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Sample records for parasitic nematode heterodera

  1. The isolation and functional analysis of parasitism genes of the beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologs of parasitism genes that encode peptides secreted from the stylet of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines are being investigated in H. schachtii to use the tractable plant model, Arabidopsis thaliana, for studies of parasitism gene function. Full-length cDNA clones encoding produ...

  2. Effects of catechin polyphenols and preparations from the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines on protease activity and behavior in three nematode species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protease activities in preparations from the plant-parasitic nematodes Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita and the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus were inhibited by exposure to a series of 8 catechin polyphenol analogs, (+)-catechin, (-)- epicatechin (EC), (-)-gallocatechin (GC)...

  3. In vitro proteolysis of nematode FLPs by preparations from the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus and two plant-parasitic nematodes (Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteolytic activities in extracts from three nematodes, the plant parasites Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita, and the free-living Panagrellus redivivus, were surveyed for substrate preferences using a battery of seven FRET-modified peptide substrates, all derived from members of the la...

  4. First Report of Korean Cyst Nematode, Heterodera koreana, Parasitic on Bamboo, Phyllostachys nigra, from Iran.

    PubMed

    Maafi, Zahra Tanha; Taheri, Zahra Majd

    2015-09-01

    Bamboo is grown sporadically in the north of Iran and is confined to very limited areas. The history of growing bamboo was to some extent simultaneous with the entrance, commencement, and growth of the tea industry in the north about a century ago. The bamboo was used for making baskets to transfer the harvested tea foliage from farm to the factory and other linked functions. A main area allocated for bamboo growing is located in Lahidjan Agricultural Research Station (LARS) in the north of Iran, where several species of bamboo were cultivated in an area of 5 ha. The species include five species of Phyllostachys (viz., P. aurea, P. bambusoides, P. decora, P. nigra, P. vivax) and one species of Arundinaria gigantean, Pleioblastus fortune, and Semiarundinaria fastuosa; however, only P. aurea and P. nigra have been precisely identified. A survey on plant parasitic nematodes associated with bamboo mainly on P. nigra in LARS revealed second-stage juveniles of cyst forming nematode in soil samples. Further analysis of root and soil samples led to recovery of a cyst nematode belonging to the genus Heterodera and the Afenestrata group. Cysts, vulval cone, and second-stage juveniles were studied for morphological and morphometric features. The classical identification was followed by amplification of the ribosomal RNA-ITS region and the D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S large-subunit rRNA gene; the amplified fragments were sequenced, edited, and compared with those of the corresponding published gene sequences. New D2-D3 and rRNA-ITS gene sequences were deposited in the GenBank database under the accession numbers KR818910 and KR818911, respectively. Based on the morphological and molecular data, the species of the cyst-forming nematode was identified as H. koreana (Vovlas et al., 1992; Mundo-Ocampo et al., 2008). The body contour of cysts was mainly subspherical, vey often with irregular shape (Fig. 1A), yellowish to light brown, thin cuticle with fine zigzag pattern

  5. Similarity and functional analyses of expressed parasitism genes in Heterodera schachtii and Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The secreted proteins encoded by “parasitism genes” expressed within the esophageal glands cells of cyst nematodes play important roles in plant parasitism. Homologous transcripts and encoded proteins of the Heterodera glycines pioneer parasitism genes Hgsyv46, Hg4e02 and Hg5d08 were identified and ...

  6. Bacterial rRNA Genes Associated with Soil Suppressiveness against the Plant-Parasitic Nematode Heterodera schachtii

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bei; Valinsky, Lea; Gao, Xuebiao; Becker, J. Ole; Borneman, James

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify bacteria involved in soil suppressiveness against the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii. Since H. schachtii cysts isolated from the suppressive soil can transfer this beneficial property to nonsuppressive soils, analysis of the cyst-associated microorganisms should lead to the identification of the causal organisms. Our experimental approach was to identify bacterial rRNA genes (rDNA) associated with H. schachtii cysts obtained from soil mixtures with various levels of suppressiveness. We hypothesized that we would be able to identify bacteria involved in the suppressiveness by correlating population shifts with differing levels of suppressiveness. Soil treatments containing different amounts of suppressive and fumigation-induced nonsuppressive soils exhibited various levels of suppressiveness after two nematode generations. The 10%-suppressive-soil treatment contained numbers of eggs per gram of soil similar to those of the 100%-suppressive-soil treatment, indicating that the suppressive factor(s) had been transferred. Bacterial rDNA associated with H. schachtii cysts were identified using a culture-independent method termed oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes. Bacteria from five major taxonomic groups (Actinobacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides, α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, and γ-Proteobacteria) were identified. Three bacterial rDNA groups contained clones that were more prevalent in the highly suppressive soil treatments than in the less suppressive treatments, indicating a potential involvement in the H. schachtii suppressiveness. When these three groups were examined with specific PCR analyses performed on H. schachtii cysts that developed in soils treated with three biocidal compounds, only one bacterial rDNA group with moderate to high sequence identity to rDNA from several Rhizobium species and uncultured α-proteobacterial clones was consistently associated with the highly

  7. Regulation of Population Densities of Heterodera cajani and Other Plant-Parasitic Nematodes by Crop Rotations on Vertisols, in Semi-Arid Tropical Production Systems in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S B; Rego, T J; Mohiuddin, M; Rao, V N

    1996-06-01

    The significance of double crop (intercrop and sequential crop), single crop (rainy season crop fallow from June to September), and rotations on densities of Heterodera cajani, Helicotylenchus retusus, and Rotylenchulus reniformis was studied on Vertisol (Typic Pellusterts) between 1987 and 1993. Cowpea (Vigna sinensis), mungbean (Phaseolus aureus), and pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) greatly increased the population densities of H. cajani and suppressed the population densities of other plant-parasitic nematodes. Mean population densities of H. cajani were about 8 times lower in single crop systems than in double crop systems, with pigeonpea as a component intercrop. Plots planted to sorghum, safflower, and chickpea in the preceding year contained fewer H. cajani eggs and juveniles than did plots previously planted to pigeonpea, cowpea, or mungbean. Continuous cropping of sorghum in the rainy season and safflower in the post-rainy season markedly reduced the population density of H. cajani. Sorghum, safflower, and chickpea favored increased population densities of H. retusus. Adding cowpea to the system resulted in a significant increase in the densities of R. reniformis. Mean densities of total plant-parasitic nematodes were three times greater in double crop systems, with pigeonpea as a component intercrop than in single crop systems with rainy season fallow component. Cropping systems had a regulatory effect on the nematode populations and could be an effective nematode management tactic. Intercropping of sorghum with H. cajani tolerant pigeonpea could be effective in increasing the productivity of traditional production systems in H. cajani infested regions. PMID:19277141

  8. Regulation of Population Densities of Heterodera cajani and Other Plant-Parasitic Nematodes by Crop Rotations on Vertisols, in Semi-Arid Tropical Production Systems in India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. B.; Rego, T. J.; Mohiuddin, M.; Rao, V. N.

    1996-01-01

    The significance of double crop (intercrop and sequential crop), single crop (rainy season crop fallow from June to September), and rotations on densities of Heterodera cajani, Helicotylenchus retusus, and Rotylenchulus reniformis was studied on Vertisol (Typic Pellusterts) between 1987 and 1993. Cowpea (Vigna sinensis), mungbean (Phaseolus aureus), and pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) greatly increased the population densities of H. cajani and suppressed the population densities of other plant-parasitic nematodes. Mean population densities of H. cajani were about 8 times lower in single crop systems than in double crop systems, with pigeonpea as a component intercrop. Plots planted to sorghum, safflower, and chickpea in the preceding year contained fewer H. cajani eggs and juveniles than did plots previously planted to pigeonpea, cowpea, or mungbean. Continuous cropping of sorghum in the rainy season and safflower in the post-rainy season markedly reduced the population density of H. cajani. Sorghum, safflower, and chickpea favored increased population densities of H. retusus. Adding cowpea to the system resulted in a significant increase in the densities of R. reniformis. Mean densities of total plant-parasitic nematodes were three times greater in double crop systems, with pigeonpea as a component intercrop than in single crop systems with rainy season fallow component. Cropping systems had a regulatory effect on the nematode populations and could be an effective nematode management tactic. Intercropping of sorghum with H. cajani tolerant pigeonpea could be effective in increasing the productivity of traditional production systems in H. cajani infested regions. PMID:19277141

  9. RNA-Seq Based Identification of Candidate Parasitism Genes of Cereal Cyst Nematode (Heterodera avenae) during Incompatible Infection to Aegilops variabilis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minghui; Long, Hai; Zhao, Yun; Li, Lin; Xu, Delin; Zhang, Haili; Liu, Feng; Deng, Guangbing; Pan, Zhifen; Yu, Maoqun

    2015-01-01

    One of the reasons for the progressive yield decline observed in cereals production is the rapid build-up of populations of the cereal cyst nematode (CCN, Heterodera avenae). These nematodes secrete so-call effectors into their host plant to suppress the plant defense responses, alter plant signaling pathways and then induce the formation of syncytium after infection. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism and parasitism during incompatible infection. To gain insight into its repertoire of parasitism genes, we investigated the transcriptome of the early parasitic second-stage (30 hours, 3 days and 9 days post infection) juveniles of the CCN as well as the CCN infected tissue of the host Aegilops variabilis by Illumina sequencing. Among all assembled unigenes, 681 putative genes of parasitic nematode were found, in which 56 putative effectors were identified, including novel pioneer genes and genes corresponding to previously reported effectors. All the 681 CCN unigenes were mapped to 229 GO terms and 200 KEGG pathways, including growth, development and several stimulus-related signaling pathways. Sixteen clusters were involved in the CCN unigene expression atlas at the early stages during infection process, and three of which were significantly gene-enriched. Besides, the protein-protein interaction network analysis revealed 35 node unigenes which may play an important role in the plant-CCN interaction. Moreover, in a comparison of differentially expressed genes between the pre-parasitic juveniles and the early parasitic juveniles, we found that hydrolase activity was up-regulated in pre J2s whereas binding activity was upregulated in infective J2s. RT-qPCR analysis on some selected genes showed detectable expression, indicating possible secretion of the proteins and putative role in infection. This study provided better insights into the incompatible interaction between H. avenae and the host plant Ae. varabilis. Moreover, RNAi targets with

  10. RNA-Seq Based Identification of Candidate Parasitism Genes of Cereal Cyst Nematode (Heterodera avenae) during Incompatible Infection to Aegilops variabilis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Minghui; Long, Hai; Zhao, Yun; Li, Lin; Xu, Delin; Zhang, Haili; Liu, Feng; Deng, Guangbing; Pan, Zhifen; Yu, Maoqun

    2015-01-01

    One of the reasons for the progressive yield decline observed in cereals production is the rapid build-up of populations of the cereal cyst nematode (CCN, Heterodera avenae). These nematodes secrete so-call effectors into their host plant to suppress the plant defense responses, alter plant signaling pathways and then induce the formation of syncytium after infection. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism and parasitism during incompatible infection. To gain insight into its repertoire of parasitism genes, we investigated the transcriptome of the early parasitic second-stage (30 hours, 3 days and 9 days post infection) juveniles of the CCN as well as the CCN infected tissue of the host Aegilops variabilis by Illumina sequencing. Among all assembled unigenes, 681 putative genes of parasitic nematode were found, in which 56 putative effectors were identified, including novel pioneer genes and genes corresponding to previously reported effectors. All the 681 CCN unigenes were mapped to 229 GO terms and 200 KEGG pathways, including growth, development and several stimulus-related signaling pathways. Sixteen clusters were involved in the CCN unigene expression atlas at the early stages during infection process, and three of which were significantly gene-enriched. Besides, the protein-protein interaction network analysis revealed 35 node unigenes which may play an important role in the plant-CCN interaction. Moreover, in a comparison of differentially expressed genes between the pre-parasitic juveniles and the early parasitic juveniles, we found that hydrolase activity was up-regulated in pre J2s whereas binding activity was upregulated in infective J2s. RT-qPCR analysis on some selected genes showed detectable expression, indicating possible secretion of the proteins and putative role in infection. This study provided better insights into the incompatible interaction between H. avenae and the host plant Ae. varabilis. Moreover, RNAi targets with

  11. Plant resistance against the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii is mediated by MPK3 and MPK6 kinases, which are controlled by the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sidonskaya, Ekaterina; Schweighofer, Alois; Shubchynskyy, Volodymyr; Kammerhofer, Nina; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Meskiene, Irute

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes infect plants and form highly sophisticated feeding sites in roots. It is not known which plant cell signalling mechanisms trigger plant defence during the early stages of nematode parasitism. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are central components of protein phosphorylation cascades transducing extracellular signals to plant defence responses. MAPK phosphatases control kinase activities and the signalling outcome. The involvement and the role of MPK3 and MPK6, as well as the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1, is demonstrated during parasitism of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis. Our data reveal notable activation patterns of plant MAPKs and the induction of AP2C1 suggesting the attenuation of defence signalling in plant cells during early nematode infection. It is demonstrated that the ap2c1 mutant that is lacking AP2C1 is more attractive but less susceptible to nematodes compared with the AP2C1-overexpressing line. This implies that the function of AP2C1 is a negative regulator of nematode-induced defence. By contrast, the enhanced susceptibility of mpk3 and mpk6 plants indicates a positive role of stress-activated MAPKs in plant immunity against nematodes. Evidence is provided that phosphatase AP2C1, as well as AP2C1-targeted MPK3 and MPK6, are important regulators of plant–nematode interaction, where the co-ordinated action of these signalling components ensures the timely activation of plant defence. PMID:26438412

  12. Plant resistance against the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii is mediated by MPK3 and MPK6 kinases, which are controlled by the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sidonskaya, Ekaterina; Schweighofer, Alois; Shubchynskyy, Volodymyr; Kammerhofer, Nina; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Meskiene, Irute

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes infect plants and form highly sophisticated feeding sites in roots. It is not known which plant cell signalling mechanisms trigger plant defence during the early stages of nematode parasitism. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are central components of protein phosphorylation cascades transducing extracellular signals to plant defence responses. MAPK phosphatases control kinase activities and the signalling outcome. The involvement and the role of MPK3 and MPK6, as well as the MAPK phosphatase AP2C1, is demonstrated during parasitism of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis. Our data reveal notable activation patterns of plant MAPKs and the induction of AP2C1 suggesting the attenuation of defence signalling in plant cells during early nematode infection. It is demonstrated that the ap2c1 mutant that is lacking AP2C1 is more attractive but less susceptible to nematodes compared with the AP2C1-overexpressing line. This implies that the function of AP2C1 is a negative regulator of nematode-induced defence. By contrast, the enhanced susceptibility of mpk3 and mpk6 plants indicates a positive role of stress-activated MAPKs in plant immunity against nematodes. Evidence is provided that phosphatase AP2C1, as well as AP2C1-targeted MPK3 and MPK6, are important regulators of plant-nematode interaction, where the co-ordinated action of these signalling components ensures the timely activation of plant defence. PMID:26438412

  13. Syncytium gene expression in Glycine max [PI88788} roots undergoing a resistant reaction of the parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate Heterodera glycines feeding sites (syncytia) from the (G. max) genotype PI 88788. Syncytia at various stages of the resistant response were isolated from roots 3, 6 and 9 days post infection (dpi). At 3 dpi, the analyses revealed highly induced...

  14. Analysis and Characterization of Vitamin B Biosynthesis Pathways in the Phytoparasitic Nematode Heterodera Glycines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, James P.

    2009-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), "Heterodera glycines" is an obligate plant parasite that can cause devastating crop losses. To aide in the study of this pathogen, the SCN genome and the transcriptome of second stage juveniles and eggs were shotgun sequenced. A bioinformatic screen of the data revealed nine genes involved in the "de novo"…

  15. A SURVEY OF CYST NEMATODES (HETERODERA SPP.) IN NORTHERN EGYPT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the occurrence and distribution of cyst nematodes (Heterodera spp.) in Egypt is important to assess their potential to cause economic damage to crop plants. A nematode survey was conducted in Alexandria and El-Behera Governorates in northern Egypt to identify the species of cy...

  16. Analysis of a Horizontally Transferred Pathway Involved in Vitamin B6 Biosynthesis from the Soybean Cyst Nematode Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterodera glycines is an obligate plant parasite capable of biochemically and developmentally altering its host's cells in order to create a specialized feeding cell. Although the exact mechanism of feeding cell morphogenesis remains a mystery, the nematode's ability to manipulate the plant is thou...

  17. Oogenesis and Reproduction of the Birch Cyst Nematode, Heterodera betulae

    PubMed Central

    Triantaphyllou, A. C.

    1970-01-01

    Cytological study revealed that maturation of oocytes of Heterodera betulae is by regular meiosis and reproduction is by parthenogenesis. Restoration of the somatic chromosome number occurs after telophase II and before egg pronucleus formation, in the absence of a mitotic apparatus through a type of endomitotic division. The haploid chromosome number is 12 (2n = 24) in 95% of the female nematodes studied and 13 in the remaining 5%. The phylogenetic relationship of H. betulae with most other Heterodera species having n = 9 is not clear. PMID:19322330

  18. Enhanced resistance to soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines in transgenic soybean by silencing putative CLE receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoli; Chronis, Demosthenis; De La Torre, Carola M; Smeda, John; Wang, Xiaohong; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2015-08-01

    CLE peptides are small extracellular proteins important in regulating plant meristematic activity through the CLE-receptor kinase-WOX signalling module. Stem cell pools in the SAM (shoot apical meristem), RAM (root apical meristem) and vascular cambium are controlled by CLE signalling pathways. Interestingly, plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete CLE-like effector proteins, which act as ligand mimics of plant CLE peptides and are required for successful parasitism. Recently, we demonstrated that Arabidopsis CLE receptors CLAVATA1 (CLV1), the CLAVATA2 (CLV2)/CORYNE (CRN) heterodimer receptor complex and RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE 2 (RPK2), which transmit the CLV3 signal in the SAM, are required for perception of beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii CLEs. Reduction in nematode infection was observed in clv1, clv2, crn, rpk2 and combined double and triple mutants. In an effort to develop nematode resistance in an agriculturally important crop, orthologues of Arabidopsis receptors including CLV1, CLV2, CRN and RPK2 were identified from soybean, a host for the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines. For each of the receptors, there are at least two paralogues in the soybean genome. Localization studies showed that most receptors are expressed in the root, but vary in their level of expression and spatial expression patterns. Expression in nematode-induced feeding cells was also confirmed. In vitro direct binding of the soybean receptors with the HgCLE peptide was analysed. Knock-down of the receptors in soybean hairy roots showed enhanced resistance to SCN. Our findings suggest that targeted disruption of nematode CLE signalling may be a potential means to engineer nematode resistance in crop plants. PMID:25581705

  19. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing and Analysis of the Cereal Cyst Nematode, Heterodera avenae

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Roychowdhury, Tanmoy; Thakur, Prasoon Kumar; Banakar, Prakash; Shukla, Rohit N.; Jones, Michael G. K.; Rao, Uma

    2014-01-01

    The cereal cyst nematode (CCN, Heterodera avenae) is a major pest of wheat (Triticum spp) that reduces crop yields in many countries. Cyst nematodes are obligate sedentary endoparasites that reproduce by amphimixis. Here, we report the first transcriptome analysis of two stages of H. avenae. After sequencing extracted RNA from pre parasitic infective juvenile and adult stages of the life cycle, 131 million Illumina high quality paired end reads were obtained which generated 27,765 contigs with N50 of 1,028 base pairs, of which 10,452 were annotated. Comparative analyses were undertaken to evaluate H. avenae sequences with those of other plant, animal and free living nematodes to identify differences in expressed genes. There were 4,431 transcripts common to H. avenae and the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and 9,462 in common with more closely related potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida. Annotation of H. avenae carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy) revealed fewer glycoside hydrolases (GHs) but more glycosyl transferases (GTs) and carbohydrate esterases (CEs) when compared to M. incognita. 1,280 transcripts were found to have secretory signature, presence of signal peptide and absence of transmembrane. In a comparison of genes expressed in the pre-parasitic juvenile and feeding female stages, expression levels of 30 genes with high RPKM (reads per base per kilo million) value, were analysed by qRT-PCR which confirmed the observed differences in their levels of expression levels. In addition, we have also developed a user-friendly resource, Heterodera transcriptome database (HATdb) for public access of the data generated in this study. The new data provided on the transcriptome of H. avenae adds to the genetic resources available to study plant parasitic nematodes and provides an opportunity to seek new effectors that are specifically involved in the H. avenae-cereal host interaction. PMID:24802510

  20. De novo transcriptome sequencing and analysis of the cereal cyst nematode, Heterodera avenae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Roychowdhury, Tanmoy; Thakur, Prasoon Kumar; Banakar, Prakash; Shukla, Rohit N; Jones, Michael G K; Rao, Uma

    2014-01-01

    The cereal cyst nematode (CCN, Heterodera avenae) is a major pest of wheat (Triticum spp) that reduces crop yields in many countries. Cyst nematodes are obligate sedentary endoparasites that reproduce by amphimixis. Here, we report the first transcriptome analysis of two stages of H. avenae. After sequencing extracted RNA from pre parasitic infective juvenile and adult stages of the life cycle, 131 million Illumina high quality paired end reads were obtained which generated 27,765 contigs with N50 of 1,028 base pairs, of which 10,452 were annotated. Comparative analyses were undertaken to evaluate H. avenae sequences with those of other plant, animal and free living nematodes to identify differences in expressed genes. There were 4,431 transcripts common to H. avenae and the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and 9,462 in common with more closely related potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida. Annotation of H. avenae carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy) revealed fewer glycoside hydrolases (GHs) but more glycosyl transferases (GTs) and carbohydrate esterases (CEs) when compared to M. incognita. 1,280 transcripts were found to have secretory signature, presence of signal peptide and absence of transmembrane. In a comparison of genes expressed in the pre-parasitic juvenile and feeding female stages, expression levels of 30 genes with high RPKM (reads per base per kilo million) value, were analysed by qRT-PCR which confirmed the observed differences in their levels of expression levels. In addition, we have also developed a user-friendly resource, Heterodera transcriptome database (HATdb) for public access of the data generated in this study. The new data provided on the transcriptome of H. avenae adds to the genetic resources available to study plant parasitic nematodes and provides an opportunity to seek new effectors that are specifically involved in the H. avenae-cereal host interaction. PMID:24802510

  1. Characterization of three novel fatty acid- and retinoid-binding protein genes (Ha-far-1, Ha-far-2 and Hf-far-1) from the cereal cyst nematodes Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi are major parasites of wheat, reducing production worldwide. Both are sedentary endoparasitic nematodes, and their development and parasitism depend strongly on nutrients obtained from hosts. Secreted fatty acid- and retinoid-binding (FAR) proteins are nematode-spe...

  2. The mitochondrial genome of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Tracey; Farrugia, Daniel; Barrett, Jeff; Chitwood, David J; Rowe, Janet; Subbotin, Sergei; Dowton, Mark

    2011-07-01

    We sequenced the entire coding region of the mitochondrial genome of Heterodera glycines. The sequence obtained comprised 14.9 kb, with PCR evidence indicating that the entire genome comprised a single, circular molecule of approximately 21-22 kb. The genome is the most T-rich nematode mitochondrial genome reported to date, with T representing over half of all nucleotides on the coding strand. The genome also contains the highest number of poly(T) tracts so far reported (to our knowledge), with 60 poly(T) tracts ≥ 12 Ts. All genes are transcribed from the same mitochondrial strand. The organization of the mitochondrial genome of H. glycines shows a number of similarities compared with Radopholus similis, but fewer similarities when compared with Meloidogyne javanica. Very few gene boundaries are shared with Globodera pallida or Globodera rostochiensis. Partial mitochondrial genome sequences were also obtained for Heterodera cardiolata (5.3 kb) and Punctodera chalcoensis (6.8 kb), and these had identical organizations compared with H. glycines. We found PCR evidence of a minicircular mitochondrial genome in P. chalcoensis, but at low levels and lacking a noncoding region. Such circularised genome fragments may be present at low levels in a range of nematodes, with multipartite mitochondrial genomes representing a shift to a condition in which these subgenomic circles predominate. PMID:21745140

  3. Molecular and morphological characterization of the corn cyst nematode, Heterodera zeae, from Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The corn cyst nematode Heterodera zeae was first detected in India, where it has wide distribution. This nematode has also been reported from Pakistan, Egypt, Thailand, Nepal, the United States, and Portugal. There is limited information regarding nematodes attacking cereals in Greece, and thus far ...

  4. A gene expression analysis of syncytia isolated from the roots of the Glycine max (soybean) genotype PI 548402 (Peking) undergoing a resistant reaction after infection by Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The syncytium, a feeding cell formed by the plant parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines, is either maintained by the interaction between the nematode and the plant cell during the course of its life cycle or experiences degradation as a consequence of a disturbance between that interaction. The loc...

  5. An ANNEXIN-like protein from the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera avenae suppresses plant defense.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changlong; Liu, Shusen; Liu, Qian; Niu, Junhai; Liu, Pei; Zhao, Jianlong; Jian, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism genes encoding secreted effector proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes play important roles in facilitating parasitism. An annexin-like gene was isolated from the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera avenae (termed Ha-annexin) and had high similarity to annexin 2, which encodes a secreted protein of Globodera pallida. Ha-annexin encodes a predicted 326 amino acid protein containing four conserved annexin domains. Southern blotting revealed that there are at least two homologies in the H. avenae genome. Ha-annexin transcripts were expressed within the subventral gland cells of the pre-parasitic second-stage juveniles by in situ hybridization. Additionally, expression of these transcripts were relatively higher in the parasitic second-stage juveniles by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis, coinciding with the time when feeding cell formation is initiated. Knockdown of Ha-annexin by method of barley stripe mosaic virus-based host-induced gene silencing (BSMV-HIGS) caused impaired nematode infections at 7 dpi and reduced females at 40 dpi, indicating important roles of the gene in parasitism at least in early stage in vivo. Transiently expression of Ha-ANNEXIN in onion epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells showed the whole cell-localization. Using transient expression assays in N. benthamiana, we found that Ha-ANNEXIN could suppress programmed cell death triggered by the pro-apoptotic mouse protein BAX and the induction of marker genes of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) in N. benthamiana. In addition, Ha-ANNEXIN targeted a point in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway downstream of two kinases MKK1 and NPK1 in N. benthamiana. PMID:25849616

  6. An ANNEXIN-Like Protein from the Cereal Cyst Nematode Heterodera avenae Suppresses Plant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changlong; Liu, Shusen; Liu, Qian; Niu, Junhai; Liu, Pei; Zhao, Jianlong; Jian, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism genes encoding secreted effector proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes play important roles in facilitating parasitism. An annexin-like gene was isolated from the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera avenae (termed Ha-annexin) and had high similarity to annexin 2, which encodes a secreted protein of Globodera pallida. Ha-annexin encodes a predicted 326 amino acid protein containing four conserved annexin domains. Southern blotting revealed that there are at least two homologies in the H. avenae genome. Ha-annexin transcripts were expressed within the subventral gland cells of the pre-parasitic second-stage juveniles by in situ hybridization. Additionally, expression of these transcripts were relatively higher in the parasitic second-stage juveniles by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis, coinciding with the time when feeding cell formation is initiated. Knockdown of Ha-annexin by method of barley stripe mosaic virus-based host-induced gene silencing (BSMV-HIGS) caused impaired nematode infections at 7 dpi and reduced females at 40 dpi, indicating important roles of the gene in parasitism at least in early stage in vivo. Transiently expression of Ha-ANNEXIN in onion epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells showed the whole cell-localization. Using transient expression assays in N. benthamiana, we found that Ha-ANNEXIN could suppress programmed cell death triggered by the pro-apoptotic mouse protein BAX and the induction of marker genes of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) in N. benthamiana. In addition, Ha-ANNEXIN targeted a point in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway downstream of two kinases MKK1 and NPK1 in N. benthamiana. PMID:25849616

  7. Assessment of Parasitic Activity of Fusarium Strains Obtained from a Heterodera schachtii-Suppressive Soil

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xuebiao; Yin, Bei; Borneman, James; Becker, J. Ole

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the potential impact of various Fusarium strains on the population development of sugarbeet cyst nematodes. Fungi were isolated from cysts or eggs of Heterodera schachtii Schmidt that were obtained from a field suppressive to that nematode. Twenty-six strains of Fusarium spp. were subjected to a phylogenic analysis of their rRNA-ITS nucleotide sequences. Seven genetically distinct Fusarium strains were evaluated for their ability to influence population development of H. schachtii and crop performance in greenhouse trials. Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris) seedlings were transplanted into fumigated field soil amended with a single fungal strain at 1,000 propagules/g soil. One week later, the soil was infested with 250 H. schachtii J2/100 cm3 soil. Parasitized eggs were present in all seven Fusarium treatments at 1,180 degree-days after fungal infestation. The percentage of parasitism ranged from 17 to 34%. Although the most efficacious F. oxysporum strain 471 produced as many parasitized eggs as occurred in the original suppressive soil, none of the Fusarium strains reduced the population density of H. schachtii compared to the conducive check. This supports prior results that Fusarium spp. were not the primary cause of the population suppression of sugarbeet cyst nematodes at this location. PMID:19259511

  8. Role of stress-related hormones in plant defence during early infection of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Radakovic, Zoran; Regis, Jully M A; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Grundler, Florian M W; Siddique, Shahid; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Heterodera schachtii, a plant-parasitic cyst nematode, invades host roots and induces a specific syncytial feeding structure, from which it withdraws all required nutrients, causing severe yield losses. The system H. schachtii–Arabidopsis is an excellent research model for investigating plant defence mechanisms. Such responses are suppressed in well-established syncytia, whereas they are induced during early parasitism. However, the mechanisms by which the defence responses are modulated and the role of phytohormones are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of hormone-based defence responses at the onset of nematode infection. First, concentrations of main phytohormones were quantified and the expression of several hormone-related genes was analysed using quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR or GeneChip. Further, the effects of individual hormones were evaluated via nematode attraction and infection assays using plants with altered endogenous hormone concentrations. Our results suggest a pivotal and positive role for ethylene during nematode attraction, whereas jasmonic acid triggers early defence responses against H. schachtii. Salicylic acid seems to be a negative regulator during later syncytium and female development. We conclude that nematodes are able to impose specific changes in hormone pools, thus modulating hormone-based defence and signal transduction in strict dependence on their parasitism stage. PMID:25825039

  9. Differential behavioral responses of two plant-parasitic nematodes to biogenic amines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hatching and infective juvenile (J2) behavior in two species of plant-parasitic nematodes, Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita, were affected by in vitro treatment with the biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. While the overall responses of each species to amine exposures w...

  10. Functional analysis of nematode secreted CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE)-like peptides of the genus Heterodera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyst nematodes of the genus Heterodera are obligate, sedentary endoparasites that have developed highly evolved relationships with specific host plant species. We have identified two H. glycines CLAVATA3/ESR(CLE)-like genes, HgCLEA and HgCLEB, that encode secreted peptides with similarity to plant ...

  11. Life cycle and control of the cyst nematode Heterodera goldeni on rice in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The life cycle and methods for control of the cyst nematode Heterodera goldeni on rice (Oryza sativa) were examined in the greenhouse. Three tests were conducted to study the effects of soil treatments with some plant materials, stems of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus), the biocontrol agent Ba...

  12. First report of the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera filipjevi on winter wheat in Montana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among the cereal cyst nematode complex, three species-Heterodera avenae, H. filipjevi and H. latipons-are the most destructive for wheat. Although H. avenae occurs in several U.S. states, H. filipjevi was discovered in the United States in Oregon in 2008 and has since been reported only in Washingto...

  13. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF ARGININE KINASES IN THE SOYBEAN CYST NEMATODE (HETERODERA GLYCINES).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine kinase (AK) is a phosphagen kinase that plays a key role in energy mobilization in invertebrates. Alignment of ESTs in the public database for soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines) produced two separate contiguous sequences (contigs) and three singletons encoding peptides with h...

  14. Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, John T; Haegeman, Annelies; Danchin, Etienne G J; Gaur, Hari S; Helder, Johannes; Jones, Michael G K; Kikuchi, Taisei; Manzanilla-López, Rosa; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Wesemael, Wim M L; Perry, Roland N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review was to undertake a survey of researchers working with plant-parasitic nematodes in order to determine a 'top 10' list of these pathogens based on scientific and economic importance. Any such list will not be definitive as economic importance will vary depending on the region of the world in which a researcher is based. However, care was taken to include researchers from as many parts of the world as possible when carrying out the survey. The top 10 list emerging from the survey is composed of: (1) root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.); (2) cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.); (3) root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.); (4) the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis; (5) Ditylenchus dipsaci; (6) the pine wilt nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; (7) the reniform nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis; (8) Xiphinema index (the only virus vector nematode to make the list); (9) Nacobbus aberrans; and (10) Aphelenchoides besseyi. The biology of each nematode (or nematode group) is reviewed briefly. PMID:23809086

  15. Functional response of the fungus Hirsutella rhossiliensis to the nematode, Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chi; Lai, YiLing; Yang, EnCe; Chen, SenYu; Xiang, MeiChun; Liu, XingZhong

    2015-07-01

    Functional response is a key index in determining the population fluctuation in predation. However, the lack of operable research system limits the studies on functional response of fungal predators. Hirsutella rhossiliensis is a dominant parasite of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. In a soil microcosm bioassay, we determined fungal biomass at different days within 21 days after inoculation, and parasitism rate of H. glycines by the fungus was determined. The functional response of H. rhossiliensis to H. glycines was established and found to be Holling's type III, which was influenced by mycelial densities. Meanwhile, we conducted anti-fungal analysis of metabolic fractions extracted from H. rhossiliensis to explain the potential mechanism of the intraspecific competition illustrated by functional response. The result of anti-fungal experiments indicated that the fungal predators had more complicated interaction at population level than expected, which might be regulated by self-inhibition metabolite(s). This study was the first functional response study of fungal predators in microcosm. With the increasing recognition of emerging fungal threats to animal, plant, and ecosystem health, the methodologies and hypotheses proposed in this study might inspire further research in fungal ecology. PMID:26032589

  16. The Geological Record of Parasitic Nematode Evolution.

    PubMed

    Poinar, George O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the evolutionary history of nematode parasites of invertebrates, vertebrates and plants based on fossil remains in amber, stone and coprolites dating from the Palaeozoic to the Holocene. The earliest parasitic nematode is a primitive plant parasite from the Devonian. Fossil invertebrate-parasitic nematodes first appeared in the Early Cretaceous, while the earliest fossil vertebrate-parasitic nematodes are from Upper Triassic coprolites. Specific examples of fossil nematode parasites over time are presented, along with views on the origin and evolution of nematodes and their hosts. PMID:26597065

  17. Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Maine Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Huettel, W N.; Francl, L. J.; Henn, A.; Bourgoin, T.

    1990-01-01

    In a survey of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with agricultural crops in nine Maine counties, 744 soil samples from 26 potential host plants were analyzed between November 1987 and January 1989. The most commonly encountered nematode genus was Pratylenchus, occurring in 85% of the samples from most crops, except blueberries and onions. Pratylenchus penetrans and P. crenatus were found commonly as species mixtures, with P. penetrans composing 40-80% of the mixture. Meloidogyne hapla was encountered in 16% of the samples in four counties, generally in potato rotations. Other nematodes encountered were Aphelenchoides spp., Criconemella curvature, Ditylenchus spp., Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus, H. digonicus, Heterodera trifolii, Paratylenchus projectus, Trichodorus spp., Tylenchorhynchus maximus, and Xiphinema americanum. Potato fields were the most heavily sampled and thus weighted the statewide results. PMID:19287791

  18. Interactions of microfungi and plant parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant parasitic nematodes and microfungi inhabit many of the same ecological habitats and interact in almost every conceivable way. Nematodes can feed on fungi, and conversely fungi can use nematodes as a food source. Fungi have been widely studied as biological controls of plant parasitic nematod...

  19. Sequence mining and transcript profiling to explore cyst nematode parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Elling, Axel A; Mitreva, Makedonka; Gai, Xiaowu; Martin, John; Recknor, Justin; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Nettleton, Dan; McCarter, James P; Baum, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    Background Cyst nematodes are devastating plant parasites that become sedentary within plant roots and induce the transformation of normal plant cells into elaborate feeding cells with the help of secreted effectors, the parasitism proteins. These proteins are the translation products of parasitism genes and are secreted molecular tools that allow cyst nematodes to infect plants. Results We present here the expression patterns of all previously described parasitism genes of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, in all major life stages except the adult male. These insights were gained by analyzing our gene expression dataset from experiments using the Affymetrix Soybean Genome Array GeneChip, which contains probeset sequences for 6,860 genes derived from preparasitic and parasitic H. glycines life stages. Targeting the identification of additional H. glycines parasitism-associated genes, we isolated 633 genes encoding secretory proteins using algorithms to predict secretory signal peptides. Furthermore, because some of the known H. glycines parasitism proteins have strongest similarity to proteins of plants and microbes, we searched for predicted protein sequences that showed their highest similarities to plant or microbial proteins and identified 156 H. glycines genes, some of which also contained a signal peptide. Analyses of the expression profiles of these genes allowed the formulation of hypotheses about potential roles in parasitism. This is the first study combining sequence analyses of a substantial EST dataset with microarray expression data of all major life stages (except adult males) for the identification and characterization of putative parasitism-associated proteins in any parasitic nematode. Conclusion We have established an expression atlas for all known H. glycines parasitism genes. Furthermore, in an effort to identify additional H. glycines genes with putative functions in parasitism, we have reduced the currently known 6,860 H

  20. Novel Pectate Lyase Genes of Heterodera glycines Play Key Roles in the Early Stage of Parasitism.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huan; Cui, Jiangkuan; Long, Haibo; Huang, Wenkun; Kong, Lingan; Liu, Shiming; He, Wenting; Hu, Xianqi; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Pectate lyases are known to play a key role in pectin degradation by catalyzing the random cleavage of internal polymer linkages (endo-pectinases). In this paper, four novel cDNAs, designated Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7, that encode pectate lyases were cloned and characterized from the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The predicted protein sequences of HG-PEL-3, HG-PEL-4 and HG-PEL-6 differed significantly in both their amino acid sequences and their genomic structures from other pectate lyases of H. glycines (HG-PEL-1, HG-PEL-2 and HG-PEL-7). A phylogenetic study revealed that the pectate lyase proteins of H. glycines are clustered into distinct clades and have distinct numbers and positioning of introns, which suggests that the pectate lyase genes of H. glycines may have evolved from at least two ancestral genes. A Southern blot analysis revealed that multiple Hg-pel-6-like genes were present in the H. glycines genome. In situ hybridization showed that four novel pectate lyases (Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7) were actively transcribed in the subventral esophageal gland cells. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay supported the finding that the expression of these genes was strong in the egg, pre-parasitic second-stage juvenile (J2) and early parasitic J2 stages and that it declined in further developmental stages of the nematode. This expression pattern suggests that these proteins play a role in the migratory phase of the nematode life cycle. Knocking down Hg-pel-6 using in vitro RNA interference resulted in a 46.9% reduction of the number of nematodes that invaded the plants and a 61.5% suppression of the development of H. glycines females within roots compared to the GFP-dsRNA control. Plant host-derived RNAi induced the silencing of the Hg-pel-6gene, which significantly reduced the nematode infection levels at 7 Days post inoculation (dpi). Similarly, this procedure reduced the number of female adults at 40 dpi, which suggests

  1. Novel Pectate Lyase Genes of Heterodera glycines Play Key Roles in the Early Stage of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huan; Cui, Jiangkuan; Long, Haibo; Huang, Wenkun; Kong, Lingan; Liu, Shiming; He, Wenting; Hu, Xianqi; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Pectate lyases are known to play a key role in pectin degradation by catalyzing the random cleavage of internal polymer linkages (endo-pectinases). In this paper, four novel cDNAs, designated Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7, that encode pectate lyases were cloned and characterized from the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The predicted protein sequences of HG-PEL-3, HG-PEL-4 and HG-PEL-6 differed significantly in both their amino acid sequences and their genomic structures from other pectate lyases of H. glycines (HG-PEL-1, HG-PEL-2 and HG-PEL-7). A phylogenetic study revealed that the pectate lyase proteins of H. glycines are clustered into distinct clades and have distinct numbers and positioning of introns, which suggests that the pectate lyase genes of H. glycines may have evolved from at least two ancestral genes. A Southern blot analysis revealed that multiple Hg-pel-6-like genes were present in the H. glycines genome. In situ hybridization showed that four novel pectate lyases (Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7) were actively transcribed in the subventral esophageal gland cells. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay supported the finding that the expression of these genes was strong in the egg, pre-parasitic second-stage juvenile (J2) and early parasitic J2 stages and that it declined in further developmental stages of the nematode. This expression pattern suggests that these proteins play a role in the migratory phase of the nematode life cycle. Knocking down Hg-pel-6 using in vitro RNA interference resulted in a 46.9% reduction of the number of nematodes that invaded the plants and a 61.5% suppression of the development of H. glycines females within roots compared to the GFP-dsRNA control. Plant host-derived RNAi induced the silencing of the Hg-pel-6gene, which significantly reduced the nematode infection levels at 7 Days post inoculation (dpi). Similarly, this procedure reduced the number of female adults at 40 dpi, which suggests

  2. Isolation and characterization of a fatty acid- and retinoid-binding protein from the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera avenae.

    PubMed

    Le, Xiuhu; Wang, Xuan; Guan, Tinglong; Ju, Yuliang; Li, Hongmei

    2016-08-01

    A gene encoding fatty acid- and retinoid-binding protein was isolated from the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera avenae and the biochemical function of the protein that it encodes was analysed. The full-length cDNA of the Ha-far-1 gene is 827 bp long and includes a 22- nucleotide trans-spliced leader sequence (SL1) at its 5-end. The genomic clone of Ha-far-1 consists of eight exons separated by seven introns, which range in size from 48 to 186 bp. The Ha-far-1 cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a 191 amino acid protein, with a predicted secretory signal peptide. Sequence analysis showed that Ha-FAR-1 has highest similarity to the Gp-FAR-1 protein from the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida and that the protein was grouped with all homologues from other plant-parasitic nematodes in a phylogenetic analysis. Fluorescence-based ligand binding analysis confirmed that the recombinant Ha-FAR-1 protein was able to bind fatty acids and retinol. Spatial and temporal expression assays showed that the transcripts of Ha-far-1 accumulated mainly in the hypodermis and that the gene is most highly expressed in third-stage juveniles of H. avenae. Fluorescence immunolocalization showed that the Ha-FAR-1 protein was present on the surface of the infective second-stage juveniles of H. avenae. Nematodes treated with dsRNA corresponding to Ha-far-1 showed significantly reduced reproduction compared to nematodes exposed to dsRNA from a non-endogenous gene, suggesting that Ha-far-1 may be an effective target gene for control of H. avenae using an RNAi strategy. PMID:27240755

  3. Ecology and Control of Cereal Cyst Nematode (Heterodera avenae) in Southern Australia.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H

    1984-07-01

    The ecology and control of cereal cyst nematode in southern Australia is reviewed. The wide distribution of Heterodera avenae in Victoria and South Australia is due largely to movement of cysts by wind during dust storms. The fungus Rhizoctonia solani frequently is associated with the nematode in a disease complex in wheat, and disease symptoms are most severe on lighter or well structured soils. Crop rotations which include periods of fallow, or of nonhost crop reduce population levels of H. avenae and improve yields. Early-sown crops (April-May) are less severely damaged than late-sown crops (June-July). The resowing of damaged wheat crops or the application of nitrogenous fertilizers rarely improve grain yields. 'Katyil,' the world's first wheat cultivar bred specifically with resistance to H. avenae, has been released in Victoria. Chemical control of the nematode in cereals is now commercially feasible, and five nematicides are registered for use by growers. PMID:19294014

  4. Nematodes, bacteria, and flies: a tripartite model for nematode parasitism.

    PubMed

    Hallem, Elissa A; Rengarajan, Michelle; Ciche, Todd A; Sternberg, Paul W

    2007-05-15

    More than a quarter of the world's population is infected with nematode parasites, and more than a hundred species of nematodes are parasites of humans [1-3]. Despite extensive morbidity and mortality caused by nematode parasites, the biological mechanisms of host-parasite interactions are poorly understood, largely because of the lack of genetically tractable model systems. We have demonstrated that the insect parasitic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, its bacterial symbiont Photorhabdus luminescens, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster constitute a tripartite model for nematode parasitism and parasitic infection. We find that infective juveniles (IJs) of Heterorhabditis, which contain Photorhabdus in their gut, can infect and kill Drosophila larvae. We show that infection activates an immune response in Drosophila that results in the temporally dynamic expression of a subset of antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes, and that this immune response is induced specifically by Photorhabdus. We also investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying IJ recovery, the developmental process that occurs in parasitic nematodes upon host invasion and that is necessary for successful parasitism. We find that the chemosensory neurons and signaling pathways that control dauer recovery in Caenorhabditis elegans also control IJ recovery in Heterorhabditis, suggesting conservation of these developmental processes across free-living and parasitic nematodes. PMID:17475494

  5. Heterodera betulae n. sp. (Heteroderidae), a Cyst-forming Nematode from River Birch

    PubMed Central

    Hirschmann, H.; Riggs, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    A new species of the genus Heterodera A. Schmidt, 1871 parasitic on river birch, Betula nigra L., is described and illustrated. Females and cysts are lemon-shaped to almost spherical with slight vulval protrusion. Female cuticles have a thick subcrystalline layer. The average cyst size is 763 by 616 [mu]. They are circumfenestrate with small anal opening and lack a yellow phase. The cyst wall pattern is typically network-like. All eggs are retained in the cyst, although a well-developed matrix is formed. The egg shell is without markings. The second-stage larvae average 462 [mu] in length and have 3 incisures in the lateral field. The tail terminal is shorter than the stylet. Males are rare. They have 4 incisures in the lateral field and bifid spicules. The relationship of H. betulae n. sp. to other Heterodera species is obscure. PMID:19325672

  6. Exploring the Host Parasitism of the Migratory Plant-Parasitic Nematode Ditylenchus destuctor by Expressed Sequence Tags Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huan; Gao, Bing-li; Kong, Ling-an; Yu, Qing; Huang, Wen-kun; He, Xu-feng; Long, Hai-bo; Peng, De-liang

    2013-01-01

    The potato rot nematode, Ditylenchus destructor, is a very destructive nematode pest on many agriculturally important crops worldwide, but the molecular characterization of its parasitism of plant has been limited. The effectors involved in nematode parasitism of plant for several sedentary endo-parasitic nematodes such as Heterodera glycines, Globodera rostochiensis and Meloidogyne incognita have been identified and extensively studied over the past two decades. Ditylenchus destructor, as a migratory plant parasitic nematode, has different feeding behavior, life cycle and host response. Comparing the transcriptome and parasitome among different types of plant-parasitic nematodes is the way to understand more fully the parasitic mechanism of plant nematodes. We undertook the approach of sequencing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a mixed stage cDNA library of D. destructor. This is the first study of D. destructor ESTs. A total of 9800 ESTs were grouped into 5008 clusters including 3606 singletons and 1402 multi-member contigs, representing a catalog of D. destructor genes. Implementing a bioinformatics' workflow, we found 1391 clusters have no match in the available gene database; 31 clusters only have similarities to genes identified from D. africanus, the most closely related species to D. destructor; 1991 clusters were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO); 1550 clusters were assigned enzyme commission (EC) numbers; and 1211 clusters were mapped to 181 KEGG biochemical pathways. 22 ESTs had similarities to reported nematode effectors. Interestedly, most of the effectors identified in this study are involved in host cell wall degradation or modification, such as 1,4-beta-glucanse, 1,3-beta-glucanse, pectate lyase, chitinases and expansin, or host defense suppression such as calreticulin, annexin and venom allergen-like protein. This result implies that the migratory plant-parasitic nematode D. destructor secrets similar effectors to those of sedentary

  7. Exploring the host parasitism of the migratory plant-parasitic nematode Ditylenchus destuctor by expressed sequence tags analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huan; Gao, Bing-li; Kong, Ling-an; Yu, Qing; Huang, Wen-kun; He, Xu-feng; Long, Hai-bo; Peng, De-liang

    2013-01-01

    The potato rot nematode, Ditylenchus destructor, is a very destructive nematode pest on many agriculturally important crops worldwide, but the molecular characterization of its parasitism of plant has been limited. The effectors involved in nematode parasitism of plant for several sedentary endo-parasitic nematodes such as Heterodera glycines, Globodera rostochiensis and Meloidogyne incognita have been identified and extensively studied over the past two decades. Ditylenchus destructor, as a migratory plant parasitic nematode, has different feeding behavior, life cycle and host response. Comparing the transcriptome and parasitome among different types of plant-parasitic nematodes is the way to understand more fully the parasitic mechanism of plant nematodes. We undertook the approach of sequencing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a mixed stage cDNA library of D. destructor. This is the first study of D. destructor ESTs. A total of 9800 ESTs were grouped into 5008 clusters including 3606 singletons and 1402 multi-member contigs, representing a catalog of D. destructor genes. Implementing a bioinformatics' workflow, we found 1391 clusters have no match in the available gene database; 31 clusters only have similarities to genes identified from D. africanus, the most closely related species to D. destructor; 1991 clusters were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO); 1550 clusters were assigned enzyme commission (EC) numbers; and 1211 clusters were mapped to 181 KEGG biochemical pathways. 22 ESTs had similarities to reported nematode effectors. Interestedly, most of the effectors identified in this study are involved in host cell wall degradation or modification, such as 1,4-beta-glucanse, 1,3-beta-glucanse, pectate lyase, chitinases and expansin, or host defense suppression such as calreticulin, annexin and venom allergen-like protein. This result implies that the migratory plant-parasitic nematode D. destructor secrets similar effectors to those of sedentary

  8. Soybean GeneChip hybridizations to RNA isolated from root pieces colonized by soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roots of susceptible 14 day-old soybean plants (cv. Williams) were inoculated with J2 soybean cyst nematodes, Heterodera glycines. After 8, 12 and 16 dpi the roots were placed under a stereomicroscope and root pieces (1 to 5 mm) that displayed 1 to many swollen SCN females were dissected out, l...

  9. Morphological and molecular observations on the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera filipjevi from the Volga and South Ural regions of Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2010-2012, a survey was conducted to determine the distribution and species diversity of the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera filipjevi within the Volga and South Ural regions of the Russian Federation. A total of 270 soil samples were collected. Seven populations of CCN were found in the rhiz...

  10. Evaluation of protein extraction methods suitable for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN) is the most destructive pathogen of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) worldwide. In this study, three different protein extraction methods including phenol/ammonium acetate (phenol method), thiourea/urea solublization (lysis method) and trichloroaceti...

  11. Effects of soil solarization on nematodes parasitic to chickpea and pigeonpea.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S B; Nene, Y L

    1990-10-01

    Solarization by covering the soil with transparent polyethylene sheets during the summer months (April, May, June) in 1984 and 1985 significantly (P = 0.01) reduced the population densities of nematodes (Heterodera cajani, Rotylenchulus reniformis, Helicotylenchus retusus, Pratylenchus sp., and Tylenchorhynchus sp.) parasitic to chickpea and pigeonpea. Population density reductions of 93% of Heterodera cajani eggs and juveniles, 99% ofHelicotylenchus retusus, 98% of Pratylenchus sp., and 100% of R. reniformis were achieved by solarization in 1984. Irrigation before covering soil with polyethylene improved (P = 0.01) the effects of solarization in reducing the population densities of Heterodera cajani. Similar trends in population density reductions were observed in 1985, but the solarization effects were not the same. Nematode population reductions in the 1984-85 season were evident until near crop harvest, but in the 1985-86 season the effects on nematode populations were not as great and did not last until harvest. Factors such as rains during the solarization, duration of solarization, and sunshine hours may have influenced the efficacy of solarization. Solarization for two seasons reduced the population densities each year about the same as single season solarization, and residual effects of solarization on nematode populations did not last for more than a crop season. PMID:19287776

  12. Mechanisms of host seeking by parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gang, Spencer S; Hallem, Elissa A

    2016-07-01

    The phylum Nematoda comprises a diverse group of roundworms that includes parasites of vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Human-parasitic nematodes infect more than one billion people worldwide and cause some of the most common neglected tropical diseases, particularly in low-resource countries [1]. Parasitic nematodes of livestock and crops result in billions of dollars in losses each year [1]. Many nematode infections are treatable with low-cost anthelmintic drugs, but repeated infections are common in endemic areas and drug resistance is a growing concern with increasing therapeutic and agricultural administration [1]. Many parasitic nematodes have an environmental infective larval stage that engages in host seeking, a process whereby the infective larvae use sensory cues to search for hosts. Host seeking is a complex behavior that involves multiple sensory modalities, including olfaction, gustation, thermosensation, and humidity sensation. As the initial step of the parasite-host interaction, host seeking could be a powerful target for preventative intervention. However, host-seeking behavior remains poorly understood. Here we review what is currently known about the host-seeking behaviors of different parasitic nematodes, including insect-parasitic nematodes, mammalian-parasitic nematodes, and plant-parasitic nematodes. We also discuss the neural bases of these behaviors. PMID:27211240

  13. Parasitic Nematodes - From Genomes to Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diseases caused by parasitic nematodes in domestic and companion animals are major factors that decrease production and quality of the agricultural products. Methods available for the control of the parasitic nematode infections are mainly based on chemical treatment, non-chemical management pra...

  14. A time-course comparative microarray analysis of an incompatible and compatible response by Glycine max (soybean) to Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode) infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of infection in soybean cv. Peking roots by compatible or incompatible races of Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode [SCN]) was assayed by microarray analyses. Using three time-points, one as nematodes penetrate the root prior to feeding site selection; a second as the nematode...

  15. SOME ASPECTS OF THE NATURAL CONTROL OF PLANT PARASITIC NEMATODES IN SOIL UNDER BROAD BEAN VICIA FABA L. CULTIVATED IN CROP ROTATION AND LONG-TERM MONOCULTURE.

    PubMed

    Skwiercz, A T; Damszel, M; Stefanovska, T; Rychcik, B

    2015-01-01

    Observations on population density of plant parasitic nematodes occurring in rhizosphere of broad bean cultivated in the crop rotation and long-term monoculture were performed during 2013-2014. 13 species were observed: Trichodorus primitivus, T. viruliferus, Paratrichodorus pachydermus, Criconema annuliferum, Paratylenchus projectus, Bitylenchus dubius, Merlinius brevidens, Pratylenchus fallax, P. flakkensis, P. neglectus, Heterodera triffolii, H. goettingiana, and Ditylenchus dipsaci. In monoculture plots 70-80% of eggs inside Heterodera cysts were colonized by pathogenic fungi (v.s. 50-62% of cysts from crop rotation). 12-18% of specimens of Pratylenchus species were colonized by the nematode-pathogenic bacteria: Bacillus penetrans. PMID:27145570

  16. The transcriptome of syncytia induced by the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Szakasits, Dagmar; Heinen, Petra; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Hofmann, Julia; Wagner, Florian; Kreil, David P; Sykacek, Peter; Grundler, Florian M W; Bohlmann, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a host for the sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii. Juvenile nematodes invade the roots and induce the development of a syncytium, which functions as a feeding site for the nematode. Here, we report on the transcriptome of syncytia induced in the roots of Arabidopsis. Microaspiration was employed to harvest pure syncytium material, which was then used to prepare RNA for hybridization to Affymetrix GeneChips. Initial data analysis showed that the gene expression in syncytia at 5 and 15 days post-infection did not differ greatly, and so both time points were compared together with control roots. Out of a total of 21 138 genes, 18.4% (3893) had a higher expression level and 15.8% (3338) had a lower expression level in syncytia, as compared with control roots, using a multiple-testing corrected false discovery rate of below 5%. A gene ontology (GO) analysis of up- and downregulated genes showed that categories related to high metabolic activity were preferentially upregulated. A principal component analysis was applied to compare the transcriptome of syncytia with the transcriptome of different Arabidopsis organs (obtained by the AtGenExpress project), and with specific root tissues. This analysis revealed that syncytia are transcriptionally clearly different from roots (and all other organs), as well as from other root tissues. PMID:18980640

  17. [Trichostrongyloidea nematodes, parasites of Microchiroptera].

    PubMed

    Durette-Desset, M C; Chabaud, A G

    1975-01-01

    1. a) List of Nematodes collected by Professor Aellen in european Microchiroptera. Additionnal morphological data to the study of Molinostrongylus alatus, M. panousei, M. skrjabini. Description of M. aelleni n. sp. b) Description of M. richardae n. sp., M. benexae n. sp. et M. bauchoti n. sp., parasites of malagasian Molossidae. c) Description of M. colleyi n. sp. and M. owyangi n. sp., parasites of Malaysian Vespertilioninae, and of Allintoschius dunni n. sp., discovered in Myotis mystacinus from Malaysia and Pipistrellus nanus from Africa. 2. Taking into account the characteristics of the synlophe, the 17 species of the genus Molinostrongylus may be divided into five groups, each one being reasonably well characteristic of the genus of their Chiropteran host. 3. The composition of the Trichostrongyloidea fauna of Chiroptera and its relationship with Trichostrongyloidea from other Mammals (Tupaiidae, Pholidotes, Primates, Sciuridés) are analysed. Six groups are separated and divided into two well defined lines: 1) genus Strongylacantha, and 2) 12 genera stemming more or less directly from the Molineinae, 4. The three conical outgrowths at the tip of the female tail which differenciate presently the Anoplostrogylinae from the Molineinae appear to be an unreliable characteristic. The two subfamilies form a complex group which will be better understood if the evolution of the synlophe and that of the caudal bursa of the males are taken into account. PMID:1211768

  18. Development of PrimeTime-Real-Time PCR for Species Identification of Soybean Cyst Nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, 1952) in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin

    2012-09-01

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is an obligate, sedentary parasite that is a major pathogen of soybean and accounts for an estimated 1 billion dollars in production losses annually in the United States of America. This paper describes the development of a real-time PCR method for rapid, sensitive, species-specific and accurate identification of SCN alone or on mixed populations with other nematodes in North Carolina. The 83-bp DNA fragment of PrimeTime-real-time PCR was designed based on a 477-bp-SCN-SCAR marker previously proved to be SCN-specific. A total of 44 populations including cyst forming nematodes (Heterodera glycines, H. fici, H. schachtii, H. trifolii, Cactodera weissi, Globodera tabacum, Meloidodera floridensis and other unidentified cyst nematodes) and non-cyst forming nematodes (Ditylenchus dipsaci, Meloidogyne incognita and Xiphinema chambersi) were tested in this study, all SCN populations are tested positive and non-SCN populations negative. This assay for the detection and identification has been successfully applied for testing a single SCN cyst, a 2(nd)-stage-SCN juvenile, a single SCN egg, up to ten SCN cysts, a 10-fold dilution of a single 2(nd)-stage-SCN juvenile and 20-fold dilution of one SCN cyst. The assay is not SCN-race specific. It gave an accurate positive result when SCN is mixed with other cyst species. Also, nematode universal primers/probes for real-time PCR amplification as a nematode endogenous control to detect the presence of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene were employed in this assay, so that a SCN-negative sample can be tested to exclude false negative. This method will be very useful for a broad range of research programs as well as the regulatory response and management of SCN in North Carolina and other region of the southeastern U.S.A. PMID:23481469

  19. Interaction Among a Nematode (Heterodera glycines), an Insect, and Three Weeds in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Robbins, R T; Oliver, L R; Mueller, A J

    1990-10-01

    A 2 x 3 x 4 factorial field experiment was established to determine the interaction among a nematode, an insect, and three weed species on soybean in 1983-86. Low (nematicide treated) or high (untreated) population densities of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, and 0, 30, or 70% main stem girdling by the threecornered alfalfa hopper (TCAH), Spissistilus festinus, were combined with no weeds, one common cocklebur (CC), Xanthium strumarium, one sicklepod (SP), Cassia obtusifolia, or one pitted morningglory (PMG), Ipomoea lacunosa, per meter of row in all possible combinations. Most of the losses from the pests were significant (P

  20. Pochonia chlamydosporia: Advances and Challenges to Improve Its Performance as a Biological Control Agent of Sedentary Endo-parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Manzanilla-López, Rosa H.; Esteves, Ivania; Finetti-Sialer, Mariella M.; Hirsch, Penny R.; Ward, Elaine; Devonshire, Jean; Hidalgo-Díaz, Leopoldo

    2013-01-01

    The nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia var. chlamydosporia is one of the most studied biological control agents against plant (semi-) endo-parasitic nematodes of the genera Globodera, Heterodera, Meloidogyne, Nacobbus and, more recently, Rotylenchulus. In this paper we present highlights from more than three decades of worldwide research on this biological control agent. We cover different aspects and key components of the complex plant-fungus-nematode tri-trophic interaction, an interaction that needs to be addressed to ensure the efficient use of P. chlamydosporia as a biopesticide as part of an integrated pest management approach. PMID:23589653

  1. Pochonia chlamydosporia: Advances and Challenges to Improve Its Performance as a Biological Control Agent of Sedentary Endo-parasitic Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla-López, Rosa H; Esteves, Ivania; Finetti-Sialer, Mariella M; Hirsch, Penny R; Ward, Elaine; Devonshire, Jean; Hidalgo-Díaz, Leopoldo

    2013-03-01

    The nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia var. chlamydosporia is one of the most studied biological control agents against plant (semi-) endo-parasitic nematodes of the genera Globodera, Heterodera, Meloidogyne, Nacobbus and, more recently, Rotylenchulus. In this paper we present highlights from more than three decades of worldwide research on this biological control agent. We cover different aspects and key components of the complex plant-fungus-nematode tri-trophic interaction, an interaction that needs to be addressed to ensure the efficient use of P. chlamydosporia as a biopesticide as part of an integrated pest management approach. PMID:23589653

  2. Towards sustainable nematode parasite control of livestock.

    PubMed

    Waller, P J

    1993-06-01

    Farmers worldwide have come to expect, and rely almost exclusively on, broad-spectrum anthelmintics to effectively control nematode parasites amongst their livestock. However, the threats of resistance, residues and ecotoxicity are of increasing concern to the future of chemotherapy. It is imperative that sustainable parasite control schemes be developed and implemented which will integrate a range of techniques to minimise anthelmintic use and still maintain high levels of profitability of the farming enterprise. At present, these need to focus on the better use of existing drugs to maximise their effectiveness and minimise the selection for resistance and impact on the environment. New drugs should also be used according to these principles. In the future it is expected that other non-chemotherapeutic options will become available, e.g. helminth vaccines, resistant hosts, biological control, nematode growth regulators, which will revolutionize the current thinking on nematode parasite control of livestock. PMID:8346643

  3. Investigations of the Host Range of the Corn Cyst Nematode, Heterodera zeae, from Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Ringer, Chloe E.; Sardanelli, Sandra; Krusberg, Lorin R.

    1987-01-01

    The host range of the corn cyst nematode, Heterodera zeae, recently detected in Maryland, was investigated. A total of 269 plant entries, representing 68 families, 172 genera, and 204 species, was inoculated with cysts or a mixture of eggs and second-stage juveniles of H. zeae. The host range of the Maryland population of H. zeae was limited to plants of the Gramineae and included 11 tribes, 33 genera, 42 species, and 77 entries. All 22 corn (Zea mays) cultivars tested were hosts. Other economic hosts included certain cultivars of barley (Hordeum vulgare), oat (Arena sativa), rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), sugar cane (Saccharum interspecific hybrid), and wheat (Triticum aestivum). Fall panicum (Panicum dichotomiflorum), a weed species common to cultivated fields in Maryland, was also a host for H. zeae. Other hosts included meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis), Calamagrostis eipgeios, Job's tears (Coix Lachryma-Jobi), green sprangletop (Leptochloa dubia), witchgrass (Panicum capillare), broomcorn (Panicum miliaceum), fountain grass (Pennisetum rueppeli), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), common reed (Phragmites australis), eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides), corn (Zea mays), and teosinte (Zea mexicana). PMID:19290286

  4. Bacteria Associated with Cysts of the Soybean Cyst Nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Sarah M.; Lawrence, John R.; Zhu, Hong; Swerhone, George D. W.; Welsh, Martha; Welacky, Tom W.; Topp, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, causes economically significant damage to soybeans (Glycine max) in many parts of the world. The cysts of this nematode can remain quiescent in soils for many years as a reservoir of infection for future crops. To investigate bacterial communities associated with SCN cysts, cysts were obtained from eight SCN-infested farms in southern Ontario, Canada, and analyzed by culture-dependent and -independent means. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observations of cyst contents revealed a microbial flora located on the cyst exterior, within a polymer plug region and within the cyst. Microscopic counts using 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazine-2-yl)aminofluorescein staining and in situ hybridization (EUB 338) indicated that the cysts contained (2.6 ± 0.5) × 105 bacteria (mean ± standard deviation) with various cellular morphologies. Filamentous fungi were also observed. Live-dead staining indicated that the majority of cyst bacteria were viable. The probe Nile red also bound to the interior polymer, indicating that it is lipid rich in nature. Bacterial community profiles determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis were simple in composition. Bands shared by all eight samples included the actinobacterium genera Actinomadura and Streptomyces. A collection of 290 bacteria were obtained by plating macerated surface-sterilized cysts onto nutrient broth yeast extract agar or on actinomycete medium. These were clustered into groups of siblings by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR fingerprinting, and representative isolates were tentatively identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. Thirty phylotypes were detected, with the collection dominated by Lysobacter and Variovorax spp. This study has revealed the cysts of this important plant pathogen to be rich in a variety of bacteria, some of which could presumably play a role in the ecology of SCN or have potential as biocontrol agents. PMID:12514048

  5. Effect of Soybean Cyst Nematode (Heterodera glycines) on Yield of Resistant and Susceptible Soybean Cultivars Grown in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T A; Pierson, P E; Young, C E; Riedel, R M; Willson, H R; Eisley, J B; Schmitthenner, A F; Lipps, P E

    1997-12-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) producers in Ohio rarely use soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN)-resistant cultivars because of concerns over limited yield potential and lack of resistance to Phytophthora sojae. A two-year study was initiated to determine grain yield and nematode population increase on soybean cyst nematode-resistant cultivars in maturity groups II and III in production fields. Sites differed in soil texture, nematode densities, and P. sojae infestation at a number of locations in Ohio. Soil was assayed for nematode densities before planting and at harvest. Yields of resistant cultivars averaged 0% to 18% higher than those of susceptible cultivars in fine-textured soils with average preplant populations ranging from 463 to 14,330 SCN eggs/100 cm(3) soil. In coarse-textured soils, yields of susceptible cultivars were 21% to 56% less than the resistant cultivars with average preplant densities ranging from 1,661 to 15,558 SCN eggs/100 cm(3) soil. The reproductive index ranged from 0.1 to 5.5 for resistant cultivars and 0.4 to 112 for susceptible cultivars. In 1993, yield of P. sojae-susceptible, nematode-resistant 'Asgrow A 3431' was as high as yield of the P. sojae-resistant, nematode-susceptible cultivar 'Resnik' in a Phytophthora-infested field. The nematode-resistant cultivars Madison Experimental 131527 and Asgrow A3431 had higher yields than AgVenture AV1341 and susceptible cultivars Resnik and Kenwood when compared over five nematode-infested sites. Nematode-resistant cultivars were found to be excellent alternatives to currently grown susceptible cultivars for managing SCN where group III cultivars are used. However, better cultivar alternatives may be needed for sites with combined Phytophthora root rot and cyst nematode problems. PMID:19274272

  6. Effect of Soybean Cyst Nematode (Heterodera glycines) on Yield of Resistant and Susceptible Soybean Cultivars Grown in Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, T. A.; Pierson, P. E.; Young, C. E.; Riedel, R. M.; Willson, H. R.; Eisley, J. B.; Schmitthenner, A. F.; Lipps, P. E.

    1997-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) producers in Ohio rarely use soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN)-resistant cultivars because of concerns over limited yield potential and lack of resistance to Phytophthora sojae. A two-year study was initiated to determine grain yield and nematode population increase on soybean cyst nematode-resistant cultivars in maturity groups II and III in production fields. Sites differed in soil texture, nematode densities, and P. sojae infestation at a number of locations in Ohio. Soil was assayed for nematode densities before planting and at harvest. Yields of resistant cultivars averaged 0% to 18% higher than those of susceptible cultivars in fine-textured soils with average preplant populations ranging from 463 to 14,330 SCN eggs/100 cm³ soil. In coarse-textured soils, yields of susceptible cultivars were 21% to 56% less than the resistant cultivars with average preplant densities ranging from 1,661 to 15,558 SCN eggs/100 cm³ soil. The reproductive index ranged from 0.1 to 5.5 for resistant cultivars and 0.4 to 112 for susceptible cultivars. In 1993, yield of P. sojae-susceptible, nematode-resistant 'Asgrow A 3431' was as high as yield of the P. sojae-resistant, nematode-susceptible cultivar 'Resnik' in a Phytophthora-infested field. The nematode-resistant cultivars Madison Experimental 131527 and Asgrow A3431 had higher yields than AgVenture AV1341 and susceptible cultivars Resnik and Kenwood when compared over five nematode-infested sites. Nematode-resistant cultivars were found to be excellent alternatives to currently grown susceptible cultivars for managing SCN where group III cultivars are used. However, better cultivar alternatives may be needed for sites with combined Phytophthora root rot and cyst nematode problems. PMID:19274272

  7. Plant-parasitic Nematode Communities and Their Associations with Soil Factors in Organically Farmed Fields in Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. Y.; Sheaffer, C. C.; Wyse, D. L.; Nickel, P.; Kandel, H.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the assemblage and abundance of plant-parasitic nematodes and their associations with soil factors in organically farmed fields in Minnesota. A total of 31 soil samples were collected from southeast (SE), 26 samples from southwest (SW), 28 from west-central (WC), and 23 from northwest (NW) Minnesota. The assemblage and abundance of plant-parasitic nematodes varied among the four regions. The soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, the most destructive pathogen of soybean, was detected in 45.2, 88.5, 10.7, and 0% of organically farmed fields with relative prominence (RP) values of 10.3, 26.5, 0.6, and 0 in the SE, SW, WC, and NW regions, respectively. Across the four regions, other common genera of plant-parasitic nematodes were Helicotylenchus (42.6, RP value, same below), Pratylenchus (26.9), Tylenchorhynchus and related genera (9.4), Xiphinema (5.6), and Paratylenchus (5.3). Aphelenchoides, Meloidogyne, Hoplolaimus, Mesocriconema, and Trichodorus were also detected at low frequencies and/or low population densities. The similarity index of plant-parasitic nematodes between two regions ranged from 0.44 to 0.71 and the similarity increased with decreasing distance between regions. The densities of most plant-parasitic nematodes did not correlate with measured soil factors (organic matter, pH, texture). However, the densities of Pratylenchus correlated negatively with % sand, and Xiphinema was correlated negatively with soil pH. PMID:23482641

  8. Sustainable Approaches to the Management of Plant-parasitic Nematodes and Disease Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological factors of soil may reduce damage caused by plant-parasitic nematodes. Suppression of plant-parasitic nematodes is particularly challenging in soils in which there are short crop sequences, sequential susceptible host crops, or infestations of multiple nematode species. In southern Indiana, a watermelon production system involving rotations with soybean and corn does not suppress Meloidogyne incognita, but several aspects of such systems can be modified to reduce nematode damage in an integrated management approach. Cash crops with resistance to M. incognita can be used to reduce population densities of M. incognita. Small grains as cover crops can be replaced by cover crops with resistance to M. incognita or by crops with biofumigation potential. Mycorrhizal fungal inoculations of potting mixes during transplanting production of watermelon seedlings may improve early crop establishment. Other approaches to nematode management utilize soil suppressiveness. One-year rotations of soybean with corn neither reduced the soil-borne complex of sudden death syndrome (SDS) nor improved soybean root health over that in soybean monoculture. Reduced tillage combined with crop rotation may reduce the activity of soil-borne pathogens in some soils. For example in a long-term trial, numbers of Heterodera glycines and severity of foliar SDS symptoms were reduced under minimum tillage. Thus, sustainable management strategies require holistic approaches that consider entire production systems rather than focus on a single crop in its year of production. PMID:22791923

  9. Sustainable approaches to the management of plant-parasitic nematodes and disease complexes.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological factors of soil may reduce damage caused by plant-parasitic nematodes. Suppression of plant-parasitic nematodes is particularly challenging in soils in which there are short crop sequences, sequential susceptible host crops, or infestations of multiple nematode species. In southern Indiana, a watermelon production system involving rotations with soybean and corn does not suppress Meloidogyne incognita, but several aspects of such systems can be modified to reduce nematode damage in an integrated management approach. Cash crops with resistance to M. incognita can be used to reduce population densities of M. incognita. Small grains as cover crops can be replaced by cover crops with resistance to M. incognita or by crops with biofumigation potential. Mycorrhizal fungal inoculations of potting mixes during transplanting production of watermelon seedlings may improve early crop establishment. Other approaches to nematode management utilize soil suppressiveness. One-year rotations of soybean with corn neither reduced the soil-borne complex of sudden death syndrome (SDS) nor improved soybean root health over that in soybean monoculture. Reduced tillage combined with crop rotation may reduce the activity of soil-borne pathogens in some soils. For example in a long-term trial, numbers of Heterodera glycines and severity of foliar SDS symptoms were reduced under minimum tillage. Thus, sustainable management strategies require holistic approaches that consider entire production systems rather than focus on a single crop in its year of production. PMID:22791923

  10. The Arabidopsis immune regulator SRFR1 dampens defences against herbivory by Spodoptera exigua and parasitism by Heterodera schachtii.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Dung T; Pike, Sharon; Wang, Jianying; Nepal Poudel, Arati; Heinz, Robert; Schultz, Jack C; Koo, Abraham J; Mitchum, Melissa G; Appel, Heidi M; Gassmann, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Plants have developed diverse mechanisms to fine tune defence responses to different types of enemy. Cross-regulation between signalling pathways may allow the prioritization of one response over another. Previously, we identified SUPPRESSOR OF rps4-RLD1 (SRFR1) as a negative regulator of ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent effector-triggered immunity against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 expressing avrRps4. The use of multiple stresses is a powerful tool to further define gene function. Here, we examined whether SRFR1 also impacts resistance to a herbivorous insect in leaves and to a cyst nematode in roots. Interestingly, srfr1-1 plants showed increased resistance to herbivory by the beet army worm Spodoptera exigua and to parasitism by the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii compared with the corresponding wild-type Arabidopsis accession RLD. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to measure the transcript levels of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonate/ethylene (JA/ET) pathway genes, we found that enhanced resistance of srfr1-1 plants to S. exigua correlated with specific upregulation of the MYC2 branch of the JA pathway concurrent with suppression of the SA pathway. In contrast, the greater susceptibility of RLD was accompanied by simultaneously increased transcript levels of SA, JA and JA/ET signalling pathway genes. Surprisingly, mutation of either SRFR1 or EDS1 increased resistance to H. schachtii, indicating that the concurrent presence of both wild-type genes promotes susceptibility. This finding suggests a novel form of resistance in Arabidopsis to the biotrophic pathogen H. schachtii or a root-specific regulation of the SA pathway by EDS1, and places SRFR1 at an intersection between multiple defence pathways. PMID:26310916

  11. Transcript analysis of parasitic females of the sedentary semi-endoparasitic nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis.

    PubMed

    Wubben, Martin J; Callahan, Franklin E; Scheffler, Brian S

    2010-07-01

    Rotylenchulus reniformis, the reniform nematode, is a sedentary semi-endoparasitic nematode capable of infecting >300 plant species, including a large number of crops such as cotton, soybean, and pineapple. In contrast to other economically important plant-parasitic nematodes, molecular genetic data regarding the R. reniformis transcriptome is virtually nonexistant. Herein, we present a survey of R. reniformis ESTs that were sequenced from a sedentary parasitic female cDNA library. Cluster analysis of 2004 high quality ESTs produced 123 contigs and 508 singletons for a total of 631 R. reniformis unigenes. BLASTX analyses revealed that 39% of all unigenes showed similarity to known proteins (Eparasitism genes were identified and included beta-1,4-endoglucanase, fatty acid- and retinol-binding proteins, and an esophageal gland cell-specific gene from Heterodera glycines. Furthermore, a putative ortholog of an enzyme involved in thiamin biosynthesis, thought to exist solely in prokaryotes, fungi, and plants, was identified. Lastly, 114 R. reniformis unigenes orthologous to RNAi-lethal Caenorhabditis elegans genes were discovered. The work described here offers a glimpse into the transcriptome of a sedentary semi-endoparasitic nematode which (i) provides the transcript sequence data necessary for investigating engineered resistance against R. reniformis and (ii) hints at the existance of a thiamin biosynthesis pathway in an animal. PMID:20346373

  12. New soybean accessions identified with resistance to Heterodera glycines populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is a serious root-parasite of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], in USA and worldwide. Annual yield losses in USA are estimated to be nearly $1 billion. These losses have remained stable at current levels with the use of resistant cultivars bu...

  13. Phenotypic characterization of roots responding to Heterodera glycines CLE peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasitism genes coding for secreted CLAVATA3/ESR(CLE)-like peptides are expressed in the dorsal gland cell of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, during syncytium induction and maintenance. Recent data indicate that there are two predominant forms of SCN CLEs, HgCLEA and HgCLEB, ...

  14. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Shahid; Radakovic, Zoran S.; De La Torre, Carola M.; Chronis, Demosthenis; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Holbein, Julia; Matera, Christiane; Hütten, Marion; Gutbrod, Philipp; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Rozanska, Elzbieta; Habash, Samer; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Grundler, Florian M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are biotrophs that cause significant losses in agriculture. Parasitism is based on modifications of host root cells that lead to the formation of a hypermetabolic feeding site (a syncytium) from which nematodes withdraw nutrients. The host cell cycle is activated in an initial cell selected by the nematode for feeding, followed by activation of neighboring cells and subsequent expansion of feeding site through fusion of hundreds of cells. It is generally assumed that nematodes manipulate production and signaling of the plant hormone cytokinin to activate cell division. In fact, nematodes have been shown to produce cytokinin in vitro; however, whether the hormone is secreted into host plants and plays a role in parasitism remained unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal activation of cytokinin signaling during interaction between the cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, and Arabidopsis using cytokinin-responsive promoter:reporter lines. Our results showed that cytokinin signaling is activated not only in the syncytium but also in neighboring cells to be incorporated into syncytium. An analysis of nematode infection on mutants that are deficient in cytokinin or cytokinin signaling revealed a significant decrease in susceptibility of these plants to nematodes. Further, we identified a cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyltransferase gene in H. schachtii and show that silencing of this gene in nematodes leads to a significant decrease in virulence due to a reduced expansion of feeding sites. Our findings demonstrate the ability of a plant-parasitic nematode to synthesize a functional plant hormone to manipulate the host system and establish a long-term parasitic interaction. PMID:26417108

  15. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) and comparative microarray expression analysis of syncytial cells isolated from incompatible and compatible soybean roots infected by soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Syncytial cells in soybean (Glycine max cultivar [cv.] Peking) roots infected by incompatible (I) and compatible (C) populations of soybean cyst nematode [SCN] (Heterodera glycines) were collected using laser capture microdissection. Gene transcript abundance was assayed using an Affymetrix® soybean...

  16. Evaluation of Legumes Common to the Pacific Northwest as Hosts for the Pea Cyst Nematode, Heterodera goettingiana.

    PubMed

    Tedford, E C; Inglis, D A

    1999-06-01

    Seventeen leguminous species common to the Pacific Northwest were evaluated as potential hosts of the pea cyst nematode, Heterodera goettingiana, in both greenhouse and field experiments. In all experiments, juveniles of H. goettingiana penetrated roots of these 17 species with the exception of greenhouse-grown chickpea. Nematodes molted and developed into swollen third-stage or fourth-stage juveniles in many of the plants, but cyst development occurred only in the field on green pea, edible dry pea, and faba bean. More H. goettingiana cysts developed on fava bean than on green pea or edible dry pea. In H. goettingiana-infested soils, cropping sequences that include fava bean and pea should be avoided. However, certain legumes, such as winter vetch, may have the potential of serving as trap crops for H. goettingiana in this region. PMID:19270885

  17. Remote Sensing of Parasitic Nematodes in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Gary W.; King, Roger; Kelley, Amber T.; Vickery, John

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for remote sensing of parasitic nematodes in plants, now undergoing development, is based on measurement of visible and infrared spectral reflectances of fields where the plants are growing. Initial development efforts have been concentrated on detecting reniform nematodes (Rotylenchulus reniformis) in cotton plants, because of the economic importance of cotton crops. The apparatus includes a hand-held spectroradiometer. The readings taken by the radiometer are processed to extract spectral reflectances at sixteen wavelengths between 451 and 949 nm that, taken together, have been found to be indicative of the presence of Rotylenchulus reniformis. The intensities of the spectral reflectances are used to estimate the population density of the nematodes in an area from which readings were taken.

  18. NEMBASE: a resource for parasitic nematode ESTs.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, John; Whitton, Claire; Schmid, Ralf; Thomson, Marian; Blaxter, Mark

    2004-01-01

    NEMBASE (available at http://www.nematodes.org) is a publicly available online database providing access to the sequence and associated meta-data currently being generated as part of the Edinburgh-Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute parasitic nematode EST project. NEMBASE currently holds approximately 100 000 sequences from 10 different species of nematode. To facilitate ease of use, sequences have been processed to generate a non-redundant set of gene objects ('partial genome') for each species. Users may query the database on the basis of BLAST annotation, sequence similarity or expression profiles. NEMBASE also features an interactive Java-based tool (SimiTri) which allows the simultaneous display and analysis of the relative similarity relationships of groups of sequences to three different databases. NEMBASE is currently being expanded to include sequence data from other nematode species. Other developments include access to accurate peptide predictions, improved functional annotation and incorporation of automated processes allowing rapid analysis of nematode-specific gene families. PMID:14681449

  19. Behaviour of Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita infective juveniles exposed to nematode FMRFamide-like peptides in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes depend upon a family of neuropeptides, the FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs), to regulate locomotion and behavior. To exploit FLPs as leads to novel nematode control agents, an understanding of how specific FLPs affect behavior, and what differences exist between species, is i...

  20. The global importance of the cereal cyst nematode (Heterodera spp.) on wheat and international approaches to its control.

    PubMed

    Nicol, J M; Elekçioğlu, I H; Bolat, N; Rivoal, R

    2007-01-01

    The Cereal Cyst Nematodes (CCNs) are a group of several closely related species which have been documented to cause economic yield loss on rainfed wheat production systems in several part of the world including North Africa, West Asia, China, India, Australia, America and several countries in Europe. The most commonly reported species is Heterodera avenae, however there are at least two other species H. filipjevi and H. latipons are implicated. It is well appreciated that plants under water and nutrient stress suffer greater yield loss. Control of CCNs requires maintaining nematode populations below economic thresholds. Chemicals are not environmentally sustainable or economic and the major emphasis on control has been with host genetic resistance applied with other integrated pest managent options. Unfortunately due to the number of species and pathotype variation genetic control of Cereal Cyst Nematode with plant resistance is complex. Turkey is one of the top ten wheat producers in the world and has identified these nematode as a major biotic constraint in their rainfed wheat systems. In 2001 a new joint intiative was established between CIMMYT International, the Turkish Ministry of Agriculture and (Ukurova University in Adana to understand i) the distribution of cereal nematodes on wheat; ii) assess the economic importance and improve our understanding of the population dynamics iii) culture, screen and assess known sources of resistance and identify new sources to both groups of nematodes; iv) integrate new sources of resistance into bread wheat cultivars for Turkey and International germplasm using conventional and molecular tools; v) investigate other integrated control options such as rotation and different wheat management strategies and finally vi) capacity build scientists to work in this important area. Some highlights of this work will be presented and the newly formed ICCNI - International Cereal Cyst Nematode Initative introduced. PMID:18399504

  1. Genomics of reproduction in nematodes: prospects for parasite intervention?

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Alasdair J; Cottee, Pauline A; Gasser, Robin B

    2008-02-01

    Understanding reproductive processes in parasitic nematodes has the potential to lead to the informed design of new anthelmintics and control strategies. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms underlying sex determination, gametogenesis and reproductive physiology for most parasitic nematodes. Together with comparative analyses of data for the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, molecular investigations are beginning to provide insights into the processes involved in reproduction and development in parasitic nematodes. Here, we review recent developments, focusing on technological aspects and on molecules associated with sex-specific differences in adult nematodes. PMID:18182326

  2. The syntaxin 31-induced gene, LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1), functions in Glycine max defense to the root parasite Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Pant, Shankar R; Krishnavajhala, Aparna; McNeece, Brant T; Lawrence, Gary W; Klink, Vincent P

    2015-01-01

    Experiments show the membrane fusion genes α soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP) and syntaxin 31 (Gm-SYP38) contribute to the ability of Glycine max to defend itself from infection by the plant parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines. Accompanying their expression is the transcriptional activation of the defense genes ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) and NONEXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) that function in salicylic acid (SA) signaling. These results implicate the added involvement of the antiapoptotic, environmental response gene LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1) in defense. Roots engineered to overexpress the G. max defense genes Gm-α-SNAP, SYP38, EDS1, NPR1, BOTRYTIS INDUCED KINASE1 (BIK1) and xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) in the susceptible genotype G. max[Williams 82/PI 518671] have induced Gm-LSD1 (Gm-LSD1-2) transcriptional activity. In reciprocal experiments, roots engineered to overexpress Gm-LSD1-2 in the susceptible genotype G. max[Williams 82/PI 518671] have induced levels of SYP38, EDS1, NPR1, BIK1 and XTH, but not α-SNAP prior to infection. In tests examining the role of Gm-LSD1-2 in defense, its overexpression results in ∼52 to 68% reduction in nematode parasitism. In contrast, RNA interference (RNAi) of Gm-LSD1-2 in the resistant genotype G. max[Peking/PI 548402] results in an 3.24-10.42 fold increased ability of H. glycines to parasitize. The results identify that Gm-LSD1-2 functions in the defense response of G. max to H. glycines parasitism. It is proposed that LSD1, as an antiapoptotic protein, may establish an environment whereby the protected, living plant cell could secrete materials in the vicinity of the parasitizing nematode to disarm it. After the targeted incapacitation of the nematode the parasitized cell succumbs to its targeted demise as the infected root region is becoming fortified. PMID:25530246

  3. The syntaxin 31-induced gene, LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1), functions in Glycine max defense to the root parasite Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Shankar R; Krishnavajhala, Aparna; McNeece, Brant T; Lawrence, Gary W; Klink, Vincent P

    2015-01-01

    Experiments show the membrane fusion genes α soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP) and syntaxin 31 (Gm-SYP38) contribute to the ability of Glycine max to defend itself from infection by the plant parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines. Accompanying their expression is the transcriptional activation of the defense genes ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) and NONEXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) that function in salicylic acid (SA) signaling. These results implicate the added involvement of the antiapoptotic, environmental response gene LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1) in defense. Roots engineered to overexpress the G. max defense genes Gm-α-SNAP, SYP38, EDS1, NPR1, BOTRYTIS INDUCED KINASE1 (BIK1) and xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) in the susceptible genotype G. max[Williams 82/PI 518671] have induced Gm-LSD1 (Gm-LSD1–2) transcriptional activity. In reciprocal experiments, roots engineered to overexpress Gm-LSD1–2 in the susceptible genotype G. max[Williams 82/PI 518671] have induced levels of SYP38, EDS1, NPR1, BIK1 and XTH, but not α-SNAP prior to infection. In tests examining the role of Gm-LSD1–2 in defense, its overexpression results in ∼52 to 68% reduction in nematode parasitism. In contrast, RNA interference (RNAi) of Gm-LSD1–2 in the resistant genotype G. max[Peking/PI 548402] results in an 3.24–10.42 fold increased ability of H. glycines to parasitize. The results identify that Gm-LSD1–2 functions in the defense response of G. max to H. glycines parasitism. It is proposed that LSD1, as an antiapoptotic protein, may establish an environment whereby the protected, living plant cell could secrete materials in the vicinity of the parasitizing nematode to disarm it. After the targeted incapacitation of the nematode the parasitized cell succumbs to its targeted demise as the infected root region is becoming fortified. PMID:25530246

  4. Benzyl isothiocyanate affects development, hatching and reproduction of the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) applied at micromolar doses decreased Heterodera glycines J2 movement, H. glycines hatching, and reproduction of H. glycines on soybean, Glycine max. Direct exposure of J2 to 30 microM BITC caused an immediate decrease (17%; P < 0.05) in J2 movement relative to 1% methan...

  5. Two-dimensional proteome reference maps for the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) reference maps of Heterodera glycines were constructed. After in-gel digestion with trypsin, 803 spots representing 426 proteins were subsequently identified by LC-MS/MS. Proteins with annotated function were further categorized by Gene Ontology. Results showed...

  6. Nematode parasite genes: what's in a name?

    PubMed

    Beech, Robin N; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Neveu, Cédric; Dent, Joseph A

    2010-07-01

    The central theme of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet is that names are meaningless, artificial constructs, detached from any underlying reality. By contrast, we argue that a well chosen gene name can concisely convey a wealth of relevant biological information. A consistent nomenclature adds transparency that can have a real impact on our understanding of gene function. Currently, genes in parasitic nematodes are often named ad hoc, leading to confusion that can be resolved by adherence to a nomenclature standard adapted from Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate this with ligand-gated ion-channels and propose that the flood of genome data and differences between parasites and the free living C. elegans will require modification of the standard. PMID:20478743

  7. Effect of different potting systems; inoculation time; nematode density and sources of cereal cyst nematode (Heterodera filipjevi) on juvenile penetration into wheat root system.

    PubMed

    Pariyar, S R; Dababat, A A; Nicol, J M; Sikora, R A

    2010-01-01

    Investigations were designed to optimize testing systems for screening wheat breeding lines for resistance to Heterodera filipjevi. The effects of: 1) plant potting systems 2) inoculum level and time of inoculation 3) and type of inoculum of H. filipjevi on detection accuracy were examined in growth chamber experiments in Turkey. The rate of nematode penetration in the highly susceptible variety Bezostaya was used as the base measurement of efficacy. The results showed that the highest level of penetration coupled with high level of germination was obtained in plastic tubes (13 cm long x 3 cm in diam.) when compared to both small flower pots (400 cm3) and smaller plastic tubes (10.2 cm long x 0.8 cm in diam.). The highest rate of nematode penetration into wheat root system was obtained by inoculating the seedlings with 1000 J2 per plant. However, inoculation with 200 J2 at sowing or 200 J2 at sowing plus an additional 200 J2 after germination improved percent penetration when compared to inoculation with 600 or 1000 J2/plant at sowing. The test on the optimum form of inoculum showed that inoculating the seedling with J2's gave the highest rate of nematode penetration over inoculum with eggs or cysts. The results of these experiments demonstrated that screening wheat for resistance can be optimized by raising the seedlings in plastic tubes and inoculating them with 400 J2. PMID:21539268

  8. Nematode.net: a tool for navigating sequences from parasitic and free-living nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Todd; Martin, John C.; Dante, Michael; Mitreva, Makedonka Dautova; Clifton, Sandra W.; Chinwalla, Asif; Waterston, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard K.; McCarter, James P.

    2004-01-01

    Nematode.net (www.nematode.net) is a web- accessible resource for investigating gene sequences from nematode genomes. The database is an outgrowth of the parasitic nematode EST project at Washington University’s Genome Sequencing Center (GSC), St Louis. A sister project at the University of Edinburgh and the Sanger Institute is also underway. More than 295 000 ESTs have been generated from >30 nematodes other than Caenorhabditis elegans including key parasites of humans, animals and plants. Nematode.net currently provides NemaGene EST cluster consensus sequence, enhanced online BLAST search tools, functional classifications of cluster sequences and comprehensive information concerning the ongoing generation of nematode genome data. The long-term goal of nematode.net is to provide the scientific community with the highest quality sequence information and tools for studying these diverse species. PMID:14681448

  9. RNAi and functional genomics in plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Rosso, M N; Jones, J T; Abad, P

    2009-01-01

    Plant nematology is currently undergoing a revolution with the availability of the first genome sequences as well as comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries from a range of nematode species. Several strategies are being used to exploit this wealth of information. Comparative genomics is being used to explore the acquisition of novel genes associated with parasitic lifestyles. Functional analyses of nematode genes are moving toward larger scale studies including global transcriptome profiling. RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to reduce expression of a range of plant parasitic nematode genes and is a powerful tool for functional analysis of nematode genes. RNAi-mediated suppression of genes essential for nematode development, survival, or parasitism is revealing new targets for nematode control. Plant nematology in the genomics era is now facing the challenge to develop RNAi screens adequate for high-throughput functional analyses. PMID:19400649

  10. The Cyst Nematode Effector Protein 10A07 Targets and Recruits Host Posttranslational Machinery to Mediate Its Nuclear Trafficking and to Promote Parasitism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hewezi, Tarek; Juvale, Parijat S.; Piya, Sarbottam; Maier, Tom R.; Rambani, Aditi; Rice, J. Hollis; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Davis, Eric L.; Hussey, Richard S.; Baum, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes synthesize and secrete effector proteins that are essential for parasitism. One such protein is the 10A07 effector from the sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, which is exclusively expressed in the nematode dorsal gland cell during all nematode parasitic stages. Overexpression of H. schachtii 10A07 in Arabidopsis thaliana produced a hypersusceptible phenotype in response to H. schachtii infection along with developmental changes reminiscent of auxin effects. The 10A07 protein physically associates with a plant kinase and the IAA16 transcription factor in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. The interacting plant kinase (IPK) phosphorylates 10A07 at Ser-144 and Ser-231 and mediates its trafficking from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocation to the nucleus is phosphorylation dependent since substitution of Ser-144 and Ser-231 by alanine resulted in exclusive cytoplasmic accumulation of 10A07. IPK and IAA16 are highly upregulated in the nematode-induced syncytium (feeding cells), and deliberate manipulations of their expression significantly alter plant susceptibility to H. schachtii in an additive fashion. An inactive variant of IPK functioned antagonistically to the wild-type IPK and caused a dominant-negative phenotype of reduced plant susceptibility. Thus, exploitation of host processes to the advantage of the parasites is one mechanism by which cyst nematodes promote parasitism of host plants. PMID:25715285

  11. The cyst nematode effector protein 10A07 targets and recruits host posttranslational machinery to mediate its nuclear trafficking and to promote parasitism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Juvale, Parijat S; Piya, Sarbottam; Maier, Tom R; Rambani, Aditi; Rice, J Hollis; Mitchum, Melissa G; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes synthesize and secrete effector proteins that are essential for parasitism. One such protein is the 10A07 effector from the sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, which is exclusively expressed in the nematode dorsal gland cell during all nematode parasitic stages. Overexpression of H. schachtii 10A07 in Arabidopsis thaliana produced a hypersusceptible phenotype in response to H. schachtii infection along with developmental changes reminiscent of auxin effects. The 10A07 protein physically associates with a plant kinase and the IAA16 transcription factor in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. The interacting plant kinase (IPK) phosphorylates 10A07 at Ser-144 and Ser-231 and mediates its trafficking from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocation to the nucleus is phosphorylation dependent since substitution of Ser-144 and Ser-231 by alanine resulted in exclusive cytoplasmic accumulation of 10A07. IPK and IAA16 are highly upregulated in the nematode-induced syncytium (feeding cells), and deliberate manipulations of their expression significantly alter plant susceptibility to H. schachtii in an additive fashion. An inactive variant of IPK functioned antagonistically to the wild-type IPK and caused a dominant-negative phenotype of reduced plant susceptibility. Thus, exploitation of host processes to the advantage of the parasites is one mechanism by which cyst nematodes promote parasitism of host plants. PMID:25715285

  12. Evolutionary and functional analysis of fructose bisphosphate aldolase of plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Cvs Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Kumar, Himansu; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-01-01

    The essential and ubiquitous enzyme fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBPA) has been a good target for controlling the various types of infections caused by pathogens and parasites. The parasitic infections of nematodes are the major concern of scientific community, leading to biochemical characterization of this enzyme. In this work we have developed a small dataset of all types of FBPA sequences collected from publically available databases (EMBL, NCBI and Uni-Port). The Phylogenetic study shows that evolutionary relationships among sequences of FBPA are clustered into three main groups. FBPA sequences of Globodera rostochiensis (FBPA_GR) and Heterodera glycines (FBPA_HG) are placed in group II, sharing the similar evolutionary relationship. The catalytic mechanism of these enzymes depends upon which class of aldolase, it belongs. The class of enzyme has been confirmed on the basis of sequences and structural similarity with template structure of class I FBPA. To confirm catalytic mechanism of above said model structures, the known substrate fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP) and competitive inhibitor Mannitol-1, 6 bisphosphate (MBP) were docked at known catalytic site of enzyme of interest. The comparative docking analysis shows that enzyme-substrate complex is forming similar Schiff base intermediate and conducts C(3)-C(4) bond cleavage by forming Hydrogen bonding with reaction catalyzing Glu-191, reactive Lys-150, and Schiff base forming Lys-233. On the other hand enzymeinhibitor noncovalent complex is forming cabinolamine precursor and the proton transfer by the formation of hydrogen bond between MBP O(2) with Glu191 enabling stabilization of cabinolamine transition state, which confirms the similar inhibition mechanism. Thus we conclude that Plant Parasitic Nematodes (PPNs) have evolutionary and functional relationship with the class I aldolase enzyme. Hence, FBPA can be targeted to control plant parasitic nematodes. PMID:23390337

  13. Evolutionary and functional analysis of fructose bisphosphate aldolase of plant parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, CVS Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Kumar, Himansu; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-01-01

    The essential and ubiquitous enzyme fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBPA) has been a good target for controlling the various types of infections caused by pathogens and parasites. The parasitic infections of nematodes are the major concern of scientific community, leading to biochemical characterization of this enzyme. In this work we have developed a small dataset of all types of FBPA sequences collected from publically available databases (EMBL, NCBI and Uni-Port). The Phylogenetic study shows that evolutionary relationships among sequences of FBPA are clustered into three main groups. FBPA sequences of Globodera rostochiensis (FBPA_GR) and Heterodera glycines (FBPA_HG) are placed in group II, sharing the similar evolutionary relationship. The catalytic mechanism of these enzymes depends upon which class of aldolase, it belongs. The class of enzyme has been confirmed on the basis of sequences and structural similarity with template structure of class I FBPA. To confirm catalytic mechanism of above said model structures, the known substrate fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP) and competitive inhibitor Mannitol-1, 6 bisphosphate (MBP) were docked at known catalytic site of enzyme of interest. The comparative docking analysis shows that enzyme-substrate complex is forming similar Schiff base intermediate and conducts C3–C4 bond cleavage by forming Hydrogen bonding with reaction catalyzing Glu-191, reactive Lys-150, and Schiff base forming Lys-233. On the other hand enzymeinhibitor noncovalent complex is forming cabinolamine precursor and the proton transfer by the formation of hydrogen bond between MBP O2 with Glu191 enabling stabilization of cabinolamine transition state, which confirms the similar inhibition mechanism. Thus we conclude that Plant Parasitic Nematodes (PPNs) have evolutionary and functional relationship with the class I aldolase enzyme. Hence, FBPA can be targeted to control plant parasitic nematodes. PMID:23390337

  14. Signatures of adaptation to plant parasitism in nematode genomes.

    PubMed

    Bird, David McK; Jones, John T; Opperman, Charles H; Kikuchi, Taisei; Danchin, Etienne G J

    2015-02-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause considerable damage to global agriculture. The ability to parasitize plants is a derived character that appears to have independently emerged several times in the phylum Nematoda. Morphological convergence to feeding style has been observed, but whether this is emergent from molecular convergence is less obvious. To address this, we assess whether genomic signatures can be associated with plant parasitism by nematodes. In this review, we report genomic features and characteristics that appear to be common in plant-parasitic nematodes while absent or rare in animal parasites, predators or free-living species. Candidate horizontal acquisitions of parasitism genes have systematically been found in all plant-parasitic species investigated at the sequence level. Presence of peptides that mimic plant hormones also appears to be a trait of plant-parasitic species. Annotations of the few genomes of plant-parasitic nematodes available to date have revealed a set of apparently species-specific genes on every occasion. Effector genes, important for parasitism are frequently found among those species-specific genes, indicating poor overlap. Overall, nematodes appear to have developed convergent genomic solutions to adapt to plant parasitism. PMID:25656361

  15. Plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive tree (Olea europaea L.) with a focus on the Mediterranean Basin: a review.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nadine; Chapuis, Elodie; Tavoillot, Johannes; Mateille, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The olive tree (Olea europaea ssp. europaea.) is one of the most ancient cultivated trees. It is an emblematic species owing to its ecological, economic and cultural importance, especially in the Mediterranean Basin. Plant-parasitic nematodes are major damaging pests on olive trees, mainly in nurseries. They significantly contribute to economic losses in the top-ten olive-producing countries in the world. However, the damages they induce in orchards and nurseries are specifically documented only in a few countries. This review aims to update knowledge about the olive-nematode pathosystem by: (1) updating the list of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive trees; (2) analysing their diversity (taxonomic level, trophic groups, dominance of taxa), which allowed us (i) to assess the richness observed in each country, and (ii) to exhibit and describe the most important taxa able to induce damages on olive trees such as: Meloidogyne, Pratylenchus, Helicotylenchus, Xiphinema, Tylenchulus, Rotylenchulus, Heterodera (distribution especially in the Mediterranean Basin, pathogenicity and reactions of olive trees); (3) describing some management strategies focusing on alternative control methods; (4) suggesting new approaches for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes based on the management of the diversity of their communities, which are structured by several environmental factors such as olive diversity (due to domestication of wild olive in the past, and to breeding now), cropping systems (from traditional to high-density orchards), irrigation, and terroirs. PMID:25103828

  16. Bacterial endosymbionts of plant-parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several groups of bacteria have been reported as endosymbionts of various orders of nematodes including the filarial nematodes (Brugia malayi, Wucheria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus (Spiruida)), the entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema spp., and Heterorhabditis spp. (Rhabditida)), and plant-p...

  17. RESPONSES OF HETERODERA GLYCINES AND MELOIDOGYNE INCOGNITA TO EXOGENOUSLY APPLIED NEUROMODULATORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine and serotonin each have significant but differing effects on behavior in juveniles of the plant-parasitic nematodes Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita. Body movement frequency was increased 2-fold in H. glycines by 5mM dopamine (P = 0.00013), while...

  18. Soybean Yield and Heterodera glycines Responses to Liquid Swine Manure in Nematode Suppressive Soil and Conducive Soil

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yong; Chen, Senyu; Vetsch, Jeffery; Randall, Gyles

    2013-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is a major factor limiting soybean yield. Experiments were conducted in 2009 and 2010 to determine the effects of liquid swine manure and chemical fertilizer PK on soybean and corn yields, and on SCN population in an SCN-suppressive field (S-Site) and an SCN-conducive field (C-Site) in Minnesota. The experiment was a split-plot design with crop sequences as main plots and fertilizer treatments as subplots. The 2-yr crop sequences were Sus-Sus, Res-Sus, and Corn-Sus, where Sus was SCN-susceptible soybean, and Res was SCN-resistant soybean. The fertilizer treatments were manure, PK, and a nonfertilizer as control. Manure did not reduce SCN egg population density but resulted in 31% lower SCN second-stage juvenile (J2) population density at the S-Site at 45 d after planting (DAP) in 2009. Manure also reduced spiral nematode (Helicotylenchus spp.) population density by 52% compared with PK and nonfertilizer treatments at S-Site at 45 DAP in 2009. The crop sequence of Corn-Sus and Res-Sus reduced the SCN egg and J2 but increased spiral nematode population density at both sites. An increase of 1.4 Mg/ha and 0.5 Mg/ha in yield of susceptible soybean was observed in manure and PK treatments, respectively, at the C-Site in 2009. Corn yield was 2.8 Mg/ha and 5.0 Mg/ha greater when treated with manure than nonfertilizer at the S-Site and C-Site, respectively. This study suggests that soil fertility management may be a useful strategy to alleviate the SCN damage to soybean. PMID:23589656

  19. Heterozygote deficits in cyst plant-parasitic nematodes: possible causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Montarry, Josselin; Jan, Pierre-Loup; Gracianne, Cecile; Overall, Andrew D J; Bardou-Valette, Sylvie; Olivier, Eric; Fournet, Sylvain; Grenier, Eric; Petit, Eric J

    2015-04-01

    Deviations of genotypic frequencies from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) expectations could reveal important aspects of the biology of populations. Deviations from HWE due to heterozygote deficits have been recorded for three plant-parasitic nematode species. However, it has never been determined whether the observed deficits were due (i) to the presence of null alleles, (ii) to a high level of consanguinity and/or (iii) to a Wahlund effect. The aim of the present work was, while taking into the possible confounding effect of null alleles, to disentangle consanguinity and Wahlund effect in natural populations of those three economically important cyst nematodes using microsatellite markers: Globodera pallida, G. tabacum and Heterodera schachtii, pests of potato, tobacco and sugar beet, respectively. The results show a consistent pattern of heterozygote deficiency in the three nematode species sampled at the spatial scale of the host plant. We demonstrate that the prevalence of null alleles is weak and that heterozygote deficits do not have a single origin. Our results suggested that it is restricted dispersal that leads to heterozygote deficits through both consanguinity and substructure, which effects can be linked to soil movement, cyst density, and the number of generations per year. We discuss potential implications for the durability of plant resistances that are used to protect crops against parasites in which mating between relatives occur. While consanguineous mating leads to homozygosity at all loci, including loci governing avirulence/virulence, which favours the expression of virulence when recessive, the Wahlund effect is expected to have no particular effect on the adaptation of nematodes to resistances. PMID:25735762

  20. Plant actin cytoskeleton re-modeling by plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Engler, Janice de Almeida; Rodiuc, Natalia; Smertenko, Andrei; Abad, Pierre

    2010-03-01

    The cytoskeleton is an important component of the plant's defense mechanism against the attack of pathogenic organisms. Plants however, are defenseless against parasitic root-knot and cyst nematodes and respond to the invasion by the development of a special feeding site that supplies the parasite with nutrients required for the completion of its life cycle. Recent studies of nematode invasion under treatment with cytoskeletal drugs and in mutant plants where normal functions of the cytoskeleton have been affected, demonstrate the importance of the cytoskeleton in the establishment of a feeding site and successful nematode reproduction. It appears that in the case of microfilaments, nematodes hijack the intracellular machinery that regulates actin dynamics and modulate the organization and properties of the actin filament network. Intervening with this process reduces the nematode infection efficiency and inhibits its life cycle. This discovery uncovers a new pathway that can be exploited for the protection of plants against nematodes. PMID:20038822

  1. Orthologs of macrophage migration inhibitory factor from parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Jon J.; Cho, Yoonsang; Lolis, Elias; Bucala, Richard; Cappello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic helminth infections are associated with modulation of host cellular immune responses, presumably to prolong parasite survival within the mammalian host. This phenomenon is attributed, at least in part, to the elaboration of parasite molecules, including orthologs of host cytokines and receptors, at the host–parasite interface. This review describes recent progress in the characterization of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) orthologs from parasitic nematodes. The roles of these molecules in parasite developmental biology and pathogenesis are discussed. Further knowledge of the species-specific activities and three-dimensional structures of human and parasitic nematode MIF molecules should make them ideal targets for drug- and/or vaccine-based strategies aimed at nematode disease control. PMID:18603473

  2. Directional movement of parasitic nematodes in response to electrical current

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steinernematid nematodes are parasites that are important natural regulating agents of insect populations. The infective juvenile nematodes respond to a variety of stimuli that aid in survival and host finding. Host finding strategies among steinernematids differ along a continuum from ambush (sit...

  3. Fungal Parasitism of Heterodera glycines Eggs as Influenced by Egg Age and Pre-colonization of Cysts by Other Fungi.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y; Chen, F J

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of egg age and pre-colonization of cysts by a saprophytic or parasitic fungus on parasitism of Heterodera glycines eggs by other parasitic fungi. In agar and in soil tests, fungi generally parasitized more eggs in early developmental stages than eggs containing a juvenile. The effect of pre-colonization of cysts by a fungus on parasitism of eggs by other fungi depended on the fungi involved. In most cases, pre-colonization of cysts by an unidentified, saprophytic fungal isolate (A-1-24) did not affect parasitism of eggs in the cysts subsequently treated with other fungi. However, pre-colonization of cysts by A-1-24 reduced fungal parasitism of eggs in cysts subsequently treated with Cylindrocarpon destructans isolate 3. In agar tests, pre-colonization of cysts by Chaetomium cochliodes, a saprophytic or weakly parasitic fungus, reduced parasitism of eggs in cysts subsequently treated with Verticillium chlamydosporium Florida isolate, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, ARF18, and another sterile fungus. However, in soil tests, pre-colonization of cysts by C. cochliodes had no effect on parasitism of eggs by subsequent fungal parasites. In another test, parasitism of eggs by V. chlamydosporium in cysts was not affected by pre-colonizing fungi C. destructans, F. oxysporum, and F. solani but was reduced by Mortierella sp., Pyrenochaeta terrestris, and C. cochliodes. Parasitism of eggs in cysts by ARF18 was reduced by pre-colonizing fungi C. destructans, F. oxysporum, F. solani, P. terrestris, and C. cochliodes but not Mortierella sp. PMID:19262761

  4. Impact of no-till cover cropping of Italian ryegrass on above and below ground faunal communities inhabiting a soybean field with special emphasis on soybean cyst nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two field trials were conducted in Maryland to evaluate the ability of an Italian ryegrass (IR) (Lolium multiflorum) cover crop in a no-till soybean (Glycine max) planting to 1) reduce populations of plant-parasitic nematodes (i.e., the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines and lesion nematodes...

  5. Soil Organic Matter and Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, T. L.; Mitkowski, N. A.; Abawi, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    Organic matter and its replenishment has become a major component of soil health management programs. Many of the soil's physical, chemical, and biological properties are a function of organic matter content and quality. Adding organic matter to soil influences diverse and important biological activities. The diversity and number of free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes are altered by rotational crops, cover crops, green manures, and other sources of organic matter. Soil management programs should include the use of the proper organic materials to improve soil chemical, physical, and biological parameters and to suppress plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne pathogens. It is critical to monitor the effects of organic matter additions on activities of major and minor plant-parasitic nematodes in the production system. This paper presents a general review of information in the literature on the effects of crop rotation, cover crops, and green manures on nematodes and their damage to economic crops. PMID:19265946

  6. Soil organic matter and management of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Widmer, T L; Mitkowski, N A; Abawi, G S

    2002-12-01

    Organic matter and its replenishment has become a major component of soil health management programs. Many of the soil's physical, chemical, and biological properties are a function of organic matter content and quality. Adding organic matter to soil influences diverse and important biological activities. The diversity and number of free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes are altered by rotational crops, cover crops, green manures, and other sources of organic matter. Soil management programs should include the use of the proper organic materials to improve soil chemical, physical, and biological parameters and to suppress plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne pathogens. It is critical to monitor the effects of organic matter additions on activities of major and minor plant-parasitic nematodes in the production system. This paper presents a general review of information in the literature on the effects of crop rotation, cover crops, and green manures on nematodes and their damage to economic crops. PMID:19265946

  7. The transcriptomes of the cattle parasitic nematode Ostertagia ostartagi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ostertagia ostertagi is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode that affects cattle and leads to a loss of production. In this study, we present the first large-scale genomic survey of O. ostertagi by the analysis of expressed transcripts from three stages of the parasite: third-stage larvae, fourth-s...

  8. Pathogenicity of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes on Blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Very little is known about the impacts of plant-parasitic nematodes on commercial production of blueberries (Vaccinium spp.). We conducted field surveys in the Pacific Northwest and Canada, as well as controlled experiments in microplots and in the greenhouse, to understand which plant-parasitic ne...

  9. Plant-parasitic Nematodes Associated with Cotton in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Kinlock, R. A.; Sprenkel, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    A sampling of 15% of the cotton hectarage in each Florida county was assayed for nematodes and soil particle components following the 1990 harvest. The distribution of juveniles of Meloidogyne spp., which were found in 61% of the 178 fields sampled statewide, was not influenced by soil type. Rotylenchulus reniformis was more prevalent in the heavier soils and occurred in 15% of the sampled fields. In fields with concomitant infestations (9% of the sampled fields), densities of root-knot juveniles per 10 cm³ soil wer e negatively related to those of reniform nematodes (R² =-0.32; P < 0.02; df = 14). Gall ratings of cotton plants, assayed in sampled soils, were positively related to the densities of root-knot juveniles per 100 cm³ soil (R² = 0.23; P < 0.01; df = 175). Other nematode genera and their frequency of occurrence were Helicotylenchus (76%), Paratrichodorus (57%), Criconemella (53%), Pratylenchus (42%), Xiphinema (7%), Heterodera (2%), and Hoplolaimus (1%). PMID:19279958

  10. A sensory code for host seeking in parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hallem, Elissa A.; Dillman, Adler R.; Hong, Annie V.; Zhang, Yuanjun; Yano, Jessica M.; DeMarco, Stephanie F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Nematodes comprise a large phylum of both free-living and parasitic species that show remarkably diverse lifestyles, ecological niches, and behavioral repertoires. Parasitic species in particular often display highly specialized host-seeking behaviors that reflect their specific host preferences. Many host-seeking behaviors can be triggered by the presence of host odors, yet little is known about either the specific olfactory cues that trigger these behaviors or the neural circuits that underlie them. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Steinernema carpocapsae are phylogenetically distant insect-parasitic nematodes whose host-seeking and host-invasion behavior resembles that of some of the most devastating human- and plant-parasitic nematodes. Here we compare the olfactory responses of H. bacteriophora and S. carpocapsae infective juveniles (IJs) to those of Caenorhabditis elegans dauers, which are analogous life stages [1]. We show that the broad host range of these parasites results from their ability to respond to the universally-produced signal carbon dioxide (CO2) as well as a wide array of odors, including host-specific odors that we identified using TD-GC-MS. We show that CO2 is attractive for the parasitic IJs and C. elegans dauers despite being repulsive for C. elegans adults [2–4], and we identify an ancient and conserved sensory neuron that mediates CO2 response in both parasitic and free-living species regardless of whether CO2 is an attractive or a repulsive cue. Finally, we show that the parasites’ odor response profiles are more similar to each other than to that of C. elegans despite their greater phylogenetic distance, likely reflecting evolutionary convergence to insect parasitism. Our results suggest that the olfactory responses of parasitic versus free-living nematodes are highly diverse and that this diversity is critical to the evolution of nematode behavior. PMID:21353558

  11. DNA barcoding of parasitic nematodes: is it kosher?

    PubMed

    Siddall, Mark E; Kvist, Sebastion; Phillips, Anna; Oceguera-Figuero, Alejandro

    2012-06-01

    Nematode parasites were encountered in kosher-certified fish meat and roe, and the question was raised as to whether or not these food products were kosher as concerns food preparation standards-a matter that pertains to the identity and, by extension, the life cycle of the parasites. To ascertain the identities of parasitic nematodes, given the distorted or damaged nature of the specimens, molecular techniques were applied in the form of DNA barcoding. To our knowledge, this is the first application of this technique to an obviously cultural concern as opposed to one of health or economic significance. Results, based both on cytochrome c oxidase subunits I and II, suggested that the parasite species found in the fish products are anisakine species that do not inhabit the intestinal lumen of the fish hosts examined. Thus, there was no evidence of failure to adhere to food preparation practices consistent with the proscriptions of Orthodox Judaism. Notwithstanding the success of DNA barcoding in determining at least the higher taxonomic identities of the parasites, some shortcomings of the DNA barcoding pipeline as it pertains to nematode parasites were encountered; specifically, the paucity of data available for the DNA barcoding locus, even for very common nematode taxa. PMID:22300283

  12. Microarray detection calls as a means to compare transcripts within syncytial cells isolated from incompatible and compatible soybean (Glycine max) roots infected by the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate pericycle and syncytial cells in soybean (Glycine max cultivar [cv.] Peking) roots infected by incompatible or compatible populations of soybean cyst nematode (SCN [Heterodera glycines]). Gene transcript detection calls were assayed using the A...

  13. Incidence and influence of plant-parasitic nematodes in southern Illinois peach orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency, distribution and impact of plant-parasitic nematodes in southern Illinois peach orchards were determined. Nine plant parasitic nematode genera were detected comprising 11 different species: Helicotylenchus platyurus, Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus, Hoplolaimus spp., Meloidogyne spp., ...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of nematode-nematophagous microbe interactions: basis for biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zou, Chenggang; Xu, Jianping; Ji, Xinglai; Niu, Xuemei; Yang, Jinkui; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause significant damage to a broad range of vegetables and agricultural crops throughout the world. As the natural enemies of nematodes, nematophagous microorganisms offer a promising approach to control the nematode pests. Some of these microorganisms produce traps to capture and kill the worms from the outside. Others act as internal parasites to produce toxins and virulence factors to kill the nematodes from within. Understanding the molecular basis of microbe-nematode interactions provides crucial insights for developing effective biological control agents against plant-parasitic nematodes. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the interactions between nematodes and nematophagous microorganisms, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms by which nematophagous microorganisms infect nematodes and on the nematode defense against pathogenic attacks. We conclude by discussing several key areas for future research and development, including potential approaches to apply our recent understandings to develop effective biocontrol strategies. PMID:25938277

  15. Exploitation of FTA cartridges for the sampling, long-term storage, and DNA-based analyses of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Marek, Martin; Zouhar, Miloslav; Douda, Ondřej; Maňasová, Marie; Ryšánek, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    The use of DNA-based analyses in molecular plant nematology research has dramatically increased over recent decades. Therefore, the development and adaptation of simple, robust, and cost-effective DNA purification procedures are required to address these contemporary challenges. The solid-phase-based approach developed by Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) has been shown to be a powerful technology for the preparation of DNA from different biological materials, including blood, saliva, plant tissues, and various human and plant microbial pathogens. In this work, we demonstrate, for the first time, that this FTA-based technology is a valuable, low-cost, and time-saving approach for the sampling, long-term archiving, and molecular analysis of plant-parasitic nematodes. Despite the complex structure and anatomical organization of the multicellular bodies of nematodes, we report the successful and reliable DNA-based analysis of nematode high-copy and low-copy genes using the FTA technology. This was achieved by applying nematodes to the FTA cards either in the form of a suspension of individuals, as intact or pestle-crushed nematodes, or by the direct mechanical printing of nematode-infested plant tissues. We further demonstrate that the FTA method is also suitable for the so-called "one-nematode-assay", in which the target DNA is typically analyzed from a single individual nematode. More surprisingly, a time-course experiment showed that nematode DNA can be detected specifically in the FTA-captured samples many years after initial sampling occurs. Collectively, our data clearly demonstrate the applicability and the robustness of this FTA-based approach for molecular research and diagnostics concerning phytonematodes; this research includes economically important species such as the stem nematode (Ditylenchus dipsaci), the sugar beet nematode (Heterodera schachtii), and the Northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla). PMID:24093923

  16. Nucleic acid transfection and transgenesis in parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Lok, James B

    2012-04-01

    Transgenesis is an essential tool for assessing gene function in any organism, and it is especially crucial for parasitic nematodes given the dwindling armamentarium of effective anthelmintics and the consequent need to validate essential molecular targets for new drugs and vaccines. Two of the major routes of gene delivery evaluated to date in parasitic nematodes, bombardment with DNA-coated microparticles and intragonadal microinjection of DNA constructs, draw upon experience with the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Bombardment has been used to transiently transfect Ascaris suum, Brugia malayi and Litomosoides sigmodontis with both RNA and DNA. Microinjection has been used to achieve heritable transgenesis in Strongyloides stercoralis, S. ratti and Parastrongyloides trichosuri and for additional transient expression studies in B. malayi. A third route of gene delivery revisits a classic method involving DNA transfer facilitated by calcium-mediated permeabilization of recipient cells in developing B. malayi larvae and results in transgene inheritance through host and vector passage. Assembly of microinjected transgenes into multi-copy episomal arrays likely results in their transcriptional silencing in some parasitic nematodes. Methods such as transposon-mediated transgenesis that favour low-copy number chromosomal integration may remedy this impediment to establishing stable transgenic lines. In the future, stable transgenesis in parasitic nematodes could enable loss-of-function approaches by insertional mutagenesis, in situ expression of inhibitory double-stranded RNA or boosting RNAi susceptibility through heterologous expression of dsRNA processing and transport proteins. PMID:21880161

  17. Selecting soybean resistant to the cyst nematode Heterodera glycines using simple sequence repeat (microssatellite) markers.

    PubMed

    Espindola, S M C G; Hamawaki, O T; Oliveira, A P; Hamawaki, C D L; Hamawaki, R L; Takahashi, L M

    2016-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a major cause of soybean yield reduction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of marker-assisted selection to identify genotypes resistant to SCN race 3 infection, using Sat_168 and Sat-141 resistance quantitative trait loci. The experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions, using soybean populations originated from crosses between susceptible and resistant parent stock: CD-201 (susceptible) and Foster IAC (resistant), Conquista (susceptible) and S83-30 (resistant), La-Suprema (susceptible) and S57-11 (resistant), and Parecis (susceptible) and S65-50 (resistant). Plants were inoculated with SCN and evaluated according to the female index (FI), those with FI < 10% were classified as resistant to nematode infection. Plants were genotyped for SCN resistance using microsatellite markers Sat-141 and Sat_168. Marker selection efficiency was analyzed by a contingency table, taking into account genotypic versus phenotypic evaluations for each line. These markers were shown to be useful tool for selection of SCN race 3. PMID:26985946

  18. Ups and downs of RNA interference in parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Britton, Collette; Samarasinghe, Buddhini; Knox, David P

    2012-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used in Caenorhabiditis elegans to identify essential gene function. In parasitic nematodes RNAi has been reported to result in transcript knockdown of some target genes, but not others, thus limiting its use as a potential functional genomics tool. We recently extended work in Haemonchus contortus to examine why only some genes seem to be susceptible to RNAi and to test RNAi effects in vivo. Here we review our findings, which suggest that site of gene expression influences silencing. This most likely reflects limited uptake of dsRNA from the environment, a phenomenon also observed in other free-living nematodes. We discuss new technologies to improve dsRNA delivery, such as nanoparticles being developed for therapeutic siRNA delivery, and methods to monitor RNAi effects. Alternative approaches will be important in progressing the application of RNAi to identify essential gene function in parasitic nematodes. PMID:21854774

  19. Nematode parasites of waterfowl (Anseriformes) from western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, M.E.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty-four species of nematodes were found in 415 Anseriformes (Anatidae) of 27 species; 93.7% of birds over 4 weeks old were infected. Data on prevalence, host specificity, age of host, and geographic distribution are given. Infections were more intense in sick birds and birds in poor physical condition. Accidental or abnormal infection was more likely in sick than in normal birds. From 1 to 13 species of nematodes are reported from each host species, including 118 new host records, 3 nematodes new for North America, and 1 new species. Multiple infections were present in 76.5% of birds parasitized; eight species of nematodes were found in one whistling swan (Olor columbianus).

  20. Resistance of Grape Rootstocks to Plant-parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, H.; Zheng, L.; Walker, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Candidate grape rootstocks were selected through a rigorous screening program initiated with important sources of resistance to Meloidogyne pathotypes and to Xiphinema index in Muscadinia rotundifolia and Vitis species native to North America. Based on their rooting capability and horticultural characteristics, 200 candidates were selected from 5,000 progeny of multiple crosses between commercial grape rootstocks and wild grape species that exhibited resistance to nematodes. After a 15-year screening process, 13 selections emerged with either almost complete or complete combined resistance to M. incognita Race 3, M. incognita pathotype Harmony C, M. arenaria pathotype Harmony A, and X. index, important nematode pests of grapevines. Durability of this broad resistance was tested by challenging the selections with the target nematodes in combination and with the target nematodes in combinations with species not included in the screening process. Durability of resistance of the candidate rootstocks was also tested by exposure to the nematode communities of infested field soils from different locations. Breadth of resistance was determined on the basis of their host status to non-target nematodes, including Mesocriconema xenoplax, Pratylenchus vulnus, Tylenchulus semipenetrans and Paratylenchus hamatus. After a total of 204 separate trials, the rootstocks were released to the grape industry as UCD GRN1, UCD GRN2, UCD GRN3, UCD GRN4, and UCD GRN5. We provide a compilation of current knowledge of the host status of these five newly released rootstocks and of 27 other rootstock cultivars to plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:23482972

  1. Isolation of nematicidal compounds from Tagetes patula L. yellow flowers: structure-activity relationship studies against cyst nematode Heterodera zeae infective stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Faizi, Shaheen; Fayyaz, Shahina; Bano, Samina; Iqbal, Erum Yawar; Lubna; Siddiqi, Humaira; Naz, Aneela

    2011-09-14

    Bioassay-guided isolation studies on the extracts of yellow flowers of Tagetes patula L. against the Heterodera zeae were carried out to identify phytochemicals lethal to this economically important cyst nematode. In vitro investigation of a polar extract and fractions showing activity led to the isolation of phenolic compounds (flavonoids and phenolic acids). In the nonpolar extract, a few fatty acids, their methyl esters, and thiophenes (including α-terthienyl) were detected. In studies of compounds obtained commercially, α-terthienyl and gallic and linoleic acids showed 100% mortality at concentrations of 0.125% after 24 h. Assessment of structure-activity relationships revealed that an increase in the number of hydroxyl groups in phenolic acids increased the activity; with fatty acids, activity depended on chain length and the number and position of double bonds. Crude extracts of the flowers of different colors also have promising activity. PMID:21780738

  2. Mechanisms of molecular mimicry of plant CLE peptide ligands by the parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes that parasitize plant roots cause huge economic losses and have few mechanisms for control. Many parasitic nematodes infect plants by reprogramming root development to drive the formation of feeding structures. How nematodes take control of plant development is largely unknown. The CLE ...

  3. The Beet Cyst Nematode Heterodera schachtii Modulates the Expression of WRKY Transcription Factors in Syncytia to Favour Its Development in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad Amjad; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Kreil, David P.; Bohlmann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is the only source of nutrients throughout their life. A recent transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that thousands of genes are up-regulated or down-regulated in syncytia as compared to root segments from uninfected plants. Among the down-regulated genes are many which code for WRKY transcription factors. Arabidopsis contains 66 WRKY genes with 59 represented by the ATH1 GeneChip. Of these, 28 were significantly down-regulated and 6 up-regulated in syncytia as compared to control root segments. We have studied here the down-regulated genes WRKY6, WRKY11, WRKY17 and WRKY33 in detail. We confirmed the down-regulation in syncytia with promoter::GUS lines. Using various overexpression lines and mutants it was shown that the down-regulation of these WRKY genes is important for nematode development, probably through interfering with plant defense reactions. In case of WRKY33, this might involve the production of the phytoalexin camalexin. PMID:25033038

  4. Chemical Communicators in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Huettel, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical signals released by one organism and perceived by another organism are classified as semiochemicals. Semiochemicals are divided into pheromones, which elicit intraspecific responses, and allelochemics, which elicit interspecific responses. Nematodes utilize and (or) recognize signals from both categories of semiochemicals. The existence of pheromones, specifically sex and aggregation pheromones, has been demonstrated in numerous plant and animal parasitic and free-living nematodes. Sex pheromones have been isolated and purified from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heterodera glycines, and epidietic pheromones have been shown to be responsible for initiation of dauer juvenile formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Allelochemics cause interspecific responses in insects and other invertebrates but are only postulated to occur in nematodes. Food-finding behavior of nematodes is almost certainly caused by host-released allelochemic messengers. Understanding of the behavioral responses and the chemical messengers that affect bioregulation of various processes in nematodes will influence future management strategies. PMID:19294130

  5. Infection with parasitic nematodes confounds vaccination efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of IL-12 and IFN-' resulting from exposure to many bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens is responsible for Th1-derived protective responses that also can inhibit development of Th2-cells expressing IL-4-dependent immunity to extra cellular helminth parasites and vice versa. In a ...

  6. Can parasites halt the invader? Mermithid nematodes parasitizing the yellow-legged Asian hornet in France

    PubMed Central

    Zuccon, Dario; Rome, Quentin; Muller, Franck; Poinar Jr, George O.; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in France 10 years ago, the yellow-legged Asian bee-hawking hornet Vespa velutina has rapidly spread to neighboring countries (Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Italy, and Germany), becoming a new threat to beekeeping activities. While introduced species often leave behind natural enemies from their original home, which benefits them in their new environment, they can also suffer local recruitment of natural enemies. Three mermithid parasitic subadults were obtained from V. velutina adults in 2012, from two French localities. However, these were the only parasitic nematodes reported up to now in Europe, in spite of the huge numbers of nests destroyed each year and the recent examination of 33,000 adult hornets. This suggests that the infection of V. velutina by these nematodes is exceptional. Morphological criteria assigned the specimens to the genus Pheromermis and molecular data (18S sequences) to the Mermithidae, due to the lack of Pheromermis spp. sequences in GenBank. The species is probably Pheromermis vesparum, a parasite of social wasps in Europe. This nematode is the second native enemy of Vespa velutina recorded in France, after a conopid fly whose larvae develop as internal parasitoids of adult wasps and bumblebees. In this paper, we provide arguments for the local origin of the nematode parasite and its limited impact on hornet colony survival. We also clarify why these parasites (mermithids and conopids) most likely could not hamper the hornet invasion nor be used in biological control programs against this invasive species. PMID:26038716

  7. Can parasites halt the invader? Mermithid nematodes parasitizing the yellow-legged Asian hornet in France.

    PubMed

    Villemant, Claire; Zuccon, Dario; Rome, Quentin; Muller, Franck; Poinar, George O; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in France 10 years ago, the yellow-legged Asian bee-hawking hornet Vespa velutina has rapidly spread to neighboring countries (Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Italy, and Germany), becoming a new threat to beekeeping activities. While introduced species often leave behind natural enemies from their original home, which benefits them in their new environment, they can also suffer local recruitment of natural enemies. Three mermithid parasitic subadults were obtained from V. velutina adults in 2012, from two French localities. However, these were the only parasitic nematodes reported up to now in Europe, in spite of the huge numbers of nests destroyed each year and the recent examination of 33,000 adult hornets. This suggests that the infection of V. velutina by these nematodes is exceptional. Morphological criteria assigned the specimens to the genus Pheromermis and molecular data (18S sequences) to the Mermithidae, due to the lack of Pheromermis spp. sequences in GenBank. The species is probably Pheromermis vesparum, a parasite of social wasps in Europe. This nematode is the second native enemy of Vespa velutina recorded in France, after a conopid fly whose larvae develop as internal parasitoids of adult wasps and bumblebees. In this paper, we provide arguments for the local origin of the nematode parasite and its limited impact on hornet colony survival. We also clarify why these parasites (mermithids and conopids) most likely could not hamper the hornet invasion nor be used in biological control programs against this invasive species. PMID:26038716

  8. The activation and suppression of plant innate immunity by parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their host plants, often involving complex alterations in host cell morphology and function. It is puzzling how nematodes can achieve this, seemingly without activating the innate immune system of their hosts. Secretions released by infective juvenile nematodes are thought to be crucial for host invasion, for nematode migration inside plants, and for feeding on host cells. In the past, much of the research focused on the manipulation of developmental pathways in host plants by plant-parasitic nematodes. However, recent findings demonstrate that plant-parasitic nematodes also deliver effectors into the apoplast and cytoplasm of host cells to suppress plant defense responses. In this review, we describe the current insights in the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the activation and suppression of host innate immunity by plant-parasitic nematodes along seven critical evolutionary and developmental transitions in plant parasitism. PMID:24906126

  9. The expression of a naturally occuriing truncated allele of an alpha-SNAP gene suppresses plant parasitic nematode infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    rhg1, defined within a 67 kb region of DNA on chromosome 18, is a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) in Glycine max (soybean) providing defense to the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines). Transcriptional mapping experiments identified an alpha soluble NSF attachment protein (alpha-SNAP) wi...

  10. Limiting opportunities for cheating stabilizes virulence in insect parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David; Raymond, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative secretion of virulence factors by pathogens can lead to social conflict when cheating mutants exploit collective secretion, but do not contribute to it. If cheats outcompete cooperators within hosts, this can cause loss of virulence. Insect parasitic nematodes are important biocontrol tools that secrete a range of significant virulence factors. Critically, effective nematodes are hard to maintain without live passage, which can lead to virulence attenuation. Using experimental evolution, we tested whether social cheating might explain unstable virulence in the nematode Heterorhabditis floridensis by manipulating relatedness via multiplicity of infection (MOI), and the scale of competition. Passage at high MOI, which should reduce relatedness, led to loss of fitness: virulence and reproductive rate declined together and all eight independent lines suffered premature extinction. As theory predicts, relatedness treatments had more impact under stronger global competition. In contrast, low MOI passage led to more stable virulence and increased reproduction. Moreover, low MOI lineages showed a trade-off between virulence and reproduction, particularly for lines under stronger between-host competition. Overall, this study indicates that evolution of virulence theory is valuable for the culture of biocontrol agents: effective nematodes can be improved and maintained if passage methods mitigate possible social conflicts. PMID:26989437

  11. Plant-parasitic Nematode Problems in the Pacific Islands

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, John

    1988-01-01

    The Pacific islands have a diverse range of food and cash crops with indigenous and introduced nematode problems. The staple food crops have serious nematode pests, such as Meloidogyne spp. on sweet potato, Hirschmanniella miticausa causing corm rot of taro, and Pratylenchus coffeae and Radopholus sp. producing tuber dry rot of yams. Bananas are infested with P. coffeae or R. similis, citrus with Tylenchulus semipenetrans, rice with Aphelenchoides besseyi, and ginger with Meloidogyne spp. and R. similis. Rotylenchulus reniformis, P. zeae, P. brachyurus, and Helicotylenchus spp. are important on all of these and other crops, such as sugarcane, passion fruit, pawpaw, and cassava. Meloidogyne spp. cause serious damage to local and introduced leaf and fruit vegetables and other crops, such as tobacco, sugarcane, pawpaw, black pepper, and pyrethrum. Many other plant-parasitic genera and species, some undescribed, occur in the Pacific, and there are many islands still to be investigated. PMID:19290200

  12. Characterization of Three Novel Fatty Acid- and Retinoid-Binding Protein Genes (Ha-far-1, Ha-far-2 and Hf-far-1) from the Cereal Cyst Nematodes Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huan; Luo, Shujie; Huang, Wenkun; Cui, Jiangkuan; Li, Xin; Kong, Lingan; Jiang, Daohong; Chitwood, David J.; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi are major parasites of wheat, reducing production worldwide. Both are sedentary endoparasitic nematodes, and their development and parasitism depend strongly on nutrients obtained from hosts. Secreted fatty acid- and retinol-binding (FAR) proteins are nematode-specific lipid carrier proteins used for nutrient acquisition as well as suppression of plant defenses. In this study, we obtained three novel FAR genes Ha-far-1 (KU877266), Ha-far-2 (KU877267), Hf-far-1 (KU877268). Ha-far-1 and Ha-far-2 were cloned from H. avenae, encoding proteins of 191 and 280 amino acids with molecular masses about 17 and 30 kDa, respectively and sequence identity of 28%. Protein Blast in NCBI revealed that Ha-FAR-1 sequence is 78% similar to the Gp-FAR-1 protein from Globodera pallida, while Ha-FAR-2 is 30% similar to Rs-FAR-1 from Radopholus similis. Only one FAR protein Hf-FAR-1was identified in H. filipjevi; it had 96% sequence identity to Ha-FAR-1. The three proteins are alpha-helix-rich and contain the conserved domain of Gp-FAR-1, but Ha-FAR-2 had a remarkable peptide at the C-terminus which was random-coil-rich. Both Ha-FAR-1 and Hf-FAR-1 had casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, while Ha-FAR-2 had predicted N-glycosylation sites. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the three proteins clustered together, though Ha-FAR-1 and Hf-FAR-1 adjoined each other in a plant-parasitic nematode branch, but Ha-FAR-2 was distinct from the other proteins in the group. Fluorescence-based ligand binding analysis showed the three FAR proteins bound to a fluorescent fatty acid derivative and retinol and with dissociation constants similar to FARs from other species, though Ha-FAR-2 binding ability was weaker than that of the two others. In situ hybridization detected mRNAs of Ha-far-1 and Ha-far-2 in the hypodermis. The qRT-PCR results showed that the Ha-far-1and Ha-far-2 were expressed in all developmental stages; Ha-far-1 expressed 70 times more than Ha-far-2 in

  13. Characterization of Three Novel Fatty Acid- and Retinoid-Binding Protein Genes (Ha-far-1, Ha-far-2 and Hf-far-1) from the Cereal Cyst Nematodes Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Fen; Luo, Lilian; Peng, Huan; Luo, Shujie; Huang, Wenkun; Cui, Jiangkuan; Li, Xin; Kong, Lingan; Jiang, Daohong; Chitwood, David J; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Heterodera avenae and H. filipjevi are major parasites of wheat, reducing production worldwide. Both are sedentary endoparasitic nematodes, and their development and parasitism depend strongly on nutrients obtained from hosts. Secreted fatty acid- and retinol-binding (FAR) proteins are nematode-specific lipid carrier proteins used for nutrient acquisition as well as suppression of plant defenses. In this study, we obtained three novel FAR genes Ha-far-1 (KU877266), Ha-far-2 (KU877267), Hf-far-1 (KU877268). Ha-far-1 and Ha-far-2 were cloned from H. avenae, encoding proteins of 191 and 280 amino acids with molecular masses about 17 and 30 kDa, respectively and sequence identity of 28%. Protein Blast in NCBI revealed that Ha-FAR-1 sequence is 78% similar to the Gp-FAR-1 protein from Globodera pallida, while Ha-FAR-2 is 30% similar to Rs-FAR-1 from Radopholus similis. Only one FAR protein Hf-FAR-1was identified in H. filipjevi; it had 96% sequence identity to Ha-FAR-1. The three proteins are alpha-helix-rich and contain the conserved domain of Gp-FAR-1, but Ha-FAR-2 had a remarkable peptide at the C-terminus which was random-coil-rich. Both Ha-FAR-1 and Hf-FAR-1 had casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, while Ha-FAR-2 had predicted N-glycosylation sites. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the three proteins clustered together, though Ha-FAR-1 and Hf-FAR-1 adjoined each other in a plant-parasitic nematode branch, but Ha-FAR-2 was distinct from the other proteins in the group. Fluorescence-based ligand binding analysis showed the three FAR proteins bound to a fluorescent fatty acid derivative and retinol and with dissociation constants similar to FARs from other species, though Ha-FAR-2 binding ability was weaker than that of the two others. In situ hybridization detected mRNAs of Ha-far-1 and Ha-far-2 in the hypodermis. The qRT-PCR results showed that the Ha-far-1and Ha-far-2 were expressed in all developmental stages; Ha-far-1 expressed 70 times more than Ha-far-2 in

  14. Parasite-induced aposematism” protects entomopathogenic nematode parasites against invertebrate enemies

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Andy; Speed, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Aposematism is a well-known strategy in which prey defend themselves from predation by pairing defenses such as toxins, with warning signals that are often visually conspicuous color patterns. Here, we examine the possibility that aposematism can be induced in a host by colonies of infectious parasites in order to protect the parasites from the consequences of attacks on the host. Earlier studies show that avian predators are reluctant to feed on carcasses of host prey that are infected with the entomopathogenic nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. As the age of infection increases, the parasites kill and preserve the host and subsequently cause its color to change, becoming bright pink then red. Nematode colonies in dead hosts may also be vulnerable, however, to nocturnally active foragers that do not use vision in prey detection. Here, then we test a novel hypothesis that the nematode parasites also produce a warning odor, which functions to repel nocturnally active predators (in this case, the beetle Pterostichus madidus). We show that beetles decrease their feeding on infected insect prey as the age of infection increases and that olfactory cues associated with the infections are effective mechanisms for deterring beetle predation, even at very early stages of infection. We propose that “parasite-induced aposematism” from the nematodes serves to replace the antipredator defenses of the recently killed host. Because sessile carcasses are exposed to a greater range of predators than the live hosts, several alternative defense mechanisms are required to protect the colony, hence aposematic signals are likely diverse in such “parasite-induced aposematism.” PMID:27004015

  15. Chemical ecology and isolation of biologically active compounds from parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp) are possibly the economically most important and best-studied species of plant parasitic nematodes. However, for Meloidogyne spp and the intensely studied nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, very little is known about signaling within and in-between species. It h...

  16. Microsporidia Are Natural Intracellular Parasites of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Troemel, Emily R; Félix, Marie-Anne; Whiteman, Noah K; Barrière, Antoine; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes. PMID:19071962

  17. Large Particle Sorting to Isolate Live Parasitic Nematode Eggs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Alfonso; Bouchery, Tiffany; Le Gros, Graham; Price, Kylie M

    2016-01-01

    Traditional jet-in-air cell sorters have been designed and optimized to isolate small particles such as mammalian lymphocytes with an average diameter of 10 μm. We discuss the practical considerations of setting up a conventional jet-in-air cell sorter, using a 200-μm nozzle, to isolate the large parasitic nematode eggs of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, with a maximum size of 60 μm. The eggs were separated based on light scattering properties, no fluorescent dye or molecule was required. PMID:27037578

  18. Cyst nematode parasitism of Arabidopsis thaliana is inhibited by salicylic acid (SA) and elicits uncoupled SA-independent pathogenesis-related gene expression in roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compatible interactions between plants and sedentary endoparasitic nematodes, including Heterodera and Meloidogyne spp., require the formation of elaborate feeding sites in proximity to the root vasculature. Feeding site development involves a signal exchange between the host and the nematode and i...

  19. Molecular and functional characterization of parasitism genes of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato cyst nematodes (Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida) are quarantined pests threatening the potato industry in the United States. Secreted proteins encoded by parasitism genes expressed in the esophageal gland cells of plant-parasitic nematodes represent the primary molecules involved in pl...

  20. Plant-parasitic nematodes associated with grapevines, Vitis vinifera, in Washington and Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveys were conducted in eastern Washington and Idaho to determine the plant-parasitic nematodes associated with wine grape (Vitis vinifera) vineyards. The most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington and Idaho wine grape vineyards were Meloidogyne hapla, Paratylenchus ...

  1. PARASITISM GENES IDENTIFIED IN THE POTATO CYST NEMATODE, GLOBODERA ROSTOCHIENSIS, USING A COMPARATIVE GENOMIC APPROACH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stylet secretions are encoded by parasitism genes expressed in the esophageal gland cells of plant-parasitic nematodes. These are the primary signals that facilitate nematode migration in host roots and control the formation of the elaborate feeding cells necessary for the development and reproduct...

  2. Research collaborations can improve the use of organic amendments for plant-parasitic nematode management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of utilizing organic amendments to manage plant-parasitic nematodes is not new, but the widespread implementation of this management practice has still not been realized. The use of organic amendments for plant-parasitic nematode management is a complex process requiring an understandin...

  3. Characterization of the Pseudomonas genus of bacteria for plant-parasitic nematode control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are among the most destructive plant pests, causing substantial economic losses to agronomic crops worldwide. Current methods of using bacteria as biocontrol agents for plant-parasitic nematodes have met with limited success in part due to limited knowledge about mechanism...

  4. Root transformation of Glycine max with responsive promoters to nematode infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines), an obligate parasite of plants, is the most damaging pathogen of soybean, causing $469 to $818 million in soybean yield losses annually in the United States. However, there are no soybean cultivars available that are resistant to all SCN populati...

  5. The Ditylenchus destructor genome provides new insights into the evolution of plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinshui; Peng, Donghai; Chen, Ling; Liu, Hualin; Chen, Feng; Xu, Mengci; Ju, Shouyong; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-07-27

    Plant-parasitic nematodes were found in 4 of the 12 clades of phylum Nematoda. These nematodes in different clades may have originated independently from their free-living fungivorous ancestors. However, the exact evolutionary process of these parasites is unclear. Here, we sequenced the genome sequence of a migratory plant nematode, Ditylenchus destructor We performed comparative genomics among the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans and all the plant nematodes with genome sequences available. We found that, compared with C. elegans, the core developmental control processes underwent heavy reduction, though most signal transduction pathways were conserved. We also found D. destructor contained more homologies of the key genes in the above processes than the other plant nematodes. We suggest that Ditylenchus spp. may be an intermediate evolutionary history stage from free-living nematodes that feed on fungi to obligate plant-parasitic nematodes. Based on the facts that D. destructor can feed on fungi and has a relatively short life cycle, and that it has similar features to both C. elegans and sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes from clade 12, we propose it as a new model to study the biology, biocontrol of plant nematodes and the interaction between nematodes and plants. PMID:27466450

  6. Parasitic success without sex – the nematode experience.

    PubMed

    Castagnone-Sereno, P; Danchin, E G J

    2014-07-01

    Asexual reproduction is usually considered as an evolutionary dead end, and difficulties for asexual lineages to adapt to a fluctuating environment are anticipated due to the lack of sufficient genetic plasticity. Yet, unlike their sexual congeners, mitotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode species, Meloidogyne spp., are remarkably widespread and polyphagous, with the ability to parasitize most flowering plants. Although this may reflect in part the short-term stability of agricultural environments, the extreme parasitic success of these clonal species points them as an outstanding evolutionary paradox regarding current theories on the benefits of sex. The discovery that most of the genome of the clonal species M. incognita is composed of pairs of homologous but divergent segments that have presumably been evolving independently in the absence of sexual recombination has shed new light on this evolutionary paradox. Together with recent studies on other biological systems, including the closely related sexual species M. hapla and the ancient asexual bdelloid rotifers, this observation suggests that functional innovation could emerge from such a peculiar genome architecture, which may in turn account for the extreme adaptive capacities of these asexual parasites. Additionally, the higher proportion of transposable elements in M. incognita compared to M. hapla and other nematodes may also be responsible in part for genome plasticity in the absence of sexual reproduction. We foresee that ongoing sequencing efforts should lead soon to a genomic framework involving genetically diverse Meloidogyne species with various different reproductive modes. This will undoubtedly promote the entire genus as a unique and valuable model system to help deciphering the evolution of asexual reproduction in eukaryotes. PMID:25105196

  7. Overview of Organic Amendments for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes, with Case Studies from Florida

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Organic amendments have been widely used for management of plant-parasitic nematodes. Relatively rapid declines in nematode population levels may occur when decomposing materials release toxic compounds, while longer-term effects might include increases in nematode antagonists. Improved crop nutrition and plant growth following amendment use may lead to tolerance of plant-parasitic nematodes. Results depend on a great variety of factors such as material used, processing/composting of material, application rate, test arena, crop rotation and agronomic practices, soil type, climate, and other environmental factors. Reasons for variable performance and interpretation of results from amendment studies are discussed. Case studies of amendments for nematode management are reviewed from Florida, where composts and crop residues are the most frequently used amendments. Plant growth was often improved by amendment application, free-living nematodes (especially bacterivores) were often stimulated, but suppression of plant-parasitic nematodes was inconsistent. Amendments were generally not as effective as soil fumigation with methyl bromide for managing root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), and often population levels or galling of root-knot nematodes in amended plots did not differ from those in non-amended control plots. While amendments may improve plant growth and stimulate soil food webs, additional study and testing are needed before they could be used reliably for management of plant-parasitic nematodes under Florida conditions. PMID:22791915

  8. Overview of organic amendments for management of plant-parasitic nematodes, with case studies from Florida.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Robert

    2011-06-01

    Organic amendments have been widely used for management of plant-parasitic nematodes. Relatively rapid declines in nematode population levels may occur when decomposing materials release toxic compounds, while longer-term effects might include increases in nematode antagonists. Improved crop nutrition and plant growth following amendment use may lead to tolerance of plant-parasitic nematodes. Results depend on a great variety of factors such as material used, processing/composting of material, application rate, test arena, crop rotation and agronomic practices, soil type, climate, and other environmental factors. Reasons for variable performance and interpretation of results from amendment studies are discussed. Case studies of amendments for nematode management are reviewed from Florida, where composts and crop residues are the most frequently used amendments. Plant growth was often improved by amendment application, free-living nematodes (especially bacterivores) were often stimulated, but suppression of plant-parasitic nematodes was inconsistent. Amendments were generally not as effective as soil fumigation with methyl bromide for managing root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), and often population levels or galling of root-knot nematodes in amended plots did not differ from those in non-amended control plots. While amendments may improve plant growth and stimulate soil food webs, additional study and testing are needed before they could be used reliably for management of plant-parasitic nematodes under Florida conditions. PMID:22791915

  9. The Genomic Basis of Parasitism in the Strongyloides Clade of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Vicky L.; Tsai, Isheng J.; Coghlan, Avril; Reid, Adam J.; Holroyd, Nancy; Foth, Bernardo J.; Tracey, Alan; Cotton, James A.; Stanley, Eleanor J.; Beasley, Helen; Bennett, Hayley M.; Brooks, Karen; Harsha, Bhavana; Kajitani, Rei; Kulkarni, Arpita; Harbecke, Dorothee; Nagayasu, Eiji; Nichol, Sarah; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Quail, Michael A.; Randle, Nadine; Xia, Dong; Brattig, Norbert W.; Soblik, Hanns; Ribeiro, Diogo M.; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Takehiko; Denver, Dee R.; Grant, Warwick; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Lok, James B.; Murayama, Haruhiko; Wastling, Jonathan; Streit, Adrian; Kikuchi, Taisei; Viney, Mark; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Soil transmitted nematodes, including Strongyloides, cause one of the most prevalent Neglected Tropical Diseases. Here we compare the genomes of four Strongyloides spp., including the human pathogen S. stercoralis, and their close relatives that are facultatively parasitic (Parastrongyloides trichosuri) and free-living (Rhabditophanes sp). A significant paralogous expansion of key gene families – astacin-like and SCP/TAPS coding gene families – is associated with the evolution of parasitism in this clade. Exploiting the unique Strongyloides life cycle we compare the transcriptome of its parasitic and free-living stages and find that these same genes are upregulated in the parasitic stages, underscoring their role in nematode parasitism. PMID:26829753

  10. The transcriptomes of the cattle parasitic nematode Ostertagia ostartagi

    PubMed Central

    Abubucker, Sahar; Zarlenga, Dante S.; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Wang, Zhengyuan; McCarter, James P.; Gasbarree, Louis; Wilson, Richard K.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2009-01-01

    Ostertagia ostertagi is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode that affects cattle and leads to a loss of production. In this study, we present the first large-scale genomic survey of Ostertagia ostertagi by the analysis of expressed transcripts from three stages of the parasite: third-stage larvae, fourth-stage larvae and adult worms. Using an in silico approach, 2,284 genes were identified from over 7,000 expressed sequence tags and abundant transcripts were analyzed and characterized by their functional profile. Of the 2,284 genes, 66% had similarity to other known or predicted genes while the rest were novel and potentially represent genes specific to the species and/or stages. Furthermore, a subset of the novel proteins were structurally annotated and assigned putative function based on orthologs in C. elegans and corresponding RNA interference phenotypes. Hence, over 70% of the genes were annotated using protein sequences, domains and pathway databases. Differentially expressed transcripts from the two larval stages and their functional profiles were also studied leading to a more detailed understanding of the parasite’s life-cycle. The identified transcripts are a valuable resource for genomic studies of O. ostertagi and can facilitate the design of control strategies and vaccine programs. PMID:19346077

  11. Spatial distribution of plant-parasitic nematodes in semi-arid Vitis vinifera vineyards in Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington Vitis vinifera vineyards are Meloidogyne hapla, Mesocriconema xenoplax, Pratylenchus spp., Xiphinema americanum, and Paratylenchus sp.; however, little is known about their distribution in the soil profile. The vertical an...

  12. The plant-parasitic nematode collections of RRIP: The realization of an ISTC project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are important pests of agricultural and wild plants throughout Russia and the world. The best strategy for management of nematode damage is an integrated approach to the problem: i.e., the use of agrotechnological approaches (crop rotation, soil amendments, etc.), reasonabl...

  13. USDA ARS RESEARCH PROGRAMS ON MICROBES FOR MANAGEMENT OF PLANT-PARASITIC NEMATODES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restrictions on use of conventional nematicides have increased the need for new methods of managing plant-parasitic nematodes. Consequently, nematode-antagonistic microbes, and active compounds produced by such organisms, are being explored as potential additions to management practices. Programs ...

  14. Transcript Analysis of Parasitic Females of the Sedentary Semi-Endoparasitic Nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira, is a sedentary semi-endoparasitic roundworm that infects the roots of many economically important plant species. Engineered resistance to plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs) via RNA-interference (RNAi) has shown promise in providing h...

  15. Role of nematode peptides and other small molecules in plant parasitism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular, genetic, and biochemical studies are demonstrating an increasingly important role of peptide signaling in nematode parasitism of plants. To date, the majority of nematode-secreted peptides identified share similarity with plant CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE) peptides, but bioinformatics analyses of n...

  16. USE OF MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA TO MODEL THE INTERACTION BETWEEN PLANT-PARASITIC NEMATODES AND LEGUMES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are using Medicago truncatula as a model plant for examination of the interaction between plant-parasitic nematodes and legumes. One objective of this work is to identify and characterize genes from the plant that are involved in the host response to nematodes or in host resistance. Using bioinfo...

  17. Molecular characterization of the reniform nematode C-type lectin gene family reveals a likely role in mitigating environmental stresses during plant parasitism.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Satish; Jenkins, Johnie N; Wubben, Martin J

    2014-03-10

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a damaging semi-endoparasitic pathogen of more than 300 plant species. Transcriptome sequencing of R. reniformis parasitic females revealed an enrichment for sequences homologous to C-type lectins (CTLs), an evolutionarily ancient family of Ca(+2)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins that are involved in the innate immune response. To gain further insight as to the potential role of CTLs in facilitating plant parasitism by R. reniformis, we performed a comprehensive assessment of the CTL gene family. 5'- and 3'-RACE experiments identified a total of 11 R. reniformis CTL transcripts (Rr-ctl-1 through Rr-ctl-11) that ranged in length from 1083 to 1,194 bp and showed 93-99% identity with one another. An alignment of cDNA and genomic sequences revealed three introns with the first intron residing within the 5'-untranslated region. BLAST analyses showed the closest homologs belonging to the parasitic nematodes Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Heterodera glycines. Rr-ctl-1, -2, and -3 were expressed throughout the R. reniformis life cycle; whereas, the remaining Rr-ctl genes showed life stage-specific expression. Quantitative real time RT-PCR determined that Rr-ctl transcripts were 839-fold higher in sedentary female nematodes than the next most abundant life stage. Predicted Rr-CTL peptides ranged from 301 to 338 amino acids long, possessed an N-terminal signal peptide for secretion, and contained a conserved CLECT domain, including the mannose-binding motifs EPN and EPD and the conserved WND motif that is required for binding Ca(+2). In addition, Rr-CTL peptides harbored repeats of a novel 17-mer motif within their C-terminus that showed similarity to motifs associated with bacterial ice nucleation proteins. In situ hybridization of Rr-ctl transcripts within sedentary females showed specific accumulation within the hypodermis of the body regions exposed to the soil environment; those structures embedded within the

  18. Management of Plant-parasitic Nematodes with a Chitin-Urea Soil Amendment and Other Materials

    PubMed Central

    Westerdahl, B. B.; Carlson, H. L.; Grant, J.; Radewald, J. D.; Welch, N.; Anderson, C. A.; Darso, J.; Kirby, D.; Shibuya, F.

    1992-01-01

    Field trials were conducted with a chitin-urea soil amendment and several other nematicides on four crop-nematode combinations: tomato-Meloidogyne incognita; potato-Meloidogyne chitwoodi; walnut-Pratylenchus vulnus; and brussels sprouts-Heterodera schachtii. Significant (P ≤ 0.10) nematode population reductions were obtained with the chitin-urea soil amendment in the trims on potato and walnut. In the trials on brussels sprouts and on tomato, phytotoxicity occurred at rates of 1,868 and 1,093 kg/ha, respectively. Significant (P ≤ 0.10) nematode reductions were also obtained with metham sodium on potato; with 1,3-D on tomato and brussels sprouts; and with sodium tetrathiocarbonate, XRM 5053, fenamiphos, ethoprop, LX1075-05, LX1075-07, and SN 109106 on tomato. The following materials did not provide significant nematode control under the conditions of the particular experiments: metham sodium, oxamyl, and Yucca extract on tomato; and dazomet granules on brussels sprouts. PMID:19283044

  19. Management of Plant-parasitic Nematodes with a Chitin-Urea Soil Amendment and Other Materials.

    PubMed

    Westerdahl, B B; Carlson, H L; Grant, J; Radewald, J D; Welch, N; Anderson, C A; Darso, J; Kirby, D; Shibuya, F

    1992-12-01

    Field trials were conducted with a chitin-urea soil amendment and several other nematicides on four crop-nematode combinations: tomato-Meloidogyne incognita; potato-Meloidogyne chitwoodi; walnut-Pratylenchus vulnus; and brussels sprouts-Heterodera schachtii. Significant (P nematode population reductions were obtained with the chitin-urea soil amendment in the trims on potato and walnut. In the trials on brussels sprouts and on tomato, phytotoxicity occurred at rates of 1,868 and 1,093 kg/ha, respectively. Significant (P nematode reductions were also obtained with metham sodium on potato; with 1,3-D on tomato and brussels sprouts; and with sodium tetrathiocarbonate, XRM 5053, fenamiphos, ethoprop, LX1075-05, LX1075-07, and SN 109106 on tomato. The following materials did not provide significant nematode control under the conditions of the particular experiments: metham sodium, oxamyl, and Yucca extract on tomato; and dazomet granules on brussels sprouts. PMID:19283044

  20. Gastrointestinal nematode species diversity in Soay sheep kept in a natural environment without active parasite control.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Rona; Melville, Lynsey; Sargison, Fiona; Kenyon, Fiona; Nussey, Dan; Watt, Kathryn; Sargison, Neil

    2016-08-30

    Molecular methods based on ITS2 sequence analysis were used to identify strongylid parasites and describe their diversity in a management intervention and anthelmintic drug treatment-free sheep flock. Fourteen different nematode parasite species were identified in the flock and the results showed a greater level of nematode species diversity than is normally reported in managed farmed flocks, with the presence of parasites such as Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Ostertagia leptospicularis, Spiculopteragia houdemeri and Trichostrongylus retortaeformis that are considered to be absent or rare in sheep kept in comparable localities. The implied prevalences of Haemonchus contortus in lambs, and of Trichostrongylus axei in lambs, ewes and rams, were higher than those in farmed sheep kept in similar regions, while those of Teladorsagia circumcincta and Trichostrongylus vitrinus were lower. Comparison of the patterns of nematode parasite infection between the summer and autumn sampling periods showed differences from the scenarios that are commonplace in comparable managed flocks; with T. vitrinus burdens of the lambs being higher in the summer than in the winter, and Oesophagostomum venulosum being the predominant nematode species in the adult sheep during the summer, while more-or-less absent from these groups during the winter. Rams played an important role in the epidemiology of certain parasitic nematode species. The relatively non-pathogenic O. venulosum was the only parasitic nematode species to predominate in any group during the study. This preliminary characterisation of the nematode parasite burdens of sheep extensively grazed on diverse unimproved pastures will aid in the understanding of the parasitological consequences of intensive grazing management and of the manner in which modern agriculture upsets the equilibrium between parasites and their hosts. These factors must be accounted for when defining the concept of sustainable parasite control and informing

  1. Targeting internal processes of plant-parasitic nematodes in the pursuit of novel agents for their control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The success of plant-parasitic nematodes as competitors with humans for crops is evidenced by the parasites' significant and continuous economic drain on global agriculture. Scientific efforts dedicated to the control of plant-parasitic nematodes employ strategies from the environmental to molecular...

  2. Seasonal prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of sheep in Northern region of Nile Delta, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Khalafalla, Reda E; Elseify, Mahmoud A; Elbahy, Nasr M

    2011-02-01

    Over 1 year, from January to December 1999, a total of 173 slaughtered sheep at Al-Mahala abattoir were examined for presence of nematode parasites. Eighteen sheep (10.4%) were infected with eight different species of nematodes. The prevalence rates of detected nematode parasites were; Haemonchus contortus (3.5%), Haemonchus placei (1.7%), Trichuris ovis (5.8%), Parabronema skrjabini (2.9%), Ostertagia trifurcata (1.2%), Chabertia ovina (0.6%) and Strongyloides papillosus (0.6%), and Graphidiops species (2.9%). The seasonal prevalence of the infection with the nematode parasites was studied and the highest rate was during autumn (15.2%) followed by summer (11.1%) and winter (9.4%) while the lowest rate was during spring (5.6%). PMID:20922430

  3. Spatial analysis of soybean canopy response to soybean cyst nematodes (Heterodera glycines) in eastern Arkansas: An approach to future precision agriculture technology application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Subodh

    2008-10-01

    Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, commonly known as soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a serious widespread pathogen of soybean in the US. Present research primarily investigated feasibility of detecting SCN infestation in the field using aerial images and ground level spectrometric sensing. Non-spatial and spatial linear regression analyses were performed to correlate SCN population densities with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Green NDVI (GNDVI) derived from soybean canopy spectra. Field data were obtained from two fields; Field A and B under different nematode control strategies in 2003 and 2004. Analysis of aerial image data from July 18, 2004 from the Field A showed a significant relationship between SCN population at planting and the GNDVI (R2=0.17 at p=0.0006). Linear regression analysis revealed that SCN had a little effect on yield (R2 =0.14, at p=0.0001, RMSEP=1052.42 kg ha-1) and GNDVI (R 2=0.17 at p=0.0006, RMSEP=0.087) derived from the aerial imagery on a single date. However, the spatial regression analysis based on spherical semivariogram showed that the RMSEP was 0.037 for the GNDVI on July 18, 2004 and 427.32 kg ha-1 for yield on October 14, 2003 indicating better model performance. For July 18, 2004 data from Field B, a relationship between NDVI and the cyst counts at planting was significant (R2=0.5 at p=0.0468). Non-spatial analyses of the ground level spectrometric data for the first field showed that NDVI and GNDVI were correlated with cyst counts at planting (R 2=0.34 and 0.27 at p=0.0015 and 0.0127, respectively), and GNDVI was correlated with eggs count at planting (R2= 0.27 at p=0.0118). Both NDVI and GNDVI were correlated with egg counts at flowering (R 2=0.34 and 0.27 at p=0.0013 and 0.0018, respectively). However, paired T test to validate the above relationships showed that, predicted values of NDVI and GNDVI were significantly different. The statistical evidences suggested that variability in vegetation indices was caused

  4. Microsporidia-nematode associations in methane seeps reveal basal fungal parasitism in the deep sea

    PubMed Central

    Sapir, Amir; Dillman, Adler R.; Connon, Stephanie A.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Ingels, Jeroen; Mundo-Ocampo, Manuel; Levin, Lisa A.; Baldwin, James G.; Orphan, Victoria J.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    The deep sea is Earth's largest habitat but little is known about the nature of deep-sea parasitism. In contrast to a few characterized cases of bacterial and protistan parasites, the existence and biological significance of deep-sea parasitic fungi is yet to be understood. Here we report the discovery of a fungus-related parasitic microsporidium, Nematocenator marisprofundi n. gen. n. sp. that infects benthic nematodes at methane seeps on the Pacific Ocean floor. This infection is species-specific and has been temporally and spatially stable over 2 years of sampling, indicating an ecologically consistent host-parasite interaction. A high distribution of spores in the reproductive tracts of infected males and females and their absence from host nematodes' intestines suggests a sexual transmission strategy in contrast to the fecal-oral transmission of most microsporidia. N. marisprofundi targets the host's body wall muscles causing cell lysis, and in severe infection even muscle filament degradation. Phylogenetic analyses placed N. marisprofundi in a novel and basal clade not closely related to any described microsporidia clade, suggesting either that microsporidia-nematode parasitism occurred early in microsporidia evolution or that host specialization occurred late in an ancient deep-sea microsporidian lineage. Our findings reveal that methane seeps support complex ecosystems involving interkingdom interactions between bacteria, nematodes, and parasitic fungi and that microsporidia parasitism exists also in the deep-sea biosphere. PMID:24575084

  5. Msp40 effector of root-knot nematode manipulates plant immunity to facilitate parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Junhai; Liu, Pei; Liu, Qian; Chen, Changlong; Guo, Quanxin; Yin, Junmei; Yang, Guangsui; Jian, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) are obligate biotrophic parasites that invade plant roots and engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their hosts. Nematode secretions, some of which have immunosuppressing activity, play essential roles in successful parasitism; however, their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the RKN-specific gene MiMsp40, cloned from Meloidogyne incognita, is expressed exclusively in subventral oesophageal gland cells and is strongly upregulated during early parasitic stages. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing MiMsp40 were more susceptible to nematode infection than were wild type plants. Conversely, the host-derived MiMsp40 RNAi suppressed nematode parasitism and/or reproduction. Moreover, overexpression of MiMsp40 in plants suppressed the deposition of callose and the expression of marker genes for bacterial elicitor elf18-triggered immunity. Transient expression of MiMsp40 prevented Bax-triggered defence-related programmed cell death. Co-agroinfiltration assays indicated that MiMsp40 also suppressed macroscopic cell death triggered by MAPK cascades or by the ETI cognate elicitors R3a/Avr3a. Together, these results demonstrate that MiMsp40 is a novel Meloidogyne-specific effector that is injected into plant cells by early parasitic stages of the nematode and that plays a role in suppressing PTI and/or ETI signals to facilitate RKN parasitism. PMID:26797310

  6. Response of Plant Parasitic and Free Living Soil Nematodes to Composted Animal Manure Soil Amendments

    PubMed Central

    Renčo, M.; Kováčik, P.

    2012-01-01

    In an outside pot experiment, dry pig manure processed on pine sawdust litter and fermented for seven days by house fly larvae (fermented manure), and pine sawdust applied alone, and in combination with a spring application of inorganic nitrogen fertilizer were used to determine their effects on plant parasitic and free-living soil nematodes on sugar beets (cv. Antek). Non amended soil was used as a control. All treatments with fermented pig manure and sawdust with nitrogen fertilizer decreased number of plant parasitic nematodes and also root-fungal feeding nematodes compared to the untreated control. Sawdust applied alone had no effect on plant parasitic and root-fungal feeding nematode suppression. Free-living nematodes which were mainly bacteriovores and fungivores were significantly more abundant in soil amended with fermented pig manure, while the sawdust had no effect on these nematodes. The effect of all tested treatments on omnivores-predators was rather random, and in general, the number of these nematodes decreased after soil amendment applications compared to the untreated control. PMID:23482503

  7. Composition of the Cockroach Gut Microbiome in the Presence of Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ozawa, Sota; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are parasitized by thelastomatid nematodes, which live in an obligate manner in their hindgut and interact with the resident microbial community. In the present study, a composition analysis was performed on the gut microbiome of Periplaneta fuliginosa and P. americana to investigate natural and artificial infection by thelastomatid nematodes. Nine libraries of the 16S rRNA gene V3–V4 region were prepared for pyrosequencing. We examined the complete gut microbiome (fore-, mid-, and hindgut) of lab-reared P. fuliginosa naturally infected with the parasitic nematode Leidynema appendiculatum and those that were nematode-free, and complemented our study by characterizing the hindgut microbial communities of lab-reared P. americana naturally infected with Hammerschmidtiella diesingi and Thelastoma bulhoesi, artificially infected with L. appendiculatum, and those that were nematode-free. Our results revealed that the fore- and midgut of naturally infected and nematode-free P. fuliginosa have close microbial communities, which is in contrast with hindgut communities; the hindgut communities of both cockroaches exhibit higher microbial diversities in the presence of their natural parasites and marked differences were observed in the abundance of the most representative taxa, namely Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Our results have provided basic information and encourage further studies on multitrophic interactions in the cockroach gut as well as the thelastomatid nematodes that play a role in this environment. PMID:27524304

  8. Isolation of whole esophageal gland cells from plant-parasitic nematodes for transcriptome analyses and effector identification.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tom R; Hewezi, Tarek; Peng, Jiqing; Baum, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal glands of plant-parasitic nematodes are highly specialized cells whose gene expression products include secreted effector proteins, which govern nematode parasitism of host plants. Therefore, elucidating the transcriptomes of esophageal glands with the goal of identifying nematode effectors is a promising avenue to understanding nematode parasitism and its evolutionary origins as well as to devising nematode control strategies. We have developed a method to separate and isolate individual esophageal gland cells from multiple species of plant-parasitic nematodes while preserving RNA quality. We have used such isolated gland cells for transcriptome analysis via high-throughput DNA sequencing. This method relies on the differential histochemical staining of the gland cells after homogenization of phytonematode tissues. Total RNA was extracted from whole gland cells isolated from eight different plant-parasitic nematode species. To validate this approach, the isolated RNA from three plant-parasitic nematode species-Globodera rostochiensis, Pratylenchus penetrans, and Radopholus similis-was amplified, gel purified, and used for 454 sequencing. We obtained 456,801 total reads with an average read length of 409 bp. Sequence analyses revealed the presence of homologs of previously known nematode effectors in these libraries, thus validating our approach. These data provide compelling evidence that this technical advance can be used to relatively easily and expediently discover effector repertoires of plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:22876962

  9. Novel parasitic nematode-specific protein of bovine filarial parasite Setaria digitata displays conserved gene structure and ubiquitous expression.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, W W; Dassanayake, R S; Weerasena, S J; Silva Gunawardene, Y I

    2014-09-01

    Setaria digitata is an animal filarial parasite, which can cause fatal diseases to livestock such as cattle, sheep, goat, buffaloes, horses etc. inflicting considerable economic losses to livelihood of livestock farmers. In spite of this, the biology and parasitic nature of this organism is largely unknown. As a step towards understanding these, we screened the cDNA library of S. digitata and identified an open reading frame that code for parasitic nematode-specific protein, which showed a significant homology to functionally and structurally unannotated sequences of parasitic nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa etc., suggesting its role in parasitism. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the S. digitata novel gene (SDNP) is expressed in adult female and male, and microfilariae. Southern hybridization studies revealed that this gene is a single-copy gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic region obtained from overlapping PCR amplification indicated that the size of the genomic region is 1819 bp in which four exons encoding 205 amino acids were interrupted by three introns of varying lengths of 419, 659 and 123 bp, and also the expansion of the size of the introns of S. digitata compared to its orthologues by integrating micro and mini-satellite containing sequence. Sequences around the splice junctions were conserved and agreed with the general GT-AG splicing rule. The gene was found to be AT rich with a GC content of 38.1%. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the gene structure of SDNP and its orthologues is conserved and it expressed ubiqutously in all the stages of nematode's life cycle. Therefore, taking these outcomes together, it can be concluded that SDNP is a parasitic nematode-specific, single copy gene having conserved gene structure of four exons interrupted by three introns and that the gene is expressed ubiquitously throughout nematode's life cycle. PMID:25382479

  10. Nematode effector proteins: an emerging paradigm of parasitism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytonematodes use a stylet and secreted effectors to invade host tissues and extract nutrients to support their growth and development. The molecular function of nematode effectors is currently the subject of intense investigation. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of nematode ...

  11. Characterization of a New Species of Cyst Nematode Parasitizing Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Examination of soil around unthrifty corn roots in northwestern Tennessee (Obion County) in 2006 revealed high population densities of juvenile nematodes and lemon-shaped cysts. This nematode resembles Cactodera spp. in possessing a circumfenestrate vulva but lacking bullae and an underbridge. These...

  12. Characterization of effector mechanisms at the host: parasite interface during the immune response to tissue-dwelling intestinal nematode parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The protective immune response that develops following infection with many tissue dwelling intestinal nematode parasites is characterized by elevations in IL-4 and IL-13 and increased numbers of CD4+ T cells, granulocytes, and macrophages. These cells accumulate at the site of infection, and in many...

  13. The novel GrCEP12 peptide from the plant-parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis suppresses flg22-mediated PTI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis is a biotrophic pathogen that secretes effector proteins into host root cells to promote successful plant parasitism. In addition to the role in generating within root tissue the feeding cells essential for nematode development, nematode secreted effe...

  14. The genomic basis of parasitism in the Strongyloides clade of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Vicky L; Tsai, Isheng J; Coghlan, Avril; Reid, Adam J; Holroyd, Nancy; Foth, Bernardo J; Tracey, Alan; Cotton, James A; Stanley, Eleanor J; Beasley, Helen; Bennett, Hayley M; Brooks, Karen; Harsha, Bhavana; Kajitani, Rei; Kulkarni, Arpita; Harbecke, Dorothee; Nagayasu, Eiji; Nichol, Sarah; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Quail, Michael A; Randle, Nadine; Xia, Dong; Brattig, Norbert W; Soblik, Hanns; Ribeiro, Diogo M; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Takehiko; Denver, Dee R; Grant, Warwick; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D; Lok, James B; Murayama, Haruhiko; Wastling, Jonathan; Streit, Adrian; Kikuchi, Taisei; Viney, Mark; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Soil-transmitted nematodes, including the Strongyloides genus, cause one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases. Here we compare the genomes of four Strongyloides species, including the human pathogen Strongyloides stercoralis, and their close relatives that are facultatively parasitic (Parastrongyloides trichosuri) and free-living (Rhabditophanes sp. KR3021). A significant paralogous expansion of key gene families--families encoding astacin-like and SCP/TAPS proteins--is associated with the evolution of parasitism in this clade. Exploiting the unique Strongyloides life cycle, we compare the transcriptomes of the parasitic and free-living stages and find that these same gene families are upregulated in the parasitic stages, underscoring their role in nematode parasitism. PMID:26829753

  15. Biological control of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes using Duddingtonia flagrans in sheep under natural conditions in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-De Gives, Pedro; Zapata Nieto, Claudia; Hernández, Enrique Liébano; Arellano, María Eugenia López; Rodríguez, David Herrera; Garduño, Roberto González

    2006-10-01

    This investigation was aimed to evaluate the use of an oral bio-preparation containing Duddingtonia flagrans chlamydospores for the control of sheep gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes under the Mexican cold high plateau conditions. Two groups of gastrointestinal parasitic nematode naturally infected sheep, were randomly selected and located into two free-gastrointestinal nematode larvae paddocks. Group 1 received once a week a supplement containing D. flagrans chlamydospores mixed with oats and molasses. Group 2 received a similar supplement without any fungal material. After 5 months grazing animals were discarded from the experiment and two groups of free-nematode "tracer" sheep were located into the same paddocks to collect larvae from the contaminated pastures. Animals were slaughtered and necropsied and the nematodes were obtained and counted. A screening of the number of gastrointestinal nematode larvae present on the grass was performed and compared between the two grazing areas. The results showed 56% reduction in the Ostertagia (Teladorsagia) circumcincta and 94% reduction in the Nematodirus sp. population of the "tracer" sheep who grazed on the D. flagrans-treated sheep area, compared to the nematode population in animals grazed on the non-treated area. The results of the number of larvae on the grazing pastures showed a 51.1% reduction for H. contortus, and 100% for Cooperia sp. in the area with fungi. In the case of Trichostrongylus sp. no reduction was observed, when compared to the control group. PMID:17135538

  16. New soybean accessions evaluated for reaction to Heterodera glycines populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is a serious pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in the USA and worldwide. Annual yield losses in the USA are estimated to be over $1 billion. These losses have remained stable with the use of resistant cultivars but over time nematode...

  17. A combined parasitological molecular approach for noninvasive characterization of parasitic nematode communities in wild hosts.

    PubMed

    Budischak, Sarah A; Hoberg, Eric P; Abrams, Art; Jolles, Anna E; Ezenwa, Vanessa O

    2015-09-01

    Most hosts are concurrently or sequentially infected with multiple parasites; thus, fully understanding interactions between individual parasite species and their hosts depends on accurate characterization of the parasite community. For parasitic nematodes, noninvasive methods for obtaining quantitative, species-specific infection data in wildlife are often unreliable. Consequently, characterization of gastrointestinal nematode communities of wild hosts has largely relied on lethal sampling to isolate and enumerate adult worms directly from the tissues of dead hosts. The necessity of lethal sampling severely restricts the host species that can be studied, the adequacy of sample sizes to assess diversity, the geographic scope of collections and the research questions that can be addressed. Focusing on gastrointestinal nematodes of wild African buffalo, we evaluated whether accurate characterization of nematode communities could be made using a noninvasive technique that combined conventional parasitological approaches with molecular barcoding. To establish the reliability of this new method, we compared estimates of gastrointestinal nematode abundance, prevalence, richness and community composition derived from lethal sampling with estimates derived from our noninvasive approach. Our noninvasive technique accurately estimated total and species-specific worm abundances, as well as worm prevalence and community composition when compared to the lethal sampling method. Importantly, the rate of parasite species discovery was similar for both methods, and only a modest number of barcoded larvae (n = 10) were needed to capture key aspects of parasite community composition. Overall, this new noninvasive strategy offers numerous advantages over lethal sampling methods for studying nematode-host interactions in wildlife and can readily be applied to a range of study systems. PMID:25644900

  18. Biocontrol: Bacillus penetrans and Related Parasites of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Sayre, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus penetrans Mankau, 1975, previously described as Duboscqia penetrans Thorne 1940, is a candidate agent for biocontrol of nematodes. This review considers the life stages of this bacterium: vegetative growth phase, colony fragmentation, sporogenesis, soil phase, spore attachment, and penetration into larvae of root-knot nematodes. The morphology of the microthallus colonies and the unusual external features of the spore are discussed. Taxonomic affinities with the actinomycetes, particularly with the genus Pasteuria, are considered. Also discussed are other soil bacterial species that are potential biocontrol agents. Products of their bacterial fermentation in soil are toxic to nematodes, making them effective biocontrol agents. PMID:19300701

  19. Fighting while parasitized: can nematode infections affect the outcome of staged combat in beetles?

    PubMed

    Vasquez, David; Willoughby, Anna; Davis, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    The effects of non-lethal parasites may be felt most strongly when hosts engage in intense, energy-demanding behaviors. One such behavior is fighting with conspecifics, which is common among territorial animals, including many beetle species. We examined the effects of parasites on the fighting ability of a saproxylic beetle, the horned passalus (Odontotaenius disjunctus, Family: Passalidae), which is host to a non-lethal nematode, Chondronema passali. We pitted pairs of randomly-chosen (but equally-weighted) beetles against each other in a small arena and determined the winner and aggression level of fights. Then we examined beetles for the presence, and severity of nematode infections. There was a non-significant tendency (p = 0.065) for the frequency of wins, losses and draws to differ between beetles with and without C. passali; non-parasitized individuals (n = 104) won 47% of their fights while those with the parasite (n = 88) won 34%, a 13% difference in wins. The number of nematodes in a beetle affected the outcome of fights between infected and uninfected individuals in an unexpected fashion: fighting ability was lowest in beetles with the lowest (p = 0.033), not highest (p = 0.266), nematode burdens. Within-fight aggression was highest when both beetles were uninfected and lowest when both were infected (p = 0.034). Collectively, these results suggest the nematode parasite, C. passali, is associated with a modest reduction in fighting ability in horned passalus beetles, consistent with the idea that parasitized beetles have lower energy available for fighting. This study adds to a small but growing body of evidence showing how parasites negatively influence fighting behavior in animals. PMID:25830367

  20. EST sequencing of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus suggests a shift in gene expression during transition to the parasitic stages.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, R; Visser, A; Otsen, M; Tibben, J; Lenstra, J A; Roos, M H

    2000-09-01

    Expressed sequence tags from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus were generated in order to identify anchor loci for comparative mapping between nematode genomes and candidate targets for future control measures. In total, 370 SL1 trans-spliced cDNAs from different developmental stages representing 195 different genes were partially sequenced. From these expressed sequence tags 50% were similar to genes with a known or predicted function and 19% were similar to nematode sequences with no ascribed function. From the first, free-living L1 and L3 stages relatively many cDNAs matched to housekeeping genes, and 11% (L1) or 23% (L3) of the encoded proteins were predicted to contain signal peptides. In contrast, no function could be ascribed to most of the cDNAs from the early L5 and adult parasitic stages, but for 30% (L5) or 55% (adult) of the encoded proteins a signal sequence was predicted. This limited analysis suggests that during the transition from the free-living to parasitic stages gene expression shifts towards the synthesis of less conserved extracellular proteins. These proteins offer the best perspectives for vaccine development and the development of anthelmintic drugs. In contrast, cDNAs from the first larval stages may be most suitable for comparative mapping with the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:10989145

  1. Benthimermithid nematode parasites of the amphipod Hirondellea dubia in the Kermadec Trench.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Daniel; Wilson, James

    2016-04-01

    Parasitic nematodes have evolved to exploit a wide variety of hosts living in a range of marine environments. Benthimermithid nematodes occur deeper than any other nematode parasites (down to 5880 m depth) but are mostly known from free-living adult stages living in the sediments, and parasitic juveniles are seldom encountered. In the present study, the benthimermithid Trophomera cf. marionensis was discovered in the body cavity of the lysianassoid amphipod Hirondellea dubia sampled between 7018 and 10,005 m depths in the Kermadec Trench. The nematode specimens, which could be readily observed through the transparent exoskeleton of freshly caught amphipods, were up to twice the length of T. marionensis specimens described from the Atlantic and East Pacific Oceans but were otherwise morphologically identical. Because of its wide geographical and water depth distribution (almost 10,000 m), T. marionensis likely consists of several cryptic species. The prevalence of Trophomera parasites among the host population was estimated to be substantially less than 1 %; such a low proportion of parasitised hosts could help explain why so few Trophomera specimens have been obtained from their host so far. The present study demonstrates that parasites can occur throughout the entire ocean depth and that they likely occur in other hadal trenches where H. dubia and other lysianassoid amphipods also dominate. PMID:26779924

  2. Parasitism of Molluscs by Nematodes: Types of Associations and Evolutionary Trends

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, P. S.; Grewal, S. K.; Tan, L.; Adams, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    Although there are no confirmed fossil records of mollusc parasitic nematodes, diverse associations of more than 108 described nematode species with slugs and snails provide a fertile ground for speculation of how mollusc parasitism evolved in nematodes. Current phylogenic resolution suggests that molluscs have been independently acquired as hosts on a number of occasions. However, molluscs are significant as hosts for only two major groups of nematodes: as intermediate hosts for metastrongyloids and as definitive hosts for a number of rhabditids. Of the 61 species of nematodes known to use molluscs as intermediate hosts, 49 belong to Metastrongyloidea (Order Strongylida); of the 47 species of nematodes that use molluscs as definitive hosts, 33 belong to the Order Rhabditida. Recent phylogenetic hypotheses have been unable to resolve whether metastrongyloids are sister taxa to those rhabditids that use molluscs as definitive hosts. Although most rhabditid nematodes have been reported not to kill their mollusc hosts prior to their reproduction, some species are pathogenic. In fact, infective juveniles of Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita vector a lethal bacterium into the slug host in which they reproduce. This life cycle is remarkably similar to the entomopathogenic nematodes in the families Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae. Also, the discoveries of Alloionema and Pellioditis in slugs are interesting, as these species have been speculated to represent the ancestral forms of the entomopathogenic nematodes. Development of the infective stage appears to be an important step toward the acquisition of molluscs as definitive hosts, and the association with specific bacteria may have arisen in conjunction with the evolution of necromeny. PMID:19265989

  3. Serine Protease-mediated Host Invasion by the Parasitic Nematode Steinernema carpocapsae*

    PubMed Central

    Toubarro, Duarte; Lucena-Robles, Miguel; Nascimento, Gisela; Santos, Romana; Montiel, Rafael; Veríssimo, Paula; Pires, Euclides; Faro, Carlos; Coelho, Ana V.; Simões, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Steinernema carpocapsae is an insect parasitic nematode used in biological control, which infects insects penetrating by mouth and anus and invading the hemocoelium through the midgut wall. Invasion has been described as a key factor in nematode virulence and suggested to be mediated by proteases. A serine protease cDNA from the parasitic stage was sequenced (sc-sp-1); the recombinant protein was produced in an Escherichia coli system, and a native protein was purified from the secreted products. Both proteins were confirmed by mass spectrometry to be encoded by the sc-sp-1 gene. Sc-SP-1 has a pI of 8.7, a molecular mass of 27.3 kDa, a catalytic efficiency of 22.2 × 104 s−1 m−1 against N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA, and is inhibited by chymostatin (IC 0.07) and PMSF (IC 0.73). Sc-SP-1 belongs to the chymotrypsin family, based on sequence and biochemical analysis. Only the nematode parasitic stage expressed sc-sp-1. These nematodes in the midgut lumen, prepared to invade the insect hemocoelium, expressed higher levels than those already in the hemocoelium. Moreover, parasitic nematode sense insect peritrophic membrane and hemolymph more quickly than they do other tissues, which initiates sc-sp-1 expression. Ex vivo, Sc-SP-1 was able to bind to insect midgut epithelium and to cause cell detachment from basal lamina. In vitro, Sc-SP-1 formed holes in an artificial membrane model (Matrigel), whereas Sc-SP-1 treated with PMSF did not, very likely because it hydrolyzes matrix glycoproteins. These findings highlight the S. carpocapsae-invasive process that is a key step in the parasitism thus opening new perspectives for improving nematode virulence to use in biological control. PMID:20656686

  4. Quantitative Detection of Double-Stranded RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing of Parasitism Genes in Heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into an organism to induce sequence-specific RNA interference (RNAi) of a target transcript has become a powerful technique to investigate gene function in nematodes and many organisms. Data provided here indicate that the inclusion of 1-2 mM spermid...

  5. Systemic above- and belowground cross talk: hormone-based responses triggered by Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivores in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Egger, Barbara; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Hofmann, Julia; Schausberger, Peter; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Above- and belowground plant parts are simultaneously attacked by different pests and pathogens. The host mediates these interactions and physiologically reacts, e.g. with local and systemic alterations of endogenous hormone levels coupled with coordinated transcriptional changes. This in turn affects attractiveness and susceptibility of the plant to subsequent attackers. Here, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used to study stress hormone-based systemic responses triggered by simultaneous root parasitism by the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivory by the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and the spider mite Tetranychus urticae. First, HPLC/MS and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR are used to show that nematode parasitism strongly affects stress hormone levels and expression of hormone marker genes in shoots. Previous nematode infection is then demonstrated to affect the behavioural and life history performance of both arthropods. While thrips explicitly avoid nematode-infected plants, spider mites prefer them. In addition, the life history performance of T. urticae is significantly enhanced by nematode infection. Finally, systemic changes triggered by shoot-feeding F. occidentalis but not T. urticae are shown to make the roots more attractive for H. schachtii. This work emphasises the importance of above- and belowground signalling and contributes to a better understanding of plant systemic defence mechanisms against plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:26324462

  6. Systemic above- and belowground cross talk: hormone-based responses triggered by Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivores in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Egger, Barbara; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Hofmann, Julia; Schausberger, Peter; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Above- and belowground plant parts are simultaneously attacked by different pests and pathogens. The host mediates these interactions and physiologically reacts, e.g. with local and systemic alterations of endogenous hormone levels coupled with coordinated transcriptional changes. This in turn affects attractiveness and susceptibility of the plant to subsequent attackers. Here, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used to study stress hormone-based systemic responses triggered by simultaneous root parasitism by the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivory by the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and the spider mite Tetranychus urticae. First, HPLC/MS and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR are used to show that nematode parasitism strongly affects stress hormone levels and expression of hormone marker genes in shoots. Previous nematode infection is then demonstrated to affect the behavioural and life history performance of both arthropods. While thrips explicitly avoid nematode-infected plants, spider mites prefer them. In addition, the life history performance of T. urticae is significantly enhanced by nematode infection. Finally, systemic changes triggered by shoot-feeding F. occidentalis but not T. urticae are shown to make the roots more attractive for H. schachtii. This work emphasises the importance of above- and belowground signalling and contributes to a better understanding of plant systemic defence mechanisms against plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:26324462

  7. Co-adaptation mechanisms in plant-nematode systems.

    PubMed

    Zinovieva, S V

    2014-01-01

    The review is aimed to analyze the biochemical and immune-breaking adaptive mechanisms established in evolution of plant parasitic nematodes. Plant parasitic nematodes are obligate, biotrophic pathogens of numerous plant species. These organisms cause dramatic changes in the morphology and physiology of their hosts. The group of sedentary nematodes which are among the most damaging plant-parasitic nematodes cause the formation of special organs called nematode feeding sites in the root tissue called syncytium (cyst nematodes, CN; Heterodera and Globodera spp.) or giant cells (root-knot nematodes, RKN; Meloidogyne spp.). The most pronounced morphological adaptations of nematodes for plant parasitism include a hollow, protrusible stylet (feeding spear) connected to three esophageal gland cells that express products secreted into plant tissues through the stylet. Several gene products secreted by the nematode during parasitism have been identified. The current battery of candidate parasitism proteins secreted by nematodes to modify plant tissues for parasitism includes cell-wall-modifying enzymes, multiple regulators of host cell cycle and metabolism, proteins that can localize near the plant cell nucleus, potential suppressors of host defense, and mimics of plant molecules. Plants are usually able to recognize and react to parasites by activating various defense responses. When the response of the plant is too weak or too late, a successful infection (compatible interaction) will result. A rapid and strong defense response (e. g. due to the presence of a resistance gene) will result in the resistant (incompatible) reaction. Defense responses include the production of toxic oxygen radicals and systemic signaling compounds as well as the activation of defense genes that lead to the production of structural barriers or other toxins. PMID:25272462

  8. Serine/threonine phosphatases in socioeconomically important parasitic nematodes--prospects as novel drug targets?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bronwyn E; Hofmann, Andreas; McCluskey, Adam; Gasser, Robin B

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the fundamental biology of parasitic nematodes (=roundworms) that cause serious diseases, affecting literally billions of animals and humans worldwide. Unlocking the biology of these neglected pathogens using modern technologies will yield crucial and profound knowledge of their molecular biology, and could lead to new treatment and control strategies. Supported by studies in the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, some recent investigations have provided improved insights into selected protein phosphatases (PPs) of economically important parasitic nematodes (Strongylida). In the present article, we review this progress and assess the potential of serine/threonine phosphatase (STP) genes and/or their products as targets for new nematocidal drugs. Current information indicates that some small molecules, known to specifically inhibit PPs, might be developed as nematocides. For instance, some cantharidin analogues are known to display exquisite PP-inhibitor activity, which indicates that some of them could be designed and tailored to specifically inhibit selected STPs of nematodes. This information provides prospects for the discovery of an entirely novel class of nematocides, which is of paramount importance, given the serious problems linked to anthelmintic resistance in parasitic nematode populations of livestock, and has the potential to lead to significant biotechnological outcomes. PMID:20732402

  9. Recent Duplication and Functional Divergence in Parasitic Nematode Levamisole-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duguet, Thomas B.; Charvet, Claude L.; Forrester, Sean G.; Wever, Claudia M.; Dent, Joseph A.; Neveu, Cedric; Beech, Robin N.

    2016-01-01

    Helminth parasites rely on fast-synaptic transmission in their neuromusculature to experience the outside world and respond to it. Acetylcholine plays a pivotal role in this and its receptors are targeted by a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds used in human health and for the control of parasitic disease. The model, Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by a large number of acetylcholine receptor subunit genes, a feature shared across the nematodes. This dynamic family is characterized by both gene duplication and loss between species. The pentameric levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor has been characterized from C. elegans, comprised of five different subunits. More recently, cognate receptors have been reconstituted from multiple parasitic nematodes that are found to vary in subunit composition. In order to understand the implications of receptor composition change and the origins of potentially novel drug targets, we investigated a specific example of subunit duplication based on analysis of genome data for 25 species from the 50 helminth genome initiative. We found multiple independent duplications of the unc-29, acetylcholine receptor subunit, where codon substitution rate analysis identified positive, directional selection acting on amino acid positions associated with subunit assembly. Characterization of four gene copies from a model parasitic nematode, Haemonchus contortus, demonstrated that each copy has acquired unique functional characteristics based on phenotype rescue of transgenic C. elegans and electrophysiology of receptors reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. We found evidence that a specific incompatibility has evolved for two subunits co-expressed in muscle. We demonstrated that functional divergence of acetylcholine receptors, driven by directional selection, can occur more rapidly than previously thought and may be mediated by alteration of receptor assembly. This phenomenon is common among the clade V parasitic

  10. Recent Duplication and Functional Divergence in Parasitic Nematode Levamisole-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Duguet, Thomas B; Charvet, Claude L; Forrester, Sean G; Wever, Claudia M; Dent, Joseph A; Neveu, Cedric; Beech, Robin N

    2016-07-01

    Helminth parasites rely on fast-synaptic transmission in their neuromusculature to experience the outside world and respond to it. Acetylcholine plays a pivotal role in this and its receptors are targeted by a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds used in human health and for the control of parasitic disease. The model, Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by a large number of acetylcholine receptor subunit genes, a feature shared across the nematodes. This dynamic family is characterized by both gene duplication and loss between species. The pentameric levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor has been characterized from C. elegans, comprised of five different subunits. More recently, cognate receptors have been reconstituted from multiple parasitic nematodes that are found to vary in subunit composition. In order to understand the implications of receptor composition change and the origins of potentially novel drug targets, we investigated a specific example of subunit duplication based on analysis of genome data for 25 species from the 50 helminth genome initiative. We found multiple independent duplications of the unc-29, acetylcholine receptor subunit, where codon substitution rate analysis identified positive, directional selection acting on amino acid positions associated with subunit assembly. Characterization of four gene copies from a model parasitic nematode, Haemonchus contortus, demonstrated that each copy has acquired unique functional characteristics based on phenotype rescue of transgenic C. elegans and electrophysiology of receptors reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. We found evidence that a specific incompatibility has evolved for two subunits co-expressed in muscle. We demonstrated that functional divergence of acetylcholine receptors, driven by directional selection, can occur more rapidly than previously thought and may be mediated by alteration of receptor assembly. This phenomenon is common among the clade V parasitic

  11. Rendering the Intractable More Tractable: Tools from Caenorhabditis elegans Ripe for Import into Parasitic Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jordan D

    2015-12-01

    Recent and rapid advances in genetic and molecular tools have brought spectacular tractability to Caenorhabditis elegans, a model that was initially prized because of its simple design and ease of imaging. C. elegans has long been a powerful model in biomedical research, and tools such as RNAi and the CRISPR/Cas9 system allow facile knockdown of genes and genome editing, respectively. These developments have created an additional opportunity to tackle one of the most debilitating burdens on global health and food security: parasitic nematodes. I review how development of nonparasitic nematodes as genetic models informs efforts to import tools into parasitic nematodes. Current tools in three commonly studied parasites (Strongyloides spp., Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum) are described, as are tools from C. elegans that are ripe for adaptation and the benefits and barriers to doing so. These tools will enable dissection of a huge array of questions that have been all but completely impenetrable to date, allowing investigation into host-parasite and parasite-vector interactions, and the genetic basis of parasitism. PMID:26644478

  12. Ascarosides coordinate the dispersal of a plant-parasitic nematode with the metamorphosis of its vector beetle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lilin; Zhang, Xinxing; Wei, Yanan; Zhou, Jiao; Zhang, Wei; Qin, Peijun; Chinta, Satya; Kong, Xiangbo; Liu, Yunpeng; Yu, Haiying; Hu, Songnian; Zou, Zhen; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Sun, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Insect vectors are required for the transmission of many species of parasitic nematodes, but the mechanisms by which the vectors and nematodes coordinate their life cycles are poorly understood. Here, we report that ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones, are produced not only by a plant-parasitic nematode, but also by its vector beetle. The pinewood nematode and its vector beetle cause pine wilt disease, which threatens forest ecosystems world-wide. Ascarosides secreted by the dispersal third-stage nematode LIII larvae promote beetle pupation by inducing ecdysone production in the beetle and up-regulating ecdysone-dependent gene expression. Once the beetle develops into the adult stage, it secretes ascarosides that attract the dispersal fourth-stage nematode LIV larvae, potentially facilitating their movement into the beetle trachea for transport to the next pine tree. These results demonstrate that ascarosides play a key role in the survival and spread of pine wilt disease. PMID:27477780

  13. Ascarosides coordinate the dispersal of a plant-parasitic nematode with the metamorphosis of its vector beetle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lilin; Zhang, Xinxing; Wei, Yanan; Zhou, Jiao; Zhang, Wei; Qin, Peijun; Chinta, Satya; Kong, Xiangbo; Liu, Yunpeng; Yu, Haiying; Hu, Songnian; Zou, Zhen; Butcher, Rebecca A; Sun, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Insect vectors are required for the transmission of many species of parasitic nematodes, but the mechanisms by which the vectors and nematodes coordinate their life cycles are poorly understood. Here, we report that ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones, are produced not only by a plant-parasitic nematode, but also by its vector beetle. The pinewood nematode and its vector beetle cause pine wilt disease, which threatens forest ecosystems world-wide. Ascarosides secreted by the dispersal third-stage nematode LIII larvae promote beetle pupation by inducing ecdysone production in the beetle and up-regulating ecdysone-dependent gene expression. Once the beetle develops into the adult stage, it secretes ascarosides that attract the dispersal fourth-stage nematode LIV larvae, potentially facilitating their movement into the beetle trachea for transport to the next pine tree. These results demonstrate that ascarosides play a key role in the survival and spread of pine wilt disease. PMID:27477780

  14. The prospects for biological control of the free-living stages of nematode parasites of livestock.

    PubMed

    Waller, P J; Faedo, M

    1996-01-01

    Control of nematode parasites of livestock is focused almost entirely on the parasitic stages within the host. Current methods rely on anthelmintic drugs, but these are under increasing threat with the development of resistance covering the whole spectrum of anthelmintics amongst the important nematode species of a range of livestock. However, invariably the greatest proportion of the parasite biomass resides not within the animal hosts, but in the external environment-commonly on pasture. It is in this environment that the free-living stages are vulnerable to a range of abiotic factors (extremes in temperature and desiccation) and biotic factors (macro- and micro-organisms) that may decimate their numbers. Of the latter, there are organisms, which exert their effects either indirectly by rendering faecal deposits inimical for the development of nematode eggs through to infective larvae, or directly by acting as pathogens or by exploiting the free-living stages as a food source. Within this vast assemblage of organisms, which include microarthropods, protozoa, viruses, bacteria and fungi, could well emerge a variety of biological control agents of nematode parasites. At present, greatest interest lies with the nematode-destroying fungi. Work has progressed from Petri dishes, to plots, to paddocks with several species of the genus Arthrobotrys and Duddingtonia flagrans. These studies indicate that the voracious nematophagous capabilities of these fungi, clearly demonstrated in vitro, translate to reductions in the number of infective larvae on pasture and indicate that levels of control, comparable to conventional schemes using anthelmintics, can be achieved. The challenge now lies in developing methods of administration of fungi to animals which can be applied under practical farm conditions. However, the pursuit of candidates for biological control of nematode parasites of livestock should not involve just a few species of nematophagous fungi. More than 100

  15. Community Composition of Plant-parasitic Nematodes in Native and Cultivated Cerrados of Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S. P.; Cares, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Communities of plant-parasitic nematodes collected from five different vegetation types (canopy woodland, savannah, gallery forest, cultivated perennial, and annual plants) and soils (yellowish red latosols, dark red latosols, arenosols, acrisols, and gleysols) were studied. Ninety percent of the soil samples collected from savannah contained at least four genera of plant-parasitic nematodes. The highest population densities were recovered from perennial plants and from acrisols. Nematodes from perennial and annual plants formed one cluster, which had a similar flexible-beta distance to that from the gallery forest. The distance in the native savannah and in canopy woodland was very different. Distance values for the soil aspect were similar for arenosols, yellowish, and dark red latosols. The value for acrisols was much larger than for the other soils. PMID:19277285

  16. Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) and Steam As Alternatives For Parasitic Nematode Control In Florida Floriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) and steam are being investigated for controlling a broad spectrum of pests, including parasitic nematodes and weeds. ASD is a biologically-based method that combines organic amendments and solar heat with water saturated soil to create oxygen-depleted soil co...

  17. De novo transcriptome assembly of the plant-parasitic nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rotylenchulus reniformis, commonly known as the reniform nematode, is a pathogen of cotton, soybean, and sweet potatoes in the Southeastern United States. An estimate of cotton production loss due to R. reniformis parasitism in the United States in 2011 was 279,000 bales. Here, we present a de novo...

  18. Evaluation of anthelmintic resistance of intestinal parasitic nematodes in heifers in south central Nebraska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internal parasitic nematodes impact the livestock industry through losses in reproductive efficiency, rate of gain, carcass quality, milk production, or immune response. The frequent use of anthelmintics with drug formulations in which chemical activity persists for long periods selects for worm re...

  19. Functional characterization of CLE peptides from a plant-parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE) proteins are a large family of secreted peptide ligands that play important roles in plant growth and development. Recent evidence suggests that plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete ligand mimics of plant CLE peptides to modify selected host root cells into multinucleate f...

  20. Spatial Distribution of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Semi-Arid Vitis vinifera Vineyards in Washington

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Amanda D.; Schreiner, R. Paul; Zasada, Inga A.

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington Vitis vinifera vineyards are Meloidogyne hapla, Mesocriconema xenoplax, Pratylenchus spp., Xiphinema americanum, and Paratylenchus sp.; however, little is known about their distribution in the soil profile. The vertical and horizontal spatial distribution of plant-parasitic nematodes was determined in two Washington V. vinifera vineyards. Others variables measured in these vineyards included soil moisture content, fine root biomass, and root colonization by arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF). Meloidogyne hapla and M. xenoplax were aggregated under irrigation emitters within the vine row and decreased with soil depth. Conversely, Pratylenchus spp. populations were primarily concentrated in vineyard alleyways and decreased with depth. Paratylenchus sp. and X. americanum were randomly distributed within the vineyards. Soil water content played a dominant role in the distribution of fine roots and plant-parasitic nematodes. Colonization of fine roots by AMF decreased directly under irrigation emitters; in addition, galled roots had lower levels of AMF colonization compared with healthy roots. These findings will help facilitate sampling and management decisions for plant-parasitic nematodes in Washington semi-arid vineyards. PMID:25580024

  1. Spatial Distribution of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Semi-Arid Vitis vinifera Vineyards in Washington.

    PubMed

    Howland, Amanda D; Schreiner, R Paul; Zasada, Inga A

    2014-12-01

    The most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington Vitis vinifera vineyards are Meloidogyne hapla, Mesocriconema xenoplax, Pratylenchus spp., Xiphinema americanum, and Paratylenchus sp.; however, little is known about their distribution in the soil profile. The vertical and horizontal spatial distribution of plant-parasitic nematodes was determined in two Washington V. vinifera vineyards. Others variables measured in these vineyards included soil moisture content, fine root biomass, and root colonization by arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF). Meloidogyne hapla and M. xenoplax were aggregated under irrigation emitters within the vine row and decreased with soil depth. Conversely, Pratylenchus spp. populations were primarily concentrated in vineyard alleyways and decreased with depth. Paratylenchus sp. and X. americanum were randomly distributed within the vineyards. Soil water content played a dominant role in the distribution of fine roots and plant-parasitic nematodes. Colonization of fine roots by AMF decreased directly under irrigation emitters; in addition, galled roots had lower levels of AMF colonization compared with healthy roots. These findings will help facilitate sampling and management decisions for plant-parasitic nematodes in Washington semi-arid vineyards. PMID:25580024

  2. Evaluation of an antibiotic producing strain of Pseudomonas flourescens for suppression of plant-parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), produced by some strains of Pseudomonas spp., is involved in suppression of several fungal root pathogens as well as plant-parasitic nematodes. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether Wood1R, a D-genotype strain of DAPG-producin...

  3. Plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive trees in Al-Jouf region, north Saudi Arabia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A preliminary survey of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive was performed in Al-Jouf region, north Saudi Arabia. Olive is a newly introduced crop in this region, and is cultivated in the agricultural enterprises of some of the biggest Saudi agricultural companies. Seedlings are mostly im...

  4. B cells have distinct roles in host protection against different nematode parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B cells may mediate protective responses against nematode parasites by supporting Th2 cell development and/or by producing antibodies. To examine this, B cell-deficient mice were inoculated with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) or Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp). B cell-deficient and wild type (WT...

  5. Invasion, establishment, and range expansion of two parasitic nematodes in the Canadian Arctic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate warming is modifying host-parasite interactions in the Arctic. Invasion of an arctic island by protostrongylid nematodes appears mediated by sporadic dispersal of muskoxen and seasonal migration by caribou from the Canadian mainland. A newly permissive environment likely facilitated initial ...

  6. [Non-indigenous and non-specific parasitic nematodes--the background and the consequences].

    PubMed

    Okulewicz, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Introduction of the host is the main reason behind introduction of the parasite, e. g., nematodes. The introduction of the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) in Europe in the 1980s resulted in expansion of the swimbladder nematode Anguillicola crassus which soon invaded not only populations of the European eel (A. anguilla), but also other local fish. The raccoon (Procyon lotor) is native to North America. It is the specific host of Strongyloides procyonis and Baylisascaris procyonis. More than 90 species of wild and domestical bird and mammal species, including humans, have been infected with B. procyonis larvae. The larvae enter various organs of paratenic hosts, particularly the central nervous system and eye, causing severe diseases and death. Asthworthius sidemi--a blood-succking, abomasal nematode, a specific parasite of the Asiatic sika deer (Cervus nippon) and sambar deer (C. unicolor)--was first introduced with its hosts into countries adjacent to Poland. A. sidemi is especially dangerous to the European bison (Bison bonasus) which is its new host. The bison populations, in both Białowieza Primaeval Forest and the Bieszczady Mts, sometimes show a 100% prevalence and mass infection intensity. Imported animals, sold in pet shops or available from private breeding firms, often carry non-native parasites. For example, the red-eared tortoise (Trachemys scripta elegans) and Afgan tortoise (Agrionemys horsfieldii) carry nematodes Angusticaecum holopterum, Tachygonetria lobata and T. robusta. Migratory birds in their wintering grounds are often infected with parasites which are usually not constant components of the native fauna, but sometimes nematodes could find a suitable conditions to complete their life cycle. E.g. Cyathosoma microspiculum, species specific to cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) and previously recorded only from Asia and the Asian-European boudary, was able complete the life cycle in Poland. The increasingly frequent travels to countries with

  7. Rooting out Defense Mechanisms in Wheat against Plant Parasitic Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.) are soil borne pathogens of many important agricultural crops including wheat. Pratylenchus invade root cells and feed using a stylet, resulting in cell death. Common signs of Pratylenchus damage are root lesions, girdling, and lack of lateral branching. ...

  8. Differential DNA methylation in discrete developmental stages of the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA methylation plays an essential role in regulating gene expression under a variety of conditions and it has therefore been hypothesized to underlie the transitions between life cycle stages in parasitic nematodes. So far, however, 5'-cytosine methylation has not been detected during any developmental stage of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Given the new availability of high-resolution methylation detection methods, an investigation of life cycle methylation in a parasitic nematode can now be carried out. Results Here, using MethylC-seq, we present the first study to confirm the existence of DNA methylation in the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis, and we characterize the methylomes of the three life-cycle stages of this food-borne infectious human pathogen. We observe a drastic increase in DNA methylation during the transition from the new born to mature stage, and we further identify parasitism-related genes that show changes in DNA methylation status between life cycle stages. Conclusions Our data contribute to the understanding of the developmental changes that occur in an important human parasite, and raises the possibility that targeting DNA methylation processes may be a useful strategy in developing therapeutics to impede infection. In addition, our conclusion that DNA methylation is a mechanism for life cycle transition in T. spiralis prompts the question of whether this may also be the case in any other metazoans. Finally, our work constitutes the first report, to our knowledge, of DNA methylation in a nematode, prompting a re-evaluation of phyla in which this epigenetic mark was thought to be absent. PMID:23075480

  9. Rendering the Intractable More Tractable: Tools from Caenorhabditis elegans Ripe for Import into Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent and rapid advances in genetic and molecular tools have brought spectacular tractability to Caenorhabditis elegans, a model that was initially prized because of its simple design and ease of imaging. C. elegans has long been a powerful model in biomedical research, and tools such as RNAi and the CRISPR/Cas9 system allow facile knockdown of genes and genome editing, respectively. These developments have created an additional opportunity to tackle one of the most debilitating burdens on global health and food security: parasitic nematodes. I review how development of nonparasitic nematodes as genetic models informs efforts to import tools into parasitic nematodes. Current tools in three commonly studied parasites (Strongyloides spp., Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum) are described, as are tools from C. elegans that are ripe for adaptation and the benefits and barriers to doing so. These tools will enable dissection of a huge array of questions that have been all but completely impenetrable to date, allowing investigation into host–parasite and parasite–vector interactions, and the genetic basis of parasitism. PMID:26644478

  10. Automated, high-throughput, motility analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes: Applications in the search for new anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Steven D; Partridge, Frederick A; Sattelle, David B

    2014-12-01

    The scale of the damage worldwide to human health, animal health and agricultural crops resulting from parasitic nematodes, together with the paucity of treatments and the threat of developing resistance to the limited set of widely-deployed chemical tools, underlines the urgent need to develop novel drugs and chemicals to control nematode parasites. Robust chemical screens which can be automated are a key part of that discovery process. Hitherto, the successful automation of nematode behaviours has been a bottleneck in the chemical discovery process. As the measurement of nematode motility can provide a direct scalar readout of the activity of the neuromuscular system and an indirect measure of the health of the animal, this omission is acute. Motility offers a useful assay for high-throughput, phenotypic drug/chemical screening and several recent developments have helped realise, at least in part, the potential of nematode-based drug screening. Here we review the challenges encountered in automating nematode motility and some important developments in the application of machine vision, statistical imaging and tracking approaches which enable the automated characterisation of nematode movement. Such developments facilitate automated screening for new drugs and chemicals aimed at controlling human and animal nematode parasites (anthelmintics) and plant nematode parasites (nematicides). PMID:25516833

  11. The surface coat of plant-parasitic nematodes: chemical composition, origin, and biological role-a review.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Y; McClure, M A

    1995-06-01

    Chemical composition, origin, and biological role of the surface coat (SC) of plant-parasitic nematodes are described and compared with those of animal-parasitic and free-living nematodes. The SC of the plant-parasitic nematodes is 5-30 nm thick and is characterized by a net negative charge. It consists, at least in part, of glycoproteins and proteins with various molecular weights, depending upon the nematode species. The lability of its components and the binding of human red blood cells to the surface of many tylenchid plant-parasitic nematodes, as well as the binding of several neoglycoproteins to the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne, suggest the presence of carbohydrate-recognition-domains for host plants and parasitic or predatory soil microorganisms (Pasteuria penetrans and Dactylaria spp., for example). These features may also assist in nematode adaptations to soil environments and to plant hosts with defense mechanisms that depend on reactions to nematode surfaces. Surface coat proteins can be species and race specific, a characteristic with promising diagnostic potential. PMID:19277272

  12. Development of abamectin loaded plant virus nanoparticles for efficacious plant parasitic nematode control.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Guenther, Richard H; Sit, Tim L; Lommel, Steven A; Opperman, Charles H; Willoughby, Julie A

    2015-05-13

    Plant parasitic nematodes are one of the world's major agricultural pests, causing in excess of $157 billion in worldwide crop damage annually. Abamectin (Abm) is a biological pesticide with a strong activity against a wide variety of plant parasitic nematodes. However, Abm's poor mobility in the soil compromises its nematicide performance because of the limited zone of protection surrounding the growing root system of the plant. In this study, we manipulated Abm's soil physical chemistry by encapsulating Abm within the Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) to produce a plant virus nanoparticle (PVN) delivery system for Abm. The transmission electron microscopic and dynamic light scattering characterization of Abm-loaded PVN (PVN(Abm)) indicated the resultant viral capsid integrity and morphology comparable to native RCNMV. In addition, the PVN(Abm) significantly increased Abm's soil mobility while enabling a controlled release strategy for Abm's bioavailability to nematodes. As a result, PVN(Abm) enlarged the zone of protection from Meloidogyne hapla root knot nematodes in the soil as compared to treating with free Abm molecules. Tomato seedlings treated with PVN(Abm) had healthier root growth and a reduction in root galling demonstrating the success of this delivery system for the increased efficacy of Abm to control nematode damage in crops. PMID:25906360

  13. RNA interference in plant parasitic nematodes: a summary of the current status.

    PubMed

    Lilley, C J; Davies, L J; Urwin, P E

    2012-04-01

    SUMMARYRNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as an invaluable gene-silencing tool for functional analysis in a wide variety of organisms, particularly the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. An increasing number of studies have now described its application to plant parasitic nematodes. Genes expressed in a range of cell types are silenced when nematodes take up double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that elicit a systemic RNAi response. Despite many successful reports, there is still poor understanding of the range of factors that influence optimal gene silencing. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted significant variations in the RNAi phenotype that can occur with different dsRNA concentrations, construct size and duration of soaking. Discrepancies in methodology thwart efforts to reliably compare the efficacy of RNAi between different nematodes or target tissues. Nevertheless, RNAi has become an established experimental tool for plant parasitic nematodes and also offers the prospect of being developed into a novel control strategy when delivered from transgenic plants. PMID:22217302

  14. Parasitic nematode communities of the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus: richness and structuring in captive systems.

    PubMed

    Lott, M J; Hose, G C; Power, M L

    2015-08-01

    Captive management practices have the potential to drastically alter pre-existing host-parasite relationships. This can have profound implications for the health and productivity of threatened species in captivity, even in the absence of clinical symptoms of disease. Maximising the success of captive breeding programmes requires a detailed knowledge of anthropogenic influences on the structure of parasite assemblages in captive systems. In this study, we employed two high-throughput molecular techniques to characterise the parasitic nematode (suborder Strongylida) communities of the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus, across seven captive sites. The first was terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of a region of rDNA encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 (ITS1), the 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2). The second was Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing of the ITS2 region. The prevalence, intensity of infection, taxonomic composition and comparative structure of strongylid nematode assemblages was assessed at each location. Prevalence (P = <0.001) and mean infection intensity (df = 6, F = 17.494, P = <0.001) differed significantly between the seven captive sites. Significant levels of parasite community structure were observed (ANOSIM, P = 0.01), with most of the variation being distributed within, rather than between, captive sites. The range of nematode taxa that occurred in captive red kangaroos appeared to differ from that of wild conspecifics, with representatives of the genus Cloacina, a dominant nematode parasite of the macropodid forestomach, being detected at only two of the seven study sites. This study also provides the first evidence for the presence of the genus Trichostrongylus in a macropodid marsupial. Our results demonstrate that contemporary species management practices may exert a profound influence on the structure of parasite communities in captive systems. PMID

  15. Genomic Mechanisms Accounting for the Adaptation to Parasitism in Nematode-Trapping Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Meerupati, Tejashwari; Andersson, Karl-Magnus; Friman, Eva; Kumar, Dharmendra; Tunlid, Anders; Ahrén, Dag

    2013-01-01

    Orbiliomycetes is one of the earliest diverging branches of the filamentous ascomycetes. The class contains nematode-trapping fungi that form unique infection structures, called traps, to capture and kill free-living nematodes. The traps have evolved differently along several lineages and include adhesive traps (knobs, nets or branches) and constricting rings. We show, by genome sequencing of the knob-forming species Monacrosporium haptotylum and comparison with the net-forming species Arthrobotrys oligospora, that two genomic mechanisms are likely to have been important for the adaptation to parasitism in these fungi. Firstly, the expansion of protein domain families and the large number of species-specific genes indicated that gene duplication followed by functional diversification had a major role in the evolution of the nematode-trapping fungi. Gene expression indicated that many of these genes are important for pathogenicity. Secondly, gene expression of orthologs between the two fungi during infection indicated that differential regulation was an important mechanism for the evolution of parasitism in nematode-trapping fungi. Many of the highly expressed and highly upregulated M. haptotylum transcripts during the early stages of nematode infection were species-specific and encoded small secreted proteins (SSPs) that were affected by repeat-induced point mutations (RIP). An active RIP mechanism was revealed by lack of repeats, dinucleotide bias in repeats and genes, low proportion of recent gene duplicates, and reduction of recent gene family expansions. The high expression and rapid divergence of SSPs indicate a striking similarity in the infection mechanisms of nematode-trapping fungi and plant and insect pathogens from the crown groups of the filamentous ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina). The patterns of gene family expansions in the nematode-trapping fungi were more similar to plant pathogens than to insect and animal pathogens. The observation of RIP activity

  16. In silico approach to screen compounds active against parasitic nematodes of major socio-economic importance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infections due to parasitic nematodes are common causes of morbidity and fatality around the world especially in developing nations. At present however, there are only three major classes of drugs for treating human nematode infections. Additionally the scientific knowledge on the mechanism of action and the reason for the resistance to these drugs is poorly understood. Commercial incentives to design drugs that are endemic to developing countries are limited therefore, virtual screening in academic settings can play a vital role is discovering novel drugs useful against neglected diseases. In this study we propose to build robust machine learning model to classify and screen compounds active against parasitic nematodes. Results A set of compounds active against parasitic nematodes were collated from various literature sources including PubChem while the inactive set was derived from DrugBank database. The support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was used for model development, and stratified ten-fold cross validation was used to evaluate the performance of each classifier. The best results were obtained using the radial basis function kernel. The SVM method achieved an accuracy of 81.79% on an independent test set. Using the model developed above, we were able to indentify novel compounds with potential anthelmintic activity. Conclusion In this study, we successfully present the SVM approach for predicting compounds active against parasitic nematodes which suggests the effectiveness of computational approaches for antiparasitic drug discovery. Although, the accuracy obtained is lower than the previously reported in a similar study but we believe that our model is more robust because we intentionally employed stringent criteria to select inactive dataset thus making it difficult for the model to classify compounds. The method presents an alternative approach to the existing traditional methods and may be useful for predicting hitherto novel anthelmintic

  17. Factors associated with the suppressiveness of sugarcane soils to plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Graham R; Rames, Emily; Stirling, A Marcelle; Hamill, Sharon

    2011-09-01

    Observations in three Australian sugarcane fields suggested that the soil just under the trash blanket (the covering of crop residue that remains on the soil surface after crops are harvested) was suppressive to plant-parasitic nematodes. Roots were concentrated in this upper layer of soil but plant-parasitic nematode populations were relatively low and roots showed few signs of nematode damage. Root biomass was much lower 15 cm further down the soil profile, where root health was poor and populations of plant-parasitic nematodes were 3-5 times higher than near the soil surface. A bioassay in which Radopholus similis (a nematode that does not occur in sugarcane soils) was inoculated into heat-sterilized and untreated soils, confirmed that biological factors were limiting nematode populations in some of the soils, with soil from 0-2 cm much more suppressive than soil from 15-17 cm. Surface soil from one site was highly suppressive, as only 16% of R. similis recoverable from heated soil were retrieved from this soil after 8 days. Numerous soil chemical, biochemical, and biological properties were measured, and non-linear regression analysis identified two major groups of factors that were significantly associated with suppressiveness. One group reflected the amount of organic matter in soil (total C, total N, and labile C) and the other was associated with the size of the free-living nematode community (total numbers of free-living nematodes, and numbers of plant associates, bacterial feeders, fungal feeders, and carnivores). These results suggested that suppressiveness was biologically mediated and was sustained by C inputs from crop residues and roots. Since nematode-trapping fungi in the test soils could not be quantified using traditional dilution plating methods, their possible role as suppressive agents was assessed by generating TRFLP profiles with Orbiliales-specific primers, and by sequencing cloned PCR products. Although the molecular data were obtained

  18. Molecular variability and evolution of the pectate lyase (pel-2) parasitism gene in cyst nematodes parasitizing different solanaceous plants.

    PubMed

    Geric Stare, Barbara; Fouville, Didier; Širca, Saša; Gallot, Aurore; Urek, Gregor; Grenier, Eric

    2011-02-01

    While pectate lyases are major parasitism factors in plant-parasitic nematodes, there is little information on the variability of these genes within species and their utility as pathotype or host range molecular markers. We have analysed polymorphisms of pectate lyase 2 (pel-2) gene, which degrades the unesterified polygalacturonate (pectate) of the host cell-wall, in the genus Globodera. Molecular variability of the pel-2 gene and the predicted protein was evaluated in populations of G. rostochiensis, G. pallida, G. "mexicana" and G. tabacum. Seventy eight pel-2 sequences were obtained and aligned. Point mutations were observed at 373 positions, 57% of these affect the coding part of the gene and produce 129 aa replacements. The observed polymorphism does not correlate either to the pathotypes proposed in potato cyst nematodes (PCN) or the subspecies described in tobacco cyst nematodes. The trees reveal a topology different from the admitted species topology as G. rostochiensis and G. pallida sequences are more similar to each other than to G. tabacum. Species-specific sites, potentially applicable for identification, and sites distinguishing PCN from tobacco cyst nematodes, were identified. As both G. rostochiensis and G. pallida display the same host range, but distinct from G. tabacum, which cannot parasitize potato plants, it is tempting to speculate that pel-2 genes polymorphism may be implicated in this adaptation, a view supported by the fact that no active pectate lyase 2 was found in G. "mexicana", a close relative of G. pallida that is unable to develop on cultivated potato varieties. PMID:21153407

  19. Changes in biochemical analytes in calves infected by nematode parasites in field conditions.

    PubMed

    de Cezaro, Marcela C; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Tecles, Fernando; Céron, José J; Eckersall, David P; Ferreira, João C P; Schmidt, Elizabeth M S

    2016-03-30

    Parasitic infections caused by nematodes are a major problem in bovines that resulting in losses in animal health and production. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate alterations in selected serum biochemical analytes in calves naturally infected with gastrointestinal (GI) and pulmonary nematodes without clinical signs. For this, samples of feces and blood of 86 calves were collected. Fecal egg counts (FEC) were determined using the modified McMaster technique with a sensitivity of 50 eggs per gram of feces (EPG). Positive nematode FEC was processed for coproculture using pooled samples to identify Strongylidae infective larvae (L3). First stage-larvae (L1) of Dictyocaulus viviparous were identified by a modified Baermann method. The biochemical analytes determined were: acute phase proteins such as haptoglobin and paraoxonase type 1; the enzymes acetylcholinesterase; butyrylcholinesterase; the lipid profile (triglycerides and total, HDL, and LDL-cholesterol); serum iron profile (iron and unsaturated iron-binding capacity); total protein and albumin; pancreatic profile (amylase and lipase); and minerals (phosphorus and calcium). The calves were divided into four groups according to the results of EPG and the modified Baermann method. Group 1: healthy control animals (n=16); Group 2: calves with only GI parasites (n=51): This group was sub-divided into sub-groups according to the EPG threshold: 2a-GI parasites with low EPG (n=23), and 2b-GI parasites with high EPG (n=28). Group 3: animals with only lungworms (n=5), and Group 4: calves with lung+GI parasites (n=14). The more prevalent genera in all coprocultures were: Cooperia spp., Haemonchus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., and Trichostrongylus spp. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the groups and Dunn's post-test was used for multiple comparisons as the data was not normally distributed (P<0.05). The haptoglobin concentration increased in calves with GI and pulmonary parasites. A

  20. The Transcriptome of Nacobbus aberrans Reveals Insights into the Evolution of Sedentary Endoparasitism in Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian; Lilley, Catherine J.; Danchin, Etienne G. J.; Rancurel, Corinne; Cock, Peter J. A.; Urwin, Peter E.; Jones, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Within the phylum Nematoda, plant-parasitism is hypothesized to have arisen independently on at least four occasions. The most economically damaging plant-parasitic nematode species, and consequently the most widely studied, are those that feed as they migrate destructively through host roots causing necrotic lesions (migratory endoparasites) and those that modify host root tissue to create a nutrient sink from which they feed (sedentary endoparasites). The false root-knot nematode Nacobbus aberrans is the only known species to have both migratory endoparasitic and sedentary endoparasitic stages within its life cycle. Moreover, its sedentary stage appears to have characteristics of both the root-knot and the cyst nematodes. We present the first large-scale genetic resource of any false-root knot nematode species. We use RNAseq to describe relative abundance changes in all expressed genes across the life cycle to provide interesting insights into the biology of this nematode as it transitions between modes of parasitism. A multigene phylogenetic analysis of N. aberrans with respect to plant-parasitic nematodes of all groups confirms its proximity to both cyst and root-knot nematodes. We present a transcriptome-wide analysis of both lateral gene transfer events and the effector complement. Comparing parasitism genes of typical root-knot and cyst nematodes to those of N. aberrans has revealed interesting similarities. Importantly, genes that were believed to be either cyst nematode, or root-knot nematode, “specific” have both been identified in N. aberrans. Our results provide insights into the characteristics of a common ancestor and the evolution of sedentary endoparasitism of plants by nematodes. PMID:25123114

  1. Prevalence of dog intestinal nematode parasites in south central West Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Savilla, Tashina M; Joy, James E; May, Jeffrey D; Somerville, Charles C

    2011-05-31

    Coprological examination was used to determine prevalence of gastrointestinal helminthes in a sample of 231 dogs (117 females and 114 males) during the summer of 2009 at a veterinary clinic in south central West Virginia, USA. Clinical signs (e.g., diarrhea, vomiting, weight gain or loss) were noted in addition to a history of anthelmintic usage. A total of 79 dogs (33.6%) were infected with one or more intestinal nematodes. Most dogs (58) were parasitized with a single species, 19 were parasitized with 2 species, and 2 were parasitized by 3 species. There was no significant difference (i.e., X(2)<3.84; P>0.05) in prevalence of infection between female and male dogs for any of the identified nematode species. The chi-square test for equality of proportions was used to determine prevalence of infection in 3 age categories of dogs (females and males combined): young dogs (≤12 months of age); mature dogs (13-83 months); and old dogs >83 months. Prevalences of infection for Ancylostoma caninum and Toxocara canis were significantly (P<0.005) higher in young dogs, whereas there was no significant difference (P>0.05) in prevalence by age category for Trichuris vulpis. Dogs exhibiting clinical signs were no more likely to harbor intestinal nematodes than dogs that were asymptomatic. Additionally, dogs receiving heartworm treatment were significantly less likely to be parasitized than dogs receiving no heartworm prophylaxis. PMID:21277089

  2. Genetic identification of five strongyle nematode parasites in wild african elephants (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    McLean, E R; Kinsella, J M; Chiyo, P; Obanda, V; Moss, C; Archie, E A

    2012-07-01

    African savannah elephants (Loxodonta africana) are an ecologically and economically important species in many African habitats. However, despite the importance of elephants, research on their parasites is limited, especially in wild populations. Currently, we lack genetic tools to identify elephant parasites. We present genetic markers from ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to identify five elephant-specific nematode parasites in the family Strongylidae: Murshidia linstowi, Murshidia longicaudata, Murshidia africana, Quilonia africana, and Khalilia sameera. We collected adult nematodes from feces deposited by wild elephants living in Amboseli National Park, Kenya. Using both morphologic and genetic techniques, we found that the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region in rDNA provides a reliable marker to distinguish these species of strongyles. We found no evidence for cryptic genetic species within these morphologic species according to the cox-1 region of mtDNA. Levels of genetic diversity in strongyles from elephants were consistent with the genetic diversity seen within other strongyle species. We anticipate that these results will be a useful tool for identifying gastrointestinal nematode parasites in elephants. PMID:22740536

  3. Prevalence and Molecular Identification of Nematode and Dipteran Parasites in an Australian Alpine Grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis)

    PubMed Central

    Umbers, Kate D. L.; Byatt, Lachlan J.; Hill, Nichola J.; Bartolini, Remo J.; Hose, Grant C.; Herberstein, Marie E.; Power, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    In alpine Australia, Orthoptera are abundant, dominant herbivores, important prey species, and hosts for parasites and parasitoids. Despite the central role of orthopterans in alpine ecosystems, the impact of parasites on orthopteran populations is under-explored. In this study we describe the relationship between parasite prevalence and host sex, body size and year of collection. We accessed an existing, preserved collection of 640 Kosciuscola tristis collected from across its range between 2007 and 2011. Upon dissection we collected juvenile parasites and used molecular tools to identify them to three families (Nematoda; Mermithidae, and Arthropoda: Diptera: Tachinidae and Sarcophagidae). The prevalence of nematodes ranged from 3.5% to 25.0% and dipterans from 2.4% to 20.0%. Contrary to predictions, we found no associations between parasite prevalence and grasshopper sex or size. Although there was an association between prevalence of both nematodes and dipterans with year of collection, this is likely driven by a small sample size in the first year. Our results provide a foundation for future studies into parasite prevalence within the alpine environment and the abiotic factors that might influence these associations. PMID:25919745

  4. Geostatistical Analysis of the Spatial Variability of Cotton-Parasitic Nematodes and the Factors Favoring its Occurrence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delineation of management zones for a site-specific management of cotton-parasitic nematodes requires the study of their spatial and temporal variability. If field-scale distributions of nematodes spatially correlate with specific biotic or abiotic conditions present in the field, those conditions c...

  5. Chorismate mutase: an alternatively spliced parasitism gene and a diagnostic marker for three important Globodera nematode species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chorismate mutase gene is widely distributed in both cyst and root-knot nematode species and believed to play a critical role in nematode parasitism. In this study, we cloned a new chorismate mutase gene (Gt-cm-1) from Globodera tabacum and further characterized the gene structure in both G. tab...

  6. Curtisia dentata (Cornaceae) leaf extracts and isolated compounds inhibit motility of parasitic and free-living nematodes.

    PubMed

    Shai, L J; Bizimenyera, E S; Bagla, V; McGaw, L J; Eloff, J N

    2009-06-01

    Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis are among the most important parasitic nematodes of small ruminants. Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living nematode, is used as a model for evaluating anthelmintic activity of a variety of test substances. Extracts of several medicinal plants are useful in vitro and in vivo against nematode development. Extracts of Curtisia dentata, a South African medicinal plant, and compounds isolated from leaves of this plant were investigated for anthelmintic activity against T. colubriformis, H. contortus and C. elegans. The acetone and dichloromethane extracts were active against all nematodes at concentrations as low as 160 microg/ml. Betulinic acid and lupeol were active against the parasitic nematodes only at the high concentrations of 1000 and 200 microg/ml, respectively. All compounds were effective against C. elegans with active concentrations as low as 8 microg/ml. Betulinic acid was less active than lupeol and ursolic acid against C. elegans. The acetone and dichloromethane extracts were also active against C. elegans with a concentration of 0.31 mg/ml resulting in almost 80% inhibition of larval motility. The use of free-living nematodes may provide information on the activity of potential anthelmintics against parasitic nematodes. Extracts of various medicinal plant species may provide solutions to ill-health of small ruminants caused by parasitic nematodes in poor communities of southern Africa. PMID:20698444

  7. Delineation of Management Zones for Site Specific Management of Parasitic Nematodes Using Geostatistical Analysis of Measured Field Characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delineation of management zones for site specific management of cotton-parasitic nematodes requires the study of their spatial and temporal variability. If the nematodes follow a spatial structure and this structure is correlated with the spatial variability of specific biotic or abiotic conditions ...

  8. Synergistic interaction of CLAVATA1, CLAVATA2, and RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE 2 in cyst nematode parasitism of Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete CLAVATA3 (CLV3)/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION (ESR) (CLE)-like effector proteins. These proteins act as ligand mimics of plant CLE peptides and are required for successful nematode infection. Previously, we showed that CLV2 and CORYNE (CRN), a heterodimer recept...

  9. Overexpression of the transcription factor RAP2.6 leads to enhanced callose deposition in syncytia and enhanced resistance against the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is their source of nutrients throughout their life. A transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that gene expression in the syncytium is different from that of the root with thousands of genes upregulated or downregulated. Among the downregulated genes are many which code for defense-related proteins. One gene which is strongly downregulated codes for the ethylene response transcription factor RAP2.6. The genome of Arabidopsis contains 122 ERF transcription factor genes which are involved in a variety of developmental and stress responses. Results Expression of RAP2.6 was studied with RT-PCR and a promoter::GUS line. During normal growth conditions the gene was expressed especially in roots and stems. It was inducible by Pseudomonas syringae but downregulated in syncytia from a very early time point on. Overexpression of the gene enhanced the resistance against H. schachtii which was seen by a lower number of nematodes developing on these plants as well as smaller syncytia and smaller female nematodes. A T-DNA mutant had a reduced RAP2.6 transcript level but this did not further increase the susceptibility against H. schachtii. Neither overexpression lines nor mutants had an effect on P. syringae. Overexpression of RAP2.6 led to an elevated expression of JA-responsive genes during early time points after infection by H. schachtii. Syncytia developing on overexpression lines showed enhanced deposition of callose. Conclusions Our results showed that H. schachtii infection is accompanied by a downregulation of RAP2.6. It seems likely that the nematodes use effectors to actively downregulate the expression of this and other defense-related genes to avoid resistance responses of the host plant. Enhanced resistance of RAP2.6 overexpression lines seemed to be due to enhanced

  10. Mechanisms of molecular mimicry of plant CLE peptide ligands by the parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongfeng; Ni, Jun; Denver, Robert; Wang, Xiaohong; Clark, Steven E

    2011-09-01

    Nematodes that parasitize plant roots cause huge economic losses and have few mechanisms for control. Many parasitic nematodes infect plants by reprogramming root development to drive the formation of feeding structures. How nematodes take control of plant development is largely unknown. Here, we identify two host factors involved in the function of a receptor ligand mimic, GrCLE1, secreted by the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. GrCLE1 is correctly processed to an active form by host plant proteases. Processed GrCLE1 peptides bind directly to the plant CLE receptors CLV2, BAM1, and BAM2. Involvement of these receptors in the ligand-mimicking process is also supported by the fact that the ability of GrCLE1 peptides to alter plant root development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is dependent on these receptors. Critically, we also demonstrate that GrCLE1 maturation can be entirely carried out by plant factors and that the availability of CLE processing activity may be essential for successful ligand mimicry. PMID:21750229

  11. Chemical signals synchronize the life cycles of a plant-parasitic nematode and its vector beetle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lilin; Zhang, Shuai; Wei, Wei; Hao, Haijun; Zhang, Bin; Butcher, Rebecca A; Sun, Jianghua

    2013-10-21

    The pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus has caused severe damage to pine forests in large parts of the world [1-4]. Dispersal of this plant-parasitic nematode occurs when the nematode develops into the dispersal fourth larval stage (LIV) upon encountering its insect vector, the Monochamus pine sawyer beetle, inside an infected pine tree [5-9]. Here, we show that LIV formation in B. xylophilus is induced by C16 and C18 fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), which are produced abundantly on the body surface of the vector beetle specifically during the late development pupal, emerging adult, and newly eclosed adult stages. The LIV can then enter the tracheal system of the adult beetle for dispersal to a new pine tree. Treatment of B. xylophilus with long-chain FAEEs, or the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002, promotes LIV formation, while Δ7-dafachronic acid blocks the effects of these chemicals, suggesting a conserved role for the insulin/IGF-1 and DAF-12 pathways in LIV formation. Our work provides a mechanism by which LIV formation in B. xylophilus is specifically coordinated with the life cycle of its vector beetle. Knowledge of the chemical signals that control the LIV developmental decision could be used to interfere with the dispersal of this plant-parasitic nematode. PMID:24120638

  12. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentration and ACC synthase expression in soybean roots and root tips and soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) colonized root pieces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It's fairly well established that a functional ethylene response path is important to root knot and cyst nematode colonization of plant roots. However, ethylene plays many roles in root development and the role of ethylene in nematode colonization of roots may be indirect, e.g. lateral root initiati...

  13. Evidence for gene flow in parasitic nematodes between two host species of shrews.

    PubMed

    Brant, Sara V; Ortí, Guillermo

    2003-10-01

    We describe the genetic structure of populations of the intestinal nematode Longistriata caudabullata (Trichostrongyloidea: Heligmosomidae), a common parasite of short-tailed shrews (genus Blarina, Insectivora: Soricidae). Parasites and hosts were collected from a transect across a contact zone between two species of hosts, Blarina brevicauda and B. hylophaga, in central North America. An 800-base pairs (bp) fragment of the ND4 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene was sequenced for 28 worms and a 783-bp fragment of the mtDNA control region was analysed for 16 shrews. Phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequences revealed reciprocal monophyly for the shrew species, concordant with morphological diagnosis, and supported the idea that the transect cuts through a secondary contact zone between well-differentiated B. brevicauda and B. hylophaga. In contrast to this pattern, the parasitic nematode mtDNA phylogeny was not subdivided according to host affiliation. Genealogical discordance between parasite and host phylogenies suggests extensive gene flow among parasites across the host species boundary. PMID:12969487

  14. Galectin-11: A novel host mediator targeting specific stages of the gastrointestinal nematode parasite, Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Preston, S J M; Beddoe, T; Walkden-Brown, S; Meeusen, E; Piedrafita, D

    2015-10-01

    Galectin-11 is released from epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, specifically following infection with gastrointestinal parasites including the highly pathogenic nematode, Haemonchus contortus. The function(s) of galectin-11 are currently unknown but seem to be associated with the development of immunity by the host. The aim of the present study was to examine the interaction of galectin-11 with the different parasitic life cycle stages of H. contortus and determine any effects on parasite development. The results of this study showed that galectin-11 binds to the surface of the L4 and adult stages of the parasite but not to the exsheathed L3 stage. In addition, at a lower concentration, binding to the L4 was specifically localised to the pharynx region. Subsequent in vitro assays demonstrated significant inhibition of larval growth and development in the presence of recombinant galectin-11. These results indicate, to our knowledge for the first time, a functional role for galectin-11 in gastrointestinal nematode infection of ruminants and a mechanism of action of galectin-11, targeting the development and growth of the L4 and possibly the adult parasite stage. PMID:26215057

  15. Analysis of the Transcriptome of the Infective Stage of the Beet Cyst Nematode, H. schachtii.

    PubMed

    Fosu-Nyarko, John; Nicol, Paul; Naz, Fareeha; Gill, Reetinder; Jones, Michael G K

    2016-01-01

    The beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, is a major root pest that significantly impacts the yield of sugar beet, brassicas and related species. There has been limited molecular characterisation of this important plant pathogen: to identify target genes for its control the transcriptome of the pre-parasitic J2 stage of H. schachtii was sequenced using Roche GS FLX. Ninety seven percent of reads (i.e., 387,668) with an average PHRED score > 22 were assembled with CAP3 and CLC Genomics Workbench into 37,345 and 47,263 contigs, respectively. The transcripts were annotated by comparing with gene and genomic sequences of other nematodes and annotated proteins on public databases. The annotated transcripts were much more similar to sequences of Heterodera glycines than to those of Globodera pallida and root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Analysis of these transcripts showed that a subset of 2,918 transcripts was common to free-living and plant parasitic nematodes suggesting that this subset is involved in general nematode metabolism and development. A set of 148 contigs and 183 singletons encoding putative homologues of effectors previously characterised for plant parasitic nematodes were also identified: these are known to be important for parasitism of host plants during migration through tissues or feeding from cells or are thought to be involved in evasion or modulation of host defences. In addition, the presence of sequences from a nematode virus is suggested. The sequencing and annotation of this transcriptome significantly adds to the genetic data available for H. schachtii, and identifies genes primed to undertake required roles in the critical pre-parasitic and early post-parasitic J2 stages. These data provide new information for identifying potential gene targets for future protection of susceptible crops against H. schachtii. PMID:26824923

  16. Analysis of the Transcriptome of the Infective Stage of the Beet Cyst Nematode, H. schachtii

    PubMed Central

    Fosu-Nyarko, John; Nicol, Paul; Naz, Fareeha; Gill, Reetinder; Jones, Michael G. K.

    2016-01-01

    The beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, is a major root pest that significantly impacts the yield of sugar beet, brassicas and related species. There has been limited molecular characterisation of this important plant pathogen: to identify target genes for its control the transcriptome of the pre-parasitic J2 stage of H. schachtii was sequenced using Roche GS FLX. Ninety seven percent of reads (i.e., 387,668) with an average PHRED score > 22 were assembled with CAP3 and CLC Genomics Workbench into 37,345 and 47,263 contigs, respectively. The transcripts were annotated by comparing with gene and genomic sequences of other nematodes and annotated proteins on public databases. The annotated transcripts were much more similar to sequences of Heterodera glycines than to those of Globodera pallida and root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Analysis of these transcripts showed that a subset of 2,918 transcripts was common to free-living and plant parasitic nematodes suggesting that this subset is involved in general nematode metabolism and development. A set of 148 contigs and 183 singletons encoding putative homologues of effectors previously characterised for plant parasitic nematodes were also identified: these are known to be important for parasitism of host plants during migration through tissues or feeding from cells or are thought to be involved in evasion or modulation of host defences. In addition, the presence of sequences from a nematode virus is suggested. The sequencing and annotation of this transcriptome significantly adds to the genetic data available for H. schachtii, and identifies genes primed to undertake required roles in the critical pre-parasitic and early post-parasitic J2 stages. These data provide new information for identifying potential gene targets for future protection of susceptible crops against H. schachtii. PMID:26824923

  17. The Biochemistry of Haemonchus contortus and Other Parasitic Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Harder, A

    2016-01-01

    Different life cycle stages of Haemonchus contortus adapt to different ecosystems. This adaptation is accompanied by alterations in gene transcription and expression associated with the energy, amino acid, nitrogen, lipid and/or nucleic acid metabolism of the respective stages. For example, the aerobic metabolism of larvae depends on an efficient citric acid cycle, whereas the anaerobic metabolism of adults requires glycolysis, resulting in the production of volatile fatty acids, such as acetic acid and propionic acid. There are only few anthelmintics targeting nematode energy metabolism. In addition, H. contortus has reduced pathways for amino acid metabolism, polyamine metabolism and nitrogen excretion pathways. Moreover, nucleic acid metabolism comprising purine and pyrimidine salvage pathways as well as lipid metabolism are reduced. In addition, nematodes possess a particular composition of their cuticle. Energy production of adult worms is mainly linked to egg production and complex regulation of the neuromuscular system in both females and males. In this context, microtubules consisting of α- and β-tubulin heterodimers play a crucial role in the presynaptic vesicle transport. Due to the significant distinction of its quarternary structure in nematodes in comparison to other organisms, β-tubulin was identified as a major target for benzimidazoles used for anthelmintic treatment. Concerning the function of the neuromuscular system, acetylcholine, a ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in H. contortus. In contrast, glutamate-gated chloride channels, calcium- and voltage-dependent potassium channels as well as γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A and its receptors act as inhibitory neurotransmitters and thus opponents to nAChR. For example, the calcium- and voltage-dependent potassium channel SLO-1 is an important target of emodepside, which is involved in the sensitive regulation of activatory and

  18. New Plant-Parasitic Nematode from the Mostly Mycophagous Genus Bursaphelenchus Discovered inside Figs in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Natsumi; Tanaka, Ryusei; Giblin-Davis, Robin M.; Davies, Kerrie A.

    2014-01-01

    A new nematode species, Bursaphelenchus sycophilus n. sp. is described. The species was found in syconia of a fig species, Ficus variegata during a field survey of fig-associated nematodes in Japan. Because it has a well-developed stylet and pharyngeal glands, the species is considered an obligate plant parasite, and is easily distinguished from all other fungal-feeding species in the genus based upon these characters. Although B. sycophilus n. sp. shares an important typological character, male spicule possessing a strongly recurved condylus, with the “B. eremus group” and the “B. leoni group” of the genus, it was inferred to be monophyletic with the “B. fungivorus group”. The uniquely shaped stylet and well-developed pharyngeal glands is reminiscent of the fig-floret parasitic but paraphyletic assemblage of “Schistonchus”. Thus, these morphological characters appear to be an extreme example of convergent evolution in the nematode family, Aphelenchoididae, inside figs. Other characters shared by the new species and its close relatives, i.e., lack of ventral P1 male genital papilla, female vulval flap, and papilla-shaped P4 genital papillae in males, corroborate the molecular phylogenetic inference. The unique biological character of obligate plant parasitism and highly derived appearance of the ingestive organs of Bursaphelenchus sycophilus n. sp. expands our knowledge of the potential morphological, physiological and developmental plasticity of the genus Bursaphelenchus. PMID:24940595

  19. Optimizing culture conditions for free-living stages of the nematode parasite Strongyloides ratti.

    PubMed

    Dulovic, Alex; Puller, Vadim; Streit, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    The rat parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti (S. ratti) has recently emerged as a model system for various aspects of parasite biology and evolution. In addition to parasitic parthenogenetic females, this species can also form facultative free-living generations of sexually reproducing adults. These free-living worms are bacteriovorous and grow very well when cultured in the feces of their host. However, in fecal cultures the worms are rather difficult to find for observation and experimental manipulation. Therefore, it has also been attempted to raise S. ratti on Nematode Growth Media (NGM) plates with Escherichia coli OP50 as food, exactly as described for the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Whilst worms did grow on these plates, their longevity and reproductive output compared to fecal cultures were dramatically reduced. In order to improve the culture success we tested other plates occasionally used for C. elegans and, starting from the best performing one, systematically varied the plate composition, the temperature and the food in order to further optimize the conditions. Here we present a plate culturing protocol for free-living stages of S. ratti with strongly improved reproductive success and longevity. PMID:27334397

  20. Use of fluorescent lectin binding to distinguish eggs of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of sheep.

    PubMed

    Umair, S; McMurtry, L W; Knight, J S; Simpson, H V

    2016-02-15

    The binding of a panel of 19 lectins to carbohydrates on the eggs of economically important nematode parasites of sheep has been assessed as the basis of a rapid test to distinguish parasite eggs, at least at the genus level. A total of six lectins can be used to identify eggs of six nematode parasites: peanut agglutinin (PNA) for Haemonchus contortus; Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) for Teladorsagia sp; Aleuria aurantia agglutinin (AAL) for Trichostrongylus sp; Psophocarpus tetragonolobus‑II (PTLII) for Nematodirus sp; Lotus tetragonolobus lectin (LTL) for Cooperia sp and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) for Chabertia ovina. For WGA, LCA and LTL, weak binding was also observed to H. contortus and Teladorsagia sp, Trichostrongylus sp and C. ovina eggs, respectively. Nematode eggs in two faecal samples were identically identified by both lectin binding and PCR, except for PCR identification of the eggs of Nematodirus sp, as these did not lyse. Lectins bound best to H. contortus eggs extracted from fresh faecal samples or after storage at room temperature or 4 °C for up to 24 h, but eggs stored at -20 °C or -80 °C did not bind PNA. PMID:26827865

  1. [Main evolution lines of plant parasitic nematodes of the order Aphelenchida siddiqi, 1980].

    PubMed

    Ryss, A Iu

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenic models for each aphelenchid family and phylogeny of the order Aphelenchida as a whole were developed on the base of detailed comparative morphological and bionomical analysis of the order. Bionomical and morphological characters having a phylogenetic significance were selected. Classification proposed by Hunt, 1993 was used as the starting-point of the study. Life cycles and their evolution in Aphelenchida were analyzed on the base of phylogenetic trees. It is concluded, that aphelenchid ancestors combined mycophagy, plant parasitic, and partly predaceous feeding. Relations of the primitive Aphelenchida with their symbionts developed from the spots of the fungal organic matter decomposition in the "nema- tode-fungi" associations, followed by a transition to the temporary endoparasitic habit omitting ectoparasitism. With a complication of the nematodes' life cycles, the insect vector (detritophagous or pollinator) transformed into the real insect host of the parasitic nematode in the 2-host life cycle (with the plant and insect hosts) or in the obligate 1-host entomoparasitic life cycle of the aphelenchid nematodes. Specialization of the aphelenchid life cycles to insect vectors followed two main ways. In the first way, the resistant to unfavorable environmental conditions nematode juveniles, known already for the primitive aphelenchids transformed into dispersal juveniles, and later into parasitic juveniles. In the second evolution line the dispersal function were laid on inseminated but non-gravid (not egg-producing) females. Both above-mentioned trends of parasitic specialization were arisen independently in different phylogenetic lines of the Aphelenchida. In each line of the parasitic development in different nematode families, the highly specialized ectoparasites, as well as endoparasites on insects, were formed. In the evolution of life cycle of parasitic nematodes, a tendency to decrease the body size took place. The function of dispersion shifted

  2. Suppression on plant-parasitic nematodes using a soil fumigation strategy based on ammonium bicarbonate and its effects on the nematode community.

    PubMed

    Su, Lanxi; Ruan, Yunze; Yang, Xiujuan; Wang, Kang; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    Banana production is severely hindered by plant-parasitic nematodes in acidic, sandy soil. This study investigated the possibility of applying a novel fumigation agent based on ammonium bicarbonate as a strategy for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes under sealed conditions. Moreover, its effects on the nematode community in pot and field experiments were also measured using morphology and feeding-habit based classification and the PCR-DGGE method. Results showed that a mixture (LAB) of lime (L) and ammonium bicarbonate (AB) in suitable additive amounts (0.857 g kg(-1) of L and 0.428 g kg(-1) of AB) showed stronger nematicidal ability than did the use of AB alone or the use of ammonium hydroxide (AH) and calcium cyanamide (CC) with an equal nitrogen amount. The nematode community was altered by the different fumigants, and LAB showed an excellent plant-parasitic nematicidal ability, especially for Meloidogyne and Rotylenchulus, as revealed by morphology and feeding-habit based classification, and for Meloidogyne, as revealed by the PCR-DGGE method. Fungivores and omnivore-predators were more sensitive to the direct effects of the chemicals than bacterivores. This study explored a novel fumigation agent for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes based on LAB and provides a potential strategy to ensure the worldwide development of the banana industry. PMID:26621630

  3. Suppression on plant-parasitic nematodes using a soil fumigation strategy based on ammonium bicarbonate and its effects on the nematode community

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lanxi; Ruan, Yunze; Yang, Xiujuan; Wang, Kang; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    Banana production is severely hindered by plant-parasitic nematodes in acidic, sandy soil. This study investigated the possibility of applying a novel fumigation agent based on ammonium bicarbonate as a strategy for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes under sealed conditions. Moreover, its effects on the nematode community in pot and field experiments were also measured using morphology and feeding-habit based classification and the PCR-DGGE method. Results showed that a mixture (LAB) of lime (L) and ammonium bicarbonate (AB) in suitable additive amounts (0.857 g kg−1 of L and 0.428 g kg−1 of AB) showed stronger nematicidal ability than did the use of AB alone or the use of ammonium hydroxide (AH) and calcium cyanamide (CC) with an equal nitrogen amount. The nematode community was altered by the different fumigants, and LAB showed an excellent plant-parasitic nematicidal ability, especially for Meloidogyne and Rotylenchulus, as revealed by morphology and feeding-habit based classification, and for Meloidogyne, as revealed by the PCR-DGGE method. Fungivores and omnivore-predators were more sensitive to the direct effects of the chemicals than bacterivores. This study explored a novel fumigation agent for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes based on LAB and provides a potential strategy to ensure the worldwide development of the banana industry. PMID:26621630

  4. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a comparison of the nAChRs of Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Joyner, Michelle; O'Connor, Vincent; Walker, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play a key role in the normal physiology of nematodes and provide an established target site for anthelmintics. The free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, has a large number of nAChR subunit genes in its genome and so provides an experimental model for testing novel anthelmintics which act at these sites. However, many parasitic nematodes lack specific genes present in C. elegans, and so care is required in extrapolating from studies using C. elegans to the situation in other nematodes. In this review the properties of C. elegans nAChRs are reviewed and compared to those of parasitic nematodes. This forms the basis for a discussion of the possible subunit composition of nAChRs from different species of parasitic nematodes. Currently our knowledge on this is largely based on studies using heterologous expression and pharmacological analysis of receptor subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It is concluded that more information is required regarding the subunit composition and pharmacology of endogenous nAChRs in parasitic nematodes. PMID:23500392

  5. Frequency and Geographical Distribution of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes on Cotton in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Baird, R. E.; Davis, R. F.; Alt, P. J.; Mullinix, B. G.; Padgett, G. B.

    1996-01-01

    A survey was conducted to examine the geographical distribution of plant-parasitic nematodes in Georgia cotton fields. A total of 778 fields in 11 Georgia counties were sampled from 1 September through 15 December 1995. Four nematode genera parasitic on cotton were found in this survey: Meloidogyne spp., Rotylenchulus sp., Hoplolaimus sp., and Belonolaimus sp. Meloidogyne spp. was present in 9% to 56% of the fields in individual counties. Rotylenchulus sp. was found in 10 counties, Hoplolaimus sp. was found in 6 counties, and Belonolaimus sp. was found in 2 counties. From all of the samples collected for this survey, Meloidogyne spp. were found in 31% of the samples, Rotylenchulus sp. was found in 14%, Hoplolaimus sp. was found in 7%, and Belonolaimus sp. was found in 0.3%. Burke County had the greatest number of fields infested by at least one of these genera (67%) and the greatest number of fields above Georgia's action thresholds (38%). Laurens County had the fewest fields where these genera were present (13%), and only 3% of fields had nematode populations above threshold levels. Data from samples collected from cotton fields and submitted by county agents from 1993 through 1994 were compiled to provide historical information about nematode distribution and population density. The results from this survey show that the major nematodes damaging to cotton are not present in all counties in Georgia. Counties in which cotton has historically been a major crop are likely to have higher levels of Meloidogyne spp., Hoplolaimus sp., and Rotylenchulus sp. in current cotton crops. Counties in which soybean has historically been a major crop are likely to have higher levels of Hoplolaimus sp. and Rotylenchulus sp. in current cotton crops. PMID:19277192

  6. Laser capture microdissection of nematode feeding cells.

    PubMed

    Ithal, Nagabhushana; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2011-01-01

    Obligate plant-parasitic nematodes, such as cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) and root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), form specialized feeding cells in host plant roots. These feeding cells provide the sole source of nutrition for the growth and reproduction of the nematode to complete its life cycle. Feeding cell formation involves complex physiological and morphological changes to normal root cells and is accompanied by dramatic changes in plant gene expression. The distinct features of feeding cells suggest that their formation entails a unique gene expression profile, a better understanding of which will assist in building models to explain signaling pathways that modulate transcriptional changes in response to nematodes. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to design strategies to develop resistance against nematodes in crop plants. Feeding cells comprise a small fraction of the total root cell population, and identification of plant gene expression changes specific to these cells is difficult. Until recently, the specific isolation of nematode feeding cells could be accomplished only by manual dissection or microaspiration. These approaches are limited in that only mature feeding cells can be isolated. These limitations in tissue accessibility for macromolecule isolation at different stages of feeding cell development can be overcome through the use of laser microdissection (LM), a technique that enables the specific isolation of feeding cells from early to late stages for RNA isolation, amplification, and downstream analysis. PMID:21359812

  7. Heterodera glycines Population Development on Soybean Treated with Glyphosate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) is a major yield limiting pest in all major soybean producing countries. In the last decade genetically modified soybean tolerant to glyphosate has become widely planted and postemergence application of glyphosate has increased exponentially. Genetically m...

  8. Host suitability of some Poaceous crop cultivars for Heterodera goldeni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The host suitability of four corn, four sorghum and five rice cultivars to the cyst nematode Heterodera goldeni was determined in the greenhouse. The results showed that H. goldeni infected and reproduced successfully on all the tested poaceous crop cultivars. The corn hybrids Pioneer 3062 and SC 10...

  9. Characterization of the Pratylenchus penetrans transcriptome including data mining of putative nematode genes involved in plant parasitism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans is considered one of the most economically important species within the genus. Host range studies have shown that nearly 400 plant species can be parasitized by this species. To obtain insight into the transcriptome of this migratory plant-parasitic ne...

  10. Trichinella spiralis, potential model nematode for epigenetics and its implication in metazoan parasitism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Wang, Rui; Liu, Mingyuan

    2014-01-10

    The recent discovery of DNA methylation in the nematode T.spiralis may raise the possibility of using it as a potential model organism for epigenetic studies instead of C. elegans, which is deficient in this important epigenetic modification. In contrast to the free-living nematode C. elegans, T. spiralis is a parasitic worm that possesses a complicated life cycle and undergoes a complex developmental regulation of genes. We emphasize that the differential methylomes in the different life-history stages of T. spiralis can provide insight on how DNA methylation is triggered and regulated. In particular, we have demonstrated that DNA methylation is involved in the regulation of its parasitism-related genes. Further computational analyses indicated that the regulatory machinery for DNA methylation can also be found in the T. spiralis genome. By a logical extension of this point, we speculate that comprehensively addressing the epigenetic machinery of T. spiralis may help to understand epigenetics in invertebrates. Furthermore, considering the implication of epigenetics in metazoan parasitism, using T. spiralis as an epigenetic model organism may further contribute to drug development against metazoan parasites. PMID:24454291