Science.gov

Sample records for paranodal axoglial junctions

  1. GLIAL ANKYRINS FACILITATE PARANODAL AXOGLIAL JUNCTION ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L.; Makara, Michael A.; Brophy, Peter J.; Cooper, Edward C.; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J.; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions, and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, are essential for rapid saltatory conduction, and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na+ channel clustering in neurons and important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here, we show that ankyrinB, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrinG, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing central nervous system. PMID:25362471

  2. Glial ankyrins facilitate paranodal axoglial junction assembly.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L; Makara, Michael A; Brophy, Peter J; Cooper, Edward C; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J; Rasband, Matthew N

    2014-12-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, and they are essential for rapid saltatory conduction and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na(+) channel clustering in neurons and are important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here we show that ankyrin-B, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrin-G, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing CNS. PMID:25362471

  3. The Cytoskeletal Adaptor Protein Band 4.1B is Required for the Maintenance of Paranodal Axo-Glial Septate Junctions in Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2011-01-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axo-glial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after one year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at about one year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  4. The cytoskeletal adaptor protein band 4.1B is required for the maintenance of paranodal axoglial septate junctions in myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2011-06-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B-null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axoglial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in the study by Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after 1 year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at ∼ 1 year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  5. Multiple functions of the paranodal junction of myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack

    2009-11-15

    Myelin sheaths include an extraordinary structure, the "paranodal axoglial junction" (PNJ), which attaches the sheath to the axon at each end of each myelin segment. Its size is enormous and its structure unique. Here we review past and current studies showing that this junction can serve multiple functions in maintaining reliable saltatory conduction. The present evidence points to three functions in particular. 1) It seals the myelin sheath to the axon to prevent major shunting of nodal action currents beneath the myelin sheath while still leaving a narrow channel interconnecting the internodal periaxonal space with the perinodal space. This pathway represents a potential route through which juxtaparanodal and internodal channels can influence nodal activity and through which nutrients, such as glucose, and other metabolites can diffuse to and from the internodal periaxonal space. 2) It serves as a mechanism for maintaining discrete, differentiated axolemmal domains at and around the node of Ranvier by acting as a barrier to the lateral movement of ion channel complexes within the axolemma, thus concentrating voltage-gated sodium channels at the node and segregating fast voltage-gated potassium channels to the juxtaparanode under the myelin sheath. 3) It attaches the myelin sheath to the axon on either side of the node and can thus maintain nodal dimensions in the face of mechanical stresses associated with stretch or other local factors that might cause disjunction. It is therefore the likely means for maintaining constancy of nodal surface area and electrical parameters essential for consistency in conduction. PMID:19224642

  6. Retention of a cell adhesion complex at the paranodal junction requires the cytoplasmic region of Caspr.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Leora; Sabanay, Helena; Poliak, Sebastian; Berglund, Erik O; Ranscht, Barbara; Peles, Elior

    2002-06-24

    An axonal complex of cell adhesion molecules consisting of Caspr and contactin has been found to be essential for the generation of the paranodal axo-glial junctions flanking the nodes of Ranvier. Here we report that although the extracellular region of Caspr was sufficient for directing it to the paranodes in transgenic mice, retention of the Caspr-contactin complex at the junction depended on the presence of an intact cytoplasmic domain of Caspr. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found that a Caspr mutant lacking its intracellular domain was often found within the axon instead of the junctional axolemma. We further show that a short sequence in the cytoplasmic domain of Caspr mediated its binding to the cytoskeleton-associated protein 4.1B. Clustering of contactin on the cell surface induced coclustering of Caspr and immobilized protein 4.1B at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, deletion of the protein 4.1B binding site accelerated the internalization of a Caspr-contactin chimera from the cell surface. These results suggest that Caspr serves as a "transmembrane scaffold" that stabilizes the Caspr/contactin adhesion complex at the paranodal junction by connecting it to cytoskeletal components within the axon. PMID:12082082

  7. Retention of a cell adhesion complex at the paranodal junction requires the cytoplasmic region of Caspr

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Leora; Sabanay, Helena; Poliak, Sebastian; Berglund, Erik O.; Ranscht, Barbara; Peles, Elior

    2002-01-01

    An axonal complex of cell adhesion molecules consisting of Caspr and contactin has been found to be essential for the generation of the paranodal axo-glial junctions flanking the nodes of Ranvier. Here we report that although the extracellular region of Caspr was sufficient for directing it to the paranodes in transgenic mice, retention of the Caspr–contactin complex at the junction depended on the presence of an intact cytoplasmic domain of Caspr. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found that a Caspr mutant lacking its intracellular domain was often found within the axon instead of the junctional axolemma. We further show that a short sequence in the cytoplasmic domain of Caspr mediated its binding to the cytoskeleton-associated protein 4.1B. Clustering of contactin on the cell surface induced coclustering of Caspr and immobilized protein 4.1B at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, deletion of the protein 4.1B binding site accelerated the internalization of a Caspr–contactin chimera from the cell surface. These results suggest that Caspr serves as a “transmembrane scaffold” that stabilizes the Caspr/contactin adhesion complex at the paranodal junction by connecting it to cytoskeletal components within the axon. PMID:12082082

  8. Spectrins and ankyrinB constitute a specialized paranodal cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Schafer, Dorothy P; Horresh, Ido; Bar, Vered; Hales, Kimberly; Yang, Yang; Susuki, Keiichiro; Peles, Elior; Stankewich, Michael C; Rasband, Matthew N

    2006-05-10

    Paranodal junctions of myelinated nerve fibers are important for saltatory conduction and function as paracellular and membrane protein diffusion barriers flanking nodes of Ranvier. The formation of these specialized axoglial contacts depends on the presence of three cell adhesion molecules: neurofascin 155 on the glial membrane and a complex of Caspr and contactin on the axon. We isolated axonal and glial membranes highly enriched in these paranodal proteins and then used mass spectrometry to identify additional proteins associated with the paranodal axoglial junction. This strategy led to the identification of three novel components of the paranodal cytoskeleton: ankyrinB, alphaII spectrin, and betaII spectrin. Biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that these proteins associate with protein 4.1B in a macromolecular complex that is concentrated at central and peripheral paranodal junctions in the adult and during early myelination. Furthermore, we show that the paranodal localization of ankyrinB is disrupted in Caspr-null mice with aberrant paranodal junctions, demonstrating that paranodal neuron-glia interactions regulate the organization of the underlying cytoskeleton. In contrast, genetic disruption of the juxtaparanodal protein Caspr2 or the nodal cytoskeletal protein betaIV spectrin did not alter the paranodal cytoskeleton. Our results demonstrate that the paranodal junction contains specialized cytoskeletal components that may be important to stabilize axon-glia interactions and contribute to the membrane protein diffusion barrier found at paranodes. PMID:16687515

  9. Electron tomography of paranodal septate-like junctions and the associated axonal and glial cytoskeletons in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nans, Andrea; Einheber, Steven; Salzer, James L; Stokes, David L

    2011-03-01

    The polarized domains of myelinated axons are specifically organized to maximize the efficiency of saltatory conduction. The paranodal region is directly adjacent to the node of Ranvier and contains specialized septate-like junctions that provide adhesion between axons and glial cells and that constitute a lateral diffusion barrier for nodal components. To complement and extend earlier studies on the peripheral nervous system, electron tomography was used to image paranodal regions from the central nervous system (CNS). Our three-dimensional reconstructions revealed short filamentous linkers running directly from the septate-like junctions to neurofilaments, microfilaments, and organelles within the axon. The intercellular spacing between axons and glia was measured to be 7.4 ± 0.6 nm, over twice the value previously reported in the literature (2.5-3.0 nm). Averaging of individual junctions revealed a bifurcated structure in the intercellular space that is consistent with a dimeric complex of cell adhesion molecules composing the septate-like junction. Taken together, these findings provide new insight into the structural organization of CNS paranodes and suggest that, in addition to providing axo-glial adhesion, cytoskeletal linkage to the septate-like junctions may be required to maintain axonal domains and to regulate organelle transport in myelinated axons. PMID:21259318

  10. Paranodal dysmyelination in peripheral nerves of Trembler mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Bobrowski-Khoury, Natasha

    2014-04-01

    Subtle defects in paranodes of myelinated nerve fibers can cause significant physiological malfunction. We have investigated myelinated fibers in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the Trembler mouse, a model of CMT-1A neuropathy, for evidence of such defects. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the "transverse bands," which attach the myelin sheath to the axon at the paranodal axoglial junction, are grossly diminished in number in Trembler nerve fibers. Although paranodes often appear to be greatly elongated, it is only a short region immediately adjacent to the node of Ranvier that displays transverse bands. Where transverse bands are missing, the junctional gap widens, thus reducing resistance to short circuiting of nodal action currents during saltatory conduction and increasing the likelihood that axonal K(+) channels under the myelin sheath will be activated. In addition, we find evidence that structural domains in Trembler axons are incompletely differentiated, consistent with diminution in nodal Na channel density, which could further compromise conduction. Deficiency of transverse bands may also increase susceptibility to disruption of the paranodal junction and retraction of the myelin sheath. We conclude that Trembler PNS myelinated fibers display subtle defects in paranodal and nodal regions that could contribute significantly to conduction defects and increased risk of myelin detachment. PMID:24446165

  11. Glutamate Excitotoxicity Inflicts Paranodal Myelin Splitting and Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Sun, Wenjing; Shi, Yunzhou; Shi, Riyi; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Paranodal myelin damage is observed in white matter injury. However the culprit for such damage remains unknown. By coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging of myelin sheath in fresh tissues with sub-micron resolution, we observed significant paranodal myelin splitting and retraction following glutamate application both ex vivo and in vivo. Multimodal multiphoton imaging further showed that glutamate application broke axo-glial junctions and exposed juxtaparanodal K+ channels, resulting in axonal conduction deficit that was demonstrated by compound action potential measurements. The use of 4-aminopyridine, a broad-spectrum K+ channel blocker, effectively recovered both the amplitude and width of compound action potentials. Using CARS imaging as a quantitative readout of nodal length to diameter ratio, the same kind of paranodal myelin retraction was observed with applications of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Moreover, exclusion of Ca2+ from the medium or application of calpain inhibitor abolished paranodal myelin retraction during glutamate exposure. Examinations of glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists further showed that the paranodal myelin damage was mediated by NMDA and kainate receptors. These results suggest that an increased level of glutamate in diseased white matter could impair paranodal myelin through receptor-mediated Ca2+ overloading and subsequent calpain activation. PMID:19693274

  12. BK Channels Localize to the Paranodal Junction and Regulate Action Potentials in Myelinated Axons of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, Moritoshi; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Misono, Kaori; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Trimmer, James S.

    2015-01-01

    In myelinated axons, K+ channels are clustered in distinct membrane domains to regulate action potentials (APs). At nodes of Ranvier, Kv7 channels are expressed with Na+ channels, whereas Kv1 channels flank nodes at juxtaparanodes. Regulation of axonal APs by K+ channels would be particularly important in fast-spiking projection neurons such as cerebellar Purkinje cells. Here, we show that BK/Slo1 channels are clustered at the paranodal junctions of myelinated Purkinje cell axons of rat and mouse. The paranodal junction is formed by a set of cell-adhesion molecules, including Caspr, between the node and juxtaparanodes in which it separates nodal from internodal membrane domains. Remarkably, only Purkinje cell axons have detectable paranodal BK channels, whose clustering requires the formation of the paranodal junction via Caspr. Thus, BK channels occupy this unique domain in Purkinje cell axons along with the other K+ channel complexes at nodes and juxtaparanodes. To investigate the physiological role of novel paranodal BK channels, we examined the effect of BK channel blockers on antidromic AP conduction. We found that local application of blockers to the axon resulted in a significant increase in antidromic AP failure at frequencies above 100 Hz. We also found that Ni2+ elicited a similar effect on APs, indicating the involvement of Ni2+-sensitive Ca2+ channels. Furthermore, axonal application of BK channel blockers decreased the inhibitory synaptic response in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Thus, paranodal BK channels uniquely support high-fidelity firing of APs in myelinated Purkinje cell axons, thereby underpinning the output of the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25948259

  13. Contactin-1 IgG4 antibodies cause paranode dismantling and conduction defects.

    PubMed

    Manso, Constance; Querol, Luis; Mekaouche, Mourad; Illa, Isabel; Devaux, Jérôme J

    2016-06-01

    Paranodal axoglial junctions formed by the association of contactin-1, contactin-associated protein 1, and neurofascin-155, play important functions in nerve impulse propagation along myelinated axons. Autoantibodies to contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 define chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy subsets of patients with specific clinical features. These autoantibodies are mostly of the IgG4 isotype, but their pathogenicity has not been proven. Here, we investigated the mechanisms how IgG subclasses to contactin-1 affect conduction. We show that purified anti-contactin-1 IgG1 and IgG4 bind to paranodes. To determine whether these isotypes can pass the paranodal barrier, we incubated isolated sciatic nerves with the purified antibody or performed intraneural injections. We found that IgG4 diffused into the paranodal regions in vitro or after intraneural injections. IgG4 infiltration was slow and progressive. In 24 h, IgG4 accessed the paranode borders near the nodal lumen, and completely fill the paranodal segments by 3 days. By contrast, control IgG, anti-contactin-1 IgG1, or even anti-contactin-associated-protein-2 IgG4 did not pass the paranodal barrier. To determine whether chronic exposure to these antibodies is pathogenic, we passively transferred anti-contactin-1 IgG1 and IgG4 into Lewis rats immunized with P2 peptide. IgG4 to contactin-1, but not IgG1, induced progressive clinical deteriorations combined with gait ataxia. No demyelination, axonal degeneration, or immune infiltration were observed. Instead, these animals presented a selective loss of the paranodal specialization in motor neurons characterized by the disappearance of the contactin-associated protein 1/contactin-1/neurofascin-155 complex at paranodes. Paranode destruction did not affect nodal specialization, but resulted in a moderate node lengthening. The sensory nerves and dorsal root ganglion were not affected in these animals. Electrophysiological examination further

  14. Connexin-47 and connexin-32 in gap junctions of oligodendrocyte somata, myelin sheaths, paranodal loops and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures: implications for ionic homeostasis and potassium siphoning.

    PubMed

    Kamasawa, N; Sik, A; Morita, M; Yasumura, T; Davidson, K G V; Nagy, J I; Rash, J E

    2005-01-01

    The subcellular distributions and co-associations of the gap junction-forming proteins connexin 47 and connexin 32 were investigated in oligodendrocytes of adult mouse and rat CNS. By confocal immunofluorescence light microscopy, abundant connexin 47 was co-localized with astrocytic connexin 43 on oligodendrocyte somata, and along myelinated fibers, whereas connexin 32 without connexin 47 was co-localized with contactin-associated protein (caspr) in paranodes. By thin-section transmission electron microscopy, connexin 47 immunolabeling was on the oligodendrocyte side of gap junctions between oligodendrocyte somata and astrocytes. By freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling, large gap junctions between oligodendrocyte somata and astrocyte processes contained much more connexin 47 than connexin 32. Along surfaces of internodal myelin, connexin 47 was several times as abundant as connexin 32, and in the smallest gap junctions, often occurred without connexin 32. In contrast, connexin 32 was localized without connexin 47 in newly-described autologous gap junctions in Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and between paranodal loops bordering nodes of Ranvier. Thus, connexin 47 in adult rodent CNS is the most abundant connexin in most heterologous oligodendrocyte-to-astrocyte gap junctions, whereas connexin 32 is the predominant if not sole connexin in autologous ("reflexive") oligodendrocyte gap junctions. These results clarify the locations and connexin compositions of heterologous and autologous oligodendrocyte gap junctions, identify autologous gap junctions at paranodes as potential sites for modulating paranodal electrical properties, and reveal connexin 47-containing and connexin 32-containing gap junctions as conduits for long-distance intracellular and intercellular movement of ions and associated osmotic water. The autologous gap junctions may regulate paranodal electrical properties during saltatory conduction. Acting in series and in parallel, autologous and

  15. Protein 4.1B associates with both Caspr/paranodin and Caspr2 at paranodes and juxtaparanodes of myelinated fibres.

    PubMed

    Denisenko-Nehrbass, Natalia; Oguievetskaia, Ksénia; Goutebroze, Laurence; Galvez, Thierry; Yamakawa, Hisashi; Ohara, Osamu; Carnaud, Michèle; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2003-01-01

    Caspr/paranodin, a neuronal transmembrane glycoprotein, is essential for the structure and function of septate-like paranodal axoglial junctions at nodes of Ranvier. A closely related protein, Caspr2, is concentrated in juxtaparanodal regions where it associates indirectly with the shaker-type potassium channels. Although ultrastructural studies indicate that paranodal complexes are linked to the cytoskeleton, the intracellular partners of Caspr/paranodin, as well as those of Caspr2, are poorly characterized. We show that the conserved intracellular juxtamembrane regions (GNP motif) of Caspr/paranodin and Caspr2 bind proteins 4.1R and 4.1B. 4.1B is known to be enriched in paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions. 4.1B immunoreactivity accumulates progressively at paranodes and juxtaparanodes during postnatal development, following the concentration of Caspr/paranodin and Caspr2, respectively, in central and peripheral myelinated axons. These two proteins coimmunoprecipitated with 4.1B in brain homogenates. Our results provide strong evidence for the association of 4.1B with Caspr/paranodin at paranodes and with Caspr2 at juxtaparanodes. We propose that 4.1B anchors these axonal proteins to the actin-based cytoskeleton in these two regions. PMID:12542678

  16. Activated microglia mediate axo-glial disruption that contributes to axonal injury in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Anurag; Komada, Masayuki; Brophy, Peter. J.; Reynolds, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The complex symptoms of chronic multiple sclerosis (MS) are due, in part, to widespread axonal pathology affecting lesioned and non-lesioned areas of the CNS. Here we describe an association between microglial activation and axon/ oligodendrocyte pathology at nodal and paranodal domains in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) of MS and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). The extent of paranodal axo-glial (neurofascin-155+/Caspr1+) disruption correlated with the local degree of microglial inflammation and axonal injury (expression of nonphosphorylated neurofilaments) in MS NAWM. These changes were independent of demyelinating lesions and did not correlate with the density of infiltrating lymphocytes. Similar axo-glial alterations were seen in pre-symptomatic EAE, at a time-point characterised by microglia activation prior to the infiltration of immune cells. Disruption of the axo-glial unit in adjuvant immunised animals was reversible and coincided with the resolution of microglial inflammation, whereas paranodal damage and microglial inflammation persisted in chronic EAE. We were able to preserve axo-glial integrity by administering minocycline, which inhibited microglial activation, in actively immunised animals. Therefore, permanent disruption to axo-glial domains in an environment of microglial inflammation is an early indicator of axonal injury that would affect normal nerve conduction contributing to pathology outside of the demyelinated lesion. PMID:20838243

  17. Axo-glial dysjunction. A novel structural lesion that accounts for poorly reversible slowing of nerve conduction in the spontaneously diabetic bio-breeding rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sima, A A; Lattimer, S A; Yagihashi, S; Greene, D A

    1986-01-01

    Biochemical abnormalities in peripheral nerve are thought to precede and condition the development of diabetic neuropathy, but metabolic intervention in chronic diabetic neuropathy produces only limited acute clinical response. The residual, metabolically unresponsive neurological deficits have never been rigorously defined in terms of either persistent metabolic derangements or irreversible structural defects because human nerve tissue is rarely accessible for anatomical and biochemical study and experimentally diabetic animals do not develop the structural hallmarks of human diabetic neuropathy. Detailed neuroanatomical-functional-biochemical correlation was therefore undertaken in long-term spontaneously diabetic BB-Wistar rats that functionally and structurally model human diabetic neuropathy. Vigorous insulin replacement in chronically diabetic BB rats essentially normalized both the sural nerve fiber caliber spectrum and the decreased sciatic nerve myo-inositol and (Na,K)-ATPase levels generally associated with conduction slowing in diabetic animals; yet, nerve conduction was only partially restored toward normal. Morphometric analysis revealed a striking disappearance of paranodal axo-glial junctional complexes that was not corrected by insulin replacement. Loss of these strategic junctional complexes, which are thought to limit lateral migration of axolemmal Na channels away from nodes of Ranvier, correlates with and can account for the diminished nodal Na permeability and resultant nodal conduction delay characteristic of chronic diabetic neuropathy in this animal model. Images PMID:3003160

  18. Defects in myelination, paranode organization and Purkinje cell innervation in the ether lipid-deficient mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Teigler, Andre; Komljenovic, Dorde; Draguhn, Andreas; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W.

    2009-01-01

    Ether lipids (ELs), particularly plasmalogens, are essential constituents of the mammalian central nervous system. The physiological role of ELs, in vivo, however is still enigmatic. In the present study, we characterized a mouse model carrying a targeted deletion of the peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase gene that results in the complete lack of ELs. Investigating the cerebellum of these mice, we observed: (i) defects in foliation patterning and delay in precursor granule cell migration, (ii) defects in myelination and concomitant reduction in the level of myelin basic protein, (iii) disturbances in paranode organization by extending the Caspr distribution and disrupting axo-glial septate-like junctions, (iv) impaired innervation of Purkinje cells by both parallel fibers and climbing fibers and (v) formation of axon swellings by the accumulation of inositol-tris-phosphate receptor 1 containing smooth ER-like tubuli. Functionally, conduction velocity of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum was significantly reduced. Most of these phenotypes were already apparent at P20 but still persisted in 1-year-old animals. In summary, these data show that EL deficiency results in severe developmental and lasting structural alterations at the cellular and network level of the cerebellum, and reveal an important role of ELs for proper brain function. Common molecular mechanisms that may underlie these phenotypes are discussed. PMID:19270340

  19. Defects in myelination, paranode organization and Purkinje cell innervation in the ether lipid-deficient mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Teigler, Andre; Komljenovic, Dorde; Draguhn, Andreas; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W

    2009-06-01

    Ether lipids (ELs), particularly plasmalogens, are essential constituents of the mammalian central nervous system. The physiological role of ELs, in vivo, however is still enigmatic. In the present study, we characterized a mouse model carrying a targeted deletion of the peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase gene that results in the complete lack of ELs. Investigating the cerebellum of these mice, we observed: (i) defects in foliation patterning and delay in precursor granule cell migration, (ii) defects in myelination and concomitant reduction in the level of myelin basic protein, (iii) disturbances in paranode organization by extending the Caspr distribution and disrupting axo-glial septate-like junctions, (iv) impaired innervation of Purkinje cells by both parallel fibers and climbing fibers and (v) formation of axon swellings by the accumulation of inositol-tris-phosphate receptor 1 containing smooth ER-like tubuli. Functionally, conduction velocity of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum was significantly reduced. Most of these phenotypes were already apparent at P20 but still persisted in 1-year-old animals. In summary, these data show that EL deficiency results in severe developmental and lasting structural alterations at the cellular and network level of the cerebellum, and reveal an important role of ELs for proper brain function. Common molecular mechanisms that may underlie these phenotypes are discussed. PMID:19270340

  20. A novel Caspr mutation causes the shambling mouse phenotype by disrupting axoglial interactions of myelinated nerves.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-yang; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Okabe, Erina; Chishima, Yûko; Kanou, Yasuhiko; Murase, Shiori; Mizumura, Kazue; Inaba, Mie; Komatsu, Yukio; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Peles, Elior; Oda, Sen-ichi; Murata, Yoshiharu

    2009-11-01

    The neurological mouse mutation shambling (shm) exhibits ataxia and hindlimb paresis. Positional cloning of shm showed that it encodes contactin-associated protein (Caspr), which is required for formation of the paranodal junction in myelinated nerves. The shm mutation is a TT insertion in the Caspr gene that results in a frame shift and a premature stop codon at the COOH-terminus. The truncated Caspr protein that is generated lacks the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Here, we found that the nodal/paranodal axoplasm of shm mice lack paranodal junctions and contain large mitochondria and abnormal accumulations of cytoplasmic organelles that indicate altered axonal transport. Immunohistochemical analysis of mutant mice showed reduced expression of Caspr, contactin, and neurofascin 155, which are thought to form a protein complex in the paranodal region; protein 4.1B, however, was normally distributed. The mutant mice had aberrant localization of voltage-gated ion channels on the axolemma of nodal/paranodal regions. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated that the velocity of saltatory conduction was reduced in sciatic nerves and that the visual response was attenuated in the primary visual cortex. These abnormalities likely contribute to the neurological phenotype of the mutant mice. PMID:19816196

  1. Loss of glial neurofascin155 delays developmental synapse elimination at the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sarah L; Sherman, Diane L; Dissanayake, Kosala; Soucy, Geneviève; Desmazieres, Anne; Lamont, Douglas J; Peles, Elior; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Wishart, Thomas M; Ribchester, Richard R; Brophy, Peter J; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2014-09-17

    Postnatal synapse elimination plays a critical role in sculpting and refining neural connectivity throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems, including the removal of supernumerary axonal inputs from neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Here, we reveal a novel and important role for myelinating glia in regulating synapse elimination at the mouse NMJ, where loss of a single glial cell protein, the glial isoform of neurofascin (Nfasc155), was sufficient to disrupt postnatal remodeling of synaptic circuitry. Neuromuscular synapses were formed normally in mice lacking Nfasc155, including the establishment of robust neuromuscular synaptic transmission. However, loss of Nfasc155 was sufficient to cause a robust delay in postnatal synapse elimination at the NMJ across all muscle groups examined. Nfasc155 regulated neuronal remodeling independently of its canonical role in forming paranodal axo-glial junctions, as synapse elimination occurred normally in mice lacking the axonal paranodal protein Caspr. Rather, high-resolution proteomic screens revealed that loss of Nfasc155 from glial cells was sufficient to disrupt neuronal cytoskeletal organization and trafficking pathways, resulting in reduced levels of neurofilament light (NF-L) protein in distal axons and motor nerve terminals. Mice lacking NF-L recapitulated the delayed synapse elimination phenotype observed in mice lacking Nfasc155, suggesting that glial cells regulate synapse elimination, at least in part, through modulation of the axonal cytoskeleton. Together, our study reveals a glial cell-dependent pathway regulating the sculpting of neuronal connectivity and synaptic circuitry in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25232125

  2. Nodes, paranodes, and incisures: from form to function.

    PubMed

    Scherer, S S

    1999-09-14

    The exquisite molecular architecture of myelinated fibers is the basis for saltatory conduction. The nodal axolemma contains high concentrations of voltage-dependent sodium channels as well as the cell adhesion molecules neurofascin and Nr-CAM, all of which are probably linked to the axonal cytoskeleton by ankyrin. At paranodes, the axonal membrane contains paranodin/Caspr, which may be a Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecule with a heterophilic partner on the apposed glial cell membrane. The juxtaparanodal axonal membrane contains the potassium channels Kv1.1 and Kv1.2, as well as the associated beta 2 subunit, which together may function to dampen re-entrant excitation. The paranodes and incisures of the Schwann cell myelin sheath contain "reflexive" adherens junctions and gap junctions. The adherens junctions are composed of E-cadherin as well as alpha- and beta-catenin, which together probably join the adjacent layers of noncompact myelin together. Reflexive gap junctions, comprising connexin32 and at least one other connexin protein, form a radial pathway for the diffusion of ions and small molecules directly across the myelin sheath. PMID:10586239

  3. Nogo-A at CNS paranodes is a ligand of Caspr: possible regulation of K(+) channel localization.

    PubMed

    Nie, Du-Yu; Zhou, Zhi-Hong; Ang, Beng-Ti; Teng, Felicia Y H; Xu, Gang; Xiang, Tao; Wang, Chao-Yang; Zeng, Li; Takeda, Yasuo; Xu, Tian-Le; Ng, Yee-Kong; Faivre-Sarrailh, Catherine; Popko, Brian; Ling, Eng-Ang; Schachner, Melitta; Watanabe, Kazutada; Pallen, Catherine J; Tang, Bor Luen; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2003-11-01

    We report Nogo-A as an oligodendroglial component congregating and interacting with the Caspr-F3 complex at paranodes. However, its receptor Nogo-66 receptor (NgR) does not segregate to specific axonal domains. CHO cells cotransfected with Caspr and F3, but not with F3 alone, bound specifically to substrates coated with Nogo-66 peptide and GST-Nogo-66. Binding persisted even after phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) removal of GPI-linked F3 from the cell surface, suggesting a direct interaction between Nogo-66 and Caspr. Both Nogo-A and Caspr co-immunoprecipitated with Kv1.1 and Kv1.2, and the developmental expression pattern of both paralleled compared with Kv1.1, implicating a transient interaction between Nogo-A-Caspr and K(+) channels at early stages of myelination. In pathological models that display paranodal junctional defects (EAE rats, and Shiverer and CGT(-/-) mice), distances between the paired labeling of K(+) channels were shortened significantly and their localization shifted toward paranodes, while paranodal Nogo-A congregation was markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that Nogo-A interacts in trans with axonal Caspr at CNS paranodes, an interaction that may have a role in modulating axon-glial junction architecture and possibly K(+)-channel localization during development. PMID:14592966

  4. Changes in the expression and localization of the paranodal protein Caspr on axons in chronic multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wolswijk, Guus; Balesar, Rawien

    2003-07-01

    The presence of intact paranodal junctions on myelinated axons in the CNS and PNS is crucial for both myelin sheath attachment and saltatory impulse conduction. The axonal glycoprotein contactin-associated protein (Caspr) is expressed in the paranodal region and plays an important role in the creation and maintenance of these adhesive junctions. In the present study, antibodies to Caspr were used to assess the integrity of paranodal junctions on myelinated axons in brain and spinal cord tissue from subjects with longstanding multiple sclerosis, a neurological disorder that affects both myelin and axons. Triple immunofluorescence combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that axons in the demyelinated centre of the 36 brain and 16 spinal cord multiple sclerosis lesions studied were devoid of Caspr immunoreactivity, suggesting that axons down regulate the expression of Caspr following demyelination. Additional data indicated that Caspr reappears in the paranodal region with the formation of new myelin sheaths. Immuno labelling further revealed that Caspr on myelinated axons in border regions was often no longer concentrated in the paranodal region, but was also present in the internodal region-a phenomenon particularly common in the borders of the more chronic lesions in the collection. Myelinated axons with long Caspr-positive stretches were often present at a considerable distance from the lesion edges. These findings raise the possibility that the aberrant location of Caspr is an early sign of impending myelin loss. This would imply that demyelination continues at a slow rate in established lesions. The diameters of Caspr-positive structures on some myelinated axons near the lesion edges were also increased. Moreover, the gap between individual myelin sheaths on these apparently swollen axons was widened occasionally and a very small myelin sheath plus additional Caspr-positive structures had sometimes formed in the enlarged space. This finding thus

  5. Spatial mapping of juxtacrine axo-glial interactions identifies novel molecules in peripheral myelination

    PubMed Central

    Poitelon, Y.; Bogni, S.; Matafora, V.; Della-Flora Nunes, G.; Hurley, E.; Ghidinelli, M.; Katzenellenbogen, B. S.; Taveggia, C.; Silvestri, N.; Bachi, A.; Sannino, A.; Wrabetz, L.; Feltri, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell interactions promote juxtacrine signals in specific subcellular domains, which are difficult to capture in the complexity of the nervous system. For example, contact between axons and Schwann cells triggers signals required for radial sorting and myelination. Failure in this interaction causes dysmyelination and axonal degeneration. Despite its importance, few molecules at the axo-glial surface are known. To identify novel molecules in axo-glial interactions, we modified the ‘pseudopodia' sub-fractionation system and isolated the projections that glia extend when they receive juxtacrine signals from axons. By proteomics we identified the signalling networks present at the glial-leading edge, and novel proteins, including members of the Prohibitin family. Glial-specific deletion of Prohibitin-2 in mice impairs axo-glial interactions and myelination. We thus validate a novel method to model morphogenesis and juxtacrine signalling, provide insights into the molecular organization of the axo-glial contact, and identify a novel class of molecules in myelination. PMID:26383514

  6. Neurofascins are required to establish axonal domains for saltatory conduction.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Diane L; Tait, Steven; Melrose, Shona; Johnson, Richard; Zonta, Barbara; Court, Felipe A; Macklin, Wendy B; Meek, Stephen; Smith, Andrew J H; Cottrell, David F; Brophy, Peter J

    2005-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are concentrated in myelinated nerves at the nodes of Ranvier flanked by paranodal axoglial junctions. Establishment of these essential nodal and paranodal domains is determined by myelin-forming glia, but the mechanisms are not clear. Here, we show that two isoforms of Neurofascin, Nfasc155 in glia and Nfasc186 in neurons, are required for the assembly of these specialized domains. In Neurofascin-null mice, neither paranodal adhesion junctions nor nodal complexes are formed. Transgenic expression of Nfasc155 in the myelinating glia of Nfasc-/- nerves rescues the axoglial adhesion complex by recruiting the axonal proteins Caspr and Contactin to the paranodes. However, in the absence of Nfasc186, sodium channels remain diffusely distributed along the axon. Our study shows that the two major Neurofascins play essential roles in assembling the nodal and paranodal domains of myelinated axons; therefore, they are essential for the transition to saltatory conduction in developing vertebrate nerves. PMID:16337912

  7. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  8. No effect of genetic deletion of contactin-associated protein (CASPR) on axonal orientation and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Anilkumar M; Garcia-Fresco, German P; Sousa, Aurea D; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Philpot, Benjamin D; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2007-08-15

    Myelinated axons are endowed with a specialized domain structure that is essential for saltatory action potential conduction. The paranodal domain contains the axoglial junctions and displays a unique ultrastructure that resembles the invertebrate septate junctions (SJs). Biochemical characterizations of the paranodal axoglial SJs have identified several molecular components that include Caspr and contactin (Cont) on the axonal side and neurofascin 155 kDa (NF155) isoform on the glial side. All these proteins are essential for the formation of the axoglial SJs. Based on the interactions between Caspr and Cont and their colocalization in the CA1 synaptic areas, it was proposed that the synaptic function of Cont requires Caspr. Here we have extended the phenotypic analysis of CASPR mutants to address further the role of Caspr at the axoglial SJs and also in axonal orientation and synaptic plasticity. We report that, in CASPR mutants, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) forms elongated membranous complexes that accumulate at the nodal/paranodal region and stretch into the juxtaparanodal region, a defect that is consistent with the paranodal disorganization. We show that the cerebellar microorganization is unaffected in CASPR mutants. We also demonstrate that Caspr function is not essential for normal CA1 synaptic transmission and plasticity. Taken together with previous findings, our results highlight that the Caspr/Cont complex is essential for the formation of axoglial SJs, whereas Cont may regulate axonal orientation and synaptic plasticity independent of its association with Caspr. PMID:17549747

  9. Axoglial contacts in the area postrema of the cat - An ultrastructural study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, Fernando E.; Gibbs, Michael A.; Mehler, William R.; Philpott, Delbert E.; Savage, Wayne

    1986-01-01

    Axoglial contacts were observed in an ultrastructural study of the area postrema of the cat. According to the disposition of the electron-dense projections attached to the adjoining membranes these contacts were classified as symmetrical or asymmetrical. The axon profiles contained aggregations of clear vesicles randomly distributed or grouped in clusters adjacent to the electron-dense projections. Dense core vesicles were occasionally seen. The neuroglial profiles were either astrocytic or ependymoglial in nature. The astrocytes showed a clear cytoplasm, polymorphous vesicles, mitochondria, glycogen granules, and bundles of filaments. The ependymal cells, in contrast, had a more electron-dense and granular appearance, tubular structures, irregular vesicular formations, profiles of smooth reticuloendoplasm, and filaments grouped in bundles or isolated in the cytoplasm. The possibility that these contacts might play a role in the chemical transfer from neurons to glial cells is discussed on the basis of existing biochemical data.

  10. HDAC1/2-Dependent P0 Expression Maintains Paranodal and Nodal Integrity Independently of Myelin Stability through Interactions with Neurofascins.

    PubMed

    Brügger, Valérie; Engler, Stefanie; Pereira, Jorge A; Ruff, Sophie; Horn, Michael; Welzl, Hans; Münger, Emmanuelle; Vaquié, Adrien; Sidiropoulos, Páris N M; Egger, Boris; Yotovski, Peter; Filgueira, Luis; Somandin, Christian; Lühmann, Tessa C; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Yamaguchi, Teppei; Matthias, Patrick; Suter, Ueli; Jacob, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathies in adults is linked to maintenance mechanisms that are not well understood. Here, we elucidate a novel critical maintenance mechanism for Schwann cell (SC)-axon interaction. Using mouse genetics, ablation of the transcriptional regulators histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1/2) in adult SCs severely affected paranodal and nodal integrity and led to demyelination/remyelination. Expression levels of the HDAC1/2 target gene myelin protein zero (P0) were reduced by half, accompanied by altered localization and stability of neurofascin (NFasc)155, NFasc186, and loss of Caspr and septate-like junctions. We identify P0 as a novel binding partner of NFasc155 and NFasc186, both in vivo and by in vitro adhesion assay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HDAC1/2-dependent P0 expression is crucial for the maintenance of paranodal/nodal integrity and axonal function through interaction of P0 with neurofascins. In addition, we show that the latter mechanism is impaired by some P0 mutations that lead to late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:26406915

  11. HDAC1/2-Dependent P0 Expression Maintains Paranodal and Nodal Integrity Independently of Myelin Stability through Interactions with Neurofascins

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Valérie; Engler, Stefanie; Pereira, Jorge A.; Ruff, Sophie; Horn, Michael; Welzl, Hans; Münger, Emmanuelle; Vaquié, Adrien; Sidiropoulos, Páris N. M.; Egger, Boris; Yotovski, Peter; Filgueira, Luis; Somandin, Christian; Lühmann, Tessa C.; D’Antonio, Maurizio; Yamaguchi, Teppei; Matthias, Patrick; Suter, Ueli; Jacob, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathies in adults is linked to maintenance mechanisms that are not well understood. Here, we elucidate a novel critical maintenance mechanism for Schwann cell (SC)–axon interaction. Using mouse genetics, ablation of the transcriptional regulators histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1/2) in adult SCs severely affected paranodal and nodal integrity and led to demyelination/remyelination. Expression levels of the HDAC1/2 target gene myelin protein zero (P0) were reduced by half, accompanied by altered localization and stability of neurofascin (NFasc)155, NFasc186, and loss of Caspr and septate-like junctions. We identify P0 as a novel binding partner of NFasc155 and NFasc186, both in vivo and by in vitro adhesion assay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HDAC1/2-dependent P0 expression is crucial for the maintenance of paranodal/nodal integrity and axonal function through interaction of P0 with neurofascins. In addition, we show that the latter mechanism is impaired by some P0 mutations that lead to late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:26406915

  12. Subtle Paranodal Injury Slows Impulse Conduction in a Mathematical Model of Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Babbs, Charles F.; Shi, Riyi

    2013-01-01

    This study explores in detail the functional consequences of subtle retraction and detachment of myelin around the nodes of Ranvier following mild-to-moderate crush or stretch mediated injury. An equivalent electrical circuit model for a series of equally spaced nodes of Ranvier was created incorporating extracellular and axonal resistances, paranodal resistances, nodal capacitances, time varying sodium and potassium currents, and realistic resting and threshold membrane potentials in a myelinated axon segment of 21 successive nodes. Differential equations describing membrane potentials at each nodal region were solved numerically. Subtle injury was simulated by increasing the width of exposed nodal membrane in nodes 8 through 20 of the model. Such injury diminishes action potential amplitude and slows conduction velocity from 19.1 m/sec in the normal region to 7.8 m/sec in the crushed region. Detachment of paranodal myelin, exposing juxtaparanodal potassium channels, decreases conduction velocity further to 6.6 m/sec, an effect that is partially reversible with potassium ion channel blockade. Conduction velocity decreases as node width increases or as paranodal resistance falls. The calculated changes in conduction velocity with subtle paranodal injury agree with experimental observations. Nodes of Ranvier are highly effective but somewhat fragile devices for increasing nerve conduction velocity and decreasing reaction time in vertebrate animals. Their fundamental design limitation is that even small mechanical retractions of myelin from very narrow nodes or slight loosening of paranodal myelin, which are difficult to notice at the light microscopic level of observation, can cause large changes in myelinated nerve conduction velocity. PMID:23844090

  13. Nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal axonal proteins during demyelination and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coman, I; Aigrot, M S; Seilhean, D; Reynolds, R; Girault, J A; Zalc, B; Lubetzki, C

    2006-12-01

    Saltatory conduction in myelinated fibres depends on the specific molecular organization of highly specialized axonal domains at the node of Ranvier, the paranodal and the juxtaparanodal regions. Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) have been shown to be deployed along the naked demyelinated axon in experimental models of CNS demyelination and in multiple sclerosis lesions. Little is known about aggregation of nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal constituents during the repair process. We analysed by immunohistochemistry on free-floating sections from multiple sclerosis brains the expression and distribution of nodal (Na(v) channels), paranodal (paranodin/Caspr) and juxtaparanodal (K(v) channels and Caspr2) molecules in demyelinated and remyelinated lesions. Whereas in demyelinated lesions, paranodal and juxtaparanodal proteins are diffusely distributed on denuded axons, the distribution of Na(v) channels is heterogeneous, with a diffuse immunoreactivity but also few broad Na(v) channel aggregates in all demyelinated lesions. In contrast to the demyelinated plaques, all remyelinated lesions are characterized by the detection of aggregates of Na(v) channels, paranodin/Caspr, K(v) channels and Caspr2. Our data suggest that these aggregates precede remyelination, and that Na(v) channel aggregation is the initial event, followed by aggregation of paranodal and then juxtaparanodal axonal proteins. Remyelination takes place in multiple sclerosis tissue but myelin repair is often incomplete, and the reasons for this remyelination deficit are many. We suggest that a defect of Na(v) channel aggregation might be involved in the remyelination failure in demyelinated lesions with spared axons and oligodendroglial cells. PMID:16766541

  14. Nonsynaptic junctions on myelinating glia promote preferential myelination of electrically active axons

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Hiroaki; Ortiz, Fernando C.; Woo, Dong Ho; Lee, Philip R.; Angulo, María Cecilia; Fields, R. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The myelin sheath on vertebrate axons is critical for neural impulse transmission, but whether electrically active axons are preferentially myelinated by glial cells, and if so, whether axo-glial synapses are involved, are long-standing questions of significance to nervous system development, plasticity and disease. Here we show using an in vitro system that oligodendrocytes preferentially myelinate electrically active axons, but synapses from axons onto myelin-forming oligodendroglial cells are not required. Instead, vesicular release at nonsynaptic axo-glial junctions induces myelination. Axons releasing neurotransmitter from vesicles that accumulate in axon varicosities induces a local rise in cytoplasmic calcium in glial cell processes at these nonsynaptic functional junctions, and this signalling stimulates local translation of myelin basic protein to initiate myelination. PMID:26238238

  15. The influence of protein-calorie malnutrition on the development of paranodal regions in spinal roots. A study with the OTAN method on rat.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, C

    1977-11-28

    During the early postnatal development of spinal roots in rats paranodal regions were often found, containing OTAN-positive inclusions in the Schwann cell cytoplasm. The presence of OTAN-positive paranodal regions showed variations in time, which were synchronous for ventral and dorsal roots. Dorsal roots, however, showed a more marked presence during development than ventral roots. Spinal roots of animals submitted to a 50% food restriction, were shown to contain more OTAN-positive paranodal regions than controls. This was true for ventral as well as dorsal roots. It is suggested that crowding of internodal segments could be one factor, determining the presence of paranodal, OTAN-positive material. PMID:414508

  16. Nodes of Ranvier act as barriers to restrict invasion of flanking paranodal domains in myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Thaxton, Courtney; Pillai, Anilkumar M; Pribisko, Alaine L; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2011-01-27

    Accumulation of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channels at nodes of Ranvier is paramount for action potential propagation along myelinated fibers, yet the mechanisms governing nodal development, organization, and stabilization remain unresolved. Here, we report that genetic ablation of the neuron-specific isoform of Neurofascin (Nfasc(NF¹⁸⁶)) in vivo results in nodal disorganization, including loss of Na(v) channel and ankyrin-G (AnkG) enrichment at nodes in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS). Interestingly, the presence of paranodal domains failed to rescue nodal organization in the PNS and the CNS. Most importantly, using ultrastructural analysis, we demonstrate that the paranodal domains invade the nodal space in Nfasc(NF¹⁸⁶) mutant axons and occlude node formation. Our results suggest that Nfasc(NF¹⁸⁶)-dependent assembly of the nodal complex acts as a molecular boundary to restrict the movement of flanking paranodal domains into the nodal area, thereby facilitating the stereotypic axonal domain organization and saltatory conduction along myelinated axons. PMID:21262464

  17. Paranodal myelin retraction in relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis visualized by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yan; Frederick, Terra J.; Huff, Terry B.; Goings, Gwendolyn E.; Miller, Stephen D.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2011-10-01

    How demyelination is initiated is a standing question for pathology of multiple sclerosis. By label-free coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging of myelin lipids, we investigate myelin integrity in the lumbar spinal cord tissue isolated from naïve SJL mice, and from mice at the onset, peak acute, and remission stages of relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Progressive demyelinating disease is initially characterized by the retraction of paranodal myelin both at the onset of disease and at the borders of acute demyelinating lesions. Myelin retraction is confirmed by elongated distribution of neurofascin proteins visualized by immunofluorescence. The disruption of paranodal myelin subsequently exposes Kv1.2 channels at the juxtaparanodes and lead to the displacement of Kv1.2 channels to the paranodal and nodal domains. Paranodal myelin is partially restored during disease remission, indicating spontaneous myelin regeneration. These findings suggest that paranodal domain injury precedes formation of internodal demyelinating lesions in relapsing EAE. Our results also demonstrate that CARS microscopy is an effective readout of myelin disease burden.

  18. Mutations in CNTNAP1 and ADCY6 are responsible for severe arthrogryposis multiplex congenita with axoglial defects.

    PubMed

    Laquérriere, Annie; Maluenda, Jérome; Camus, Adrien; Fontenas, Laura; Dieterich, Klaus; Nolent, Flora; Zhou, Jié; Monnier, Nicole; Latour, Philippe; Gentil, Damien; Héron, Delphine; Desguerres, Isabelle; Landrieu, Pierre; Beneteau, Claire; Delaporte, Benoit; Bellesme, Céline; Baumann, Clarisse; Capri, Yline; Goldenberg, Alice; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Bonneau, Dominique; Estournet, Brigitte; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Francannet, Christine; Odent, Sylvie; Saint-Frison, Marie-Hélène; Sigaudy, Sabine; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Gelot, Antoinette; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Lacroix, Catherine; Drouin-Garraud, Valerie; Malinge, Marie-Claire; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Bessieres, Bettina; Bonniere, Maryse; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie; Khung-Savatovsky, Suonary; Perez, Marie José; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Mercier, Sandra; Roume, Joelle; Trestard, Laetitia; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Layet, Valérie; Legendre, Marine; Vigouroux-Castera, Adeline; Lunardi, Joel; Bayes, Monica; Jouk, Pierre S; Rigonnot, Luc; Granier, Michèle; Sternberg, Damien; Warszawski, Josiane; Gut, Ivo; Gonzales, Marie; Tawk, Marcel; Melki, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Non-syndromic arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by multiple congenital contractures resulting from reduced fetal mobility. Genetic mapping and whole exome sequencing (WES) were performed in 31 multiplex and/or consanguineous undiagnosed AMC families. Although this approach identified known AMC genes, we here report pathogenic mutations in two new genes. Homozygous frameshift mutations in CNTNAP1 were found in four unrelated families. Patients showed a marked reduction in motor nerve conduction velocity (<10 m/s) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of sciatic nerve in the index cases revealed severe abnormalities of both nodes of Ranvier width and myelinated axons. CNTNAP1 encodes CASPR, an essential component of node of Ranvier domains which underlies saltatory conduction of action potentials along the myelinated axons, an important process for neuronal function. A homozygous missense mutation in adenylate cyclase 6 gene (ADCY6) was found in another family characterized by a lack of myelin in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) as determined by TEM. Morpholino knockdown of the zebrafish orthologs led to severe and specific defects in peripheral myelin in spite of the presence of Schwann cells. ADCY6 encodes a protein that belongs to the adenylate cyclase family responsible for the synthesis of cAMP. Elevation of cAMP can mimic axonal contact in vitro and upregulates myelinating signals. Our data indicate an essential and so far unknown role of ADCY6 in PNS myelination likely through the cAMP pathway. Mutations of genes encoding proteins of Ranvier domains or involved in myelination of Schwann cells are responsible for novel and severe human axoglial diseases. PMID:24319099

  19. Molecular alterations underlie nodal and paranodal degeneration in type 1 diabetic neuropathy and are prevented by C-peptide.

    PubMed

    Sima, Anders A F; Zhang, Weixian; Li, Zhen-Guo; Murakawa, Yuichi; Pierson, Christopher R

    2004-06-01

    To explore the molecular abnormalities underlying the degeneration of the node of Ranvier, a characteristic aberration of type 1 diabetic neuropathy, we examined in type 1 BB/Wor and type 2 BBZDR/Wor rats changes in expression of key molecules that make up the nodal and paranodal apparatus of peripheral nerve. Their posttranslational modifications were examined in vitro. Their responsiveness to restored insulin action was examined in type 1 animals replenished with proinsulin C-peptide. In sciatic nerve, the expression of contactin, receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta, and the Na(+)-channel beta(1) subunit, paranodal caspr and nodal ankyrin(G) was unaltered in 2-month type 1 diabetic BB/Wor rats but significantly decreased after 8 months of diabetes. These abnormalities were prevented by C-peptide administered to type 1 BB/Wor rats and did not occur in duration- and hyperglycemia-matched type 2 BBZDR/Wor rats. The expression of the alpha-Na(+)-channel subunit was unaltered. In SH-SY5Y cells, only the combination of insulin and C-peptide normalized posttranslational O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modifications and maximized serine phosphorylation of ankyrin(G) and p85 binding to caspr. The beneficial effects of C-peptide resulted in significant normalization of the nerve conduction deficits. These data describe for the first time the progressive molecular aberrations underlying nodal and paranodal degenerative changes in type 1 diabetic neuropathy and demonstrate that they are preventable by insulinomimetic C-peptide. PMID:15161761

  20. [New insights on the organization of the nodes of Ranvier].

    PubMed

    Devaux, J J

    2014-12-01

    Myelin plays a crucial role in the rapid and saltatory conduction of the nerve impulse along myelinated axons. In addition, myelin closely regulates the organization of the axonal compartments. This organization involves several complex mechanisms including axo-glial contact, diffusion barriers, the cytoskeletal network, and the extracellular matrix. In peripheral nerves, the axo-glial contact dictates the formation of the nodes and the clustering of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav). The axo-glial contact at nodes implicates adhesion molecules expressed by the Schwann cell (gliomedin and NrCAM), which binds a partner, neurofascin-186, on the axonal side. This complex is essential for the recruitment of ankyrin-G, a cytoskeletal scaffolding protein, which binds and concentrates Nav channels at nodes. The paranodal junctions flanking the nodes also play a complementary function in node formation. These junctions are formed by the association of contactin-1/caspr-1/neurofascin-155 and create a diffusion barrier, which traps proteins at the nodes and dampens their diffusion along the internode. In the central nervous system, the mechanisms of node formation are different and the formation of the paranodal junctions precedes the aggregation of Nav channels at nodes. However, node formation can still happen in absence of paranodal junctions in the CNS. One explanation is that NF186 interacts with components of the extracellular matrix around the node and thereby stabilizes the aggregation of nodal proteins. It is likely that many other proteins are also implicated in the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of the axonal compartments. The nature and function of these proteins are yet to be identified. PMID:25459119

  1. Disrupted axon-glia interactions at the paranode in myelinated nerves cause axonal degeneration and neuronal cell death in the aged Caspr mutant mouse shambling.

    PubMed

    Takagishi, Yoshiko; Katanosaka, Kimiaki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Murata, Yoshiharu

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that axonal degeneration is a disease mechanism in various neurodegenerative diseases and that the paranodes at the nodes of Ranvier may be the initial site of pathogenesis. We investigated the pathophysiology of the disease process in the central and peripheral nervous systems of a Caspr mutant mouse, shambling (shm), which is affected by disrupted paranodal structures and impaired nerve conduction of myelinated nerves. The shm mice manifest a progressive neurological phenotype as mice age. We found extensive axonal degeneration and a loss of neurons in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system in aged shm mice. Axonal alteration of myelinated nerves was defined by abnormal distribution and expression of neurofilaments and derangements in the status of phosphorylated and non/de-phosphorylated neurofilaments. Autophagy-related structures were also accumulated in degenerated axons and neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that disrupted axon-glia interactions at the paranode cause the cytoskeletal alteration in myelinated axons leading to neuronal cell death, and the process involves detrimental autophagy and aging as factors that promote the pathogenesis. PMID:27255813

  2. Loss of Glial Neurofascin155 Delays Developmental Synapse Elimination at the Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Sarah L.; Sherman, Diane L.; Dissanayake, Kosala; Soucy, Geneviève; Desmazieres, Anne; Lamont, Douglas J.; Peles, Elior; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Wishart, Thomas M.; Ribchester, Richard R.; Brophy, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Postnatal synapse elimination plays a critical role in sculpting and refining neural connectivity throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems, including the removal of supernumerary axonal inputs from neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Here, we reveal a novel and important role for myelinating glia in regulating synapse elimination at the mouse NMJ, where loss of a single glial cell protein, the glial isoform of neurofascin (Nfasc155), was sufficient to disrupt postnatal remodeling of synaptic circuitry. Neuromuscular synapses were formed normally in mice lacking Nfasc155, including the establishment of robust neuromuscular synaptic transmission. However, loss of Nfasc155 was sufficient to cause a robust delay in postnatal synapse elimination at the NMJ across all muscle groups examined. Nfasc155 regulated neuronal remodeling independently of its canonical role in forming paranodal axo–glial junctions, as synapse elimination occurred normally in mice lacking the axonal paranodal protein Caspr. Rather, high-resolution proteomic screens revealed that loss of Nfasc155 from glial cells was sufficient to disrupt neuronal cytoskeletal organization and trafficking pathways, resulting in reduced levels of neurofilament light (NF-L) protein in distal axons and motor nerve terminals. Mice lacking NF-L recapitulated the delayed synapse elimination phenotype observed in mice lacking Nfasc155, suggesting that glial cells regulate synapse elimination, at least in part, through modulation of the axonal cytoskeleton. Together, our study reveals a glial cell-dependent pathway regulating the sculpting of neuronal connectivity and synaptic circuitry in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25232125

  3. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  4. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  5. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  6. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  7. Bimetallic junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcella, F. G.; Lessmann, G. G.; Lindberg, R. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The formation of voids through interdiffusion in bimetallic welded structures exposed to high operating temperatures is inhibited by utilizing an alloy of the parent materials in the junction of the parent materials or by preannealing the junction at an ultrahigh temperature. These methods are also used to reduce the concentration gradient of a hardening agent.

  8. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  9. Making the connection - shared molecular machinery and evolutionary links underlie the formation and plasticity of occluding junctions and synapses.

    PubMed

    Harden, Nicholas; Wang, Simon Ji Hau; Krieger, Charles

    2016-08-15

    The pleated septate junction (pSJ), an ancient structure for cell-cell contact in invertebrate epithelia, has protein components that are found in three more-recent junctional structures, the neuronal synapse, the paranodal region of the myelinated axon and the vertebrate epithelial tight junction. These more-recent structures appear to have evolved through alterations of the ancestral septate junction. During its formation in the developing animal, the pSJ exhibits plasticity, although the final structure is extremely robust. Similar to the immature pSJ, the synapse and tight junctions both exhibit plasticity, and we consider evidence that this plasticity comes at least in part from the interaction of members of the immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecule superfamily with highly regulated membrane-associated guanylate kinases. This plasticity regulation probably arose in order to modulate the ancestral pSJ and is maintained in the derived structures; we suggest that it would be beneficial when studying plasticity of one of these structures to consider the literature on the others. Finally, looking beyond the junctions, we highlight parallels between epithelial and synaptic membranes, which both show a polarized distribution of many of the same proteins - evidence that determinants of apicobasal polarity in epithelia also participate in patterning of the synapse. PMID:27528207

  10. Differential Stability of PNS and CNS Nodal Complexes When Neuronal Neurofascin Is Lost

    PubMed Central

    Desmazieres, Anne; Zonta, Barbara; Zhang, Ao; Wu, Lai-Man N.; Sherman, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Fast, saltatory conduction in myelinated nerves requires the clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) at nodes of Ranvier in a nodal complex. The Neurofascin (Nfasc) gene encodes neuronal Neurofascin 186 (Nfasc186) at the node and glial Neurofascin 155 at the paranode, and these proteins play a key role in node assembly. However, their role in the maintenance and stability of the node is less well understood. Here we show that by inducible ablation of Nfasc in neurons in adult mice, Nfasc186 expression is reduced by >99% and 94% at PNS and CNS nodes, respectively. Gliomedin and NrCAM at PNS and brevican at CNS nodes are largely lost with neuronal neurofascin; however, Nav at nodes of Ranvier persist, albeit with ∼40% reduction in expression levels. βIV Spectrin, ankyrin G, and, to a lesser extent, the β1 subunit of the sodium channel, are less affected at the PNS node than in the CNS. Nevertheless, there is a 38% reduction in PNS conduction velocity. Loss of Nfasc186 provokes CNS paranodal disorganization, but this does not contribute to loss of Nav. These results show that Nav at PNS nodes are still maintained in a nodal complex when neuronal neurofascin is depleted, whereas the retention of nodal Nav in the CNS, despite more extensive dissolution of the complex, suggests a supportive role for the partially disrupted paranodal axoglial junction in selectively maintaining Nav at the CNS node. PMID:24719087

  11. Differential stability of PNS and CNS nodal complexes when neuronal neurofascin is lost.

    PubMed

    Desmazieres, Anne; Zonta, Barbara; Zhang, Ao; Wu, Lai-Man N; Sherman, Diane L; Brophy, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    Fast, saltatory conduction in myelinated nerves requires the clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) at nodes of Ranvier in a nodal complex. The Neurofascin (Nfasc) gene encodes neuronal Neurofascin 186 (Nfasc186) at the node and glial Neurofascin 155 at the paranode, and these proteins play a key role in node assembly. However, their role in the maintenance and stability of the node is less well understood. Here we show that by inducible ablation of Nfasc in neurons in adult mice, Nfasc186 expression is reduced by >99% and 94% at PNS and CNS nodes, respectively. Gliomedin and NrCAM at PNS and brevican at CNS nodes are largely lost with neuronal neurofascin; however, Nav at nodes of Ranvier persist, albeit with ∼40% reduction in expression levels. βIV Spectrin, ankyrin G, and, to a lesser extent, the β1 subunit of the sodium channel, are less affected at the PNS node than in the CNS. Nevertheless, there is a 38% reduction in PNS conduction velocity. Loss of Nfasc186 provokes CNS paranodal disorganization, but this does not contribute to loss of Nav. These results show that Nav at PNS nodes are still maintained in a nodal complex when neuronal neurofascin is depleted, whereas the retention of nodal Nav in the CNS, despite more extensive dissolution of the complex, suggests a supportive role for the partially disrupted paranodal axoglial junction in selectively maintaining Nav at the CNS node. PMID:24719087

  12. Crooked, coiled and crimpled are three Ly6-like proteins required for proper localization of septate junction components.

    PubMed

    Nilton, Anna; Oshima, Kenzi; Zare, Fariba; Byri, Sunitha; Nannmark, Ulf; Nyberg, Kevin G; Fehon, Richard G; Uv, Anne E

    2010-07-01

    Cellular junction formation is an elaborate process that is dependent on the regulated synthesis, assembly and membrane targeting of constituting components. Here, we report on three Drosophila Ly6-like proteins essential for septate junction (SJ) formation. SJs provide a paracellular diffusion barrier and appear molecularly and structurally similar to vertebrate paranodal septate junctions. We show that Crooked (Crok), a small GPI-anchored Ly6-like protein, is required for septa formation and barrier functions. In embryos that lack Crok, SJ components are produced but fail to accumulate at the plasma membrane. Crok is detected in intracellular puncta and acts tissue-autonomously, which suggests that it resides in intracellular vesicles to assist the cell surface localization of SJ components. In addition, we demonstrate that two related Ly6 proteins, Coiled (Cold) and Crimpled (Crim), are required for SJ formation and function in a tissue-autonomous manner, and that Cold also localizes to intracellular vesicles. Specifically, Crok and Cold are required for correct membrane trafficking of Neurexin IV, a central SJ component. The non-redundant requirement for Crok, Cold, Crim and Boudin (Bou; another Ly6 protein that was recently shown to be involved in SJ formation) suggests that members of this conserved family of proteins cooperate in the assembly of SJ components, possibly by promoting core SJ complex formation in intracellular compartments associated with membrane trafficking. PMID:20570942

  13. Solitons in Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. V.

    1998-11-01

    Magnetic flux quanta in Josephson junctions, often called fluxons, in many cases behave as solitons. A review of recent experiments and modelling of fluxon dynamics in Josephson circuits is presented. Classic quasi-one-dimensional junctions, stacked junctions (Josephson superlattices), and discrete Josephson transmission lines (JTLs) are discussed. Applications of fluxon devices as high-frequency oscillators and digital circuits are also addressed.

  14. CNP is required for maintenance of axon-glia interactions at nodes of Ranvier in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Rasband, Matthew N; Tayler, Jane; Kaga, Yoshimi; Yang, Yang; Lappe-Siefke, Corinna; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Bansal, Rashmi

    2005-04-01

    Axoglial interactions underlie the clustering of ion channels and of cell adhesion molecules, regulate gene expression, and control cell survival. We report that Cnp1-null mice, lacking expression of the myelin protein cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (CNP), have disrupted axoglial interactions in the central nervous system (CNS). Nodal sodium channels (Nav) and paranodal adhesion proteins (Caspr) are initially clustered normally, but become progressively disorganized with age. These changes are characterized by mislocalized Caspr immunostaining, combined with a decrease of clustered Na+ channels, and occur before axonal degeneration and microglial invasion, both prominent in older Cnp1-null mice. We suggest that CNP is a glial protein required for maintaining the integrity of paranodes and that disrupted axoglial signaling at this site underlies progressive axonal degeneration, observed later in the CNS of Cnp1-null mice. PMID:15657937

  15. Three-junction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Ludowise, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  16. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowik, Ł.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Mélin, T.

    2013-11-01

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (ND≈1020-1021cm-3) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2-50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as ND-1/3, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as ND1/3. We thus establish a "nanocrystal counterpart" of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  17. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. PMID:22881834

  18. Carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhen; Postma, Henk W. Ch.; Balents, Leon; Dekker, Cees

    1999-11-01

    The ultimate device miniaturization would be to use individual molecules as functional devices. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising candidates for achieving this: depending on their diameter and chirality, they are either one-dimensional metals or semiconductors. Single-electron transistors employing metallic nanotubes and field-effect transistors employing semiconducting nanotubes have been demonstrated. Intramolecular devices have also been proposed which should display a range of other device functions. For example, by introducing a pentagon and a heptagon into the hexagonal carbon lattice, two tube segments with different atomic and electronic structures can be seamlessly fused together to create intramolecular metal-metal, metal-semiconductor, or semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. Here we report electrical transport measurements on SWNTs with intramolecular junctions. We find that a metal-semiconductor junction behaves like a rectifying diode with nonlinear transport characteristics that are strongly asymmetric with respect to bias polarity. In the case of a metal-metal junction, the conductance appears to be strongly suppressed and it displays a power-law dependence on temperatures and applied voltage, consistent with tunnelling between the ends of two Luttinger liquids. Our results emphasize the need to consider screening and electron interactions when designing and modelling molecular devices. Realization of carbon-based molecular electronics will require future efforts in the controlled production of these intramolecular nanotube junctions.

  19. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  20. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  1. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  2. T-Junction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Part 1: Two different volume renderings of fluid temperatures in a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000. Part 2: Volume rendering of fluid temperatures in a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000, simulated using Nek5000 at three different resolutions. Part 3: Temperature distribution for a turbulent T-junction mixing problem at Reynolds number Re=40,000, simulated using Nek5000 with 89056 spectral elements of order N=9 (65 million grid points). Credits: Science: Aleks Obabko and Paul Fisher, Argonne National Laboratory
 Visualization: Hank Childs, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357

  3. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  4. Josephson junction mixing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theory is presented which, though too simple to explain quantitative details in the Josephson junction mixing response, is sufficient for explaining qualitatively the results observed. Crucial to the theory presented, and that which differentiates it from earlier ones, is the inclusion of harmonic voltages across the ideal Josephson element.

  5. Squeezable electron tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, J.; Alexander, S.; Cox, M.; Sonnenfeld, R.; Hansma, P. K.

    1983-09-01

    We report a versatile new technique for constructing electron tunneling junctions with mechanically-adjusted artificial barriers. I-V curves are presented for tunneling between Ag electrodes with vacuum, gas, liquid or solid in the barrier. An energy gap is apparent in the measured I-V curve when tunneling occurs between superconducting Pb electrodes.

  6. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  7. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. PMID:26008742

  8. Pathophysiological actions of neuropathy-related anti-ganglioside antibodies at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Plomp, Jaap J; Willison, Hugh J

    2009-01-01

    The outer leaflet of neuronal membranes is highly enriched in gangliosides. Therefore, specific neuronal roles have been attributed to this family of sialylated glycosphingolipids, e.g. in modulation of ion channels and transporters, neuronal interaction and recognition, temperature adaptation, Ca2+ homeostasis, axonal growth, (para)node of Ranvier stability and synaptic transmission. Recent developmental, ageing and injury studies on transgenic mice lacking subsets of gangliosides indicate that gangliosides are involved in maintenance rather than development of the nervous system and that ganglioside family members are able to act in a mutually compensatory manner. Besides having physiological functions, gangliosides are the likely antigenic targets of autoantibodies present in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), a group of neuropathies with clinical symptoms of motor- and/or sensory peripheral nerve dysfunction. Antibody binding to peripheral nerves is thought to either interfere with ganglioside function or activate complement, causing axonal damage and thereby disturbed action potential conduction. The presynaptic motor nerve terminal at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) may be a prominent target because it is highly enriched in gangliosides and lies outside the blood–nerve barrier, allowing antibody access. The ensuing neuromuscular synaptopathy might contribute to the muscle weakness in GBS patients. Several groups, including our own, have studied the effects of anti-ganglioside antibodies in ex vivo and in vivo experimental settings at mouse NMJs. Here, after providing a background overview on ganglioside synthesis, localization and physiology, we will review those studies, which clearly show that anti-ganglioside antibodies are capable of binding to NMJs and thereby can exert a variety of pathophysiological effects. Furthermore, we will discuss the human clinical electrophysiological and histological evidence produced so far of the existence of a neuromuscular

  9. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  10. Holliday Junction Resolvases

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Haley D.M.; West, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. PMID:25183833

  11. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  12. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion. PMID:17303718

  13. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  14. [Gap junction and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiao-rong; Tao, Jian; Wang, Yun-kai

    2015-11-01

    Gap junctions play a critical role in electrical synchronization and exchange of small molecules between neighboring cells; connexins are a family of structurally related transmembrane proteins that assemble to form vertebrate gap junctions. Hyperglycemia changes the structure gap junction proteins and their expression, resulting in obstruction of neural regeneration, vascular function and wound healing, and also promoting vascular atherosclerosis. These pathogenic factors would cause diabetic foot ulcers. This article reviews the involvement of connexins in pathogenesis of diabetic foot. PMID:26822053

  15. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  16. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Dan; Segall, Ken

    2010-07-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These “Josephson junction neurons” reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, large interconnected networks of Josephson junction neurons would operate fully in parallel. They would be orders of magnitude faster than both traditional computer simulations and biological neural networks. Josephson junction neurons provide a new tool for exploring long-term large-scale dynamics for networks of neurons.

  17. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  18. Neuromuscular junction disorders.

    PubMed

    Verschuuren, Jan; Strijbos, Ellen; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Diseases of the neuromuscular junction comprise a wide range of disorders. Antibodies, genetic mutations, specific drugs or toxins interfere with the number or function of one of the essential proteins that control signaling between the presynaptic nerve ending and the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Acquired autoimmune disorders of the neuromuscular junction are the most common and are described here. In myasthenia gravis, antibodies to acetylcholine receptors or to proteins involved in receptor clustering, particularly muscle-specific kinase, cause direct loss of acetylcholine receptors or interfere with the agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering necessary for efficient neurotransmission. In the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), loss of the presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels results in reduced release of the acetylcholine transmitter. The conditions are generally recognizable clinically and the diagnosis confirmed by serologic testing and electromyography. Screening for thymomas in myasthenia or small cell cancer in LEMS is important. Fortunately, a wide range of symptomatic treatments, immunosuppressive drugs, or other immunomodulating therapies is available. Future research is directed to understanding the pathogenesis, discovering new antigens, and trying to develop disease-specific treatments. PMID:27112691

  19. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells. PMID:26404354

  20. Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Laimer, Martin; Lanschuetzer, Christoph M; Diem, Anja; Bauer, Johann W

    2010-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa type Herlitz (JEB-H) is the autosomal recessively inherited, more severe variant of "lucidolytic" JEB. Characterized by generalized, extensive mucocutaneous blistering at birth and early lethality, this devastating condition is most often caused by homozygous null mutations in the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, each encoding for 1 of the 3 chains of the heterotrimer laminin-332. The JEB-H subtype usually presents as a severe and clinically diverse variant of the EB group of mechanobullous genodermatoses. This article outlines the epidemiology, presentation, and diagnosis of JEB-H. Morbidity and mortality are high, necessitating optimized protocols for early (including prenatal) diagnosis and palliative care. Gene therapy remains the most promising perspective. PMID:19945616

  1. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  2. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  3. Disordered graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, W. A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-02-01

    A tight-binding approach based on the Chebyshev-Bogoliubov-de Gennes method is used to describe disordered single-layer graphene Josephson junctions. Scattering by vacancies, ripples, or charged impurities is included. We compute the Josephson current and investigate the nature of multiple Andreev reflections, which induce bound states appearing as peaks in the density of states for energies below the superconducting gap. In the presence of single-atom vacancies, we observe a strong suppression of the supercurrent, which is a consequence of strong intervalley scattering. Although lattice deformations should not induce intervalley scattering, we find that the supercurrent is still suppressed, which is due to the presence of pseudomagnetic barriers. For charged impurities, we consider two cases depending on whether the average doping is zero, i.e., existence of electron-hole puddles, or finite. In both cases, short-range impurities strongly affect the supercurrent, similar to the vacancies scenario.

  4. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices. PMID:27277330

  5. Electronic properties of nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin, Ph.; Meunier, V.

    1998-08-01

    The possibility of realizing junctions between two different nanotubes has recently attracted a great interest, even though much remains to be done for putting this idea in concrete form. Pentagon-heptagon pair defects in the otherwise perfect graphitic network make such connections possible, with virtually infinite varieties. In this paper, the literature devoted to nanotube junctions is briefly reviewed. A special emphasize is put on the electronic properties of C nanotube junctions, together with an indication on how their current-voltage characteristics may look like.

  6. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  7. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  8. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  9. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  10. Neuromuscular junctional disorders.

    PubMed

    Girija, A S; Ashraf, V V

    2008-07-01

    Neuromuscular junctional disorders (NMJ) in children are distinct entity. They may be acquired or hereditary. They pose problem in diagnosis because of the higher occurrence of sero negative Myasthenia Gravis (MG) cases in children. The identity of MusK antibody positivity in a good percentage of sero negative cases further adds to problems in diagnosis. The Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome (CMS) which are rare disorders of hereditary neuromuscular transmission (NMT) has to be differentiated because immunotherapy has no benefit in this group. Molecular genetic studies of these diseases helps to identify specific type of CMS which is important as other drugs like Fluoxetine, Quinidine are found to be effective in some. In infancy, all can manifest as floppy infant syndrome. The important key to diagnosis is by detailed electrophysiological studies including repetitive nerve stimulation at slow and high rates and its response to anticholinesterases and estimation of Acetyl choline receptor antibodies. Other causes of neuromuscular transmission defects viz. snake venom poisoning and that due to drugs are discussed. PMID:18716738

  11. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  12. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  13. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  14. The cytoskeletal adapter protein 4.1G organizes the internodes in peripheral myelinated nerves

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovic, Aleksandra; Horresh, Ido; Golan, Neev; Spiegel, Ivo; Sabanay, Helena; Frechter, Shahar; Ohno, Shinichi; Terada, Nobuo; Möbius, Wiebke; Rosenbluth, Jack; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Myelinating Schwann cells regulate the localization of ion channels on the surface of the axons they ensheath. This function depends on adhesion complexes that are positioned at specific membrane domains along the myelin unit. Here we show that the precise localization of internodal proteins depends on the expression of the cytoskeletal adapter protein 4.1G in Schwann cells. Deletion of 4.1G in mice resulted in aberrant distribution of both glial adhesion molecules and axonal proteins that were present along the internodes. In wild-type nerves, juxtaparanodal proteins (i.e., Kv1 channels, Caspr2, and TAG-1) were concentrated throughout the internodes in a double strand that flanked paranodal junction components (i.e., Caspr, contactin, and NF155), and apposes the inner mesaxon of the myelin sheath. In contrast, in 4.1G−/− mice, these proteins “piled up” at the juxtaparanodal region or aggregated along the internodes. These findings suggest that protein 4.1G contributes to the organization of the internodal axolemma by targeting and/or maintaining glial transmembrane proteins along the axoglial interface. PMID:22291039

  15. Axolemmal abnormalities in myelin mutants.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, J

    1990-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that the paranodal axoglial junction plays important roles in the differentiation and function of myelinated axons. In myelin-deficient axons, ion flux across the axolemma is greater than that in myelinated fibers because a larger proportion of the axolemma is active during continuous, as opposed to saltatory, conduction. In addition, older myelin-deficient rats that have developed spontaneous seizures display small foci of node-like E-face particle accumulations in CNS axons as well as more diffuse regions of increased particle density and number. Assuming that the E-face particles represent sodium channels, such regions could underlie high sodium current density during activity, low threshold for excitation, and increased extracellular potassium accumulation. Depending on the degree of spontaneous channel opening, they could also represent sites of spontaneous generation of activity. The appearance of seizures and their gradual increase in frequency and severity could represent an increase in the number of such regions. In addition, diminution in the dimensions of the extracellular space during maturation would result in increased extracellular resistance, which, together with increasing axonal diameter, would tend to increase the likelihood of ephaptic interaction among neighboring axons as well as the likelihood of extracellular potassium rises to levels that could cause spontaneous activity. PMID:2268117

  16. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  17. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  18. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  19. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  20. Measurement of tunnel junction resistance during formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, W.C.; Johnson, R.T.; Lee, J.S.; Laws, K.E.; Bland, R.W. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have measured the characteristics of aluminum tunnel junctions during and immediately after the formation of the junction. This has permitted us to observe changes in the oxide barrier, in vacuum and in air. By observing the barrier resistance during sputtering, they were able to diagnose and correct problems due to plasma discharges which were damaging the junctions. They report preliminary results from junctions passivated with a silicon nitride cap layer.

  1. GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION AND CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gap Junctions (GJs) provide cell-to-cell communication (GJIC) of essential metabolites and ions. Js allow tissues to average responses, clear waste products, and minimize the effects of xenobiotics by dilution and allowing steady-state catabolism. any chemicals can adversely affe...

  2. The Yolla Bolly junction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, M.C.; Jayko, A.S. ); Jones, D.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Engebretson, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    West of Red Bluff, California, rocks of the northern Coast Ranges, Klamath-Sierra Nevada, and Great Valley provinces come together at what has been called the Yolla Bolly junction. Mapping of the Red Bluff and Willows 1:100,000 quadrangles has greatly clarified the enigmatic features of this complex area. Terranes of the Klamath Mountains and their Cretaceous sedimentary cover have been thrust northwestward over the Elder Creek terrane and Franciscan rocks, north of the left-lateral Cold Fork fault zone. The Condrey Mountain window (Franciscan Pickett Peak terrane) provides a measure of the magnitude of this thrusting (ca 90 km). South of the Cold Fork fault zone, the Franciscan and Elder Creek terranes were driven southeastward as tectonic wedges onto Sierran-Klamath basement. Timing of this scissor-tectonics is not constrained near the junction, but further north in southwest Oregon, Lower Eocene strata were deformed by overthrusting of the Klamath block whereas Upper Eocene strata overlap the thrust, indicating that thrusting occurred between about 52 and 60 Ma. Plate reconstructions for this time interval indicate the close proximity of the Kula-Farallon-North America triple junction and that old (ca 100 m.y.) Farallon lithosphere was being subducted north of the junction whereas to the south, very young (ca 10 m.y.) Kula plate was presumably obducted onto North America.

  3. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  4. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  5. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  6. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β. PMID:25871745

  7. Ureteropelvic junction disease: diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Giulia; Maggi, Fabio; Valentini, Viola

    2002-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction disease is very frequent in pediatric age. Diagnosis is usually established on sonography; in most cases it is prenatal and confirmed at birth. On sonography, hydronephrosis and the site of obstruction is identified with morphofunctional information on renal parenchyma. In the past, urography was the reference examination for ureteropelvic junction disease, but its use is limited in pediatrics especially in prenatal study for radioprotection as well as for the limited glomerular filtration of neonatal kidney. CT and MRI as second level examinations do not find many indications, while angioscintigraphy is largely used to acquire functional data and, in combination with sonography, is basic for diagnosis as well as in follow-up of operated patients. PMID:12696256

  8. Gap junctions as electrical synapses.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M V

    1997-06-01

    Gap junctions are the morphological substrate of one class of electrical synapse. The history of the debate on electrical vs. chemical transmission is instructive. One lesson is that Occam's razor sometimes cuts too deep; the nervous system does its operations in a number of different ways and a unitarian approach can lead one astray. Electrical synapses can do many things that chemical synapses can do, and do them just as slowly. More intriguing are the modulatory actions that chemical synapses can have on electrical synapses. Voltage dependence provides an important window on structure function relations of the connexins, even where the dependence may have no physiological role. The new molecular approaches will greatly advance our knowledge of where gap junctions occur and permit experimental manipulation with high specificity. PMID:9278865

  9. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements.

  10. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. PMID:27073108

  11. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  12. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron–vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  13. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions. PMID:27420149

  14. String junction as a baryonic constituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    1996-02-01

    We extend the model for QCD string with quarks to consider the Mercedes Benz string configuration describing the three-quark baryon. Under the assumption of adiabatic separation of quark and string junction motion we formulate and solve the classical equation of motion for the junction. We dare to quantize the motion of the junction, and discuss the impact of these modes on the baryon spectra.

  15. String junctions and holographic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chiodaroli, Marco; Gutperle, Michael; Hung, Ling-Yan; Krym, Darya

    2011-01-15

    In this paper we study half-BPS type IIB supergravity solutions with multiple AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xM{sub 4} asymptotic regions, where M{sub 4} is either T{sup 4} or K{sub 3}. These solutions were first constructed in [M. Chiodaroli, M. Gutperle, and D. Krym, J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2010) 066.] and have geometries given by the warped product of AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 2}xM{sub 4} over {Sigma}, where {Sigma} is a Riemann surface. We show that the holographic boundary has the structure of a star graph, i.e. n half-lines joined at a point. The attractor mechanism and the relation of the solutions to junctions of self-dual strings in six-dimensional supergravity are discussed. The solutions of [M. Chiodaroli, M. Gutperle, and D. Krym, J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2010) 066.] are constructed introducing two meromorphic and two harmonic functions defined on {Sigma}. We focus our analysis on solutions corresponding to junctions of three different conformal field theories and show that the conditions for having a solution charged only under Ramond-Ramond three-form fields reduce to relations involving the positions of the poles and the residues of the relevant harmonic and meromorphic functions. The degeneration limit in which some of the poles collide is analyzed in detail. Finally, we calculate the holographic boundary entropy for a junction of three CFTs and obtain a simple expression in terms of poles and residues.

  16. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions. PMID:19072125

  17. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  18. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  19. An improved junction capacitance model for junction field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Liou, Juin J.; Cirba, Claude R.; Green, Keith

    2006-07-01

    A new junction capacitance model for the four-terminal junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is presented. With a single expression, the model, which is valid for different temperatures and a wide range of bias conditions, describes correctly the JFET junction capacitance behavior and capacitance drop-off phenomenon. The model has been verified using experimental data measured at Texas Instruments.

  20. Neuronal expression of GalNAc transferase is sufficient to prevent the age-related neurodegenerative phenotype of complex ganglioside-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Denggao; McGonigal, Rhona; Barrie, Jennifer A; Cappell, Joanna; Cunningham, Madeleine E; Meehan, Gavin R; Fewou, Simon N; Edgar, Julia M; Rowan, Edward; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi; Brophy, Peter J; Willison, Hugh J

    2014-01-15

    Gangliosides are widely expressed sialylated glycosphingolipids with multifunctional properties in different cell types and organs. In the nervous system, they are highly enriched in both glial and neuronal membranes. Mice lacking complex gangliosides attributable to targeted ablation of the B4galnt1 gene that encodes β-1,4-N-acetylegalactosaminyltransferase 1 (GalNAc-transferase; GalNAcT(-/-)) develop normally before exhibiting an age-dependent neurodegenerative phenotype characterized by marked behavioral abnormalities, central and peripheral axonal degeneration, reduced myelin volume, and loss of axo-glial junction integrity. The cell biological substrates underlying this neurodegeneration and the relative contribution of either glial or neuronal gangliosides to the process are unknown. To address this, we generated neuron-specific and glial-specific GalNAcT rescue mice crossed on the global GalNAcT(-/-) background [GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) and GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial)] and analyzed their behavioral, morphological, and electrophysiological phenotype. Complex gangliosides, as assessed by thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry, GalNAcT enzyme activity, and anti-ganglioside antibody (AgAb) immunohistology, were restored in both neuronal and glial GalNAcT rescue mice. Behaviorally, GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) retained a normal "wild-type" (WT) phenotype throughout life, whereas GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial) resembled GalNAcT(-/-) mice, exhibiting progressive tremor, weakness, and ataxia with aging. Quantitative electron microscopy demonstrated that GalNAcT(-/-) and GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial) nerves had significantly increased rates of axon degeneration and reduced myelin volume, whereas GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) and WT appeared normal. The increased invasion of the paranode with juxtaparanodal Kv1.1, characteristically seen in GalNAcT(-/-) and attributed to a breakdown of the axo-glial junction, was normalized in GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) but remained present in Gal

  1. Axon-glia interactions and the domain organization of myelinated axons requires neurexin IV/Caspr/Paranodin.

    PubMed

    Bhat, M A; Rios, J C; Lu, Y; Garcia-Fresco, G P; Ching, W; St Martin, M; Li, J; Einheber, S; Chesler, M; Rosenbluth, J; Salzer, J L; Bellen, H J

    2001-05-01

    Myelinated fibers are organized into distinct domains that are necessary for saltatory conduction. These domains include the nodes of Ranvier and the flanking paranodal regions where glial cells closely appose and form specialized septate-like junctions with axons. These junctions contain a Drosophila Neurexin IV-related protein, Caspr/Paranodin (NCP1). Mice that lack NCP1 exhibit tremor, ataxia, and significant motor paresis. In the absence of NCP1, normal paranodal junctions fail to form, and the organization of the paranodal loops is disrupted. Contactin is undetectable in the paranodes, and K(+) channels are displaced from the juxtaparanodal into the paranodal domains. Loss of NCP1 also results in a severe decrease in peripheral nerve conduction velocity. These results show a critical role for NCP1 in the delineation of specific axonal domains and the axon-glia interactions required for normal saltatory conduction. PMID:11395000

  2. The Sinai triple junction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, Vincent; Armijo, Rolando; Tapponnier, Paul

    1987-09-01

    This paper is a summary of a more detailed analysis of the kinematics of the Sinai triple junction (Courtillot et al., 1987). Accurate kinematic data are lacking along the Red Sea and they can be supplemented by bathymetric, topographic and geological data pertaining to the three arms of the entirely continental Sinai triple junction. Motions across the northern Red Sea and along the Gulf of Elat are an order of magnitude larger than across the Gulf of Suez. The direction of motion there remains a major uncertainty. A possible kinematic model is highlighted, in which right-lateral strike-slip motion and small pull-apart basins occur along the Gulf of Suez, in agreement with recent field observations in Egypt. Early Miocene is marked by major geodynamical changes all along the northern boundaries of the African and Indian plates. We suggest that rifting in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and Gulf of Suez was initiated at the end of the first phase of continental extrusion of Indochina, when the Tibetan plateau began to rise and spreading in the South China Sea came to a halt.

  3. Electron transport through molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2011-12-01

    At present, metal-molecular tunnel junctions are recognized as important active elements in molecular electronics. This gives a strong motivation to explore physical mechanisms controlling electron transport through molecules. In the last two decades, an unceasing progress in both experimental and theoretical studies of molecular conductance has been demonstrated. In the present work we give an overview of theoretical methods used to analyze the transport properties of metal-molecular junctions as well as some relevant experiments and applications. After a brief general description of the electron transport through molecules we introduce a Hamiltonian which can be used to analyze electron-electron, electron-phonon and spin-orbit interactions. Then we turn to description of the commonly used transport theory formalisms including the nonequilibrium Green’s functions based approach and the approach based on the “master” equations. We discuss the most important effects which could be manifested through molecules in electron transport phenomena such as Coulomb, spin and Frank-Condon blockades, Kondo peak in the molecular conductance, negative differential resistance and some others. Bearing in mind that first principles electronic structure calculations are recognized as the indispensable basis of the theory of electron transport through molecules, we briefly discuss the main equations and some relevant applications of the density functional theory which presently is often used to analyze important characteristics of molecules and molecular clusters. Finally, we discuss some kinds of nanoelectronic devices built using molecules and similar systems such as carbon nanotubes, various nanowires and quantum dots.

  4. Magnetoresistance in Boron Carbide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Ellen; Sokolov, A.; Baruth, A.; Robertson, B. W.; Adenwalla, S.

    2007-03-01

    The properties of thin insulator layers are crucial to the performance of magnetic tunnel junctions. Commercial requirements are a device with a high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) with low cost and high stability. At present the vast majority of barriers are made from amorphous Al2O3 and crystalline MgO. The TMR value depends not only on the spin-dependent electronic structure of the electrodes, but on the metal-insulator interface. Oxide-type barriers may suffer from local vacancies and other type of defects, resulting in oxygen diffusion, making the TMR value unstable with time. We present TMR results obtained on a non-oxide barrier, boron carbide (B10C2) for applications in magnetic tunnel junctions. This low Z inorganic material can be grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) without pinholes in the ultra thin film regime. PECVD grown boron carbide is an excellent dielectric with resistivities in the range of 10^7 ohm-cm, with a band gap that can be adjusted from 0.7 eV to 1.9 eV by altering the boron to carbon ratio and to band gap values well above 2.7 eV by adding phosphorus. This creates a unique opportunity for experimental study of a broad spectrum of phenomena, related to the dielectric properties of the barrier.

  5. Solar Cells With Multiple Small Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Concept for improving efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells based on decreasing p/n junction area in relation to total surface area of cell. Because of reduced junction area, surface leakage drops and saturation current density decreases. Surface passivation helps to ensure short-circuit current remains at high value and response of cells to blue light increases.

  6. The tight junction: a multifunctional complex.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Eveline E; Lynch, Robert D

    2004-06-01

    Multicellular organisms are separated from the external environment by a layer of epithelial cells whose integrity is maintained by intercellular junctional complexes composed of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, whereas gap junctions provide for intercellular communication. The aim of this review is to present an updated overview of recent developments in the area of tight junction biology. In a relatively short time, our knowledge of the tight junction has evolved from a relatively simple view of it being a permeability barrier in the paracellular space and a fence in the plane of the plasma membrane to one of it acting as a multicomponent, multifunctional complex that is involved in regulating numerous and diverse cell functions. A group of integral membrane proteins-occludin, claudins, and junction adhesion molecules-interact with an increasingly complex array of tight junction plaque proteins not only to regulate paracellular solute and water flux but also to integrate such diverse processes as gene transcription, tumor suppression, cell proliferation, and cell polarity. PMID:15151915

  7. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  8. Design of immobile nucleic acid junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, N C; Kallenbach, N R

    1983-01-01

    Nucleic acids that interact to generate structures in which three or more double helices emanate from a single point are said to form a junction. Such structures arise naturally as intermediates in DNA replication and recombination. It has been proposed that stable junctions can be created by synthesizing sets of oligonucleotides of defined sequence that can associate by maximizing Watson-Crick complementarity (Seeman N. C., 1981, Biomolecular Stereodynamics. Adenine Press, New York. 1: 269-278; Seeman, N. C., 1982, J. Theor. Biol. 99:237-247.) To make it possible to design molecules that will form junctions of specific architecture, we present here an efficient algorithm for generating nucleic acid sequences that optimize two fundamental properties: fidelity and stability. Fidelity refers to the relative probability of forming the junction complex relative to all alternative paired structures. Calculations are described that permit approximate prediction of the melting curves for junction complexes. PMID:6197102

  9. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  10. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  11. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  12. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-01

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/2, the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  13. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-15

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/{radical}(2), the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  14. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  15. The myoendothelial junction: breaking through the matrix?

    PubMed Central

    Heberlein, Katherine; Straub, Adam; Isakson, Brant E

    2009-01-01

    Within the vasculature, specialized cellular extensions from endothelium (and sometimes smooth muscle) protrude through the extracellular matrix where they interact with the opposing cell type. These structures, termed myoendothelial junctions, have been cited as a possible key element in the control of several vascular physiologies and pathologies. This review will discuss observations that have led to a focus on the myoendothelial junction as a cellular integration point in the vasculature for both homeostatic and pathological conditions and as a possible independent signaling entity. We will also highlight the need for novel approaches to studying the myoendothelial junction in order to comprehend the cellular biology associated with this structure. PMID:19330678

  16. Temperature dependence of thermopower in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsang; Lenert, Andrej; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2016-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions are of considerable interest due to their promise for efficient energy conversion. While the dependence of thermoelectric properties of junctions on molecular structure has been recently studied, their temperature dependence remains unexplored. Using a custom built variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope, we measured the thermopower and electrical conductance of individual benzenedithiol junctions over a range of temperatures (100 K-300 K). We find that while the electrical conductance is independent of temperature, the thermopower increases linearly with temperature, confirming the predictions of the Landauer theory.

  17. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuai; Sen, Suman; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng, Hongbo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2012-10-26

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. PMID:23037952

  18. New Phenomena in Josephson SINIS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    We analyze the dc and ac Josephson effects in SaINISb junctions in which an additional bias current flows in the N layer. The case of low temperatures and voltages \\(eV, T<<Δ\\) is considered in the dirty limit. We show that the critical Josephson current may change sign, and the considered SINIS junction may become a π junction if the voltage drop across the N/Sa interface exceeds a certain value \\(eVN>Δ/2\\). The ac Josephson effect may arise even if the current flows only through the N/Sa interface, whereas the current through the Sb/N interface is absent.

  19. Plasticity of single-atom Pb junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Salgado, C.; Néel, N.; Palacios, J. J.; Kröger, J.

    2016-06-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was used to fabricate atomic contacts on Pb(111). Conductance characteristics of the junctions were simultaneously recorded with forming and subsequent breaking of the contacts. A pronounced hysteresis effect in conductance traces was observed from junctions comprising the clean Pb(111) surface. The hysteretic behavior was less profound in contacts to single Pb atoms adsorbed to Pb(111). Density-functional calculations reproduced the experimental results by performing a full ab initio modeling of plastic junction deformations. A comprehensive description of the experimental findings was achieved by considering different atomic tip apex geometries.

  20. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  1. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  2. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  3. Ferromagnetic planar Josephson junction with transparent interfaces: a φ junction proposal.

    PubMed

    Heim, D M; Pugach, N G; Kupriyanov, M Yu; Goldobin, E; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R

    2013-05-29

    We calculate the current-phase relation of a planar Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic weak link located on top of a thin normal metal film. Following experimental observations we assume transparent superconductor-ferromagnet interfaces. This provides the best interlayer coupling and a low suppression of the superconducting correlations penetrating from the superconducting electrodes into the ferromagnetic layer. We show that this Josephson junction is a promising candidate for experimental φ junction realization. PMID:23636963

  4. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  5. Molecular junctions: Single-molecule contacts exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-05-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based method it is now possible to get an atomistic-level description of the most probable binding and contact configuration for single-molecule electrical junctions.

  6. Computing Scattering Characteristics Of Waveguide Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Manshadi, Farzin

    1994-01-01

    Rectangular WaveGuide Junction SCATtering RWGSCAT computer program solves scattering properties of waveguide device. Modeled as assembly of rectangular waveguides of different cross sections. RWGSCAT written in FORTRAN 77.

  7. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  8. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  9. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  10. Local Frame Junction Trees in SLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, Frank O.

    2005-11-01

    Junction trees (JT) is a general purpose tool for exact inference on graphical models. Many of the existing algorithms for building junction trees require a fixed static graphical model. The construction process is not unique, finding the one with the best computational structure (smallest clique size) is also a hard problem. For large scale inference problems, such as Geo-referencing using triangular geodetic networks or equivalent, the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem in robotics pose some challenges to junction tree applications. Incremental junction tree techniques for dynamic graphical models prescribe heuristic methods for growing the tree structure, and are applicable to large scale graphical models. Of concern are the proliferative widening of the tree, which makes message passing expensive. In the context of SLAM we present a new apporach that exploits the local frame dependence of novel observation variables.

  11. Superconducting switch made of graphene nanoribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qifeng; Dong, Jinming

    2008-09-01

    The transmission of superconductor-graphene nanoribbon-superconductor junctions (SGS) has been studied by the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the on-site potential U in the center zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) of the SGS junction plays an important role in the magnitude of the supercurrent Ic. As the effective Fermi energy μeff (μeff = μF-U) goes from negative to positive, the SGS junction would suddenly transform from an 'OFF' state to an 'ON' state. And, as μeff increases further, the Ic will continue to increase. This switching behavior of the SGS junction shares the same origin with the zigzag GNR valley-isospin valve (Rycerz et al 2007 Nat. Phys. 3 172). Besides the valley-isospin, the density of states will also have an effect on the suppression of Ic.

  12. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  13. Spectroscopy Measurements of Magnesium Diboride Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlack, J. T.; Lambert, J. G.; Carabello, S. A.; Thrailkill, Z. E.; Galwaduge, P. T.; Ramos, R. C.

    2010-03-01

    MgB2 has the highest Tc of the conventional superconductors at 39K and exhibits two superconducting energy bands. This material is also inexpensive to produce and has been utilized in new designs for MRI, RF cavities, and Josephson junctions. We report results of recent spectroscopy and transport measurements of Josephson junctions made of MgB2 obtained from our collaborators. We investigate its transport characteristics at sub-kelvin temperatures as well as its responses to resonant microwave activation.

  14. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  15. Quantum Coherence in a Superfluid Josephson Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Supradeep; Sato, Yuki

    2011-02-04

    We report a new kind of experiment in which we take an array of nanoscale apertures that form a superfluid {sup 4}He Josephson junction and apply quantum phase gradients directly along the array. We observe collective coherent behaviors from aperture elements, leading to quantum interference. Connections to superconducting and Bose-Einstein condensate Josephson junctions as well as phase coherence among the superfluid aperture array are discussed.

  16. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  17. Supercurrent switch in graphene pi junctions.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Sudbø, Asle

    2008-05-01

    We study the supercurrent in a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor graphene junction. In contrast to its metallic counterpart, the oscillating critical current in our setup decays only weakly upon increasing the exchange field and junction width. We find an unusually large residual value of the supercurrent at the oscillatory cusps due to a strong deviation from a sinusoidal current-phase relationship. Our findings suggest a very efficient device for dissipationless supercurrent switching. PMID:18518411

  18. Supercurrent Switch in Graphene π Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Jacob; Yokoyama, Takehito; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Sudbø, Asle

    2008-05-01

    We study the supercurrent in a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor graphene junction. In contrast to its metallic counterpart, the oscillating critical current in our setup decays only weakly upon increasing the exchange field and junction width. We find an unusually large residual value of the supercurrent at the oscillatory cusps due to a strong deviation from a sinusoidal current-phase relationship. Our findings suggest a very efficient device for dissipationless supercurrent switching.

  19. Shalbatana/Simud Vallis Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The sinuous channels and streamlined islands at the junction of Shalbatana and Simud Vallis present an erosional history of the catastrophic floods that scoured the Martian surface hundreds of millions of years ago.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16, Longitude 317.4 East (42.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  20. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csáki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron.

  1. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csaki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.; Department of Physics, University of Wales Swansea, Swansea, SA2 8PP,

    2000-08-15

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Association of TAG-1 with Caspr2 is essential for the molecular organization of juxtaparanodal regions of myelinated fibers.

    PubMed

    Traka, Maria; Goutebroze, Laurence; Denisenko, Natalia; Bessa, Maria; Nifli, Artemisia; Havaki, Sophia; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Fukamauchi, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Kazutada; Soliven, Betty; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Karagogeos, Domna

    2003-09-15

    Myelination results in a highly segregated distribution of axonal membrane proteins at nodes of Ranvier. Here, we show the role in this process of TAG-1, a glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored cell adhesion molecule. In the absence of TAG-1, axonal Caspr2 did not accumulate at juxtaparanodes, and the normal enrichment of shaker-type K+ channels in these regions was severely disrupted, in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In contrast, the localization of protein 4.1B, an axoplasmic partner of Caspr2, was only moderately altered. TAG-1, which is expressed in both neurons and glia, was able to associate in cis with Caspr2 and in trans with itself. Thus, a tripartite intercellular protein complex, comprised of these two proteins, appears critical for axo-glial contacts at juxtaparanodes. This complex is analogous to that described previously at paranodes, suggesting that similar molecules are crucial for different types of axo-glial interactions. PMID:12975355

  3. Long Josepshon Junction in a Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornes, Ivan

    2005-03-01

    We present a model for an underdamped long Josephson junction coupled to a single-mode electromagnetic cavity, and carry out numerical calculations using this model in various regimes. The coupling may occur through either the electric or the magnetic field of the cavity mode. When a current is injected into the junction, we find that the time-averaged voltage exhibits self-induced resonant steps due to coupling between the current in the junction and the electric field of the cavity mode. These steps are similar to those observed and calculated in small Josephson junctions. When a soliton is present in the junction (corresponding to a quantum of magnetic flux parallel to the junction plates), the SIRS's disappear if the electric field in the cavity is spatially uniform. If the cavity mode has a spatially varying electric field, there is a strong coupling between the soliton and the cavity mode. This coupling causes the soliton to become phase-locked to the cavity mode, and produces step-like anomalies on the soliton branch of the IV characteristics. If the coupling is strong enough, the frequency of the cavity mode is greatly red-shifted from its uncoupled value. We present simple geometrical arguments and a simple analytical model which account for this behavior. This work was supported by NSF grant DMR04-13395.

  4. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise. PMID:23134759

  5. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  6. The junctional complex in the intestine of Sagitta setosa (Chaetognatha): the paired septate junction.

    PubMed

    Duvert, M; Gros, D; Salat, C

    1980-04-01

    The junctional complex of the intestine of Sagitta setosa has been studied in tissues stained with uranyl acetate or after lanthanum impregnation, and by freeze-cleavage. All types of junctions have been characterized in both perpendicular and tangential planes. From the apex to the base of the cell the following junctions occur in this order: a zonula adhaerens; a septate junction where the septa occur in pairs; a pleated sheet septate junction; and numerous gap junctions of the A-type. From the upper part of the cells inwards to the septate junction, the membranes follow a relatively straight path. In the lower part of the cells the membranes are deeply interdigitating. At the intersection between 3 cells a very different junction is to be observed where small units, periodically disposed, bind the membranes of the 3 adjoining cells. Each unit is composed of 3 short segments which bind the cell membranes to a central ring 16.6 +/- 2.3 nm in outer diameter. The paired septate junction constitutes a new type. Its main features are that the septa are paired and occur in 2 formations, one the 'loose formation', with elements between the septa of each pair, and the other, a 'tight formation'. After lanthanum impregnation, the thickness of each septum is seen to be about 3 nm and the undulation period 12.6 +/- 1.6 nm. On freeze-fractures 10-nm particles are found on crests on the PF face and in furrows on the EF face. The possible significance of this type of junction is discussed. The junctional complex described is analogous to those found in various invertebrate epithelia. PMID:6105159

  7. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support. PMID:21694407

  8. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  9. Junctional Adhesion Molecule A Promotes Epithelial Tight Junction Assembly to Augment Lung Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Quintero, David A.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.; Koval, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A−/− mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A−/− mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  10. Esophagogastric junction distensibility in hiatus hernia.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, C; McMahon, B P; Ejstrud, P; Ostapiuk, M A; Funch-Jensen, P; Drewes, A M

    2016-07-01

    Hiatus hernia is known to be an important risk factor for developing gastroesophageal reflux disease. We aimed to use the endoscopic functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) to evaluate the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. EndoFLIP assessments were made in 30 patients with hiatus hernia and Barrett's esophagus, and in 14 healthy controls. The EndoFLIP was placed straddling the esophagogastric junction and the bag distended stepwise to 50 mL. Cross-sectional areas of the bag and intra-bag pressures were recorded continuously. Measurements were made in the separate sphincter components and hiatus hernia cavity. EndoFLIP measured functional aspects such as sphincter distensibility and pressure of all esophagogastric junction components and visualized all hiatus hernia present at endoscopy. The lower esophageal sphincter in hiatus hernia patients had a lower pressure (e.g. 47.7 ± 13.0 vs. 61.4 ± 19.2 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the common esophagogastric junction in controls. In hiatus hernia patients, the crural diaphragm had a lower pressure (e.g. 29.6 ± 10.1 vs. 47.7 ± 13.0 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the lower esophageal sphincter. There was a significant association between symptom scores in patients and EndoFLIP assessment. Conclusively, EndoFLIP was a useful tool. To evaluate the presence of a hiatus hernia and to measure the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. Furthermore, EndoFLIP distinguished the separate esophagogastric junction components in hiatus hernia patients, and may help us understand the biomechanics of the esophagogastric junction and the mechanisms behind hiatal herniation. PMID:25789842

  11. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  12. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup error–induced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of ± 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans.

  13. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis: Diagnosis, Pathogenesis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaewon

    2016-01-01

    Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a common radiographic finding after long spinal fusion. A number of studies on the causes, risk factors, prevention, and treatment of PJK have been conducted. However, no clear definition of PJK has been established. In this paper, we aimed to clarify the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of PJK by reviewing relevant papers that have been published to date. A literature search was conducted on PubMed using "proximal junctional", "proximal junctional kyphosis", and "proximal junctional failure" as search keywords. Only studies that were published in English were included in this study. The incidence of PJK ranges from 5% to 46%, and it has been reported that 66% of cases occur 3 months after surgery and approximately 80% occur within 18 months. A number of studies have reported that there is no significantly different clinical outcome between PJK patients and non-PJK patients. One study showed that PJK patients expressed more pain than non-PJK patients. However, recent studies focused on proximal junctional failure (PJF), which is accepted as a severe form of PJK. PJF showed significant adverse impact in clinical aspect such as pain, neurologic deficit, ambulatory difficulties, and social isolation. Numerous previous studies have identified various risk factors and reported on the treatment and prevention of PJK. Based on these studies, we determined the clinical significance and impact of PJK. In addition, it is important to find a strategic approach to the proper treatment of PJK. PMID:27340542

  14. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  15. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  16. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  17. Holographic Josephson junction from massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Li, Huai-Fan; Zeng, Hua-Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2016-05-01

    We study the holographic superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity. If the boundary theory is independent of spatial directions, i.e., if the chemical potential is homogeneous in spatial directions, we find that the graviton mass parameter will make it more difficult for the normal metal-superconductor phase transition to take place. In the holographic model of the Josephson junction, it is found that the maximal tunneling current will decrease according to the graviton mass parameter. Besides, the coherence length of the junction decreases as well with respect to the graviton mass parameter. If one interprets the graviton mass parameter as the effect of momentum dissipation in the boundary field theory, this indicates that the stronger the momentum dissipation is, the smaller the coherence length is.

  18. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  19. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  20. Electronic Veselago lensing in graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Cory

    Ballistic electrons in a uniform 2D electron gas (2DEG) behave in close analogy to light propagating through an optical medium. In the absence of impurity scattering, electrons follow straight-line trajectories, while the associated de Broglie wavelength can give rise to interference and diffraction. Here we present measurements of ballistic graphene devices in which a graphite gate is used to realize an atomically-smooth junction. We demonstrate unambiguous signatures of negative refraction across a PN junction, paving the way for electron optics inspired by Veselago lensing. Comparison with theoretical simulations reveals the importance of the junction profile towards this effort. Opportunities for future device designs that may take advantage of these effects will be discussed.

  1. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  2. Molecular organization of tricellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mikio; Izumi, Yasushi; Oda, Yukako; Higashi, Tomohito; Iwamoto, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    When the apicolateral border of epithelial cells is compared with a polygon, its sides correspond to the apical junctional complex, where cell adhesion molecules assemble from the plasma membranes of two adjacent cells. On the other hand, its vertices correspond to tricellular contacts, where the corners of three cells meet. Vertebrate tricellular contacts have specialized structures of tight junctions, termed tricellular tight junctions (tTJs). tTJs were identified by electron microscopic observations more than 40 years ago, but have been largely forgotten in epithelial cell biology since then. The identification of tricellulin and angulin family proteins as tTJ-associated membrane proteins has enabled us to study tTJs in terms of not only the paracellular barrier function but also unknown characteristics of epithelial cell corners via molecular biological approaches. PMID:25097825

  3. Synchronized Switching in a Josephson Junction Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity.

  4. Tunneling Magnetothermopower in Magnetic Tunnel Junction Nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebing, N.; Serrano-Guisan, S.; Rott, K.; Reiss, G.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2011-10-01

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%.

  5. Tunneling magnetothermopower in magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Liebing, N; Serrano-Guisan, S; Rott, K; Reiss, G; Langer, J; Ocker, B; Schumacher, H W

    2011-10-21

    We study tunneling magnetothermopower (TMTP) in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars. Thermal gradients across the junctions are generated by an electric heater line. Thermopower voltages up to a few tens of μV between the top and bottom contact of the nanopillars are measured which scale linearly with the applied heating power and hence the thermal gradient. The thermopower signal varies by up to 10  μV upon reversal of the relative magnetic configuration of the two CoFeB layers from parallel to antiparallel. This signal change corresponds to a large spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of the order of 100  μV/K and a large TMTP change of the tunnel junction of up to 90%. PMID:22107572

  6. Synchronized switching in a josephson junction crystal.

    PubMed

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity. PMID:24949766

  7. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  8. Oxidative Stress, Lens Gap Junctions, and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The eye lens is constantly subjected to oxidative stress from radiation and other sources. The lens has several mechanisms to protect its components from oxidative stress and to maintain its redox state, including enzymatic pathways and high concentrations of ascorbate and reduced glutathione. With aging, accumulation of oxidized lens components and decreased efficiency of repair mechanisms can contribute to the development of lens opacities or cataracts. Maintenance of transparency and homeostasis of the avascular lens depend on an extensive network of gap junctions. Communication through gap junction channels allows intercellular passage of molecules (up to 1 kDa) including antioxidants. Lens gap junctions and their constituent proteins, connexins (Cx43, Cx46, and Cx50), are also subject to the effects of oxidative stress. These observations suggest that oxidative stress-induced damage to connexins (and consequent altered intercellular communication) may contribute to cataract formation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 339–353. PMID:18831679

  9. Phonon Josephson junction with nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Shabir; Vitali, David

    2016-03-01

    We study coherent phonon oscillations and tunneling between two coupled nonlinear nanomechanical resonators. We show that the coupling between two nanomechanical resonators creates an effective phonon Josephson junction, which exhibits two different dynamical behaviors: Josephson oscillation (phonon-Rabi oscillation) and macroscopic self-trapping (phonon blockade). Self-trapping originates from mechanical nonlinearities, meaning that when the nonlinearity exceeds its critical value, the energy exchange between the two resonators is suppressed, and phonon Josephson oscillations between them are completely blocked. An effective classical Hamiltonian for the phonon Josephson junction is derived and its mean-field dynamics is studied in phase space. Finally, we study the phonon-phonon coherence quantified by the mean fringe visibility, and show that the interaction between the two resonators may lead to the loss of coherence in the phononic junction.

  10. Defect junctions and domain wall dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P.P.; Oliveira, J.C.R.E.; Martins, C.J.A.P.; Menezes, J.; Menezes, R.

    2006-06-15

    We study a number of domain wall forming models where various types of defect junctions can exist. These illustrate some of the mechanisms that will determine the evolution of defect networks with junctions. Understanding these mechanisms is vital for a proper assessment of a number of cosmological scenarios: we will focus on the issue of whether or not cosmological frustrated domain wall networks can exist at all, but our results are also relevant for the dynamics of cosmic (super)strings, where junctions are expected to be ubiquitous. We also define and discuss the properties that would make up the ideal model in terms of hypothetical frustrated wall networks, and provide an explicit construction for such a model. We carry out a number of numerical simulations of the evolution of these networks, analyze and contrast their results, and discuss their implications for our no-frustration conjecture.

  11. Magnesium gating of cardiac gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Kurata, Yasutaka; Oka, Chiaki; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Noma, Akinori

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to study kinetics of modulation by intracellular Mg(2+) of cardiac gap junction (Mg(2+) gate). Paired myocytes of guinea-pig ventricle were superfused with solutions containing various concentrations of Mg(2+). In order to rapidly apply Mg(2+) to one aspect of the gap junction, the non-junctional membrane of one of the pair was perforated at nearly the connecting site by pulses of nitrogen laser beam. The gap junction conductance (G(j)) was measured by clamping the membrane potential of the other cell using two-electrode voltage clamp method. The laser perforation immediately increased G(j), followed by slow G(j) change with time constant of 3.5 s at 10 mM Mg(2+). Mg(2+) more than 1.0 mM attenuated dose-dependently the gap junction conductance and lower Mg(2+) (0.6 mM) increased G(j) with a Hill coefficient of 3.4 and a half-maximum effective concentration of 0.6 mM. The time course of G(j) changes was fitted by single exponential function, and the relationship between the reciprocal of time constant and Mg(2+) concentration was almost linear. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model of Mg(2+) gate with one open state and three closed states well reproduced experimental results. One-dimensional cable model of thirty ventricular myocytes connected to the Mg(2+) gate model suggested a pivotal role of the Mg(2+) gate of gap junction under pathological conditions. PMID:20553744

  12. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  13. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  14. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J; Dana, Syamal K

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions. PMID:26723143

  15. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Electronic properties of electrodeposited semiconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatman, Shawn Michael Edward

    This thesis describes the synthesis, structural properties, optical properties, and electronic properties of semiconductor junctions based on electrochemically deposited ZnO and CU2O thin films. The first focus is characterizing the effect of deposition conditions (including applied potential and electrolyte composition) on the fundamental properties of these materials (including carrier concentration, band gap, and microstructure). Subsequent discussion addresses electrical conduction to and through ZnO/substrate junctions as a function of these deposition conditions. Finally, three device applications for these ZnO-based junction are explored: Schottky rectifiers, humidity sensors, and photovoltaic cells. Since electrical conduction to and through heterojunction interfaces is very important for maximizing the functionality of semiconductor devices, this thesis work is an essential step towards increasing the functionality of multi-layer ZnO-based heterojunction devices prepared by electrodeposition. Capacitive Mott-Schottky analyses showed that the carrier concentrations of our ZnO electrodeposits are dependent upon deposition potential, with higher net carrier concentration at more positive potentials. UV/Visible diffuse reflectance data indicates that band gap increases with more positive deposition potentials. Together, these results suggest that hydrogen is the dominant, yet unintentional, Moss-Burstein like dopant in our n-type ZnO. Furthermore, the range of carrier concentrations we can achieve (10 18 -- 1021 cm-3) is comparable to that obtained with intentional doping. This is significant because using deposition potential to change growth rate or morphology will simultaneously change electronic properties. The deposition potential studies evolved into a procedure for selective, one-step production of either ohmic or rectifying (Schottky) ZnO/metal junctions (Chatman et al., Appi.Phys.Lett., 2008, 92, 012103/1-3). Rectifying ratio and soft

  17. Electrostatic model of radial pn junction nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2013-08-01

    Poisson's equation is solved for a radial pn junction nanowire (NW) with surface depletion. This resulted in a model capable of giving radial energy band and electric field profiles for any arbitrary core/shell doping density, core/shell dimensions, and surface state density. Specific cases were analyzed to extract pertinent underlying physics, while the relationship between NW specifications and the depletion of the NW were examined to optimize the built-in potential across the junction. Additionally, the model results were compared with experimental results in literature to good agreement. Finally, an optimum device design is proposed to satisfy material, optical, and electrostatic constraints in high efficiency NW solar cells.

  18. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  19. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  20. Alternating current driven instability in magnetic junctions.

    PubMed

    Epshtein, E M; Zilberman, P E

    2009-04-01

    An effect is considered of alternating (high-frequency) current on the spin-valve-type magnetic junction configuration. The stability with respect to small fluctuations is investigated in the macrospin approximation. When the current frequency is close to the eigenfrequency (precession frequency) of the free layer, parametric resonance occurs. Both collinear configurations, antiparallel and parallel, can become unstable under resonance conditions. The antiparallel configuration can also become unstable under non-resonant conditions. The threshold current density amplitude is of the order of the dc current density for switching of the magnetic junction. PMID:21825350

  1. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions.

  2. Atomic-scaled characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Wang, Dennis; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    Graphene p-n junctions are essential devices for studying relativistic Klein tunneling and the Veselago lensing effect in graphene. We have successfully fabricated graphene p-n junctions using both lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. We then use our 4-probe STM system to characterize the junctions. The ability to carry out scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in our STM instrument is essential for us to locate and measure the junction interface. We obtain both the topography and dI/dV spectra at the junction area, from which we track the shift of the graphene chemical potential with position across the junction interface. This allows us to directly measure the spatial width and roughness of the junction and its potential barrier height. We will compare the junction properties of devices fabricated by the aforementioned two methods and discuss their effects on the performance as a Veselago lens.

  3. Ballistic bipolar junctions in chemically gated graphene ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Baringhaus, Jens; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The realization of ballistic graphene pn-junctions is an essential task in order to study Klein tunneling phenomena. Here we show that intercalation of Ge under the buffer layer of pre-structured SiC-samples succeeds to make truly nano-scaled pn-junctions. By means of local tunneling spectroscopy the junction width is found to be as narrow as 5 nm which is a hundred times smaller compared to electrically gated structures. The ballistic transmission across the junction is directly proven by systematic transport measurements with a 4-tip STM. Various npn- and pnp-junctions are studied with respect to the barrier length. The pn-junctions are shown to act as polarizer and analyzer with the second junction becoming transparent in case of a fully ballistic barrier. This can be attributed to the almost full suppression of electron transmission through the junction away from normal incidence. PMID:25898259

  4. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  5. Ballistic transport in InSb Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasco, John Jeffrey; Gill, Stephen; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    We present transport measurements on Josephson junctions consisting of InSb nanowires contacted by Al at various junction lengths. Junction behavior as a function of gate voltage, electric field, and magnetic field is discussed. We show that short junctions behave as 1D quantum wires, exhibiting quantized conductance steps. In addition, we show how Josephson behavior changes as transport evolves from ballistic to diffusive as a function of contact spacing.

  6. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  7. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-21

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a π-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  8. Semiconductor liquid-junction solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, B.A.

    1982-10-29

    A semiconductor liquid junction photocell in which the photocell is in the configuration of a light concentrator and in which the electrolytic solution both conducts current and facilitates the concentration of incident solar radiation onto the semiconductor. The photocell may be in the configuration of a non-imaging concentrator such as a compound parabolic concentrator, or an imaging concentrator such as a lens.

  9. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    PubMed Central

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  10. PECAM-1: regulator of endothelial junctional integrity.

    PubMed

    Privratsky, Jamie R; Newman, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    PECAM-1 (also known as CD31) is a cellular adhesion and signaling receptor comprising six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like homology domains, a short transmembrane domain and a 118 amino acid cytoplasmic domain that becomes serine and tyrosine phosphorylated upon cellular activation. PECAM-1 expression is restricted to blood and vascular cells. In circulating platelets and leukocytes, PECAM-1 functions largely as an inhibitory receptor that, via regulated sequential phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain, limits cellular activation responses. PECAM-1 is also highly expressed at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions as a mechanosensor, as a regulator of leukocyte trafficking and in the maintenance of endothelial cell junctional integrity. In this review, we will describe (1) the functional domains of PECAM-1 and how they contribute to its barrier-enhancing properties, (2) how the physical properties of PECAM-1 influence its subcellular localization and its ability to influence endothelial cell barrier function, (3) various stimuli that initiate PECAM-1 signaling and/or function at the endothelial junction and (4) cross-talk of PECAM-1 with other junctional molecules, which can influence endothelial cell function. PMID:24435645

  11. Superfluid density through 2D superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Shih, Chih-Kang

    As S. Qin et al. reported, two monolayer (2 ML) lead film on a silicon (111) substrate has one of two different atomic structures on the silicon substrate: the unstrained 1x1 and the psedumorphically strained √3x √3 (i.e. the same lattice constant as the Si √3x √3 lattice). Most interestingly, although these two different regions show the same quantum well state features, they have different Tc's (5 K and 4 K). These two different regions of 2 ML film naturally form superconductor-superconductor (SS or SS') junctions along silicon step edges. Physical connection of the junction is only 1 ML thickness because of the step height difference of substrate. We will present this study of SS (or SS') junction system using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and in-situ double-coil mutual inductance measurement. The transition of superconducting gaps across either SS or SS' junctions should show how to locally affect each other. Double coil measurement show a global Tc close to the lower Tc region with sizable superfluid density. We will discuss the phase rigidity and its relationship to the superfluid density in this ultra-thin Pb film that is only 2 ML thick.

  12. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass (Beck, 2013). Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electrical current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of (110±2) μeV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  13. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  14. Axial p-n-junctions in nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C; Shik, A; Byrne, K; Lynall, D; Blumin, M; Saveliev, I; Ruda, H E

    2015-02-27

    The charge distribution and potential profile of p-n-junctions in thin semiconductor nanowires (NWs) were analyzed. The characteristics of screening in one-dimensional systems result in a specific profile with large electric field at the boundary between the n- and p- regions, and long tails with a logarithmic drop in the potential and charge density. As a result of these tails, the junction properties depend sensitively on the geometry of external contacts and its capacity has an anomalously large value and frequency dispersion. In the presence of an external voltage, electrons and holes in the NWs can not be described by constant quasi-Fermi levels, due to small values of the average electric field, mobility, and lifetime of carriers. Thus, instead of the classical Sah-Noice-Shockley theory, the junction current-voltage characteristic was described by an alternative theory suitable for fast generation-recombination and slow diffusion-drift processes. For the non-uniform electric field in the junction, this theory predicts the forward branch of the characteristic to have a non-ideality factor η several times larger than the values 1 < η < 2 from classical theory. Such values of η have been experimentally observed by a number of researchers, as well as in the present work. PMID:25656461

  15. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Erik O.; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices. PMID:25553192

  16. Graphene-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobas, Enrique

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's in-plane transport has been widely researched and has yielded extraordinary carrier mobilities of 105 cm2/Vs and spin diffusion lengths of exceeding 100 μm. These properties bode well for graphene in future electronics and spintronics technologies. Its out-of-plane transport has been far less studied, although its parent material, graphite, shows a large conductance anisotropy. Recent calculations show graphene's interaction with close-packed ferromagnetic metal surfaces should produce highly spin-polarized transport out-of-plane, an enabling breakthrough for spintronics technology. In this work, we fabricate and measure FM/graphene/FM magnetic tunnel junctions using CVD-grown single-layer graphene. The resulting juctions show non-linear current-voltage characteristics and a very weak temperature dependence consistent with charge tunneling transport. Furthermore, we study spin transport across the junction as a function of bias voltage and temperature. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) peaks at two percent for single-layer graphene junctions and exhibits the expected bias asymmetry and a temperature dependence that fits well with established spin-polarized tunneling models. Results of mutli-layer graphene tunnel junctions will also be discussed.

  17. Miniaturized symmetrization optics for junction laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Jacob M. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor); Neil, Clyde C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Miniaturized optics comprising transverse and lateral cylindrical lenses composed of millimeter-sized rods with diameters, indices-of-refraction and spacing such that substantially all the light emitted as an asymmetrical beam from the emitting junction of the laser is collected and translated to a symmetrical beam.

  18. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency.

  19. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  20. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  1. Overdamped Josephson junctions for digital applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febvre, P.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.; Belogolovskii, M.; Collot, R.; Lacquaniti, V.

    2013-01-01

    An interesting feature of Superconductor-Normal metal-Superconductor Josephson junctions for digital applications is due to their non-hysteretic current-voltage characteristics in a broad temperature range below Tc. This allows to design Single-Flux-Quantum (SFQ) cells without the need of external shunts. Two advantages can be drawn from this property: first the SFQ cells can be more compact which leads to a more integrated solution towards nano-devices and more complex circuits; second the absence of electrical parasitic elements associated with the wiring of resistors external to the Josephson junctions increases the performance of SFQ circuits, in particular regarding the ultimate speed of operation. For this purpose Superconductor-Normal metal-Insulator-Superconductor Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions have been recently developed at INRiM with aluminum layer thicknesses between 30 and 100 nm. They exhibit non-hysteretic current-voltage characteristics with IcRn values higher than 0.5 mV in a broad temperature range and optimal Stewart McCumber parameters at 4.2 K for RSFQ applications. The main features of obtained SNIS junctions regarding digital applications are presented.

  2. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  3. Tight junction, selective permeability, and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Krug, Susanne M; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The tight junction forms a barrier against unlimited paracellular passage but some of the tight junction proteins just do the opposite, they form extracellular channels zigzagging between lateral membranes of neighboring cells. All of these channel-forming proteins and even some of the barrier formers exhibit selectivity, which means that they prefer certain substances over others. All channel formers exhibit at least one of the three types of selectivity: for cations (claudin-2, -10b, -15), for anions (claudin-10a, -17) or for water (claudin-2). Also some, but not all, barrier-forming claudins are charge-selective (claudin-4, -8, -14). Moreover, occludin and tricellulin turned out to be relevant for barrier formation against macromolecule passage. Tight junction proteins are dysregulated or can be genetically defective in numerous diseases, which may lead to three effects: (i) impaired paracellular transport e.g. causing magnesium loss in the kidney, (ii) increased paracellular transport of solutes and water e.g. causing leak-flux diarrhea in the intestine, and (iii) increased permeability to large molecules e.g. unwanted intestinal pathogen uptake fueling inflammatory processes. This review gives an overview on the properties of tight junction proteins featuring selective permeability, and in this context explains how these proteins induce or aggravate diseases. PMID:25220018

  4. Electric Field Effect in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.

    The electric field effect in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks (IJJ's) is investigated on the basis of the capacitively-coupled IJJ model. We clarify the current-voltage characteristics of the IJJ's in the presence of an external electric field. It is predicted that the IJJ's show a dynamical transition to the voltage state as the external electric field is increased.

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Intrinsic Josephson junctions: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurgens, A. A.

    2000-08-01

    Some recent developments in the fabrication of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) and their application for studying high-temperature superconductors are discussed. The major advantages of IJJ and unsolved problems are outlined. The feasibility of three-terminal devices based on the stacked IJJ is briefly evaluated.

  6. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  7. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  8. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Junction AVA is located in southern San Joaquin County, California. The boundaries are as follows: (1... the San Joaquin River levee, near Benchmark 35 in T3S/R6E; (2) Then in a southeasterly direction, follow the levee along the San Joaquin River onto the Ripon, CA quadrangle map; (3) Then in a...

  9. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  10. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  11. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  12. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  13. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  14. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  15. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  16. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  18. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  19. A power balance model for converging and diverging flow junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Guffey, S.E. ); Fraser, D.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors propose that pressures across a junction of flows are best described by potential, kinetic, and dissipated (lost) power. It is demonstrated that differences in Bernoulli constants up- and downstream of junctions are not proportional to energy losses even in the trivial case of zero junction losses.

  20. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  1. Dependence of proximity-induced supercurrent on junction length in multilayer-graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, A.; Sato, T.; Goto, H.; Tomori, H.; Takana, S.; Ootuka, Y.; Tsukagoshi, K.

    2010-11-01

    We report experimental observation of the proximity-induced supercurrent in superconductor-multilayer graphene-superconductor junctions. We find that the supercurrent is a linearly decreasing function of the junction length (separation of the superconducting electrodes), which is quite different from the usual behavior of exponential dependence. We suggest that this behavior originates from the intrinsic large contact resistance between the multilayer and the superconducting electrodes.

  2. 75 FR 6094 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Grand Junction, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace at Grand Junction, CO (74 FR... Junction, CO Grand Junction Regional, Grand Junction, CO (Lat. 39 07'21'' N., long. 108 31'36'' W.) Grand Junction VORTAC (Lat. 39 03'34'' N., long. 108 47'33'' W.) Grand Junction Localizer (Lat. 39 07'04''...

  3. Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An InGaAs-based three-junction (3J) tandem thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell has been investigated to utilize more of the blackbody spectrum (from a 1,100 C general purpose heat source GPHS) efficiently. The tandem consists of three vertically stacked subcells, a 0.74-eV InGaAs cell, a 0.6- eV InGaAs cell, and a 0.55-eV InGaAs cell, as well as two interconnecting tunnel junctions. A greater than 20% TPV system efficiency was achieved by another group with a 1,040 C blackbody using a single-bandgap 0.6- eV InGaAs cell MIM (monolithic interconnected module) (30 lateral junctions) that delivered about 12 V/30 or 0.4 V/junction. It is expected that a three-bandgap tandem MIM will eventually have about 3 this voltage (1.15 V) and about half the current. A 4 A/cm2 would be generated by a single-bandgap 0.6-V InGaAs MIM, as opposed to the 2 A/cm2 available from the same spectrum when split among the three series-connected junctions in the tandem stack. This would then be about a 50% increase (3xVoc, 0.5xIsc) in output power if the proposed tandem replaced the single- bandgap MIM. The advantage of the innovation, if successful, would be a 50% increase in power conversion efficiency from radioisotope heat sources using existing thermophotovoltaics. Up to 50% more power would be generated for radioisotope GPHS deep space missions. This type of InGaAs multijunction stack could be used with terrestrial concentrator solar cells to increase efficiency from 41 to 45% or more.

  4. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  5. The effects of junction depth and impurity concentration on ion-implanted, junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, R.C.

    1980-12-01

    This paper presents data resulting from tests on the experimental optimization of the ion-implanted region of horizontal junction, silicon, ion-implanted P+N and N+P solar cells. The experimental data are compared to theoretical predictions based on a simple model and to data obtained with diffused junction solar cells (1). Optimum junction depth and average ion-implanted layer concentration for ion-implanted, silicon, PN junction solar cells under non-concentrated sunlight (approximately AMI conditions) appear to be 0.5..mu..m and 5X10/sup 18/ atoms/cm/sup 3/, respectively. Variation in solar cell efficiency with junction depth is rapid between 0.1 and 0.5..mu..m. Variations of efficiency in response to changes in concentration are minimal over the range tested. Experiments under various illumination conditions indicate increasing efficiency as insolation increases from 83mw/cm/sup 2/ to 100 mw/cm/sup 2/. Comparison with diffused junction, silicon solar cells indicates a potentially greater efficiency for ion-implanted solar cells. However, variation in efficiency between individual solar cells is sufficiently great to warrant further experimentation before reaching any final conclusions.

  6. Thermopower measurements of atomic and molecular junctions using microheater-embedded mechanically-controllable break junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-03-01

    There has been growing interest in developing high-performance thermoelectric materials for realizing thermoelectric power generation. Quantum confinement effects in low-dimensional structures are expected to provide high electronic density of states for enhanced thermopower, and thus considered as a promising approach for achieving a high figure of merit (M. S. Dresselhaus et al., Adv. Mat. 19 (2007) 1043-1053). From this respect, it is interesting to study thermoelectric properties of atomic and molecular junctions and evaluate their potential as a thermoelectric material. Recently, we have developed a heater-embedded micro-fabricated mechanically-controllable break junction (MCBJ) for investigating the thermoelectric transport in single-atom and -molecule junctions. Using the MCBJ devices, we could repeatedly form stable junctions at room temperatures via a self-breaking mechanism with one side being heated by the adjacent microheater. In my presentation, I will show the results of simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and the electrical conductance of atom-sized Au junctions and Au-benzenedithiol-Au junctions and discuss on the geometrical dependence of thermoelectric transport.

  7. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016. PMID:26899144

  8. The critical current of point symmetric Josephson tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations. The shape of the junction determines the specific form of the magnetic-field dependence of its Josephson current. Here we address the magnetic diffraction patterns of specially shaped planar Josephson tunnel junctions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations. We focus on a wide ensemble of junctions whose shape is invariant under point reflection. We analyze the implications of this type of isometry and derive the threshold curves of junctions whose shape is the union or the relative complement of two point symmetric plane figures.

  9. Indentation Tests Reveal Geometry-Regulated Stiffening of Nanotube Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Yang, Yang; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Asif, Syed; Penev, Evgeni S; Yakobson, Boris I; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-01-13

    Here we report a unique method to locally determine the mechanical response of individual covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in various configurations such as "X", "Y", and "Λ"-like. The setup is based on in situ indentation using a picoindenter integrated within a scanning electron microscope. This allows for precise mapping between junction geometry and mechanical behavior and uncovers geometry-regulated junction stiffening. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the dominant contribution to the nanoindentation response is due to the CNT walls stretching at the junction. Targeted synthesis of desired junction geometries can therefore provide a "structural alphabet" for construction of macroscopic CNT networks with tunable mechanical response. PMID:26618517

  10. Stereoelectronic switching in single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Li, Haixing; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A new intersection between reaction chemistry and electronic circuitry is emerging from the ultraminiaturization of electronic devices. Over decades chemists have developed a nuanced understanding of stereoelectronics to establish how the electronic properties of molecules relate to their conformation; the recent advent of single-molecule break-junction techniques provides the means to alter this conformation with a level of control previously unimagined. Here we unite these ideas by demonstrating the first single-molecule switch that operates through a stereoelectronic effect. We demonstrate this behaviour in permethyloligosilanes with methylthiomethyl electrode linkers. The strong σ conjugation in the oligosilane backbone couples the stereoelectronic properties of the sulfur-methylene σ bonds that terminate the molecule. Theoretical calculations support the existence of three distinct dihedral conformations that differ drastically in their electronic character. We can shift between these three species by simply lengthening or compressing the molecular junction, and, in doing so, we can switch conductance digitally between two states.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dennis; Zhou, Xiaodong; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark; Ross, Frances; Pasupathy, Abhay

    Theoretical predictions of relativistic Klein tunneling and Veselago lensing in graphene have inspired efforts to fabricate graphene p-n junctions where such phenomena could be realized and studied via electronic transport or scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Here we will discuss the interplay between device geometry and our measurements in a 4-probe STM, which allows for simultaneous back gating, biasing, and scanning of a micromechanically exfoliated graphene sample. A sharp p-n junction is essential to the manifestation of these aforementioned effects, and we examine the benefits and drawbacks of several routes toward this goal from a fabrication standpoint. These methods include lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. Finally, we will describe our subsequent characterization results for each, including information about topography and spatial mapping of the density of states. This work is supported by NSF IGERT (DGE-1069240).

  12. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  13. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  14. Magnetoamplification in a Bipolar Magnetic Junction Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangaraju, N.; Peters, J. A.; Wessels, B. W.

    2010-09-01

    We have demonstrated the first bipolar magnetic junction transistor using a dilute magnetic semiconductor. For an InMnAs p-n-p transistor magnetoamplification is observed at room temperature. The observed magnetoamplification is attributed to the magnetoresistance of the magnetic semiconductor InMnAs heterojunction. The magnetic field dependence of the transistor characteristics confirm that the magnetoamplification results from the junction magnetoresistance. To describe the experimentally observed transistor characteristics, we propose a modified Ebers-Moll model that includes a series magnetoresistance attributed to spin-selective conduction. The capability of magnetic field control of the amplification in an all-semiconductor transistor at room temperature potentially enables the creation of new computer logic architecture where the spin of the carriers is utilized.

  15. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  16. Dissipation and traversal time in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Ranfagni, Anedio; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The various ways of evaluating dissipative effects in macroscopic quantum tunneling are re-examined. The results obtained by using functional integration, while confirming those of previously given treatments, enable a comparison with available experimental results relative to Josephson junctions. A criterion based on the shortening of the semiclassical traversal time tau of the barrier with regard to dissipation can be established, according to which DELTAtau/tau > or approx. N/Q, where Q is the quality factor of the junction and N is a numerical constant of order unity. The best agreement with the experiments is obtained for N=1.11, as it results from a semiempirical analysis based on an increase in the potential barrier caused by dissipative effects.

  17. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules. PMID:27215814

  18. Cusps on cosmic superstrings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Rajamanoharan, Senthooran; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: william.nelson@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The existence of cusps on non-periodic strings ending on D-branes is demonstrated and the conditions for which such cusps are generic are derived. The dynamics of F-strings, D-strings and FD-string junctions are investigated. It is shown that pairs of FD-string junctions, such as would form after intercommutations of F-strings and D-strings, generically contain cusps. This new feature of cosmic superstrings opens up the possibility of extra channels of energy loss from a string network. The phenomenology of cusps on such cosmic superstring networks is compared to that of cusps formed on networks of their field theory analogues, the standard cosmic strings.

  19. Boson Josephson Junction with Trapped Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S. R.

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates at T=0 in a double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. Analytic elliptic function solutions are obtained for the time evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance z(t) (related to the condensate phase difference) of the Boson Josephson junction (BJJ). Surprisingly, the neutral-atom BJJ shows (non-sinusoidal generalizations of) effects seen in charged-electron superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ). The BJJ elliptic-function behavior has a singular dependence on a GPE parameter ratio Λ at a critical ratio Λ=Λc, beyond which a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect sets in with a non-zero time-averaged imbalance ≠0.

  20. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  1. Lycopene oxidation product enhances gap junctional communication.

    PubMed

    Aust, O; Ale-Agha, N; Zhang, L; Wollersen, H; Sies, H; Stahl, W

    2003-10-01

    Carotenoids as well as their metabolites and oxidation products stimulate gap junctional communication (GJC) between cells, which is thought to be one of the protective mechanisms related to cancer-preventive activities of these compounds. Increased intake of lycopene by consumption of tomatoes or tomato products has been epidemiologically associated with a diminished risk of prostate cancer. Here, we report a stimulatory effect of a lycopene oxidation product on GJC in rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells. The active compound was obtained by complete in vitro oxidation of lycopene with hydrogen peroxide/osmium tetroxide. For structural analysis high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, ultraviolet/visible-, and infrared spectrophotometry were applied. The biologically active oxidation product was identified as 2,7,11-trimethyl-tetradecahexaene-1,14-dial. The present data indicate a potential role of lycopene degradation products in cell signaling enhancing cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions. PMID:12909274

  2. Josephson Junctions Help Measure Resonance And Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid H. S.; Mcgrath, William R.; Bumble, Bruce; Leduc, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of superconducting microstrip transmission lines measured at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Submicron Josephson (super-conductor/insulator/superconductor) junctions used as both voltage-controlled oscillators and detectors to measure frequencies (in range of hundreds of gigahertz) of high-order resonant electromagnetic modes of superconducting microstrip transmission-line resonators. This oscillator/detector approach similar to vacuum-tube grid dip meters and transistor dip meters used to probe resonances at much lower frequencies.

  3. Electron irradiation of tandem junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical behavior of 100 micron thick tandem junction solar cells manufactured by Texas Instruments was studied as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence, photon irradiation, and 60 C annealing. These cells are found to degrade rapidly with radiation, the most serious loss occurring in the blue end of the cell's spectral response. No photon degradation was found to occur, but the cells did anneal a small amount at 60 C.

  4. Peltier Junction heats and cools car seat

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, M.A.

    1994-10-10

    Electrically heated seats may soon become heated and cooled seats. The design called the CCS module exploits the heat-pump capability of a class of semiconductor thermoelectric devices (TEDs) known as Peltier Junction. Every CCS module contain two TEDs. Heating and cooling occurs through convection and conduction. The heart of the system is the thermoelectric heat pump. This is originally conceived as the sole heating/cooling options for a prototype electric vehicle.

  5. Semiconductor junction formation by directed heat

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Robert B.

    1988-03-24

    The process of the invention includes applying precursors 6 with N- and P-type dopants therein to a silicon web 2, with the web 2 then being baked in an oven 10 to drive off excessive solvents, and the web 2 is then heated using a pulsed high intensity light in a mechanism 12 at 1100.degree.-1150.degree. C. for about 10 seconds to simultaneously form semiconductor junctions in both faces of the web.

  6. Electronic and optical spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiner, Michael J.

    Electronic transport through molecules has been intensively studied in recent years, due to scientific interest in fundamental questions about charge transport and the technological promise of nanoscale circuitry. A wide range of range of experimental platforms have been developed to electronically probe both single molecules and molecular monolayers. However, it remains challenging to fabricate reliable electronic contacts to molecules, and the vast majority of molecular electronic architectures are not amenable to standard characterization techniques, such as optical spectroscopy. Thus the field of molecular electronics has been hampered with problems of reproducibility, and many fundamental questions about electronic transport remain unanswered. This thesis describes four significant contributions towards the fabrication and characterization of molecular electronic devices: (1) The development of a new method for creating robust, large area junctions where the electronic transport is through a single monolayer of molecules. This method utilizes atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow an ultrathin oxide layer on top of a molecular monolayer, which protects the molecules against subsequent processing. (2) A new method for rapid imaging and analysis of single defects in molecular monolayers. This method also electrically passivates defects as it labels them. (3) Hot carrier spectroscopy of molecular junctions. Using optically excited hot carriers, we demonstrate the ability to probe the energy level lineup inside buried molecular junctions. (4) Efficient coupling of optical fields to metal-insulator-metal (MIM) surface plasmon modes. We show both theoretical and experimental work illustrating the ability to create very intense optical fields inside MIM systems. The intense fields generated in this manner have natural extensions to a variety of applications, such as photon assisted tunneling in molecular junctions, optical modulators, and ultrafast optoelectronic

  7. An epitaxial ferroelectric tunnel junction on silicon.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhipeng; Guo, Xiao; Lu, Hui-Bin; Zhang, Zaoli; Song, Dongsheng; Cheng, Shaobo; Bosman, Michel; Zhu, Jing; Dong, Zhili; Zhu, Weiguang

    2014-11-12

    Epitaxially grown functional perovskites on silicon (001) and the ferroelectricity of a 3.2 nm thick BaTiO3 barrier layer are demonstrated. The polarization-switching-induced change in tunneling resistance is measured to be two orders of magnitude. The obtained results suggest the possibility of integrating ferroelectric tunnel junctions as binary data storage media in non-volatile memory cells on a silicon platform. PMID:25200550

  8. Quantum dynamics in the bosonic Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Chuchem, Maya; Cohen, Doron; Smith-Mannschott, Katrina; Hiller, Moritz; Kottos, Tsampikos; Vardi, Amichay

    2010-11-15

    We employ a semiclassical picture to study dynamics in a bosonic Josephson junction with various initial conditions. Phase diffusion of coherent preparations in the Josephson regime is shown to depend on the initial relative phase between the two condensates. For initially incoherent condensates, we find a universal value for the buildup of coherence in the Josephson regime. In addition, we contrast two seemingly similar on-separatrix coherent preparations, finding striking differences in their convergence to classicality as the number of particles increases.

  9. Single-molecule junctions beyond electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V.; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-06-01

    The idea of using individual molecules as active electronic components provided the impetus to develop a variety of experimental platforms to probe their electronic transport properties. Among these, single-molecule junctions in a metal-molecule-metal motif have contributed significantly to our fundamental understanding of the principles required to realize molecular-scale electronic components from resistive wires to reversible switches. The success of these techniques and the growing interest of other disciplines in single-molecule-level characterization are prompting new approaches to investigate metal-molecule-metal junctions with multiple probes. Going beyond electronic transport characterization, these new studies are highlighting both the fundamental and applied aspects of mechanical, optical and thermoelectric properties at the atomic and molecular scales. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of quantum interference and manipulation of electronic and nuclear spins in single-molecule circuits are heralding new device concepts with no classical analogues. In this Review, we present the emerging methods being used to interrogate multiple properties in single molecule-based devices, detail how these measurements have advanced our understanding of the structure-function relationships in molecular junctions, and discuss the potential for future research and applications.

  10. Josephson junction in a thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.; Dobrovitski, V. V.; Clem, J. R.; Mawatari, Yasunori; Mints, R. G.

    2001-04-01

    The phase difference {phi}(y) for a vortex at a line Josephson junction in a thin film attenuates at large distances as a power law, unlike the case of a bulk junction where it approaches exponentially the constant values at infinities. The field of a Josephson vortex is a superposition of fields of standard Pearl vortices distributed along the junction with the line density {phi}'(y)/2{pi}. We study the integral equation for {phi}(y) and show that the phase is sensitive to the ratio l/{Lambda}, where l={lambda}{sub J}{sup 2}/{lambda}{sub L}, {Lambda}=2{lambda}{sub L}{sup 2}/d, {lambda}{sub L}, and {lambda}{sub J} are the London and Josephson penetration depths, and d is the film thickness. For l<<{Lambda}, the vortex ''core'' of the size l is nearly temperature independent, while the phase ''tail'' scales as l{Lambda}/y{sup 2}={lambda}{sub J}2{lambda}{sub L}/d/y{sup 2}; i.e., it diverges as T{yields}T{sub c}. For l>>{Lambda}, both the core and the tail have nearly the same characteristic length l{Lambda}.

  11. Radial pn Junction, Wire Array Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayes, Brendan Melville

    Radial pn junctions are potentially of interest in photovoltaics as a way to decouple light absorption from minority carrier collection. In a traditional planar design these occur in the same dimension, and this sets a lower limit on absorber material quality, as cells must both be thick enough to effectively absorb the solar spectrum while also having minority-carrier diffusion lengths long enough to allow for efficient collection of the photo-generated carriers. Therefore, highly efficient photovoltaic devices currently require highly pure materials and expensive processing techniques, while low cost devices generally operate at relatively low efficiency. The radial pn junction design sets the direction of light absorption perpendicular to the direction of minority-carrier transport, allowing the cell to be thick enough for effective light absorption, while also providing a short pathway for carrier collection. This is achieved by increasing the junction area, in order to decrease the path length any photogenerated minority carrier must travel, to be less than its minority carrier diffusion length. Realizing this geometry in an array of semiconducting wires, by for example depositing a single-crystalline inorganic semiconducting absorber layer at high deposition rates from the gas phase by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, allows for a "bottom up" approach to device fabrication, which can in principle dramatically reduce the materials costs associated with a cell.

  12. Functional analysis of tight junction organization.

    PubMed

    DiBona, D R

    1985-01-01

    The functional basis of tight junction design has been examined from the point of view that this rate-limiting barrier to paracellular transport is a multicompartment system. Review of the osmotic sensitivity of these structures points to the need for this sort of analysis for meaningful correlation of structure and function under a range of conditions. A similar conclusion is drawn with respect to results from voltage-clamping protocols where reversal of spontaneous transmural potential difference elicits parallel changes in both structure and function in much the same way as does reversal of naturally occurring osmotic gradients. In each case, it becomes necessary to regard the junction as a functionally polarized structure to account for observations of its rectifying properties. Lastly, the details of experimentally-induced junction deformation are examined in light of current theories of its organization; arguments are presented in favor of the view that the primary components of intramembranous organization (as viewed with freeze-fracture techniques) are lipidic rather than proteinaceous. PMID:4088839

  13. Very large thermophase in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Giazotto, F; Heikkilä, T T; Bergeret, F S

    2015-02-13

    The concept of thermophase refers to the appearance of a phase gradient inside a superconductor originating from the presence of an applied temperature bias across it. The resulting supercurrent flow may, in suitable conditions, fully counterbalance the temperature-bias-induced quasiparticle current therefore preventing the formation of any voltage drop, i.e., a thermovoltage, across the superconductor. Yet, the appearance of a thermophase is expected to occur in Josephson-coupled superconductors as well. Here, we theoretically investigate the thermoelectric response of a thermally biased Josephson junction based on a ferromagnetic insulator. In particular, we predict the occurrence of a very large thermophase that can reach π/2 across the contact for suitable temperatures and structure parameters; i.e., the quasiparticle thermal current can reach the critical current. Such a thermophase can be several orders of magnitude larger than that predicted to occur in conventional Josephson tunnel junctions. In order to assess experimentally the predicted very large thermophase, we propose a realistic setup realizable with state-of-the-art nanofabrication techniques and well-established materials, based on a superconducting quantum interference device. This effect could be of strong relevance in several low-temperature applications, for example, for revealing tiny temperature differences generated by coupling the electromagnetic radiation to one of the superconductors forming the junction. PMID:25723238

  14. Josephson Effect in SFNS Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karminskaya, T. Yu.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Sidorenko, A. S.

    The critical current, I C, of Josephson junctions both in ramp-type (S-FN-S) and in overlap (SNF-FN-FNS, SN-FN-NS, SNF-N-FNS) geometries has been calculated in the frame of linearized Usadel equations (S-superconductor, F-ferromagnetic, N-normal metal). For the ramp-type structures, in which S electrodes contact directly the end walls of FN bilayer, it is shown that I C may exhibit damping oscillations as a function of both the distance L between superconductors and thicknesses d F,N of ferromagnetic and normal layers. The conditions have been determined under which the decay length and period of oscillation of I C(L) at fixed d F are of the order of decay length of superconducting correlations in the N metal, ξN, that is much larger than in F film. In overlap configurations, in which S films are placed on the top of NF bilayer, the studied junctions have complex SNF or SN electrodes (N or NF bilayer are situated under a superconductor). We demonstrate that in these geometries the critical current can exceed that in ramp-type junctions. Based on these results, the choice of the most practically applicable geometry is discussed.

  15. Primary thermometry with nanoscale tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvi, K.P.; Kauppinen, J.P.; Paalanen, M.A.; Pekola, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    We have found current-voltage (I-V) and conductance (dI/dV) characteristics of arrays of nanoscale tunnel junctions between normal metal electrodes to exhibit suitable features for primary thermometry. The current through a uniform array depends on the ratio of the thermal energy k{sub B}T and the electrostatic charging energy E{sub c} of the islands between the junctions and is completely blocked by Coulomb repulsion at T=0 and at small voltages eV/2 {<=} Ec. In the opposite limit, k{sub B}T {much_gt} E{sub c}, the width of the conductance minimum scales linearly and universally with T and N, the number of tunnel junctions, and qualifies as a primary thermometer. The zero bias drop in the conductance is proportional to T{sup -1} and can be used as a secondary thermometer. We will show with Monte Carlo simulations how background charge and nonuniformities of the array will affect the thermometer.

  16. Fermi edge singularity in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Sherkunov, Yury; D'Ambrumenil, Nicholas; Muzykantskii, Boris

    2010-03-01

    We present results on the non-equilibrium Fermi edge singularity (FES) problem in tunnel junctions. The FES, which is present in a Fermi gas subject to any sudden change of potential, manifests itself in the final state many body interaction between the electrons in the leads [1]. We establish a connection between the FES problem in a tunnel junction and the Full Counting Statistics (FCS) for the device [2]. We find that the exact profile of the changing potential (or the profile for the barrier opening and closing in the tunnel junction case) strongly affects the overlap between the initial and final state of the Fermi gas. We factorize the contribution to the FES into two approximately independent terms: one is connected with the short time opening process while the other is concerned with the long time asymptotic effect, namely the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. We consider applications to a localized level coupled through a tunnel barrier to a 1D lead driven out of equilibrium [3]. References: [1] G. Mahan, Phys. Rev. 163, 1612 (1967); P. Nozieres and C. T. De Dominicis, Phys. Rev. 178, 1079 (1969); P. Anderson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 18, 1049 (1967) [2] J. Zhang, Y. Sherkunov, N. d'Ambrumenil, and B. Muzykantskii, ArXiv:0909.3427 [3] D. Abanin and L. Levitov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186803 (2005)

  17. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  18. Scanning SQUID microscopy of SFS π-Josephson junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Oboznov, V. A.

    2005-03-01

    We use a Scanning SQUID Microscope to image the magnetic flux distribution in arrays of SFS (superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor) Josephson junctions. The junctions are fabricated with barrier thickness such that they undergo a transition to a π-junction state at a temperature Tπ 2-4 K. In arrays with cells that have an odd number of π-junctions, we observe spontaneously generated magnetic flux in zero applied magnetic field. We image both fully-frustrated arrays and arrays with non-uniform frustration created by varying the number of π-junctions in the cells. By monitoring the onset of spontaneous flux as a function of temperature near Tπ,^ we estimate the uniformity of the junction critical currents.

  19. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2012-03-06

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  20. Gap distance and interactions in a molecular tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuai; He, Jin; Zhang, Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Lindsay, Stuart

    2011-09-14

    The distance between electrodes in a tunnel junction cannot be determined from the external movement applied to the electrodes because of interfacial forces that distort the electrode geometry at the nanoscale. These distortions become particularly complex when molecules are present in the junction, as demonstrated here by measurements of the AC response of a molecular junction over a range of conductivities from microsiemens to picosiemens. Specific chemical interactions within the junction lead to distinct features in break-junction data, and these have been used to determine the electrode separation in a junction functionalized with 4(5)-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1H-imidazole-2-carboxamide, a reagent developed for reading DNA sequences. PMID:21838292

  1. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-01

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 109 kW-1. Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design.

  2. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 10(9) kW(-1). Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design. PMID:25005801

  3. Selective plating for junction delineation in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Eichfeld, Chad M; Wood, Carolyn; Liu, Bangzhi; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Redwing, Joan M; Mohney, Suzanne E

    2007-09-01

    The in situ growth of p-n junctions in silicon nanowires enables the fabrication of a variety of nanoscale electronic devices. We have developed a method for selective coating of Au onto n-type segments of silicon nanowire p-n junctions. Selective plating allows for quick verification of the position of p-n junctions along the nanowire using electron microscopy and allows for measurement of segment length. PMID:17696558

  4. The SNS Josephson junction with a third terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prans, G. P.; Meissner, H.

    1974-01-01

    Discussion of the operating characteristics of a three-terminal thin-film SNS Josephson junction whose diameter is much greater than the electron pair coherence length in the N metal. It is shown that a junction of this type is essentially a two-terminal device even though the third terminal of the junction supplies the control current. The mechanism underlying this finding is discussed.

  5. Definitive evidence for the existence of tight junctions in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lane, N J; Chandler, H J

    1980-09-01

    Extensive and unequivocal tight junctions are here reported between the lateral borders of the cellular layer that circumscribes the arachnid (spider) central nervous system. This account details the features of these structures, which form a beltlike reticulum that is more complex than the simple linear tight junctions hitherto found in invertebrate tissues and which bear many of the characteristics of vertebrate zonulae occludentes. We also provide evidence that these junctions form the basis of a permeability barrier to exogenous compounds. In thin sections, the tight junctions are identifiable as punctate points of membrane apposition; they are seen to exclude the stain and appear as election- lucent moniliform strands along the lines of membrane fusion in en face views of uranyl-calcium-treated tissues. In freeze-fracture replicas, the regions of close membrane apposition exhibit P-face (PF) ridges and complementary E-face (EF) furrows that are coincident across face transitions, although slightly offset with respect to one another. The free inward diffusion of both ionic and colloidal lanthanum is inhibited by these punctate tight junctions so that they appear to form the basis of a circumferential blood-brain barrier. These results support the contention that tight junctions exist in the tissues of the invertebrata in spite of earlier suggestions that (a) they are unique to vertebrates and (b) septate junctions are the equivalent invertebrate occluding structure. The component tight junctional 8- to 10-nm-particulate PF ridges are intimately intercalated with, but clearly distinct from, inverted gap junctions possessing the 13-nm EF particles typical of arthropods. Hence, no confusion can occur as to which particles belong to each of the two junctional types, as commonly happens with vertebrate tissues, especially in the analysis of developing junctions. Indeed, their coexistance in this way supports the idea, over which there has been some controversy, that

  6. Topological phase transition of a Josephson junction and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutasoit, Jimmy; Marciani, Marco; Tarasinski, Brian; Beenakker, Carlo

    A Josephson junction formed by a superconducting ring interrupted by a semiconductor nanowire can realize a zero-dimensional class D topological superconductor. By coupling the Josephson junction to a ballistic wire and altering the strength of the coupling, one can drive this topological superconductor through a topological phase transition. We study the compressibility of the junction as a probe of the topological phase transition. We also study the dynamics of the phase transition by studying the current pulse injected into the wire.

  7. Macroscopic quantum effects in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Machida, M.

    2008-09-01

    A macroscopic quantum theory for the capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ’s) is constructed. We clarify the multi-junction effect for the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) to the first resistive branch. It is shown that the escape rate is greatly enhanced by the capacitive coupling between junctions. We also discuss the origin of the N2-enhancement in the escape rate observed in the uniformly switching in Bi-2212 IJJ’s.

  8. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua Joshua

    2008-11-11

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  9. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  10. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  11. Direct experimental determination of voltage across high-low junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    High-low (HL) junctions form a part of many semiconductor devices, including back surface field solar cells. A first experimental determination and interpretation of the voltage across the HL junction under low- and high-injection conditions is presented as a function of the voltage across a nearby p/n junction. Theoretical analysis from first principles is shown to bear well on the experimental results. In addition, a test structure is proposed for measurement of the effective surface recombination velocity at the HL junctions.

  12. Naturally formed graded junction for organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yan; Yang, Yang

    2003-09-01

    In this letter, we report naturally-formed graded junctions (NFGJ) for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). These junctions are fabricated using single thermal evaporation boat loaded with uniformly mixed charge transport and light-emitting materials. Upon heating, materials sublimate sequentially according to their vaporizing temperatures forming the graded junction. Two kinds of graded structures, sharp and shallow graded junctions, can be formed based on the thermal properties of the selected materials. The NFGJ OLEDs have shown excellent performance in both brightness and lifetime compared with heterojunction devices.

  13. Josephson junction through a disordered topological insulator with helical magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Alexander; Alidoust, Mohammad; Loss, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We study supercurrent and proximity vortices in a Josephson junction made of disordered surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator with a proximity induced in-plane helical magnetization. In a regime where the rotation period of helical magnetization is larger than the junction width, we find supercurrent 0 -π crossovers as a function of junction thickness, magnetization strength, and parameters inherent to the helical modulation and surface states. The supercurrent reversals are associated with proximity induced vortices, nucleated along the junction width, where the number of vortices and their locations can be manipulated by means of the superconducting phase difference and the parameters mentioned above.

  14. Craniovertebral Junction Instability: A Review of Facts about Facets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction surgery involves an appropriate philosophical, biomechanical and anatomical understanding apart from high degree of technical skill and ability of controlling venous and arterial bleeding. The author presents his 30-year experience with treating complex craniovertebral junction instability related surgical issues. The facets of atlas and axis form the primary site of movements at the craniovertebral junction. All craniovertebral junction instability is essentially localized to the atlantoaxial facet joint. Direct manipulation and fixation of the facets forms the basis of treatment for instability. PMID:26240728

  15. Josephson Current and Multiple Andreev Reflections in Graphene SNS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skachko, Ivan; Du, Xu; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2008-03-01

    The Josephson Effect and Superconducting Proximity Effect were observed in Superconductor-Graphene-Superconductor (SGS) Josephson junctions with coherence lengths comparable to the distance between the superconducting leads. By comparing the measured temperature and gate dependence of the supercurrent and the proximity induced sub-gap features (multiple Andreev reflections) to theoretical predictions, we find that the diffusive junction model yields close quantitative agreement with the results. This is consistent with the fact that the measured mean free paths in these junctions, 10 ˜ 30 nm, are significantly shorter than the lead separation. We show that all SGS devices reported so far fall in the diffusive junction category.

  16. Electrical and Spectroscopic Characterization of Metal-Molecule-Metal Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Theresa

    2005-03-01

    Considerable attention has been devoted to developing an understanding of the mechanisms that dominate electrical transport in metal- molecule-metal junctions comprised of single and small ensembles of molecules. In this talk, we will present an overview of recent research on the electrical and spectroscopic characterization of molecular junctions inserted along the length of sub-40-nm diameter Au and Pd metal nanowires (i.e., in-wire junctions) fabricated by template-directed synthesis. In particular, we will show results that investigate the relationship between the temperature dependent (10 -- 300 K) current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and the vibrational spectra measured by inelastic electron tunneling (IET) spectroscopy for candidate molecular wires and bistable switching molecules. The two types of molecular wire junctions that were studied incorporate a self assembled monolayer of dithiolated oligo(phenylene- ethynylene) (OPE) molecules or their -NO2 derivatives. The I-V of these junctions are stable and reproducible between +/-1V. Temperature independent I-V are measured for both types of junctions, which is indicative of coherent tunneling transport. Moreover, strong vibrations associated with υ(18b) and υ(19a) ring modes were observed in both junctions. In contrast, measurements of molecular junctions that incorporate SAMs based on aniline derivatives show reproducible bistable switching with an on-off ratio of >10:1 at 1V. Differences are observed in the vibrational spectra that depend on the state of the junction.

  17. Magic-T Junction using Microstrip/Slotline Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Doiron, Terence

    2008-01-01

    An improved broadband planar magic-T junction that incorporates microstrip/slotline transitions has been developed. In comparison with a prior broadband magic-T junction incorporating microstrip/slotline transitions, this junction offers superior broadband performance. In addition, because this junction is geometrically simpler and its performance is less affected by fabrication tolerances, the benefits of the improved design can be realized at lower fabrication cost. There are potential uses for junctions like this one in commercial microwave communication receivers, radar and polarimeter systems, and industrial microwave instrumentation. A magic-T junction is a four-port waveguide junction consisting of a combination of an H-type and an E-type junction. An E-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm that extends from a main waveguide in the same direction as that of the electric (E) field in the waveguide. An H-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm parallel to the magnetic (H) field in a main waveguide. A magic-T junction includes two input ports (here labeled 1 and 2, respectively) and two output ports (here labeled E and H, respectively). In an ideal case, (1) a magic-T junction is lossless, (2) the input signals add (that is, they combine in phase with each other) at port H, and (3) the input signals subtract (that is, they combine in opposite phase) at port E. The prior junction over which the present junction is an improvement affords in-phase-combining characterized by a broadband frequency response, and features a small slotline area to minimize in-band loss. However, with respect to isolation between ports 1 and 2 and return loss at port E, it exhibits narrowband frequency responses. In addition, its performance is sensitive to misalignment of microstrip and slotline components: this sensitivity is attributable to a limited number of quarter-wavelength (lambda/4) transmission-line sections for matching impedances

  18. Differences between liver gap junction protein and lens MIP 26 from rat: implications for tissue specificity of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B J; Takemoto, L J; Hunkapiller, M W; Hood, L E; Revel, J P

    1983-03-01

    Liver gap junctions and gap-junction-like structures from eye lenses are each comprised of a single major protein (Mr 28,000 and 26,000, respectively). These proteins display different two-dimensional peptide fingerprints, distinct amino acid compositions, nonhomologous N-terminal amino acid sequences and different sensitivities to proteases when part of the intact junction. However, the junctional protein of each tissue is well conserved between species, as demonstrated previously for lens and now for liver in several mammalian species. The possiblity of tissue-specific gap junction proteins is discussed in the light of data suggesting that rat heart gap junctions are comprised of yet a third protein. PMID:6299583

  19. Epithelial tight junctions in intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schulzke, Joerg D; Ploeger, Svenja; Amasheh, Maren; Fromm, Anja; Zeissig, Sebastian; Troeger, Hanno; Richter, Jan; Bojarski, Christian; Schumann, Michael; Fromm, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The epithelium in inflamed intestinal segments of patients with Crohn's disease is characterized by a reduction of tight junction strands, strand breaks, and alterations of tight junction protein content and composition. In ulcerative colitis, epithelial leaks appear early due to micro-erosions resulting from upregulated epithelial apoptosis and in addition to a prominent increase of claudin-2. Th1-cytokine effects by interferon-gamma in combination with TNFalpha are important for epithelial damage in Crohn's disease, while interleukin-13 (IL-13) is the key effector cytokine in ulcerative colitis stimulating apoptosis and upregulation of claudin-2 expression. Focal lesions caused by apoptotic epithelial cells contribute to barrier disturbance in IBD by their own conductivity and by confluence toward apoptotic foci or erosions. Another type of intestinal barrier defect can arise from alpha-hemolysin harboring E. coli strains among the physiological flora, which can gain pathologic relevance in combination with proinflammatory cytokines under inflammatory conditions. On the other hand, intestinal barrier impairment can also result from transcellular antigen translocation via an initial endocytotic uptake into early endosomes, and this is intensified by proinflammatory cytokines as interferon-gamma and may thus play a relevant role in the onset of IBD. Taken together, barrier defects contribute to diarrhea by a leak flux mechanism (e.g., in IBD) and can cause mucosal inflammation by luminal antigen uptake. Immune regulation of epithelial functions by cytokines may cause barrier dysfunction not only by tight junction impairments but also by apoptotic leaks, transcytotic mechanisms, and mucosal gross lesions. PMID:19538319

  20. Plasmon Enhanced Hetero-Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a systematic study of plasmon-enhanced hetero-junction solar cells made of colloidal quantum dots (PbS) and nanowires (ZnO), with/without metal nanoparticles (Au). The structure of solar cell devices was characterized by AFM, SEM and profilometer, etc. The power conversion efficiencies of solar cell devices were characterized by solar simulator (OAI TriSOL, AM1.5G Class AAA). The enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of metal nanoparticles was obvious. We believe this is due to the plasmonic effect from the metal nanoparticles. The correlation between surface roughness, film uniformity and device performance was also studied.

  1. Creating Spin Switches and Junctions on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Eric; Stamp, Philip

    2010-03-01

    Inspired by the work of Hirjibehedin et al, (Science 317 1199) creating Heisenberg spin chains on an insulating surface, we examine geometries in which excitations down a spin chain are either blocked or transmitted depending on the state of a central junction, made from a spin dimer. The dimer state can be controlled by excitations down an additional chain, creating a spin switch. In addition to the technological applications of such a switch, the theoretical language developed has application to certain quantum computation schemes.

  2. On Chip Josephson Junction Microwave Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, Ofer; Abutaleb, Mohamed; Kirby, Chris; Rennie, Michael

    We report on the design and measurement of a reflective single-pole single-throw microwave switch based on a superconducting circuit containing a single Josephson junction. The device has no internal power dissipation, minimal insertion loss, and is controlled by Φ0-level base-band signals. The data demonstrates the device operation with 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth centered at 10 GHz and better than 20 dB on/off ratio for input powers up to -100 dBm.

  3. On-chip Josephson junction microwave switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, O.; Abutaleb, M. O.; Kirby, C.; Rennie, M.

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the design and measurement of a reflective single-pole single-throw microwave switch with no internal power dissipation, based on a superconducting circuit containing a single Josephson junction. The data demonstrate the switch operation with 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth centered at 10 GHz, low insertion loss, and better than 20 dB on/off ratio. The switch's measured performance agrees well with simulations for input powers up to -100 dBm. An extension of the demonstrated circuit to implement a single-pole double-throw switch is shown in simulation.

  4. Phonon interference effects in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Markussen, Troels

    2013-12-28

    We study coherent phonon transport through organic, π-conjugated molecules. Using first principles calculations and Green's function methods, we find that the phonon transmission function in cross-conjugated molecules, like meta-connected benzene, exhibits destructive quantum interference features very analogous to those observed theoretically and experimentally for electron transport in similar molecules. The destructive interference features observed in four different cross-conjugated molecules significantly reduce the thermal conductance with respect to linear conjugated analogues. Such control of the thermal conductance by chemical modifications could be important for thermoelectric applications of molecular junctions.

  5. Junctional angle of a bihanded helix.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wolgemuth, Charles W; Huber, Greg

    2014-10-01

    Helical filaments having sections of reversed chirality are common phenomena in the biological realm. The apparent angle between the two sections of opposite handedness provides information about the geometry and elasticity of the junctional region. In this paper, the governing differential equations for the local helical axis are developed, and asymptotic solutions of the governing equations are solved by perturbation theory. The asymptotic solutions are compared with the corresponding numerical solutions, and the relative error at second order is found to be less than 1.5% over a range of biologically relevant curvature and torsion values from 0 to 1/2 in dimensionless units. PMID:25375538

  6. Atrioventricular Junction Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilesh; Daoud, Emile G

    2016-04-01

    Atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation is an effective therapy in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who are intolerant to or unsuccessfully managed with rhythm control or medical rate control strategies. A drawback is that the procedure mandates a pacing system. Overall, the safety and efficacy of AVJ ablation is high with a majority of the patients reporting significant improvement in symptoms and quality-of-life measures. Risk of sudden cardiac death after device implantation is low, especially with an appropriate postprocedure pacing rate. Mortality benefit with AVJ ablation has been shown in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. PMID:26968669

  7. Atrioventricular junction ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilesh; Daoud, Emile G

    2014-11-01

    Atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation is an effective therapy in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who are intolerant to or unsuccessfully managed with rhythm control or medical rate control strategies. A drawback is that the procedure mandates a pacing system. Overall, the safety and efficacy of AVJ ablation is high with a majority of the patients reporting significant improvement in symptoms and quality-of-life measures. Risk of sudden cardiac death after device implantation is low, especially with an appropriate postprocedure pacing rate. Mortality benefit with AVJ ablation has been shown in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. PMID:25443238

  8. Elasticity of a soap film junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, F.; Janiaud, E.; Bacri, J.-C.; Andreotti, B.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the elasticity of an isolated, threefold junction of soap films (Plateau border), which displays static undulations when liquid rapidly flows into it. By analyzing the shape of the Plateau border (thickness R and transverse displacement) as a function of the liquid flow rate Q, we show experimentally and theoretically that the elasticity of the Plateau border is dominated by the bending of the soap films pulling on the Plateau border. In this asymptotic regime, the undulation wavelength obeys the scaling law ˜Q2 R-2 and the decay length ˜Q2 R-4.

  9. Collisions of strings with Y junctions.

    PubMed

    Copeland, E J; Kibble, T W B; Steer, D A

    2006-07-14

    We study the dynamics of Nambu-Goto strings with junctions at which three strings meet. In particular, we exhibit one simple exact solution and examine the process of intercommuting of two straight strings in which they exchange partners but become joined by a third string. We show that there are important kinematical constraints on this process. The exchange cannot occur if the strings meet with very large relative velocity. This may have important implications for the evolution of cosmic superstring networks and non-Abelian string networks. PMID:16907431

  10. Spin blockade qubit in a superconducting junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padurariu, C.; Nazarov, Yu. V.

    2012-12-01

    We interpret a recent pioneering experiment (Zgirski M. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 257003) on quasiparticle manipulation in a superconducting break junction in terms of spin blockade drawing analogy with spin qubits. We propose a novel qubit design that exploits the spin state of two trapped quasiparticles. We detail the coherent control of all four spin states by resonant quantum manipulation and compute the corresponding Rabi frequencies. The read-out technique is based on the spin blockade that inhibits quasiparticle recombination in triplet states. We provide extensive microscopic estimations of the parameters of our model.

  11. Photoresponse in arrays of thermoelectric nanowire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, T. E.; Scott, R.; Johnson, S.; Brower, T.; Belk, J. H.; Hunt, J. H.

    2013-07-01

    We report the first demonstration of optical detection by thermoelectric nanowire junctions. We employed devices composed of bismuth nanowire arrays which are capped with a transparent indium tin oxide electrode. The incident surface features very low optical reflectivity and enhanced light trapping. The unique attributes of the thermoelectric arrays are the combination of strong temporal and optical wavelength dependences of the photocurrent. Under infrared illumination, the signal can be completely described by thermoelectric effects considering cooling rates given by heat diffusion through the array. In addition, under visible illumination, we observe a photovoltaic response.

  12. Nonintrusive Measurement Of Temperature Of LED Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Powers, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Temperature inferred from spectrum of emitted light. Method of determining temperature of junction based on two relevant characteristics of LED. Gap between valence and conduction electron-energy bands in LED material decreases with increasing temperature, causing wavelength of emitted photon to increase with temperature. Other, as temperature increases, non-radiative processes dissipate more of input electrical energy as heat and less as photons in band-gap wavelenth region; optical and quantum efficiencies decrease with increasing temperature. In principal, either characteristic alone used to determine temperature. However, desirable to use both to obtain indication of uncertainty.

  13. Full potential of radial junction Si thin film solar cells with advanced junction materials and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shengyi; Misra, Soumyadeep; Lu, Jiawen; Yu, Zhongwei; Yu, Linwei; Xu, Jun; Wang, Junzhuan; Xu, Ling; Shi, Yi; Chen, Kunji; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2015-07-01

    Combining advanced materials and junction design in nanowire-based thin film solar cells requires a different thinking of the optimization strategy, which is critical to fulfill the potential of nano-structured photovoltaics. Based on a comprehensive knowledge of the junction materials involved in the multilayer stack, we demonstrate here, in both experimental and theoretical manners, the potential of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin film solar cells in a radial junction (RJ) configuration. Resting upon a solid experimental basis, we also assess a more advanced tandem RJ structure with radially stacking a-Si:H/nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si:H) PIN junctions, and show that a balanced photo-current generation with a short circuit current density of Jsc = 14.2 mA/cm2 can be achieved in a tandem RJ cell, while reducing the expensive nc-Si:H absorber thickness from 1-3 μ m (in planar tandem cells) to only 120 nm. These results provide a clearly charted route towards a high performance Si thin film photovoltaics.

  14. Switching and Rectification in Carbon-Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Menon, Madhu; Chernozatonskii, Leonid

    2003-01-01

    Multi-terminal carbon-nanotube junctions are under investigation as candidate components of nanoscale electronic devices and circuits. Three-terminal "Y" junctions of carbon nanotubes (see Figure 1) have proven to be especially interesting because (1) it is now possible to synthesize them in high yield in a controlled manner and (2) results of preliminary experimental and theoretical studies suggest that such junctions could exhibit switching and rectification properties. Following the preliminary studies, current-versus-voltage characteristics of a number of different "Y" junctions of single-wall carbon nanotubes connected to metal wires were computed. Both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes of various chiralities were considered. Most of the junctions considered were symmetric. These computations involved modeling of the quantum electrical conductivity of the carbon nanotubes and junctions, taking account of such complicating factors as the topological defects (pentagons, heptagons, and octagons) present in the hexagonal molecular structures at the junctions, and the effects of the nanotube/wire interfaces. A major component of the computational approach was the use of an efficient Green s function embedding scheme. The results of these computations showed that symmetric junctions could be expected to support both rectification and switching. The results also showed that rectification and switching properties of a junction could be expected to depend strongly on its symmetry and, to a lesser degree, on the chirality of the nanotubes. In particular, it was found that a zigzag nanotube branching at a symmetric "Y" junction could exhibit either perfect rectification or partial rectification (asymmetric current-versus-voltage characteristic, as in the example of Figure 2). It was also found that an asymmetric "Y" junction would not exhibit rectification.

  15. Metallic Electrode: Semiconducting Nanotube Junction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in an experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube [Collins et al., Science 278, 100 ('97)]. We claim that there are two contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube semi conductor) junction depending whether the alignment of the metal and semiconductor band structure is (1) variable (vacuum-gap) or (2) fixed (touching) with V. With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube. However, the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in forward current with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, while with V > 0 for an p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type. We apply this picture to the source-drain I-V characteristics in a long nanotube-channel field-effect-transistor (Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1597 ('00)], and show that two independent metal-semiconductor junctions connected in series are responsible for the observed behavior.

  16. Fractional Solitons in Excitonic Josephson Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Fen; Su, Jung-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The Josephson effect is especially appealing to physicists because it reveals macroscopically the quantum order and phase. In excitonic bilayers the effect is even subtler due to the counterflow of supercurrent as well as the tunneling between layers (interlayer tunneling). Here we study, in a quantum Hall bilayer, the excitonic Josephson junction: a conjunct of two exciton condensates with a relative phase ϕ0 applied. The system is mapped into a pseudospin ferromagnet then described numerically by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. In the presence of interlayer tunneling, we identify a family of fractional sine-Gordon solitons which resemble the static fractional Josephson vortices in the extended superconducting Josephson junctions. Each fractional soliton carries a topological charge Q that is not necessarily a half/full integer but can vary continuously. The calculated current-phase relation (CPR) shows that solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π is the lowest energy state starting from zero ϕ0 – until ϕ0 > π – then the alternative group of solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π − 1 takes place and switches the polarity of CPR. PMID:26511770

  17. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Ajith; Baheti, Neeraj N; Iype, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS). SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability is limited to a few centers. For RNS supramaximal stimulation is essential and so is display of the whole waveform of each muscle response at maximum amplitude. The amplitudes of the negative phase of the first and fourth responses are measured from baseline to negative peak, and the percent change of the fourth response compared with the first represents the decrement or increment. A decrement greater than 10% is accepted as abnormal and smooth progression of response amplitude train and reproducibility form the crux. In suspected LEMS the effect of fast rates of stimulation should be determined after RNS response to slow rates of stimulation. Caution is required to avoid misinterpretation of potentiation and pseudofacilitation. PMID:23661960

  18. Functional ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Shengwei; Han, Kun; Huang, Lisen; Schlom, Darrell G.; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando; Chen, Jingsheng

    2015-07-01

    The quest for solid state non-volatility memory devices on silicon with high storage density, high speed, low power consumption has attracted intense research on new materials and novel device architectures. Although flash memory dominates in the non-volatile memory market currently, it has drawbacks, such as low operation speed, and limited cycle endurance, which prevents it from becoming the “universal memory”. In this report, we demonstrate ferroelectric tunnel junctions (Pt/BaTiO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3) epitaxially grown on silicon substrates. X-ray diffraction spectra and high resolution transmission electron microscope images prove the high epitaxial quality of the single crystal perovskite films grown on silicon. Furthermore, the write speed, data retention and fatigue properties of the device compare favorably with flash memories. The results prove that the silicon-based ferroelectric tunnel junction is a very promising candidate for application in future non-volatile memories.

  19. Edge currents in frustrated Josephson junction ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. M.; Santos, F. D. R.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present a numerical study of quasi-1D frustrated Josephson junction ladders with diagonal couplings and open boundary conditions, in the large capacitance limit. We derive a correspondence between the energy of this Josephson junction ladder and the expectation value of the Hamiltonian of an analogous tight-binding model, and show how the overall superconducting state of the chain is equivalent to the minimum energy state of the tight-binding model in the subspace of one-particle states with uniform density. To satisfy the constraint of uniform density, the superconducting state of the ladder is written as a linear combination of the allowed k-states of the tight-binding model with open boundaries. Above a critical value of the parameter t (ratio between the intra-rung and inter-rung Josephson couplings) the ladder spontaneously develops currents at the edges, which spread to the bulk as t is increased until complete coverage is reached. Above a certain value of t, which varies with ladder size (t = 1 for an infinite-sized ladder), the edge currents are destroyed. The value t = 1 corresponds, in the tight-binding model, to the opening of a gap between two bands. We argue that the disappearance of the edge currents with this gap opening is not coincidental, and that this points to a topological origin for these edge current states.

  20. Communication Through Gap Junctions in the Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K; Windler, R; de Wit, C

    2016-01-01

    A swarm of fish displays a collective behavior (swarm behavior) and moves "en masse" despite the huge number of individual animals. In analogy, organ function is supported by a huge number of cells that act in an orchestrated fashion and this applies also to vascular cells along the vessel length. It is obvious that communication is required to achieve this vital goal. Gap junctions with their modular bricks, connexins (Cxs), provide channels that interlink the cytosol of adjacent cells by a pore sealed against the extracellular space. This allows the transfer of ions and charge and thereby the travel of membrane potential changes along the vascular wall. The endothelium provides a low-resistance pathway that depends crucially on connexin40 which is required for long-distance conduction of dilator signals in the microcirculation. The experimental evidence for membrane potential changes synchronizing vascular behavior is manifold but the functional verification of a physiologic role is still open. Other molecules may also be exchanged that possibly contribute to the synchronization (eg, Ca(2+)). Recent data suggest that vascular Cxs have more functions than just facilitating communication. As pharmacological tools to modulate gap junctions are lacking, Cx-deficient mice provide currently the standard to unravel their vascular functions. These include arteriolar dilation during functional hyperemia, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, vascular collateralization after ischemia, and feedback inhibition on renin secretion in the kidney. PMID:27451099

  1. Fractional Solitons in Excitonic Josephson Junctions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Fen; Su, Jung-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The Josephson effect is especially appealing to physicists because it reveals macroscopically the quantum order and phase. In excitonic bilayers the effect is even subtler due to the counterflow of supercurrent as well as the tunneling between layers (interlayer tunneling). Here we study, in a quantum Hall bilayer, the excitonic Josephson junction: a conjunct of two exciton condensates with a relative phase ϕ0 applied. The system is mapped into a pseudospin ferromagnet then described numerically by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. In the presence of interlayer tunneling, we identify a family of fractional sine-Gordon solitons which resemble the static fractional Josephson vortices in the extended superconducting Josephson junctions. Each fractional soliton carries a topological charge Q that is not necessarily a half/full integer but can vary continuously. The calculated current-phase relation (CPR) shows that solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π is the lowest energy state starting from zero ϕ0 - until ϕ0 > π - then the alternative group of solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π - 1 takes place and switches the polarity of CPR. PMID:26511770

  2. Vortex depinning in Josephson-junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, E. K. F.; Györffy, B. L.

    1993-02-01

    On the basis of a simple model we study the supercurrent-carrying capacity of a planar array of Josephson junctions. In particular we investigate the zero-temperature vortex-depinning current iBc, which is the largest supercurrent in an array containing one extra vortex on top of the ground-state vortex superlattice induced by an external magnetic field f. In the zero-field, f=0, case our results support the tilted-sinusoidal vortex-potential description of previous workers. However, in the fully frustrated, f=1/2 case, a more careful interpretation is required. We find that on the application of a transport current, the resulting vortex motion is not that of the extra vortex moving over a rigid field-induced vortex background. Rather, a vortex belonging to the checkerboard ground-state pattern first crosses over a junction into a neighboring ``empty'' plaquette. Then, the ``extra'' vortex moves to take its place. Our interpretation is based on a linear stability analysis, with the onset of vortex motion being associated with the vanishing of one eigenvalue of the stability matrix. Further applications of the method are suggested.

  3. Fabrication of Niobium Nanobridge Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachiki, T.; Horiguchi, K.; Uchida, T.

    2014-05-01

    To realize antenna-coupled Josephson detectors for microwave and millimeter-wave radiation, planar-type Nb nanobridge Josephson junctions were fabricated. Nb thin films whose thickness, the root mean square roughness and the critical temperature were 20.0 nm, 0.109 nm and 8.4 K, respectively were deposited using a DC magnetron sputtering at a substrate temperature of 700°C. Nanobridges were obtained from the film using 80-kV electron beam lithography and reactive ion-beam etching in CF4 (90%) + O2 (10%) gases. The minimum bridge area was 65 nm wide and 60 nm long. For the nanobridge whose width and length were less than 110 nm, an I-V characteristic showed resistively-shunted-junction behaviour near the critical temperature. Moreover, Shapiro steps were observed in the nanobridge with microwave irradiation at a frequency of 6 - 30 GHz. The Nb nanobridges can be used as detectors in the antenna-coupled devices.

  4. Functional ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Shengwei; Han, Kun; Huang, Lisen; Schlom, Darrell G.; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando, A; Chen, Jingsheng

    2015-01-01

    The quest for solid state non-volatility memory devices on silicon with high storage density, high speed, low power consumption has attracted intense research on new materials and novel device architectures. Although flash memory dominates in the non-volatile memory market currently, it has drawbacks, such as low operation speed, and limited cycle endurance, which prevents it from becoming the “universal memory”. In this report, we demonstrate ferroelectric tunnel junctions (Pt/BaTiO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3) epitaxially grown on silicon substrates. X-ray diffraction spectra and high resolution transmission electron microscope images prove the high epitaxial quality of the single crystal perovskite films grown on silicon. Furthermore, the write speed, data retention and fatigue properties of the device compare favorably with flash memories. The results prove that the silicon-based ferroelectric tunnel junction is a very promising candidate for application in future non-volatile memories. PMID:26215429

  5. Tricellular Tight Junctions in the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are structures that seal the space between the epithelial cell sheets. In the inner ear, the barrier function of TJs is indispensable for the separation of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces, which is essential for the generation and maintenance of the endocochlear potential (EP). TJs are formed by the intercellular binding of membrane proteins, known as claudins, and mutations in these proteins cause deafness in humans and mice. Within the epithelial cell sheet, however, a bound structure is present at the site where the corners of three cells meet (tricellular tight junctions (tTJs)), and the maintenance of the barrier function at this location cannot be explained by the claudins alone. Tricellulin and the angulin family of proteins (angulin-1/LSR, angulin-2/ILDR1, and angulin-3/ILDR2) have been identified as tTJ-associated proteins. Tricellulin and ILDR1 are localized at the tTJ and alterations in these proteins have been reported to be involved in deafness. In this review, we will present the current state of knowledge for tTJs. PMID:27195292

  6. Tricellular Tight Junctions in the Inner Ear.

    PubMed

    Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro; Katsuno, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are structures that seal the space between the epithelial cell sheets. In the inner ear, the barrier function of TJs is indispensable for the separation of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces, which is essential for the generation and maintenance of the endocochlear potential (EP). TJs are formed by the intercellular binding of membrane proteins, known as claudins, and mutations in these proteins cause deafness in humans and mice. Within the epithelial cell sheet, however, a bound structure is present at the site where the corners of three cells meet (tricellular tight junctions (tTJs)), and the maintenance of the barrier function at this location cannot be explained by the claudins alone. Tricellulin and the angulin family of proteins (angulin-1/LSR, angulin-2/ILDR1, and angulin-3/ILDR2) have been identified as tTJ-associated proteins. Tricellulin and ILDR1 are localized at the tTJ and alterations in these proteins have been reported to be involved in deafness. In this review, we will present the current state of knowledge for tTJs. PMID:27195292

  7. GAP junctional communication in brain secondary organizers.

    PubMed

    Bosone, Camilla; Andreu, Abraham; Echevarria, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are integral membrane proteins that enable the direct cytoplasmic exchange of ions and low molecular weight metabolites between adjacent cells. They are formed by the apposition of two connexons belonging to adjacent cells. Each connexon is formed by six proteins, named connexins (Cxs). Current evidence suggests that gap junctions play an important part in ensuring normal embryo development. Mutations in connexin genes have been linked to a variety of human diseases, although the precise role and the cell biological mechanisms of their action remain almost unknown. Among the big family of Cxs, several are expressed in nervous tissue but just a few are expressed in the anterior neural tube of vertebrates. Many efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular bases of Cxs cell biology and how they influence the morphogenetic signal activity produced by brain signaling centers. These centers, orchestrated by transcription factors and morphogenes determine the axial patterning of the mammalian brain during its specification and regionalization. The present review revisits the findings of GJ composed by Cx43 and Cx36 in neural tube patterning and discuss Cx43 putative enrollment in the control of Fgf8 signal activity coming from the well known secondary organizer, the isthmic organizer. PMID:27273333

  8. Enterocytes’ tight junctions: From molecules to diseases

    PubMed Central

    Assimakopoulos, Stelios F; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Charonis, Aristidis

    2011-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are structures between cells where cells appear in the closest possible contact. They are responsible for sealing compartments when epithelial sheets are generated. They regulate the permeability of ions, (macro) molecules and cells via the paracellular pathway. Their structure at the electron microscopic level has been well known since the 1970s; however, only recently has their macromolecular composition been revealed. This review first examines the major macromolecular components of the TJs (occludin, claudins, junctional adhesion molecule and tricellulin) and then the associated macromolecules at the intracellular plaque [zonula occludens (ZO)-1, ZO-2, ZO-3, AF-6, cingulin, 7H6]. Emphasis is given to their interactions in order to begin to understand the mode of assembly of TJs. The functional significance of TJs is detailed and several mechanisms and factors involved are discussed briefly. Emphasis is given to the role of intestinal TJs and the alterations observed or speculated in diverse disease states. Specifically, intestinal TJs may exert a pathogenetic role in intestinal (inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease) and extraintestinal diseases (diabetes type 1, food allergies, autoimmune diseases). Additionally, intestinal TJs may be secondarily disrupted during the course of diverse diseases, subsequently allowing the bacterial translocation phenomenon and promoting the systemic inflammatory response, which is often associated with clinical deterioration. The major questions in the field are highlighted. PMID:22184542

  9. Fractional Solitons in Excitonic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ya-Fen; Su, Jung-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The Josephson effect is especially appealing to physicists because it reveals macroscopically the quantum order and phase. In excitonic bilayers the effect is even subtler due to the counterflow of supercurrent as well as the tunneling between layers (interlayer tunneling). Here we study, in a quantum Hall bilayer, the excitonic Josephson junction: a conjunct of two exciton condensates with a relative phase ϕ0 applied. The system is mapped into a pseudospin ferromagnet then described numerically by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. In the presence of interlayer tunneling, we identify a family of fractional sine-Gordon solitons which resemble the static fractional Josephson vortices in the extended superconducting Josephson junctions. Each fractional soliton carries a topological charge Q that is not necessarily a half/full integer but can vary continuously. The calculated current-phase relation (CPR) shows that solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π is the lowest energy state starting from zero ϕ0 - until ϕ0 > π - then the alternative group of solitons with Q = ϕ0/2π - 1 takes place and switches the polarity of CPR.

  10. Conductance spectroscopy of topological superconductor wire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, F.; Brydon, Philip; Sau, Jay

    We study the zero-temperature transport properties of one-dimensional normal metal-superconductor (NS) junctions with topological superconductors across their topological transitions. Working within the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) formalism generalized for topological NS junctions, we analytically calculate the differential conductance for tunneling into two models of a topological superconductor: a spinless intrinsic p-wave superconductor and a spin-orbit-coupled s-wave superconductor in a Zeeman field. The zero-bias conductance takes nonuniversal values in the nontopological phase while it is robustly quantized at 2e2 / h in the topological regime. Despite this quantization at zero voltage, the zero-bias conductance only develops a peak (or a local maximum) as a function of voltage for sufficiently large interfacial barrier strength, or certain parameter regimes of spin-orbit coupling strength. Our calculated BTK conductance also shows that the conductance is finite inside the superconducting gap region because of the finite barrier transparency, providing a possible mechanism for the observed ``soft gap'' feature in the experimental studies. Work is done in collaboration with Sankar Das Sarma and supported by Microsoft Q, LPS-CMTC, and JQI-NSF-PFC.

  11. Josephson current in parallel SFS junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioselevich, Pavel; Ostrovsky, Pavel; Fominov, Yakov; Feigelman, Mikhail

    We study a Josephson junction between superconductors connected by two parallel ferromagnetic arms. If the ferromagnets are fully polarised, supercurrent can only flow via Cooper pair splitting between the differently polarised arms. The disorder-average current is suppressed, but mesoscopic fluctuations lead to a significant typical current. We extract the typical current from a current-current correlator. The current is proportional to sin2 α / 2 , where α is the angle between the polarisations of the two arms, revealing the spin dependence of crossed Andreev reflection. Compared to an SNS device of the same geometry, the typical SFS current is small by a factor determined by the properties of the superconducting leads alone. The current is insensitive to the flux threading the area between the ferromagnetic arms of the junction. However, if the ferromagnetic arms are replaced by metal with magnetic impurities, or partially polarised ferromagnets, the Josephson current starts depending on the flux with a period of h / e , i.e. twice the superconducting flux quantum.

  12. High efficiency quadruple junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestam, R.; Aissat, A.; Vilcot, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    This work focuses on the modeling and optimization of a structure based on InGaP/InGaAs/InGaAsN/Ge for photovoltaic. In this study we took into consideration the concentration effect of alloys x (In) and y (N) on the strain, the bandgap, the absorption and structure efficiency. It has been shown that the concentration of indium varies the strain and the bandgap. These two parameters change considerably the yield. Also it optimized the effect of alloys on the total absorption of the structure. For a concentration of indium x = 0.40 and y = 0.03 we had a absorption coefficient which is equal to 2 × 106 cm-1. We have found 50% efficiency for the multi-junction structure based on In0.55Ga0.45P/In0.40Ga0.60As/In0.30Ga0.70As0.97N0.03/Ge. To achieve a reliable high efficiency multi-junction structure, we just need to optimize the concentrations of different alloys.

  13. Intrinsic Josephson Junctions with Intermediate Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Paul A.; Saleem, Sajid; Fenton, Jon C.; Speller, Susie; Grovenor, Chris R. M.

    2011-03-01

    In cuprate superconductors, adjacent cuprate double-planes are intrinsically Josephson-coupled. For bias currents perpendicular to the planes, the current-voltage characteristics correspond to those of an array of underdamped Josephson junctions. We will discuss our experiments on sub-micron Tl-2212 intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). The dynamics of the IJJs at the plasma frequency are moderately damped (Q ~ 8). This results in a number of counter-intuitive observations, including both a suppression of the effect of thermal fluctuations and a shift of the skewness of the switching current distributions from negative to positive as the temperature is increased. Simulations confirm that these phenomena result from repeated phase slips as the IJJ switches from the zero-voltage to the running state. We further show that increased dissipation counter-intuitively increases the maximum supercurrent in the intermediate damping regime (PRL vol. 103, art. no. 217002). We discuss the role of environmental dissipation on the dynamics and describe experiments with on-chip lumped-element passive components in order control the environment seen by the IJJs. Work supported by EPSRC.

  14. Switching of Current in a Molecular Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Kamal; Mandal, Subhasish; Pati, Ranjit

    2013-03-01

    Achieving atomic level control at the metal-molecule interface in a single molecule conductance measurement is a difficult task that hinders the progress in molecular electronics. The lack of atomic level structural information of the interface makes the theoretical interpretation of experimental data much harder. Herein, we create an ensemble of device structure by varying metal-molecule binding sites, the orientation of the molecule at the interface, interface distance, and conformational change within the molecule to study junction dependent conductance behavior in Ruthenium-Bis(terpyridine) molecular wire, which has been fabricated and characterized. An orbital dependent DFT in conjunction with a parameter free, single particle Green's function approach is used to study the I-V characteristics. Our calculation for the weakly-coupled ONTOP junction geometry yields a relatively small (OFF state) current value below a threshold voltage (Vth) . The current value is found to increase at Vth and remains flat (ON state) after the threshold value. A similar non-linear I-V curve with a current switching behavior has been reported experimentally. This work is supported by the NSF through Grant 0643420.

  15. Dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P. P.; Oliveira, J. C. R. E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Menezes, J.; Menezes, R.

    2008-11-15

    We use a combination of analytic tools and an extensive set of the largest and most accurate three-dimensional field theory numerical simulations to study the dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions. We build upon our previous work and consider a class of models which, in the limit of large number N of coupled scalar fields, approaches the so-called ''ideal'' model (in terms of its potential to lead to network frustration). We consider values of N between N=2 and N=20, and a range of cosmological epochs, and we also compare this class of models with other toy models used in the past. In all cases we find compelling evidence for a gradual approach to scaling, strongly supporting our no-frustration conjecture. We also discuss the various possible types of junctions (including cases where there is a hierarchy of them) and their roles in the dynamics of the network. Finally, we provide a cosmological Zel'dovich-type bound on the energy scale of this kind of defect network: it must be lower than 10 keV.

  16. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on…

  17. Literacy Junction: Cultivating Adolescents' Engagement in Literature through Web Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spires, Hiller; Cuper, Pru

    2002-01-01

    Outlines Literacy Junction, an interactive website for middle school students and their teachers. Explains that while Literacy Junction is grounded in transactional theory, its conceptual base extends into a blend of actual and virtual transactions between readers and texts that expands the traditional boundaries of literacy and learning.…

  18. Molecular Transport Junctions Created By Self-Contacting Gapped Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong Kuk; Lee, One-Sun; Jang, Jae-Won; Petrosko, Sarah Hurst; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-08-01

    Molecular transport junctions (MTJs) are important components in molecular electronic devices. However, the synthesis of MTJs remains a significant challenge, as the dimensions of the junction must be tailored for each experiment, based on the molecular lengths. A novel methodology is reported for forming MTJs, taking advantage of capillary and van der Waals forces. PMID:27364594

  19. Mapping the Transmission Functions of Single-Molecule Junctions.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Brian; Low, Jonathan Z; Xia, Jianlong; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Campos, Luis M; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-06-01

    Charge transport phenomena in single-molecule junctions are often dominated by tunneling, with a transmission function dictating the probability that electrons or holes tunnel through the junction. Here, we present a new and simple technique for measuring the transmission functions of molecular junctions in the coherent tunneling limit, over an energy range of 1.5 eV around the Fermi energy. We create molecular junctions in an ionic environment with electrodes having different exposed areas, which results in the formation of electric double layers of dissimilar density on the two electrodes. This allows us to electrostatically shift the molecular resonance relative to the junction Fermi levels in a manner that depends on the sign of the applied bias, enabling us to map out the junction's transmission function and determine the dominant orbital for charge transport in the molecular junction. We demonstrate this technique using two groups of molecules: one group having molecular resonance energies relatively far from EF and one group having molecular resonance energies within the accessible bias window. Our results compare well with previous electrochemical gating data and with transmission functions computed from first principles. Furthermore, with the second group of molecules, we are able to examine the behavior of a molecular junction as a resonance shifts into the bias window. This work provides a new, experimentally simple route for exploring the fundamentals of charge transport at the nanoscale. PMID:27186894

  20. TEMPORAL CHANGE IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    TEMPORAL CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY *

    The objective of this study was to examine the reduction in gap junction communication (GJC) in primary hepatocytes due to coincident melatonin and magnetic field treatments to determine if these conditions could prov...

  1. 10. VIEW UPSTREAM OF PIPELINE SECTION AT JUNCTION OF HUME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW UPSTREAM OF PIPELINE SECTION AT JUNCTION OF HUME CEMENT PIPE AND CAST-IRON (460'). NOTE CYLINDRICAL COLLAR OF CEMENT SECTIONS AND BELL JUNCTIONS OF IRON PIPE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  2. Effect of surface losses on soliton propagation in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.; Pedersen, N.F.; Pagano, S.

    1986-05-12

    We have explored numerically the effects on soliton propagation of a third order damping term in the modified sine-Gordon equation. In Josephson tunnel junctions such a term corresponds physically to quasiparticle losses within the metal electrodes of the junction. We find that this loss term plays the dominant role in determining the shape and stability of the soliton at high velocity.

  3. Josephson junctions in high-T/sub c/ superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Falco, C.M.; Lee, T.W.

    1981-01-14

    The invention includes a high T/sub c/ Josephson sperconducting junction as well as the method and apparatus which provides the junction by application of a closely controlled and monitored electrical discharge to a microbridge region connecting two portions of a superconducting film.

  4. Septal Junctions in Filamentous Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Forchhammer, Karl; Maldener, Iris

    2016-02-01

    In the filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, septal junctions that traverse the septal peptidoglycan join adjacent cells, allowing intercellular communication. Perforations in the septal peptidoglycan have been observed, and proteins involved in the formation of such perforations and putative protein components of the septal junctions have been identified, but their relationships are debated. PMID:26748968

  5. Analysis of junction-barrier-controlled Schottky (JBS) rectifier characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliga, B. Jayant

    1985-11-01

    This paper provides analytical solutions for the forward conduction and reverse leakage characteristics of junction-barrier-controlled Schottky (JBS) rectifiers. Good agreement between the calculated output characteristics using these solutions and experimental measurements on devices fabricated with different junction depths and Schottky barrier heights is observed. These equations are valuable for the analysis and design of JBS power rectifiers.

  6. Conditions for synchronization in Josephson-junction arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chernikov, A.A.; Schmidt, G.

    1995-12-31

    An effective perturbation theoretical method has been developed to study the dynamics of Josephson Junction series arrays. It is shown that the inclusion of Junction capacitances, often ignored, has a significant impact on synchronization. Comparison of analytic with computational results over a wide range of parameters shows excellent agreement.

  7. Claudins and the Modulation of Tight Junction Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Claudins are tight junction membrane proteins that are expressed in epithelia and endothelia and form paracellular barriers and pores that determine tight junction permeability. This review summarizes our current knowledge of this large protein family and discusses recent advances in our understanding of their structure and physiological functions. PMID:23589827

  8. Forming Solar-Cell Junctions By Flash Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Paul, Jr.; Campbell, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Modified fabrication process simultaneously forms front and back junctions of silicon photovoltaic cells. With flash diffusion, junctions formed in 10 to 20 seconds. Cost reductions of 25 to 30 percent expected with modified process. Devices produced have performance equal to or better than cells made by conventional diffusion.

  9. Processing of Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Josephson Edge Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical behavior of epitaxial superconductor-normal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson edge junctions is strongly affected by processing conditions. Ex-situ processes, utilizing photoresist and polyimide/photoresist mask layers, are employed for ion milling edges for junctions with Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxide (YBCO) electrodes and primarily Co-doped YBCO interlayers.

  10. The cell-cell junctions of mammalian testes: I. The adhering junctions of the seminiferous epithelium represent special differentiation structures.

    PubMed

    Domke, Lisa M; Rickelt, Steffen; Dörflinger, Yvette; Kuhn, Caecilia; Winter-Simanowski, Stefanie; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina; Heid, Hans; Franke, Werner W

    2014-09-01

    The seminiferous tubules and the excurrent ducts of the mammalian testis are physiologically separated from the mesenchymal tissues and the blood and lymph system by a special structural barrier to paracellular translocations of molecules and particles: the "blood-testis barrier", formed by junctions connecting Sertoli cells with each other and with spermatogonial cells. In combined biochemical as well as light and electron microscopical studies we systematically determine the molecules located in the adhering junctions of adult mammalian (human, bovine, porcine, murine, i.e., rat and mouse) testis. We show that the seminiferous epithelium does not contain desmosomes, or "desmosome-like" junctions, nor any of the desmosome-specific marker molecules and that the adhering junctions of tubules and ductules are fundamentally different. While the ductules contain classical epithelial cell layers with E-cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs) and typical desmosomes, the Sertoli cells of the tubules lack desmosomes and "desmosome-like" junctions but are connected by morphologically different forms of AJs. These junctions are based on N-cadherin anchored in cytoplasmic plaques, which in some subforms appear thick and dense but in other subforms contain only scarce and loosely arranged plaque structures formed by α- and β-catenin, proteins p120, p0071 and plakoglobin, together with a member of the striatin family and also, in rodents, the proteins ZO-1 and myozap. These N-cadherin-based AJs also include two novel types of junctions: the "areae adhaerentes", i.e., variously-sized, often very large cell-cell contacts and small sieve-plate-like AJs perforated by cytoplasm-to-cytoplasm channels of 5-7 nm internal diameter ("cribelliform junctions"). We emphasize the unique character of this epithelium that totally lacks major epithelial marker molecules and structures such as keratin filaments and desmosomal elements as well as EpCAM- and PERP-containing junctions. We also

  11. Quasi-optical Josephson-junction oscillator arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. A.; Leduc, H. G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1993-01-01

    Josephson junctions are natural voltage-controlled oscillators capable of generating submillimeter-wavelength radiation, but a single junction usually can produce only 100 nW of power and often has a broad spectral linewidth. The authors are investigating 2D quasi-optical power combining arrays of 103 and 104 NbN/MgO/NbN and Nb/Al-AlO(x)/Nb junctions to overcome these limitations. The junctions are dc-biased in parallel and are distributed along interdigitated lines. The arrays couple to a resonant mode of a Fabry-Perot cavity to achieve mutual phase-locking. The array configuration has a relatively low impedance, which should allow the capacitance of the junctions to be tuned out at the oscillation frequency.

  12. Josephson SFS π-junctions. Potential Applications in Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazanov, Valeriy; Oboznov, Vladimir; Bolginov, Vitalii; Feofanov, Alexey

    2006-09-01

    Novel superconducting weak links, `π-junctions', were realized recently. An origin of the π-state in a Superconductor - Ferromagnet - Superconductor (SFS) junction is an oscillating and sign-reversing superconducting order parameter induced in the ferromagnet close to the SF-interface. The π-behavior in SFS sandwiches was first observed by our group in 2000. Our recent result was a detection of transitions into π-state and back into 0-state, i.e. a nonmonotonic (with two nodes) behavior of the junction critical current vs. F-layer thickness, π-junctions with critical current density up to 2000 A/cm2 were achieved that are suitable for applications in future superconducting digital and quantum electronics. Our junctions are based on a niobium thin film technology so they can be incorporated directly into existing architectures of the superconducting electronics.

  13. Role of autophagy in the regulation of epithelial cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Prashant; Ma, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism by which bulk cytoplasmic material, including soluble macromolecules and organelles, is targeted for lysosomal degradation. The role of autophagy in diverse cellular processes such as metabolic stress, neurodegeneration, cancer, aging, immunity, and inflammatory diseases is being increasingly recognized. Epithelial cell junctions play an integral role in the cell homeostasis via physical binding, regulating paracellular pathways, integrating extracellular cues into intracellular signaling, and cell-cell communication. Recent data indicates that cell junction composition is very dynamic. The junctional protein complexes are actively regulated in response to various intra- and extra-cellular clues by intracellular trafficking and degradation pathways. This review discusses the recent and emerging information on how autophagy regulates various epithelial cell junctions. The knowledge of autophagy regulation of epithelial junctions will provide further rationale for targeting autophagy in a wide variety of human disease conditions. PMID:27583189

  14. Fixed-Gap Tunnel Junction for Reading DNA Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Previous measurements of the electronic conductance of DNA nucleotides or amino acids have used tunnel junctions in which the gap is mechanically adjusted, such as scanning tunneling microscopes or mechanically controllable break junctions. Fixed-junction devices have, at best, detected the passage of whole DNA molecules without yielding chemical information. Here, we report on a layered tunnel junction in which the tunnel gap is defined by a dielectric layer, deposited by atomic layer deposition. Reactive ion etching is used to drill a hole through the layers so that the tunnel junction can be exposed to molecules in solution. When the metal electrodes are functionalized with recognition molecules that capture DNA nucleotides via hydrogen bonds, the identities of the individual nucleotides are revealed by characteristic features of the fluctuating tunnel current associated with single-molecule binding events. PMID:25380505

  15. Evolution of perpendicular magnetized tunnel junctions upon annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devolder, Thibaut; Couet, S.; Swerts, J.; Furnemont, A.

    2016-04-01

    We study the evolution of perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junctions under 300 to 400 °C annealing. The hysteresis loops do not evolve much during annealing and they are not informative of the underlying structural evolutions. These evolutions are better revealed by the frequencies of the ferromagnetic resonance eigenmodes of the tunnel junction. Their modeling provides the exchange couplings and the layers' anisotropies within the stack which can serve as a diagnosis of the tunnel junction state after each annealing step. The anisotropies of the two CoFeB-based parts and the two Co/Pt-based parts of the tunnel junction decay at different rates during annealing. The ferromagnet exchange coupling through the texture-breaking Ta layer fails above 375 °C. The Ru spacer meant to promote a synthetic antiferromagnet behavior is also insufficiently robust to annealing. Based on these evolutions we propose optimization routes for the next generation tunnel junctions.

  16. Hybrid magnetic tunnel junction/spin filter device

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Nelson-Cheeseman, B.; Wong, F.; Chopdekar, R.; Arenholz, E.; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel

    2008-07-10

    Surfaces and interfaces of complex oxides materials provide a rich playground for the exploration of novel magnetic properties not found in the bulk but also the development of functional interfaces to be incorporated into applications. We have recently been able to demonstrate a new type of hybrid spin filter/ magnetic tunnel junction. Our hybrid spin-filter/magnetic-tunnel junction devices are epitaxial oxide junctions of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrodes with magnetic NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} barrier layers. Depending on whether the barrier is in a paramagnetic or ferromagnetic state, the junction exhibits magnetic tunnel junction behavior where the spin polarized conduction is dominated by the electrode-barrier interface or spin filter behavior where conduction is dominated by barrier layer magnetism.

  17. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  18. Observation of short ballistic Josephson effect in vertical graphene junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2014-03-01

    The current-phase relation (CPR) of vertical graphene Josephson junctions (vGJJs) was measured using phase-sensitive dc-SQUID interferometry. A vGJJ, realized by vertically sandwiching a monolayer graphene between two Al electrodes, had an atomically short channel with transparent contacts for the highly coherent junction nature. The measured CPR was almost perfectly skewed, which rigorously confirmed the short ballisticity of the vGJJs. The short ballistic character of a Josephson junction has been predicted since 1970's but has never been realized in scalable hybrid systems. The CPR also provided energy spectrum of Andreev levels formed inside the junction, which offered a promising prospect for scalable quantum information devices such as Andreev-level qubits. This vertical-junction scheme is also readily applicable to the other cleavable materials such as three-dimensional topological insulators or transition metal dichalcogenides, opening a new pathway for uncovering exotic coherence phenomena arising in an atomic scale.

  19. Design of Steerable Wavelets to Detect Multifold Junctions.

    PubMed

    Püspöki, Zsuzsanna; Uhlmann, Virginie; Vonesch, Cédric; Unser, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We propose a framework for the detection of junctions in images. Although the detection of edges and key points is a well examined and described area, the multiscale detection of junction centers, especially for odd orders, poses a challenge in pattern analysis. The goal of this paper is to build optimal junction detectors based on 2D steerable wavelets that are polar-separable in the Fourier domain. The approaches we develop are general and can be used for the detection of arbitrary symmetric and asymmetric junctions. The backbone of our construction is a multiscale pyramid with a radial wavelet function where the directional components are represented by circular harmonics and encoded in a shaping matrix. We are able to detect M -fold junctions in different scales and orientations. We provide experimental results on both simulated and real data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. PMID:26685237

  20. Scattering form factors for self-assembled network junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Safran, S. A.; Sottmann, T.; Strey, R.

    2007-11-01

    The equilibrium microstructures in microemulsions and other self-assembled systems show complex, connected shapes such as symmetric bicontinuous spongelike structures and asymmetric bicontinuous networks formed by cylinders interconnected at junctions. In microemulsions, these cylinder network microstructures may mediate the structural transition from a spherical or globular phase to the bicontinuous microstructure. To understand the structural and statistical properties of such cylinder network microstructures as measured by scattering experiments, models are needed to extract the real-space structure from the scattering data. In this paper, we calculate the scattering functions appropriate for cylinder network microstructures. We focus on such networks that contain a high density of network junctions that connect the cylindrical elements. In this limit, the network microstructure can be regarded as an assembly of randomly oriented, closed packed network junctions (i.e., the cylinder scattering contributions are neglected). Accordingly, the scattering spectrum of the network microstructure can be calculated as the product of the junction number density, the junction form factor, which describes the scattering from the surface of a single junction, and a structure factor, which describes the local correlations of different junctions due to junction interactions (including their excluded volume). This approach is applied to analyze the scattering data from a bicontinuous microemulsion with equal volumes of water and oil. In a second approach, we included the cylinder scattering contribution in the junction form factor by calculating the scattering intensity of Y junctions to which three rods with spherical cross section are attached. The respective theoretical predictions are compared with results of neutron scattering measurements on a water-in-oil microemulsion with a connected microstructure.

  1. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  2. Metal-free molecular junctions on ITO via amino-silane binding—towards optoelectronic molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergani, S.; Furmansky, Y.; Visoly-Fisher, I.

    2013-11-01

    Light control over currents in molecular junctions is desirable as a non-contact input with high spectral and spatial resolution provided by the photonic input and the molecular electronics element, respectively. Expanding the study of molecular junctions to non-metallic transparent substrates, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), is vital for the observation of molecular optoelectronic effects. Non-metallic electrodes are expected to decrease the probability of quenching of molecular photo-excited states, light-induced plasmonic effects, or significant electrode expansion under visible light. We have developed micron-sized, metal free, optically addressable ITO molecular junctions with a conductive polymer serving as the counter-electrode. The electrical transport was shown to be dominated by the nature of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The use of amino-silane (APTMS) as the chemical binding scheme to ITO was found to be significant in determining the transport properties of the junctions. APTMS allows high junction yields and the formation of dense molecular layers preventing electrical short. However, polar amino-silane binding to the ITO significantly decreased the conductance compared to thiol-bound SAMs, and caused tilted geometry and disorder in the molecular layer. As the effect of the molecular structure on transport properties is clearly observed in our junctions, such metal-free junctions are suitable for characterizing the optoelectronic properties of molecular junctions.

  3. Metal-free molecular junctions on ITO via amino-silane binding-towards optoelectronic molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Sergani, S; Furmansky, Y; Visoly-Fisher, I

    2013-11-15

    Light control over currents in molecular junctions is desirable as a non-contact input with high spectral and spatial resolution provided by the photonic input and the molecular electronics element, respectively. Expanding the study of molecular junctions to non-metallic transparent substrates, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), is vital for the observation of molecular optoelectronic effects. Non-metallic electrodes are expected to decrease the probability of quenching of molecular photo-excited states, light-induced plasmonic effects, or significant electrode expansion under visible light. We have developed micron-sized, metal free, optically addressable ITO molecular junctions with a conductive polymer serving as the counter-electrode. The electrical transport was shown to be dominated by the nature of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The use of amino-silane (APTMS) as the chemical binding scheme to ITO was found to be significant in determining the transport properties of the junctions. APTMS allows high junction yields and the formation of dense molecular layers preventing electrical short. However, polar amino-silane binding to the ITO significantly decreased the conductance compared to thiol-bound SAMs, and caused tilted geometry and disorder in the molecular layer. As the effect of the molecular structure on transport properties is clearly observed in our junctions, such metal-free junctions are suitable for characterizing the optoelectronic properties of molecular junctions. PMID:24129428

  4. Switch in Gap Junction Protein Expression is Associated with Selective Changes in Junctional Permeability During Keratinocyte Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissette, Janice L.; Kumar, Nalin M.; Gilula, Norton B.; Hall, James E.; Dotto, G. Paolo

    1994-07-01

    Gap junctional communication provides a mechanism for regulating multicellular activities by allowing the exchange of small diffusible molecules between neighboring cells. The diversity of gap junction proteins may exist to form channels that have different permeability properties. We report here that induction of terminal differentiation in mouse primary keratinocytes by calcium results in a specific switch in gap junction protein expression. Expression of α_1 (connexin 43) and β_2 (connexin 26) gap junction proteins is down-modulated, whereas that of β_3 (connexin 31) and β_4 (connexin 31.1) proteins is induced. Although both proliferating and differentiating keratinocytes are electrically coupled, there are significant changes in the permeability properties of the junctions to small molecules. In parallel with the changes in gap junction protein expression during differentiation, the intercellular transfer of the small dyes neurobiotin, carboxyfluorescein, and Lucifer yellow is significantly reduced, whereas that of small metabolites, such as nucleotides and amino acids, proceeds unimpeded. Thus, a switch in gap junction protein expression in differentiating keratinocytes is accompanied by selective changes in junctional permeability that may play an important role in the coordinate control of the differentiation process.

  5. Guiding chemical pulses through geometry: Y junctions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, L; Kevrekidis, I G; Punckt, C; Rotermund, H H

    2006-03-01

    We study computationally and experimentally the propagation of chemical pulses in complex geometries. The reaction of interest, CO oxidation, takes place on single crystal Pt(110) surfaces that are microlithographically patterned; they are also addressable through a focused laser beam, manipulated through galvanometer mirrors, capable of locally altering the crystal temperature and thus affecting pulse propagation. We focus on sudden changes in the domain shape (corners in a Y-junction geometry) that can affect the pulse dynamics; we also show how brief, localized temperature perturbations can be used to control reactive pulse propagation. The computational results are corroborated through experimental studies in which the pulses are visualized using reflection anisotropy microscopy. PMID:16605643

  6. Quantum Tunneling Current in Nanoscale Plasmonic Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Recently, electron tunneling between plasmonic resonators is found to support quantum plasmon resonances, which may introduce new regimes in nano-optoelectronics and nonlinear optics. This revelation is of substantial interest to the fundamental problem of electron transport in nano-scale, for example, in a metal-insulator-metal junction (MIM), which has been continuously studied for decades. Here, we present a self-consistent model of electron transport in a nano-scale MIM, by solving the coupled Schrödinger and Poisson equations. The effects of space charge, exchange-correlation, anode emission, and material properties of the electrodes and insulator are examined in detail. The self-consistent calculations are compared with the widely used Simmons formula. Transition from the direct tunneling regime to the space-charge-limited regime is demonstrated. This work was supported by AFOSR.

  7. Functional oesophago-gastric junction imaging

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Barry P; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Despite its role in disease there is still no definitive method to assess oesophago-gastric junction competence (OGJ). Traditionally the OGJ has been assessed using manometry with lower oesophageal sphincter pressure as the indicator. More recently this has been shown not to be a very reliable marker of sphincter function and competence against reflux. Disorders such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and to a lesser extend achalasia still effects a significant number of patients. This review looks at using a new technique known as impedance planimetry to profile the geometry and pressure in the OGJ during distension of a bag. The data gathered can be reconstructed into a dynamic representation of OGJ action. This has been shown to provide a useful representation of the OGJ and to show changes to the competence of the OGJ in terms of compliance and distensibility as a result of endoluminal therapy. PMID:16718804

  8. Ultrafast endocytosis at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Liu, Qiang; Davis, M Wayne; Hollopeter, Gunther; Thomas, Nikita; Jorgensen, Nels B; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles can be released at extremely high rates, which places an extraordinary demand on the recycling machinery. Previous ultrastructural studies of vesicle recycling were conducted in dissected preparations using an intense stimulation to maximize the probability of release. Here, a single light stimulus was applied to motor neurons in intact Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes expressing channelrhodopsin, and the animals rapidly frozen. We found that docked vesicles fuse along a broad active zone in response to a single stimulus, and are replenished with a time constant of about 2 s. Endocytosis occurs within 50 ms adjacent to the dense projection and after 1 s adjacent to adherens junctions. These studies suggest that synaptic vesicle endocytosis may occur on a millisecond time scale following a single physiological stimulus in the intact nervous system and is unlikely to conform to current models of endocytosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00723.001 PMID:24015355

  9. Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale. PMID:25635386

  10. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Yeun; Yoon, Sei Mee; Choi, Eun Ju; Lee, Jinu

    2016-09-15

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action. PMID:27487578

  11. Advanced Concepts in Josephson Junction Reflection Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Vesterinen, Visa; Hassel, Juha; Paraoanu, G. S.; Seppä, Heikki; Hakonen, Pertti

    2014-06-01

    Low-noise amplification at microwave frequencies has become increasingly important for the research related to superconducting qubits and nanoelectromechanical systems. The fundamental limit of added noise by a phase-preserving amplifier is the standard quantum limit, often expressed as noise temperature . Towards the goal of the quantum limit, we have developed an amplifier based on intrinsic negative resistance of a selectively damped Josephson junction. Here we present measurement results on previously proposed wide-band microwave amplification and discuss the challenges for improvements on the existing designs. We have also studied flux-pumped metamaterial-based parametric amplifiers, whose operating frequency can be widely tuned by external DC-flux, and demonstrate operation at pumping, in contrast to the typical metamaterial amplifiers pumped via signal lines at.

  12. Josephson junction array protected from local noises.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchenko, Sergey; Olaya, David; Dupont-Ferrier, Eva; Doucot, Benoit; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We have developed small arrays of Josephson junctions (JJs) that can be viewed as prototypes of superconducting qubits protected from local noises [1]. The array consists of twelve superconducting loops interrupted by four sub-micron JJs. The protected state is realized when each loop is threaded by half of the magnetic flux quantum. It has been observed that the array with the optimized amplitude of quantum fluctuations is protected against magnetic flux variations well beyond linear order, in agreement with theoretical predictions [2]. 1. S. Gladchenko et al., ``Superconducting Nanocircuits for Topologically Protected Qubits'', arXiv:cond-mat/0802.2295, to be published in Nature Physics. 2. L.B. Ioffe and M.V. Feigelman, Phys. Rev. B 66, 224503 (2002); B. Doucot et al., Phys. Rev. B 71, 024505 (2005); B. Doucot and L.B. Ioffe, Phys. Rev. B 76, 214507 (2007).

  13. Ferromagnetism inside of magnetic tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, Glennie

    2010-10-01

    Over this past summer I performed research with different annealing temperatures cooling rates for Magnetic Tunneling Junctions (MTJ's). The MTJ's were composed of a 3nm FeCoB ferromagnet, a 1.6 nm MgO tunneling barrier, and a 3nm FeCoB ferromagnet pinned by a 15nm IrMn anti-ferromagnet. This speech also includes a review of concepts that include; coercivity (of the free and fixed layer), Tunneling Magneto resistance (TMR), exchange bias, and a basic concept of the parallel/anti-parallel configuration of the sample and how this affects resistance. This particular study was on two things; *How the maximum thermal annealing temperature affects TMR. *How holding the maximum thermal annealing temperature constant and varying the cooling rates (.2 c/sec, 2 c/sec, 137 c/sec) affects the coercivity of the free layer and the exchange bias.

  14. Two Bayesian methods for junction classification.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Miguel A; Escolano, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    We propose two Bayesian methods for junction classification which evolve from the Kona method: a region-based method and an edge-based method. Our region-based method computes a one-dimensional (1-D) profile where wedges are mapped to intervals with homogeneous intensity. These intervals are found through a growing-and-merging algorithm driven by a greedy rule. On the other hand, our edge-based method computes a different profile which maps wedge limits to peaks of contrast, and these peaks are found through thresholding followed by nonmaximum suppression. Experimental results show that both methods are more robust and efficient than the Kona method, and also that the edge-based method outperforms the region-based one. PMID:18237911

  15. Exotic brane junctions from F-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tetsuji

    2016-05-01

    Applying string dualities to F-theory, we obtain various [ p, q]-branes whose constituents are standard branes of codimension two and exotic branes. We construct junctions of the exotic five-branes and their Hanany-Witten transitions associated with those in F-theory. In this procedure, we understand the monodromy of the single 5 2 2 -brane. We also find the objects which are sensitive to the branch cut of the 5 2 2 -brane. Considering the web of branes in the presence of multiple exotic five-branes analogous to the web of five-branes with multiple seven-branes, we obtain novel brane constructions for SU(2) gauge theories with n flavors and their superconformal limit with enhanced E n+1 symmetry in five, four, and three dimensions. Hence, adapting the techniques of the seven-branes to the exotic branes, we will be able to construct F-theories in diverse dimensions.

  16. Wnt Signaling in Neuromuscular Junction Development

    PubMed Central

    Koles, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Wnt proteins are best known for their profound roles in cell patterning, because they are required for the embryonic development of all animal species studied to date. Besides regulating cell fate, Wnt proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their roles in nervous system development and function. New studies indicate that multiple positive and negative Wnt signaling pathways take place simultaneously during the formation of vertebrate and invertebrate neuromuscular junctions. Although some Wnts are essential for the formation of NMJs, others appear to play a more modulatory role as part of multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the most recent findings regarding the function of Wnts at the NMJ from both vertebrate and invertebrate model systems. PMID:22510459

  17. Work fluctuations in bosonic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, R. G.; Palma, G. M.; De Chiara, G.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the first two moments and full probability distribution of the work performed on a system of bosonic particles in a two-mode Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian when the self-interaction term is varied instantaneously or with a finite-time ramp. In the instantaneous case, we show how the irreversible work scales differently depending on whether the system is driven to the Josephson or Fock regime of the bosonic Josephson junction. In the finite-time case, we use optimal control techniques to substantially decrease the irreversible work to negligible values. Our analysis can be implemented in present-day experiments with ultracold atoms and we show how to relate the work statistics to that of the population imbalance of the two modes.

  18. Studies of silicon pn junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications of the basic Shockley equations that result from the random and nonrandom spatial variations of the chemical composition of a semiconductor were developed. These modifications underlie the existence of the extensive emitter recombination current that limits the voltage over the open circuit of solar cells. The measurement of parameters, series resistance and the base diffusion length is discussed. Two methods are presented for establishing the energy bandgap narrowing in the heavily-doped emitter region. Corrections that can be important in the application of one of these methods to small test cells are examined. Oxide-charge-induced high-low-junction emitter (OCI-HLE) test cells which exhibit considerably higher voltage over the open circuit than was previously seen in n-on-p solar cells are described.

  19. Field-effect P-N junction

    DOEpatents

    Regan, William; Zettl, Alexander

    2015-05-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to field-effect p-n junctions. In one aspect, a device includes an ohmic contact, a semiconductor layer disposed on the ohmic contact, at least one rectifying contact disposed on the semiconductor layer, a gate including a layer disposed on the at least one rectifying contact and the semiconductor layer and a gate contact disposed on the layer. A lateral width of the rectifying contact is less than a semiconductor depletion width of the semiconductor layer. The gate contact is electrically connected to the ohmic contact to create a self-gating feedback loop that is configured to maintain a gate electric field of the gate.

  20. The Hall effect in ballistic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, C. J. B.; Washburn, S.; Büttiker, M.; Knoedler, C. M.; Hong, J. M.

    1990-04-01

    In narrow high-mobility conductors the predominant source of scattering is reflection of carriers off the confining potential. We demonstrate that by changing the geometry of the intersection of the Hall probes with the conductor, the Hall resistance can be quenched, negative or enhanced. More complex junction geometries can lead to one of these phenomena for one field polarity and to another for the other field polarity. At liquid helium temperatures these results can be explained by following trajectories. In the milli-Kelvin range fluctuations are superimposed. At high fields strong resonant depressions of the Hall resistance are found which may be associated with bound states in the region of the cross.

  1. Studying two-level systems in Josephson junctions with a Josephson junction defect spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Khalil, M. S.; Gladchenko, Sergiy; Simmonds, R. W.; Lobb, C. J.; Osborn, K. D.

    2012-02-01

    We have fabricated and measured Josephson junction defect spectrometers (JJDSs), which are frequency-tunable, nearly-harmonic oscillators that probe two-level systems (TLSs) in the barrier of a Josephson junction (JJ). A JJDS consists of the JJ under study fabricated with a parallel capacitor and inductor such that it can accommodate a wide range of junction inductances, LJ0, while maintaining an operating frequency, f01, in the range of 4-8 GHz. In this device, the parallel inductance helps the JJ maintain linearity over a wide range of frequencies. This architecture allows for the testing of JJs with a wide range of areas and barrier materials, and in the first devices we have tested Al/AlOx/Al JJs. By applying a magnetic flux bias to tune f01, we detect TLSs in the JJ barrier as splittings in the device spectrum. We will present our results toward identifying and quantifying these TLSs, which are known to cause decoherence in quantum devices that rely on JJs.

  2. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to contribute to the optimized design of fan bypass systems in advanced turbofan engines. Increasing the engine bypass ratios have provided a major boost in engine performance improvement over the last fifty years. An engine with high bypass ratio (11-16:1) such as the Advanced Ducted Propulsion (ADP) is being developed and is expected to provide an additional 25% improvement in overall efficiency over the early turbofans. Such significant improvements in overall efficiency would reduce the cost per seat mile, which is a major government and Industry challenge for the 21th century. The research is part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program that involves a NASA, U.S. Industry and FAA partnership with the goal of a safe and highly productive global air transportation system. The immediate objective of the study is to perform numerical simulation of duct-strut interactions to elucidate the loss mechanisms associated with this configuration that is typical of advanced turbofan engines such as ADP. However, at present experimental data for a duct-strut configuration are not available. Thus, as a first step a wing-body junction flow would be studied and is the specific objective of the present study. At the outset it is to be recognized that while duct-strut interaction flow is similar to that of wing-body junction flows, there are some differences owing to the presence of a wall at both ends of the strut. Likewise, some differences are due to the sheared inflow (as opposed to a uniform inflow) velocity profile. It is however expected that some features of a wing-body junction flow would persist. Next, some of the salient aspects of the complex flow near a wing-body junction, as revealed by various studies reported in the literature will be reviewed. One of the principle characteristics of the juncture flow, is the presence of the mean flow components in a plane perpendicular to the direction of the oncoming free

  3. VEGF and Angiopoietin-1 exert opposing effects on cell junctions by regulating the Rho GEF Syx

    PubMed Central

    Ngok, Siu P.; Geyer, Rory; Liu, Miaoliang; Kourtidis, Antonis; Agrawal, Sudesh; Wu, Chuanshen; Seerapu, Himabindu Reddy; Lewis-Tuffin, Laura J.; Moodie, Karen L.; Huveldt, Deborah; Marx, Ruth; Baraban, Jay M.; Storz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Ang1 (Angiopoietin-1) have opposing effects on vascular permeability, but the molecular basis of these effects is not fully known. We report in this paper that VEGF and Ang1 regulate endothelial cell (EC) junctions by determining the localization of the RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Syx. Syx was recruited to junctions by members of the Crumbs polarity complex and promoted junction integrity by activating Diaphanous. VEGF caused translocation of Syx from cell junctions, promoting junction disassembly, whereas Ang1 maintained Syx at the junctions, inducing junction stabilization. The VEGF-induced translocation of Syx from EC junctions was caused by PKD1 (protein kinase D1)-mediated phosphorylation of Syx at Ser806, which reduced Syx association to its junctional anchors. In support of the pivotal role of Syx in regulating EC junctions, syx−/− mice had defective junctions, resulting in vascular leakiness, edema, and impaired heart function. PMID:23253477

  4. Triple junctions and multi-directional extension of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgenii

    2016-04-01

    Triple junctions are among the most remarkable features of global plate tectonics but their nucleation and evolution remains debatable. Divergent (R-R-R) triple junctions (at 120o and T junctions) are particular ones since their stability depends on the exact values of the relative velocities of multi-directional plate motions and hence is strongly affected by plate rheology and processes of crustal and lithospheric accretion. It is commonly accepted (although not quantitatively tested) that the geometry and stability of R-R-R triple junctions should be related to the intuitive geometric considerations that 3-branch configurations should be more "stable" compared to >3-branch configurations (e.g. quadruple junctions) under conditions of long-term multi-directional extension on a 3D Earth surface. Indeed, it has been long-time suggested that triple junctions result from evolution of short-lived quadruple junctions, yet, without providing a consistent mechanical explanation or experimental demonstration of this process, due to the rheological complexity of the breaking lithosphere subsequently subjected to complex oceanic crustal and lithospheric accretion processes. Therefore, a complete 3D thermo-mechanically consistent approach is needed to understand the processes of formation of multi-branch junctions. Here, we study numerically the processes of multi-branch junctions formation under condition of multi-directional lithospheric extension. We use high-resolution 3D numerical magmatic-thermo-mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere and account for crustal and lithospheric accretion processes. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (1) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (2) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the

  5. Gold plasmonic effects on charge transport through single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Olgun; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-03-01

    We study the impact of surface plasmon polaritons, the coupling of electromagnetic waves to collective electron oscillations on metal surfaces, on the conductance of single-molecule junctions. We use a scanning-tunneling microscope based break junction setup that is built into an optical microscope to form molecular junctions. Coherent 685nm light is used to illuminate the molecular junctions formed with 4,4'-bipyridine with diffraction limited focusing performance. We employ a lock-in type technique to measure currents induced by light. Furthermore, the thermal expansion due to laser heating is mimicked by mechanically modulating inter-electrode separation. For each junction studied, we measure current, and use AC techniques to determine molecular junction resonance levels and coupling strengths. We use a cross correlations analysis technique to analyze and compare the effect of light to that of the mechanical modulation. Our results show that junction transmission characteristics are not altered under illumination, within the resolution of our instrument. We argue that photo-currents measured with lock-in techniques in these kinds of structures are due to thermal effects. This work was funded by the Center for Re-Defining Photovoltaic Efficiency through Molecule Scale Control, an EFRC funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DESC0001085.

  6. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw

    2014-04-28

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%–33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21–4.67 nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2–7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07 ± 0.11 TPa and 0.18–0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  7. Thin-film Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshe, Maayan; Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2009-01-01

    We study the field dependence of the maximum current Im(H) in narrow edge-type thin-film Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density. Im(H) is evaluated within nonlocal Josephson electrodynamics taking into account the stray fields that affect the difference of the order-parameter phases across the junction and therefore the tunneling currents. We find that the phase difference along the junction is proportional to the applied field, depends on the junction geometry, but is independent of the Josephson critical current density gc , i.e., it is universal. An explicit form for this universal function is derived for small currents through junctions of the width W≪Λ , the Pearl length. The result is used to calculate Im(H) . It is shown that the maxima of Im(H)∝1/H and the zeros of Im(H) are equidistant but only in high fields. We find that the spacing between zeros is proportional to 1/W2 . The general approach is applied to calculate Im(H) for a superconducting quantum interference device with two narrow edge-type junctions. If gc changes sign periodically or randomly, as it does in grain boundaries of high- Tc materials and superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor heterostructures, Im(H) not only acquires the major side peaks, but due to nonlocality the following peaks decay much slower than in bulk junctions.

  8. Spin transport and dynamics in the F/N junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua; Bedell, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    We study the spin transport in the low temperature regime (often referred to as the precession-dominated regime) between a ferromagnetic Fermi liquid (FFL) and a normal metal metallic Fermi liquid (NFL), the F/N junction, which is considered one of the basic spintronic devices. In particular, we explore the propagation of spin waves and transport of magnetization through the interface of the F/N junction where non-equilibrium spin polarization is created on the normal metal side of the junction by spin injection. We calculate the probable spin wave modes in the precession-dominated regime on both sides of the junction especially on the NFL side where the system is out of equilibrium. Proper boundary conditions at the interface are introduced to establish the transport of the spin properties through the F/N junction. In the end, a possible transmission conduction electron spin resonance experiment is suggested on the F/N junction to see if the predicted spin wave modes could propagate through the junction.

  9. Pallidal gap junctions-triggers of synchrony in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Bettina C; Heida, Tjitske; Zhao, Yan; van Gils, Stephan A; van Wezel, Richard J A

    2014-01-01

    Although increased synchrony of the neural activity in the basal ganglia may underlie the motor deficiencies exhibited in Parkinson's disease (PD), how this synchrony arises, propagates through the basal ganglia, and changes under dopamine replacement remains unknown. Gap junctions could play a major role in modifying this synchrony, because they show functional plasticity under the influence of dopamine and after neural injury. In this study, confocal imaging was used to detect connexin-36, the major neural gap junction protein, in postmortem tissues of PD patients and control subjects in the putamen, subthalamic nucleus (STN), and external and internal globus pallidus (GPe and GPi, respectively). Moreover, we quantified how gap junctions affect synchrony in an existing computational model of the basal ganglia. We detected connexin-36 in the human putamen, GPe, and GPi, but not in the STN. Furthermore, we found that the number of connexin-36 spots in PD tissues increased by 50% in the putamen, 43% in the GPe, and 109% in the GPi compared with controls. In the computational model, gap junctions in the GPe and GPi strongly influenced synchrony. The basal ganglia became especially susceptible to synchronize with input from the cortex when gap junctions were numerous and high in conductance. In conclusion, connexin-36 expression in the human GPe and GPi suggests that gap junctional coupling exists within these nuclei. In PD, neural injury and dopamine depletion could increase this coupling. Therefore, we propose that gap junctions act as a powerful modulator of synchrony in the basal ganglia. PMID:25124148

  10. Josephson radiation from InSb-nanowire junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Woerkom, David; Proutski, Alexander; Krivachy, Tamas; Bouman, Daniel; van Gulik, Ruben; Gul, Onder; Cassidy, Maja; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Kouwenhoven, Leo; Geresdi, Attila

    Semiconducting nanowire Josephson junctions has recently gained interest as building blocks for Majorana circuits and gate-tuneable superconducting qubits . Here we investigate the rich physics of the Andreev bound state spectrum of InSb nanowire junctions utilizing the AC Josephson relation 2eV_bias =hf . We designed and characterized an on-chip microwave circuit coupling the nanowire junction to an Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junction. The DC response of the tunnel junction is affected by photon-assisted quasiparticle current, which gives us the possibility to measure the radiation spectrum of the nanowire junction up to several tens of GHz in frequency. Our circuit design allows for voltage or phase biasing of the Josephson junction enabling direct mapping of Andreev bound states. We discuss our fabrication methods and choice of materials to achieve radiation detection up to a magnetic field of few hundred milliTesla, compatible with Majorana states in spin-orbit coupled nanowires. This work has been supported by the Netherlands Foundations FOM, Abstract NWO and Microsoft Corporation Station Q.

  11. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw; Ke, Changhong

    2014-04-01

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%-33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21-4.67 nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2-7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07 ± 0.11 TPa and 0.18-0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  12. Pallidal gap junctions-triggers of synchrony in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Schwab, Bettina C; Heida, Tjitske; Zhao, Yan; van Gils, Stephan A; van Wezel, Richard J A

    2014-10-01

    Although increased synchrony of the neural activity in the basal ganglia may underlie the motor deficiencies exhibited in Parkinson's disease (PD), how this synchrony arises, propagates through the basal ganglia, and changes under dopamine replacement remains unknown. Gap junctions could play a major role in modifying this synchrony, because they show functional plasticity under the influence of dopamine and after neural injury. In this study, confocal imaging was used to detect connexin-36, the major neural gap junction protein, in postmortem tissues of PD patients and control subjects in the putamen, subthalamic nucleus (STN), and external and internal globus pallidus (GPe and GPi, respectively). Moreover, we quantified how gap junctions affect synchrony in an existing computational model of the basal ganglia. We detected connexin-36 in the human putamen, GPe, and GPi, but not in the STN. Furthermore, we found that the number of connexin-36 spots in PD tissues increased by 50% in the putamen, 43% in the GPe, and 109% in the GPi compared with controls. In the computational model, gap junctions in the GPe and GPi strongly influenced synchrony. The basal ganglia became especially susceptible to synchronize with input from the cortex when gap junctions were numerous and high in conductance. In conclusion, connexin-36 expression in the human GPe and GPi suggests that gap junctional coupling exists within these nuclei. In PD, neural injury and dopamine depletion could increase this coupling. Therefore, we propose that gap junctions act as a powerful modulator of synchrony in the basal ganglia. PMID:25124148

  13. Epithelial junctions and Rho family GTPases: the zonular signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Citi, Sandra; Guerrera, Diego; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell-cell junctions is crucially important to regulate adhesion, apico-basal polarity and motility of epithelial cells, and ultimately controls the architecture and physiology of epithelial organs. Junctions are supported, shaped and regulated by cytoskeletal filaments, whose dynamic organization and contractility are finely tuned by GTPases of the Rho family, primarily RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Recent research has identified new molecular mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between these GTPases and epithelial junctions. Here we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the organization, molecular evolution and cytoskeletal anchoring of cell-cell junctions, and we comment on the most recent advances in the characterization of the interactions between Rho GTPases and junctional proteins, and their consequences with regards to junction assembly and regulation of cell behavior in vertebrate model systems. The concept of “zonular signalosome” is proposed, which highlights the close functional relationship between proteins of zonular junctions (zonulae occludentes and adhaerentes) and the control of cytoskeletal organization and signaling through Rho GTPases, transcription factors, and their effectors. PMID:25483301

  14. High electronic couplings of single mesitylene molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    We report on an experimental analysis of the charge transport properties of single mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) molecular junctions. The electronic conductance and the current-voltage characteristics of mesitylene molecules wired into Au electrodes were measured by a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based break-junction method at room temperature in a liquid environment. We found the molecular junctions exhibited two distinct conductance states with high conductance values of ca. 10(-1) G 0 and of more than 10(-3) G 0 (G 0 = 2e (2)/h) in the electronic conductance measurements. We further performed a statistical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of the molecular junctions in the two states. Within a single channel resonant tunnelling model, we obtained electronic couplings in the molecular junctions by fitting the current-voltage characteristics to the single channel model. The origin of the high conductance was attributed to experimentally obtained large electronic couplings of the direct π-bonded molecular junctions (ca. 0.15 eV). Based on analysis of the stretch length of the molecular junctions and the large electronic couplings obtained from the I-V analysis, we proposed two structural models, in which (i) mesitylene binds to the Au electrode perpendicular to the charge transport direction and (ii) mesitylene has tilted from the perpendicular orientation. PMID:26732978

  15. High electronic couplings of single mesitylene molecular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Yuki; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report on an experimental analysis of the charge transport properties of single mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) molecular junctions. The electronic conductance and the current–voltage characteristics of mesitylene molecules wired into Au electrodes were measured by a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based break-junction method at room temperature in a liquid environment. We found the molecular junctions exhibited two distinct conductance states with high conductance values of ca. 10−1 G 0 and of more than 10−3 G 0 (G 0 = 2e 2/h) in the electronic conductance measurements. We further performed a statistical analysis of the current–voltage characteristics of the molecular junctions in the two states. Within a single channel resonant tunnelling model, we obtained electronic couplings in the molecular junctions by fitting the current–voltage characteristics to the single channel model. The origin of the high conductance was attributed to experimentally obtained large electronic couplings of the direct π-bonded molecular junctions (ca. 0.15 eV). Based on analysis of the stretch length of the molecular junctions and the large electronic couplings obtained from the I–V analysis, we proposed two structural models, in which (i) mesitylene binds to the Au electrode perpendicular to the charge transport direction and (ii) mesitylene has tilted from the perpendicular orientation. PMID:26732978

  16. Distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saraga, Fernanda; Ng, Leo; Skinner, Frances K

    2006-03-01

    Gap junctions allow direct electrical communication between CNS neurons. From theoretical and modeling studies, it is well known that although gap junctions can act to synchronize network output, they can also give rise to many other dynamic patterns including antiphase and other phase-locked states. The particular network pattern that arises depends on cellular, intrinsic properties that affect firing frequencies as well as the strength and location of the gap junctions. Interneurons or GABAergic neurons in hippocampus are diverse in their cellular characteristics and have been shown to have active dendrites. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic neurons, also known as basket cells, can contact one another via gap junctions on their distal dendrites. Using two-cell network models, we explore how distal electrical connections affect network output. We build multi-compartment models of hippocampal basket cells using NEURON and endow them with varying amounts of active dendrites. Two-cell networks of these model cells as well as reduced versions are explored. The relationship between intrinsic frequency and the level of active dendrites allows us to define three regions based on what sort of network dynamics occur with distal gap junction coupling. Weak coupling theory is used to predict the delineation of these regions as well as examination of phase response curves and distal dendritic polarization levels. We find that a nonmonotonic dependence of network dynamic characteristics (phase lags) on gap junction conductance occurs. This suggests that distal electrical coupling and active dendrite levels can control how sensitive network dynamics are to gap junction modulation. With the extended geometry, gap junctions located at more distal locations must have larger conductances for pure synchrony to occur. Furthermore, based on simulations with heterogeneous networks, it may be that one requires active dendrites if phase-locking is to occur in networks formed

  17. Effect of current injection into thin-film Josephson junctions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2014-11-11

    New thin-film Josephson junctions have recently been tested in which the current injected into one of the junction banks governs Josephson phenomena. One thus can continuously manage the phase distribution at the junction by changing the injected current. Our method of calculating the distribution of injected currents is also proposed for a half-infinite thin-film strip with source-sink points at arbitrary positions at the film edges. The strip width W is assumed small relative to Λ=2λ2/d;λ is the bulk London penetration depth of the film material and d is the film thickness.

  18. The mechanism of light emission from statistically rough tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P.; Walmsley, D. G.

    1984-04-01

    Its is found that the spectrum of the light emitted by statistically rough tunnel junctions in the range 400-700 nm correlates with the calculated damping of the fast surface plasmon polariton mode of the tunnel junction structure. It is deduced that the radiative decay of this mode is responsible for the bulk of the light emission. It is shown that the view of existing theory that emission from statistically rough junctions is mediated by the slow surface plasmon polariton mode is untenable. Our deductions firmly consolidate a suggestion due to Kroo, Szentirmay and Felszerfalvi.

  19. Effect of current injection into thin-film Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2014-11-11

    New thin-film Josephson junctions have recently been tested in which the current injected into one of the junction banks governs Josephson phenomena. One thus can continuously manage the phase distribution at the junction by changing the injected current. Our method of calculating the distribution of injected currents is also proposed for a half-infinite thin-film strip with source-sink points at arbitrary positions at the film edges. The strip width W is assumed small relative to Λ=2λ2/d;λ is the bulk London penetration depth of the film material and d is the film thickness.

  20. Heat Transport in Graphene Ferromagnet-Insulator-Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Wei

    2011-04-01

    We study heat transport in a graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconducting junction. It is found that the thermal conductance of the graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor (FIS) junction is an oscillatory function of the barrier strength χ in the thin-barrier limit. The gate potential U0 decreases the amplitude of thermal conductance oscillation. Both the amplitude and phase of the thermal conductance oscillation varies with the exchange energy Eh. The thermal conductance of a graphene FIS junction displays the usual exponential dependence on temperature, reflecting the s-wave symmetry of superconducting graphene.

  1. Ischemic preconditioning protects against gap junctional uncoupling in cardiac myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sundset, Rune; Cooper, Marie; Mikalsen, Svein-Ole; Ytrehus, Kirsti

    2004-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning increases the heart's tolerance to a subsequent longer ischemic period. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of gap junction communication in simulated preconditioning in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myofibroblasts. Gap junctional intercellular communication was assessed by Lucifer yellow dye transfer. Preconditioning preserved intercellular coupling after prolonged ischemia. An initial reduction in coupling in response to the preconditioning stimulus was also observed. This may protect neighboring cells from damaging substances produced during subsequent regional ischemia in vivo, and may preserve gap junctional communication required for enhanced functional recovery during subsequent reperfusion. PMID:16247851

  2. Effect of current injection into thin-film Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2014-11-01

    New thin-film Josephson junctions have recently been tested in which the current injected into one of the junction banks governs Josephson phenomena. One thus can continuously manage the phase distribution at the junction by changing the injected current. A method of calculating the distribution of injected currents is proposed for a half-infinite thin-film strip with source-sink points at arbitrary positions at the film edges. The strip width W is assumed small relative to Λ =2 λ2/d ;λ is the bulk London penetration depth of the film material and d is the film thickness.

  3. Statistical mechanics of strings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, R. J.; Steer, D. A.

    2008-07-15

    We investigate the Hagedorn transitions of string networks with Y-junctions as may occur, for example, with (p,q) cosmic superstrings. In a simplified model with three different types of string, the partition function reduces to three generalized coupled XY models. We calculate the phase diagram and show that, as the system is heated, the lightest strings first undergo the Hagedorn transition despite the junctions. There is then a second, higher, critical temperature above which infinite strings of all tensions, and junctions, exist. Conversely, on cooling to low temperatures, only the lightest strings remain, but they collapse into small loops.

  4. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction communication (GJC) mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases, and signaling cascades. This gap junction network (GJN) can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies. PMID:24578694

  5. Study of Gap Junctions in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been described in different cell types including stem cells and has been involved in different biological events. GJIC is required for mouse embryonic stem cell maintenance and proliferation and various studies suggest that functional GJIC is a common characteristic of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) maintained in different culture conditions. This chapter introduces methods to study gap junctions in hESC, from expression of gap junction proteins to functional study of GJIC in hESC proliferation, apoptosis, colony growth, and pluripotency. PMID:24859928

  6. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to contribute to the optimized design of fan bypass systems in advanced turbofan engines. Increasing the engine bypass ratios have provided a major boost in engine performance improvement over the last fifty years. An engine with high bypass ratio (11-16:1) such as the Advanced Ducted Propulsion (ADP) is being developed and is expected to provide an additional 25% improvement in overall efficiency over the early turbofans. Such significant improvements in overall efficiency would reduce the cost per seat mile, which is a major government and Industry challenge for the 21th century. The research is part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program that involves a NASA, U.S. Industry and FAA partnership with the goal of a safe and highly productive global air transportation system. The immediate objective of the study is to perform numerical simulation of duct-strut interactions to elucidate the loss mechanisms associated with this configuration that is typical of advanced turbofan engines such as ADP. However, at present experimental data for a duct-strut configuration are not available. Thus, as a first step a wing-body junction flow would be studied and is the specific objective of the present study. At the outset it is to be recognized that while duct-strut interaction flow is similar to that of wing-body junction flows, there are some differences owing to the presence of a wall at both ends of the strut. Likewise, some differences are due to the sheared inflow (as opposed to a uniform inflow) velocity profile. It is however expected that some features of a wing-body junction flow would persist. Next, some of the salient aspects of the complex flow near a wing-body junction, as revealed by various studies reported in the literature will be reviewed. One of the principle characteristics of the juncture flow, is the presence of the mean flow components in a plane perpendicular to the direction of the oncoming free

  7. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are

  8. 10. DETAIL OF JUNCTION BETWEEN LOWER CHORD, VERTICAL LACED CHANNEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF JUNCTION BETWEEN LOWER CHORD, VERTICAL LACED CHANNEL, FLOOR BEAM, EYE BAR, AND U-BOLT. WEST ABUTMENT. - River Road Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek in Spring Creek Township, Hallton, Elk County, PA

  9. Single-charge detection by an atomic precision tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    House, M. G. Peretz, E.; Keizer, J. G.; Hile, S. J.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2014-03-17

    We demonstrate sensitive detection of single charges using a planar tunnel junction 8.5 nm wide and 17.2 nm long defined by an atomically precise phosphorus doping profile in silicon. The conductance of the junction responds to a nearby gate potential and also to changes in the charge state of a quantum dot patterned 52 nm away. The response of this detector is monotonic across the entire working voltage range of the device, which will make it particularly useful for studying systems of multiple quantum dots. The charge sensitivity is maximized when the junction is most conductive, suggesting that more sensitive detection can be achieved by shortening the length of the junction to increase its conductance.

  10. Single-charge detection by an atomic precision tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, M. G.; Peretz, E.; Keizer, J. G.; Hile, S. J.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate sensitive detection of single charges using a planar tunnel junction 8.5 nm wide and 17.2 nm long defined by an atomically precise phosphorus doping profile in silicon. The conductance of the junction responds to a nearby gate potential and also to changes in the charge state of a quantum dot patterned 52 nm away. The response of this detector is monotonic across the entire working voltage range of the device, which will make it particularly useful for studying systems of multiple quantum dots. The charge sensitivity is maximized when the junction is most conductive, suggesting that more sensitive detection can be achieved by shortening the length of the junction to increase its conductance.

  11. Studies of silicon p-n junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    To provide theoretical support for investigating different ways to obtain high open-circuit voltages in p-n junction silicon solar cells, an analytical treatment of heavily doped transparent-emitter devices is presented that includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, a doping concentration gradient, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. Topics covered include: (1) experimental determination of bandgap narrowing in the emitter of silicon p-n junction devices; (2) heavily doped transparent regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors; (3) high-low-emitter solar cell; (4) determination of lifetimes and recombination currents in p-n junction solar cells; (5) MOS and oxide-charged-induced BSF solar cells; and (6) design of high efficiency solar cells for space and terrestrial applications.

  12. 55. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL JUNCTION BOX ON SOUTH FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL JUNCTION BOX ON SOUTH FACE OF SLC-3W UMBLICAL MAST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. High thermopower of mechanically stretched single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; He, Yuhui; Arima, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Metal-molecule-metal junction is a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications that utilizes quantum confinement effects in the chemically defined zero-dimensional atomic structure to achieve enhanced dimensionless figure of merit ZT. A key issue in this new class of thermoelectric nanomaterials is to clarify the sensitivity of thermoelectricity on the molecular junction configurations. Here we report simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and conductance on Au-1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)-Au junctions mechanically-stretched in-situ at sub-nanoscale. We obtained the average single-molecule conductance and thermopower of 0.01 G0 and 15 μV/K, respectively, suggesting charge transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital. Meanwhile, we found the single-molecule thermoelectric transport properties extremely-sensitive to the BDT bridge configurations, whereby manifesting the importance to design the electrode-molecule contact motifs for optimizing the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions. PMID:26112999

  14. 27. INTERIOR OF UTILITY ROOM SHOWING ELECTRICAL JUNCTION CABINET, HOPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. INTERIOR OF UTILITY ROOM SHOWING ELECTRICAL JUNCTION CABINET, HOPPER WINDOW, OPEN DOOR TO KITCHEN NO. 2, AND METAL SINK. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 6, Cashbaugh-Kilpatrick House, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  15. Evidence for Nonlocal Electrodynamics in Planar Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, A. A.; Rydh, A.; Golod, T.; Motzkau, H.; Klushin, A. M.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2013-09-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the critical current modulation Ic(H) for two types of planar Josephson junctions: a low-Tc Nb/CuNi/Nb and a high-Tc YBa2Cu3O7-δ bicrystal grain-boundary junction. At low T both junctions exhibit a conventional behavior, described by the local sine-Gordon equation. However, at elevated T the behavior becomes qualitatively different: the Ic(H) modulation field ΔH becomes almost T independent and neither ΔH nor the critical field for the penetration of Josephson vortices vanish at Tc. Such an unusual behavior is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for junctions with nonlocal electrodynamics. We extract absolute values of the London penetration depth λ from our data and show that a crossover from local to nonlocal electrodynamics occurs with increasing T when λ(T) becomes larger than the electrode thickness.

  16. Manipulating Josephson junctions in thin-films by nearby vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V G; Mints, R G

    2014-07-01

    It is shown that a vortex trapped in one of the banks of a planar edge-type Josephson junction in a narrow thin-film superconducting strip can change drastically the dependence of the junction critical current on the applied field, I-c(H). When the vortex is placed at certain discrete positions in the strip middle, the pattern I-c(H) has zero at H = 0 instead of the traditional maximum of '0-type' junctions. The number of these positions is equal to the number of vortices trapped at the same location. When the junction-vortex separation exceeds similar to W, the strip width, I-c(H) is no longer sensitive to the vortex presence. The same is true for any separation if the vortex approaches the strip edges. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Back-contact vertical-junction solar cell and method

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, M.W.; Kolesar, E.S. Jr.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes vertical-junction back contact solar cell apparatus. It comprises: a wafer of semiconductor material having upward and downward facing surfaces and predetermined thickness, first conductivity type dopant, crystal orientation, and concentration; an array of radiant energy capturing vertical walled and tilted flat bottomed cavity members disposed in rows across the semiconductor wafer upward facing surface with each of the cavities including an internal surface area received layer of pn-junction forming second conductivity type dopant containing semiconductor; a first grid of electrically interconnected electrodes dispersed across the downward facing wafer surface in surface contact with first electrical polarity current collection regions of each the pn-junction inclusive cavity member; a second grid of electrically interconnected electrodes electrically segregated from the first grid and dispersed across the downward facing wafer surface in surface contact with second electrical polarity current collection regions of each the pn-junction inclusive cavity member.

  18. The influence of the instabilities in modelling arteriovenous junction haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Stephen P; Houston, J Graeme; Walsh, Michael T

    2015-10-15

    The arteriovenous junction is characterised by high flow rates, large pressure difference and typically a palpable thrill or audible bruit, associated with turbulent flow. However, the arteriovenous junction is frequently studied with the assumption of streamline flow. This assumption is based on the Reynolds number calculation, although other factors can contribute to turbulent generation. In this study, the presence of instabilities is examined and the influencing factors discussed. This was performed using a pseudo-realistic geometry with adapted graft angles, vein diameter, outflow split ratio and graft inlet velocity values. Correlation was performed between steady and unsteady averaged simulation cases with correlation performance ranked. Overall the arteriovenous junction is capable of possessing highly disturbed flows, in which strict modelling requirements are necessary to capture such instabilities and avoid erroneous conclusions. Vein diameter and flow split ratio contribute to turbulent generation, thus Reynolds number cannot be used as a sole turbulent criterion in the arteriovenous junction. PMID:26315920

  19. Doping enhanced barrier lowering in graphene-silicon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xintong; Zhang, Lining; Chan, Mansun

    2016-06-01

    Rectifying properties of graphene-semiconductor junctions depend on the Schottky barrier height. We report an enhanced barrier lowering in graphene-Si junction and its essential doping dependence in this paper. The electric field due to ionized charge in n-type Si induces the same type doping in graphene and contributes another Schottky barrier lowering factor on top of the image-force-induced lowering (IFIL). We confirm this graphene-doping-induced lowering (GDIL) based on well reproductions of the measured reverse current of our fabricated graphene-Si junctions by the thermionic emission theory. Excellent matching between the theoretical predictions and the junction data of the doping-concentration dependent barrier lowering serves as another evidence of the GDIL. While both GDIL and IFIL are enhanced with the Si doping, GDIL exceeds IFIL with a threshold doping depending on the as-prepared graphene itself.

  20. 54. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, looking southwest. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  1. 55. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, looking southwest. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  2. Polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells with frozen junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Yongfang; Yu, Gang; Heeger, Alan J.

    1999-10-01

    We report on polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) with frozen p-i-n junctions. The dynamic p-i-n junction in polymer LECs is stabilized by lowering the temperature below the glass transition temperature of the ion-transport polymer. Detailed studies have shown that the frozen p-i-n junction in LECs based on the luminescent polymer poly[5-(2'ethylhexyloxy)-2-methoxy-1,4-phenylene vinylene] and polyethylene oxide containing lithium triflate (PEO:LiCF3SO3) is stable at temperatures up to 200 K. Frozen-junction LECs offer a number of advantages; they exhibit unipolar light emission, balanced injection, fast response, high brightness, low operating voltage, and insensitivity to electrode materials and film thickness.

  3. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Massarotti, D; Pal, A; Rotoli, G; Longobardi, L; Blamire, M G; Tafuri, F

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  4. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Massarotti, D.; Pal, A.; Rotoli, G.; Longobardi, L.; Blamire, M. G.; Tafuri, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  5. VIEW SOUTHEASTBUILDING 7 MACHINE SHOP JUNCTION OF 1890 SECTION (LEFT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTHEAST-BUILDING 7 MACHINE SHOP JUNCTION OF 1890 SECTION (LEFT) AND 1901 SECTION (RIGHT) - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  6. Interface Structure and Transport of Complex Oxide Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Chi, M.; Arenholz, E.; Browning, N. D.; Suzuki, Y.

    2008-02-01

    The interface structure and magnetism of hybrid magnetic tunnel junction-spin filter devices have been investigated and correlated with the transport behavior exhibited. Magnetic tunnel junctions made of theoretically predicted half-metallic electrodes (perovskite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and spinel Fe3O4) sandwiching a spinel NiMn2O4 tunnel barrier exhibit very high crystalline quality as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Structurally abrupt interfaces allow for the distinct magnetic switching of the electrodes as well as large junction magnetoresistance. The change in the magnetic anisotropy observed at the spinel-spinel interface supports the presence of limited interdiffusion and the creation of a magnetically soft interfacial layer, whose strong exchange coupling to the Fe3O4 electrode likely accounts for the low background magnetoresistance observed in these junctions, and the successful spin filtering when the barrier layer is ferrimagnetic.

  7. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e2/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks. PMID:24270238

  8. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e(2)/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks. PMID:24270238

  9. Nonlinear microwave absorption in weak-link Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, L.M.; Wosik, J.; Wolfe, J.C.

    1996-12-01

    A model, based on the resistively shunted junction theory, is developed and used to study microwave absorption in weak-link Josephson junctions in high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors. Both linear and nonlinear cases of microwave absorption in Josephson junctions are analyzed. A comparison of the model with microwave absorption loop theory is presented along with a general condition for the applicability of both models. The nonlinear case was solved numerically and the threshold points of sharp microwave absorption are presented. At these points, a 2{pi} phase quantization takes place within each microwave cycle, leading to an onset of a sharp rise of absorption. Existence of the 2{pi} dynamic quantization is the key to the interpretation of nonlinear microwave absorption data. The nonlinear microwave absorption model is extended to the study of nonuniformly coupled junctions, and a general statement for the applicability of such a model is presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. 17. PRAIRIE CITY DITCH, NEAR ITS JUNCTION WITH RHODES DITCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. PRAIRIE CITY DITCH, NEAR ITS JUNCTION WITH RHODES DITCH, CUT THROUGH SLATY BEDROCK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  11. Mechanical tuning of conductance and thermopower in helicene molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Jaroslav; Chocholoušová, Jana Vacek; Stará, Irena G; Starý, Ivo; Dubi, Yonatan

    2015-05-21

    Helicenes are inherently chiral polyaromatic molecules composed of all-ortho fused benzene rings possessing a spring-like structure. Here, using a combination of density functional theory and tight-binding calculations, it is demonstrated that controlling the length of the helicene molecule by mechanically stretching or compressing the molecular junction can dramatically change the electronic properties of the helicene, leading to a tunable switching behavior of the conductance and thermopower of the junction with on/off ratios of several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, control over the helicene length and number of rings is shown to lead to more than an order of magnitude increase in the thermopower and thermoelectric figure-of-merit over typical molecular junctions, presenting new possibilities of making efficient thermoelectric molecular devices. The physical origin of the strong dependence of the transport properties of the junction is investigated, and found to be related to a shift in the position of the molecular orbitals. PMID:25905658

  12. High thermopower of mechanically stretched single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; He, Yuhui; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-01-01

    Metal-molecule-metal junction is a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications that utilizes quantum confinement effects in the chemically defined zero-dimensional atomic structure to achieve enhanced dimensionless figure of merit ZT. A key issue in this new class of thermoelectric nanomaterials is to clarify the sensitivity of thermoelectricity on the molecular junction configurations. Here we report simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and conductance on Au-1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)-Au junctions mechanically-stretched in-situ at sub-nanoscale. We obtained the average single-molecule conductance and thermopower of 0.01 G0 and 15 μV/K, respectively, suggesting charge transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital. Meanwhile, we found the single-molecule thermoelectric transport properties extremely-sensitive to the BDT bridge configurations, whereby manifesting the importance to design the electrode-molecule contact motifs for optimizing the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions. PMID:26112999

  13. 75 FR 76294 - Radio Broadcasting Services: Pacific Junction, IA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... instead in the Media Bureau's Consolidated Data Base System (``CDBS'') as a reserved assignment for... Junction, in overcoming objections raised by the FAA to the activation of this allotment. See 75 FR...

  14. PAINT SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATED COLUMN AT JUNCTION OF WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PAINT SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATED COLUMN AT JUNCTION OF WEST BAY (ORIGINAL) AND CENTER BAYS (SECOND ADDITION), LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Paint Shop, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  15. 8. VIEW SOUTHWEST, DETAIL OF JUNCTION OF EAST AND NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW SOUTHWEST, DETAIL OF JUNCTION OF EAST AND NORTH ELEVATIONS AT PORCH ROOF LEVEL SHOWING GLAZED HEADERS AND BELT COURSE - David Sterrett House, State Game Lands Plot No. 169 (Upper Mifflin Township), Newville, Cumberland County, PA

  16. Tunnel junction enhanced nanowire ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; May, Brelon J.; Deitz, Julia I.; Grassman, Tyler J.; McComb, David W.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2015-09-07

    Polarization engineered interband tunnel junctions (TJs) are integrated in nanowire ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs). A ∼6 V reduction in turn-on voltage is achieved by the integration of tunnel junction at the base of polarization doped nanowire UV LEDs. Moreover, efficient hole injection into the nanowire LEDs leads to suppressed efficiency droop in TJ integrated nanowire LEDs. The combination of both reduced bias voltage and increased hole injection increases the wall plug efficiency in these devices. More than 100 μW of UV emission at ∼310 nm is measured with external quantum efficiency in the range of 4–6 m%. The realization of tunnel junction within the nanowire LEDs opens a pathway towards the monolithic integration of cascaded multi-junction nanowire LEDs on silicon.

  17. Magnetoanisotropic Andreev reflection in ferromagnet-superconductor junctions.

    PubMed

    Högl, Petra; Matos-Abiague, Alex; Žutić, Igor; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2015-09-11

    Andreev reflection spectroscopy of ferromagnet-superconductor (FS) junctions [corrected] is an important probe of spin polarization. We theoretically investigate spin-polarized transport in FS junctions in the presence of Rashba and Dresselhaus interfacial spin-orbit fields and show that Andreev reflection can be controlled by changing the magnetization orientation. We predict a giant in- and out-of-plane magnetoanisotropy of the junction conductance. If the ferromagnet is highly spin polarized-in the half-metal limit-the magnetoanisotropic Andreev reflection depends universally on the spin-orbit fields only. Our results show that Andreev reflection spectroscopy can be used for sensitive probing of interfacial spin-orbit fields in a FS junction. PMID:26406844

  18. Tight-binding study of bilayer graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, W. A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2012-11-01

    Using highly efficient simulations of the tight-binding Bogoliubov-de-Gennes model, we solved self-consistently for the pair correlation and the Josephson current in a superconducting-bilayer graphene-superconducting Josephson junction. Different doping levels for the non-superconducting link are considered in the short- and long-junction regimes. Self-consistent results for the pair correlation and superconducting current resemble those reported previously for single-layer graphene except at the Dirac point, where remarkable differences in the proximity effect are found, as well as a suppression of the superconducting current in the long-junction regime. Inversion symmetry is broken by considering a potential difference between the layers and we found that the supercurrent can be switched if the junction length is larger than the Fermi length.

  19. Superconducting switch made of graphene-nanoribbon junctions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qifeng; Dong, Jinming

    2008-09-01

    The transmission of superconductor-graphene nanoribbon-superconductor junctions (SGS) has been studied by the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the on-site potential U in the center zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) of the SGS junction plays an important role in the magnitude of the supercurrent I(c). As the effective Fermi energy μ(eff) (μ(eff) = μ(F)-U) goes from negative to positive, the SGS junction would suddenly transform from an 'OFF' state to an 'ON' state. And, as μ(eff) increases further, the I(c) will continue to increase. This switching behavior of the SGS junction shares the same origin with the zigzag GNR valley-isospin valve (Rycerz et al 2007 Nat. Phys. 3 172). Besides the valley-isospin, the density of states will also have an effect on the suppression of I(c). PMID:21828860

  20. View of Highway 140 and Overhang Rock. Location of junction ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Highway 140 and Overhang Rock. Location of junction with Old Coulterville Road behind rock. Looking north-northwest - All Year Highway, Between Arch Rock & Yosemite Valley, El Portal, Mariposa County, CA

  1. Charge Transport in Azobenzene-Based Single-Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Kim, Youngsang; Sysoiev, Dmytro; Frederiksen, Thomas; Groth, Ulrich; Scheer, Elke

    2013-03-01

    The azobenzene class of molecules has become an archetype of molecular photoswitch research, due to their simple structure and the significant difference of the electronic system between their cis and trans isomers. However, a detailed understanding of the charge transport for the two isomers, when embedded in a junction with electrodes is still lacking. In order to clarify this issue, we investigate charge transport properties through single Azobenzene-ThioMethyl (AzoTM) molecules in a mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) system at 4.2 K. Single-molecule conductance, I-V characteristics, and IETS spectra of molecular junctions are measured and compared with first-principles transport calculations. Our studies elucidate the origin of a slightly higher conductance of junctions with cis isomer and demonstrate that IETS spectra of cis and trans forms show distinct vibrational fingerprints that can be used for identifying the isomer.

  2. Thin Films and Josephson Junctions of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Peter Andrew

    We have studied the growth of superconducting films of rm Y_1Ba_2Cu_3O _{7-delta} using reactive electron beam coevaporation. Emphasis was placed on determining the most important growth parameters, and optimizing the instrumentation for controlling the growth environment. We have experimented with atomic absorption based deposition rate control, quartz lamp based substrate heating, and various forms of activated oxygen. Methods for generating and delivering molecular oxygen, oxygen ion beams, ozone and atomic oxygen were investigated and their effects on film quality were characterized. We found that the specific method of oxidation was not critical to the film quality but that optimal films were produced at lower pressures (~10^{-4} T) for more chemically reactive allotropes of oxygen. Composition was found to be quite important in determining the film properties. These results are discussed in the context of growth kinetics and equilibrium thermodynamics. We have studied the transport properties of artificial grain boundary Josephson junctions of rm Y_1Ba_2Cu_3O_{7-delta }. Measurements and modeling of the magnetic interference patterns of the critical currents revealed the presence of extensive disorder within the junctions. The temperature dependence of the critical currents revealed behavior consistent with the resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. Modeling the inhomogeneous junctions as parallel arrays of RSJ-like junctions explained the clean RSJ-like current-voltage characteristics even in junctions showing extremely complicated magnetic interference patterns. The observed modulation period of the single junction interference patterns showed an unusual w^{-2} width dependence that could be quantitatively explained by a model of flux focusing based on the London theory. A model of the diffraction patterns for junctions fabricated from extremely thin films shows unexpected deviations from the usual behavior. These peculiarities are understood in terms of

  3. Probing Electronic and Thermoelectric Properties of Single Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widawsky, Jonathan R.

    In an effort to further understand electronic and thermoelectric phenomenon at the nanometer scale, we have studied the transport properties of single molecule junctions. To carry out these transport measurements, we use the scanning tunneling microscope-break junction (STM-BJ) technique, which involves the repeated formation and breakage of a metal point contact in an environment of the target molecule. Using this technique, we are able to create gaps that can trap the molecules, allowing us to sequentially and reproducibly create a large number of junctions. By applying a small bias across the junction, we can measure its conductance and learn about the transport mechanisms at the nanoscale. The experimental work presented here directly probes the transmission properties of single molecules through the systematic measurement of junction conductance (at low and high bias) and thermopower. We present measurements on a variety of molecular families and study how conductance depends on the character of the linkage (metal-molecule bond) and the nature of the molecular backbone. We start by describing a novel way to construct single molecule junctions by covalently connecting the molecular backbone to the electrodes. This eliminates the use of linking substituents, and as a result, the junction conductance increases substantially. Then, we compare transport across silicon chains (silanes) and saturated carbon chains (alkanes) while keeping the linkers the same and find a stark difference in their electronic transport properties. We extend our studies of molecular junctions by looking at two additional aspects of quantum transport -- molecular thermopower and molecular current-voltage characteristics. Each of these additional parameters gives us further insight into transport properties at the nanoscale. Evaluating the junction thermopower allows us to determine the nature of charge carriers in the system and we demonstrate this by contrasting the measurement of amine

  4. Prism-coupled light emission from tunnel junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ushioda, S.; Rutledge, J. E.; Pierce, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Completely p-polarized light emission has been observed from smooth Al-AlO(x)-Au tunnel junctions placed on a prism coupler. The angle and polarization dependence demonstrate unambiguously that the emitted light is radiated by the fast-mode surface plasmon polariton. The emission spectra suggest that the dominant process for the excitation of the fast mode is through conversion of the slow mode to the fast mode mediated by residual roughness on the junction surface.

  5. Improved High/Low Junction Silicon Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Pao, S. C.; Lindholm, F. A.; Fossum, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Method developed to raise value of open-circuit voltage in silicon solar cells by incorporating high/low junction in cell emitter. Power-conversion efficiency of low-resistivity silicon solar cell considerably less than maximum theoretical value mainly because open-circuit voltage is smaller than simple p/n junction theory predicts. With this method, air-mass-zero opencircuit voltage increased from 600 mV level to approximately 650 mV.

  6. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  7. A rare presentation of lipoma on mandibular mucogingival junction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Jain, Kanu; Nagpal, Archna; Baiju, Chandrababu Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma is the most common tumor of mesenchymal tissues of body, but its occurrence in oral cavity is infrequent. Buccal mucosa is the most common intraoral site of lipoma followed by tongue, floor of the mouth, and buccal vestibule. The involvement of mucogingival junction is rare. We present a unique case report of oral lipoma occurring on mandibular mucogingival junction with review of literature which has emphasis on differential diagnosis. PMID:27143835

  8. Culture and characterization of human junctional epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, T; Izumi, Y; Sueda, T

    1997-03-01

    This study was undertaken to establish a culture of junctional epithelial cells derived from gingival tissue attached to the tooth surface and to characterize these cells immunocytochemically and ultrastructurally. Primary cultures of cells were obtained from the junctional tissue explanted on type I collagen-coated dishes and immersed in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cells were subcultured with conditioned serum-free keratinocyte medium (keratinocyte-SFM + 5% FBS) on dishes coated with solubilized extract of the basement membrane. After 24 hours, the medium was changed to keratinocyte-SFM (0.09 mM Ca2+). The cell-doubling time was 40.5 hours. As a control, cells from gingival tissue were cultured by the same method. Cells from junctional tissue and gingival tissue were compared immunocytochemically using monoclonal antibodies to keratin, vimentin, and desmoplakins I and II and using Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA). The keratin AE1 and AE3 was expressed by all of culture cells. The vimentin (specific for the intermediate filament of mesenchymal cells) was also expressed by all cells. The expression pattern of keratin 19 was observed not only by cells from junctional tissue but also by cells from gingival tissue. All keratin peptides were expressed in both cells. However, DBA reacted only with cells from the junctional tissue. Anti-desmoplakin I and II reacted with both cells, however, the staining patterns differed. DBA-positive cultured epithelial cells from the junctional tissue showed poor tonofilament bundles and were rich in cytoplasmic organelles. These findings suggest that junctional epithelial cells can be isolated from junctional tissue and cultured under improved conditions. PMID:9100198

  9. Nonsinusoidal Current-Phase Relation in SFS Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubov, A. A.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Fominov, Ya. V.

    2002-06-01

    Various types of the current-phase relation I(phi) in superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor (SFS) point contacts and planar double-barrier junctions are studied within the quasiclassical theory in the limit of thin diffusive ferromagnetic interlayers. The physical mechanisms leading to highly nontrivial I(phi) dependence are identified by studying the spectral supercurrent density. These mechanisms are also responsible for the 0-pi transition in SFS Josephson junctions.

  10. Graphene/silicon nanowire Schottky junction for enhanced light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guifeng; Zhu, Hongwei; Wang, Kunlin; Wei, Jinquan; Li, Xinming; Shu, Qinke; Guo, Ning; Wu, Dehai

    2011-03-01

    Schottky junction solar cells are assembled by directly coating graphene films on n-type silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. The graphene/SiNW junction shows enhanced light trapping and faster carrier transport compared to the graphene/planar Si structure. With chemical doping, the SiNW-based solar cells showed energy conversion efficiencies of up to 2.86% at AM1.5 condition, opening a possibility of using graphene/semiconductor nanostructures in photovoltaic application. PMID:21323376

  11. Dok-7 mutations underlie a neuromuscular junction synaptopathy.

    PubMed

    Beeson, David; Higuchi, Osamu; Palace, Jackie; Cossins, Judy; Spearman, Hayley; Maxwell, Susan; Newsom-Davis, John; Burke, Georgina; Fawcett, Peter; Motomura, Masakatsu; Müller, Juliane S; Lochmüller, Hanns; Slater, Clarke; Vincent, Angela; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2006-09-29

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of inherited disorders of neuromuscular transmission characterized by fatigable muscle weakness. One major subgroup of patients shows a characteristic "limb girdle" pattern of muscle weakness, in which the muscles have small, simplified neuromuscular junctions but normal acetylcholine receptor and acetylcholinesterase function. We showed that recessive inheritance of mutations in Dok-7, which result in a defective structure of the neuromuscular junction, is a cause of CMS with proximal muscle weakness. PMID:16917026

  12. Automatic recording of direct current singularity amplitudes in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Costabile, G.; Gambardella, U.; Pagano, S.

    1985-08-01

    We have designed and tested an electronic circuit to record the amplitude of any current singularity in the current-voltage characteristic of a Josephson tunnel junction. The detection of the peak current occurs only when the junction voltage is within a range that can be centered and narrowed conveniently. We describe the circuit in detail and illustrate its operation in the recording of some typical dc singularities.

  13. A rare presentation of lipoma on mandibular mucogingival junction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Jain, Kanu; Nagpal, Archna; Baiju, Chandrababu Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma is the most common tumor of mesenchymal tissues of body, but its occurrence in oral cavity is infrequent. Buccal mucosa is the most common intraoral site of lipoma followed by tongue, floor of the mouth, and buccal vestibule. The involvement of mucogingival junction is rare. We present a unique case report of oral lipoma occurring on mandibular mucogingival junction with review of literature which has emphasis on differential diagnosis. PMID:27143835

  14. Quantum statistical theory of semiconductor junctions in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1977-01-01

    Free carrier and electric field distributions of one-dimensional semiconductor junctions are evaluated using a quantum mechanical phase-space distribution and its corresponding Boltzmann equation. Attention is given to quantum and exchange corrections in cases of high doping concentrations when carrier densities become degenerate. Quantitative differences between degenerate and classical junction characteristics, e.g., maximum electric field and built-in voltage and carrier concentration within the transition region, are evaluated numerically.

  15. Gravitational radiation by cosmic strings in a junction

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Karouby, J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Khosravi, S.

    2009-01-15

    The formalism for computing the gravitational power radiation from excitations on cosmic strings forming a junction is presented and applied to the simple case of co-planar strings at a junction when the excitations are generated along one string leg. The effects of polarization of the excitations and of the back-reaction of the gravitational radiation on the small scale structure of the strings are studied.

  16. Magnetic anisotropy in strained manganite films and bicrystal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. V.; Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Petrzhik, A. M.; Borisenko, I. V.; Shadrin, A. V.; Gunnarsson, R.

    2013-04-01

    Transport and magnetic properties of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) manganite thin films and bicrystal junctions were investigated. Epitaxial manganite films were grown on SrTiO3, LaAlO3, NdGaO3 (NGO), and (LaAlO3)0.3 + (Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 substrates, and their magnetic anisotropy were determined by two independent techniques of magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was demonstrated that by using these techniques, a small (0.3%) anisotropy of crystal structure at the (110) surface plane of the orthorhombic NGO substrate leads to uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of the films in the plane of the substrate at least at the room temperature. It was found that on vicinal NGO substrates, the value of magnetic anisotropy strength can be varied in the range 100-200 Oe at T = 295 K by changing the substrate vicinal angle from 0° to 25°. Measurement of the magnetic anisotropy of manganite bicrystal junction demonstrated the presence of two ferromagnetic spin subsystems for both types of bicrystal boundaries with tilting of basal plane of manganite tilted bicrystal (TB-junction) and with rotation of crystallographic axes (RB-junction) used for comparison. The magnetoresistance of TB-junctions increases with decreasing temperature and the misorientation angle. Variation of bicrystal misorientation angle does not lead to change of misorientation of easy magnetic axes in the film parts forming TB-junction. Analysis of the voltage dependencies of bicrystal junction conductivity show that the low value of the magnetoresistance for the LSMO bicrystal junctions can be caused by two scattering mechanisms. The first one is the spin-flip of spin-polarized carriers due to the strong electron-electron interactions in a disordered layer at the bicrystal boundary at low temperatures and the second one is spin-flip by antiferromagnetic magnons at high temperatures.

  17. Strain-tunable Josephson current in graphene-superconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, B.

    2013-10-01

    Strain effects on Josephson current in a graphene-superconductor junction are explored theoretically. It is demonstrated that the supercurrent is an oscillatory function of zigzag direction strain with a strain-dependent oscillating frequency. Interestingly, it is found that the Josephson current under armchair direction strain can be turned on/off with a cutoff strain. In view of the on/off properties of the Josephson current, we propose the strained graphene Josephson junction to be utilized as a supercurrent switch.

  18. Evidence for a minigap in YBCO grain boundary Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Lucignano, P; Stornaiuolo, D; Tafuri, F; Altshuler, B L; Tagliacozzo, A

    2010-10-01

    Self-assembled YBaCuO diffusive grain boundary submicron Josephson junctions offer a realization of a special regime of the proximity effect, where normal state coherence prevails on the superconducting coherence in the barrier region. Resistance oscillations from the current-voltage characteristic encode mesoscopic information on the junction and more specifically on the minigap induced in the barrier. Their persistence at large voltages is evidence of the long lifetime of the antinodal (high energy) quasiparticles. PMID:21230860

  19. Optical switching in a superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, G.; Göbel, E. O.; Schmitz, J.; Walther, M.; Wagner, J.

    1999-07-01

    We have fabricated Josephson junctions with a two-dimensional electron gas based on InAs/AlSb/GaSb as the barrier. The behavior of the junction during and after illumination with different wavelengths was studied. Due to a persistent positive and negative photoeffect, depending on the excitation wavelength, the carrier density and hence the critical current as well as the normal resistance could be switched between two different stable states.

  20. Aeroacoustics of T-junction merging flow.

    PubMed

    Lam, G C Y; Leung, R C K; Tang, S K

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports a numerical study of the aeroacoustics of merging flow at T-junction. The primary focus is to elucidate the acoustic generation by the flow unsteadiness. The study is conducted by performing direct aeroacoustic simulation approach, which solves the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations and the perfect gas equation of state simultaneously using the conservation element and solution element method. For practical flows, the Reynolds number based on duct width is usually quite high (>10(5)). In order to properly account for the effects of flow turbulence, a large eddy simulation methodology together with a wall modeling derived from the classical logarithm wall law is adopted. The numerical simulations are performed in two dimensions and the acoustic generation physics at different ratios of side-branch to main duct flow velocities VR (=0.5,0.67,1.0,2.0) are studied. Both the levels of unsteady interactions of merging flow structures and the efficiency of acoustic generation are observed to increase with VR. Based on Curle's analogy, the major acoustic source is found to be the fluctuating wall pressure induced by the flow unsteadiness occurred in the downstream branch. A scaling between the wall fluctuating force and the efficiency of the acoustic generation is also derived. PMID:23363089

  1. Fluxon Dynamics in Elliptic Annular Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto; Mygind, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a magnetic flux quantum (current vortex) trapped in a current-biased long planar elliptic annular Josephson tunnel junction. The system is modeled by a perturbed sine-Gordon equation that determines the spatial and temporal behavior of the phase difference across the tunnel barrier separating the two superconducting electrodes. In the absence of an external magnetic field, the fluxon dynamics in an elliptic annulus does not differ from that of a circular annulus where the stationary fluxon speed merely is determined by the system losses. The interaction between the vortex magnetic moment and a spatially homogeneous in-plane magnetic field gives rise to a tunable periodic non-sinusoidal potential which is strongly dependent on the annulus aspect ratio. We study the escape of the vortex from a well in the tilted potential when the bias current exceeds the depinning current. The smallest depinning current as well as the lowest sensitivity of the annulus to the external field is achieved when the axes ratio is equal to √{2}. The presented extensive numerical results are in good agreement with the findings of the perturbative approach. We also probe the rectifying properties of an asymmetric potential implemented with an egg-shaped annulus formed by two semi-elliptic arcs.

  2. Tight Junction Properties Change During Epidermis Development

    PubMed Central

    Celli, A; Zhai, Y; Jiang, YJ; Crumrine, D; Elias, PM; Feingold, KR; Mauro, TM

    2012-01-01

    In terrestrial animals, the epidermal barrier transitions from covering an organism suspended in a liquid environment in utero, to protecting a terrestrial animal postnatally from air and environmental exposure. Tight junctions (TJ) are essential for establishing the epidermal permeability barrier during embryonic development, and modulate normal epidermal development and barrier functions postnatally. We now report that TJ function, as well as claudin-1 and occludin expression, change in parallel during late epidermal development. Specifically, TJ block the paracellular movement of Lanthanum (La3+) early in rat in vivo prenatal epidermal development, at gestational days 18–19, with concurrent upregulation of claudin-1 and occludin. TJ then become more permeable to ions and water as the fetus approaches parturition, concomitant with development of the lipid epidermal permeability barrier, at days 20–21. This sequence is recapitulated in cultured human epidermal equivalents (HEE), as assessed both by ultrastructural studies comparing permeation of large and small molecules, and by the standard electrophysiologic parameter of resistance (R), suggesting further that this pattern of development is intrinsic to mammalian epidermal development. These findings demonstrate that the role of TJ changes during epidermal development, and further suggest that the TJ-based and lipid-based epidermal permeability barriers are interdependent. PMID:22882565

  3. Graphene Josephson Junction Single Photon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Evan D.; Lee, Gil-Ho; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Heuck, Mikkel; Crossno, Jesse; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk; Fong, Kin Chung

    Single photon detectors (SPDs) have found use across a wide array of applications depending on the wavelength to which they are sensitive. Graphene, because of its linear, gapless dispersion near the Dirac point, has a flat, wide bandwidth absorption that can be enhanced to near 100 % through the use of resonant structures making it a promising candidate for broadband SPDs. Upon absorbing a photon in the optical to mid-infrared range, a small (~10 μm2) sheet of graphene at cryogenic temperatures can experience a significant increase in electronic temperature due to its extremely low heat capacity. At 1550 nm, for example, calculations show that the temperature could rise by as much as 500 %. This temperature increase could be detected with near perfect quantum efficiency by making the graphene the weak link in a Josephson junction (JJ). We present a theoretical model demonstrating that such a graphene JJ SPD could operate at the readily achievable temperature of 3 K with near zero dark count, sub-50 ps timing jitter, and sub-5 ns dead time and report on the progress toward experimentally realizing the device.

  4. Dermal eosinophilic infiltrate in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Saraiya, Ami; Yang, Catherine S; Kim, Jinah; Bercovitch, Lionel; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Telang, Gladys

    2015-08-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by a split in the lamina lucida usually because of mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 resulting in absence or reduction of laminin-332. Rare subtypes of JEB have mutations in COL17A1, ITGB4, ITGA6 and ITGA3 leading to reduction or dysfunction of collagen XVII, integrin α6β4 and integrin α3. The classic finding under light microscopy is a paucicellular, subepidermal split. We describe the unusual presence of an eosinophilic infiltrate in the bullae and subjacent dermis in a neonate with JEB, generalized intermediate (formerly known as non-Herlitz-type JEB), discuss the histologic differential diagnosis for a subepidermal blister in a neonate, review the literature regarding cases of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) presenting with inflammatory infiltrates, and discuss mechanisms to explain these findings. This case highlights that eosinophils can rarely be seen in EB and should not mislead the dermatopathologist into diagnosing an autoimmune blistering disorder. PMID:25950805

  5. Spin-crossover molecule based thermoelectric junction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-05-11

    Using ab-initio numerical methods, we explore the spin-dependent transport and thermoelectric properties of a spin-crossover molecule (i.e., iron complex of 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)pyridine) based nano-junction. We demonstrate a large magnetoresistance, efficient conductance-switching, and spin-filter activity in this molecule-based two-terminal device. The spin-crossover process also modulates the thermoelectric entities. It can efficiently switch the magnitude as well as spin-polarization of the thermocurrent. We find that thermocurrent is changed by ∼4 orders of magnitude upon spin-crossover. Moreover, it also substantially affects the thermopower and consequently, the device shows extremely efficient spin-crossover magnetothermopower generation. Furthermore, by tuning the chemical potential of electrodes into a certain range, a pure spin-thermopower can be achieved for the high-spin state. Finally, the reasonably large values of figure-of-merit in the presence and absence of phonon demonstrate a large heat-to-voltage conversion efficiency of the device. We believe that our study will pave an alternative way of tuning the transport and thermoelectric properties through the spin-crossover process and can have potential applications in generation of spin-dependent current, information storage, and processing.

  6. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  7. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  8. Superconducting qubits with semiconductor nanowire Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, K. D.; Larsen, T. W.; Kuemmeth, F.; Jespersen, T. S.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygård, J.; Marcus, C. M.

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting transmon qubits are a promising basis for a scalable quantum information processor. The recent development of semiconducting InAs nanowires with in situ molecular beam epitaxy-grown Al contacts presents new possibilities for building hybrid superconductor/semiconductor devices using precise bottom up fabrication techniques. Here, we take advantage of these high quality materials to develop superconducting qubits with superconductor-normal-superconductor Josephson junctions (JJs) where the normal element is an InAs semiconductor nanowire. We have fabricated transmon qubits in which the conventional Al-Al2O3-Al JJs are replaced by a single gate-tunable nanowire JJ. Using spectroscopy to probe the qubit we observe fluctuations in its level splitting with gate voltage that are consistent with universal conductance fluctuations in the nanowire's normal state conductance. Our gate-tunable nanowire transmons may enable new means of control for large scale qubit architectures and hybrid topological quantum computing schemes. Research supported by Microsoft Station Q, Danish National Research Foundation, Villum Foundation, Lundbeck Foundation and the European Commission.

  9. Photoinduced carrier annihilation in silicon pn junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Motoki, Takayuki; Yasuda, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Hasumi, Masahiko; Mizuno, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    We report analysis of the photo-induced minority carrier effective lifetime (τeff) in a p+n junction formed on the top surfaces of a n-type silicon substrate by ion implantation of boron and phosphorus atoms at the top and bottom surfaces followed by activation by microwave heating. Bias voltages were applied to the p+ boron-doped surface with n+ phosphorus-doped surface kept at 0 V. The values of τeff were lower than 1 × 10-5 s under the reverse-bias condition. On the other hand, τeff markedly increased to 1.4 × 10-4 s as the forward-bias voltage increased to 0.7 V and then it leveled off when continuous-wave 635 nm light was illuminated at 0.74 mW/cm2 on the p+ surface. The carrier annihilation velocity S\\text{p + } at the p+ surface region was numerically estimated from the experimental τeff. S\\text{p + } ranged from 4000 to 7200 cm/s under the reverse-bias condition when the carrier annihilation velocity S\\text{n + } at the n+ surface region was assumed to be a constant value of 100 cm/s. S\\text{p + } markedly decreased to 265 cm/s as the forward-bias voltage increased to 0.7 V.

  10. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    PubMed Central

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  11. Quantum interference in topological insulator Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Juntao; Liu, Haiwen; Liu, Jie; Li, Yu-Xian; Joynt, Robert; Sun, Qing-feng; Xie, X. C.

    2016-05-01

    Using nonequilibrium Green's functions, we studied numerically the transport properties of a Josephson junction, superconductor-topological insulator-superconductor hybrid system. Our numerical calculation shows first that proximity-induced superconductivity is indeed observed in the edge states of a topological insulator adjoining two superconducting leads and second that the special characteristics of topological insulators endow the edge states with an enhanced proximity effect with a superconductor but do not forbid the bulk states to do the same. In a size-dependent analysis of the local current, it was found that a few residual bulk states can lead to measurable resistance, whereas because these bulk states spread over the whole sample, their contribution to the interference pattern is insignificant when the sample size is in the micrometer range. Based on these numerical results, it is concluded that the apparent disappearance of residual bulk states in the superconducting interference process as described by Hart et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 638 (2014), 10.1038/nphys3036] is just due to the effects of size: the contribution of the topological edge states outweighs that of the residual bulk states.

  12. Room-temperature single-electron junction.

    PubMed Central

    Facci, P; Erokhin, V; Carrara, S; Nicolini, C

    1996-01-01

    The design, realization, and test performances of an electronic junction based on single-electron phenomena that works in the air at room temperature are hereby reported. The element consists of an electrochemically etched sharp tungsten stylus over whose tip a nanometer-size crystal was synthesized. Langmuir-Blodgett films of cadmium arachidate were transferred onto the stylus and exposed to a H2S atmosphere to yield CdS nanocrystals (30-50 angstrom in diameter) imbedded into an organic matrix. The stylus, biased with respect to a flat electrode, was brought to the tunnel distance from the film and a constant gap value was maintained by a piezo-electric actuator driven by a feedback circuit fed by the tunneling current. With this set-up, it is possible to measure the behavior of the current flowing through the quantum dot when a bias voltage is applied. Voltage-current characteristics measured in the system displayed single-electron trends such as a Coulomb blockade and Coulomb staircase and revealed capacitance values as small as 10(-19) F. PMID:11607710

  13. Resolving Holliday junctions with Escherichia coli UvrD helicase.

    PubMed

    Carter, Annamarie S; Tahmaseb, Kambiz; Compton, Sarah A; Matson, Steven W

    2012-03-01

    The Escherichia coli UvrD helicase is known to function in the mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair pathways and has also been suggested to have roles in recombination and replication restart. The primary intermediate DNA structure in these two processes is the Holliday junction. UvrD has been shown to unwind a variety of substrates including partial duplex DNA, nicked DNA, forked DNA structures, blunt duplex DNA and RNA-DNA hybrids. Here, we demonstrate that UvrD also catalyzes the robust unwinding of Holliday junction substrates. To characterize this unwinding reaction we have employed steady-state helicase assays, pre-steady-state rapid quench helicase assays, DNaseI footprinting, and electron microscopy. We conclude that UvrD binds initially to the junction compared with binding one of the blunt ends of the four-way junction to initiate unwinding and resolves the synthetic substrate into two double-stranded fork structures. We suggest that UvrD, along with its mismatch repair partners, MutS and MutL, may utilize its ability to unwind Holliday junctions directly in the prevention of homeologous recombination. UvrD may also be involved in the resolution of stalled replication forks by unwinding the Holliday junction intermediate to allow bypass of the blockage. PMID:22267744

  14. Low-Tc superconducting tunnel junction submillimeter wave receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claude, Stephane M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Jones, A.; Matheson, D. N.; Little, L. T.; Davies, Steven R.

    1994-07-01

    A low Tc Pb alloy Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction heterodyne receiver has been constructed for astronomical use and tested over the frequency range of 400 to 540 GHz. Various alloy structures have been investigated in order to allow the production of small area SIS junctions with stable electrical characteristics and resistance to stress on cooling from 300 K to 4.2 K. Improvements in photolithography and thin film deposition techniques have been made that allow the fabrication of reliable sub-micron area junctions using suspended photoresist stencil and E-beam evaporation techniques. A single sub-micron area junction is mounted in a reduced height two tuner waveguide structure, which provides an optimum impedance match between the junction and the received signal. Performance measurements made with the receiver installed on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, Hawaii, show a total system double sideband noise equivalent temperature of 160 K at 460 GHz and 220 K at 490 GHz, measured in a 1 GHz instantaneous IF bandwidth centered at 4 GHz. The receiver demonstrates that Pb alloy tunnel junctions provide excellent sensitivity at submillimetre wavelengths and are sufficiently stable and reliable to allow use at a remote observing site.

  15. Light emission from statistically rough Ag tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P.; Walmsley, D. G.

    1986-05-01

    Observation of both narrowband 3.8 eV emission and broadband, mostly visible emission from single, statistically rough CaF 2AlAl 2O 3Ag tunnel junction structures under high applied bias (> 4 V) is reported. Resolution between the two components of the output is much superior in the tunnel junction arrangement than in experiments where high energy (keV) electron beams impinge on rough Ag films. Importantly, we find that the broadband emission cuts off at 3.5 eV even when the applied bias exceeds 4 V. This cut-off energy is higher than that reported elsewhere and confirms that for Ag junctions the bulk of the broadband output is indeed mediated by the fast surface plasmon polariton mode (which has a maximum energy of 3.5 eV) and not by the slow or junction mode. Both components of the output are found to be most intense in the direction normal to the junction surface and to be substantially unpolarised. For the broadband emission these features are consistent with results of theoretical calculation; for the narrowband 3.8 eV emission they contrast sharply with the observed characteristics of the 3.8 eV emission from smooth Ag junctions.

  16. Engineering design of artificial vascular junctions for 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoxiao; Bibb, Richard; Harris, Russell

    2016-06-01

    Vascular vessels, including arteries, veins and capillaries, are being printed using additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing. This paper demonstrates that it is important to follow the vascular design by nature as close as possible when 3D printing artificial vascular branches. In previous work, the authors developed an algorithm of computational geometry for constructing smooth junctions for 3D printing. In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) is used to compare the wall shear stress and blood velocity field for the junctions of different designs. The CFD model can reproduce the expected wall shear stress at locations remote from the junction. For large vessels such as veins, it is shown that ensuring the smoothness of the junction and using smaller joining angles as observed in nature is very important to avoid high wall shear stress and recirculation. The issue is however less significant for capillaries. Large joining angles make no difference to the hemodynamic behavior, which is also consistent with the fact that most capillary junctions have large joining angles. The combination of the CFD analysis and the junction construction method form a complete design method for artificial vascular vessels that can be 3D printed using additive manufacturing technologies. PMID:27321286

  17. Dynamic gap junctional communication: a delimiting model for tissue responses.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, G J; Brink, P R; Ramanan, S V

    1994-01-01

    Gap junctions are aqueous intercellular channels formed by a diverse class of membrane-spanning proteins, known as connexins. These aqueous pores provide partial cytoplasmic continuity between cells in most tissues, and are freely permeable to a host of physiologically relevant second messenger molecules/ionic species (e.g., Ca2+, IP3, cAMP, cGMP). Despite the fact that these second messenger molecules/ionic species have been shown to alter junctional patency, there is no clear basis for understanding how dynamic and transient changes in the intracellular concentration of second messenger molecules might modulate the extent of intercellular communication among coupled cells. Thus, we have modified the tissue monolayer model of Ramanan and Brink (1990) to account for both the up-regulatory and down-regulatory effects on junctions by second messenger molecules that diffuse through gap junctions. We have chosen the vascular wall as our morphological correlate because of its anisotropy and large investment of gap junctions. The model allows us to illustrate the putative behavior of gap junctions under a variety of physiologically relevant conditions. The modeling studies demonstrated that transient alterations in intracellular second messenger concentrations are capable of producing 50-125% changes in the number of cells recruited into a functional syncytial unit, after activation of a single cell. Moreover, the model conditions required to demonstrate such physiologically relevant changes in intercellular diffusion among coupled cells are commonly observed in intact tissues and cultured cells. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7811948

  18. Intraepithelial lymphocytes express junctional molecules in murine small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko . E-mail: INAGAKI@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Sawaguchi, Akira; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Matsuzaki, Goro; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2005-06-17

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) that reside at basolateral site regulate the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells (EC) for providing a first line of host defense in intestine. However, it remains unknown how IEL interact and communicate with EC. Here, we show that IEL express junctional molecules like EC. We identified mRNA expression of the junctional molecules in IEL such as zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) (tight junction), {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin (adherens junction), and connexin26 (gap junction). IEL constitutively expressed occludin and E-cadherin at protein level, while other T cells in the thymus, spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patches did not. {gamma}{delta} IEL showed higher level of these expressions than {alpha}{beta} IEL. The expression of occludin was augmented by anti-CD3 Ab stimulation. These results suggest the possibility of a novel role of IEL concerning epithelial barrier and communication between IEL and EC.

  19. STIM Proteins and the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Silvia; Meyer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic organelles can interact with each other through stable junctions where the two membranes are kept in close apposition. The junction that connects the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane (ER-PM junction) is unique in providing a direct communication link between the ER and the PM. In a recently discovered signaling process, STIM (stromal-interacting molecule) proteins sense a drop in ER Ca2+ levels and directly activate Orai PM Ca2+ channels across the junction space. In an inverse process, a voltage-gated PM Ca2+ channel can directly open ER ryanodine-receptor Ca2+ channels in striated-muscle cells. Although ER-PM junctions were first described 50 years ago, their broad importance in Ca2+ signaling, as well as in the regulation of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol lipid transfer, has only recently been realized. Here, we discuss research from different fields to provide a broad perspective on the structures and unique roles of ER-PM junctions in controlling signaling and metabolic processes. PMID:21548779

  20. Low-energy theory of transport in Majorana wire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazunov, A.; Egger, R.; Levy Yeyati, A.

    2016-07-01

    We formulate and apply a low-energy transport theory for hybrid quantum devices containing junctions of topological superconductor (TS) wires and conventional normal (N) or superconducting (S) leads. We model TS wires as spinless p -wave superconductors and derive their boundary Keldysh Green's function, capturing both the Majorana end state and continuum quasiparticle excitations in a unified manner. We also specify this Green's function for a finite-length TS wire. Junctions connecting different parts of the device are described by the standard tunneling Hamiltonian. Using this Hamiltonian approach, one also has the option to include many-body interactions in a systematic manner. For N-TS junctions, we provide the current-voltage (I -V ) characteristics at arbitrary junction transparency and give exact results for the shot-noise power and the excess current. For TS-TS junctions, analytical results for the thermal noise spectrum and for the I -V curve in the high-transparency low-bias regime are presented. For S-TS junctions, we compute the entire I -V curve and clarify the conditions for having a finite Josephson current.

  1. Critical Current Oscillations of Josephson Junctions with Ferromagnetic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Joseph A.; Khasawneh, Mazin A.; Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    Josephson junctions containing ferromagnetic layers are of considerable interest for the development of practical cryogenic memory and superconducting qubits. Such junctions exhibit a phase shift of π for certain ranges of ferromagnetic layer thickness. We present studies of Nb based micron-scale Josephson junctions using ferromagnetic layers of Ni, Ni81Fe19, or Ni65Co20Fe15. By applying an external magnetic field, the critical current of the junctions containing Ni81Fe19 and Ni65Co20Fe15 is found to follow a characteristic Fraunhofer pattern, and displays the clear switching behavior expected of single-domain magnets. However, the junctions containing Ni exhibit more complex behaviors. The maximum value of the critical current, extracted from the Fraunhofer patterns, oscillates as a function of the ferromagnetic layer thickness, indicating transitions in the phase difference across the junction between values of zero and π. We compare the data to previous work and to models of the 0- π transitions based on existing clean and dirty limit theories. This work was supported by IARPA via ARO Contract W911NF-14-C-0115.

  2. The string-junction picture of multiquark states: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G. C.; Veneziano, G.

    2016-06-01

    We recall and update, both theoretically and phenomenologically, our (nearly) forty-years-old proposal of a string-junction as a necessary complement to the conventional classification of hadrons based just on their quark-antiquark constituents. In that proposal single (though in general metastable) hadronic states are associated with "irreducible" gauge-invariant operators consisting of Wilson lines (visualized as strings of color flux tubes) that may either end on a quark or an antiquark, or annihilate in triplets at a junction J or an anti-junction overline{J} . For the junction-free sector (ordinary qoverline{q} mesons and glueballs) the picture is supported by large- N (number of colors) considerations as well as by a lattice strong-coupling expansion. Both imply the famous OZI rule suppressing quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams. For hadrons with J and/or overline{J} constituents the same expansions support our proposal, including its generalization of the OZI rule to the suppression of J-overline{J} annihilation diagrams. Such a rule implies that hadrons with junctions are "mesophobic" and thus unusually narrow if they are below threshold for decaying into as many baryons as their total number of junctions (two for a tetraquark, three for a pentaquark). Experimental support for our claim, based on the observation that narrow multiquark states typically lie below (well above) the relevant baryonic (mesonic) thresholds, will be presented.

  3. Electric-field-induced magnetization switching in CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with high junction resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2016-05-01

    We show the electric-field induced magnetization switching for CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with thick MgO barrier layer of 2.8 nm, whose resistance-area product is 176 kΩ μm2, and achieve the small switching energy of 6.3 fJ/bit. The increase of the junction resistance is expected to suppress the energy consumption due to the Joule heating during the switching; however, the energy is still dominated by the Joule energy rather than the charging energy. This is because the junction resistance decreases more rapidly for junctions with thicker MgO as bias voltage increases.

  4. Ultimate efficiency limit of single-junction perovskite and dual-junction perovskite/silicon two-terminal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansouri, Ibraheem; Ho-Baillie, Anita; Green, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    Theoretical calculation based on detailed balance and incorporating different realistic optical and electrical losses predicts conversion efficiency beyond 22% for single-junction perovskite devices. In dual-junction perovskite/silicon devices, theoretical conversion efficiency around 40% is been determined. However, dramatic drop in the conversion efficiency is shown to be due to the glass reflection and FTO parasitic absorption losses. Additionally, practical conversion efficiency limits of dual-junction two-terminal perovskite/silicon tandem solar cell of 30% are achievable as reported in this work using state-of-the-art demonstrated devices. Additionally, various crystalline silicon (industry and laboratory demonstrated) technologies are used as the bottom cell for the current matched tandem cell stacks with higher relative improvements when using commercial c-Si solar cells. Moreover, the effect of eliminating the parasitic resistances and enhancing the external radiative efficiency (ERE) in the perovskite junction on tandem performance are also investigated enhancing the stack efficiencies.

  5. A Three-Isocenter Jagged-Junction IMRT Approach for Craniospinal Irradiation Without Beam Edge Matching for Field Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Fred; Ramaseshan, Ramani; Corns, Robert; Harrop, Sheryl; Nuraney, Nimet; Steiner, Peter; Aldridge, Stephanie; Liu, Mitchell; Carolan, Hannah; Agranovich, Alex; Karvat, Anand

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Traditionally craniospinal irradiation treats the central nervous system using two or three adjacent field sets. We propose a technique using a three-isocenter intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan (jagged-junction IMRT) which overcomes problems associated with field junctions and beam edge matching and improves planning and treatment setup efficiencies with homogenous target dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Treatments for 3 patients with a prescription of 36 Gy in 20 fractions were retrospectively planned with jagged-junction IMRT and compared to conventional treatment plans. Planning target volume (PTV) included the whole brain and spinal canal to the S3 vertebral level. The plan used three field sets, each with a unique isocenter. One field set with seven fields treated the cranium. Two field sets treated the spine, each set using three fields. Fields from adjacent sets were overlapped, and the optimization process smoothly integrated the dose inside the overlapped junction. Results: For jagged-junction IMRT plans vs. conventional technique, the average homogeneity index equaled 0.08 {+-} 0.01 vs. 0.12 {+-} 0.02, respectively, and conformity number equaled 0.79 {+-} 0.01 vs. 0.47 {+-} 0.12, respectively. The 95% isodose surface covered (99.5 {+-} 0.3)% of the PTV vs. (98.1 {+-} 2.0)%, respectively. Both jagged-junction IMRT plans and the conventional plans had good sparing of organs at risk. Conclusions: Jagged-junction IMRT planning provided good dose homogeneity and conformity to the target while maintaining a low dose to organs at risk. Results from jagged-junction IMRT plans were better than or equivalent to those from the conventional technique. Jagged-junction IMRT optimization smoothly distributed dose in the junction between field sets. Because there was no beam matching, this treatment technique is less likely to produce hot or cold spots at the junction, in contrast to conventional techniques. The planning process is also

  6. Optimal Normal Tissue Sparing in Craniospinal Axis Irradiation Using IMRT With Daily Intrafractionally Modulated Junction(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Johannes M.A.M.; Louwe, Rob J.W.; Kollenburg, Peter G.M. van; Kunze-Busch, Martina C.; Gidding, Corrie E.M.; Lindert, Erik J. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique for craniospinal irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with improved dose homogeneity at the field junction(s), increased target volume conformity, and minimized dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: Five patients with high-risk medulloblastoma underwent CT simulation in supine position. For each patient, an IMRT plan with daily intrafractionally modulated junction(s) was generated, as well as a treatment plan based on conventional three-dimensional planning (3DCRT). A dose of 39.6 Gy in 22 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy was prescribed. Dose-volume parameters for target volumes and OARs were compared for the two techniques. Results: The maximum dose with IMRT was <107% in all patients. V{sub <95} and V{sub >107} were <1 cm{sup 3} for IMRT compared with 3-9 cm{sup 3} for the craniospinal and 26-43 cm{sup 3} for the spinal-spinal junction with 3DCRT. These observations corresponded with a lower homogeneity index and a higher conformity index for the spinal planning target volume with IMRT. IMRT provided considerable sparing of acute and late reacting tissues. V{sub 75} for the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, and intestine was 81%, 81%, and 22% with 3DCRT versus 5%, 0%, and 1% with IMRT, respectively. V{sub 75} for the heart and thyroid was 42% and 32% vs. 0% with IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT with daily intrafractionally modulated junction results in a superior target coverage and junction homogeneity compared with 3DCRT. A significant dose reduction can be obtained for acute as well as late-reacting tissues.

  7. Junction-to-Case Thermal Resistance of a Silicon Carbide Bipolar Junction Transistor Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    Junction temperature of a prototype SiC-based bipolar junction transistor (BJT) was estimated by using the base-emitter voltage (V(sub BE)) characteristic for thermometry. The V(sub BE) was measured as a function of the base current (I(sub B)) at selected temperatures (T), all at a fixed collector current (I(sub C)) and under very low duty cycle pulse conditions. Under such conditions, the average temperature of the chip was taken to be the same as that of the temperature-controlled case. At increased duty cycle such as to substantially heat the chip, but same I(sub C) pulse height, the chip temperature was identified by matching the V(sub BE) to the thermometry curves. From the measured average power, the chip-to-case thermal resistance could be estimated, giving a reasonable value. A tentative explanation for an observed bunching with increasing temperature of the calibration curves may relate to an increasing dopant atom ionization. A first-cut analysis, however, does not support this.

  8. Reduction of Gap Junctional Conductance by Microinjection of Antibodies against the 27-kDa Liver Gap Junction Polypeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, E. L.; Spray, D. C.; Bennett, M. V. L.

    1985-04-01

    Antibody raised against isolated rat liver gap junctions was microinjected into coupled cells in culture to assess its influence on gap junctional conductance. A rapid inhibition of fluorescent dye transfer and electrical coupling was produced in pairs of freshly dissociated adult rat hepatocytes and myocardial cells as well as in pairs of superior cervical ganglion neurons from neonatal rats cultured under conditions in which electrotonic synapses form. The antibodies have been shown by indirect immunofluorescence to bind to punctate regions of the plasma membrane in liver. By immunoreplica analysis of rat liver homogenates, plasma membranes, and isolated gap junctions resolved on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels, binding was shown to be specific for the 27-kDa major polypeptide of gap junctions. This and similar antibodies should provide a tool for further investigation of the role of cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctions and indicate that immunologically similar polypeptides comprise gap junctions in adult mammalian cells derived from all three germ layers.

  9. Reduction of gap junctional conductance by microinjection of antibodies against the 27-kDa liver gap junction polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Hertzberg, E L; Spray, D C; Bennett, M V

    1985-01-01

    Antibody raised against isolated rat liver gap junctions was microinjected into coupled cells in culture to assess its influence on gap junctional conductance. A rapid inhibition of fluorescent dye transfer and electrical coupling was produced in pairs of freshly dissociated adult rat hepatocytes and myocardial cells as well as in pairs of superior cervical ganglion neurons from neonatal rats cultured under conditions in which electrotonic synapses form. The antibodies have been shown by indirect immunofluorescence to bind to punctate regions of the plasma membrane in liver. By immunoreplica analysis of rat liver homogenates, plasma membranes, and isolated gap junctions resolved on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels, binding was shown to be specific for the 27-kDa major polypeptide of gap junctions. This and similar antibodies should provide a tool for further investigation of the role of cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctions and indicate that immunologically similar polypeptides comprise gap junctions in adult mammalian cells derived from all three germ layers. Images PMID:2986116

  10. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    PubMed

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers. PMID:26869428

  11. Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) are differentially expressed in fibroblasts and co-localize with ZO-1 to adherens-like junctions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Junctional Adhesion Molecules (JAMs) are components and regulators of the well-characterized epithelial and endothelial tight junction. Since the molecular components of native fibroblast adherens-like junctions remain poorly described we determined JAM expression profiles in fibroblasts. We found J...

  12. Quaternary Evolution of Karliova Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sançar, Taylan; Zabcı, Cengiz; Akyüz, H. Serdar

    2013-04-01

    The arguments to explain Quaternary evolution of Karlıova Triple Junction (KTJ) depends upon two different analogue models. The compressional type of Prandtl Cell Model (PCM) and 60 km wide shear zone with concomitant counter clockwise block rotation used to modelled for west and east of the KTJ respectively. The data for the model of west of the KTJ acquired by extensive field studies, and quantified geomorphic features. Compressional PCM put forward that behavior of slip lines controlled by boundary faults. But the model is not enough to explain slip distribution, age relation of them. At west of the KTJ boundary faults presented by eastern most segments of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) and the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ). Slip lines, however, presented by Bahçeli and Toklular faults. Both field studies and morphometric analyses undisputedly set forth that there are two different fault types between the NAFZ and EAFZ. The most strain loaded fault type, which are positioned near the NAFZ, start as a strike-slip fault and when it turn to SE its sense of motion change to oblique normal due to changing orientation of principal stress axes. The new orientation of stress axes exposed in the field as a special kind of caprock -cuesta-. The younger slip lines formed very close to junction point and accommodate less slip. Even though slip trajectories started from the boundary faults in compressional PCM, at the west of KTJ, right lateral trajectories more clearly formed close the NAFZ and left lateral trajectories, relatively less strain loaded fault type, are poorly formed close the EAFZ . We think that, this differences between KTJ and compressional PCM result from the distinction of velocity of boundary faults. East of the KTJ governed by completely different mechanism. The region controlled two main fault systems. The Varto Fault Zone (VFZ), the eastern branch of the KTJ, and Murat Fault (MF) delimited the region from north and south respectively. The

  13. Elongated nanostructures for radial junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yinghuan; Vece, Marcel Di; Rath, Jatindra K; Dijk, Lourens van; Schropp, Ruud E I

    2013-10-01

    In solar cell technology, the current trend is to thin down the active absorber layer. The main advantage of a thinner absorber is primarily the reduced consumption of material and energy during production. For thin film silicon (Si) technology, thinning down the absorber layer is of particular interest since both the device throughput of vacuum deposition systems and the stability of the devices are significantly enhanced. These features lead to lower cost per installed watt peak for solar cells, provided that the (stabilized) efficiency is the same as for thicker devices. However, merely thinning down inevitably leads to a reduced light absorption. Therefore, advanced light trapping schemes are crucial to increase the light path length. The use of elongated nanostructures is a promising method for advanced light trapping. The enhanced optical performance originates from orthogonalization of the light's travel path with respect to the direction of carrier collection due to the radial junction, an improved anti-reflection effect thanks to the three-dimensional geometric configuration and the multiple scattering between individual nanostructures. These advantages potentially allow for high efficiency at a significantly reduced quantity and even at a reduced material quality, of the semiconductor material. In this article, several types of elongated nanostructures with the high potential to improve the device performance are reviewed. First, we briefly introduce the conventional solar cells with emphasis on thin film technology, following the most commonly used fabrication techniques for creating nanostructures with a high aspect ratio. Subsequently, several representative applications of elongated nanostructures, such as Si nanowires in realistic photovoltaic (PV) devices, are reviewed. Finally, the scientific challenges and an outlook for nanostructured PV devices are presented. PMID:24088584

  14. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support.

  15. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  16. Functional Properties of Dendritic Gap Junctions in Cerebellar Golgi Cells.

    PubMed

    Szoboszlay, Miklos; Lőrincz, Andrea; Lanore, Frederic; Vervaeke, Koen; Silver, R Angus; Nusser, Zoltan

    2016-06-01

    The strength and variability of electrical synaptic connections between GABAergic interneurons are key determinants of spike synchrony within neuronal networks. However, little is known about how electrical coupling strength is determined due to the inaccessibility of gap junctions on the dendritic tree. We investigated the properties of gap junctions in cerebellar interneurons by combining paired somato-somatic and somato-dendritic recordings, anatomical reconstructions, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and modeling. By fitting detailed compartmental models of Golgi cells to their somato-dendritic voltage responses, we determined their passive electrical properties and the mean gap junction conductance (0.9 nS). Connexin36 immunofluorescence and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling revealed a large variability in gap junction size and that only 18% of the 340 channels are open in each plaque. Our results establish that the number of gap junctions per connection is the main determinant of both the strength and variability in electrical coupling between Golgi cells. PMID:27133465

  17. Role of magnetic anisotropy in spin-filter junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chopdekar, R.V.; Wong, F.; Nelson-Cheeseman, B.B.; Liberati, M.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2011-01-10

    We have fabricated oxide-based spin-filter junctions in which we demonstrate that magnetic anisotropy can be used to tune the transport behavior of spin-filter junctions. We have demonstrated spin-filtering behavior in La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} junctions where the interface anisotropy plays a significant role in determining transport behavior. Detailed studies of chemical and magnetic structure at the interfaces indicate that abrupt changes in magnetic anisotropy across the nonisostructural interface is the cause of the significant suppression of junction magnetoresistance in junctions with MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} barrier layers.

  18. Proximity Effect at Graphene - High Tc Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Shih, En-Min; Arefe, Ghidewon; Kim, Youngduck; Edelberg, Drew; Andrade, Erick; Wang, Dennis; Hone, James; Dean, Cory; Pasupathy, Abhay; Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA Collaboration

    The proximity effect is a well-known mesoscopic phenomenon where Cooper pairs from a superconductor (S) enter into a normal metal (N) that is well coupled to it. Since graphene was discovered a decade ago, the proximity effect at superconductor-graphene junctions has been extensively studied and interesting phenomena such as specular Andreev reflection and ballistic transport at graphene Josephson junctions have been observed. However, superconductors used in these experiments to date are of conventional low Tc, such as aluminum(Tc=1.2K), NbSe2(Tc=7K), and MoRe(Tc=8K). Understanding how the proximity effect works between high-Tc superconductors (pnictides and cuprates) and the Dirac Fermions of graphene remains largely unexplored. The chief technical challenge here is to create high-quality junctions between high-Tc superconductors and graphene. In this work, we will introduce a home-made setup that allows us to exfoliate, transfer and encapsulate superconductor-graphene junctions in a well controlled inert atmosphere. Transport measurements of the proximity effect at graphene-iron pnictide(FeSe, FeTeSe) and graphene-cuprate(BSCCO) junctions will be described.

  19. Regulation of Endothelial Adherens Junctions by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells form a semipermeable, regulated barrier that limits the passage of fluid, small molecules, and leukocytes between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. The adherens junction, a major mechanism of intercellular adhesion, is comprised of transmembrane cadherins forming homotypic interactions between adjacent cells and associated cytoplasmic catenins linking the cadherins to the cytoskeleton. Inflammatory conditions promote the disassembly of the adherens junction and a loss of intercellular adhesion, creating openings or gaps in the endothelium through which small molecules diffuse and leukocytes transmigrate. Tyrosine kinase signaling has emerged as a central regulator of the inflammatory response, partly through direct phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the adherens junction components. This review discusses the findings that support and those that argue against a direct effect of cadherin and catenin phosphorylation in the disassembly of the adherens junction. Recent findings indicate a complex interaction between kinases, phosphatases, and the adherens junction components that allow a fine regulation of the endothelial permeability to small molecules, leukocyte migration, and barrier resealing. PMID:26556953

  20. Controllable 0-π Josephson junctions containing a ferromagnetic spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, E. C.; Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Glick, Joseph A.; Wang, Yixing; Miller, D. L.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2016-06-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are antagonistic forms of order, and rarely coexist. Many interesting new phenomena occur, however, in hybrid superconducting/ferromagnetic systems. For example, a Josephson junction containing a ferromagnetic material can exhibit an intrinsic phase shift of π in its ground state for certain thicknesses of the material. Such `π-junctions' were first realized experimentally in 2001 (refs ,), and have been proposed as circuit elements for both high-speed classical superconducting computing and for quantum computing. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the phase state of a Josephson junction containing two ferromagnetic layers can be toggled between 0 and π by changing the relative orientation of the two magnetizations. These controllable 0-π junctions have immediate applications in cryogenic memory, where they serve as a necessary component to an ultralow power superconducting computer. Such a fully superconducting computer is estimated to be orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than current semiconductor-based supercomputers. Phase-controllable junctions also open up new possibilities for superconducting circuit elements such as superconducting `programmable logic', where they could function in superconducting analogues to field-programmable gate arrays.