blake, David E.; Collins, S. Andy; Elliott, S. T.; Sarrazin, P.

    1999-10-01

    There is a large variety of mining and manufacturing operations where process monitoring and control can benefit from on-site analysis of both chemical and mineralogic constituents. CHEMIN is a CCD-based instrument capable of both X-ray fluorescence (XRF; chemical) and X-ray diffraction (XRD; mineralogic) analysis. Monitoring and control with an instrument like CHEMIN can be applied to feedstocks, intermediate materials, and final products to optimize production. Examples include control of cement feedstock, of ore for smelting, and of minerals that pose inhalation hazards in the workplace. The combined XRD/XRF capability of CHEMIN can be used wherever a desired commodity is associated with unwanted constituents that may be similar in chemistry or structure but not both (e.g., Ca in both gypsum and feldspar, where only the gypsum is desired to make wallboard). In the mining industry, CHEMIN can determine mineral abundances on the spot and enable more economical mining by providing the means to assay when is being mined, quickly and frequently, at minimal cost. In manufacturing, CHEMIN could be used to spot-check the chemical composition and crystalline makeup of a product at any stage of production. Analysis by CHEMIN can be used as feedback in manufacturing processes where rates of heating, process temperature, mixture of feedstocks, and other variables must be adjusted in real time to correct structure and/or chemistry of the product (e.g., prevention of periclase and alkali sulfate coproduction in cement manufacture).

  4. Lead Speciation in House Dust from Canadian Urban Homes Using EXAFS Micro-XRF and Micro-XRD

    SciTech Connect

    L MacLean; S Beauchemin; P Rasmussen

    2011-12-31

    X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, micro-X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF), and micro-X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD) were used to determine the speciation of Pb in house dust samples from four Canadian urban homes having elevated Pb concentrations (>1000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}). Linear combination fitting of the XAFS data, supported by {mu}XRF and {mu}XRD, shows that Pb is complexed in a variety of molecular environments, associated with both the inorganic and organic fractions of the dust samples. The inorganic species of lead identified were as follows: Pb metal, Pb carbonate, Pb hydroxyl carbonate, Pb oxide, and Pb adsorbed to iron oxyhydroxides. Pb carbonate and/or Pb hydroxyl carbonate occurred in all four dust samples and accounted for 28 to 75% of total Pb. Pb citrate and Pb bound to humate were the organic species identified. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of XAFS to identify Pb speciation in house dust and show the potential to identify Pb sources from new homes versus older homes. Understanding Pb speciation and how it influences bioaccessibility is important for human health risk assessment and risk management decisions which aim to improve indoor environmental health.

  5. Combined in situ XRD and in situ XANES studies on the reduction behavior of a rhenium promoted cobalt catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Payzant, E A; Jothimurugesan, K; Spivey, J J

    2011-08-28

    A 10% Co-4% Re/(2% Zr/SiO(2)) catalyst was prepared by co-impregnation using a silica support modified by 2% Zr. The catalyst was characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), in situ XRD and in situ XANES analysis where it was simultaneously exposed to H(2) using a temperature programmed ramp. The results showed the two step reduction of large crystalline Co(3)O(4) with CoO as an intermediate. TPR results showed that the reduction of highly dispersed Co(3)O(4) was facilitated by reduced rhenium by a H(2)-spillover mechanism. In situ XRD results showed the presence of both, Co-hcp and Co-fcc phases in the reduced catalyst at 400 °C. However, the Co-hcp phase was more abundant, which is thought to be the more active phase as compared to the Co-fcc phase for CO hydrogenation. CO hydrogenation at 270 °C and 5 bar pressure produces no detectable change in the phases during the time of experiment. In situ XANES results showed a decrease in the metallic cobalt in the presence of H(2)/CO, which can be attributed due to oxidation of the catalyst by reaction under these conditions. PMID:21743918

  6. Synthesis of metal complexes involving Schiff base ligand with methylenedioxy moiety: Spectral, thermal, XRD and antimicrobial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, M. L.; Jeyakumar, T.; Anandakumaran, J.; Karpanai Selvan, B.

    2014-10-01

    Metal complexes of Zn(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Mn(II) Hg(II), and Ag(I) have been synthesized from Schiff base ligand, prepared by the condensation of 3,4-(methylenedioxy)aniline and 5-bromo salicylaldehyde. All the compounds have been characterized by using elemental analysis, molar conductance, FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, mass spectra, powder XRD and thermal analysis (TG/DTA) technique. The elemental analysis suggests the stoichiometry to be 1:1 (metal:ligand). The FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectral data suggest that the ligand coordinate to the metal atom by imino nitrogen and phenolic oxygen as bidentate manner. Mass spectral data further support the molecular mass of the compounds and their structure. Powder XRD indicates the crystalline state and morphology of the ligand and its metal complexes. The thermal behaviors of the complexes prove the presence of lattice as well as coordinated water molecules in the complexes. Melting point supports the thermal stability of all the compounds. The in vitro antimicrobial effects of the synthesized compounds were tested against five bacterial and three fungal species by well diffusion method. Antioxidant activities have also been performed for all the compounds. Metal complexes show more biological activity than the Schiff base.

  7. Synthesis of metal complexes involving Schiff base ligand with methylenedioxy moiety: spectral, thermal, XRD and antimicrobial studies.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, M L; Jeyakumar, T; Anandakumaran, J; Karpanai Selvan, B

    2014-10-15

    Metal complexes of Zn(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Mn(II) Hg(II), and Ag(I) have been synthesized from Schiff base ligand, prepared by the condensation of 3,4-(methylenedioxy)aniline and 5-bromo salicylaldehyde. All the compounds have been characterized by using elemental analysis, molar conductance, FT-IR, UV-Vis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, mass spectra, powder XRD and thermal analysis (TG/DTA) technique. The elemental analysis suggests the stoichiometry to be 1:1 (metal:ligand). The FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and UV-Vis spectral data suggest that the ligand coordinate to the metal atom by imino nitrogen and phenolic oxygen as bidentate manner. Mass spectral data further support the molecular mass of the compounds and their structure. Powder XRD indicates the crystalline state and morphology of the ligand and its metal complexes. The thermal behaviors of the complexes prove the presence of lattice as well as coordinated water molecules in the complexes. Melting point supports the thermal stability of all the compounds. The in vitro antimicrobial effects of the synthesized compounds were tested against five bacterial and three fungal species by well diffusion method. Antioxidant activities have also been performed for all the compounds. Metal complexes show more biological activity than the Schiff base. PMID:24820326

  8. Lead speciation in house dust from Canadian urban homes using EXAFS, micro-XRF, and micro-XRD.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Lachlan C W; Beauchemin, Suzanne; Rasmussen, Pat E

    2011-07-01

    X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF), and micro-X-ray diffraction (μXRD) were used to determine the speciation of Pb in house dust samples from four Canadian urban homes having elevated Pb concentrations (>1000 mg Pb kg(-1)). Linear combination fitting of the XAFS data, supported by μXRF and μXRD, shows that Pb is complexed in a variety of molecular environments, associated with both the inorganic and organic fractions of the dust samples. The inorganic species of lead identified were as follows: Pb metal, Pb carbonate, Pb hydroxyl carbonate, Pb oxide, and Pb adsorbed to iron oxyhydroxides. Pb carbonate and/or Pb hydroxyl carbonate occurred in all four dust samples and accounted for 28 to 75% of total Pb. Pb citrate and Pb bound to humate were the organic species identified. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of XAFS to identify Pb speciation in house dust and show the potential to identify Pb sources from new homes versus older homes. Understanding Pb speciation and how it influences bioaccessibility is important for human health risk assessment and risk management decisions which aim to improve indoor environmental health. PMID:21591711

  9. Strain study of gold nanomaterials as HR-TEM calibration standard.

    PubMed

    Peng, X Y; Zhou, L Q; Li, X; Tao, X F; Ren, L L; Cao, W H; Xu, G F

    2015-12-01

    This work presents the use of high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) and geometric phase analysis (GPA) to measure the interplanar spacing and strain distribution of three gold nanomaterials, respectively. The results showed that the {111} strain was smaller than the {002} strain for any kind of gold materials at the condition of same measuring method. The 0.65% of {111} strain in gold film measured by HREM (0.26% measured by GPA) was smaller than the {111} strains in two gold particles. The presence of lattice strain was interpreted according to the growth mechanism of metallic thin film. It is deduced that the {111} interplanar spacing of the gold thin film is suitable for high magnification calibration of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the gold film is potential to be a new calibration standard of TEM. PMID:26342191

  10. Soot Precursor Material: Spatial Location via Simultaneous LIF-LII Imaging and Characterization via TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and physical transformation between gaseous fuel pyrolysis products and solid carbonaceous soot represents a critical step in soot formation. In this paper, simultaneous two-dimensional LIF-LII (laser-induced fluorescence - laser-induced incandescence) images identify the spatial location where the earliest identifiable chemical and physical transformation of material towards solid carbonaceous soot occurs along the axial streamline in a normal diffusion flame. The identification of the individual LIF and LII signals is achieved by examining both the excitation wavelength dependence and characteristic temporal decay of each signal. Spatially precise thermophoretic sampling measurements are guided by the LIF-LII images with characterization of the sampled material accomplished via both bright and dark field TEM. Both bright and dark field TEM measurements support the observed changes in photophysical properties which account for conversion of fluorescence to incandescence as fuel pyrolysis products evolve towards solid carbonaceous soot.

  11. Theoretical analysis and modeling of Thickness-Expansion Mode (TEM) sensors for fluid characterization.

    PubMed

    Elvira, Luis; Resa, Pablo; Castro, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the principles of Thickness-Expansion Mode (TEM) resonators for the characterization of fluids are described. From the measurement of the resonance parameters of a TEM piezoelectric transducer, the compressional acoustic impedance of gases and liquids can be determined. Since the propagation of mechanical waves into the fluid is not necessary, information in a wide range of frequencies can be obtained. Alternatively, these sensors can be driven in combination with other ultrasonic techniques to simultaneously determine the density, speed of sound and viscosity of samples. Some potential applications include the probe monitoring of processes and the characterization of fluids under harsh conditions. The main experimental criteria for the design and construction of high-resolution impedance meters (such as piezoelectric material, protective coating or thermal response) have been studied using equivalent electrical circuit modeling and finite element analysis. PMID:23206416

  12. TEM identification of subsurface phases in ternary U-Pu-Zr fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Papesch, Cynthia A.; Cole, James I.

    2016-05-01

    Phases and microstructure in as-cast, annealed at 850 °C, and subsequently cooled U-23Pu-9Zr fuel were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. SEM examination shows formation of three phases in the alloy that were identified in TEM using selective area diffraction pattern analysis: α-Zr globular and elongated δ-UZr2 inclusions and a thick oxide layer formed on top of β-Pu phase, which has been initially assumed to be ζ-(U, Pu). However, further examination of the cross-sectional TEM specimens identified the matrix phases as δ-UZr2, β-Pu, and (U, Zr)ht. Two types of inclusions were observed in the immediate vicinity of the specimen surface and they were consistent with α-Zr and ζ-(U, Pu).

  13. Extracting 3-D information from SEM and TEM images: Approaches and applications in the physical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    L`Esperance, G.; Dionne, M.; Tremblay, S.

    1996-12-31

    Techniques for extracting 3-D information from TEM samples in life sciences have considerably progressed in recent years. One approach has been the use of serial prepared by ultramicrotomy from which the volume of the sample and of various constituents can be reconstructed. In the case of engineering materials, however, ultramicrotomy generally induces severe deformation resulting in a large density of structural defects (dislocations, stacking faults etc.). This leads to significant diffraction contrast effects which mask microstructural features such as second phase particles, precipitates etc. Recently, a series of TEM bright field images taken at different tilts have been used in combination with image analysis to determine the volume fraction (V{sub f}) of second phase particles in thin foils of aluminum alloys. Although the technique was successful to remove most of the diffraction contrast effects and to make the particles visible, the need to acquire and process a large number of images makes the technique laborious and can lead to artefacts.

  14. Direct observation of catalytic oxidation of particulate matter using in situ TEM

    PubMed Central

    Kamatani, Kohei; Higuchi, Kimitaka; Yamamoto, Yuta; Arai, Shigeo; Tanaka, Nobuo; Ogura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    The ability to observe chemical reactions at the molecular level convincingly demonstrates the physical and chemical phenomena occurring throughout a reaction mechanism. Videos obtained through in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the oxidation of catalytic soot under practical reaction conditions. Carbon oxidation reactions using Ag/SiO2 or Cs2CO3/nepheline catalysts were performed at 330 °C under an O2 flow of 0.5 Pa in the TEM measurement chamber. Ag/SiO2 catalyzed the reaction at the interface of the mobile Ag species and carbon, while the Cs species was fixed on the nepheline surface during the reaction. In the latter case, carbon particles moved, remained attached to the Cs2CO3/nepheline surface, and were consumed at the interface by the oxidation reaction. Using this technique, we were able to visualize such mobile and immobile catalysis according to different mechanisms. PMID:26154580

  15. A simple method for fabrication of enhanced fluorescence substrate on TEM copper grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Du, Yabing; Qi, Jianxia; Zhang, Wenwen; Li, Wenyang

    2013-09-01

    A simple method to fabricate enhanced fluorescence substrates was experimentally demonstrated. The fabricated substrate, consisting of silver dendrites, was manufactured by a modified galvanic displacement process between Ag ions and TEM grid at room temperature. Substrate enhancement efficiency, which was evaluated from fluorescence spectrum intensities of the adsorbed Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) molecules, was found to increase rapidly with reaction time. The observation highlights the importance of strong coupling effects between silver nanobranches and the variation of SEF efficiency can be qualitatively explained with the local surface plasmon resonance model of coupled silver nanostructures. As a result, with a laser, a spectrometer, some second-hand TEM grids, and simple chemical agents, we can easily fabricate the enhanced substrate, which can be applied to study surface enhanced fluorescence, one of the research focuses currently.

  16. In-Situ TEM Observation of Twinning and Detwinning During Cyclic Loading in Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; McCabe, Rodney J.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Tomé, Carlos N.

    2013-04-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to directly observe twin evolution in Mg under tension and compression. Twins grow during tensile loading. Upon load reversal, the first-generation twin detwins by nucleation and growth of a second-generation twin within its volume. This mechanism for detwinning is different from the more traditional mechanism of detwinning by reverse motion of a twin boundary. Reloading in tension causes the second-generation twin to recede, leaving behind residual features. In compression, the second-generation twin re-nucleates in the area of this debris, and grows. Interactions between dislocations and twin boundaries change the character of the observed dislocations. Direct observation of such behavior aids in clearer understanding of the observed microstructures from post-mortem TEM.

  17. In-Situ TEM Observation of Twinning and Detwinning During Cyclic Loading in Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; McCabe, Rodney J.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Tomé, Carlos N.

    2014-01-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to directly observe twin evolution in Mg under tension and compression. Twins grow during tensile loading. Upon load reversal, the first-generation twin detwins by nucleation and growth of a second-generation twin within its volume. This mechanism for detwinning is different from the more traditional mechanism of detwinning by reverse motion of a twin boundary. Reloading in tension causes the second-generation twin to recede, leaving behind residual features. In compression, the second-generation twin re-nucleates in the area of this debris, and grows. Interactions between dislocations and twin boundaries change the character of the observed dislocations. Direct observation of such behavior aids in clearer understanding of the observed microstructures from post-mortem TEM.

  18. A TEM-horn antenna with dielectric lens for fast impulse response

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    We designed and constructed a pair of TEM-horn antennas specifically for the very fast time-domain boresight response. Two physical topologies were made. A printed-board configuration has much slower transient response, which we think is due to pulse-smearing of the antenna currents in the dielectric substrate of the printed wiring boards. The solid state version has a 20 ps transition duration response in the main beam endfire (boresight) direction, which is the fastest we have seen to date. And since the antenna has a round trip antenna current propagation time of 6 ns, it offers clean radiated electromagnetic field measurement capability with a clear time of several nanoseconds. The printed board version has resistive loading at the aperture end of the conductors, which should offer better low- frequency performance. The dielectric lens certainly does improve the transient performance of the TEM horn, and was simple to design.

  19. Analytical study of raw Swarna Makshika (Chalcopyrite) and its Bhasma through TEM and EDAX

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Sudhaldev; Jha, Chandra Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    Ayurveda, the Indian System of Medicine deals with a number of metals and minerals. Swarna Makshika (SM), a chalcopyrite one such minerals has iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and sulphur (S) as major ingredients along with other trace elements of therapeutic importance. Studies related with characterization of SM are very few. In the current study SM and SM Bhasma were analysed through Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX). Analysis reveals the presence of iron, copper, and sulphur in SM. In addition to these elements, SM Bhasma found to contain Potassium, Magnesium, Aluminum, and Silicon in trace amount. TEM study reveals that, grain size of the SM (5-10 microns) is significantly reduced in SM Bhasma to 50-200 nm. PMID:24250132

  20. Joint inversion of TEM and DC in roadway advanced detection based on particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jiulong; Li, Fei; Peng, Suping; Sun, Xiaoyun; Zheng, Jing; Jia, Jizhe

    2015-12-01

    Transient electromagnetic method (TEM)and direct current method (DC)are two key widely applied methods for practical roadway detection, but both have their limitations. To take the advantage of each method, a synchronous nonlinear joint inversion method is proposed based on TEM and DC by using particle swarm optimization (PSO)algorithm. Firstly, a model with double low resistance anomaly and interference is constructed to test the performance of the method. Then the independent inversion and joint inversion are calculated by using the model built above. It is demonstrated that the joint inversion helped in improving the interpretation of the data to get better results. It is because that the suppression of interference and separation of the resistivity anomalies ahead and the back of the roadway working face using the proposed method. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used in a coalmine in Huainan coalfield in east China to demonstrate its practical usefulness.

  1. TEM wave propagation in a microstrip line on a substrate of circular segment cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malits, P.; Haridim, M.; Chulski, S.

    2015-12-01

    TEM mode wave propagation in a microstrip transmission line on a dielectric substrate of circular segment cross section is of concern. A suggested design of a microstrip is convenient for manufacturing and allows to miniaturize microstrips since there is no lateral fringing effect of the substrate in the transmitted fundamental TEM mode. By using the bipolar orthogonal coordinates, the plane potential problem is reformulated in the form of trigonometric dual integral equations. The discontinuous integrals containing Legendre functions of complex degree and the Abel integral equation are employed to reduce the dual equations to a Fredholm equation of the second kind. The structure of the Fredholm integral equation allows to obtain a simple approximate solution. Basing on this solution, rigorous approximate formulas for the characteristic impedance are derived. The characteristic impedance of a microstrip transmission line on a silicon substrate is computed and plotted as an example.

  2. A combined TEM and X-ray microanalytical study of argon in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, R. J.; Goodhew, P. J.

    1988-07-01

    A series of aluminium samples have been implanted at room temperature with a low dose of argon ions. The development of argon bubbles from the initially sub-microscopic argon clusters has been studied by annealing the samples to a series of temperatures up to 0.97 Tm. The argon content of selected volumes of each sample has been determined by X-ray analysis in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). This result has then been compared with that calculated from measurements of bubble sizes taken from TEM micrographs of the visible bubble population in the same volume of the sample. The results indicate that sub-microscopic argon clusters may survive after annealing to temperatures as high as 500°C. Evidence is also found for the trapping of argon at the air formed surface oxide-metal interfaces.

  3. Experimental Space Weathering of Ordinary Chondrites by Nanopulse Laser: TEM Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Hiroi, T.; Keller, L. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    A set of ordinary chondrite meteorites has been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser to simulate the effects of micrometeorite bombardment. Three meteorites, an H (Ehole), L (Chateau Renard - CR), and LL (Appley Bridge - AB) were lasered following the method of Sasaki et al [1]. Near IR spectra were taken before and after exposure to examine the optical changes induced and the samples were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) to understand the physical changes.

  4. Spotiton: A prototype for an integrated inkjet dispense and vitrification system for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tilak; Sheehan, Patrick; Crum, John; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades, Cryo-TEM has developed into a powerful technique for high-resolution imaging of biological macromolecules in their native vitrified state. However, the technique for vitrifying specimens onto EM grids is essentially unchanged – application of ~ 3 µL sample to a grid, followed by blotting and rapid plunge freezing into liquid ethane. Several trials are often required to obtain suitable thin (few hundred nanometers or less) vitrified layers amenable for cryo-TEM imaging, which results in waste of precious sample and resources. While commercially available instruments provide some level of automation to control the vitrification process in an effort to increase quality and reproducibility, obtaining satisfactory vitrified specimens remains a bottleneck in the Cryo-TEM pipeline. We describe here a completely novel method for EM specimen preparation based on small volume (picoliter to nanoliter) dispensing using inkjet technology. A first prototype system (Spotiton v0.5) demonstrates feasibility of this new approach for specimen vitrification. A piezo-electric inkjet dispenser is integrated with optical real-time cameras (100 Hz frame rate) to analyze picoliter to nanoliter droplet profiles in-flight and spreading dynamics on the grid, and thus provides a method to optimize timing of the process. Using TEM imaging and biochemical assays we demonstrate that the piezo-electric inkjet mechanism does not disrupt the structural or functional integrity of macromolecules. These preliminary studies provide insight into the factors and components that will need further development to enable a robust and repeatable technique for specimen vitrification using this novel approach. PMID:22569522

  5. Thermal stress induced voids in nanoscale copper interconnects by in-situ TEM heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Jin Ho

    Stress induced void formation in Cu interconnects, due to thermal stresses generated during the processing of semiconductors, is an increasing reliability issue in the semiconductor industry as Cu interconnects are being downscaled to follow the demand for faster chip speed. In this work, 1.8 micron and 180 nm wide Cu interconnects, fabricated by Freescale Semiconductors, were subjected to thermal cycles, in-situ in the TEM, to investigate the stress relaxation mechanisms as a function of interconnect linewidth. The experiments show that the 1.8 micron Cu interconnect lines relax the thermal stresses through dislocation nucleation and motion while the Cu interconnect 180 nm lines exhibit void formation. Void formation in 180 nm lines occurs predominantly at triple junctions where the Ta diffusion barrier meets a Cu grain boundary. In order to understand void formation in 180 nm lines, the grain orientation and local stresses are determined. In particular, Nanobeam Diffraction (NBD) in the TEM is used to obtain the diffraction pattern of each grain, from which the crystal orientation is evaluated by the ACT (Automated Crystallography for TEM) software. In addition, 2D Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations are performed using the Object Oriented Finite Modeling (OOF2) software to correlate grain orientation with local stresses, and consequently void formation. According to the experimental and simulation results obtained, void formation in 180nm Cu interconnects does not seem to be solely dependent on local stresses, but a combination of diffusion paths available, stress gradients and possibly the presence of defects. In addition, based on the in-situ TEM observations, void growth seems to occur through grain boundary and/or interfacial diffusion. However, in-situ STEM observations of fully opened voids post-failure show pileup of material at the Cu grain surfaces. This means that surface or interface diffusion is also very active during void growth in the presence

  6. Comparison of preparation techniques for nuclear materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Miller, Brandon D; Cole, James I; Gan, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of highly radioactive and irradiated nuclear fuels and materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is conjoined with a set of unique challenges, including but not limited to personnel radiation exposure and contamination. The paper evaluates three specimen preparation techniques for preparation of irradiated materials and determines which technique yields to the most reliable characterization of radiation damage microstructure. Various specimen preparation artifacts associated with each technique are considered and ways of minimizing these artifacts are addressed.

  7. Validation of the gyrokinetic model in ITG and TEM dominated L-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Greenwald, M.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.; Walk, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    A rigorous validation of the gyrokinetic model was performed in both ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron mode (TEM) dominated Alcator C-Mod plasmas at (normalized midplane minor radius) r/a = 0.5 and 0.8. Analysis focuses on two L-mode discharges operated with 1.2 and 3.5 MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating. In depth investigation into the experimental uncertainties and simulation sensitivities in these discharges allows for a stringent test of the gyrokinetic model implemented by the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) in both the centre of the stiff gradient region (r/a = 0.5) and the middle of the region often associated with the transport ‘shortfall’(r/a = 0.8). To identify the nature of the plasma turbulence and to ensure a robust evaluation of the model's ability to reproduce experiment, the sensitivity of the simulation results to experimental uncertainty in turbulence drive and suppression terms were determined at both radial locations. When significant TEM activity is present, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations are found to reproduce both electron and ion experimental heat fluxes within their diagnosed uncertainties. In contrast, in the absence of TEM, electron heat fluxes are robustly under predicted by low-k, gyrokinetic simulation.

  8. Coarsening of Pd nanoparticles in an oxidizing atmosphere studied by in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Chorkendorff, Ib; Dahl, Søren; Skoglundh, Magnus; Helveg, Stig

    2016-06-01

    The coarsening of supported palladium nanoparticles in an oxidizing atmosphere was studied in situ by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Specifically, the Pd nanoparticles were dispersed on a planar and amorphous Al2O3 support and were observed during the exposure to 10 mbar technical air at 650 °C. Time-resolved TEM image series reveal that the Pd nanoparticles were immobile and that a few percent of the nanoparticles grew or shrank, indicating a coarsening process mediated by the Ostwald ripening mechanism. The TEM image contrast suggests that the largest nanoparticles tended to wet the Al2O3 support to a higher degree than the smaller nanoparticles and that the distribution of projected particle sizes consequently broadens by the appearance of an asymmetric tail toward the larger particle sizes. A comparison with computer simulations based on a simple mean-field model for the Ostwald ripening process indicates that the observed change in the particle size distribution can be accounted for by wetting of the Al2O3 support by the larger Pd nanoparticles.

  9. GISAXS modelling of helium-induced nano-bubble formation in tungsten and comparison with TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Matt; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Bernard, Elodie; Kirby, Nigel; Kluth, Patrick; Riley, Daniel; Corr, Cormac

    2016-05-01

    Grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is a powerful non-destructive technique for the measurement of nano-bubble formation in tungsten under helium plasma exposure. Here, we present a comparative study between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and GISAXS measurements of nano-bubble formation in tungsten exposed to helium plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) fusion experiment. Both techniques are in excellent agreement, suggesting that nano-bubbles range from spheroidal to ellipsoidal, displaying exponential diameter distributions with mean diameters μ=0.68 ± 0.04 nm and μ=0.6 ± 0.1 nm measured by TEM and GISAXS respectively. Depth distributions were also computed, with calculated exponential depth distributions with mean depths of 8.4 ± 0.5 nm and 9.1 ± 0.4 nm for TEM and GISAXS. In GISAXS modelling, spheroidal particles were fitted with an aspect ratio ε=0.7 ± 0.1. The GISAXS model used is described in detail.

  10. Edge-melting: nanoscale key-mechanism to explain nanoparticle formation from heated TEM grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaria, Maura; Taurino, Antonietta; Catalano, Massimo; Caricato, Anna Paola; Martino, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we examine at both experimental and fundamental levels, the experimental evidence of nanoparticle formation in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) metal grids annealed at temperatures lower than the melting point of the corresponding metal bulk material. Our experimental investigation considers the most thermally unstable TEM grids (i.e. Cu-grids) and inspects the possible sources and mechanisms of contamination of thin films, conventionally deposited on carbon-coated Cu-grids. The investigations are supported by morphological-compositional analyses performed in different regions of the TEM sample. Then, a general model is formulated and discussed in order to explain the grid thermal instability, based on the critical role of edge-melting (i.e. melting initiated at edges and corners of the grid bars), the enhanced rate of evaporation from a liquid surface and the polycristallinity of the grid bars. Hence, we totally disregard conventional arguments such as bulk evaporation and metal vapor pressure and, in order to emphasize and clarify the alternative point of view of our model, we also overview the nano-scale melting phenomenology relevant to our discussion and survey the discrepancies reported in the literature.

  11. Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases in Ireland, Including a Novel Enzyme, TEM-102

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Dearbháile; O'Hare, Colette; Glennon, Maura; Maher, Majella; Corbett-Feeney, Geraldine; Cormican, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Organisms producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) have been reported in many countries, but there is no information on the prevalence of ESBL-producing members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in Ireland. A total of 925 isolates of ampicillin-resistant members of the Enterobacteriaceae were received from six hospitals in Ireland over a 3-year period from September 1996 to September 1999. Isolates were screened for ESBL production by the double-disk diffusion (DDD) method. DDD-positive isolates that were (i) confirmed as ESBL producers by National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) confirmatory testing and (ii) susceptible to cefoxitin by disk diffusion were considered ESBL producers. By these criteria, 27 (3%) of the ampicillin-resistant members of the Enterobacteriaceae studied were categorized as ESBL producers. Molecular typing suggested that some intra- and interhospital spread of ESBL-producing isolates had occurred. DNA sequencing of amplified blaTEM and blaSHV genes resulted in the detection of a novel blaTEM ESBL gene, blaTEM-102 in two isolates (Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae) received from the same hospital but isolated from different patients. The study suggests dissemination of ESBL-producing bacteria within the health care system in Ireland and emphasizes the need for measures to control such spread. PMID:12878521

  12. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. PMID:27571919

  13. 3D TEM reconstruction and segmentation process of laminar bio-nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Iturrondobeitia, M. Okariz, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, R.; Jimbert, P.; Guraya, T.; Ibarretxe, J.

    2015-03-30

    The microstructure of laminar bio-nanocomposites (Poly (lactic acid)(PLA)/clay) depends on the amount of clay platelet opening after integration with the polymer matrix and determines the final properties of the material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique is the only one that can provide a direct observation of the layer dispersion and the degree of exfoliation. However, the orientation of the clay platelets, which affects the final properties, is practically immeasurable from a single 2D TEM image. This issue can be overcome using transmission electron tomography (ET), a technique that allows the complete 3D characterization of the structure, including the measurement of the orientation of clay platelets, their morphology and their 3D distribution. ET involves a 3D reconstruction of the study volume and a subsequent segmentation of the study object. Currently, accurate segmentation is performed manually, which is inefficient and tedious. The aim of this work is to propose an objective/automated segmentation methodology process of a 3D TEM tomography reconstruction. In this method the segmentation threshold is optimized by minimizing the variation of the dimensions of the segmented objects and matching the segmented V{sub clay} (%) and the actual one. The method is first validated using a fictitious set of objects, and then applied on a nanocomposite.

  14. Novel Transrotational Solid State Order Discovered by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    Exotic thin crystals with unexpected transrotational microstructures have been discovered by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for crystal growth in thin (10-100 nm) amorphous films of different chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) prepared by various methods. Primarily we use our TEM bend contour technique. The unusual phenomenon can be traced in situ in TEM column: dislocation independent regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. Such transrotation (unit cell trans lation is complicated by small rotationrealized round an axis lying in the film plane) can result in strong regular lattice orientation gradients (up to 300 degrees per micrometer) of different geometries: cylindrical, ellipsoidal, toroidal, saddle, etc. Transrotation is increasing as the film gets thinner. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. Transrotational micro crystals have been eventually recognized by other authors in some vital thin film materials, i.e. PCMs for memory, silicides, SrTiO3. Atomic model and possible mechanisms of the phenomenon are discussed. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is also proposed Support of RF Ministry of Education and Science is acknowledged.

  15. Thinning of Large Biological Cells for Cryo-TEM Characterization by Cryo-FIB Milling

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Korrinn M.; Ke, Danxia; Gray, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Peijun

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Focused ion beam milling at cryogenic temperatures (cryo-FIB) is a valuable tool that can be used to thin vitreous biological specimens for subsequent imaging and analysis in a cryo-transmission electron microscope (cryo-TEM) in their frozen-hydrated state. This technique offers the potential benefit of eliminating the mechanical artifacts that are typically found with cryo-ultramicrotomy. However, due to the additional complexity in transferring samples in and out of the FIB, contamination and devitrification of the amorphous ice is commonly encountered. In order to address these problems, we have designed a new sample cryo-shuttle that specifically accepts Polara TEM cartridges directly in order to simplify the transfer process between the FIB and TEM. We used the quality of the ice in the sample as an indicator to test various parameters used the process, and demonstrated with successful milling of large mammalian cells. By comparing the results from larger HeLa cells to those from E. coli cells, we discuss some of the artifacts and challenges we have encountered using this technique. PMID:22906009

  16. Differential Dependence on N-Glycosylation of Anthrax Toxin Receptors CMG2 and TEM8

    PubMed Central

    Friebe, Sarah; Deuquet, Julie; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2015-01-01

    ANTXR 1 and 2, also known as TEM8 and CMG2, are two type I membrane proteins, which have been extensively studied for their role as anthrax toxin receptors, but with a still elusive physiological function. Here we have analyzed the importance of N-glycosylation on folding, trafficking and ligand binding of these closely related proteins. We find that TEM8 has a stringent dependence on N-glycosylation. The presence of at least one glycan on each of its two extracellular domains, the vWA and Ig-like domains, is indeed necessary for efficient trafficking to the cell surface. In the absence of any N-linked glycans, TEM8 fails to fold correctly and is recognized by the ER quality control machinery. Expression of N-glycosylation mutants reveals that CMG2 is less vulnerable to sugar loss. The absence of N-linked glycans in one of the extracellular domains indeed has little impact on folding, trafficking or receptor function of the wild type protein expressed in tissue culture cells. N-glycans do, however, seem required in primary fibroblasts from human patients. Here, the presence of N-linked sugars increases the tolerance to mutations in cmg2 causing the rare genetic disease Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome. It thus appears that CMG2 glycosylation provides a buffer towards genetic variation by promoting folding of the protein in the ER lumen. PMID:25781883

  17. Direct evidence of chemical ordering in the FePt nanostructured alloy by HR-TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rekha; Medwal, Rohit; Annapoorni, S.

    2015-07-01

    The iron-platinum (FePt) alloy exhibits structural and magnetic phase transformation even at a low temperature of 300 °C with an insignificant grain growth. These transformation studies were understood nano-scopically using high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The FePt grains show strain induced structural transformation and adopts polycrystalline behaviour. The chemical ordering of FePt grains is explained using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of the TEM image. HR-TEM image shows the hexagonal arrangement of Pt atoms in the [0 0 1] direction in the FePt unit cell which gives the direct evidence of chemical ordering in FePt nanostructured alloy. The filtration and reconstruction method has been employed with the help of inverse Fast Fourier Transformation tool, confirming the formation of L10 FePt phase. The chemical ordering is also confirmed by structural and magnetic measurements revealing an order parameter of 0.875 and coercivity 3 kOe respectively at a low annealing temperature of 300 °C. The chemical ordering at low annealing temperature makes it suitable for media storage applications.

  18. 2.5 D Transrotational Microcrystals and Nanostructures Revealed by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    Unexpected transrotational microcrystals can be grown in thin 10-100 nm amorphous films. Crystals of different morphology (from nanowhiskers to spherulites, complex textures) and chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) grown in thin films prepared by various methods are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We use primarily our TEM bend-contour method and SAED (HREM, AFM are also performed). The phenomenon resides in strong (up to 300 degrees/ μm) regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. It can be traced inside TEM in situ. Usual translation is complicated by slight regular rotation of the crystal unit cell (transrotation) most prominent at the mesoscale. Different geometries of transrotation of positive and negative curvature are revealed. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. It can be also considered similar to hypothetical endless 2.5 D analogy of MW nanotube/nano-onion halves. Transrotation is strongly increasing as the film gets thinner in the range 100-15 nm. Transrotations supplement dislocations and disclinations. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is proposed. Support of Ministry of Higher Education and Science is acknowledged.

  19. "Rinse and trickle": a protocol for TEM preparation and investigation of inorganic fibers from biological material.

    PubMed

    Vigliaturo, Ruggero; Capella, Silvana; Rinaudo, Caterina; Belluso, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to define a sample preparation protocol that allows inorganic fibers and particulate matter extracted from different biological samples to be characterized morphologically, crystallographically and chemically by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS). The method does not damage or create artifacts through chemical attacks of the target material. A fairly rapid specimen preparation is applied with the aim of performing as few steps as possible to transfer the withdrawn inorganic matter onto the TEM grid. The biological sample is previously digested chemically by NaClO. The salt is then removed through a series of centrifugation and rinse cycles in deionized water, thus drastically reducing the digestive power of the NaClO and concentrating the fibers for TEM analysis. The concept of equivalent hydrodynamic diameter is introduced to calculate the settling velocity during the centrifugation cycles. This technique is applicable to lung tissues and can be extended to a wide range of organic materials. The procedure does not appear to cause morphological damage to the fibers or modify their chemistry or degree of crystallinity. The extrapolated data can be used in interdisciplinary studies to understand the pathological effects caused by inorganic materials. PMID:27151190

  20. Cosmic non-TEM radiation and synthetic feed array sensor system in ASIC mixed signal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centureli, F.; Scotti, G.; Tommasino, P.; Trifiletti, A.; Romano, F.; Cimmino, R.; Saitto, A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper deals with the opportunity to introduce "Not strictly TEM waves" Synthetic detection Method (NTSM), consisting in a Three Axis Digital Beam Processing (3ADBP), to enhance the performances of radio telescope and sensor systems. Current Radio Telescopes generally use the classic 3D "TEM waves" approximation Detection Method, which consists in a linear tomography process (Single or Dual axis beam forming processing) neglecting the small z component. The Synthetic FEED ARRAY three axis Sensor SYSTEM is an innovative technique using a synthetic detection of the generic "NOT strictly TEM Waves radiation coming from the Cosmo, which processes longitudinal component of Angular Momentum too. Than the simultaneous extraction from radiation of both the linear and quadratic information component, may reduce the complexity to reconstruct the Early Universe in the different requested scales. This next order approximation detection of the observed cosmologic processes, may improve the efficacy of the statistical numerical model used to elaborate the same information acquired. The present work focuses on detection of such waves at carrier frequencies in the bands ranging from LF to MMW. The work shows in further detail the new generation of on line programmable and reconfigurable Mixed Signal ASIC technology that made possible the innovative Synthetic Sensor. Furthermore the paper shows the ability of such technique to increase the Radio Telescope Array Antenna performances.

  1. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. PMID:27571919

  2. Antibody-based tumor vascular theranostics targeting endosialin/TEM1 in a new mouse tumor vascular model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunsheng; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Hu, Jia; Hasegawa, Kosei; Swails, Jennifer; Grasso, Luigi; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Nicolaides, Nicholas; Muzykantov, Vladimir R; Divgi, Chaitanya R; Coukos, George

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1, endosialin) is a tumor vascular marker with significant diagnostic and therapeutic potential. However, in vivo small animal models to test affinity reagents specifically targeted to human (h)TEM1 are limited. We describe a new mouse tumor model where tumor vascular endothelial cells express hTEM1 protein. Methods: Immortalized murine endothelial cells MS1 were engineered to express hTEM1 and firefly luciferase and were inoculated in nude mice either alone, to form hemangioma-like endothelial grafts, or admixed with ID8 ovarian tumor cells, to form chimeric endothelial-tumor cell grafts. MORAb-004, a monoclonal humanized IgG1 antibody specifically recognizing human TEM1 was evaluated for targeted theranostic applications, i.e., for its ability to affect vascular grafts expressing hTEM1 as well as being a tool for molecular positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Results: Naked MORAb-004 treatment of mice bearing angioma grafts or chimeric endothelial-tumor grafts significantly suppressed the ability of hTEM1-positive endothelial cells, but not control endothelial cells, to form grafts and dramatically suppressed local angiogenesis. In addition, highly efficient radioiodination of MORAb-004 did not impair its affinity for hTEM1, and [124I]-MORAb-004-PET enabled non-invasive visualization of tumors enriched with hTEM1-positive, but not hTEM1 negative vasculature with high degree of specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: The development of a new robust endothelial graft model expressing human tumor vascular proteins will help accelerate the development of novel theranostics targeting the tumor vasculature, which exhibit affinity specifically to human targets but not their murine counterparts. Our results also demonstrate the theranostic potential of MORAb-004 as PET imaging tracer and naked antibody therapy for TEM1-positive tumor. PMID:24553243

  3. Landed XRD/XRF analysis of prime targets in the search for past or present Martian life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Elliott, S. T.; Sarrazin, P.; Collins, S. A.; Chipera, S.

    1998-12-01

    Mars landers seeking evidence for past or present life will be guided by information from orbital mapping and from previous surface exploration. Several target options have been proposed, including sites that may harbor extant life and sites most likely to preserve evidence of past life. These sites have specific mineralogic characteristics. Extant life might be gathered around the sinters and associated mineral deposits of rare active fumaroles, or held within brine pockets and inclusions in a few evaporite-mineral deposits. Possibilities for fossilization include deltaic and lake-bottom sediments of once-flooded craters, sinters formed by ancient hot-spring deposits, and the carbonate deposits associated with some evaporite systems. However, the highly varied mineralogy of fossil occurrences on Earth leads to the inference that Mars, an equally complex planet, could host a broad variety of potential fossilizing deposits. The abundance of volcanic systems on Mars and evidence for close associations between volcanism and water release suggest possibilities of organism entrapment and mineralization in volcaniclastic deposits, as found in some instances on Earth. Thus the targets being considered for exploration include a wide variety of unique deposits that would be characterized by silica or various nonsilicate minerals. Beyond these ``special'' deposits and in the most general case, an ability to distinguish mineralized from uncemented volcanic detritus may be the key to success in finding possible fossilbearing authigenic mineralogies. A prototype miniaturized X ray diffraction/X ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument has been evaluated with silica, carbonate, and sulfate minerals and with a basalt, to examine the capabilities of this tool in mineralogic and petrologic exploration for exobiological goals. This instrument, CHEMIN (chemical and mineralogical analyzer), is based on an innovative low-power X ray tube, transmission geometry, and CCD collection and

  4. Landed XRD/XRF analysis of prime targets in the search for past or present Martian life.

    PubMed

    Vaniman, D; Bish, D; Blake, D; Elliott, S T; Sarrazin, P; Collins, S A; Chipera, S

    1998-12-25

    Mars landers seeking evidence for past or present life will be guided by information from orbital mapping and from previous surface exploration. Several target options have been proposed, including sites that may harbor extant life and sites most likely to preserve evidence of past life These sites have specific mineralogic characteristics. Extant life might be gathered around the sinters and associated mineral deposits of rare active fumaroles, or held within brine pockets and inclusions in a few evaporite-mineral deposits. Possibilities for fossilization include deltaic and lake-bottom sediments of once-flooded craters, sinters formed by ancient hot-spring deposits, and the carbonate deposits associated with some evaporite systems. However, the highly varied mineralogy of fossil occurrences on Earth leads to the inference that Mars, an equally complex planet, could host a broad variety of potential fossilizing deposits. The abundance of volcanic systems on Mars and evidence for close associations between volcanism and water release suggest possibilities of organism entrapment and mineralization in volcaniclastic deposits, as found in some instances on Earth. Thus the targets being considered for exploration include a wide variety of unique deposits that would be characterized by silica or various nonsilicate minerals. Beyond these "special" deposits and in the most general case, an ability to distinguish mineralized from uncemented volcanic detritus may be the key to success in finding possible fossil-bearing authigenic mineralogies. A prototype miniaturized X ray diffraction/X ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument has been evaluated with silica, carbonate, and sulfate minerals and with a basalt, to examine the capabilities of this tool in mineralogic and petrologic exploration for exobiological goals. This instrument. CHEMIN (chemical and mineralogical analyzer), is based on an innovative low-power X ray tube, transmission geometry, and CCD collection and

  5. Coordinated spectral and XRD analyses of magnesite-nontronite-forsterite mixtures and implications for carbonates on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Perry, Kaysea A.; Darby Dyar, M.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Blake, David F.; Brown, Adrian J.; Peel, Samantha E.

    2013-04-01

    Mineral detection on Mars largely relies on laboratory data of minerals and mineral mixtures. The objective of this study is to provide reflectance spectra in the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) and mid-IR regions, X-ray diffraction (XRD) data and Mössbauer spectra of a suite of carbonate, phyllosilicate and olivine mixtures in order to facilitate identification and characterization of these minerals on Mars. Remote sensing observations indicate that combinations of these minerals are present in ancient rocks on Mars around the Isidis Basin and in Gusev crater. Magnesite, nontronite, and forsterite size fractions <125 µm were selected for this study. Results of the VNIR reflectance analyses illustrate the complexity of VNIR spectra of mixtures. Analyses of the NIR band depths near 2.3, 2.5, 3.4, and 4 µm showed clear trends with carbonate abundance, although the data are not linear. Mixtures of magnesite and nontronite exhibited a band near 2.3 µm much closer to that observed for nontronite than that for magnesite. VNIR analyses of the mixtures indicated that a small amount of forsterite in any of the mixtures contributed a large increase in the broad ~1 µm band and, hence, the red slope characteristic of Fe2+-bearing minerals. Mid-IR mixture spectra were dominated by magnesite and forsterite, and nontronite was much more difficult to detect by mid-IR spectra in the mixtures. This could be related to why phyllosilicates are detected in many locations on Mars using data collected by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, but not detected using data collected by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer. Mössbauer spectroscopy is well suited for analyses of Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing minerals, and modeling of the peak areas gave well-correlated trends for nontronite and forsterite abundances where abundant Fe was present. XRD full-pattern fitting analyses were performed on the magnesite-forsterite series, giving results within 6 wt % of the actual values

  6. Local Structures of Mechanically Alloyed Al70Cu20Fe10 Nanocomposites Studied by XRD and XAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Shilong; Qian Liying; He Bo; Zou Shaobo; Wei Shiqiang; Bian Qing

    2007-02-02

    Ternary Al70Cu20Fe10 alloy nano-composites prepared by mechanical alloying are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results indicate that after milled for 10 hours, the coordination environment around Cu atoms is changed largely and becomes disordered, but the local structure of Fe atoms still remains as that of {alpha}-Fe. This indicates the forming of inter-metallic compound Al2Cu with body center cubic structure. Even if the milling time is extended to 40 hours, only small amount of {alpha}-Fe can be alloyed to produce Al-Fe-Cu alloy. However, the annealing treatment at 700 deg. C can drive the {alpha}-Fe to incorporate into the Al2Cu compound to form an icosahedral alloy phase.

  7. Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert

    SciTech Connect

    FEHL,DAVID LEE; BIGGS,F.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.

    2000-01-17

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({le}2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.

  8. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qiguang; Williams, Frances; Zhao, Xin; Reece, Charles E.; Krishnan, Mahadevan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surfaces top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  9. Investigation of structural resorption behavior of biphasic bioceramics with help of gravimetry, μCT, SEM, and XRD.

    PubMed

    de Wild, Michael; Amacher, Fabienne; Bradbury, Christopher R; Molenberg, Aart

    2016-04-01

    Resorbable bone substitute materials are widely used for bone augmentation after tumor resection, parallel to implant placement, or in critical size bone defects. In this study, the structural dissolution of a biphasic calcium phosphate bone substitute material with a hydroxyapatite (HA)/tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ratio of 60/40 was investigated by repeatedly placing porous blocks in EDTA solution at 37 °C. At several time points, the blocks were investigated by SEM, µCT, and gravimetry. It was found that always complete 2-3 µm sized grains were removed from the structure and that the β-TCP is dissolved more rapidly. This selective dissolution of the β-TCP grains was confirmed by XRD measurements. The blocks were eroded from the outside toward the center. The structure remained mechanically stable because the central part showed a delayed degradation and because the slower dissolving HA grains preserved the integrity of the structure. PMID:25952407

  10. Degradation of dental ZrO2-based materials after hydrothermal fatigue. Part I: XRD, XRF, and FESEM analyses.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Jorge; Pinto, Ana M; Monteiro, Regina C C; Braz Fernandes, Francisco M; Laranjeira, Pedro; Veiga, João P

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of simulated low-temperature degradation (s-LTD) and hydrothermal fatigue on the degradation of three ZrO(2)-based dental materials. Lava, IPS, and NanoZr discs were randomly assigned to (1) Control-Storage in distilled water at 37°C; (2) Aging at 134°C for 5 h (s-LTD); (3) Thermocycling in saliva for 30,000 cycles (TF). XRD revealed that ZrO(2) m phase was identified in all groups but TF increased the m phase only for Lava. Under the FESEM, Lava showed no alterations under s-LTD, but displayed corrosion areas up to 60 µm wide after TF. We conclude that TF accelerated the degradation of Lava through an increase in the m phase and grain pull-out from the material surface. PMID:22447060

  11. Identification of reaction compounds in micrometric layers from gothic paintings using combined SR-XRD and SR-FTIR.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Nati; Butí, Salvador; Nicholson, James; Emerich, Hermann; Labrador, Ana; Pradell, Trinitat

    2009-07-15

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (micro-SR-XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-SR-FTIR) are used in the non-destructive identification of reaction and aging compounds from micrometric ancient painting layers. The combination of the micrometer size and non-destructive nature of the techniques together with the high resolution and brilliance of the synchrotron radiation has proved to be a procedure most advantageous for the study of reaction, aging and degradation processes. Copper, lead and calcium carboxylates and oxalates are determined in the chromatic, preparation and alteration layers from 15th century egg tempera and oil paintings. Their nature and crystallinity have been assessed. Some hypothesis about the mechanisms of development of both carboxylates and oxalates are presented. PMID:19559899

  12. Characterization of minerals in air dust particles in the state of Tamilnadu, India through FTIR, XRD and SEM analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Kumar, R.; Rajkumar, P.

    2014-11-01

    The abstract of this paper explains the presence of minerals in air which causes great concern regarding public health issues. The spectroscopic investigation of air dust particles of several samples in various locations in the state of Tamilnadu, India is reported. Qualitative analyses were carried out to determine the major and minor constituent minerals present in the samples based on the FTIR, XRD absorption peaks. This study also identified the minerals like quartz, asbestos, kaolinite, calcite, hematite, montmorillonite, nacrite and several other trace minerals in the air dust particles. The presents of quartz is mainly found in all the samples invariably. Hence the percentage of quartz and its crystalline nature were determined with the help of extinction co-efficient and crystallinity index respectively. The shape and size of the particulates are studied with SEM analysis.

  13. Real-Time XRD Studies of Li-O2 Electrochemical Reaction in Nonaqueous Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyunseob; Yilmaz, Eda; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2012-11-01

    Understanding of electrochemical process in rechargeable Li-O2 battery has suffered from lack of proper analytical tool, especially related to the identification of chemical species and number of electrons involved in the discharge/recharge process. Here we present a simple and straightforward analytical method for simultaneously attaining chemical and quantified information of Li2O2 (discharge product) and byproducts using in situ XRD measurement. By real-time monitoring of solid-state Li2O2 peak area, the accurate efficiency of Li2O2 formation and the number of electrons can be evaluated during full discharge. Furthermore, by observation of sequential area change of Li2O2 peak during recharge, we found nonlinearity of Li2O2 decomposition rate for the first time in ether-based electrolyte. PMID:26296031

  14. Characterisation of 1,3-diammonium propylselenate monohydrate by XRD, FT-IR, FT-Raman, DSC and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunarayanan, S.; Arjunan, V.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Atalay, Yusuf

    2016-03-01

    The crystals of 1,3-diammonium propylselenate monohydrate (DAPS) were prepared and characterised X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR, FT-Raman spectroscopy, and DFT/B3LYP methods. It comprises protonated propyl ammonium moieties (diammonium propyl cations), selenate anions and water molecule which are held together by a number of hydrogen bonds and form infinite chains. The XRD data confirm the transfer of two protons from selenic acid to 1,3-diaminopropane molecule. The DAPS complex is stabilised by the presence of O-H···O and N-H···O hydrogen bonds and the electrostatic interactions as well. The N···O and O···O bond distances are 2.82-2.91 and 2.77 Å, respectively. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 1,3-diammonium propyl selenate monohydrate are recorded and the complete vibrational assignments have been discussed. The geometry is optimised by B3LYP method using 6-311G, 6-311+G and 6-311+G* basis sets and the energy, structural parameters, vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities are determined. Differential scanning colorimetry (DSC) data were also presented to analyse the possibility of the phase transition. Complete natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis is carried out to analyse the intramolecular electronic interactions and their stabilisation energies. The electrostatic potential of the complex lies in the range +1.902e × 10-2 to -1.902e × 10-2. The limits of total electron density of the complex is +8.43e × 10-2 to -8.43e × 10-2.

  15. Radiometric, SEM and XRD investigation of black sands at Chituc placer deposit North of the City of Navodari, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Octavian G.; Blebea-Apostu, Ana-Maria; Gomoiu, Claudia; Margineanu, Romul M.; Costea, Constantin; Dumitras, Delia; Ion, Adriana

    2014-05-01

    The black sand of the Chituc marine sandbank situated northern of the city of Navodari (Romania), displayed anomalous high ambient dose rates. Field measurements performed during 2013 Summer campaign recorded in some places dose rate up to 200 nSv/h, significantly overpassing the average value of 44 ± 20 nSv/h recorded along the entire Southern sector of Romanian Black Sea shore. Here, the sand presented a black-brownish hue, different by the usual white yellowish colour. Gamma ray spectrometry performed on both Slanic-Prahove Underground Low Background Laboratory and Gological Institute Radiometric Facilities showed with clarity the dominance of 228-Ac radioisotope in the 50 microns fraction together with the 226-Ra and traces of 40-K. No significant amount of anthropogenic 137-Cs were identified. The other granulometric fractions, i.e. 315, 200 as well 100 microns presented a significant lower level of radioactivity. X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) data attested the presence of monazite, zircon, magnetite, ilmenite, andradite, quartz, aragonite and albite in different proportions, the monazite and zircon being preponderant in the 50 microns, the most radioactive fraction. Based on both radiometric and XRD determinations we come to the conclusion that the evidenced radioactivity could be attributed to both uranium and thorium series in the zircon and monazite fractions and to a lesser extent in the garnet fraction. By its position with respect to Danube Delta, the Chituc marine sandbank could be regarded as a placer where heavy minerals discharged in the Black Sea by the Danube River and transported southward by the Great Black Sea Rim are deposited by gravity separation during sedimentary processes. The implications of the Chituc levee radioactive anomaly for any further human activity are analysed and discussed. Acknowledgement: Work done within the BS ERA NET 041 project in the frame of BS-ERA.NET Pilot Joint CAll 2010-2011.

  16. XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy investigation of Mn substituted CuFe2O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rai, A; Banerjee, M

    2008-08-01

    The effect of Mn substitution in Cu ferrite may present a challenge, as there are three transition metals ions distributed among the two available crystallographic sub lattices. This system also presents complicated super exchange interactions. In this study a series of five powdered samples with composition Cu(1-x)Mn(x)Fe2O4 were investigated using XRD and transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. The variation of lattice parameter, crystallite size, and Mössbauer parameters of the product formed with the variation in the concentration of Mn has been studied. XRD study revealed the formation of pure phase spinels with FCC cubic structure having particle size ranging from 7.2 nm to 20 nm. Lattice constant value showed constant increase with increasing Mn concentration. AFM image confirms the formation of spherical shaped nanoparticles. Mössbauer spectroscopy proves to be an excellent tool for probing the local environment of Fe atoms present in such materials. Results show two sets of six finger patterns for all the samples with two double line pattern obtained for the composition with x = 0.75 and 1.0, indicating the presence of Fe in both A and B site. Increase in Mn concentration first increases the hyperfine field and then it gradually decreases. This effect is observed at both the sites. This effect is due to the relative strengths of Fe-O-X super exchange (X = Fe, Mn, Cu) as well as number of different nearest neighbour of A and B sites. The unexpected behaviour for the last two compositions can be explained by the presence of particle size distribution that results in superparamagnetic behaviour. PMID:19049197

  17. Biochemical Characterization of the TEM-107 Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase in a Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate from South Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Chong, Yunsop

    2011-01-01

    The TEM-107 extended-spectrum β-lactamase detected in a Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolate had a Gly238Ser substitution compared to the TEM-43 β-lactamase. The MIC of ceftazidime was higher (64 μg/ml) than that of cefotaxime (2 μg/ml) for the isolate. Clavulanic acid reduced the MIC of ceftazidime 64-fold. PMID:21911565

  18. Constraints on the Thermal History of Martian Meteorites ALH84001 and MIL03346 by Single Crystal XRD, Electron Microprobe and Mössbauer Analyses of Ortho- and Clinopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, M. C.; Fioretti, A. M.; Cámara, F.; Carraro, A.; McCammon, C.; Tazzoli, V.

    2007-07-01

    Constraints on the thermal history of meteorites can be established by estimating the Fe2+-Mg order degree in their pyroxene using single-crystal XRD. We present here the data obtained on martian meteorites ALH84001 and MIL03346.

  19. Microscopic imaging of resin-bonded dentin using Cryo-FIB/TEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, Turki A.

    2015-03-01

    Background and Objective: Introduction of focused ion beam (FIB) for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) preparation had enhanced the understanding of materials' interaction at nanoscale. However, this technique generates localized heat that may possibly have some effect on organic/vital structures during preparation of biological tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of milling with Cryogenic-FIB on imaging the ultra-morphological features of dentin-resin interface bonded in a tooth and compare the findings to a room-temperature FIB prepared specimens. Methods: After cylindrical dentin cavities (3 mm diameter × 1.5 mm depth) were prepared on the occlusal surfaces of extracted, non-carious human premolar teeth, they were restored with Filtek P90 (Silorane) restorative system (3M ESPE, USA). To investigate the ultra-morphological features of resin-dentin interface, the bonded specimens were divided into 2 groups based on the preparation technique; (1) FIB preparation at room-temperature (RT), and (2) FIB preparation with cryogenic cooling (Cy). Later, each group was examined under TEM. Results: The obtained sections in RT group showed blurred scattered needle-like crystals above the resin-impregnated dentin. However, the orientation of these crisscross needle-like crystals and the ultramorphological features of the underlying dentin were more vivid and distinct in Cy group. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this in-vitro study, it could be concluded that combining FIB with cryogenic cooling had preserved the biological organic features of dentin due to minimized beam damage. The presented cryogenic technique should be considered in future FIB/TEM studies involving biological substrates. This research was supported by King Abdulaziz University.

  20. Geological Hypothesis Testing and Investigations of Coupling with Transient Electromagnetics (TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, A. C.; Moeller, M. M.; Snyder, E.; Workman, E. J.; Urquhart, S.; Bedrosian, P.; Pellerin, L.

    2014-12-01

    Transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were acquired in Borrego Canyon within the Santo Domingo Basin of the Rio Grande Rift, central New Mexico, during the 2014 Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) field program. TEM surveys were carried out in several regions both to investigate geologic structure and to illustrate the effects of coupling to anthropogenic structures. To determine an optimal survey configuration, 50, 100 and 200 m square transmitter loops were deployed; estimates of depth-of-investigation and logistical considerations determined that 50 m loops were sufficient for production-style measurements. A resistive (100s of ohm-m) layer was identified at a depth of 25-75 m at several locations, and interpreted as dismembered parts of one or more concealed volcanic flows, an interpretation consistent with Tertiary volcanic flows that cap the Santa Anna Mesa immediately to the south. TEM soundings were also made across an inferred fault to investigate whether fault offset is accompanied by lateral changes in electrical resistivity. Soundings within several hundred meters of the inferred fault strand were identical, indicating no resistivity contrast across the fault, and possibly an absence of recent activity. An old windmill and water tank, long-abandoned, offered an excellent laboratory to study the effect of coupling to metallic anthropogenic structures. The character of the measured data strongly suggests the water tank is in electrical contact with the earth (galvanic coupling), and an induced response was persistent to more than 1 second after current turn-off. Coupling effects could be identified at least 150 meters from the tank. Understanding the mechanism behind such coupling and the ability to identify coupled data are critical skills, as one-dimensional modeling of data is affected by such coupling producing artificial conductive layers at depth.

  1. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  2. Soot Precursor Material: Visualization Via Simultaneous LIF-LII and Characterization Via TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous combined laser-induced fluorescence and laser-induced incandescence (LIF-LII) images are presented for both a normal and inverse diffusion flame. The excitation wavelength dependence distinguishes the LIF and LII signals in images from the normal diffusion flame while the temporal decay distinguishes the signals in images of the inverse diffusion flame. Each flame presents a minimum in the combined LIF-LII intensity in a region separating the fuel pyrolysis and soot containing regions. Opacity, geometric in definition, and extent of crystallinity measured through both bright and dark field Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) characterizes the thermophoretically sampled material from within this minimal LIF-LII intensity region. TEM analysis reveals rather different soot processes occurring within the normal and inverse diffusion flame. In the normal diffusion flame, rapid chemical and physical coalescence of PAHs results in initial formation of soot precursor particles that are highly crystalline and evolve toward fully formed soot. In the inverse diffusion flame, rapid coalescence of pyrolysis products occurs, producing tarlike, globular structures equivalent in size to fully formed soot aggregates but with markedly less crystallinity than normal-appearing soot. These different material properties are interpreted as reflecting different relative rates of chemical and physical coalescence of fuel pyrolysis products versus carbonization. Significantly, these TEM images support qualitative photophysical arguments suggesting that, in general, this 'dark' region observed in the LIF-LII images demarcates a transitional region in which a fundamental change in the material the material chemical/physical properties occurs between solid carbonaceous soot and condensed or gaseous molecular growth material.

  3. Protein-protein binding affinities by pulse proteolysis: application to TEM-1/BLIP protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Melinda S; Ratcliff, Kathleen; Marqusee, Susan; Handel, Tracy M

    2010-10-01

    Efficient methods for quantifying dissociation constants have become increasingly important for high-throughput mutagenesis studies in the postgenomic era. However, experimentally determining binding affinity is often laborious, requires large amounts of purified protein, and utilizes specialized equipment. Recently, pulse proteolysis has been shown to be a robust and simple method to determine the dissociation constants for a protein-ligand pair based on the increase in thermodynamic stability upon ligand binding. Here, we extend this technique to determine binding affinities for a protein-protein complex involving the β-lactamase TEM-1 and various β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) mutants. Interaction with BLIP results in an increase in the denaturation curve midpoint, C(m), of TEM-1, which correlates with the rank order of binding affinities for several BLIP mutants. Hence, pulse proteolysis is a simple, effective method to assay for mutations that modulate binding affinity in protein-protein complexes. From a small set (n = 4) of TEM-1/BLIP mutant complexes, a linear relationship between energy of stabilization (dissociation constant) and ΔC(m) was observed. From this "calibration curve," accurate dissociation constants for two additional BLIP mutants were calculated directly from proteolysis-derived ΔC(m) values. Therefore, in addition to qualitative information, armed with knowledge of the dissociation constants from the WT protein and a limited number of mutants, accurate quantitation of binding affinities can be determined for additional mutants from pulse proteolysis. Minimal sample requirements and the suitability of impure protein preparations are important advantages that make pulse proteolysis a powerful tool for high-throughput mutagenesis binding studies. PMID:20669180

  4. A survey of jet aircraft PM by TEM in APEX III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chung-Hsuan; Bryg, Victoria M.; Vander Wal, Randy L.

    2016-09-01

    Results are reported for sampling non-volatile particulate matter from field tests during the NASA led APEX III campaign. This paper reports observations of particulate emissions collected from a suite of jet engine aircraft to assess differences and similarities in soot macro- micro- and nanostructure using TEM. Aggregates are compact, primary particle sizes varied and nanostructure is mixed. Comparisons are made to soot from a laboratory flame as a well-studied reference. Results are interpreted in terms of turbulence interacting with the different stages of particle formation and growth with implications for atmospheric processing and climate impact.

  5. In Situ Laser Synthesis of Si Nanowires in the Dynamic TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, M; Reed, B; LaGrange, T; Browning, N

    2007-12-05

    Nanowires (NWs) are a crucial component in today's nanoscale devices and are vital to the further development of nanotechnology. To achieve reliable growth of NWs and uniform electronic properties, the specific mechanisms that control the structural development of NWs and the correlation between NWs and their nucleation and growth processes must be examined. Because imaging is not possible in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) chambers, in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) based growth methods provide a method for characterizing NW evolution. In this paper, we describe a new method of in situ synthesis and imaging of NWs using laser-assisted growth inside a TEM. The vapor-liquid solid (VLS) growth mechanism (Figure 1), first described by Wagner and co-workers, is a widely accepted description of how many 1D nanostructures are formed. VLS and similar models have been applied to such methods as hybrid pulsed-laser ablation/chemical vapor deposition (PLA/CVD) and laser assisted NW growth at elevated temperatures, in which a pulsed laser ablates a target with gas flowing through the reaction chamber held at elevated temperature. These methods have successfully produced semiconductor and conducting oxide NWs with size control determined by the catalyst droplet diameter. The VLS description of NW growth is a widely accepted model, but the exact role of vapor species and its interaction with the catalyst particle is not fully understood. For example, NW growth has been observed to occur far below predicted eutectic temperatures, which suggests that alternative mechanisms such as solid-liquid-solid growth (SLS) may play a role. Many NW fabrication techniques preclude direct in situ characterization of the growth process. Because of this need for direct observation during growth, TEM-based NW growth methods have become increasingly popular. Though progress has been made in the study of the VLS mechanism of NW growth using in situ TEM, conventional in situ growth

  6. A Survey of Jet Aircraft PM by TEM in APEX III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    Based upon field testing during the NASA led APEX III campaign conducted in November 2005 at the NASA Glenn Research Center in coordination with Continental Airlines and Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. This paper reports observations of particulate emissions collected from a suite of jet engine aircraft to assess differences and similarities in soot macro- micro- and nanostructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aggregates are compact, primary particle sizes varied and nanostructure mixed. Comparisons are made to more familiar laboratory flame-generated soot as a well-studied point of reference. Results are interpreted in terms of turbulence interacting with the different stages of particle formation and growth.

  7. Generation of high-power ultrawideband electromagnetic pulses in a system with a coaxial tem horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, V. P.; Korovin, S. D.; Pegel', I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Stepchenko, A. S.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    1996-12-01

    A coaxial TEM horn was designed on the basis of results from nonstationary computer modeling using code KARAT. With its high dielectric strength, this antenna is capable of radiating high-power ultrawideband nanosecond pulses. The pulse source used was a compact generator built around a coaxial forming line with a built-in Tesla transformer, which shapes pulses up to 1 GW high at repetition frequencies up to 1 kHz. The amplitude of the pulses on a matched load was 20 kV at a duration of 4 nsec. Returns of ultrawideband signals from objects with simple geometric shapes were studied in laboratory experiments using this radiator.

  8. In-Situ TEM-STM Observations of SWCNT Ropes/Tubular Transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sola, F.; Lebron-Colon, M.; Ferreira, P. J.; Fonseca, L. F.; Meador, M. A.; Marin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) prepared by the HiPco process were purified using a modified gas phase purification technique. A TEM-STM holder was used to study the morphological changes of SWCNT ropes as a function of applied voltage. Kink formation, buckling behavior, tubular transformation and eventual breakdown of the system were observed. The tubular formation was attributed to a transformation from SWCNT ropes to multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) structures. It is likely mediated by the patching and tearing mechanism which is promoted primarily by the mobile vacancies generated due to current-induced heating and, to some extent, by electron irradiation.

  9. A joule-class, TEM00 spatial profile, narrow-linewidth laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupel, Andreas; Bodnar, Nathan; Hemmer, Micha"l.; Richardson, Martin

    2011-02-01

    A Joule-class, narrow-linewidth amplifier line delivering 20 ns pulses with a TEM00 spatial profile is presented. A Q-switched Nd:YAG oscillator with an intra-cavity volume Bragg grating (VBG) is used to seed the amplifier line. A series of flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG amplifiers consisting of a double-pass and two single-pass amplifiers boost the energy of the 21 ns pulses to 480 mJ. The presented amplifier line will be used for fundamental studies including remote Raman spectroscopy and ns filamentation.

  10. Thermophysical ESEM and TEM Characterization of Carbon Fibers CTE, Spectroscopy and Roughness Studies at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Ozden O.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate determination of the transverse properties of carbon fibers is important for assessment and prediction of local material as well as global structural response of composite components. However the measurements are extremely difficult due to the very small diameters of the fibers (few microns only) and must be conducted within a microscope. In this work, environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are used to determine the transverse coefficient of thermal expansion of different carbon fibers as a function of temperature.

  11. The importance of XRD analysis in provenance and palaeoenvironmental studies of the Piedras de Afilar Formation, Neoproterozoic of Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamoukaghlian, K.; Poiré, D. G.; Gaucher, C.; Uriz, N.; Cingolani, C.; Frigeiro, P.

    2009-04-01

    The Piedras de Afilar Formation crops out in the southeast part of Uruguay, forming part of the Tandilia Terrane (sensu Bossi et al. 2005). Pamoukaghlian et al. (2006) and Gaucher et al. (2008) have published δ13C, δ18O and U/Pb SHRIMP results, which indicate a Neoproterozoic age for this formation. The palaeoenvironment has been defined as a shallow marine platform based on the presence of interference ripples, hummocky and mega-hummocky cross-stratification. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses help to better constrain the palaeoenvironment: the presence of chlorite/smectite found in black shales, suggest a reducing environment, and abundant illite indicates a cold to temperate climate. Provenance studies have been undertaken that utilise a combination of detailed palaeocurrent measurements, petrographic descriptions, XRD analyses, and geochemical isotopic analyses, including U/Pb SHRIMP determinations. Mineral compositional diagrams for sandstones suggest a stable cratonic provenance. Palaeocurrents are mainly from the NNE, indicating a provenance from the cratonic areas of the Tandilia Terrane. The illite crystal index indicates diagenetic to low-metamorphic conditions for the sequence; this is important to confirm that the identified minerals are authigenic. Clay minerals identified by XRD analysis of sandstones from the siliciclastic member are illite (80 - 90%), kaolinite (5 - 10%), and chlorite (5 - 10%). This is consistent with a provenance from the cratonic areas (quartz-feldspar dominated rock types). Isotopic analyses have been undertaken to provide better constraints on the tectonic setting. U/Pb SHRIMP ages for the youngest zircons are 990 Ma (Gaucher et al. 2008), and the basal granite (Granito de la Paz) is 2056 ± 11 Ma (Hartmann et al. 2001), suggesting a provenance from the Archaean basement for the Piedras de Afilar Formation, like its counterparts in the Rio de la Plata Craton. References Bossi, J., Piñeyro, D., Cingolani, C. (2005). El l

  12. Nano-Structural Elucidation in Carbon Black Loaded NR Vulcanizate by 3D-TEM and In Situ WAXD Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda,Y.; Kato, A.; Shimanuki, J.; Kohjiya, S.; Tosaka, M.; Poompradub, S.; Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) visualization of nanometer structure of carbon black dispersion in rubbery matrix has successfully been studied and reported in this paper. Use of 3D-TEM, which is computerized tomography combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), enabled us to reconstruct 3D images of carbon black aggregates in natural rubber (NR) matrix. The TEM measurements were conducted by a bright-field method on thin samples without any electron staining. The sample was subject to uni-axial tilting (+65 degree to -65 degree with 2 degree increment) in the sample chamber, and 66 TEM images were taken on each sample. These TEM images were used for computerized tomography to reconstruct the 3D image. This technique is designated as 3D-TEM. The nano-structural features observed by 3D-TEM were in conformity with the electron-conductivity results, and the percolation behavior was recognized. These results were further supplemented by in situ wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), i.e., simultaneous WAXD and tensile measurements on the sample to observe the strain-induced crystallization in NR vulcanizate. Upon tensile elongation, the crystallization was clearly observed in WAXD in the presence of carbon black, and it contributed to the tensile properties. In order to understand the performances of filled NR vulcanizates, it surely is necessary to know the structural states of the mixed nano-filler and the crystallites produced upon elongation.

  13. Mineralogical Capabilities of the CheMin XRD/XRF instrument on Mars Science Laboratory (MSL ’11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Yen, A. S.; Chen, C.; Sarrazin, P.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S.; Morris, R. V.

    2009-12-01

    A principal goal of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL ‘11) mission is to identify and characterize present or past habitable environments on Mars. By determining the mineralogical composition of rocks or soil, one can often deduce the conditions under which they formed, or their subsequent diagenetic or metamorphic history. The CheMin mineralogical instrument [1-3] will return quantitative X-ray diffraction data (XRD) and qualitative X-ray fluorescence data (XRF; 14 < Z < 92) from scooped soils and drilled rock powders collected from the Mars surface. Small amounts (45-65 mm3) of sample material sieved to <150 µm will be delivered through a funnel to one of 27 reuseable sample cells located on a sample wheel. Sample cells are 8-mm diameter discs bounded by 7-µm thick Mylar or Kapton windows spaced 170 µm apart. Within this volume, the sample is shaken by piezoelectric vibration at sonic frequencies, causing the powder to flow past a narrow, collimated X-ray beam in random orientations during the course of an analysis. CheMin is designed to have a Minimum Detection Limit (MDL) of <3% by mass, accuracy better than 15% and precision better than 10% for phases present in concentrations >4X MDL (12%). CheMin uses a Co X-ray tube so that absorption in iron-rich samples is minimized. The resolution of the diffraction patterns is <0.35° 2θ, and the angular measurement range is 4-55° 2θ. The capabilities of the FM instrument were tested during ThermoVac using mineral and ceramic standards contained on the FM sample wheel. Standards include 88:12 and 97:3 mixtures of beryl:quartz for assessment of the accuracy and precision of quantitative analyses, miminum detection limits, 2θ range and 2θ resolution; a compositionally diverse ceramic material for XRF evaluation; arcanite (K2SO4); and an amphibole. Analyses were performed under Mars atmospheric pressure at a range of Rover Avionics Mounting Platform (RAMP) temperatures from -40C to +26C. Within the predicted Mars

  14. Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV.

    PubMed

    Linck, Martin; Hartel, Peter; Uhlemann, Stephan; Kahl, Frank; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max; Niestadt, Marcel; Bischoff, Maarten; Biskupek, Johannes; Lee, Zhongbo; Lehnert, Tibor; Börrnert, Felix; Rose, Harald; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-08-12

    Atomic resolution in transmission electron microscopy of thin and light-atom materials requires a rigorous reduction of the beam energy to reduce knockon damage. However, at the same time, the chromatic aberration deteriorates the resolution of the TEM image dramatically. Within the framework of the SALVE project, we introduce a newly developed C_{c}/C_{s} corrector that is capable of correcting both the chromatic and the spherical aberration in the range of accelerating voltages from 20 to 80 kV. The corrector allows correcting axial aberrations up to fifth order as well as the dominating off-axial aberrations. Over the entire voltage range, optimum phase-contrast imaging conditions for weak signals from light atoms can be adjusted for an optical aperture of at least 55 mrad. The information transfer within this aperture is no longer limited by chromatic aberrations. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using the examples of 30 kV phase-contrast TEM images of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, showing unprecedented contrast and resolution that matches image calculations. PMID:27563976

  15. TEM and SIMS Analysis of (100), (110), and (111) Single Crystal Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, A. D.; Stevie, F. A.; Leonard, D. N.; Russell, P. E.; Griffis, D. P.; Myneni, G. R.

    2007-08-09

    Single crystal niobium specimens of (100), (110) and (111) crystal orientations have been analyzed using TEM and SIMS. The TEM specimens were prepared using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and show niobium oxide thicknesses ranging from 4.9 to 8.3 nm for the three specimens after buffer chemical polishing. The oxide layers appear uniform and no significant sub-oxide region was noted. SIMS analysis was made for all three orientations on hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen before and after heat treatments at 90, 600, and 1250 deg. C. Hydrogen is at a high level between the oxide layer and niobium, but at a relatively low level in the oxide. No high oxygen concentration region was noted in the niobium below the oxide. C contamination on the surface is detected mainly at the surface. Analysis after heat treatments showed some decrease in hydrogen after the 600 deg. C heat treatment, and significant oxidation of the niobium after the 1250 deg. C heat treatment.

  16. Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linck, Martin; Hartel, Peter; Uhlemann, Stephan; Kahl, Frank; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max.; Niestadt, Marcel; Bischoff, Maarten; Biskupek, Johannes; Lee, Zhongbo; Lehnert, Tibor; Börrnert, Felix; Rose, Harald; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-08-01

    Atomic resolution in transmission electron microscopy of thin and light-atom materials requires a rigorous reduction of the beam energy to reduce knockon damage. However, at the same time, the chromatic aberration deteriorates the resolution of the TEM image dramatically. Within the framework of the SALVE project, we introduce a newly developed Cc/Cs corrector that is capable of correcting both the chromatic and the spherical aberration in the range of accelerating voltages from 20 to 80 kV. The corrector allows correcting axial aberrations up to fifth order as well as the dominating off-axial aberrations. Over the entire voltage range, optimum phase-contrast imaging conditions for weak signals from light atoms can be adjusted for an optical aperture of at least 55 mrad. The information transfer within this aperture is no longer limited by chromatic aberrations. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using the examples of 30 kV phase-contrast TEM images of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, showing unprecedented contrast and resolution that matches image calculations.

  17. Determination of the initial oxidation behavior of Zircaloy-4 by in-situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Wayne; Ghassemi, Hessam; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4), specifically by oxidation, is a problem of great importance as this material is critical for current nuclear reactor cladding. The early formation behavior and structure of the oxide layer during oxidation was studied using in-situ TEM techniques that allowed for Zry-4 to be monitored during corrosion. These environmental exposure experiments were coupled with precession electron diffraction to identify and quantify the phases present in the samples before and after the oxidation. Following short-term, high temperature oxidation, the dominant phase was revealed to be monoclinic ZrO2 in a columnar structure. These samples oxidized in-situ contained structures that correlated well with bulk Zry-4 subjected to autoclave treatment, which were used for comparison and validation of this technique. By using in-situ TEM the effect of microstructure features, such as grain boundaries, on oxidation behavior of an alloy can be studied. The technique presented herein holds the potential to be applied any alloy system to study these effects.

  18. Quantitative Electrochemical Measurements using in situ ec-S/TEM Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R; Sacci, Robert L; Brown, Gilbert M; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie; Gardiner, Daniel; Walden II, Franklin S; Damiano, John; Nackashi, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Insight into dynamic electrochemical processes can be obtained with in situ ec-S/TEM, which utilizes microfluidic electrochemical cells to characterize electrochemical processes with S/TEM imaging, diffraction or spectroscopy. The microfluidic electrochemical cell is composed of microfabricated devices with glassy carbon and platinum microband electrodes in a three-electrode cell configuration. To establish the validity of this method for quantitative in situ electrochemistry research, cyclic voltammetry, choronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed using a standard one electron transfer redox couple using a [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- based electrolyte. Established relationships of the electrode geometry and microfluidic conditions were fitted with cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometic measurements of analyte diffusion coefficients and was found to agree with well-accepted values that are on the order of 10-5 cm2 s-1. Influence of the electron beam on electrochemical measurements was found to be negligible during CV scans where the current profile varied only within a few nA with the electron beam on and off which is well within the hysteresis between multiple CV scans. The combination of experimental results provides a validation that quantitative electrochemistry experiments can be performed with these small-scale microfluidic electrochemical cells provided that accurate geometrical electrode configurations, diffusion boundary layers and microfluidic conditions are accounted for.

  19. Applying compressive sensing to TEM video: A substantial frame rate increase on any camera

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stevens, Andrew; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-13

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1 ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing (CS) methods to increase the frame rate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integratedmore » into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical CS inversion. Here we describe the background of CS and statistical methods in depth and simulate the frame rates and efficiencies for in-situ TEM experiments. Depending on the resolution and signal/noise of the image, it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by more than an order of magnitude using this approach.« less

  20. In-situ TEM investigations of graphic-epitaxy and small particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    Palladium was deposited inside a controlled-vacuum specimen chamber of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) onto MgO and alpha-alumina substrate surfaces. Annealing and various effects of gas exposure of the particulate Pd deposits were studied in-situ by high resolution TEM and electron diffraction. Whereas substrate temperatures of 500 C or annealing of room temperature (RT) deposits to 500 C were needed to obtain epitaxy on sapphire, RT deposits on MgO were perfectly epitaxial. For Pd/MgO a lattice expansion of 2 to 4% was noted; the highest values of expansion were found for the smallest particles. The lattice expansion of small Pd particles on alumina substrates was less than 1%. Long-time RT exposure of Pd/MgO in a vacuum yielded some moblity and coalescence events, but notably fewer than for Pd on sapphire. Exposure to air or oxygen greatly enhanced the particle mobility and coalescence and also resulted in the flattening of Pd particles on MgO substrates. Electron-beam irradiation further enhanced this effect. Exposure to air for several tens of hours of Pd/MgO led to strong coalescence.

  1. Microstructural modifications in tungsten induced by high flux plasma exposure: TEM examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, A.; Bakaeva, A.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Terentyev, D.; De Temmerman, G.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2016-02-01

    We have performed microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to reveal nanometric features in the sub-surface region of tungsten samples exposed to high flux, low energy deuterium plasma. TEM examination revealed formation of a dense dislocation network and dislocation tangles, overall resulting in a strong increase in the dislocation density by at least one order of magnitude as compared to the initial one. Plasma-induced dislocation microstructure vanishes beyond a depth of about 10 μm from the top of the exposed surface where the dislocation density and its morphology becomes comparable to the reference microstructure. Interstitial edge dislocation loops with Burgers vector a 0/2<111> and a 0<100> were regularly observed within 6 μm of the sub-surface region of the exposed samples, but absent in the reference material. The presence of these loops points to a co-existence of nanometric D bubbles, growing by loop punching mechanism, and sub-micron deuterium flakes, resulting in the formation of surface blisters, also observed here by scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Compositional and Structural Characterization by TEM of Lattice-Mismatched III-V Epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Rathi, M.; Nesheim, R.; Zheng, N.; Vunnam, S.; Carapella, J. J.; Wanlass, M. W.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss compositional and structural transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization of lattice-mismatched (LMM) III-V epilayers grown on GaAs by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), with possible applications in high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. In addition to the use of TEM imaging to survey layer thicknesses and defect morphology, our analysis emphasizes the particular methods of energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED). Outlined here is a standards-based method for extracting compositions by EDX, which uses principal-component analysis (PCA) [1], combined with the zeta-factor approach of Watanabe and Williams [2]. A procedure is described that uses the coordinates of high-order Laue zone (HOLZ) lines, which are found in the bright-field disks of CBED patterns, to extract composition and strain parameters from embedded epilayers. The majority of the crystal growth for this work was performed at NREL, which has accommodated the development at SDSM&T of the characterization techniques described. However, epilayer deposition capability at SDSM&T has recently been achieved, using a home-built system, which is presently being used to examine new lattice-mismatched structures relevant to photovoltaic technology.

  3. EBSD and TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, Melissa C.; Gorman, Brian P.; Miller, Brandon D.; King, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and studying the irradiation behavior of high burn-up oxide fuel is critical to licensing of future fast breeder reactors. Advancements in experimental techniques and equipment are allowing for new insights into previously irradiated samples. In this work dual column focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscope (SEM) was utilized to prepared transmission electron microscope samples from mixed oxide fuel with a burn-up of 6.7% FIMA. Utilizing the FIB/SEM for preparation resulted in samples with a dose rate of <0.5 mRem/h compared to approximately 1.1 R/h for a traditionally prepared TEM sample. The TEM analysis showed that the sample taken from the cooler rim region of the fuel pellet had approximately 2.5x higher dislocation density than that of the sample taken from the mid-radius due to the lower irradiation temperature of the rim. The dual column FIB/SEM was additionally used to prepared and serially slice approximately 25 um cubes. High quality electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) were collected from the face at each step, showing, for the first time, the ability to obtain EBSD data from high activity irradiated fuel.

  4. High-resolution methane emission estimates using the InTEM inversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, S.; Manning, A.; Robinson, A. D.; Riddick, S. N.; Forster, G.; Oram, D.; O'Doherty, S.; Harris, N. R. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. In response to this, an inversion approach, InTEM, was adapted to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model (NAME) were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. Emission estimates were produced at varying spatial resolutions, for annual and seasonal time frames . We present results indicating the optimum number of observation sites required for this region, and how this can affect our uncertainty estimates. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. To our knowledge, no inversion technique has been implemented on such a fine spatial resolution. This is a pilot project which, given proof of concept, could be scaled up as an alternative method for producing national scale emission inventories.

  5. Applying compressive sensing to TEM video: A substantial frame rate increase on any camera

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-13

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1 ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing (CS) methods to increase the frame rate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical CS inversion. Here we describe the background of CS and statistical methods in depth and simulate the frame rates and efficiencies for in-situ TEM experiments. Depending on the resolution and signal/noise of the image, it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by more than an order of magnitude using this approach.

  6. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasl, J.; Mikmeková, Š.; Jandová, D.

    2014-03-01

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures.

  7. TEM characterization of corrosion products formed on a SS-15ZR alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J. S.; Abraham, D. P.

    2000-01-04

    The corrosion products formed on a stainless steel-15Zr (SS-15Zr) alloy have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Examination of alloy particles that were immersed in 90 C deionized water for two years revealed that different corrosion products were formed on the stainless steel and intermetallic phases. Two corrosion products were identified on an austenite particle: trevorite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) in the layer close to the metal and maghemite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in the outer layer. The corrosion layer formed on the intermetallic was uniform, adherent, and amorphous. The EDS analysis indicated that the layer was enriched in zirconium when compared with the intermetallic composition. High-resolution TEM images of the intermetallic-corrosion layer interface show an interlocking metal-oxide interface which may explain the relatively strong adherence of the corrosion layer to the intermetallic surface. These results will be used to evaluate corrosion mechanisms and predict long-term corrosion behavior of the alloy waste form.

  8. In-situ TEM observation of nano-void formation in UO2 under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabathier, C.; Martin, G.; Michel, A.; Carlot, G.; Maillard, S.; Bachelet, C.; Fortuna, F.; Kaitasov, O.; Oliviero, E.; Garcia, P.

    2014-05-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of UO2 polycrystals irradiated in situ with 4 MeV Au ions were performed at room temperature (RT) to better understand the mechanisms of cavity and ultimately fission products nucleation in UO2. Experiments were carried out at the JANNuS Orsay facility that enables in situ ion irradiations inside the microscope to be carried out. The majority of 4 MeV gold ions were transmitted through the thin foil, and the induced radiation defects were investigated by TEM. Observations showed that nano-void formation occurs at ambient temperature in UO2 thin foils irradiated with energetic heavy ions under an essentially nuclear energy loss regime. The diameter and density of nano-objects were measured as a function of the gold irradiation dose at RT. A previous paper has also revealed a similar nano-object population after a Xe implantation performed at 390 keV at 870 K. The nano-object density was modelled using simple concepts derived from Classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The results are in good agreement, which suggests a mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation induced by energetic cascade overlaps. This indicates that nano-void formation mechanism is controlled by radiation damage. Such nanovoids are likely to act as sinks for mobile fission products during reactor operation.

  9. Inversion of arbitrary segmented loop source TEM data over a layered earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Xue, Guo-qiang; Zhao, pan; Zhou, Nan-nan; Zhong, Hua-sen

    2016-05-01

    The loop source TEM method has been widely used in the detection of a mined out area in China. In the cases that the laying of traditional rectangle or square transmitting loop is limited due to the presence of obstacle on the path of the loop, the changing of the shape of the transmitting loop to bypass the obstacle is a labor saving solution. A numeric integration scheme is proposed to calculate the response and Jacobian of the segmented loop source from that of an electric dipole source. The comparison of forward response between the segmented loop and square loop shows the effect of loop geometry on the decay curves. In order to interpret the data from an irregular source loop, this paper presents an inversion scheme that incorporate the effect of loop geometry. The proposed inversion scheme is validated on the synthetic data, and then applied to the field data. The result reveals that the developed inversion scheme is capable of interpreting the segmented loop source TEM field data.

  10. Structural changes in collagen fibrils across a mineralized interface revealed by cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Quan, Bryan D; Sone, Eli D

    2015-08-01

    The structure of the mineralized collagen fibril, which is the basic building block of mineralized connective tissues, is critical to its function. We use cryo-TEM to study collagen structure at a well-defined hard-soft tissue interface, across which collagen fibrils are continuous, in order to evaluate changes to collagen upon mineralization. To establish a basis for the analysis of collagen banding, we compared cryo-TEM images of rat-tail tendon collagen to a model based on the X-ray structure. While there is close correspondence of periodicity, differences in band intensity indicate fibril regions with high density but lacking order, providing new insight into collagen fibrillar structure. Across a mineralized interface, we show that mineralization results in an axial contraction of the fibril, concomitant with lateral expansion, and that this contraction occurs only in the more flexible gap region of the fibril. Nevertheless, the major features of the banding pattern are not significantly changed, indicating that the axial arrangement of molecules remains largely intact. These results suggest a mechanism by which collagen fibrils are able to accommodate large amounts of mineral without significant disruption of their molecular packing, leading to synergy of mechanical properties. PMID:25892483

  11. TEM studies of laterally overgrown GaN layers grown on non-polarsubstrates

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Ni, X.; Morkoc, H.

    2006-01-05

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study pendeo-epitaxial GaN layers grown on polar and non-polar 4H SiC substrates. The structural quality of the overgrown layers was evaluated using a number of TEM methods. Growth of pendeo-epitaxial layers on polar substrates leads to better structural quality of the overgrown areas, however edge-on dislocations are found at the meeting fronts of two wings. Some misorientation between the 'seed' area and wing area was detected by Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction. Growth of pendeo-epitaxial layers on non-polar substrates is more difficult. Two wings on the opposite site of the seed area grow in two different polar directions with different growth rates. Most dislocations in a wing grown with Ga polarity are 10 times wider than wings grown with N-polarity making coalescence of these layers difficult. Most dislocations in a wing grown with Ga polarity bend in a direction parallel to the substrate, but some of them also propagate to the sample surface. Stacking faults formed on the c-plane and prismatic plane occasionally were found. Some misorientation between the wings and seed was detected using Large Angle Convergent Beam Diffraction.

  12. An in situ TEM study of the evolution of Xe bubble populations in UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, A.; Sabathier, C.; Carlot, G.; Kaïtasov, O.; Bouffard, S.; Garcia, P.; Valot, C.

    2012-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments were carried out on the JANNUS platform (Joint Accelerators for Nano-science and NUclear Simulation) at CSNSM (Center of Nuclear Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry) laboratory in Orsay. The experiment was devoted to the study of the evolution of the xenon aggregate population with increasing implantation fluence. A thin UO 2 foil was implanted at fluences ranging from 3 × 10 12 to 7 × 10 14 at cm -2 with 390 keV Xe 3+ ions at an irradiation temperature of 873 K. The TEM results indicate the presence of nanometer size bubbles above a fluence of 6 × 10 12 Xe cm -2 and an increase in the bubble number density was observed between 6 × 10 12 Xe cm -2 and 2 × 10 14 Xe cm -2. Above 2 × 10 14 Xe cm -2, the number density levels off at 4 × 10 23 ± 0.5 × 10 23 m -3.

  13. TEM investigation of irradiation damage in single crystal CeO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Bei; Kirk, Mark A.; Chen, Weiying; Oaks, Aaron; Rest, Jeffery; Yacout, Abdellatif; Stubbins, James F.

    2011-07-01

    In order to understand the evolution of radiation damage in oxide nuclear fuel, 150-1000 keV Kr ions were implanted into single crystal CeO 2, as a simulation of fluorite ceramic UO 2, while in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations were carried out. Two characteristic defect structures were investigated: dislocation/dislocation loops and nano-size gas bubbles. The growth behavior of defect clusters induced by 1 MeV Kr ions up to doses of 5 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 were followed at 600 °C and 800 °C. TEM micrographs clearly show the development of defect structures: nucleation of dislocation loops, transformation to extended dislocation lines, and the formation of tangled dislocation networks. The difference in dislocation growth rates at 600 °C and 800 °C revealed the important role which Ce-vacancies play in the loop formation process. Bubble formation, studied through 150 keV Kr implantations at room temperature and 600 °C, might be influenced by either the mobility of metal-vacancies correlated with at threshold temperature or the limitation of gas solubility as a function of temperature.

  14. Adsorption of Lysine on Na-Montmorillonite and Competition with Ca(2+): A Combined XRD and ATR-FTIR Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanli; Wang, Shengrui; Liu, Jingyang; Xu, Yisheng; Zhou, Xiaoyun

    2016-05-17

    Lysine adsorption at clay/aqueous interfaces plays an important role in the mobility, bioavailability, and degradation of amino acids in the environment. Knowledge of these interfacial interactions facilitates our full understanding of the fate and transport of amino acids. Here, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) measurements were used to explore the dynamic process of lysine adsorption on montmorillonite and the competition with Ca(2+) at the molecular level. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to determine the peak assignments of dissolved lysine in the solution phase. Three surface complexes, including dicationic, cationic, and zwitterionic structures, were observed to attach to the clay edge sites and penetrate the interlayer space. The increased surface coverage and Ca(2+) competition did not affect the interfacial lysine structures at a certain pH, whereas an elevated lysine concentration contributed to zwitterionic-type coordination at pH 10. Moreover, clay dissolution at pH 4 could be inhibited at a higher surface coverage with 5 and 10 mM lysine, whereas the inhibition effect was inconspicuous or undetected at pH 7 and 10. The presence of Ca(2+) not only could remove a part of the adsorbed lysine but also could facilitate the readsorption of dissolved Si(4+) and Al(3+) and surface protonation. Our results provide new insights into the process of lysine adsorption and its effects on montmorillonite surface sites. PMID:27118104

  15. Mechanical properties and XRD studies of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel fabricated by a low temperature polymer precursor route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chunghao; Rohbeck, Nadia; Gopalakrishnan, Karthik; Tulenko, James S.; Baney, Ronald H.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) inert matrix fuel (IMF) pellets fabricated by a low temperature (1050 °C) polymer precursor route were evaluated at room temperature. The Vickers hardness was mainly related to the chemical bonding strength between the amorphous SiC phase and the β-SiC particles. The biaxial fracture strength with pre-notch and fracture toughness were found to be mostly controlled by the pellet density. The maximum Vickers hardness, biaxial fracture strength with pre-notch and fracture toughness achieved were 5.6 GPa, 201 MPa and 2.9 MPa m1/2 respectively. These values appear to be superior to the reference MOX or UO2 fuels. Excellent thermal shock resistance for the fabricated SiC IMF was proven and the values were compared to conventional UO2 pellets. XRD studies showed that ceria (PuO2 surrogate) chemically reacted with the polymer precursor during sintering, forming cerium oxysilicate. Whether PuO2 will chemically react in a similar manner remains unclear.

  16. Investigation of the electrocatalysis for oxygen reduction reaction by Pt and binary Pt alloys: an XRD, XAS and electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.; Srinivasan, S.

    1995-12-31

    Electrocatalysis for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on five binary Pt alloy electrocatalysts (PtCr/C, PtMn/C, PtFe/C, PtCo/C and PtNi/C) supported on carbon have been investigated. The electrochemical characteristics for ORR in a proton conducting fuel cell environment has been correlated with the electronic and structural parameters determined under in situ conditions using XANES and EXAFS technique respectively. Results indicate that all the alloys possess higher Pt 5d band vacancies as compared to Pt/C. There is also evidence of lattice contraction in the alloys (supported by XRD results). Further, the Pt/C shows increase in Pt 5 d band vacancies during potential transitions from 0.54 to 0.84 V vs. RHE, which has been ration@ on the basis of OH type adsorption. In contrast to this, the alloys do not exhibit such an enhancement. Detailed EXAFS analysis supports the presence of OH species on Pt/C and its relative absence in the alloys. Correlation of the electrochemical results with bond distances and d-band vacancies show a volcano type behavior with the PtCr/C on top of the curve.

  17. Structural studies with the use of XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy of new high Manganese steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonska, Magdalena Barbara

    2014-04-01

    New high-strength austenitic and austenitic-ferritic manganese steels represent a significant potential in applications for structural components in the automotive and railway industry due to the excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good plasticity. They belong to the group of steels called AHSS (Advanced High Strength Steels) and UHSS (Ultra High Strength Steels). Application of this combination of properties allows a reduction in the weight of vehicles by the use of reduced cross-section components, and thus to reduce fuel consumption. The development and implementation of industrial production of such interesting and promising steel and its use as construction material requires an improvement of their casting properties and susceptibility to deformation in plastic working conditions. In this work, XRD, Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy were employed in a study of the new high-manganese steels with a austenite and austenite-ferrite structure. The influence of the plastic deformation parameters on the changes in the structure, distribution of ferrite and disclosure of the presence of carbides was determined. The analysis of phase transformations in various times using CEMS method made possible to reveal their fine details.

  18. In Situ XAS and XRD Studies of Substituted Spinel Lithium Manganese Oxides in the 4-5 V Region

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.; Ein-Eli, Y.

    1998-11-01

    Partial substitution of Mn in lithium manganese oxide spinel materials by Cu and Ni greatly affects the electrochemistry and the phase behavior of the cathode. Substitution with either metal or with a combination of both shortens the 4.2 V plateau and results in higher voltage plateaus. In situ x-ray absorption (XAS) studies indicate that the higher voltage plateaus are related to redox processes on the substituents. In situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) on LiCu{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} shows single phase behavior during the charge and discharge process. Three phases are observed for LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} and two phases are observed in the case of LiNi{sub 0.25}Cu{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4}. The electrolyte stability is dependent on both the operating voltage and the cathode composition. Even though Ni substituted materials have lower voltages, the electrolyte is more stable in cells with the Cu substituted materials.

  19. XRD analysis of undoped and Fe doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles by Williamson Hall method

    SciTech Connect

    Bharti, Bandna; Barman, P. B.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-28

    Undoped and Fe doped titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method at room temperature. The synthesized samples were annealed at 500°C. For structural analysis, the prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystallite size of TiO{sub 2} and Fe doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were calculated by Scherer’s formula, and was found to be 15 nm and 11 nm, respectively. Reduction in crystallite size of TiO{sub 2} with Fe doping was observed. The anatase phase of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction. By using Williamson-Hall method, lattice strain and crystallite size were also calculated. Williamson–Hall plot indicates the presence of compressive strain for TiO{sub 2} and tensile strain for Fe-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles annealed at 500°C.

  20. Reactivity of fluoro-substituted bis(thiocarbonyl) donors with diiodine: an XRD, FT-Raman, and DFT investigation.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Annalisa; Aragoni, M Carla; Bingham, Ann L; Castellano, Carlo; Coles, Susanne L; Demartin, Francesco; Hursthouse, Michael B; Isaia, Francesco; Lippolis, Vito; Maninchedda, Giuseppe; Pintus, Anna; Arca, Massimiliano

    2013-12-01

    The reactions of 1,3,8,10-tetrakis(4'-fluorophenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrathiocino[1,2-b:3,4-b']diimidazolyl-2,9-dithione (4) and molecular diiodine afforded spoke adducts with stoichiometries 4·I2 and 4·3I2 , isolated in the compound 4·3I2·xCH2Cl2·(1-x)I2 (x=0.70), and characterized by single-crystal XRD and FT-Raman spectroscopy. The nature of the reaction products was investigated under the prism of theoretical calculations carried out at the DFT level. The structural data, FT-Raman spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations agree in indicating that the introduction of fluorophenyl substituents results in a lowering of the Lewis basicity of this class of bis(thiocarbonyl) donors compared with alkyl-substituted tetrathiocino donors and fluorine allows for extended interactions that are responsible for solid-state crystal packing. PMID:24027238

  1. Simplified Procedure for Estimating Epitaxy of La2Zr2O7-Buffered NiW RABITS Using XRD

    SciTech Connect

    Rikel, Mark O.; Isfort, Dirk; Klein, Marcel; Ehrenberg, Jurgen; Bock, Joachim; Specht, Eliot D; Sun-Wagener, Ming; Weber, Oxana; Sporn, Dieter; Engel, Sebastian; de Haas, Oliver; Semerad, Robert; Schubert, Margitta; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A procedure is developed for assessing the epitaxy of La(2-x)Zr(2+x)O(7) (LZO) layers on NiW RABITS. Comparing XRD patterns (theta / 2-theta scans and 2D rocking curves) of LZO films of known thickness (ellipsometry or reflectometry measurements) with those of standard samples (100% epitaxial LZO film and an isotropic LZO pellet of known density), we estimate the epitaxial (EF), and polycrystalline (PF) fractions of LZO within the layer. The procedure was tested using MOD-LZO(100 nm)/NiW tape samples with varied from 3 to 90% (reproducibly prepared by varying the humidity of Ar-5%H2 gas during heat treatment). A qualitative agreement with RHEED and quantitative (within 10%) agreement with the EBSD results was shown. Correlation between EF and Jc in 600 nm thick YBCO layer deposited on MOD-LZO/NiW using thermal coevaporation enables us to impose the EF=80% margin on the quality of LZO layer for the particular conductor architecture.

  2. Drill Core Mineral Analysis by Means of the Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer HySpex, XRD and Asd in Proximity of the MÝTINA Maar, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerting, F.; Rogass, C.; Kaempf, H.; Lubitz, C.; Harms, U.; Schudack, M.; Kokaly, R.; Mielke, C.; Boesche, N.; Altenberger, U.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is increasingly used for surface mapping. Therefore different expert systems are being utilized to identify surface cover materials. Those expert systems mainly rely on the spectral comparison between unknown and library spectra, but their performances were only limited qualified. This study aims on the comparative analysis of drill core samples from the recently discovered maar system in the Czech Republic. Drill core samples from the surrounding area of the Mýtina maar were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and the hyperspectral spectrometer HySpex. Additionally, soil samples were measured in-situ by the ASD FieldSpec4 and in the laboratory by the HySpex VNIR/SWIR spectrometer system. The data was then analyzed by the MICA-algorithm and the results were compared to the results of the XRD -analysis. The XRD-analysis served here as validation basis. The results of the hyperspectral and the XRD analyses were used to densify a volcanic map that also integrates in-situ soil measurements in the surrounding area of Mýtina. The comparison of the XRD- and solaroptical remote sensing results showed a good correlation of qualified minerals if the soil organic carbon content was significantly low. Contrary to XRD, smectites and muscovites were also straightforward identified that underlines the overall performance of the approach to identify minerals. Basically, in this work an operable approach is proposed that enables the fast, repeatable and detailed analysis of drill cores, drill core samples and soil samples and, hence, provides a higher performance than state-of-the-art XRD-analyses.

  3. Optical and TEM study of shock metamorphism from the Sedan test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Thus far, detailed petrologic studies of shock metamorphism have been performed on samples recovered from laboratory experiments and on a few natural impactites. The loading history of these samples is quite different: In particular, laboratory experiments spend only a short time (less than 1 microsec) at peak pressure, whereas natural impactites may have stress pulses from 0.1 - 1 ms. On the other hand, laboratory experiments have known stress histories; natural impactites do not. Natural samples are also subjected to thousands or millions of years of postshock annealing and/or weathering. A useful intermediate case is that of nuclear detonation. Stress pulses for these events can reach 0.1 ms or higher, and samples are obtained in pristine condition. All three types of loading produce stresses of hundreds of kilobars. Samples studied were taken from the Sedan nulcear test site, and consist of a coarse-grained granodiorite containing quartz, K-feldspar, cordierite, and hornblende. Samples were studied optically in this section, then were thinned with an ion mill and studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Optically, quartz and K-feldspar displayed numerous sets of planar deformation features (PDF's) identical to the nondecorated PDF's seen in laboratory samples and many natural impactites. TEM study showed that the PDF's in quartz and feldspar corresponded to densely packed wide transformation lamellae identical to those described in laboratory studies. The transformation lamellae in both minerals were amorphous, with no sign of high-pressure phases. In the case of K-feldspar only, narrow sublamellae extended outward from some wide lamellae. Quartz, which was more abundant and studied more extensively, contained no shock-induced dislocations. Some planar features were also seen in cordierite, but could not be identified due to rapid beam damage. No shock defects were seen in hornblende in TEM. The shock-induced defects present at the Sedan site are very

  4. Using TEM for sounding conductive and deep groundwater in Mars analog environments: Comparing two field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernsletten, J. A.

    2005-11-01

    A TEM survey was carried out in Pima County, Arizona, in January 2003. Data was collected using 100 m Tx loops and a ferrite-cored magnetic coil Rx antenna, using a 16 Hz sounding frequency, which is sensitive to slightly salty groundwater. Prominent features in the data are the ~500 m depth of investigation and the ~120 m depth to the water table, confirmed by data from four USGS test wells sur-rounding the field area. Note also the conductive (~20-40 Ωm) clay-rich soil above the water table. During May and June of 2003, a Fast-Turnoff (early time) TEM survey was carried out at the Peña de Hierro field area of the MARTE project, near the town of Nerva, Spain. Data was collected using 20 m and 40 m Tx loop antennae and 10 m loop Rx antennae, with a 32 Hz sounding frequency. Data from Line 4 (of 16) from this survey, collected using 40 m Tx loops, show ~200 m depth of investigation and a conduc-tive high at ~90 m depth below Station 20 (second station of 10 along this line). This is the water table, matching the 431 m MSL elevation of the nearby pit lake. Data from Line 15 and Line 14 of the Rio Tinto survey, collected using 20 m Tx loops, achieve ~50 m depth of investigation and show con-ductive highs at ~15 m depth below Station 50 (Line 15) and Station 30 (Line 14), interpreted as subsurface water flow under mine tailings matching surface flows seen coming out from under the tailings, and shown on maps. Both of the interpretations from Rio Tinto data (Line 4, and Lines 15 & 14) were confirmed by preliminary results from the MARTE ground truth drilling campaign carried out in September and October 2003. Drill Site 1 was moved ~50 m based on recommendations built on data from Line 15 and Line 14 of the Fast-Turnoff TEM survey.

  5. In situ TEM investigations of mineral growth through oriented attachment of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Nielsen, M.; Lee, J. R.; Frandsen, C.; Banfield, J. F.; Kisailus, D.; De Yoreo, J.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of crystals through aggregation and coalescence of nanoparticles is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon in biomineral, biomimetic and natural systems, and during synthetic production of nanoparticles and nanowires. The resulting crystals often exhibit complex forms ranging from quasi-one-dimensional chains to 3D hierarchical and self-similar superstructures. Yet the final structure typically diffracts as a single crystal, implying that the primary particles aligned during growth. When coalignment is accompanied by coalescence, this growth process is often referred to as oriented attachment (OA). OA is now recognized as an important mechanism of crystal growth in many materials in the environment. However, the pathway by which OA occurs has not been established. Although the preservation of primary particle morphology and formation of twins and stacking faults at particle-particle boundaries strongly suggest a sequence of whole particle alignment followed by interface elimination, atom-by-atom reorientation via dislocation and grain-boundary migration after attachment are another potential mechanism. If indeed the primary particles align before attachment, the dynamics of that process and the forces that drive it have yet to be revealed. To achieve this understanding we are investigating crystal nucleation and oriented attachment in a number of systems, such as iron oxides and oxyhydroxide as well as titanium dioxide, through in situ and ex situ TEM. We performed high-resolution TEM using a fluid cell to directly observe oriented attachment of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles. The particles undergo continuous rotation and interaction until they find a perfect lattice match. A sudden jump to contact then occurs over less than 1 nanometer, followed by lateral atom-by-atom addition initiated at the contact point. Interface elimination proceeds at a rate consistent with the curvature dependence of the Gibbs free energy. Measured translational and

  6. TEM Investigation of Nano-scale Precipitates in Ultrahigh-Pressure Clinopyroxenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Tina Renee

    This investigation details the TEM characterization of epitaxially-exsolved nano-scale siliceous precipitates in cores of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) clinopyroxenes from eclogites of the Bohemian Massif and Western Gneiss Region, and a Kokchetav Massif garnet pyroxenite. Siliceous precipitates are observed in cores of UHP clinopyroxenes from multiple UHP metamorphic terranes, and are often used as indicators for UHP metamorphism. Without atomic-scale characterization, these precipitates have been identified only as quartz or coesite. The close structural and orientation relationships of siliceous phases and their host clinopyroxenes are revealed by High Resolution TEM and Scanning TEM (HRTEM/STEM) images and Selected Area Electron Diffraction. Low pressure, low density siliceous phases of keatite, α-cristobalite, tridymite, siliceous glasses, and albite are reported here, not the previously described higher density silica polymorphs. The phase that precipitates may be controlled by a complex combination of factors. Particularly, calculated vacancy content (Ca-Eskola component) in clinopyroxenes may be the overriding factor in creating localized low pressure micro-environments for nano-precipitate exsolution. Higher vacancy content may be linked with the lowest density silica, tridymite; lower vacancy contents may be linked with somewhat higher density polymorphs of silica, including α-cristobalite and the first confirmed natural occurrences of keatite. Mechanisms of exsolution are closely related to the interfaces that develop between phases. The geometry of the substrate in epitaxial mineral growth may cause growth of phases not stable at existing P-T-X conditions. Little strain in HRTEM/STEM images is observed and shows favorable lattice matching between siliceous precipitates/hosts; interface models detailing a calculated 5.4% difference in unit cells at most support this. Nano-scale size effects are also important—they stabilize nano-scale and metastable

  7. TEM Study of Intergranular Fluid Distributions in Rocks at a Nanometer Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraga, T.; Anderson, I. M.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    The distribution of intergranular fluids in rocks plays an essential role in fluid migration and rock rheology. Structural and chemical analyses with sub-nanometer resolution is possible with transmission and scanning-transmission electron microscopy; therefore, it is possible to perform the fine-scale structural analyses required to determine the presence or absence of very thin fluid films along grain boundaries. For aqueous fluids in crustal rocks, Hiraga et al. (2001) observed a fluid morphology controlled by the relative values of the solid-solid and solid-fluid interfacial energies, which resulted in well-defined dihedral angles. Their high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations demonstrate that grain boundaries are tight even at a nanometer scale, consistent with the absence of aqueous fluid films. For partially molten ultra-mafic rocks, two conflicting conclusions have been reached: nanometer-thick melt films wet grain boundaries (Drury and Fitz Gerald 1996; De Kloe et al. 2000) versus essentially all grain boundaries are melt-free (Vaughan et al. 1982; Kohlstedt 1990). To resolve this conflict, Hiraga et al. (2002) examined grain boundaries in quenched partially molten peridotites. Their observations demonstrate the following: (i) Although a small fraction of the grains are separated by relatively thick (~1 μm) layers of melt, lattice fringe images obtained with a high-resolution TEM reveal that most of the remaining boundaries do not contain a thin amorphous phase. (ii) In addition, the composition of olivine-olivine grain boundaries was analyzed with a nano-beam analytical scanning TEM with a probe size of <2 nm. Although the grain boundaries contained no melt film, the concentration of Ca, Al and Ti were enhanced near the boundaries. The segregation of these elements to the grain boundaries formed enriched regions <7 nm wide. A similar pattern of chemical segregation was detected in subsolidus systems. Creep experiments on the

  8. In situ TEM visualization of superior nanomechanical flexibility of shear-exfoliated phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Ma, Hongyu; Lei, Shuangying; Sun, Jun; Chen, Jing; Ge, Binghui; Zhu, Yimei; Sun, Litao

    2016-07-01

    Recently discovered atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise for applications in flexible nanoelectronic devices. Experimentally identifying and characterizing nanomechanical properties of phosphorene are challenging, but also potentially rewarding. This work combines for the first time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and an in situ micro-manipulation system to directly visualize the nanomechanical behaviour of individual phosphorene nanoflakes. We demonstrate that the phosphorene nanoflakes can be easily bent, scrolled, and stretched, showing remarkable mechanical flexibility rather than fracturing. An out-of-plane plate-like bending mechanism and in-plane tensile strain of up to 34% were observed. Moreover, a facile liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce such mono-layer and few-layer phosphorene nanoflakes in organic solvents using only a household kitchen blender. The effects of surface tensions of the applied solvents on the ratio of average length and thickness (L/T) of the nanoflakes were studied systematically. The results reported here will pave the way for potential industrial-scale applications of flexible phosphorene nanoelectronic devices.Recently discovered atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise for applications in flexible nanoelectronic devices. Experimentally identifying and characterizing nanomechanical properties of phosphorene are challenging, but also potentially rewarding. This work combines for the first time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and an in situ micro-manipulation system to directly visualize the nanomechanical behaviour of individual phosphorene nanoflakes. We demonstrate that the phosphorene nanoflakes can be easily bent, scrolled, and stretched, showing remarkable mechanical flexibility rather than fracturing. An out-of-plane plate-like bending mechanism and in-plane tensile strain of up to

  9. A TEM investigation of shock metamorphism in quartz from the Vredefort dome, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Hugues; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Doukhan, Jean-Claude

    1994-02-01

    The origin of the Vredefort structure in South Africa is still debated. Several causes have been discussed, namely asteroid impact, internal gas explosion or tectonic processes. Evidence of dynamic rock deformation is pervasive in the form of planar features in quartz grains, shatter cones, veins of pseudotachylite and occurrence of coesite and stishovite (high-pressure quartz polymorphs). A number of these characteristics is widely believed to support an impact origin. However, the planar features in quartz, which are generally considered as one of the strongest indicators of impact, are in the Vredefort case considered as anomalous when compared with those from accepted impact structures. We have investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the defect microstructures in quartz grains from different lithologies sampled at various places at the Vredefort structure. Whatever the locality, only thin mechanical Brazil twin lamellae in the basal plane are observed by TEM. So far, such defects have only been found in quartz from impact sites, but always associated with sets of thin glass lamellae in rhombohedral planes 10-1 n with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. At the scale of the optical microscope, Brazil twins in (0001) are easily detected in Vredefort quartz grains because of the numerous tiny fluid inclusions which decorate them. Similar alignments of tiny fluid inclusions parallel to other planes are also detected optically, but at the TEM scale no specific shock defects are detected along their traces. If these inclusion alignments initially were shock features, they are now so severely weathered that they can no longer be recognized as unambiguous shock lamellae. Fine-grained coesite was detected in the vicinity of narrow pseudotachylite veinlets in a quartzite specimen, but stishovite was not found, even in areas where its occurrence was previously reported. Finally, definite evidence of high-temperature annealing was observed in all the samples

  10. Practical workflow for cryo focused-ion-beam milling of tissues and cells for cryo-TEM tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chyongere; Schmelzer, Thomas; Kishchenko, Gregory; Wagenknecht, Terence; Marko, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitreous freezing offers a way to study cells and tissue in a near-native state by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), which is important when structural information at the macromolecular level is required. Many cells -- especially those in tissue -- are too thick to study intact in the cryo-TEM. Cryo focused-ion-beam (cryo-FIB) milling is being used in a few laboratories to thin vitreously frozen specimens, thus avoiding the artifacts and difficulties of cryo-ultramicrotomy. However, the technique is challenging because of the need to avoid devitrification and frost accumulation during the entire process, from the initial step of freezing to the final step of loading the specimen into the cryo-TEM. We present a robust workflow that makes use of custom fixtures and devices that can be used for high-pressure-frozen bulk tissue samples as well as for samples frozen on TEM grids. PMID:24211822

  11. Problems at the Leading Edge of Space Weathering as Revealed by TEM Combined with Surface Science Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C. A.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    Analytical field-emission TEM techniques cross-correlated with surface analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provides a unique two-prong approach for characterizing how solar wind ion processing contributes to space weathering.

  12. Quasi-TEM electromagnetic modes of a plasma waveguide with a nonsimply connected cross section in an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashov, I. N. Kuzelev, M. V.

    2014-12-15

    Electromagnetic modes of a plasma waveguide with a nonsimply connected cross section in an external magnetic field are investigated. The existence of quasi-TEM modes in a finite-strength magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that, in the limits of infinitely strong and zero magnetic fields, this mode transforms into a true TEM mode. The possibility of excitation of such modes by an electron beam in the regime of the anomalous Doppler effect is analyzed.

  13. TEM Study of Precipitation in a NiAl-3Ti-0.5Hf Single-Crystal Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Noebe, R. D.; Howe, J. M.; Wilson, A. W.; Levit, V.

    1996-01-01

    Samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared from 3 mm diameter cylinders electro-discharge machined from the heat-treated ingots. Slices sectioned from the cylinders were mechanically ground and electrochemically thinned in a twinjet Tenupol-3 polisher. Microstructural and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) studies were conducted in a Philips 400T TEM equipped with a double tilt goniometer and a KEVEX Si/Li X-ray detector.

  14. A TEM Investigation of the Fine-Grained Matrix of the Martian Basaltic Breccia NWA 7034

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muttik, N.; Keller, L. P.; Agee, C. B.; McCubbin, F. M.; Santos, A. R.; Rahman, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The martian basaltic breccia NWA 7034 is characterized by fine-grained groundmass containing several different types of mineral grains and lithologic clasts. The matrix composition closely resembles Martian crustal rock and soil composition measured by recent rover and orbiter missions. The first results of NWA 7034 suggest that the brecciation of this martian meteorite may have formed due to eruptive volcanic processes; however, impact related brecciation processes have been proposed for paired meteorites NWA 7533 and NWA 7475]. Due to the very fine grain size of matrix, its textural details are difficult to resolve by optical and microprobe observations. In order to examine the potential nature of brecciation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies combined with focused ion-beam technique (FIB) has been undertaken. Here we present the preliminary observations of fine-grained groundmass of NWA 7034 from different matrix areas by describing its textural and mineralogical variations and micro-structural characteristics.

  15. Materials science applications of a 120 kV FEG TEM/STEM: Triskaidekaphilia

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Fisher, A.T.; Kenik, E.A.; Wang, Z.L.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction by several manufacturers of 200kV transmission electron microscopes (TEM) equipped with field emission guns affords the opportunity to assess their potential impact on materials science by examining applications of similar 100-120kV instruments that have been in use for more than a decade. This summary is based on results from a Philips EM400T/FEG configured as an analytical electron microscope (AEM) with a 6,585 scanning transmission (STEM) unit, EDAX 9100/70 or 9900 energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) systems, and Gatan 607 serial- or 666 parallel-detection electron energy-loss spectrometers (EELS). Examples in four areas that illustrate applications that are impossible or so difficult as to be impracticable with conventional thermionic electron guns are described.

  16. Image processing enhancement of high-resolution TEM micrographs of nanometer-size metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artal, P.; Avalos-Borja, M.; Soria, F.; Poppa, H.; Heinemann, K.

    The high-resolution TEM detectability of lattice fringes from metal particles supported on substrates is impeded by the substrate itself. Single value decomposition (SVD) and Fourier filtering (FFT) methods were applied to standard high resolution micrographs to enhance lattice resolution from particles as well as from crystalline substrates. SVD produced good results for one direction of fringes, and it can be implemented as a real-time process. Fourier methods are independent of azimuthal directions and allow separation of particle lattice planes from those pertaining to the substrate, which makes it feasible to detect possible substrate distortions produced by the supported particle. This method, on the other hand, is more elaborate, requires more computer time than SVD and is, therefore, less likely to be used in real-time image processing applications.

  17. In situ sputter cleaning of thin film metal substrates for UHV-TEM corrosion studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1973-01-01

    A prerequisite for conducting valid corrosion experiments by in situ electron microscopy techniques is not only the achievement of UHV background pressure conditions at the site of the specimen but also the ability to clean the surface of the thin metal substrate specimen before initiation of the corrosive interaction. A miniaturized simple ion gun has been constructed for this purpose. The gun is small enough to be incorporated into an UHV electron microscope specimen chamber with hot stage in such a way as to permit bombardment of the substrate specimen while observing it by transmission electron microscopy TEM. It is shown that the ion beam generated is confined well enough to cause a sputtering removal of substrate material at a rate of approximately 5-10 A/min and to prevent the sputter deposition of contaminating material from the specimen holder.

  18. Quantitative nanoscopy: Tackling sampling limitations in (S)TEM imaging of polymers and composites.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Snel, Roderick; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    Sampling limitations in electron microscopy questions whether the analysis of a bulk material is representative, especially while analyzing hierarchical morphologies that extend over multiple length scales. We tackled this problem by automatically acquiring a large series of partially overlapping (S)TEM images with sufficient resolution, subsequently stitched together to generate a large-area map using an in-house developed acquisition toolbox (TU/e Acquisition ToolBox) and stitching module (TU/e Stitcher). In addition, we show that quantitative image analysis of the large scale maps provides representative information that can be related to the synthesis and process conditions of hierarchical materials, which moves electron microscopy analysis towards becoming a bulk characterization tool. We demonstrate the power of such an analysis by examining two different multi-phase materials that are structured over multiple length scales. PMID:26492325

  19. Preparation of cross sections of thermal spray coatings for TEM investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. )

    1992-03-01

    A technique for the preparation of cross sections for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of thermal spray coatings has been developed. The procedure is designed to minimize specimen damage during mechanical thinning and to reduce the effect of differential thinning during ion milling. Specimens were made by two different coating systems - WC-Co coating produced by the FARE Gun process on a mild steel substrate and Tribaloy T-800 sprayed by the HVOF process on a nickel-base superalloy. These specimens have large areas that are electron transparent on either side of the interface, and the results have shown the atomic scale microstructure of the interface between the thermal spray coating and the substrate. 9 refs.

  20. A Rapid Method for Viral Particle Detection in Viral-Induced Gastroenteritis: A TEM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, M. John; Barrish, James P.; Hayes, Elizabeth S.; Leer, Laurie C.; Estes, Mary K.; Cubitt, W. D.

    1995-10-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a common cause of hospitalization in the pediatric population. The most frequent cause of gastroenteritis is viral in origin. The purpose of this study was to compare a rapid modified negative-staining TEM method with the conventional pseudoreplica technique in detection of viral particles in fecal samples from children with viral gastroenteritis. The modified negative-staining method resulted in a significantly higher (2.5 ± 0.5, p = 0.02) viral rating score than that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique (1.7 ± 0.4). In addition, the preparation time for the negative-staining method was approximately one fifth that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique. Rapid diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis may be made by ultrastructural detection of viral particles in fecal samples using the negative staining technique.

  1. A FIB/TEM Study of a Complex Wark-Lovering Rim on a Vigarano CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multilayered mineral sequences that surround most Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). Several processes have been proposed for WL rim formation, including condensation, flash-heating or reaction with a nebular reservoir, or combinations of these [e.g. 1-7], but no consensus exists. Our previous coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and NanoSIMS O isotopic measurements showed that a WL rim experienced flash heating events in a nebular environment with planetary O isotopic composition, distinct from the (16)O-rich formation environment [6]. Our efforts have focused on CAIs from the CV(sub red) chondrites, especially Vigarano, because these have escaped much of the parent body alteration effects that are common in CAIs from CV(sub ox) group.

  2. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of enclosures using UWB pulses inside an open TEM waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2007-06-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Numerical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, a measurement procedure is introduced using ultra wideband (UWB) electromagnetic field pulses. The procedure provides a quick way to determine the transient shielding effectiveness of an enclosure without performing time consuming frequency domain measurements. For demonstration, a cylindrical enclosure made of conductive textile is examined. The field pulses are generated inside an open TEM-waveguide. From the measurement of the transient electric and magnetic fields with and without the shield in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness of the shielding material as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are derived.

  3. Laser Based In Situ Techniques: Novel Methods for Generating Extreme Conditions in TEM Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, M; Lagrange, T; Reed, B; Armstrong, M; Campbell, G; DeHope, W; Kim, J; King, W; Masiel, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-25

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.

  4. FIB and TEM observations of defects in hot-dip zinc coatings.

    PubMed

    Hong, Moon-Hi; Saka, Hiroyasu

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic ability of FIB (focused ion beam) fabrication to remove materials from a very small and/or precisely located slab using an accelerated Ga ion beam were employed to prepare cross-sectional thin films of zinc-coated steel sheets composed of Fe-Zn intermetallic compounds. A few defects observed frequently on the galvannealed (GA) coating surface were analyzed. Streaky marks indicated the rich concentration of oxides at the interface between the galvannealed coating and the steel substrate. The annealing experiment indicated the existence of Mn and Si oxides on the steel substrate. The grain size of ferrite in the extreme surface of the substrate was smaller as compared with conventional IF (Interstitial Free) steels. Furthermore, some superlattice spots were observed at the fine ferrite grain. Defects that are termed 'wavy pattern' and 'dross' were also analyzed by the combination of the FIB and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) techniques. PMID:15582963

  5. A TEM Study of Creep Deformation Mechanisms in Allvac 718Plus

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R; Unocic, Kinga A; Hayes, Robert; Daehn, Glenn; Mills, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study on the evolution of creep deformation substructure in Ni-base superalloy Allvac 718Plus has been performed. Specimens crept at 620 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 690-732 C were examined utilizing diffraction contrast TEM characterization techniques. Creep was interrupted at 1-2.5% strain in order to study the deformation substructure following a limited amount of deformation. The dominant deformation modes at each of the test temperatures were highly planar in nature and involved shearing of the matrix and precipitates on {111} glide planes. In addition, paired a/2<110> dislocations were evident which suggest an antiphase boundary shearing mechanism. Creep induced microtwinning was also observed at the highest creep temperature which was created by identical a/6<112> Shockley partial dislocations that shear the matrix and precipitates on consecutive close packed {111} glide planes.

  6. TEM studies of oxidized NiAl and Ni3Al cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.; Ruhle, M.

    1989-01-01

    Cross sections of oxide scale/(Ni-Al) intermetallics were prepared by a new method and studied using primarily TEM. The cross sections were prepared by encasing an oxidized metal specimen sandwich in a low-melting-temperature zinc alloy. Observations of oxidized zirconium-doped beta-NiAl cross sections revealed crystallographic voids beneath an adherent Al2O3 scale. The oxide-metal interface was incoherent, but a high dislocation density in the metal near the interface suggested that a large tensile stress was induced by the attached oxide scale. A duplex Al2O3-NiAl2O4 scale formed on zirconium-doped and zirconium/boron-doped gamma-prime-Ni3Al alloys. Additional results are presented involving oxidation mechanisms and oxide-metal interface structures.

  7. TEM characterization of dislocation loops in irradiated bcc Fe-based steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Bo; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2012-12-08

    In this study, we describe a methodology to examine dislocation loops in irradiated steels based on a combination of crystallographic information and g*b invisibility criteria. Dislocation loops in transmission electron microscope (TEM) images can be conveniently analyzed using this method. Through this analysis approach, dislocation loops in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels irradiated at 400 *C have been examined. The predominant types of loops found in irradiated RAFM steels were h100i{200} and 1/2h111i 111. The size, density, and density anisotropy of these two types of dislocation loops were quantified. It was observed that the h100i{200} loop density is more than twice that of 1/2h111i{111} loops. A large density anisotropy of h100i{200} loops was identified.

  8. In situ TEM investigation of microstructural behavior of superplastic Al–Mg–Sc alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dám, Karel; Lejček, Pavel; Michalcová, Alena

    2013-02-15

    Dynamic changes in microstructure of the superplastic ultrafine-grained Al–3Mg–0.2Sc (wt.%) alloy refined by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP). were observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy at temperatures up to 300 °C (annealing and tensile deformation) in order to simulate the initial stages of superplastic testing. It was found that the microstructure changes significantly during the preheating before the superplastic deformation, which was accompanied by decreased microhardness. During the deformation at 300 °C, high dislocation activity as well as motion of low-angle grain boundaries was observed while high-angle grain boundaries did not move due to the presence of scandium in the alloy. - Highlights: ► We performed in situ TEM annealing and straining on superplastic Al–Mg–Sc alloy. ► We simulated the conditions of early stages of superplastic testing. ► Significant changes in microstructure occur during preheating before deformation.

  9. In situ TEM/SEM electronic/mechanical characterization of nano material with MEMS chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuelin, Wang; Tie, Li; Xiao, Zhang; Hongjiang, Zeng; Qinhua, Jin

    2014-08-01

    Our investigation of in situ observations on electronic and mechanical properties of nano materials using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the help of traditional micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology has been reviewed. Thanks to the stability, continuity and controllability of the loading force from the electrostatic actuator and the sensitivity of the sensor beam, a MEMS tensile testing chip for accurate tensile testing in the nano scale is obtained. Based on the MEMS chips, the scale effect of Young's modulus in silicon has been studied and confirmed directly in a tensile experiment using a transmission electron microscope. Employing the nanomanipulation technology and FIB technology, Cu and SiC nanowires have been integrated into the tensile testing device and their mechanical, electronic properties under different stress have been achieved, simultaneously. All these will aid in better understanding the nano effects and contribute to the designation and application in nano devices.

  10. In situ TEM Observation of Resistance Switching in Titanate Based Device

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Lü, Weiming; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Jirong; Gu, Changzhi; Gu, Lin; Wang, Yanguo; Duan, Xiaofeng; Yu, Richeng

    2014-01-01

    After decades of efforts, the research on resistance switching (RS) behavior in transition metal oxides has shifted to the stage of verifying the proposed models by direct experimental evidences. In this paper, RS behavior and oxygen content variation of La0.85Sr0.15TiO3/SrTiO3:Nb (LSTO/STON) were investigated by in situ transmission electron microscopy observation and in situ electron energy loss spectrum characterization under external electric field. The oxygen content fluctuation adjusted by applied bias has been investigated and the observed results imply the conductive channels should be formed by the oxygen vacancy at the Pt/LSTO interface. Moreover, in situ TEM characterization displays the advantage - to reveal the origin of various RS behaviors. PMID:24463532

  11. A Microanalytical (TEM) Study of Fine-grained Chondrule Rims in NWA 5717

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigolski, J. N.; Frank, D. R.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Weisberg, M. K.; Ebel, D. S.; Rahman, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 5717 is a highly primitive ordinary chondrite of petrologic type 3.05 with ubiquitous fine-grained chondrule rims [1, 2]. Rims appear around approximately 60% of chondrules and are comprised of micron-sized mineral and lithic fragments and microchondrules that are embdedded in an FeO-rich submicron groundmass that compositionally resembles fayalitic olivine. Some rim clasts appear overprinted with FeO-rich material, suggesting secondary alteration that postdates rim formation. Here we present a microanalytical (TEM) study of the submicron component (i.e. the groundmass) of the rims in order to determine the crystal structures and compositions of their constituent phases and decipher the accretion and alteration history recorded in rims.

  12. Quantitative TEM analysis of precipitation and grain boundary segregation in neutron irradiated EUROFER 97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, Christian; Gaganidze, Ermile; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of irradiation induced microstructural defects is essential for assessing the applicability of structural steels like the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel EUROFER 97 in upcoming fusion reactors. In this work Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used to analyze the types and structure of precipitates, and the evolution of their size distributions and densities caused by neutron irradiation to a dose of 32 displacements per atom (dpa) at 330-340 °C in the irradiation experiment ARBOR 1. A significant growth of MX and M23C6 type precipitates is observed after neutron irradiation, while the precipitate density remains unchanged. Hardening caused by MX and M23C6 precipitate growth is assessed by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening (DBH) model, and shown to be of minor importance when compared to other irradiation effects like dislocation loop formation. Additionally, grain boundary segregation of chromium induced by neutron irradiation was investigated and detected in irradiated specimens.

  13. The adhesion behavior of carbon coating studied by re-indentation during in situ TEM nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xue; Diao, Dongfeng

    2016-01-01

    We report a nanoscale adhesion induced nano-response in terms of re-indentation during in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) nanoindentation on the carbon coating with silicon substrate. The adhesive force generated with nanoindentation was measured, and re-indentation phenomenon during unloading with displacement sudden drop and external loading force change from tension to compression was found. The occurrence of re-indentation during unloading was ascribed to the adhesive force of the contact interface between the indenter and the coating surface. Adhesion energies released for re-indentation processes were quantitatively analyzed from the re-indentation load-displacement curves, and carbon coating reduced the impact of adhesion for silicon substrate. The adhesion induced nano-response of contact surfaces would affect the reliability and performance of nano devices.

  14. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning. PMID:26507466

  15. Characterizing the Phyllosilicate Component of the Sheepbed Mudstone in Gale Crater, Mars Using Laboratory XRD and EGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Archer, P. D.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Sutter, B.; Farmer, J. D.; Downs, R. T.; Leveille, R.; Achilles, C. A.; Crisp, J. A.; Des Marais, D. J.; Morookian, J. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Spanovich, N.; Treiman, A. H.; Yen, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Curiosity rover investigated the mineralogy of the Sheepbed mudstone member of the Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale crater. Data from the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) X-ray diffractometer (XRD) helped identify phyllosilicates in the two drilled samples, John Klein and Cumberland. These patterns showed peaks at low angles, consistent with (001) peaks in 2:1 swelling phyllosilicates [1]. Evolved gas analyses (EGA) by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument of these samples confirmed the presence of phyllosilicates through the release of H2O at high temperatures, consistent with dehydroxylation of octahedral OH in phyllosilicates [2]. CheMin data for the phyllosilicates at John Klein and Cumberland show that they are structurally similar in that their (02l) peaks are near 22.5 deg 2theta, suggesting both samples contain trioctahedral 2:1 phyllosilicates [1]. However, the positions of the (001) peaks differ: the phyllosilicate at John Klein has its (001) peak at 10 Angstroms, whereas the phyllosilicate at Cumberland has an (001) peak at 14 Angstroms. Such differences in (001) dspacings can be ascribed to the type of cation in the interlayer site [3]. For example, large monovalent cations (e.g., K(+)) have low hydration energies and readily lose their H2O of hydration, whereas small divalent cations (e.g., Mg(2+)) have high energies of hydration and retain H2O in the phyllosilicate interlayers [3,4]. The goal of this study is to determine whether differences in the interlayer cation composition can explain the CheMin data from John Klein and Cumberland and to use this knowledge to better understand phyllosilicate formation mechanisms.

  16. Bone matrix calcification during embryonic and postembryonic rat calvarial development assessed by SEM-EDX spectroscopy, XRD, and FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henmi, Akiko; Okata, Hiroshi; Anada, Takahisa; Yoshinari, Mariko; Mikami, Yasuto; Suzuki, Osamu; Sasano, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral is constituted of biological hydroxyapatite crystals. In developing bone, the mineral crystal matures and the Ca/P ratio increases. However, how an increase in the Ca/P ratio is involved in maturation of the crystal is not known. The relationships among organic components and mineral changes are also unclear. The study was designed to investigate the process of calcification during rat calvarial bone development. Calcification was evaluated by analyzing the atomic distribution and concentration of Ca, P, and C with scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and changes in the crystal structure with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Histological analysis showed that rat calvarial bone formation started around embryonic day 16. The areas of Ca and P expanded, matching the region of the developing bone matrix, whereas the area of C became localized around bone. X-ray diffraction and FTIR analysis showed that the amorphous-like structure of the minerals at embryonic day 16 gradually transformed into poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite, whereas the proportion of mineral to protein increased until postnatal week 6. FTIR analysis also showed that crystallization of hydroxyapatite started around embryonic day 20, by which time SEM-EDX spectroscopy showed that the Ca/P ratio had increased and the C/Ca and C/P ratios had decreased significantly. The study suggests that the Ca/P molar ratio increases and the proportion of organic components such as proteins of the bone matrix decreases during the early stage of calcification, whereas crystal maturation continues throughout embryonic and postembryonic bone development. PMID:25773047

  17. SR-XRD and SR-FTIR study of the alteration of silver foils in medieval paintings.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Nati; Butí, Salvador; Labrador, Ana; Cinque, Gianfelice; Emerich, Hermann; Pradell, Trinitat

    2011-03-01

    Altarpieces and polychrome carved wood from the fifteenth century AD usually exhibit golden and silvery areas by the application of a very thin foil of metal. The metal foils were normally protected from the atmosphere by a varnish or resin which maybe either preserved or absent. Moreover, they were glued to the background surface by adhesive substances (egg yolk, drying oil or animal glue). The high proportion of the glueing substances often renders the development of reaction compounds. With time, silver alters blacken or simply disappear completely. In this paper, we study the alterations to metal foils from a selection of fifteenth century artworks showing different glueing agents, organic coatings and several degrees of conservation of the organic coatings and metal leafs. The submillimetric layered structure and the high variability and low amount of most of the compounds present in the different layers, as well as their differing nature (organic and inorganic) make the use of micron-sensitive high-resolution techniques essential for their study. In particular, the high resolution, high brilliance and small footprint renders synchrotron radiation most adequate for their study. SR-XRD was performed to identify the reaction compounds formed in the different layers; μFTIR was used at to identify the silver protecting organic coatings, the metal foil glueing layers and the corresponding reaction compounds. The results obtained suggest that atmospheric corrosion is the dominant mechanism, and therefore that the degree of corrosion of the metal foils is mainly related to the conservation state of the protecting coatings. PMID:21079931

  18. Monitoring the Stability of Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions by Cryo-TEM Image Analysis and Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Grapentin, Christoph; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC-NE) are disperse systems consisting of nanoscale liquid perfluorocarbon droplets stabilized by an emulsifier, usually phospholipids. Perfluorocarbons are chemically inert and non-toxic substances that are exhaled after in vivo administration. The manufacture of PFC-NE can be done in large scales by means of high pressure homogenization or microfluidization. Originally investigated as oxygen carriers for cases of severe blood loss, their application nowadays is more focused on using them as marker agents in 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging (19F MRI). 19F is scarce in organisms and thus PFC-NE are a promising tool for highly specific and non-invasive imaging of inflammation via 19F MRI. Neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages phagocytize PFC-NE and subsequently migrate to inflamed tissues. This technique has proven feasibility in numerous disease models in mice, rabbits and mini pigs. The translation to clinical trials in human needs the development of a stable nanoemulsion whose droplet size is well characterized over a long storage time. Usually dynamic light scattering (DLS) is applied as the standard method for determining particle sizes in the nanometer range. Our study uses a second method, analysis of transmission electron microscopy images of cryo-fixed samples (Cryo-TEM), to evaluate stability of PFC-NE in comparison to DLS. Four nanoemulsions of different composition are observed for one year. The results indicate that DLS alone cannot reveal the changes in particle size, but can even mislead to a positive estimation of stability. The combination with Cryo-TEM images gives more insight in the particulate evolution, both techniques supporting one another. The study is one further step in the development of analytical tools for the evaluation of a clinically applicable perfluorooctylbromide nanoemulsion. PMID:26098661

  19. Dynamics of copper oxidation investigated by in situ UHV-TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guangwen

    To bridge the gap between information provided by surface science methods (adsorption of up to ˜a few monolayers of oxygen) and that provided by bulk oxidation studies (typically, an oxide layer of a few microns or thicker), the initial stages of metal oxidation---from nucleation to coalescence---are being investigated by in situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy (UHV-TEM). The aims of this thesis research are to gain basic insight into the complex kinetics and energetics of nano-oxide formation during the initial stages of oxidation, and fundamentally understand the distribution, stability, and morphological evolution of oxide islands since controlled oxidation is a processing tool for creating nanostructure patterns on surfaces. A systematic in situ study was carried out of the dynamic responses of Cu thin films to variations in thermodynamic variables such as temperature, oxygen pressure, strain, and crystallographic orientation. The main findings of the experiments include: (1) the universality of oxygen surface diffusion model, (2) formation of completely different oxide structure from oxide islands (disks, nanorods, dome, container pyramids) to disordered networks and almost uniform layer growth by altering the oxidation temperature and substrate orientation, (3) creation of nano-indentation arrays on metal surfaces by reducing the oxide arrays. The in situ UHV-TEM measurements of shape and size evolution of the oxides were used to gain fundamental insights into the complex kinetics and energetics of oxidation and reduction. Models based on the surfaces and strain during oxidation explained quantitatively the formation of some of the novel oxide nano-structures. A wealth of surface processes was discovered that reveal how each surface and thermodynamic condition needs to be considered for fundamentally understanding and controlling oxidation behavior.

  20. Characterization of TEM-1 β-Lactamase-Producing Kingella kingae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Anushree; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Soherwardy, Amenah; Nudell, Yoav; Mackenzie, Grace A.; Johnson, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a human pathogen that causes pediatric osteoarticular infections and infective endocarditis in children and adults. The bacterium is usually susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics, although β-lactam resistance has been reported in rare isolates. This study was conducted to identify β-lactam-resistant strains and to characterize the resistance mechanism. Screening of a set of 90 K. kingae clinical isolates obtained from different geographic locations revealed high-level resistance to penicillins among 25% of the strains isolated from Minnesota and Iceland. These strains produced TEM-1 β-lactamase and were shown to contain additional ≥50-kb plasmids. Ion Torrent sequencing of extrachromosomal DNA from a β-lactamase-producing strain confirmed the plasmid location of the blaTEM gene. An identical plasmid pattern was demonstrated by multiplex PCR in all β-lactamase producers. The porin gene's fragments were analyzed to investigate the relatedness of bacterial strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the por gene fragment, resulting in two major clusters with 11 allele types forming bacterial-strain subclusters. β-Lactamase producers were grouped together based on por genotyping. Our results suggest that the β-lactamase-producing strains likely originate from a single plasmid-bearing K. kingae isolate that traveled from Europe to the United States, or vice versa. This study highlights the prevalence of penicillin resistance among K. kingae strains in some regions and emphasizes the importance of surveillance for antibiotic resistance of the pathogen. PMID:23796935

  1. Li ion nanowire batteries and their in situ characterization in the TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmetov, Dmitry

    2012-02-01

    The ability to measure the morphological, chemical, and transport characteristics with nanoscale resolution in electrochemical energy storage devices is critical for understanding the complex interfacial reactions and phase transformation that accompany cycling of secondary batteries. In this talk I will describe the use of an all-nanowire Li ion battery for in situ characterization of charge and discharge reactions. The nanowire batteries (NWBs) consist of a metalized core, a LiCoO2 cathode, LiPON solid electrolyte, and a thin film Si anode. Measuring several micrometers in length and several hundred nanometers in diameter, the NWBs can be readily imaged and analyzed in transmission electron microscopes (TEM, STEM). We use focused ion beam milling and electron beam induced deposition to separate the cathode and anode and fabricate Pt contacts to a NWB. In situ electrical cycling of NWBs in TEM reveals that the most of the structural changes due to cycling happens in the electrolyte layer especially near the cathode/electrolyte interface. Electrical response from a single NWB was measured in the sub-pA range. For NWBs with the thinnest electrolyte, approximately 100 nm, we observe rapid self-discharge, along with void formation at the electrode/electrolyte interface, indicating electrical and chemical breakdown. The analysis of the NWB's electrical characteristics reveals space-charge limited electronic conduction, which effectively shorts the anode and cathode electrodes. When the electrolyte thickness is increased, the self-discharge rate is reduced substantially and the NWBs maintain a potential above 2 V. Our study illustrates that at reduced dimensions the increase in the electric field can lead to large electronic current in the electrolyte effectively shorting the battery even when the electrolyte layer is uniform and pinhole free. The scaling of this phenomenon provides useful guidelines for design of 3D Li ion batteries.

  2. High-resolution methane emission estimates using surface measurements and the InTEM inversion system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Sarah; Manning, Alistair; Robinson, Andrew; Riddick, Stuart; Forster, Grant; Oram, Dave; O'Doherty, Simon; Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    High quality GHG emission estimates will be required to successfully tackle climate change. There is a growing need for comparisons between emission estimates produced using bottom-up and top-down techniques at high spatial resolution. Here, a top-down inversion approach combining multi-year atmospheric measurements and an inversion model, InTEM, was used to estimate methane emissions for a region in the South East of the UK (~100 x 150 km). We present results covering a 2-year period (July 2012 - July 2014) in which atmospheric methane concentrations were recorded at 1 - 2 minute time-steps at four locations within the region of interest. Precise measurements were obtained using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) for all sites except one, which used a PICARRO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS). These observations, along with the UK Met Office's Lagrangian particle dispersion model, NAME, were used within InTEM to produce the methane emission fields. We present results from both Bayesian and non-prior based inversion analysis at varying spatial resolutions, for annual, seasonal and monthly time frames. These results are compared with the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) which is compiled using bottom-up methods and available at 1x1 km resolution. A thorough assessment of uncertainty is incorporated into this technique which is represented in the results. This project is part of the UK GAUGE campaign which aims to produce robust estimates of the UK GHG budget using new and existing measurement networks (e.g. the UK DECC GHG network) and modelling activities at a range of scales.

  3. Design of high-brightness TEM00-mode solar-pumped laser for renewable material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, D.; Almeida, J.

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sunlight into laser light by direct solar pumping is of ever-increasing importance because broadband, temporally constant, sunlight is converted into laser light, which can be a source of narrowband, collimated, rapidly pulsed, radiation with the possibility of obtaining extremely high brightness and intensity. Nonlinear processes, such as harmonic generation, might be used to obtain broad wavelength coverage, including the ultraviolet wavelengths, where the solar flux is very weak. The direct excitation of large lasers by sunlight offers the prospect of a drastic reduction in the cost of coherent optical radiation for high average power materials processing. This renewable laser has a large potential for many applications such as high-temperature materials processing, renewable magnesium-hydrogen energy cycle and so on. We propose here a scalable TEM00 mode solar laser pumping scheme, which is composed of four firststage 1.13 m diameter Fresnel lenses with its respective folding mirrors mounted on a two-axis automatic solar tracker. Concentrated solar power at the four focal spots of these Fresnel lenses are focused individually along a common 3.5 mm diameter, 70 mm length Nd:YAG rod via four pairs of second-stage fused-silica spherical lenses and third-stage 2D-CPCs (Compound Parabolic Concentrator), sitting just above the laser rod which is also double-pass pumped by four V-shaped pumping cavities. Distilled water cools both the rod and the concentrators. 15.4 W TEM00 solar laser power is numerically calculated, corresponding to 6.7 times enhancement in laser beam brightness.

  4. Characterization of Pebax angioplasty balloon surfaces with AFM, SEM, TEM, and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob A; Forsyth, Bruce; Zhou, Fang; Myers, Jason; Frethem, Chris; Haugstad, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In the medical device industry, angioplasty balloons have been widely used in the less invasive treatment of heart disease by expanding and relieving clogged structures in various arterial segments. However, new applications using thin coatings on the balloon surface have been explored to enhance therapeutic value in the delivery of pharmaceuticals (drug-elution) or control thermal energy output (RF ablation). In this study, angioplasty balloon materials comprised of poly(ether-block-amide) (Pebax) were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize physical properties at the balloon surface that may affect coating adhesion. The soft segment of this Pebax 1074 material is polyethylene oxide (PEO) and the hard segment is nylon-12. The morphology of the hard segments of this block co-polymer are found via AFM stiffness measurements to be (40 ± 20) nm by (300 ± 150) nm and are oriented parallel to the surface of the balloon. SAXS measurements found the lamellar spacing to be (18.5 ± 0.5) nm, and demonstrate a preferential orientation in agreement with TEM and AFM measurements. Fixation of this balloon in resin, followed by cryo-sectioning is shown to provide a novel manner in which to investigate surface characteristics on the balloon such as material or coating thickness as well as uniformity in comparison to the bulk structure. These outputs were deemed critical to improve overall balloon processing such as molding and surface treatment options for robust designs toward better procedural outcomes targeting new therapeutic areas. PMID:25891789

  5. Coupling In Situ TEM and Ex Situ Analysis to Understand Heterogeneous Sodiation of Antimony.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Tan, Xuehai; Li, Peng; Kalisvaart, Peter; Janish, Matthew T; Mook, William M; Luber, Erik J; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Carter, C Barry; Mitlin, David

    2015-10-14

    We employed an in situ electrochemical cell in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) together with ex situ time-of-flight, secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) depth profiling, and FIB-helium ion scanning microscope (HIM) imaging to detail the structural and compositional changes associated with Na/Na(+) charging/discharging of 50 and 100 nm thin films of Sb. TOF-SIMS on a partially sodiated 100 nm Sb film gives a Na signal that progressively decreases toward the current collector, indicating that sodiation does not proceed uniformly. This heterogeneity will lead to local volumetric expansion gradients that would in turn serve as a major source of intrinsic stress in the microstructure. In situ TEM shows time-dependent buckling and localized separation of the sodiated films from their TiN-Ge nanowire support, which is a mechanism of stress-relaxation. Localized horizontal fracture does not occur directly at the interface, but rather at a short distance away within the bulk of the Sb. HIM images of FIB cross sections taken from sodiated half-cells, electrically disconnected, and aged at room temperature, demonstrate nonuniform film swelling and the onset of analogous through-bulk separation. TOF-SIMS highlights time-dependent segregation of Na within the structure, both to the film-current collector interface and to the film surface where a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) exists, agreeing with the electrochemical impedance results that show time-dependent increase of the films' charge transfer resistance. We propose that Na segregation serves as a secondary source of stress relief, which occurs over somewhat longer time scales. PMID:26389786

  6. Deep sounding TEM investigation method based on a modified fixed central-loop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guo-qiang; Bai, Chao-ying; Yan, Shu; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Li, Mei-fang; Zhou, Nan-nan

    2012-01-01

    The central-loop TEM technology has been widely used in mineral exploration, engineering and environmental investigations and assorted geologic studies. For easy and efficient working conditions, a square (or rectangular) loop is generally employed instead of a circular one. Any position within the inner one ninth of the central part of the loop is often designated as the central survey location (within which the field is assumed to be uniform), and referred to as a modified central-loop configuration. However, the deduced field parameters at such non-central positions when calculated by a central-loop formula result in decreased accuracy and possibly erroneous interpretation. A large-fixed loop offers the advantage of being able to determine the induced potential at any point inside or outside the loop. In this study we provide the formula for the large-fixed loop and receiver positions within the modified central-loop system and solve the problem. Specifically, we compute the electromagnetic response of any field point by using an electric dipole integration method. The full time-domain apparent resistivity values are then extracted by using an iterative method. Both theoretical modeling and real data examples indicate that such a configuration not only improves the accuracy for the TEM survey, but also enlarges the exploration depth, due to a large loop used in the deployment. The method is used for locating the water enriched areas in coal mines in Yangquan region of Shanxi province and in Bin County of Shaanxi province, China. The interpreted results are tested by later drilling, which confirmed our combined method to be a reliable and efficient method for deep sounding.

  7. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W. Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens prepared by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.

  8. Crystal polymer interaction with new injectable bone substitute; SEM and Hr TEM study.

    PubMed

    Daculsi, G; Rohanizadeh, R; Weiss, P; Bouler, J M

    2000-04-01

    A composite constituted of calcium phosphate (CaP) granules and a hydrophilic polymer as a carrier (hydroxy-propyl-methyl cellulose, HPMC) was developed to be an injectable bone substitute (IBS, CNRS patent). IBS is a composite and not an ionic cement. The composite obtained is ready to use and sterile. Chemical interactions between organic and inorganic components appeared during the association of the two. The interactions of the CaP and the polymer have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe (EDX), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HrTEM) SEM revealed a degradation of the granules into smaller particles while EDX was unable to show significant changes in the Ca/P ratio during aging of the composite. With Hr TEM, however, we observed hydrolysis (process of dissolution and precipitation) from the surface to about 13 nm into the HA crystals and occasional dissolution with precipitation of beta-TCP crystals. In HA, the first zone of interaction consisted of a single layer of small globular crystals of 2 to 3 nm in diameter. Numerous lattice patterns in all three axes could be observed. Under the globular crystals zone, the inter-reticular distances of the single crystals appeared enlarged by 1.2% (from 0.817 to 0.827 nm). The enlargement seems to correspond to diffusion of HPO(4) into the crystal lattice. In beta-TCP crystals, dissolution was observed to be several nanometers deep, but globular surface precipitation rarely was observed. With time or after steam sterilization, no changes were observed. These data demonstrate the strong interactions of the hydrophylic polymer with calcium phosphate, but only in the first several nanometers of thickness. PMID:10644956

  9. TEM Study of Aerosol Particles in Brown Haze Episodes over Northern China in Spring 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Shao, L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne aerosol collections were performed in eight brown haze episodes from 31 May to 21 June 2007 in Beijing, China. Morphologies, compositions, and mixing states of individual aerosol particles having different sizes were obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aerosol particle types less than 2 μ m in diameter include mineral dust, fly ash, soot, organic material, and K-rich, S-rich, and metal particles (Fe- and Zn-rich). Mineral dust particles dominate in the range of 2 to 10 μ m. In addition to finding contributions from vehicle emissions and soil dust in Beijing, TEM results from the study provide new insights into sources such as agricultural biomass burning, industrial activities, and waste incineration. These sources can contribute not only great amounts of K-rich and metal particles but also reactive gases such as NH3, NOx, SO2, and VOCs to the haze. More than 80% of the analyzed aerosol particles are internally mixed. K- and S-rich particles tend to be coagulated with fly ash, soot, metal, and fine-grained mineral dust particles. Organic materials can act as inclusions in the K- and S-rich particles and their coatings. Over 90% of the analyzed internally mixed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, or Na-rich coatings, and only 8% are associated with K- or S-rich coatings. The compositions of Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings suggest that they are possibly nitrates mixed with minor sulfates and chlorides. Calcium sulfate particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected within Ca(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 coatings. These results indicate that mineral dust particles in the brown haze episodes participated in heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere with one or more of SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. The development of coatings altered some mineral dust particles from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

  10. Use of an ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer to obtain sample powder for chemin, a combined XRD/XRF instrument.

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S. J.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Sherrit, S.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Blake, D.

    2003-01-01

    One of the technical issues that must be addressed before landing an XRD,iXRF spectrometer on an extraterrestrial body is how best to obtain a representative sample powder for analysis. For XRD powder diffraction analyses, it is beneficial to have a powder that is extremely fine grained to reduce preferred orientation effects and to provide a statistically significant number of crystallites to the Xray beam. Although a 2 dimensional detector as used in the CHEMIN instrument will produce good results with poorly prepared powders, the quality of the data will improve with the quality of the sample powder.

  11. Quantitative In Situ TEM Studies of Small-Scale Plasticity in Irradiated and Unirradiated Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Claire

    In this work, unirradiated and irradiated model body centered cubic (BCC) and face centered cubic (FCC) materials are investigated using advanced electron microscopy techniques to quantitatively measure local stresses and strains around defects, with the overarching goal of obtaining a fundamental understanding of defect physics. Quantitative in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tensile tests are performed with Molybdenum-alloy nano-fibers, functioning as a model BCC structural material. Local true stress and strain around an active Frank-Read type dislocation source are obtained using quantitative load-displacement data and digital image correlation. A mixed Frank-Read dislocation source, b=a/2[-1-11](112) with a line direction 20° from a screw orientation and length 177 nm, is observed to begin operating at a measured local stress of 1.38 GPa. The measured local true stress values compare very well to estimated stresses using dislocation radius of curvature, and a line-tension model of a large bow-out configuration, with differences of only ˜1%. The degree to which the local true stresses can be measured is highly promising. However, the ultimate failure mode of these fibers, sudden strain softening after dislocation starvation and exhaustion, cannot be captured at the typical camera frame rate of 30 frames per second. Thus, fibers are mechanically tested while under observation with the Gatan K2-IS direct electron detector camera, where the frame rate is an order of magnitude larger at 400 fps. Though the increase in frame rate adds to the overall understanding of the sudden failure, by definitively showing that the nano-fibers break rather than strain soften, the failure mechanism still operates too quickly to be observed. In the final investigation of this BCC model structural alloy, the mechanical behavior of heavily dislocated, but unirradiated, and He1+ and Ni 2+ irradiated nano-fibers are compared. Remarkable similarities are found in the

  12. Correlated NanoSIMS, TEM, and XANES Studies of Presolar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groopman, Evan Edward

    The objective of this thesis is to describe the correlated study of individual presolar grains via Nano-scale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) utilizing X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), with a focus on connecting these correlated laboratory studies to astrophysical phenomena. The correlated isotopic, chemical, and microstructural studies of individual presolar grains provide the most detailed description of their formation environments, and help to inform astrophysical models and observations of stellar objects. As a part of this thesis I have developed and improved upon laboratory techniques for micromanipulating presolar grains and embedding them in resin for ultramicrotomy after NanoSIMS analyses and prior to TEM characterization. The new methods have yielded a 100% success rate and allow for the specific correlation of microstructural and isotopic properties of individual grains. Knowing these properties allows for inferences to be made regarding the condensation sequences and the origins of the stellar material that condensed to form these grains. NanoSIMS studies of ultramicrotomed sections of presolar graphite grains have revealed complex isotopic heterogeneities that appear to be primary products of the grains' formation environments and not secondary processing during the grains' lifetimes. Correlated excesses in 15N and 18O were identified as being carried by TiC subgrains within presolar graphite grains from supernovae (SNe). These spatially-correlated isotopic anomalies pinpoint the origin of the material that formed these grains: the inner He/C zone. Complex microstructures and isotopic heterogeneities also provide evidence for mixing in globular SN ejecta, which is corroborated by models and telescopic observations. In addition to these significant isotopic discoveries, I have also observed the first reported nanocrystalline core

  13. Multi-scale characterization by FIB-SEM/TEM/3DAP.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, T; Sepehri-Amin, H; Sasaki, T T; Hono, K

    2014-11-01

    In order to improve properties of functional materials, it is important to understand the relation between the structure and the properties since the structure has large effect to the properties. This can be done by using multi-scale microstructure analysis from macro-scale to nano and atomic scale. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with focused ion beam (FIB), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and 3D atom probe (3DAP) are complementary analysis tools making it possible to know the structure and the chemistry from micron to atomic resolution. SEM gives us overall microstructural and chemical information by various kinds of detectors such as secondary electron, backscattered electron, EDS and EBSD detectors. Also, it is possible to analyze 3D structure and chemistry via FIB serial sectioning. In addition, using TEM we can focus on desired region to get more complementary information from HRTEM/STEM/Lorentz images, SAED/NBD patterns and EDS/EELS to see the detail micro or nano-structure and chemistry. Especially, combination of probe Cs corrector and split EDS detectors with large detector size enable us to analyze the atomic scale elemental distribution. Furthermore, if the specimen has a complicated 3D nanostructure, or we need to analyze light elements such as hydrogen, lithium or boron, 3DAP can be used as the only technique which can visualize and analyze distribution of all constituent atoms of our materials within a few hundreds nm area. Hence, site-specific sample preparation using FIB/SEM is necessary to get desired information from region of interest. Therefore, this complementary analysis combination works very well to understand the detail of materials.In this presentation, we will show the analysis results obtained from some of functional materials by Carl Zeiss CrossBeam 1540EsB FIB/SEM, FEI Tecnai G(2) F30, Titan G2 80-200 TEMs and locally build laser assisted 3DAP. As the one of the example, result of multi-scale characterization for

  14. Shell structure of natural rubber particles: evidence of chemical stratification by electrokinetics and cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Christophe N; Crassous, Jérôme J; Drechsler, Markus; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Eloy, Marie; de Gaudemaris, Benoît; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2013-11-26

    The interfacial structure of natural rubber (NR) colloids is investigated by means of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and electrokinetics over a broad range of KNO3 electrolyte concentrations (4-300 mM) and pH values (1-8). The asymptotic plateau value reached by NR electrophoretic mobility (μ) in the thin double layer limit supports the presence of a soft (ion- and water-permeable) polyelectrolytic type of layer located at the periphery of the NR particles. This property is confirmed by the analysis of the electron density profile obtained from cryo-TEM that evidences a ∼2-4 nm thick corona surrounding the NR polyisoprene core. The dependence of μ on pH and salt concentration is further marked by a dramatic decrease of the point of zero electrophoretic mobility (PZM) from 3.6 to 0.8 with increasing electrolyte concentration in the range 4-300 mM. Using a recent theory for electrohydrodynamics of soft multilayered particles, this "anomalous" dependence of the PZM on electrolyte concentration is shown to be consistent with a radial organization of anionic and cationic groups across the peripheral NR structure. The NR electrokinetic response in the pH range 1-8 is indeed found to be equivalent to that of particles surrounded by a positively charged ∼3.5 nm thick layer (mean dissociation pK ∼ 4.2) supporting a thin and negatively charged outermost layer (0.6 nm in thickness, pK ∼ 0.7). Altogether, the strong dependence of the PZM on electrolyte concentration suggests that the electrostatic properties of the outer peripheral region of the NR shell are mediated by lipidic residues protruding from a shell containing a significant amount of protein-like charges. This proposed NR shell interfacial structure questions previously reported NR representations according to which the shell consists of either a fully mixed lipid-protein layer, or a layer of phospholipids residing exclusively beneath an outer proteic film. PMID:24152085

  15. A comparative TEM study of in-reactor and post-irradiation tensile tested copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Tähtinen, S.; Singh, B. N.

    2013-11-01

    The deformation microstructures of oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following in-reactor and post-irradiation slow strain rate tensile tests. The TEM results suggest that the main modes of deformation differ between all examined cases. Plastic deformation appeared predominantly localized in the defect-free cleared channels following post-irradiation testing and hardly any dislocations were seen outside the channels. The microstructures following in-reactor tests were characterized by a small amount of cleared channels and a distinct dislocation density within the matrix. However, the dislocations observed following in-reactor testing did not seem to interact with each other, whereas that was the main mode of deformation in the non-irradiated reference sample. The possible mechanisms of plastic deformation are discussed based on the experimental results. Dislocation-dislocation interactions played the major role if irradiation or irradiation damage is not present. As a result of the interactions, the microstructure of non-irradiated reference copper was characterized by a well-defined cellularized dislocation microstructure. Dynamic dislocation-displacement cascade interactions dominated the deformation process at the in-reactor tensile tests. As a result, the formation of defect-free cleared channels was delayed, dislocations were found from the matrix between the channels, and a clear strain hardening was observed after the yield point. No clear difference between accumulated irradiation damage at in-reactor and post-irradiation samples was found, which may be due to localized nature of SFT evolution in displacement cascades at copper. In the post-irradiation experiments, dislocations were confined to slip planes and annihilate irradiation defects, while moving on the planes and creating defect-free cleared channels. The plastic deformation is localized into these channels, causing a decrease in

  16. TEM-1 AND ROB-1 PRESENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE STRAINS, ISTANBUL, TURKEY.

    PubMed

    Kuvat, Nuray; Nazik, Hasan; Berkiten, Rahmiye; Öngen, Betigül

    2015-03-01

    Resistance of 235 Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates from Istanbul Medical Faculty Hospital, Turkey were determined against 19 antibiotics by disc diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of those found resistant to ampicillin, cefuroxim, chloramphenicol and meropenem were measured using E-test. Ampicillin-resistant isolates producing beta-lactamase as demonstrated by a nitrocefin assay were analyzed for the presence of TEM-1 and ROB-1 genes by PCR. Eleven percent of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin (10 µg/ml), of which 73% were beta-lactamase positive and carried TEM-1 gene, but none were positive for ROB-1 gene. All isolates susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate (20/10 µg/ml), azithromycin (15 µg/ml), aztreonam (30 µg/ml), cefotaxime (30 µg/ml), ceftriaxone (30 µg/ml), ciprofloxacin (5 µg/ml), levofloxacin (5 µg/ml), and telithromycin (15 µg/ml) but 24%, 15%, 4%, 4%, 2%, 1%, 1%, 0.5%, 0.5% and 0.5% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (1.25/23.75 µg/ml), tetracycline (30 µg/ml), cefaclor (30 µg/ml), clarithromycin (15 µg/ml), cefuroxime (30 µg/ml), meropenem (10 µg/ml), chloramphenicol (30 µg/ml), ampicillin-sulbactam (10/10 µg/ml), nalidixic acid (30 µg/ml), and fosfomycin (30 µg/ml), respectively. MIC values of three cefuroxime-resistant isolates was 24, 48 and > 256 µg/ml, respectively; of two meropenem-resistant strains > 256 µg/ml; and of two chloramphenicol-susceptible isolates (by disc diffusion method) 6 µg/ml (considered as intermediate susceptible). Multiple- antibiotics resistance was detected in 15% of the strains, with resistance to 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 antibiotics in 8.5%, 4%, 2%, 0.5% and 0.5% of the isolates, respectively. By identifying beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae, empirical therapy with beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations and second generation cephalosporins would be inappropriate for such patients (approximately 3%). Our findings will

  17. Experimental Space Weathering: A coordinated LIBS, TEM, VIS and NIR/MIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojic, Aleksandra N.; Pavlov, Sergey; Markus, Kathrin; Morlok, Andreas; Wirth, Richard; Weber, Iris; Schreiber, Anja; Hiesinger, Harald; Sohn, Martin; Huebers, Heinz-Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    We conducted pulsed infrared laser irradiation experiments, in order to simulate space weathering triggered modifications of planetary surfaces not protected by an enveloping atmosphere [1,2], e.g., Mercury. Our work is embedded in the framework of the BepiColombo space mission to Mercury [3]. The MErcury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS), an onboard spectrometer will deliver surface data in the range of 7 - 14 μm once it reaches orbit in 2024 [4]. Space weathering effects known from other Solar System bodies are likely to be very prominent on Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, the lack of a protective atmosphere and its weak magnetic field [5]. Space weathering effects, e.g., implantation of solar wind in regolith material, sputtering and (micro) meteorite impacts modify the planetary surface and thus, therefrom obtained spectral data in the VIS/NIR range considerably (e.g., reddening and darkening of spectra) [6‑9]. We expect modifications induced by space weathering, known from the VIS/NIR range also to show in the mid infrared range, probably by amorphisation or similar still unknown effects [2,10]. Our approach is therefore threefold: a) alter analog material artificially by pulsed laser experiments, b) investigate altered analog material spectrally (VIS/NIR and MIR range) and c) conduct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on selected weathered grains to better understand the nanostratigraphy developed by irradiation and its impact on the resulting infrared spectra. Here, we report on results obtained from the first set of experiments. Characteristic upper mantle minerals were taken as analog material, Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene, were ground into a powder (< 160 μm), slightly compressed into pellets and subsequently irradiated under high vacuum conditions (˜ 10‑6 mbar) with a pulsed (˜ 8ns) infrared laser at a fluence of ˜ 2 Jcm‑2. From the irradiated pellet surfaces, VIS/NIR and MIR spectra were obtained and

  18. Cryo-TEM of morphology and kinetics of self-assembled nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jingshan

    Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) is applied to study various structures in solutions and suspensions from micron to nanometer scale. By vitrifying the liquid samples at different moments, sequential stages of a dynamic process can be frozen and the structures occurring from about 30 sec to over 10 min can be imaged. Therefore a picture of how the structures evolve with time in the liquid systems can be established. This method has been proven to be a powerful technique in studying the morphology and kinetics of self-assembled nanostructures. Such a pseudo-in-situ technique is used to "watch" the crystallization process of silver stearate (AgSt) from sodium stearate (NaSt) dispersions. AgSt crystal is produced from a reaction of NaSt and silver nitrate. The reaction, as a AgSt crystallization process, starts from AgSt micelles, which aggregate and grow into hexagonal shaped crystals of about 10 microns. If silver bromide (AgBr) grains are present, the micelles do not prefer to aggregate, but rather deposit on the surface of the AgBr crystalline grains. Variation of the carboxylate chain length does not affect the crystallization process very much, although the morphology of both the reactant and the product is changed. Nanostructure transition in sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) solutions is investigated as well. A micellar network structure can form if equal molar calcium chloride is added to 3 wt% SLES solution. The network can be broken into wormlike micelle segments such as spheres and rods by sonication. After about 10 min, these broken pieces can reassemble and reform the network through wormlike micelle growth and connection. Also by using Cryo-TEM, 100-200 nm casein micelles are observed at 1 wt% casein solution, but aggregated submicelles cannot be distinguished. However, individual submicelles of about 30 nm are indeed captured in a 0.03 wt% solution. By adding acid or EDTA, the casein micelles can be disrupted into small particles

  19. He Transport and Fate of Tempered Martensitic Steels: Summary of Recent TEM Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, G Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2010-02-26

    As an extension of prior work [1-4], we summarize recent observations made on a He-implanted tempered martensitic steel (TMS), F82H mod 3, irradiated in the HFIR, in both as-tempered (AT) and cold-worked (CW) conditions. A novel implantation technique was used to uniformly inject He into 3-mm diameter TEM discs to depths ranging from ≈ 5-8 µm. The He is generated by two-step transmutation reactions in Ni contained in a NiAl coating layer adjacent to paired 3 mm TEM discs. NiAl layers from 1 to 4 μm thick produced He/dpa ratios between 5 and 40 appm/dpa. The irradiations were at temperatures of 300, 400 and 500°C from 3.9 to 9 dpa and 90 to 380 appm He. Electron transparent samples were prepared by a cross-sectional thinning technique that allowed investigating microstructural evolution over a range of implantation depths. Irradiation of the AT alloy to 9 dpa at 500°C and 380 appm He resulted in relatively large, faceted cavities, that are likely voids, along with a much higher density of smaller He bubbles. The cavities were most often aligned in pearl necklace like strings, presumably due to their formation on pre-existing dislocations. A finer distribution of cavities was also present on precipitate interfaces, lath and grain boundaries. Nine dpa irradiations that produced 190 appm He resulted in a somewhat more random distribution and lower density of smaller matrix cavities; but lower He levels had a less noticeable effect on bubbles in the lath and precipitate boundaries. Corresponding irradiations of the CW F82H produced a larger number of smaller cavities. Irradiation of the AT alloy to 3.9 dpa and 90 ppm He at 400°C produced a similar cavity population to that observed at 500°C at 190 appm He, while the corresponding cavities at 500°C are slightly larger and more numerous at 380 appm He. The cavity strings were less obvious for the 400°C irradiations, and the bubble distribution appeared to be more random. No cavities were observed in the case of

  20. TEM Cell Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques From 2 MHz to 200 MHz - Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Evans, William C.; Reed, Joshua L.; Shimp, Samuel K.; Fitzpatrick, Fred D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated in a TEM cell operating with radiated fields from 2 - 200 MHz. It is the first part of a two-paper series. This first paper discusses cable types and shield connections. In the second paper, the effects of load and source resistances and chassis connections are examined. For each topic, well established theories are compared to data from a real-world physical system. Finally, recommendations for minimizing cable susceptibility (and thus cable emissions) are presented. There are numerous papers and textbooks that present theoretical analyses of cable noise reduction techniques. However, empirical data is often targeted to low frequencies (e.g. <50 KHz) or high frequencies (>100 MHz). Additionally, a comprehensive study showing the relative effects of various noise reduction techniques is needed. These include the use of dedicated return wires, twisted wiring, cable shielding, shield connections, changing load or source impedances, and implementing load- or source-to-chassis isolation. We have created an experimental setup that emulates a real-world electrical system, while still allowing us to independently vary a host of parameters. The goal of the experiment was to determine the relative effectiveness of various noise reduction techniques when the cable is in the presence of radiated emissions from 2 MHz to 200 MHz. The electronic system (Fig. 1) consisted of two Hammond shielded electrical enclosures, one containing the source resistance, and the other containing the load resistance. The boxes were mounted on a large aluminium plate acting as the chassis. Cables connecting the two boxes measured 81 cm in length and were attached to the boxes using standard D38999 military-style connectors. The test setup is shown in Fig. 2. Electromagnetic fields were created using an HP8657B signal generator, MiniCircuits ZHL-42W-SMA amplifier, and an EMCO 5103 TEM cell. Measurements were

  1. Prevalence of β-lactam (blaTEM) and Metronidazole (nim) Resistance Genes in the Oral Cavity of Greek Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Koukos, Georgios; Konstantinidis, Antonios; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Arsenakis, Minas; Slini, Theodora; Sakellari, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of blaTEM and nim genes that encode resistance to β-lactams and nitroimidazoles, respectively, in the oral cavity of systemically healthy Greek subjects. Materials and Methodology: After screening 720 potentially eligible subjects, 154 subjects were recruited for the study, including 50 periodontally healthy patients, 52 cases of gingivitis and 52 cases of chronic periodontitis. The clinical parameters were assessed with an automated probe. Various samples were collected from the tongue, first molars and pockets >6mm, and analysed by polymerase chain reaction-amplification of the blaTEM and nim genes, using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. Results: There was a high rate of detection of blaTEM in plaque and tongue samples alike in all periodontal conditions (37% of plaque and 60% of tongue samples, and 71% of participants). The blaTEM gene was detected more frequently in the tongue samples of the periodontally healthy (56%) and chronic periodontitis (62%) groups compared to the plaque samples from the same groups (36% and 29%, respectively; z-test with Bonferroni corrections-tests, P<0.05). The nim gene was not detected in any of the 343 samples analysed. Conclusion: The oral cavity of Greek subjects often harbours blaTEM but not nim genes, and therefore the antimicrobial activity of β-lactams might be compromised. PMID:27099637

  2. Appraisal of an Array TEM Method in Detecting a Mined-Out Area Beneath a Conductive Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Xue, Guo-qiang; Zhou, Nan-nan; Chen, Wei-ying

    2015-10-01

    The transient electromagnetic method has been extensively used for the detection of mined-out area in China for the past few years. In the cases that the mined-out area is overlain by a conductive layer, the detection of the target layer is difficult with a traditional loop source TEM method. In order to detect the target layer in this condition, this paper presents a newly developed array TEM method, which uses a grounded wire source. The underground current density distribution and the responses of the grounded wire source TEM configuration are modeled to demonstrate that the target layer is detectable in this condition. The 1D OCCAM inversion routine is applied to the synthetic single station data and common middle point gather. The result reveals that the electric source TEM method is capable of recovering the resistive target layer beneath the conductive overburden. By contrast, the conductive target layer cannot be recovered unless the distance between the target layer and the conductive overburden is large. Compared with inversion result of the single station data, the inversion of common middle point gather can better recover the resistivity of the target layer. Finally, a case study illustrates that the array TEM method is successfully applied in recovering a water-filled mined-out area beneath a conductive overburden.

  3. TEM Observation of the Ti Interlayer Between SiC Substrates During Diffusion Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Shigeo; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mori

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion bonding was carried out to join SiC to SiC substrates using titanium interlayers. In this study, 10 m and 20 m thick physical vapor deposited (PVD) Ti surface coatings, and 10 and 20 m thick Ti foils were used. Diffusion bonding was performed at 1250 C for PVD Ti coatings and 1200 C for Ti foil. This study investigates the microstructures of the phases formed during diffusion bonding through TEM and selected-area diffraction analysis of a sample prepared with an FIB, which allows samples to be taken from the reacted area. In all samples, Ti3SiC2, Ti5Si3Cx and TiSi2 phases were identified. In addition, TiC and unknown phases also appeared in the samples in which Ti foils were used as interlayers. Furthermore, Ti3SiC2 phases show high concentration and Ti5Si3Cx formed less when samples were processed at a higher temperature and thinner interlayer samples were used. It appears that the formation of microcracks is caused by the presence of intermediate phase Ti5Si3Cx, which has anisotropic thermal expansion, and by the presence of an unidentified Ti-Si-C ternary phase with relatively low Si content.

  4. TEM observation of bacteria-induced plagioclase dissolution and secondary mineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, T.; Kyono, A.; Nishimiya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Silicate minerals are the most common minerals in the earth's crust. Bacteria are also distributed throughout the earth's surface environment. The silicate minerals are known to be dissolved by organic acids and polysaccharides known as bacteria metabolites. The metabolic activity of bacteria therefore plays an important role in the interaction between dissolution of the silicate minerals and formation of secondary minerals. However, little is known about the secondary mineral formation process associated with the bacterial metabolism. To clarify the bacterial effect on the mineral dissolution and the secondary mineral formation, we closely investigated the effect of bacterial activity on surface texture modification and chemical composition changes of plagioclase which is the most abundant silicate mineral in the earth's crust. The bacteria were isolated from soil and then added in a suitable medium with several plagioclase fragments (Ab100% and An100%). It was incubated for 10 days. Al and Si concentrations in the medium were measured by ICP-AES to monitor the dissolution of the plagioclase. Secondary mineral formation during the incubation was observed by TEM, EDS and SAED methods. The authors will give the experiment results and discuss the effect of bacterial activity on the plagioclase dissolution and the secondary mineral formation in detail.

  5. TEM investigation of the microporous compound VSB-1: Building units and crystal growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Colmont, Marie Terasaki, Osamu

    2007-03-15

    Surface fine structure and structural defects in the open framework material VSB-1 have been investigated by electron microscopy. Crystal growth phenomena are proposed by a building unit model: (i) a unit is formed by two building units; (ii) they are linked to form first channels; and (iii) the whole network is grown via a layer-by-layer growth mechanism. A planar defect was observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) image taken with the [0001] incidence, and diffuse streaks related to the presence of defects were observed in a series of electron diffraction (ED) patterns. The microstructure model derived from the defect structure gives information on crystal growth. These defects highlight an open site that could be the pillar of a new crystal growth process. The study of defects and crystal growth is important in understanding physical properties such as catalytic or magnetic properties, and in synthesising a new open framework structure. - Graphical abstract: TEM investigation of the microporous compound VSB-1 evidenced defects and information about building units and crystal growth. As usually observed for microporous materials, the crystal growth via a layer by layer mechanism.

  6. TEM-simulation of amorphous carbon films: influence of supercell packaging.

    PubMed

    Schultrich, H; Schultrich, B

    2001-07-01

    Recent developments in thin film technology allow to prepare deliberately amorphous carbon films with structures widely varying between graphite-like (sp2) and diamond-like (sp3) atomic bonds. This leads to amorphous structures with correspondingly varying densities. By periodically changing deposition conditions, nanometer multilayers may be prepared consisting of carbon layers of different density. Simulation of the electron microscopic imaging allows to differentiate between such real structural details (on the nanometer scale) and artefacts induced by the imaging procedure. But it must be assured that the modeled structure reflects the real one with sufficient accuracy. Thorough comparison of different simulation strategies shows that for the adequate simulation of TEM imaging of amorphous materials, the thickness of the layer with independently distributed atoms has to exceed a certain limit. Then, the statistical scattering of the randomly distributed atoms will be averaged. Otherwise, if the model of the transmission electron microscopy sample is constructed as iteration of thin identical supercells, the superposition of scattering waves with constant phase differences results in enhanced local fluctuations burying the multilayer structure. For thicker packages of supercells with independent random distributions, the effect of statistical atomic arrangements is more and more leveled off. Hence, nanometer structures based on regions with different density will be visible more distinctively in the random background. For carbon, this critical thickness amounts to about 4 nm. This is of special importance for the visualization of nanoscaled heterogeneities like multilayers or nanotube-like inclusions in amorphous matrices. PMID:11419873

  7. The Telemedical Rescue Assistance System "TemRas"--development, first results, and impact.

    PubMed

    Büscher, Christian; Elsner, Jesko; Schneiders, Marie-Thérèse; Thelen, Sebastian; Brodziak, Tadeusz; Seidenberg, Peter; Schilberg, Daniel; Tobias, Michael; Jeschke, Sabina

    2014-04-01

    German emergency medical services (EMS) face the challenge of ensuring high-quality emergency care against a background of continuously increasing numbers of emergency missions, resource shortages concomitant with greatly increased arrival times, particularly in rural areas. Because German EMS physicians are at maximum capacity, an immediate response is not always possible, and thus delays in commencing advanced life support measures sometimes occur. In such scenarios, paramedics start the initial treatment until the EMS physician arrives. The delayed availability of a physician can defer the decision process of the paramedics and thus postpone the start of the patient's essential treatment, which is particularly dangerous during the care of cardiovascular emergencies. Therefore, the project Telemedical Rescue Assistance System (TemRas) has developed an innovative concept to improve quality of emergency care. The objective is to introduce so-called tele-EMS physicians providing remote medical support for the emergency team on site by transmitting audio and video data as well as vital signs and 12-lead-ECG from the emergency site to a teleconsultation center. In this article, the development process as well as the first results of the evaluation phase and the impact for further use of telemedicine in EMS are presented. PMID:24445230

  8. Role of pleiotropy during adaptation of TEM-1 β-lactamase to two novel antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Martijn F; Witte, Sariette; Salverda, Merijn L M; Koopmanschap, Bertha; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J Arjan G M

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotropy is a key feature of the genotype–phenotype map, and its form and extent have many evolutionary implications, including for the dynamics of adaptation and the evolution of specialization. Similarly, pleiotropic effects of antibiotic resistance mutations may affect the evolution of antibiotic resistance in the simultaneous or fluctuating presence of different antibiotics. Here, we study the role of pleiotropy during the in vitro adaptation of the enzyme TEM-1 β-lactamase to two novel antibiotics, cefotaxime (CTX) and ceftazidime (CAZ). We subject replicate lines for four rounds of evolution to selection with CTX and CAZ alone, and in their combined and fluctuating presence. Evolved alleles show positive correlated responses when selecting with single antibiotics. Nevertheless, pleiotropic constraints are apparent from the effects of single mutations and from selected alleles showing smaller correlated than direct responses and smaller responses after simultaneous and fluctuating selection with both than with single antibiotics. We speculate that these constraints result from structural changes in the oxyanion pocket surrounding the active site, where accommodation of CTX and the larger CAZ is balanced against their positioning with respect to the active site. Our findings suggest limited benefits from the combined or fluctuating application of these related cephalosporins for containing antibiotic resistance. PMID:25861383

  9. Mechanical characterization of pristine and hydrogen-exposed palladium nanowires by in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Carpena-Núñez, Jennifer; Yang, Dachi; Kim, Jae-Woo; Park, Cheol; Fonseca, Luis F

    2013-01-25

    Changes in the crystal lattice of palladium nanowires (Pd NWs) upon hydrogen exposure by absorption and interstitial introduction of hydrogen atoms within the matrix can induce swelling of the nanostructure and generate dislocations through the solid that may alter the overall mechanical performance of the material. Understanding the mechanical behavior of Pd NW-based hydrogen sensors may provide crucial information regarding material changes where the integrity of the sensing device can be compromised. The plastic behavior of hydrogen sensing Pd NWs was studied prior to-and subsequently to-hydrogen exposure via in situ transmission electron microscope-atomic force microscope (TEM-AFM) experiments to understand the role of hydrogenation in the NWs mechanical performance simultaneous to real-time observation. Quantitative and qualitative analysis was performed for deformed NWs upon compression and tension. Large plastic deformation was observed for pristine Pd NWs whereas little plastic deformation was observed for hydrogen-exposed Pd NWs. Tested pristine NWs behaved in a ductile manner, and necking events were observed for all tested specimens upon tension. Lowered ductility was observed for the hydrogen-exposed specimen, in accordance with hydrogen embrittlement observed in bulk palladium. PMID:23262467

  10. TEM observation of neutron-induced collision cascades in Bi-2212 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksa, M.; Pongratz, P.; Eibl, O.; Sauerzopf, F. M.; Weber, H. W.; Li, T. W.; Kes, P. H.

    1998-03-01

    Several high-quality single crystals of the superconductor Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8 (Bi-2212) were exposed to three different neutron fluences in the central irradiation facility of the Triga Mark II reactor in Vienna in the form of pre-prepared and pre-characterized transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples as well as in full crystalline form. We find that the radiation damage produced in Bi-2212 is very similar to that found previously in YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (Y-123) single crystals. The diameter of the amorphous cascade volume is 3.5 nm, the inwardly directed strain field is of approximately the same size, the density of cascades is 3.7×10 22 m -3 per 10 22 neutrons m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and their concentration scales linearly with neutron fluence. Based on these results and in view of the similar displacement cross-sections of the constituents of other high temperature superconductors, we conclude that the neutron-induced defects in high- Tc materials will generally have a diameter (including the strain field) of 5-7 nm.

  11. In situ TEM Studies of the Initial Oxidation stage of Cu and Cu Alloy Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Judith; Kang, Yihong; Luo, Langli; Ciston, James; Stach, Eric; Zhou, Guangwen

    2012-02-01

    The fundamental understanding of oxidation at the nanoscale is important for the environmental stability of coating materials as well as processing of oxide nanostructures. Our previous studies show the epitaxial growth of Cu2O islands during the initial stages of oxidation of Cu thin films, where surface diffusion and strain impact the oxide development and morphologies. The addition of secondary elements changes the oxidation mechanism. If the secondary element is non-oxidizing, such as Au, it will limit the Cu2O island growth due to the depletion of Cu near the oxide islands. When the secondary element is oxidizing, for example Ni, the alloy will show more complex behaviour, where duplex oxide islands were observed. Nucleation density and growth rate of oxide islands are observed under various temperatures and oxygen partial pressures (pO2) as a function of time by in situ ultra high vacuum (UHV)-transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our initial results of Cu-Ni(001) oxidation is that the oxide epitaxy and morphologies change as function of Ni concentration. For higher spatial resolution, we are examining the atomic scale oxidation by aberration-corrected ETEM with 1å resolution.

  12. Advanced TEM specimen preparation methods for replication of P91 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.R.G. . E-mail: drm@ansto.gov.au; Sulaiman, S.

    2006-01-15

    A range of advanced transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation methods, based on replication, have been developed for P91 steel. The results obtained have been compared with conventional replication and thin foil methods. The aim has been to obtain complimentary information from thin foil and replica specimens from the same region of interest either sequentially or simultaneously. The effects of various reagents for dissolution of the steel matrix and replica release have been investigated, and chemical methods for removing amorphous iron oxide contaminants from replicas have been identified. A method of region-specific replication is demonstrated whereby regions of thin foils previously characterised by TEM, can be subsequently replicated. This enables the former location of extracted particles, such as on grain/lath/subgrain boundaries etc., to be determined prior to microanalysis. It also permits the identification of artefacts such as stray particles and failed extractions. A second method of thin foil partial replication was developed in which both replica and thin foil are present on the same specimen. At the interface between the two regions, thin foil information such as dislocation interactions with fine scale particles and replica information such as microanalysis of particles within the same grain or lath can be obtained. Double replication of thin foils has also been successfully demonstrated. These methods are applied to a creep resistant martensitic steel (P91), but should be broadly applicable to a wide range of alloy steels.

  13. Morphological and Compositional (S)TEM Analysis of Multiple Exciton Generation Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisnivesky-Rocca-Rivarola, F.; Davis, N. J. L. K.; Bohm, M.; Ducati, C.

    2015-10-01

    Quantum confinement of charge carriers in semiconductor nanocrystals produces optical and electronic properties that have the potential to enhance the power conversion efficiency of solar cells. One of these properties is the efficient formation of more than one electron-hole pair from a single absorbed photon, in a process called multiple exciton generation (MEG). In this work we studied the morphology of nanocrystal multilayers of PbSe treated with CdCl2 using complementary imaging and spectroscopy techniques to characterise the chemical composition and morphology of full MEG devices made with PbSe nanorods (NRs). IN the scanning TEM (STEM), plan view images and chemical maps were obtained of the nanocrystal layers, which allowed for the analysis of crystal structure and orientation, as well as size distribution and aspect ratio. These results were complemented by cross-sectional images of full devices, which allowed accessing the structure of each layer that composes the device, including the nanorod packing in the active nanocrystal layer.

  14. Coevolutionary Landscape Inference and the Context-Dependence of Mutations in Beta-Lactamase TEM-1.

    PubMed

    Figliuzzi, Matteo; Jacquier, Hervé; Schug, Alexander; Tenaillon, Oliver; Weigt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative characterization of mutational landscapes is a task of outstanding importance in evolutionary and medical biology: It is, for example, of central importance for our understanding of the phenotypic effect of mutations related to disease and antibiotic drug resistance. Here we develop a novel inference scheme for mutational landscapes, which is based on the statistical analysis of large alignments of homologs of the protein of interest. Our method is able to capture epistatic couplings between residues, and therefore to assess the dependence of mutational effects on the sequence context where they appear. Compared with recent large-scale mutagenesis data of the beta-lactamase TEM-1, a protein providing resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics, our method leads to an increase of about 40% in explicative power as compared with approaches neglecting epistasis. We find that the informative sequence context extends to residues at native distances of about 20 Å from the mutated site, reaching thus far beyond residues in direct physical contact. PMID:26446903

  15. Revealing local variations in nanoparticle size distributions in supported catalysts: a generic TEM specimen preparation method.

    PubMed

    Pingel, Torben; Skoglundh, Magnus; Grönbeck, Henrik; Olsson, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The specimen preparation method is crucial for how much information can be gained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of supported nanoparticle catalysts. The aim of this work is to develop a method that allows for observation of size and location of nanoparticles deposited on a porous oxide support material. A bimetallic Pt-Pd/Al(2)O(3) catalyst in powder form was embedded in acrylic resin and lift-out specimens were extracted using combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM). These specimens allow for a cross-section view across individual oxide support particles, including the unaltered near surface region of these particles. A site-dependent size distribution of Pt-Pd nanoparticles was revealed along the radial direction of the support particles by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. The developed specimen preparation method enables obtaining information about the spatial distribution of nanoparticles in complex support structures which commonly is a challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:26139081

  16. TEM-EDS with Breakthroughs in 3D Wiring and High-Speed Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Yamamoto, R.; Hara, T.; Maehata, K.; Iyomoto, N.; Tanaka, K.

    2012-06-01

    We have been improving our TEM-EDS for elemental microanalysis after a successful achievement of a high energy resolution (7.8 eV at 1.7 keV) using a TES microcalorimeter. The improvements fall into a 3D superconductive wiring and a high-speed processing (˜3,000 cps). We are implementing a 10-ch TES array for higher count rate and a broader dynamic range. The shape of a probe needs to be a small polygonal rod with an approximate size of 1 cm×1 cm×10 cm, and hence the placing and wiring of the TES array and read-out circuits at the cryogenic stage were very demanding. We overcame those difficulties by 3D photolithography and electrodeposition. With these new technologies, we developed the OFC probe with solder-plated 3D wiring, and successfully observed a superconductivity at the temperature of liquid helium. As a required count rate per channel is ˜300 cps, the overall system count rate is ˜3,000 cps, which is incomparably higher than before. In the last model, we used an embedded system to process waveforms from a 4-ch 14-bit 1 MS/s ADC due to a small signal bandwidth, but this time we parallelized three identical ADCs and transfer raw waveforms by Ethernet lines to a host to achieve the required system count rate.

  17. In-situ TEM observation of dislocation evolution in Kr-irradiated UO2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lingfeng He; Mahima Gupta; Clarissa A. Yablinsky; Jian Gan; Marquis A. Kirk; Xian-Ming Bai; Janne Pakarinen; Todd R. Allen

    2013-11-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of UO2 single crystal irradiated with Kr ions at high temperatures was conducted to understand the dislocation evolution due to high-energy radiation. The dislocation evolution in UO2 single crystal is shown to occur as nucleation and growth of dislocation loops at low-irradiation doses, followed by transformation to extended dislocation segments and networks at high doses, as well as shrinkage and annihilation of some loops and dislocations due to high temperature annealing. Generally the trends of dislocation evolution in UO2 are similar under Kr irradiation at different ion energies and temperatures (150 keV at 600 degrees C and 1 MeV at 800 degrees C) used in this work, although the specific dislocation loop size and density are quite different. Interstitial-type dislocation loops with Burgers vector along <110> were observed in the Kr-irradiated UO2.The irradiated specimens were denuded of dislocation loops near the surface.

  18. In situ TEM visualization of superior nanomechanical flexibility of shear-exfoliated phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Ma, Hongyu; Lei, Shuangying; Sun, Jun; Chen, Jing; Ge, Binghui; Zhu, Yimei; Sun, Litao

    2016-07-14

    Recently discovered atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise for applications in flexible nanoelectronic devices. Experimentally identifying and characterizing nanomechanical properties of phosphorene are challenging, but also potentially rewarding. This work combines for the first time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and an in situ micro-manipulation system to directly visualize the nanomechanical behaviour of individual phosphorene nanoflakes. We demonstrate that the phosphorene nanoflakes can be easily bent, scrolled, and stretched, showing remarkable mechanical flexibility rather than fracturing. An out-of-plane plate-like bending mechanism and in-plane tensile strain of up to 34% were observed. Moreover, a facile liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce such mono-layer and few-layer phosphorene nanoflakes in organic solvents using only a household kitchen blender. The effects of surface tensions of the applied solvents on the ratio of average length and thickness (L/T) of the nanoflakes were studied systematically. The results reported here will pave the way for potential industrial-scale applications of flexible phosphorene nanoelectronic devices. PMID:27362430

  19. Coevolutionary Landscape Inference and the Context-Dependence of Mutations in Beta-Lactamase TEM-1

    PubMed Central

    Figliuzzi, Matteo; Jacquier, Hervé; Schug, Alexander; Tenaillon, Oliver; Weigt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative characterization of mutational landscapes is a task of outstanding importance in evolutionary and medical biology: It is, for example, of central importance for our understanding of the phenotypic effect of mutations related to disease and antibiotic drug resistance. Here we develop a novel inference scheme for mutational landscapes, which is based on the statistical analysis of large alignments of homologs of the protein of interest. Our method is able to capture epistatic couplings between residues, and therefore to assess the dependence of mutational effects on the sequence context where they appear. Compared with recent large-scale mutagenesis data of the beta-lactamase TEM-1, a protein providing resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics, our method leads to an increase of about 40% in explicative power as compared with approaches neglecting epistasis. We find that the informative sequence context extends to residues at native distances of about 20 Å from the mutated site, reaching thus far beyond residues in direct physical contact. PMID:26446903

  20. TEM characterization of planar defects in massively transformed TiAl alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.D.; Wiezorek, J.M.K.; Fraser, H.L.; Kaufman, M.J.; Loretto, M.H.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of a massively transformed Ti-49at.%Al alloy has been studied by conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM) and high resolution TEM (HREM). A high density of planar defects, namely complex anti-phase domain boundaries (CAPDB) and thermal micro-twins (TMT) have been observed. CTEM images and diffraction patterns showed that two anti-phase related {gamma}-matrix domains were generally separated by a thin layer of a 90{degree}-domain, for which the c-axis is rotated 90{degree} over a common cube axis with respect to those of the {gamma}-matrix domains. HREM confirmed the presence of two crystallographically different types of 90{degree}-domains being associated with the CAPDB. Furthermore, interactions between the CAPDB and TMT have been observed. Local faceting of the generally wavy, non-crystallographic CAPDB parallel to the {l_brace}111{r_brace}-twinning planes occurred due to interaction with the TMT. The relaxation of the CAPDB onto {l_brace}111{r_brace} required diffusion which is proposed to be enhanced locally in the presence of the dislocations associated with the formation of TMT during the massive transformation.

  1. Comparison Between Eight- and Sixteen-Channel TEM Transceive Arrays for Body Imaging at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, CJ; DelaBarre, L; Moeller, S; Tian, J; Akgun, C; Van De Moortele, P-F; Bolan, PJ; Ugurbil, K; Vaughan, JT; Metzger, GJ

    2011-01-01

    Eight- and sixteen-channel transceive stripline/TEM body arrays were compared at 7 tesla (297 MHz) both in simulation and experimentally. Despite previous demonstrations of similar arrays for use in body applications, a quantitative comparison of the two configurations has not been undertaken to date. Results were obtained on a male pelvis for assessing transmit, SNR and parallel imaging performance and to evaluate local power deposition versus transmit B1 (B1+). All measurements and simulations were conducted after performing local B1+ phase shimming in the region of the prostate. Despite the additional challenges of decoupling immediately adjacent coils, the sixteen-channel array demonstrated improved or nearly equivalent performance to the eight-channel array based on the evaluation criteria. Experimentally, transmit performance and SNR were 22% higher for the sixteen-channel array while significantly increased reduction factors were achievable in the left-right direction for parallel imaging. Finite-difference time-domain simulations demonstrated similar results with respect to transmit and parallel imaging performance, however a higher transmit efficiency advantage of 33% was predicted. Simulations at both 3T and 7T verified the expected parallel imaging improvements with increasing field strength and showed that, for a specific B1+ shimming strategy employed, the sixteen-channel array exhibited lower local and global SAR for a given B1+. PMID:22102483

  2. TEM examination of microstructural evolution during processing of 14CrYWTi nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, H.; Alinger, M. J.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.

    2004-08-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was carried out on the co-evolution of the coarser-scale microstructural features in mechanically alloyed (MA) powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated Fe-14Cr-3W-0 and 0.4Ti-0.25Y 2O 3 nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The pancake shaped nanoscale grains in the as-MA powders are textured and elongated parallel to the particle surface. Powder annealing results in re-crystallization at 850 °C and grain growth at 1150 °C. The grains also recrystallize and may grow in the alloys HIPed at 850 °C, but appear to retain a polygonized sub-grain structure. The grains are larger and more distinct in the alloys HIPed at 1000 and 1150 °C. However, annealing resulted in bi-modal grain size distribution. Finer grains retained a significant dislocation density and populations of small precipitates with crystal structures distinct form the matrix. The grains and precipitates were much larger in alloys without Ti.

  3. TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

  4. Observation of thermally etched grain boundaries with the FIB/TEM technique

    SciTech Connect

    Palizdar, Y.; San Martin, D.; Ward, M.; Cochrane, R.C.; Brydson, R.; Scott, A.J.

    2013-10-15

    Thermal etching is a method which is able to reveal and characterize grain boundaries, twins or dislocation structures and determine parameters such as grain boundary energies, surface diffusivities or study phase transformations in steels, intermetallics or ceramic materials. This method relies on the preferential transfer of matter away from grain boundaries on a polished sample during heating at high temperatures in an inert/vacuum atmosphere. The evaporation/diffusion of atoms at high temperatures results in the formation of grooves at the intersections of the planes of grain/twin boundaries with the polished surface. This work describes how the combined use of Focussed Ion Beam and Transmission Electron Microscopy can be used to characterize not only the grooves and their profile with the surface, but also the grain boundary line below the groove, this method being complementary to the commonly used scanning probe techniques. - Highlights: • Thermally etched low-carbon steel samples have been characterized by FIB/TEM • Grain boundary (GB) lines below the groove have been characterized in this way • Absence of ghost traces and large θ angle suggests that GB are not stationary but mobile • Observations correlate well with previous works and Mullins' investigations [22].

  5. Microscopic characterization of FO/PRO membranes--a comparative study of CLSM, TEM and SEM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ning; Wei, Jing; She, Qianhong; Pacheco, Federico; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2012-09-18

    Osmotically driven membrane processes (including forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO)) have received increasing attention in recent decades. The performance of an FO/PRO membrane is significantly limited by internal concentration polarization, which is a strong function of the membrane support layer pore structure. The objective of the current study was to develop microscopic characterization methods for quantitative/semiquantitative analysis of membrane pore structure (both pore diameter and porosity distribution across membrane thickness). The use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for noninvasive characterization of the internal pore structure of FO/PRO membranes is reported for the first time. By performing optical sectioning, information on pore diameter, porosity depth profile and pore connectivity can be obtained. The CLSM porosity results are further compared to those obtained using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and reasonably good agreement was observed. A comparison of these characterization methods reveals their complementary nature, and a combination of these techniques may allow a more comprehensive understanding of membrane structure. The current study also provided a comprehensive insight into the pore structure of commercially available FO/PRO membranes. PMID:22897436

  6. An in situ heating TEM analysis method for an interface reaction.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Ito, Katsuji; Nagakubo, Yasuhira; Asakawa, Takayuki; Kanemura, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    In order to analyze the thermal property of nano-sized materials, an in situ observation technique that allows highly sensitive energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic (EDX) analyses and high-resolution in situ heating observation of precision specimens is required. A method for the in situ observation of the interface reaction using an analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a specimen-heating holder was developed. The specimen holder used in this study was a direct-heating type having a fine tungsten wire heater. For sensitive analyses including an EDX map of composition changes during the interface reaction, a space toward the EDX detector with a take-off angle of 20 degrees was made in the specimen holder. Samples were prepared by attaching a micro-sample directly to the heater using the focused ion beam (FIB) micro-sampling technique. It was confirmed that the sensitive EDX map and electron diffraction analyses were possible during the reaction, and that the resolution of this technique was of the order of 0.223 nm at 550 degrees C. PMID:19376815

  7. TEM Cell Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques from 2 MHz to 200 MHz -- Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Evans, William C.; Reed, Joshua L.; Shimp, Samuel K., III; Fitzpatrick, Fred D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated in a TEM cell operating with radiated fields from 2 - 200 MHz. It is the second part of a two-paper series. The first paper discussed cable types and shield connections. In this second paper, the effects of load and source resistances and chassis connections are examined. For each topic, well established theories are compared to data from a real-world physical system. Finally, recommendations for minimizing cable susceptibility (and thus cable emissions) are presented. There are numerous papers and textbooks that present theoretical analyses of cable noise reduction techniques. However, empirical data is often targeted to low frequencies (e.g. <50 KHz) or high frequencies (>100 MHz). Additionally, a comprehensive study showing the relative effects of various noise reduction techniques is needed. These include the use of dedicated return wires, twisted wiring, cable shielding, shield connections, changing load or source impedances, and implementing load- or source-to-chassis isolation. We have created an experimental setup that emulates a real-world electrical system, while still allowing us to independently vary a host of parameters. The goal of the experiment was to determine the relative effectiveness of various noise reduction techniques when the cable is in the presence of radiated emissions from 2 MHz to 200 MHz.

  8. In Situ TEM Concurrent and Successive Au Self-Ion Irradiation and He Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, Claire; Hattar, K; Minor, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The development of advanced computational methods used for predicting performance lifetimes of materials exposed to harsh radiation environments are highly dependent on fundamental understanding of solid-radiation interactions that occur within metal components. In this work, we present successive and concurrent in situ TEM dual-beam self-ion irradiation of 2.8MeV Au4+ and implantation of 10 keV He1+, utilizing a new facility at Sandia National Laboratories. These experiments, using a model material system, provide direct real-time insight into initial interactions of displacement damage and fission products that simulate damage from neutron exposure. In successive irradiation, extensive dislocation loop and stacking fault tetrahedra damage was formed and could be associated with individual ion strikes, but no evidence of cavity formation was observed. In contrast, concurrent irradiation to the same dose resulted in the onset of cavity formation at the site of a heavy-ion strike. This direct real-time observation provides insight into the complex interplay between the helium and vacancy dynamics.

  9. Energy-filtering TEM at high magnification: spatial resolution and detection limits.

    PubMed

    Grogger, Werner; Schaffer, Bernhard; Krishnan, Kannan M; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2003-09-01

    Energy-filtering TEM (EFTEM) has turned out to be a very efficient and rapid tool for the chemical characterization of a specimen on a nanometer and even subnanometer length scale. Especially, the detection and measurement of very thin layers has become a great application of this technique in many materials science fields, e.g. semiconductors and hard disk technology. There, the reliability of compositional profiles is an important issue. However, the experimentally obtainable spatial resolution strongly influences the appearance of a thin layer in an EFTEM image, when dimensions reach subnanometer levels, which mainly leads to a broadening of the layer in the image. This fact has to be taken into account, when measuring the thickness of such a thin layer. Additionally, the convolution decreases contrast which makes the layer less visible in the image and finally determines the detection limit. In this work we present a systematic study on specifically designed Mn/PdMn multilayer test specimens to explore the practical aspects of spatial resolution and detection limits in EFTEM. Although specific to the ionization edges used, we will present general conclusions about the practical limitations in terms of EFTEM spatial resolution. Additionally, work will be shown about low energy-loss imaging of thin oxide layers, where delocalization is the main factor responsible for broadening. PMID:12871810

  10. XRD measurement of mean thickness, thickness distribution and strain for illite and illite-smectite crystallites by the Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drits, V.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    A modified version of the Bertaut-Warren-Averbach (BWA) technique (Bertaut 1949, 1950; Warren and Averbach 1950) has been developed to measure coherent scattering domain (CSD) sizes and strains in minerals by analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. This method is used to measure CSD thickness distributions for calculated and experimental XRD patterns of illites and illite-smectites (I-S). The method almost exactly recovers CSD thickness distributions for calculated illite XRD patterns. Natural I-S samples contain swelling layers that lead to nonperiodic structures in the c* direction and to XRD peaks that are broadened and made asymmetric by mixed layering. Therefore, these peaks cannot be analyzed by the BWA method. These difficulties are overcome by K-saturation and heating prior to X-ray analysis in order to form 10-A?? periodic structures. BWA analysis yields the thickness distribution of mixed-layer crystals (coherently diffracting stacks of fundamental illite particles). For most I-S samples, CSD thickness distributions can be approximated by lognormal functions. Mixed-layer crystal mean thickness and expandability then can be used to calculate fundamental illite particle mean thickness. Analyses of the dehydrated, K-saturated samples indicate that basal XRD reflections are broadened by symmetrical strain that may be related to local variations in smectite interlayers caused by dehydration, and that the standard deviation of the strain increases regularly with expandability. The 001 and 002 reflections are affected only slightly by this strain and therefore are suited for CSD thickness analysis. Mean mixed-layer crystal thicknesses for dehydrated I-S measured by the BWA method are very close to those measured by an integral peak width method.

  11. In situ TEM studies of micron-sized all-solid-state fluoride ion batteries: Preparation, prospects, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hammad Fawey, Mohammed; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Reddy, Munnangi Anji; Rongeat, Carine; Scherer, Torsten; Hahn, Horst; Fichtner, Maximilian; Kübel, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Trustworthy preparation and contacting of micron-sized batteries is an essential task to enable reliable in situ TEM studies during electrochemical biasing. Some of the challenges and solutions for the preparation of all-solid-state batteries for in situ TEM electrochemical studies are discussed using an optimized focused ion beam (FIB) approach. In particular redeposition, resistivity, porosity of the electrodes/electrolyte and leakage current are addressed. Overcoming these challenges, an all-solid-state fluoride ion battery has been prepared as a model system for in situ TEM electrochemical biasing studies and first results on a Bi/La0.9 Ba0.1 F2.9 half-cell are presented. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:615-624, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27145192

  12. In Situ TEM Observations on the Sulfur-Assisted Catalytic Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Li, Shisheng; Shi, Chao; Cong, Hong-Tao; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-04-17

    The effect of sulfur on the catalytic nucleation and growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from an iron catalyst was investigated in situ by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalyst precursor of ferrocene and growth promoter of sulfur were selectively loaded inside of the hollow core of multiwall CNTs with open ends, which served as a nanoreactor powered by applying a voltage inside of the chamber of a TEM. It was found that a SWCNT nucleated and grew perpendicularly from a region of the catalyst nanoparticle surface, instead of the normal tangential growth that occurs with no sulfur addition. Our in situ TEM observation combined with CVD growth studies suggests that sulfur functions to promote the nucleation and growth of SWCNTs by forming inhomogeneous local active sites and modifying the interface bonding between catalysts and precipitated graphitic layers, so that carbon caps can be lifted off from the catalyst particle. PMID:26269989

  13. Network Analysis of Sequence-Function Relationships and Exploration of Sequence Space of TEM β-Lactamases.

    PubMed

    Zeil, Catharina; Widmann, Michael; Fademrecht, Silvia; Vogel, Constantin; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    The Lactamase Engineering Database (www.LacED.uni-stuttgart.de) was developed to facilitate the classification and analysis of TEM β-lactamases. The current version contains 474 TEM variants. Two hundred fifty-nine variants form a large scale-free network of highly connected point mutants. The network was divided into three subnetworks which were enriched by single phenotypes: one network with predominantly 2be and two networks with 2br phenotypes. Fifteen positions were found to be highly variable, contributing to the majority of the observed variants. Since it is expected that a considerable fraction of the theoretical sequence space is functional, the currently sequenced 474 variants represent only the tip of the iceberg of functional TEM β-lactamase variants which form a huge natural reservoir of highly interconnected variants. Almost 50% of the variants are part of a quartet. Thus, two single mutations that result in functional enzymes can be combined into a functional protein. Most of these quartets consist of the same phenotype, or the mutations are additive with respect to the phenotype. By predicting quartets from triplets, 3,916 unknown variants were constructed. Eighty-seven variants complement multiple quartets and therefore have a high probability of being functional. The construction of a TEM β-lactamase network and subsequent analyses by clustering and quartet prediction are valuable tools to gain new insights into the viable sequence space of TEM β-lactamases and to predict their phenotype. The highly connected sequence space of TEM β-lactamases is ideally suited to network analysis and demonstrates the strengths of network analysis over tree reconstruction methods. PMID:26883706

  14. SEM and TEM Characterization of As-Fabricated U-7Mo Disperson Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2009-11-01

    The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate can have a dramatic impact on the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of dispersion fuel plates, SEM and TEM analysis have been performed on RERTR-9A archive fuel plates, which went through an additional hot isostatic procsssing (HIP) step during fabrication. The fuel plates had depleted U-7Mo fuel particles dispersed in either Al-2Si or 4043 Al alloy matrix. For the characterized samples, it was observed that a large fraction of the ?-phase U-7Mo alloy particles had decomposed during fabrication, and in areas near the fuel/matrix interface where the transformation products were present significant fuel/matrix interaction had occurred. Relatively thin Si-rich interaction layers were also observed around the U-7Mo particles. In the thick interaction layers, (U)(Al,Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were identified, and in the thin interaction layers U(Al,Si)3, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and USi1.88-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this work, exposure of dispersion fuel plates to relatively high temperatures during fabrication impacts the overall microstructure, particularly the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. The time and temperature of fabrication should be carefully controlled in order to produce the most uniform Si-rich layers around the U-7Mo particles.

  15. Applying transport-distance specific SOC distribution to calibrate soil erosion model WaTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaxian; Heckrath, Goswin J.; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Slope-scale soil erosion, transport and deposition fundamentally decide the spatial redistribution of eroded sediments in terrestrial and aquatic systems, which further affect the burial and decomposition of eroded SOC. However, comparisons of SOC contents between upper eroding slope and lower depositional site cannot fully reflect the movement of eroded SOC in-transit along hillslopes. The actual transport distance of eroded SOC is decided by its settling velocity. So far, the settling velocity distribution of eroded SOC is mostly calculated from mineral particle specific SOC distribution. Yet, soil is mostly eroded in form of aggregates, and the movement of aggregates differs significantly from individual mineral particles. This urges a SOC erodibility parameter based on actual transport distance distribution of eroded fractions to better calibrate soil erosion models. Previous field investigation on a freshly seeded cropland in Denmark has shown immediate deposition of fast settling soil fractions and the associated SOC at footslopes, followed by a fining trend at the slope tail. To further quantify the long-term effects of topography on erosional redistribution of eroded SOC, the actual transport-distance specific SOC distribution observed on the field was applied to a soil erosion model WaTEM (based on USLE). After integrating with local DEM, our calibrated model succeeded in locating the hotspots of enrichment/depletion of eroded SOC on different topographic positions, much better corresponding to the real-world field observation. By extrapolating into repeated erosion events, our projected results on the spatial distribution of eroded SOC are also adequately consistent with the SOC properties in the consecutive sample profiles along the slope.

  16. Ethiopian Geothermal Resources Inferred from Electromagnetic (AMT/MT, TEM) Data and Seismic Noise Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, N. J.; Whaler, K. A.; Johnson, N.; Baptie, B.; Lemma, Y.; Desissa, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.; Keir, D.; Fisseha, S.; Dawes, G.; Hautot, S.

    2012-12-01

    In Ethiopia, modern energy (hydroelectricity and foreign petroleum) is expensive and unpredictable, yet energy access is key to sustainable development. Active volcanoes and hot springs located in the slow-spreading rift zone of the Afar Depression suggest an abundant geothermal energy resource; however, before this energy can be utilized subsurface geophysical analysis is needed to study the geothermal system, its potential and identify drilling targets. The aim of this project is to use geophysical data (audio-magnetotelluric (AMT), magnetotelluric (MT), transient-electromagnetic (TEM) and passive seismic data), recently recorded in the Northern Tendaho Graben of Afar, Ethiopia, to constrain geothermal system parameters (i.e. geology, temperature, fluid properties, etc.). Recovery of these parameters enables the understanding of reservoir heat flow, geothermal energy potential, economic viability and development of an optimal drilling strategy. The AMT/MT data were recorded at 28 sites along two parallel profiles oriented perpendicular to regional geologic strike. Two-dimensional joint inversion of the TE and TM modes from all sites identifies two very strong conducting layers (~1 Ohm-m), at <500 m and 5-10 km, separated by a more resistive layer (~50 Ohm-m). This model is strongly correlated with borehole information. The deeper high conductivity anomaly shallows toward the center of the profile, at the location of highest recorded fluid temperature from early drilling operations. MT impedance tensor decomposition, phase tensor analysis and induction vector calculations, as well as forward modelling of the inversion results are mutually consistent. Two-dimensional surface wave tomography results from seismic noise interferometry add another layer of geophysical information to this interdisciplinary study, complementing the AMT/MT survey. This project was funded by the US-UK Fulbright Commission and the University of Edinburgh, and benefited from strong

  17. Comparative studies of thin film growth on aluminium by AFM, TEM and GDOES characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jiantao; Thompson, George E.

    2016-07-01

    In this present study, comparative studies of trivalent chromium conversion coating formation, associated with aluminium dissolution process, have been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). High-resolution electron micrographs revealed the evident and uniform coating initiation on the whole surface after conversion treatment for only 30 s, although a network of metal ridges was created by HF etching pre-treatment. In terms of conversion treatment process on electropolished aluminium, constant kinetics of coating growth, ∼0.30 ± 0.2 nm/s, were found after the prolonged conversion treatment for 600 s. The availability of electrolyte anions for coating deposition determined the growth process. Simultaneously, a proceeding process of aluminium dissolution during conversion treatment, of ∼0.11 ± 0.02 nm/s, was found for the first time, indicating constant kinetics of anodic reactions. The distinct process of aluminium consumption was assigned with loss of corrosion protection of the deposited coating material as evidenced in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Based on the present data, a new mechanism of coating growth on aluminium was proposed, and it consisted of an activation period (0-30 s), a linear growth period (0.30 nm/s, up for 600 s) and limited growth period (0.17 nm/s, 600-1200 s). In addition, the air-drying post-treatment and a high-vacuum environment in the microscope revealed a coating shrinkage, especially in the coatings after conversion treatments for longer time.

  18. A comparison of EDS microanalysis in FIB-prepared and electropolished TEM thin foils.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, C R; Hackenberg, R E; Shiflet, G J

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a fine-probe EDS microanalytical study of cellular precipitation in a Cu-Ti binary alloy. Compositional profiles across the solute depleted Cu-rich FCC lamellae and the Cu4Ti lamellae within isothermally formed cellular colonies were measured in a FEG-TEM from thin-foil specimens prepared by conventional electropolishing and by a technique using a Ga+ focused ion-beam (FIB). The Cliff-Lorimer ratio method, with an absorption correction, was employed to quantify the compositions. Two FIB samples were prepared with different orientations of the lamellae with respect to the ion-milling direction. The compositional profiles across the Cu-rich FCC lamellae and the Cu4Ti compound lamellae in both the FIB-prepared samples and the electropolished sample were, within experimental error, numerically equivalent. The composition of the Cu4Ti compound phase lamellae was very close to the ideal stoichiometric composition of 20 at % Ti. It is concluded that for this system, and for the specimen preparation procedures used in this study, the Ga+ ion-milling process has had no detectable effect on the chemistry changes across the interlamellar interface at the scale studied. These results indicate that the possible sources of chemical artifacts which include redeposition, preferential sputtering and ion-induced atomic migration can be minimized if several precautions are taken during milling in the FIB. Consistent with previous investigators, it was also found that the ion-milling process does introduce significant structural artifacts (e.g., dislocations) into the softer FCC Cu-rich phase compared with a specimen produced by conventional electropolishing. PMID:12489594

  19. From olivine to ringwoodite: a TEM study of a complex process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittarello, Lidia; Ji, Gang; Yamaguchi, Akira; Schryvers, Dominique; Debaille, Vinciane; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The study of shock metamorphism of olivine might help to constrain impact events in the history of meteorites. Although shock features in olivine are well known, so far, there are processes that are not yet completely understood. In shock veins, olivine clasts with a complex structure, with a ringwoodite rim and a dense network of lamellae of unidentified nature in the core, have been reported in the literature. A highly shocked (S5-6), L6 meteorite, Asuka 09584, which was recently collected in Antarctica by a Belgian-Japanese joint expedition, contains this type of shocked olivine clasts and has been, therefore, selected for detailed investigations of these features by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Petrographic, geochemical, and crystallographic studies showed that the rim of these shocked clasts consists of an aggregate of nanocrystals of ringwoodite, with lower Mg/Fe ratio than the unshocked olivine. The clast's core consists of an aggregate of iso-oriented grains of olivine and wadsleyite, with higher Mg/Fe ratio than the unshocked olivine. This aggregate is crosscut by veinlets of nanocrystals of olivine, with extremely low Mg/Fe ratio. The formation of the ringwoodite rim is likely due to solid-state, diffusion-controlled, transformation from olivine under high-temperature conditions. The aggregate of iso-oriented olivine and wadsleyite crystals is interpreted to have formed also by a solid-state process, likely by coherent intracrystalline nucleation. Following the compression, shock release is believed to have caused opening of cracks and fractures in olivine and formation of olivine melt, which has lately crystallized under postshock equilibrium pressure conditions as olivine.

  20. The Formation Mechanism of Mesoporous Materials studied by EPR Spectroscopy and Cryo-TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthstein, Sharon

    Ordered mesoporous materials raised a wide interest in the scientific community due to their unique structural properties which encompasses nanosize ordered channels. These materials have potential applications in diverse technological fields such as catalysis, membranes, microelectronics and sensors. The formation of these materials is initiated by the interaction of micelle of surfactant molecules with precursors of an inorganic oxide, usually silica, which further polymerizes to form solids with a well defined pore structure and amorphous walls. The aim of this study is to explore the details of this intriguing reaction mechanism on two types of materials, hexagonal and cubic, prepared with Pluronic block-copolymers as surfactants. The Pluronic micelles are characterized by a hydrophobic polypropylene oxide core and a hydrophilic polyethylene oxide corona. Examples of questions we address are: How does a homogeneous micellar solution transforms into an ordered phase? What kinds of interactions are responsible to this transformation? Our work focused on processes that take place on two levels, the molecular one and the mesoscale, which were investigated by combining electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) techniques. The molecular level studies combine in-situ and freeze quench EPR spectroscopic techniques applied to nitroxide spin-probes introduced (at minute quantities) into the reaction mixtures. The nitroxide radicals serve as paramagnetic probes in the reaction mixture. They do not react or affect the reaction product but they sense in-situ the changes that occur in their environment during the reaction. The EPR spectrum provides information regarding the dynamic of the probe, which is affected by its surrounding, and the polarity of its environment. Fine structural details, such as the distribution of water and additives within the micelle, can be obtained from Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation

  1. XRD and mineralogical analysis of gypsum dunes at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico and applications to gypsum detection on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, B.; Bishop, J. L.; Fenton, L. K.; King, S. J.; Blake, D.; Sarrazin, P.; Downs, R.; Horgan, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    A field portable X-ray Diffraction (XRD) instrument was used at White Sands National Monument to perform in-situ measurements followed by laboratory analyses of the gypsum-rich dunes and to determine its modal mineralogy. The field instrument is a Terra XRD (Olympus NDT) based on the technology of the CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity which is providing the mineralogical and chemical composition of scooped soil samples and drilled rock powders collected at Gale Crater [1]. Using Terra at White Sands will contribute to 'ground truth' for gypsum-bearing environments on Mars. Together with data provided by VNIR spectra [2], this study clarifies our understanding of the origin and history of gypsum-rich sand dunes discovered near the northern polar region of Mars [3]. The results obtained from the field analyses performed by XRD and VNIR spectroscopy in four dunes at White Sands revealed the presence of quartz and dolomite. Their relative abundance has been estimated using the Reference Intensity Ratio (RIR) method. For this study, particulate samples of pure natural gypsum, quartz and dolomite were used to prepare calibration mixtures of gypsum-quartz and gypsum-dolomite with the 90-150μm size fractions. All single phases and mixtures were analyzed by XRD and RIR factors were calculated. Using this method, the relative abundance of quartz and dolomite has been estimated from the data collected in the field. Quartz appears to be present in low amounts (2-5 wt.%) while dolomite is present at percentages up to 80 wt.%. Samples from four dunes were collected and prepared for subsequent XRD analysis in the lab to estimate their composition and illustrate the changes in mineralogy with respect to location and grain size. Gypsum-dolomite mixtures: The dolomite XRD pattern is dominated by an intense diffraction peak at 2θ≈36 deg. which overlaps a peak of gypsum, This makes low concentrations of dolomite

  2. Fast-Turnoff Transient Electromagnetic (TEM) Field Study at the Mars Analog Site of Rio Tinto, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernsletten, J. A.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes a Fast-Turnoff Transient Electromagnetic (TEM) study at the Peña de Hierro ("Berg of Iron") field area of the Mars Analog Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE), near the towns Rio Tinto and Nerva, Andalucia region, Spain.

  3. Studying the TEM response of a 3-D conductor at a geological contact using the FDTD method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Tripp, A.C.; Hohmann, G.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many mineral targets are located near contact zones. Since the change of resistivity across the contact can distort or obscure the transient electromagnetic (TEM) response of the target, it is important to understand the possible effects. Previous investigators have examined similar problems using scale models. For example, Spies and Parker (1984) studied the TEM responses of fixed-loop and moving-loop configurations to geological contacts with lateral resistivity variations. More recently, Wilt (1991) systematically studied TEM soundings near a geological contact and observed that different survey systems respond to the contact in different ways. This paper will illustrate the use of the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) algorithm of Wang and Hohmann (1993) for calculating the TEM response of a 3-D conductive body at a geological contact. The algorithm is based on the Yee staggered grid FDTD method for solving the transient electrical nonmagnetic field responses of a 3-D model. On a suitable computer, a wide range of model responses can be readily calculated, a versatility that scale modeling does not share. This study uses a fixed transmitter loop, roving-receiver configuration. Many other configurations can be regarded as special cases of this survey. It is commonly employed, for instance, by the Newmont EMP (Body and Wiles, 1984), UTEM (West et al., 1984), and Geonics EM37 systems. The configuration also facilitates finite-difference, time-domain modeling because it does not require frequent movement of the source.

  4. TEM and RBS studies of single and double discrete buried damage layers in P+ implanted Si on subsequent laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sadana, D K; Strathman, M; Washburn, J; Booker, G R

    1980-01-01

    This work is aimed at studying the regrowth behaviour of single and double buried damage layers on subsequent laser annealing of P+ implanted Si, implanted at 120 keV to doses of 5 x 1014/cm2 and 7.5 x1015/cm2, respectively. A Q-switched ruby laser operating at a wavelength of 0.695micro m was used for the annealing. 90° cross sectional TEM and MeV He+ channelling spectroscopy were used to examine the damage structures and their depth distributions. At 0.9 J/cm2, TEM results showed that the single buried damage layer regrew into two discrete damage layers. At 2.0 J/cm2, TEM results showed that the first layer in the double buried damage layers type structures either completely annealout out, leaving a partially annealed second layer consisting of damage clusters or had dislocations in the first damage layer region that extended from the surface and were in direct contact with the deeper lying second layer of damage clusters. The MeV He+ channelling spectra for the above samples were in agreement with the TEM results.

  5. Homology modeling and virtual screening of inhibitors against TEM- and SHV-type-resistant mutants: A multilayer filtering approach.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mohammad H; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Khan, Asad U

    2015-01-01

    TEM and SHV are class-A-type β-lactamases commonly found in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Previous studies reported S130G and K234R mutations in SHVs to be 41- and 10-fold more resistant toward clavulanic acid than SHV-1, respectively, whereas TEM S130G and R244S also showed the same level of resistance. These selected mutants confer higher level of resistance against clavulanic acid. They also show little susceptibility against other commercially available β-lactamase inhibitors. In this study, we have used docking-based virtual screening approach in order to screen potential inhibitors against some of the major resistant mutants of SHV and TEM types β-lactamase. Two different inhibitor-resistant mutants from SHV and TEM were selected. Moreover, we have retained the active site water molecules within each enzyme. Active site water molecules were placed within modeled structure of the mutant whose structure was unavailable with protein databank. The novelty of this work lies in the use of multilayer virtual screening approach for the prediction of best and accurate results. We are reporting five inhibitors on the basis of their efficacy against all the selected resistant mutants. These inhibitors were selected on the basis of their binding efficacies and pharmacophore features. PMID:25779642

  6. PROPOSED ASTM METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ASBESTOS IN AIR BY TEM AND INFORMATION ON INTERFERING FIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The draft of the ASTM Test Method for air entitled: "Airborne Asbestos Concentration in Ambient and Indoor Atmospheres as Determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy Direct Transfer (TEM)" (ASTM Z7077Z) is an adaptation of the International Standard, ISO 10312. It is currently...

  7. Breeding for reduced post-harvest seed dormancy in switchgrass: registration of TEM-LoDorm switchgrass germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) germplasm line TEM-LoDorm (Reg. No. GP-98, PI 636468) was developed by the USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (currently Texas AgriLife Research) and was released in May 2007. Establishment of desirable stands of switchgrass ...

  8. Combining µXANES and µXRD mapping to analyse the heterogeneity in calcium carbonate granules excreted by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Brinza, Loredana; Schofield, Paul F; Hodson, Mark E; Weller, Sophie; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Geraki, Kalotina; Quinn, Paul D; Mosselmans, J Frederick W

    2014-01-01

    The use of fluorescence full spectral micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (µXANES) mapping is becoming more widespread in the hard energy regime. This experimental method using the Ca K-edge combined with micro-X-ray diffraction (µXRD) mapping of the same sample has been enabled on beamline I18 at Diamond Light Source. This combined approach has been used to probe both long- and short-range order in calcium carbonate granules produced by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. In granules produced by earthworms cultured in a control artificial soil, calcite and vaterite are observed in the granules. However, granules produced by earthworms cultivated in the same artificial soil amended with 500 p.p.m. Mg also contain an aragonite. The two techniques, µXRD and µXANES, probe different sample volumes but there is good agreement in the phase maps produced. PMID:24365942

  9. Quantitative assessment of alkali-reactive aggregate mineral content through XRD using polished sections as a supplementary tool to RILEM AAR-1 (petrographic method)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Nelia; Sorensen, Bjorn E.; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.

    2012-11-15

    The mineral content of 5 aggregate samples from 4 different countries, including reactive and non-reactive aggregate types, was assessed quantitatively by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using polished sections. Additionally, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to characterize the opal-CT identified in one of the aggregate samples. Critical review of results from polished sections against traditionally powdered specimen has demonstrated that for fine-grained rocks without preferred orientation the assessment of mineral content by XRD using polished sections may represent an advantage over traditional powder specimens. Comparison of data on mineral content and silica speciation with expansion data from PARTNER project confirmed that the presence of opal-CT plays an important role in the reactivity of one of the studied aggregates. Used as a complementary tool to RILEM AAR-1, the methodology suggested in this paper has the potential to improve the strength of the petrographic method.

  10. Multiscale structural characterizations of mixed U(iv)-An(iii) oxalates (An(iii) = Pu or Am) combining XAS and XRD measurements.

    PubMed

    Arab-Chapelet, B; Martin, P M; Costenoble, S; Delahaye, T; Scheinost, A C; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-04-28

    Mixed actinide(III,IV) oxalates of the general formula M2.2UAn(C2O4)5·nH2O (An = Pu or Am and M = H3O(+) and N2H5(+)) have been quantitatively precipitated by oxalic precipitation in nitric acid medium (yield >99%). Thorough multiscale structural characterization using XRD and XAS measurements confirmed the existence of mixed actinide oxalate solid solutions. The XANES analysis confirmed that the oxidation states of the metallic cations, tetravalent for uranium and trivalent for plutonium and americium, are maintained during the precipitation step. EXAFS measurements show that the local environments around U(+IV), Pu(+III) and Am(+III) are comparable, and the actinides are surrounded by ten oxygen atoms from five bidentate oxalate anions. The mean metal-oxygen distances obtained by XAS measurements are in agreement with those calculated from XRD lattice parameters. PMID:26979820

  11. Synthesis, thermal, XRD and spectroscopic studies characterization of Tutton salt K2M (SO4)2·6H2O (M = Mg, Ni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzougui, H.; Attia-Essaies, S.; Ben Hassen-Chehimi, D.

    2016-09-01

    Tutton's salts K2M(SO4)2·6H2O (M = Mg, Ni) have been synthesized by the slow evaporation method at room temperature. A complete structural characterization has been carried out by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicate that the structure of these salts is monoclinic system with the space group P21/a (Z = 2). IR and Raman spectra of KMS6 (M = Mg,Ni) have been recorded and analyzed. From the spectra, the vibrations due to SO42- ion, the complex [M(H2O)6]2+ and the water molecules have been identified. Thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis and XRD at high-temperature investigations show that the dehydration of these salts occurs between 300 and 500 K. This indicates the removal of all water molecules around 426 K.

  12. High temperature XRD of Cu{sub 2.1}Zn{sub 0.9}SnSe{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Raju Mallik, Ramesh Chandra

    2014-04-24

    Quaternary compound with chemical composition Cu{sub 2.1}Zn{sub 0.9}SnSe{sub 4} is prepared by solid state synthesis. High temperature XRD (X-Ray Diffraction) of this compound is used in studying the effect of temperature on lattice parameters and thermal expansion coefficients. Thermal expansion coefficient is one of the important quantities in evaluating the Grüneisen parameter which further useful in determining the lattice thermal conductivity of the material. The high temperature XRD of the material revealed that the lattice parameters as well as thermal expansion coefficients of the material increased with increase in temperature which confirms the presence of anharmonicty.

  13. A quantitative study of the microstructure and crystallographic fiber texture in nickel electrodeposits used in radio-frequency MEMS switches, including a new transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique for polycrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantwell, Patrick R.

    The microstructure of electrodeposited nickel films in radio-frequency (RF) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switches has been quantitatively studied to inform and validate multi-scale, multi-physics computer simulations that aim to predict the lifetime and failure mechanisms of the RF MEMS switches. The RF MEMS switches are currently under study at the Purdue University center for the Prediction of Reliability, Integrity, and Survivability of Microsystems (PRISM). An array of microstructural characterization techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy have be used to study the nickel film and to quantify grain size and crystallographic texture and provide information about elemental impurities and surface roughness and impurity elements. Particular emphasis has been placed on quantifying the crystallographic fiber texture of the polycrystalline nickel film as a function of film height within a single specimen using a new transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microtexture method. The TEM method employs a special type of plan view TEM sample and uses hollow cone dark field (HCDF) TEM imaging to spatially map the orientation of individual crystallites at discrete film heights. A trend of increasing 001 fiber texture with film height was discovered, which has implications for the elastic behavior of the MEMS device. The method can be applied to study fiber texture evolution as a function of height in polycrystalline films to gather data that may elucidate fundamental film growth mechanisms. The method is explained in detail. It is well-known that the elastic properties of polycrystalline thin films used in MEMS devices can deviate from bulk isotropic values and become directionally-dependent if a crystallographic texture is present. Hence, the ability to predict the actual anisotropic elastic properties of textured films is important for MEMS design and

  14. A Concept for the Development of Spatially Resolved Measurements for Soil Moisture with TEM Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapteva, Yulia; Schmidt, Felix; Bumberger, Jan

    2014-05-01

    's equations. It describes the one-dimensional wave propagation in a multi-layered medium, assuming the wave to be transverse electromagnetic (TEM). In the particular case of transmission lines with perpendicularly arranged layer transitions this assumption is very close to reality. Such waveguides and their frequency domain measurements in layered media are promising concerning a development ways working with soil moisture detection.

  15. Dynamics of early stage nano-oxidation by in situ UHV-TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Judith

    2011-03-01

    Environmental stability is one of the most important properties for materials exposed to air. As dimensions of engineered systems approach nanoscale, fundamental understanding of reactions with oxygen at this length scale is critical for environmental stability as well as for processing oxide nanostructures, where surface reactions are commonly utilized. The nanoscale stages of oxidation from the nucleation of the metal oxide to the formation of the thermodynamically stable oxide represent a scientifically challenging and technologically important terra incognito. The kinetics of early stage oxidation of Cu, Cu-Au and Cu-Ni alloys were visualized using in situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy (UHV-TEM), where the initial oxidation stages can be observed in real-time under well-controlled surface conditions. We examined the dynamic responses of thin films to variations in thermodynamic variables such as temperature, oxygen pressure, strain, and crystallographic orientation. The kinetics of the nucleation and growth of three-dimensional oxide islands demonstrate that oxygen surface diffusion is the primary mechanism for oxide growth during initial oxidation in dry oxygen, and thus bears a striking resemblance to heteroepitaxy. Compared with the behavior of Cu films, the oxidation of Cu-Au alloys revealed more complexity. For example, the oxidation of (100)-oriented Cu-Au alloys with low Au content at ~ 600 C results in the formation of Cu2O oxide islands with a dendritic morphology and a non-uniform lateral distribution of Au around the islands. For Cu-Ni oxidation, the addition of Ni causes the formation Cu2O and/or NiO where the oxide type(s) and the relative orientation with the film depend on the Ni concentration, oxygen partial pressure and temperature. Evolution of the shape and size of the oxide islands can be quantitatively analyzed and provide fundamental insights into the complex kinetics and energetics of oxidation. Models based on

  16. Hydraulic and thermal soil Parameter combined with TEM data at quaternary coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Ima; Kirsch, Reinhard; Scheer, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    In order to generate a more efficient method of planning and dimensioning small- and medium sized geothermal power plants at quaternary subsurface a basic approach has been attempted. Within the EU-project CLIWAT, the coastal region of Denmark, Germany, Netherlands and Belgium has been investigated and air borne electro magnetic data was collected. In this work the regional focus was put on the isle of Föhr. To describe the subsurface with relevant parameters one need the information from drillings and geophysical well logging data. The approach to minimize costs and use existing data from state agencies led the investigation to the combination of specific electrical resistivity data and hydraulic and thermal conductivity. We worked out a basic soil/hydraulic conductivity statistic for the isle of Föhr by gathering all well logging data from the island and sorted the existing soil materials to associated kf -values. We combined specific electrical resistivity with hydraulic soil properties to generate thermal conductivity values by extracting porosity. Until now we generated a set of rough data for kf - values and thermal conductivity. The air borne TEM data sets are reliable up to 150 m below surface, depending on the conductivity of the layers. So we can suppose the same for the differentiated parameters. Since this is a very rough statistic of kf -values, further more investigation has to be made. Although the close connection to each area of investigation either over existing logging data or laboratory soil property values will remain necessary. Literature: Ahmed S, de Marsily G, Talbot A (1988): Combined Use of Hydraulic and Electrical Properties of an Aquifer in a Geostatistical Estimation of Transmissivity. - Groundwater, vol. 26 (1) Burschil T, Scheer W, Wiederhold H, Kirsch R (2012): Groundwater situation on a glacially affected barrier island. Submitted to Hydrology and Earth System Sciences - an Interactive Open Access Journal of the European

  17. High-Resolution Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) Using a Monochromated TEM/STEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Erni, R.; Browning, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 200 keV FEI TF20 XT monochromated (scanning) transmission electron microscope funded by NASA's SRLIDAP program is undergoing installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Instrument specifications in STEM mode are Cs =1.0 mm, Cc =1.2 mm, image resolution =0.18 nm, and in TEM mode Cs =1.3 mm, Cc =1.3 mm, information limit =0.14 nm. Key features of the instrument are a voltage-stabilized high tension (HT) supply, a monochromator, a high-resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer/energy filter, a high-resolution annular darkfield detector, and a solid-state x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. The high-tension tank contains additional sections for 60Hz and high frequency filtering, resulting in an operating voltage of 200 kV plus or minus 0.005V, a greater than 10-fold improvement over earlier systems. The monochromator is a single Wien filter design. The energy filter is a Gatan model 866 Tridiem-ERS high resolution GIF spec d for less than or equal to 0.15 eV energy resolution with 29 pA of current in a 2 nm diameter probe. 0.13 eV has already been achieved during early installation. The x-ray detector (EDAX/Genesis 4000) has a take-off angle of 20 degrees, an active area of 30 square millimeters, and a solid angle of 0.3 steradians. The higher solid angle is possible because the objective pole-piece allows the detector to be positioned as close as 9.47 mm from the specimen. The voltage-stabilized HT supply, monochromator and GIF enable high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) with energy resolution comparable to synchrotron XANES, but with approximately 100X better spatial resolution. The region between 0 and 100 eV is called the low-loss or valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) region where features due to collective plasma oscillations and single electron transitions of valence electrons are observed. Most of the low-loss VEELS features we are detecting are being observed for the first time in IDPs. A major focus of

  18. Directional growth of organic NLO crystal by different growth methods: A comparative study by means of XRD, HRXRD and laser damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivanandhan, M.; Huang, Xinming; Uda, Satoshi; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Vijayan, N.; Sankaranarayanan, K.; Ramasamy, P.

    2008-10-01

    Unidirectional benzophenone single crystals grown by vertical Bridgman (VB), microtube-Czochralski (μT-CZ), uniaxially solution crystallization method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution XRD (HRXRD), laser damage threshold (LDT) studies and the results were compared. The XRD study exhibits the growth direction of the benzophenone crystal ingots. The HRXRD curves recorded by multicrystal X-ray diffractometer (MCD) revealed that the crystals grown by all the three methods contain internal structural grain boundaries. The SR grown sample shows relatively good crystalline nature with the full-width half-maximum (FWHM) of the main peak of 39 arcsec. While, the VB grown crystal contain multiple low-angle ( α⩾1 arcmin) grain boundaries, probably due to thermal stress during post-growth annealing caused by the difference in the lattice expansion coefficients of the crystal and the ampoule, whereas such thermal stress are absent in μT-CZ grown sample due to the free standing nature of the grown crystal. Hence, the μT-CZ grown crystals contain only one very low-angle ( α<1 arcmin) grain boundary. LDT study shows that the SR grown benzophenone crystal has higher LDT than the samples grown by other methods, probably due to relatively high-crystalline perfection of the SR grown crystals.

  19. XRF, μ-XRD and μ-spectroscopic techniques for revealing the composition and structure of paint layers on polychrome sculptures after multiple restorations.

    PubMed

    Franquelo, M L; Duran, A; Castaing, J; Arquillo, D; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2012-01-30

    This paper presents the novel application of recently developed analytical techniques to the study of paint layers on sculptures that have been restored/repainted several times across centuries. Analyses were performed using portable XRF, μ-XRD and μ-Raman instruments. Other techniques, such as optical microscopy, SEM-EDX and μ-FTIR, were also used. Pigments and other materials including vermilion, minium, red lac, ivory black, lead white, barium white, zinc white (zincite), titanium white (rutile and anatase), lithopone, gold and brass were detected. Pigments from both ancient and modern times were found due to the different restorations/repaintings carried out. μ-Raman was very useful to characterise some pigments that were difficult to determine by μ-XRD. In some cases, pigments identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques used in this work. This work is the first article devoted to the study of sculpture cross-section samples using laboratory-made μ-XRD systems. PMID:22284518

  20. Characterizing the Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Phases Found by MSL Using Laboratory XRD and EGA Measurements of Natural and Synthetic Materials (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Chipera, S.; Bish, D. L.; Bristow, T.; Archer, P. D.; Blake, D.; Achilles, C.; Ming, D. W.; Vaniman, D.; Crisp, J. A.; Des Marais, D. J.; Downs, R.; Farmer, J. D.; Morookian, J.; Morrison, S.; Sarrazin, P.; Spanovich, N.; Treiman, A. H.; Yen, A. S.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed on the Peace Vallis alluvial fan in Gale crater on August 5, 2012. A primary mission science objective is to search for past habitable environments, and, in particular, to assess the role of past water. Identifying the minerals and mineraloids that result from aqueous alteration at Gale crater is essential for understanding past aqueous processes at the MSL landing site and hence for interpreting the site's potential habitability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument and evolved gas analyses (EGA) from the SAM instrument have helped the MSL science team identify phases that resulted from aqueous processes: phyllosilicates and amorphous phases were measure in two drill samples (John Klein and Cumberland) obtained from the Sheepbed Member, Yellowknife Bay Fm., which is believed to represent a fluvial-lacustrine environment. A third set of analyses was obtained from scoop samples from the Rocknest sand shadow. Chemical data from the APXS instrument have helped constrain the chemical compositions of these secondary phases and suggest that the phyllosilicate component is Mg-enriched and the amorphous component is Fe-enriched, relatively Si-poor, and S- and H-bearing. To refine the phyllosilicate and amorphous components in the samples measured by MSL, we measured XRD and EGA data for a variety of relevant natural terrestrial phyllosilicates and synthetic mineraloids in laboratory testbeds of the CheMin and SAM instruments. Specifically, Mg-saturated smectites and vermiculites were measured with XRD at low relative humidity to understand the behavior of the 001 reflections under Mars-like conditions. Our laboratory XRD measurements suggest that interlayer cation composition affects the hydration state of swelling clays at low RH and, thus, the 001 peak positions. XRD patterns of synthetic amorphous materials, including allophane, ferrihydrite, and hisingerite were used in full-pattern fitting (FULLPAT) models to help

  1. Quantification of Electrochemical Nanoscale Processes in Lithium Batteries By OperandoEC-(S)TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L.; Qian, Jiangfeng; Nasybulin, Eduard; Welch, David A.; Park, Chiwoo; Faller, Roland; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Xu, Wu; Evans, James E.; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Mueller, Karl T.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-07-27

    Lithium (Li)-ion batteries are currently used for a wide variety of portable electronic devices, electric vehicles and renewable energy applications. In addition, extensive worldwide research efforts are now being devoted to more advanced “beyond Li-ion” battery chemistries - such as lithium-sulfur (Li-S) and lithium-air (Li-O2) - in which the carbon anode is replaced with Li metal. However, the practical application of Li metal anode systems has been highly problematic. The main challenges involve controlling the formation of a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer and the suppression of Li dendrite growth during the charge/discharge process (achieving “dendrite-free” cycling). The SEI layer formation continuously consumes the electrolyte components creating highly resistive layer, which leads to the rapid decrease of cycling performance and degradation of the Li anode. The growth of Li metal dendrites at the anode contributes to rapid capacity fading (the presence of “dead Li” created during the discharge leads to an increased overpotential) and, in the case of continuous growth, leads to internal short circuits and extreme safety issues. Here we demonstrate the application of an operando electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy (ec-(S)TEM) cell to study the SEI layer formation and the initial stages of Li dendrite growth - the goal is to develop a mechanism for mitigating the degradation processes and increasing safety. Bright field (BF) STEM images in Figure 1 A-C show Li metal deposition and dissolution processes at the interface between the Pt working electrode and the lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) in propylene carbonate (PC) electrolyte during three charge/discharge cycles. A contrast reversal caused by Li metal being lighter/less dense than surrounding electrolyte (Li appears brighter than the background in BF STEM images) allows Li to be uniquely identified from the other components in the system - the only solid

  2. TEM Study of the Growth Mechanism, Phase Transformation, and Core/shell Structure of Semiconductor Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tai Lun

    In this thesis, the fabrication and characterization of one-dimensional nanostructures have been studied systematically to understand the growth mechanism and structure transformation of one-dimensional nanostructures. The growth behavior of the ultrathin ZnSe nanowires with diameter less than 60 nm was found to be different from classical vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process. The growth rate increases when the diameter of nanowires decreases, in contrast to the classical VLS process in which the growth rate increases with the diameter. The nucleation, initial growth, growth rates, defects, interface structures and growth direction of the nanowires were investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We found the structure and growth direction of ultra-thin nanowires are highly sensitive to growth temperatures and diameters of nanowires. At a low growth temperature (380°C), the growth direction for most nanowires is along <111>. Planar defects were found throughout the nanowires. At a high growth temperature (530°C), uniform nanowires with diameters around 10nm were grown along <110> and <112> directions, and the nanowires with diameters larger than 20nm were mainly grown along <111> direction. The possible growth mechanism of ultrathin nanowires was proposed by combining the solid catalytic growth with the interface diffusion theory, in order to explain how the growth temperature and the size of the catalysts influent the morphology, growth direction and growth rate of ultrathin nanowires. Structural and phase transformation of a nickel coated Si nanowire to NiSi2/SiC core-shell nanowire heterostructures has been investigated by the in-situ Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The phase transformation is a single-site nucleation process and therefore a single crystalline NiSi2 core resulted in the core-shell nanowire heterostructures. The transformation of the Si nanowire to NiSi2/SiC core-shell nanowire heterostructures was extremely

  3. In Vivo Inflammatory Effects of Ceria Nanoparticles on CD-1 Mouse: Evaluation by Hematological, Histological, and TEM Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poma, Anna; Ragnelli, Anna Maria; de Lapuente, Joaquin; Ramos, David; Borras, Miquel; Di Gioacchino, Mario; Santucci, Sandro; De Marzi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The attention on CeO2-NPs environmental and in vivo effects is due to their presence in diesel exhaust and in diesel filters that release a more water-soluble form of ceria NPs, as well as to their use for medical applications. In this work, acute and subacute in vivo toxicity assays demonstrate no lethal effect of these NPs. Anyhow, performing in vivo evaluations on CD-1 mouse systems, we demonstrate that it is even not correct to assert that ceria NPs are harmless for living systems as they can induce status of inflammation, revealed by hematological-chemical-clinical assays as well as histological and TEM microscope observations. TEM analysis showed the presence of NPs in alveolar macrophages. Histological evaluation demonstrated the NPs presence in lungs tissues and this can be explained by assuming their ability to go into the blood stream and lately into the organs (generating inflammation). PMID:25032226

  4. Recent Advances in Electron Tomography: TEM and HAADF-STEM Tomography for Materials Science and IC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kubel, C; Voigt, A; Schoenmakers, R; Otten, M; Su, D; Lee, T; Carlsson, A; Engelmann, H; Bradley, J

    2005-11-09

    Electron tomograph tomography is a well y well-established technique for three-dimensional structure determination of (almost) amorphous specimens in life science applications. With the recent advances in nanotechnology and the semiconductor industry, there is also an increasing need for high-resolution 3D structural information in physical sciences. In this paper, we evaluate the capabilities and limitations of TEM and HAADF-STEM tomography for the 3D structural characterization of partially crystalline to highly crystalline materials. Our analysis of catalysts, a hydrogen storage material, and different semiconductor devices shows that features with a diameter as small as 1-2 nm can be resolved in 3D by electron tomography. For partially crystalline materials with small single crystalline domains, TEM tomography provides reliable 3D structural information. HAADF-STEM tomography is more versatile and can also be used for high-resolution 3D imaging of highly crystalline materials such as semiconductor devices.

  5. In-situ TEM crystallization of anorthite-glass films on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamaci, M.P.; Carter, C.B.; Bentley, J.

    1993-12-31

    Anorthite-glass films have been grown by pulsed-laser deposition on single-crystal {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates which were pre-thinned to electron transparency. The glass films were crystallized in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which allowed direct observation and video-recording of the crystallization process. Crystallization of these films in the TEM resulted in the formation of hexagonal and orthorhombic anorthite. The orthorhombic phase was the predominant product of glass films grown at elevated substrate temperatures and displayed strong epitaxy with the underlying substrate. In contrast, the hexagonal phase was the major constituent of films grown at ambient substrate temperature and displayed no clear epitaxy with the substrate. The difference in degree of epitaxy and phase structure may be evidence of ordering at the original glass/oxide interface.

  6. Efficient single-mode (TEM{sub 00}) Nd : YVO{sub 4} laser with longitudinal 808-nm diode pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Donin, V I; Yakovin, D V; Yakovin, M D

    2013-10-31

    A single-mode Nd : YVO{sub 4} laser with unidirectional longitudinal pumping by laser diodes with λ = 808 nm and a power of 40 W is studied. In the TEM{sub 00} mode, the output laser power is 24 W with the optical efficiency η{sub opt} = 57.1 % (slope efficiency 63.3 %), which, as far as we know, is the best result for Nd{sup 3+} : YVO{sub 4} lasers with longitudinal pumping at λ = 808 nm from one face of the active crystal. Estimates of thermal effects show that, using a Nd : YVO{sub 4} crystal (length 20 mm, diameter 3 mm, dopant concentration 0.27 at%) with two undoped ends and bidirectional diode pumping with a total power of 170 W, one can obtain an output power of ∼100 W in the TEM{sub 00} mode from one active element. (lasers)

  7. TEM, HRTEM, electron holography and electron tomography studies of gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles in Inconel 718 superalloy.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, B; Kruk, A; Stepniowska, E; Cempura, G; Geiger, D; Formanek, P; Hernandez, J; Midgley, P; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the study was the identification of gamma' and gamma'' strengthening precipitates in a commercial nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 (Ni-19Fe-18Cr-5Nb-3Mo-1Ti-0.5Al-0.04C, wt %) using TEM dark-field, HRTEM, electron holography and electron tomography imaging. To identify gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles unambiguously, a systematic analysis of experimental and theoretical diffraction patterns were performed. Using HRTEM method it was possible to analyse small areas of precipitates appearance. Electron holography and electron tomography techniques show new possibilities of visualization of gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles. The analysis by means of different complementary TEM methods showed that gamma'' particles exhibit a shape of thin plates, while gamma' phase precipitates are almost spherical. PMID:19903242

  8. Fibre-coupled red diode-pumped Alexandrite TEM00 laser with single and double-pass end-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabzadah, E. A.; Damzen, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the investigation of an Alexandrite laser end-pumped by a fibre-coupled red diode laser module. Power, efficiency, spatial, spectral, and wavelength tuning performance are studied as a function of pump and laser cavity parameters. It is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of greater than 1 W power and also highest laser slope efficiency (44.2%) in a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser with diffraction-limited TEM00 mode operation. Spatial quality was excellent with beam propagation parameter M 2 ~ 1.05. Wavelength tuning from 737–796 nm was demonstrated using an intracavity birefringent tuning filter. Using a novel double pass end-pumping scheme to get efficient absorption of both polarisation states of the scrambled fibre-delivered diode pump, a total output coupled power of 1.66 W is produced in TEM00 mode with 40% slope efficiency.

  9. Photosensing performance of branched CdS/ZnO heterostructures as revealed by in situ TEM and photodetector tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Tian, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Xi; Liu, Jiangwei; Li, Song-Lin; Tang, Dai-Ming; Liu, Dequan; Liao, Meiyong; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-06-01

    CdS/ZnO branched heterostructures have been successfully synthesized by combining thermal vapour deposition and a hydrothermal method. Drastic optoelectronic performance enhancement of such heterostructures was revealed, compared to plain CdS nanobelts, as documented by comparative in situ optoelectronic studies on corresponding individual nanostructures using an originally designed laser-compatible transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. Furthermore, flexible thin-film based photodetectors based on standard CdS nanobelts and newly prepared CdS/ZnO heterostructures were fabricated on PET substrates, and comparative photocurrent and photo-responsivity measurements thoroughly verified the in situ TEM results. The CdS/ZnO branched heterostructures were found to have better performance than standard CdS nanobelts for optoelectronic applications with respect to the photocurrent to dark current ratio and responsivity.CdS/ZnO branched heterostructures have been successfully synthesized by combining thermal vapour deposition and a hydrothermal method. Drastic optoelectronic performance enhancement of such heterostructures was revealed, compared to plain CdS nanobelts, as documented by comparative in situ optoelectronic studies on corresponding individual nanostructures using an originally designed laser-compatible transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. Furthermore, flexible thin-film based photodetectors based on standard CdS nanobelts and newly prepared CdS/ZnO heterostructures were fabricated on PET substrates, and comparative photocurrent and photo-responsivity measurements thoroughly verified the in situ TEM results. The CdS/ZnO branched heterostructures were found to have better performance than standard CdS nanobelts for optoelectronic applications with respect to the photocurrent to dark current ratio and responsivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00963k

  10. Sol-gel synthesis and TEM-EDX characterisation of hydroxyapatite nanoscale powders modified by Mg, Sr or Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaisar, S. A.; Bilton, M.; Wallace, R.; Brydson, R.; Brown, A. P.; Ward, M.; Milne, S. J.

    2010-07-01

    Chemically modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles have been prepared by a sol-gel route. Analysis by TEM-EDX confirmed that the dopants, Mg, Sr or Ti had been incorporated into the product. However each sample displayed variability in the level of dopant incorporation in different particles within the same sample. Particle sizes were <= 100 nm for samples modified by Mg or Ti. Doping with Sr produced an elongated particle morphology, with dimensions ~ 200nm × 50 nm.

  11. Guidance from an in situ hot stage in TEM to synthesize magnetic metal nanoparticles from a MOF.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Zhang, Daliang; Zou, Houbing; Zhu, Liangkui; Xue, Ming; Fang, Qianrong; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-08-18

    A series of in situ hot stage experiments using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were studied to directly observe the transition of a Ni-MOF to Ni nanoparticles wrapped in carbon (Ni-NPC) over temperatures ranging from ambient temperature to 700 °C. Ni-NPC-600 displays high catalytic activity in 4-nitrophenol reduction and high conversion, even after 10 cycles. PMID:27491946

  12. EBSD and TEM investigation of the hot deformation substructure characteristics of a type 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cizek, P; Whiteman, J A; Rainforth, W M; Beynon, J H

    2004-03-01

    The evolution of crystallographic texture and deformation substructure was studied in a type 316L austenitic stainless steel, deformed in rolling at 900 degrees C to true strain levels of about 0.3 and 0.7. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used in the investigation and a comparison of the substructural characteristics obtained by these techniques was made. At the lower strain level, the deformation substructure observed by EBSD appeared to be rather poorly developed. There was considerable evidence of a rotation of the pre-existing twin boundaries from their original orientation relationship, as well as the formation of highly distorted grain boundary regions. In TEM, at this strain level, the substructure was more clearly revealed, although it appeared rather inhomogeneously developed from grain to grain. The subgrains were frequently elongated and their boundaries often approximated to traces of [111] slip planes. The corresponding misorientations were small and largely displayed a non-cumulative character. At the larger strain, the substructure within most grains became well developed and the corresponding misorientations increased. This resulted in better detection of sub-boundaries by EBSD, although the percentage of indexing slightly decreased. TEM revealed splitting of some sub-boundaries to form fine microbands, as well as the localized formation of microshear bands. The substructural characteristics observed by EBSD, in particular at the larger strain, generally appeared to compare well with those obtained using TEM. With increased strain level, the mean subgrain size became finer, the corresponding mean misorientation angle increased and both these characteristics became less dependent on a particular grain orientation. The statistically representative data obtained will assist in the development of physically based models of microstructural evolution during thermomechanical processing of austenitic

  13. Subgrain boundary analyses in deformed orthopyroxene by TEM/STEM with EBSD-FIB sample preparation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Toshihiro; Raimbourg, Hugues; Kumamoto, Akihito; Fujii, Eiko; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution structure analyses using electron beam techniques have been performed for the investigation of subgrain boundaries (SGBs) in deformed orthopyroxene (Opx) in mylonite from Hidaka Metamorphic Belt, Hokkaido, Japan, to understand ductile deformation mechanism of silicate minerals in shear zones. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis of Opx porphyroclasts in the mylonitic rock indicated that the crystal orientation inside the Opx crystals gradually changes by rotation about the b-axis by SGBs and crystal folding. In order to observe the SGBs along the b-axis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM), the following sample preparation protocol was adopted. First, petrographic thin sections were slightly etched with hydrofluoric acid to identify SGBs in SEM. The Opx crystals whose b-axes were oriented close to the normal of the surface were identified by EBSD, and the areas containing SGBs were picked and thinned for (S) TEM analysis with a focused ion beam instrument with micro-sampling system. High-resolution TEM imaging of the SGBs in Opx revealed various boundary structures from a periodic array of dissociated (100) [001] edge dislocations to partially or completely incoherent crystals, depending on the misorientation angle. Atomic-resolution STEM imaging clearly confirmed the formation of clinopyroxene (Cpx) structure between the dissociated partial dislocations. Moreover, X-ray microanalysis in STEM revealed that the Cpx contains a considerable amount of calcium replacing iron. Such chemical inhomogeneity may limit glide motion of the dislocation and eventually the plastic deformation of the Opx porphyroclasts at a low temperature. Chemical profiles across the high-angle incoherent SGB also showed an enrichment of the latter in calcium at the boundary, suggesting that SGBs are an efficient diffusion pathway of calcium out of host Opx grain during cooling.

  14. Structural characterizaiton and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution, in-situ TEM and TED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The existing in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) facility was improved by adding a separately pumped mini-specimen chamber. The chamber contains wire-evaporation sources for three metals and a specimen heater for moderate substrate temperatures. A sample introduction device was constructed, installed, and tested, facilitating rapid introduction of a specimen into the mini-chamber while maintaining the background pressure in that chamber in the 10(-9) millibar range. Small particles and clusters of Pd, grown by deposition from the vapor phase in an in-situ TEM facility on amorphous and crystalline support films of alumina and on ultra-thin carbon films, were analyzed by conventional high-resolution TEM and image analysis in terms of detectability, number density, and size distribution. The smallest particles that could be detected and counted contained no more than 6 atoms; size determinations could be made for particles 1 nm in diameter. The influence of various oxygen plasma treatments, annealing treatments, and of increasing the substrate temperature during deposition was investigated. The TEM technique was employed to demonstrate that under otherwise identica l conditions the lattice parameter of Pd particles in the 1 to 2 nm size range and supported in random orientation on ex-situ prepared mica films is expanded by some 3% when compared to 5 nm size particles. It is believed that this expansion is neither a small-particle diffraction effect nor due to pseudomorphism, but that it is due to a annealing-induced transformation of the small as-deposited particles with predominantly composite crystal structures into larger particles with true f.c.c. structure and thus inherently smaller lattice parameter.

  15. Efficient TEM(00)-mode operation of a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Rines, D. M.; Dinerman, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a novel pumping geometry that ensures efficient conversion of pump energy into the TEM(00) mode is reported. Of the 1064-nm output, 11.8 microJ of energy was obtained in a 200-microsec pulse with 64 microJ of pump energy at 808 nm. The overall conversion and slope efficiencies were 18 and 23 percent, respectively.

  16. TEM Characterization of a Titanium Nitride (TiN) Inclusion in a Fe-Ni-Co Maraging Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes, Vincent; Migot, Sylvie; Robaut, Florence; Bellot, Jean-Pierre; Perrin-Guérin, Valérie; Witzke, Sylvain; Jardy, Alain

    2015-07-01

    A TEM observation of a TiN inclusion associated to a spinel (MgAl2O4) and calcium sulfide germs is reported. It shows an orientation relationship between these three phases, indicating an epitaxial growth of the TiN over the spinel and CaS. This observation strengthens the hypothesis of a heterogeneous nucleation of TiN particles during the solidification of a maraging steel.

  17. In situ targeting TEM8 via immune response and polypeptide recognition by wavelength-modulated surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yimin; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Jie; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in real-time and in situ monitoring of living cell activities in life science and medicine. This paper reports a whole cell sensing protocol over the interface of Au film coupled in a wavelength-modulated surface plasmon resonance (WMSPR) biosensor. With dual parabolic mirrors integrated in the sensor, the compact and miniaturized instrument shows satisfactory refractive index sensitivity (2220 nm/RIU) and a high resolution of resonance wavelength shift of 0.3 nm to liquid samples. The affinity interactions between the biomarker of human tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) and antibody (Ab) or specific polypeptide (PEP) were firstly introduced to WMSPR biosensor analysis. Both the interaction events of Ab-cell and PEP-cell over the Au film interface can be recognized by the sensor and the balance time of interactions is about 20 min. The concentration range of Ab for quantitative monitoring of the TEM8 expression on human colon carcinoma SW620 cells was investigated. The present low-cost and time-saving method provides a time resolution of binding specificity between Ab/PEP and TEM8 for real-time analysis of antigen on living tumor cell surface. PMID:26822761

  18. In situ targeting TEM8 via immune response and polypeptide recognition by wavelength-modulated surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Jie; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in real-time and in situ monitoring of living cell activities in life science and medicine. This paper reports a whole cell sensing protocol over the interface of Au film coupled in a wavelength-modulated surface plasmon resonance (WMSPR) biosensor. With dual parabolic mirrors integrated in the sensor, the compact and miniaturized instrument shows satisfactory refractive index sensitivity (2220 nm/RIU) and a high resolution of resonance wavelength shift of 0.3 nm to liquid samples. The affinity interactions between the biomarker of human tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) and antibody (Ab) or specific polypeptide (PEP) were firstly introduced to WMSPR biosensor analysis. Both the interaction events of Ab-cell and PEP-cell over the Au film interface can be recognized by the sensor and the balance time of interactions is about 20 min. The concentration range of Ab for quantitative monitoring of the TEM8 expression on human colon carcinoma SW620 cells was investigated. The present low-cost and time-saving method provides a time resolution of binding specificity between Ab/PEP and TEM8 for real-time analysis of antigen on living tumor cell surface. PMID:26822761

  19. High-field actively detuneable transverse electromagnetic (TEM) coil with low-bias voltage for high-power RF transmission.

    PubMed

    Avdievich, Nikolai I; Bradshaw, Ken; Kuznetsov, Andrey M; Hetherington, Hoby P

    2007-06-01

    The design and construction of a 4T (170 MHz) transverse electromagnetic (TEM) actively detuneable quadrature head coil is described. Conventional schemes for active detuning require high negative bias voltages (>300 V) to prevent leakage of RF pulses with amplitudes of 1-2 kW. To extend the power handling capacity and avoid the use of high DC bias voltages, we developed an alternate method of detuning the volume coil. In this method the PIN diodes in the detuning circuits are shorted when the RF volume coil is tuned, and negatively biased with -12 V when the coil is detuned. To preserve the high Q(U)/Q(L) ratio of the TEM coil, we modified the method of Nabetani and Watkins (Proceedings of the 13th Annual Meeting of ISMRM, Kyoto, Japan, 2004, abstract 1574) by utilizing a high-impedance (approximately 200 Omega), lumped-element, quarter-wavelength transformer. A Q(U) of 500 was achieved for the detuneable TEM, such that incorporation of the detuning network had minimal effect (<1 dB) on the performance of the coil in vivo. PMID:17534919

  20. Validation studies of gyrokinetic ITG and TEM turbulence simulations in a JT-60U tokamak using multiple flux matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Motoki; Honda, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Maiko; Urano, Hajime; Nunami, Masanori; Maeyama, Shinya; Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko; Sugama, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative validation studies of flux-tube gyrokinetic Vlasov simulations on ion and electron heat transport are carried out for the JT-60U tokamak experiment. The ion temperature gradient (ITG) and/or trapped electron modes (TEM) driven turbulent transport and zonal flow generations are investigated for an L-mode plasma in the local turbulence limit with a sufficiently small normalized ion thermal gyroradius and weak mean radial electric fields. Nonlinear turbulence simulations by the GKV code successfully reproduce radial profiles of the ion and electron energy fluxes in the core region. The numerical results show that the TEM-driven zonal flow generation in the outer region is more significant than that in the core region with ITG- and ITG–TEM-dominated turbulence, leading to moderate transport shortfall of the ion energy flux. Error levels in the prediction of the ion and electron temperature gradient profiles in the core region are estimated as less than +/- 30% , based on a multiple flux matching technique, where the simulated ion and electron energy fluxes are simultaneously matched to the experimental values.