Science.gov

Sample records for parasitology

  1. Teaching veterinary parasitology.

    PubMed

    Verster, A

    1994-08-01

    The history of parasitology and the teaching of veterinary parasitology in South Africa are reviewed briefly. Courses in veterinary parasitology are presented at the faculties of veterinary science at the University of Pretoria and the Medical University of South Africa as well as at the Pretoria Technicon. At the University of Pretoria, the three disciplines of veterinary parasitology, entomology, helminthology and protozoology, are covered in 330 core lectures; from 13 to 40% of the contact time is devoted to practical classes. Teaching veterinary parasitology is both labour intensive and costly, viz. R1700 (US$570) per student per annum. Such costs are justified by the R148.8 million (US$49.6 million) spent every year in South Africa on anthelmintics, ectoparasiticides and vaccines to control parasites. Veterinary parasitology is a dynamic subject and the curriculum must be revised regularly to incorporate new information. Because the parasite faunas are so diverse no single textbook can satisfy the requirements of the various institutions worldwide which teach the subject, with the result that extensive use is made of notes. In Australia and in Europe, ticks and tick-borne diseases are less important than they are in Africa; consequently insufficient space is devoted to them in textbooks to satisfy the requirements of the subject in African countries. Parasite control under extensive and intensive conditions is dealt with adequately at the University of Pretoria, but increasing emphasis will be given to small-scale farming systems, particularly if alternative food animals are to be kept. PMID:7846856

  2. Teaching human parasitology in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    China has approximately one-fifth of the world’s population. Despite the recent success in controlling major parasitic diseases, parasitic diseases remain a significant human health problem in China. Hence, the discipline of human parasitology is considered as a core subject for undergraduate and postgraduate students of the medical sciences. We consider the teaching of human parasitology to be fundamental to the training of medical students, to the continued research on parasitic diseases, and to the prevention and control of human parasitic diseases. Here, we have summarized the distribution of educational institutions in China, particularly those that teach parasitology. In addition, we have described some existing parasitology courses in detail as well as the teaching methods used for different types of medical students. Finally, we have discussed the current problems in and reforms to human parasitology education. Our study indicates that 304 regular higher education institutions in China offer medical or related education. More than 70 universities have an independent department of parasitology that offers approximately 10 different parasitology courses. In addition, six universities in China have established excellence-building courses in human parasitology. PMID:22520237

  3. The history of Italian parasitology.

    PubMed

    Roncalli Amici, R

    2001-07-12

    The history of Italian parasitology can be subdivided into two periods: pre-Redi and post-Redi. The first period includes the contributions to parasitology by savants who operated during the Roman, medieval and Renaissance eras; the second period started in 1668 when Francesco Redi published his experiments to debunk the theory of spontaneous generation; the work of Redi was subsequently continued by Vallisnieri, Spallanzani and others. The latter period includes classic contributions in the field of parasitology provided by veterinarians such as Ercolani, Perroncito, Piana and Rivolta, and by physicians such as Bassi, Grassi, Golgi, and Celli. Also, two outstanding pages of medical parasitology were written during this period--the unraveling and defeat of St. Gotthard's disease and the conquering of malaria on Italian soil--both accomplished through the generous efforts of dedicated individuals. PMID:11516576

  4. History of Human Parasitology

    PubMed Central

    Cox, F. E. G.

    2002-01-01

    Humans are hosts to nearly 300 species of parasitic worms and over 70 species of protozoa, some derived from our primate ancestors and some acquired from the animals we have domesticated or come in contact with during our relatively short history on Earth. Our knowledge of parasitic infections extends into antiquity, and descriptions of parasites and parasitic infections are found in the earliest writings and have been confirmed by the finding of parasites in archaeological material. The systematic study of parasites began with the rejection of the theory of spontaneous generation and the promulgation of the germ theory. Thereafter, the history of human parasitology proceeded along two lines, the discovery of a parasite and its subsequent association with disease and the recognition of a disease and the subsequent discovery that it was caused by a parasite. This review is concerned with the major helminth and protozoan infections of humans: ascariasis, trichinosis, strongyloidiasis, dracunculiasis, lymphatic filariasis, loasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, cestodiasis, paragonimiasis, clonorchiasis, opisthorchiasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, African trypanosomiasis, South American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, cyclosporiasis, and microsporidiosis. PMID:12364371

  5. Parasitology in France: the past.

    PubMed

    Humphery-Smith, I; Théodoridès, J; Touratier, L; Le-Flohic, A M

    1990-07-01

    The 'French School of Parasitology' has its roots in the thirteenth century. Since then, it has contributed much to our understanding of parasitic organisms, their biology and their role as etiological agents of disease. In many fields of parasitology, the names of members of this school remain associated with taxonomic groups or species and they include two Nobel Prize winners, yet today, the origins of these names and the efforts of these early parasitologists have too often been forgotten. Here, Ian Humphery-Smith, Jean Théodoridès, Louis Touratier and Anne-Marie Le-Flohic outline the highlights of the French contribution to our knowledge of host-parasite relationships. PMID:15463346

  6. 42 CFR 493.1264 - Standard: Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard: Parasitology. 493.1264 Section 493.1264 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1264 Standard: Parasitology....

  7. 42 CFR 493.1264 - Standard: Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard: Parasitology. 493.1264 Section 493.1264 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1264 Standard: Parasitology....

  8. 42 CFR 493.1264 - Standard: Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Parasitology. 493.1264 Section 493.1264 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1264 Standard: Parasitology....

  9. 42 CFR 493.1264 - Standard: Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Parasitology. 493.1264 Section 493.1264 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1264 Standard: Parasitology....

  10. 42 CFR 493.1264 - Standard: Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard: Parasitology. 493.1264 Section 493.1264 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1264 Standard: Parasitology....

  11. 42 CFR 493.1204 - Condition: Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Parasitology. 493.1204 Section 493.1204 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1204 Condition: Parasitology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1204 - Condition: Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Parasitology. 493.1204 Section 493.1204 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1204 Condition: Parasitology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  13. 42 CFR 493.829 - Standard; Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Parasitology. 493.829 Section 493.829 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.829 Standard; Parasitology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of...

  14. [Scientific standards in parasitology in historical perspective].

    PubMed

    Lonc, Elzbieta; Płonka-Syroka, Bozena

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of scientific standards in parasitology was carried out from the perspective of anthropology of knowledge - a new discipline that emerged from non-classical history science in the 1990s. The history of parasitology, its development and limitations, are presented in a broad socio-cultural context, as the answers of scientists to different social needs in historical periods. In parasitological history there are some periods characteristic for all newly emerging disciplines of natural science. The first systematic account of natural phenomena and their interpretations was initiated in the 16th century and continued till the mid 18th century. It was a period when the phenomena could not be explained in a proper way by the existing and accepted theories. The epidemic diseases were one of these phenomena which were interpreted based on ancient ideas, mostly humoral pathology. In the 16th century a new contagium concept of material factors (pathogenes) that could be spread by contact among humans or close association was formed. This hypothesis, however, was not widely accepted because it contradicted the well-established normative concepts in the European academic naturalism. The development of parasitology was stopped because of theoretical barriers and interpretation difficulties (non-materialistic standard of naturalism, humoral pathology and spontaneous theory). In the second half of the 18th century, the theoretical crisis in natural sciences gave a new impulse for many disciplines; among others, parasitology entered in its second stage of development. The collected observations were classified in a new way and in the context of new interpretations. The progress in parasitology was prompted by the intensified urbanization, rapid increase of European population as well as by wars connected with infections and epidemics. It resulted in two competitive research programs (the French and the German). On the basis of the same observations, they advanced different theoretical interpretations. The third period in the history of parasitology lasted from the mid 19th century to the end of World War I. At that time a common agreement was established in all Europe, with regard to interpretation of standards inspired by positivism, i.e. verification of empirical statements through observation. Parasitology emerged as a separate discipline. Theoretical barriers limiting its progress and setting the questions were overcome. The contagion concept was reinstated. The colonial conquests solving demography problem provided the most important social impulse for the progress in parasitology. It was supported by governments interested in having their colonies free from diseases, mainly malaria and other tropical diseases, and thus safe for the European pioneer settlers. There was also development of parasitological scientific institutions (institutes of tropical medicine) and didactics. After World War I parasitology entered the fruitful stage of discipline development which resulted in a division into subdisciplines and a progress of new scientific fields. Its theoretical standards have become fixed and provided a basis for preventive programmes against parasite diseases, supported financially by European goverments, USA and some other countries. Those programmes were executed both in the home countries and in the colonies. After World War II, in the fourth stage of parasitology development, attention was mainly paid to local natural environment in order to diagnose parasites and their vectors. At the same time, parasitology became an applied science practiced in many specialized centres not only at universities. Presently, the main aims of parasitology are studies on biodiversity of parasites and environmental protection in the developed countries, and within tropical medicine as the travel medicine, because of rapid increase of tourism. PMID:16913523

  15. 42 CFR 493.917 - Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Parasitology. 493.917 Section 493.917 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Proficiency Testing Programs for Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty...

  16. 42 CFR 493.917 - Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Parasitology. 493.917 Section 493.917 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Proficiency Testing Programs for Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty...

  17. 42 CFR 493.829 - Standard; Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... These Tests § 493.829 Standard; Parasitology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at... unsatisfactory performance and results in a score of 0 for the testing event. Consideration may be given to those... in a score of 0 for the testing event. (d)(1) For any unsatisfactory testing event for reasons...

  18. 42 CFR 493.829 - Standard; Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... These Tests § 493.829 Standard; Parasitology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at... unsatisfactory performance and results in a score of 0 for the testing event. Consideration may be given to those... in a score of 0 for the testing event. (d)(1) For any unsatisfactory testing event for reasons...

  19. 42 CFR 493.829 - Standard; Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... These Tests § 493.829 Standard; Parasitology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at... unsatisfactory performance and results in a score of 0 for the testing event. Consideration may be given to those... in a score of 0 for the testing event. (d)(1) For any unsatisfactory testing event for reasons...

  20. 42 CFR 493.917 - Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Parasitology. 493.917 Section 493.917 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Proficiency Testing Programs for Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty...

  1. 42 CFR 493.917 - Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Parasitology. 493.917 Section 493.917 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Proficiency Testing Programs for Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty...

  2. Current status and challenge of Human Parasitology teaching in China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chun-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infection profile in China has been changed greatly with the rapid economic development in China since the 1980s, such as the tremendous decreased infection rate of the soil-borne helminthiasis, the elimination of filariasis, the control of malaria, and the initiation to eradicate malaria in 2020. Some food-borne parasitic infections have increased such as Clonorchiasis, Cysticercosis, and Echinococcosis, probably because of the increased chances of eating out. This trend directly affected the status of Human Parasitology teaching in medical universities, such as the shorten length of this course, re-adjusted contents structure and teaching manners, even the change of the name of this course. In this paper, we analyzed the current status and challenges of Human Parasitology teaching in medical universities, and discussed the requisite contents and manners in course delivery and measures to improve the quality of Human Parasitology teaching in China. PMID:23265609

  3. An integrated parasitology: Revealing the elephant through tradition and invention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The field of parasitology contributes to the elucidation of patterns and processes in evolution, ecology and biogeography, of fundamental importance across the biosphere, leading to a thorough understanding of biodiversity and varied responses to global change. Foundations from taxonomic and systema...

  4. A Hypermedia Computer-Aided Parasitology Tutoring System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodoropoulos, Georgios; Loumos, Vassili

    A hypermedia tutoring system for teaching parasitology to college students was developed using an object oriented software development tool, Knowledge Pro. The program was designed to meet four objectives: knowledge incorporation, tutoring, indexing of key words for Boolean search, and random generation of quiz questions with instant scoring. The…

  5. An integrated parasitology: revealing the elephant through tradition and invention.

    PubMed

    Hoberg, Eric P; Agosta, Salvatore J; Boeger, Walter A; Brooks, Daniel R

    2015-04-01

    The field of parasitology contributes to the elucidation of patterns and processes in evolution, ecology, and biogeography that are of fundamental importance across the biosphere, leading to a thorough understanding of biodiversity and varied responses to global change. Foundations from taxonomic and systematic information drive biodiversity discovery and foster considerable infrastructure and integration of research programs. Morphological, physiological, behavioral, life-history, and molecular data can be synthesized to discover and describe global parasite diversity, in a timely manner. In fully incorporating parasitology in policies for adaptation to global change, parasites and their hosts should be archived and studied within a newly emergent conceptual universe (the 'Stockholm Paradigm'), embracing the inherent complexity of host-parasite systems and improved explanatory power to understand biodiversity past, present, and future. PMID:25488772

  6. Universal challenges for parasite control: a perspective from equine parasitology.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Martin K

    2015-07-01

    Formulating and disseminating recommendations for parasite control is a dynamic process that requires constant interaction between parasitology researchers and the end-users in the field. Any set of guidelines requires continuous evaluation of efficacy and possible adverse effects, and adjustments are invariably needed along the way. Experience with formulating guidelines for equine parasite control illustrates that end-users struggle with striking the balance between treating too little and too much. PMID:26143301

  7. Parasitology tutoring system: a hypermedia computer-based application.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, G; Loumos, V

    1994-02-14

    The teaching of parasitology is a basic course in all life sciences curricula, and up to now no computer-assisted tutoring system has been developed for this purpose. By using Knowledge Pro, an object-oriented software development tool, a hypermedia tutoring system for teaching parasitology to college students was developed. Generally, a tutoring system contains a domain expert, a student model, a pedagogical expert and the user interface. In this project, particular emphasis was given to the user interface design and the expert knowledge representation. The system allows access to the educational material through hypermedia and indexing at the pace of the student. The hypermedia access is facilitated through key words defined as hypertext and objects in pictures defined as hyper-areas. The indexing access is based on a list of parameters that refers to various characteristics of the parasites, e.g. taxonomy, host, organ, etc. In addition, this indexing access can be used for testing the student's level of understanding. The advantages of this system are its user-friendliness, graphical interface and ability to incorporate new educational material in the area of parasitology. PMID:8205794

  8. Parasitological and clinical studies on human scabies in Cairo.

    PubMed

    Sarwat, M A; el Okbi, L M; el Sayed, M M; el Okbi, S M; el Deeb, H K

    1993-12-01

    This study is a parasitological and clinical study on human scabies. This study was carried out on 100 patients attending the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic at Ain Shams University Hospitals, including 54 males and 46 females. All patients were subjected to detailed history taking, complete dermatological examination including Skin Scraping Test and Burrow Ink Test. Younger patients attended the dermatology clinic earlier than older patients, who usually delayed their visits until complications occurred. Scratching, erythematous papules and secondary infected lesions were the commonest lesions. The hands, wrist and external genitalia were the most frequently affected sites while the feet, ankles, knees and back were the least affected. Burrows could only be detected in 40% of patients. The most frequent sites were the web spaces, external genitalia, and finger sides. Burrow Ink Test was positive among 85% of patients with burrows while mites could be identified by Skin Scraping Test in 55% of patients. The most frequent clinical manifestations in the parasitologically positive patients were itching, burrows, and papules, and the most frequent sites were the web spaces, and the finger sides. Multiple sites affection was the characteristic feature among the preschool age children who represented 14% of cases. PMID:8308357

  9. Parasitology of five primates in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kooriyama, Takanori; Hasegawa, Hideo; Shimozuru, Michito; Tsubota, Toshio; Nishida, Toshisada; Iwaki, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    Parasitological surveillance in primates has been performed using coprological observation and identification of specimens from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania (Mahale). In this study, we conducted coprological surveillance to identify the fauna of parasite infection in five primate species in Mahale: red colobus (Procolobus badius tephrosceles), red-tailed monkeys (Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti), vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops pygerythrus), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), and chimpanzees. Fecal samples were examined microscopically, and parasite identification was based on the morphology of cysts, eggs, larvae, and adult worms. Three nematodes (Oesophagostomum spp., Strongyloides sp., and Trichuris sp.), Entamoeba coli, and Entamoeba spp. were found in all five primate species. The following infections were identified: Bertiella studeri was found in chimpanzees and yellow baboons; Balantidium coli was found in yellow baboons; three nematodes (Streptopharagus, Primasubulura, an undetermined genus of Spirurina) and Dicrocoeliidae gen. sp. were found in red-tailed monkeys, vervet monkeys, and yellow baboons; Chitwoodspirura sp. was newly identified in red colobus and red-tailed monkeys; Probstmayria gombensis and Troglocorys cava were newly identified in chimpanzees, together with Troglodytella abrassarti; and Enterobius sp. was newly identified in red colobus. The parasitological data reported for red colobus, vervet monkeys, and yellow baboons in Mahale are the first reports for these species. PMID:22661394

  10. [Geographical Information Systems and remote sensing technologies in parasitological epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, L; Cascone, C; Sibilio, G; Musella, V; Taddei, R; Cringoli, G

    2004-06-01

    Parasites have natural habitats in the same way as a species: they are found in focal areas where the spatial distribution of the parasite, host, vector and required environmental conditions coincide. The spatial distribution of parasites is, therefore, a function of the interaction between abiotic and biotic environmental factors. The boundaries of distributions are not strictly fixed in space and time and may fluctuate with climate and other components of the environment or anthropical factors. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technologies are being used increasingly to study the spatial and temporal patterns of disease. GIS can be used to complement conventional ecological monitoring and modelling techniques, and provide means to portray complex relationships in the ecology of disease. In addition, the use of GIS and RS to identify environmental features allows determination of risk factors and delimitation of areas at risk, permitting more rational allocation of resources for cost-effective control. Since 1996, GIS have been used in our territorial cross-sectional and longitudinal parasitological surveys in order to experiment new applications to plan sampling protocols and to display quickly, clearly, and analytically the spatial and/or temporal distribution of parasitological data. The use of GIS allowed us to draw the following types of descriptive parasitological maps: distribution maps, distribution maps with proportioned peaks, choroplethic maps with proportioned peaks, point distribution maps and point distribution maps with proportioned peaks. In a recent study, GIS and RS technologies have been used also to identify environmental features that influence the distribution of paramphistomosis in sheep from the southern Italian Apennines and to develop a preliminary risk assessment model. A GIS was constructed using RS and landscape feature data together with paramphistome positive survey records from 197 georeferenced ovine farms with animals pasturing in an area of the southern Italian Apennines. The GIS for the study area was constructed utilizing the following environmental variables: Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), land cover, elevation, slope, aspect, and total length of rivers. In addition, data regarding the presence of watercourses smaller than rivers, namely, streams, springs and brooks were recorded in the field. All these variables were then calculated for "buffer zones" consisting of the areas included in a circle of 3 Km diameter centred on 197 farms. The environmental data obtained were analyzed by univariate and multivariate statistical analyses using the paramphistome farm coprological status (positive/negative) as the dependent variable. A multivariate stepwise discriminant analysis model was developed that included moors and heathland, sclerophyllus and coniferous forest vegetation, autumn-winter NDVI and presence of streams, springs and brooks on pasture. The variables entered in the model are consistent with the environmental requirements of paramphistomes and their snail intermediate host. In particular, the land cover types entered in the model in this area are indicators of marginal uncultivable and sloping zones where typically there is the presence of water (permanently or temporarily). In addition, since NDVI can be used as an indicator of regional thermal-moisture regime, the distribution of farms positive for paramphistomosis corresponding to relatively high values of winter NDVI indicated the presence of adequate moisture and temperatures favourable to the rumen fluke and the snails. In conclusion, GIS and RS are useful to define the habitats of parasites, especially for those with strong environmental determinants, and to produce forecasting maps requested for the planning and the monitoring of control strategies on small and large scale. PMID:15305690

  11. Microbiological and parasitological investigation on chelonians reared in Italian facilities.

    PubMed

    Marenzoni, Maria L; Zicavo, Alessia; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Morganti, Giulia; Scuota, Stefania; Coletti, Mauro; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Santoni, Lorenzo; Natalilo, PaoMauro; Moretta, Iolanda

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise in the number of pet chelonians and their illegal trade can modify the ecology, involving exotic pets, humans, and microbiological agents. Therefore, different epidemiological situations and the related risk to introduce and spread infectious diseases, especially zoonotic agents, have to be considered. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbiological and parasitological situation in 2 chelonian facilities (a private breeding of tortoises and a shelter for turtles) collecting oral/cloacal swabs and cloacal flushes to research viruses, bacteria, and parasites. No Chelonian Herperviruses, Cryptosporidium spp., and Giardia spp. infections were found. Salmonella spp. were detected in 8% of tortoises and in 37.5% of turtles and oxyurid eggs in 23.7% of tortoises and 15% of turtles; ascarid eggs were present only in tortoises. Moreover, 6 turtles showed cutaneous lesions, where Aeromonas sobria was isolated as main pathogen. Further studies should be performed to understand the zoonotic and infectious risk in each chelonian facility and to characterize the variables that could influence the microbiological patterns. PMID:26344661

  12. The Quality of Methods Reporting in Parasitology Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Flórez-Vargas, Oscar; Bramhall, Michael; Noyes, Harry; Cruickshank, Sheena; Stevens, Robert; Brass, Andy

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing concern both inside and outside the scientific community over the lack of reproducibility of experiments. The depth and detail of reported methods are critical to the reproducibility of findings, but also for making it possible to compare and integrate data from different studies. In this study, we evaluated in detail the methods reporting in a comprehensive set of trypanosomiasis experiments that should enable valid reproduction, integration and comparison of research findings. We evaluated a subset of other parasitic (Leishmania, Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, Trichuris and Schistosoma) and non-parasitic (Mycobacterium) experimental infections in order to compare the quality of method reporting more generally. A systematic review using PubMed (2000–2012) of all publications describing gene expression in cells and animals infected with Trypanosoma spp was undertaken based on PRISMA guidelines; 23 papers were identified and included. We defined a checklist of essential parameters that should be reported and have scored the number of those parameters that are reported for each publication. Bibliometric parameters (impact factor, citations and h-index) were used to look for association between Journal and Author status and the quality of method reporting. Trichuriasis experiments achieved the highest scores and included the only paper to score 100% in all criteria. The mean of scores achieved by Trypanosoma articles through the checklist was 65.5% (range 32–90%). Bibliometric parameters were not correlated with the quality of method reporting (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient 0.05). Our results indicate that the quality of methods reporting in experimental parasitology is a cause for concern and it has not improved over time, despite there being evidence that most of the assessed parameters do influence the results. We propose that our set of parameters be used as guidelines to improve the quality of the reporting of experimental infection models as a pre-requisite for integrating and comparing sets of data. PMID:25076044

  13. [A bite of parasite, experiences of application of documentaries into parasitology class teaching].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Hong-chang; Yao, Yun-liang; Shao, Sheng-wen; Ru, Xiao-chen; Dong, Hai-yan; Zhang, Ting

    2015-06-01

    Medical parasitology education has been facing some difficulties, because it is a course of wide range, lacking clinical cases and concerned specimens of parasites currently. In addition, its relationship with life is not closely enough. All these reasons may impact the effect of class education negatively. Therefore, it is important to increase the vitality of parasitology education and diversify the instructional mode by using the resources from Internet. In recent years, the Discovery Channel has uploaded a documentary Monsters Inside Me online. This documentary is high professional and closely linked with parasitology. It maintains numbers of clinical cases about parasitic diseases. Each episode is about 3 minutes and shortly enough to be introduced into class teaching. However, this resource has not been fully used in domestic temporally. We found that direct introduction of the documentary into class teaching can enrich teaching forms to attract learning interest of students, and finally improve the teaching effect of class. Above that, another popular documentary A Bite of China involves many related knowledge points of parasitology. The appropriate usage of the knowledge can build up close linkage between book and life, which is extremely helpful to give students a deep impression of parasitology. In brief, it is our strong recommendation to introduce the documentary Monsters Inside Me into class. PMID:26510370

  14. The Mobile Team of Parasitology-Mycology, a medical entity for educational purposes to serve sick patients.

    PubMed

    Desoubeaux, G; Simon, E G; Perrotin, D; Chandenier, J

    2014-06-01

    The Mobile Team of Parasitology-Mycology is a movable entity of the Parasitology-Mycology laboratory of Tours University Hospital, France. In contrast to the usual prerogatives of biomedical laboratories, the Mobile Team of Parasitology-Mycology is requested to intervene directly at bedside in various clinical departments, or even outside the hospital facility. Although its actions are of course primarily devoted to specialized diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the Mobile Team also plays an important educational role in the medical training of undergraduate or graduate students. PMID:24316319

  15. Web-Based Virtual Microscopy for Parasitology: A Novel Tool for Education and Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Ewert; Lundin, Mikael; Thors, Cecilia; Lebbad, Marianne; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Helin, Heikki; Leiva, Byron; Isola, Jorma; Lundin, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Background The basis for correctly assessing the burden of parasitic infections and the effects of interventions relies on a somewhat shaky foundation as long as we do not know how reliable the reported laboratory findings are. Thus virtual microscopy, successfully introduced as a histopathology tool, has been adapted for medical parasitology. Methodology/Principal Findings Specimens containing parasites in tissues, stools, and blood have been digitized and made accessible as a “webmicroscope for parasitology” (WMP) on the Internet (http://www.webmicroscope.net/parasitology).These digitized specimens can be viewed (“navigated” both in the x-axis and the y-axis) at the desired magnification by an unrestricted number of individuals simultaneously. For virtual microscopy of specimens containing stool parasites, it was necessary to develop the technique further in order to enable navigation in the z plane (i.e., “focusing”). Specimens were therefore scanned and photographed in two or more focal planes. The resulting digitized specimens consist of stacks of laterally “stiched” individual images covering the entire area of the sample photographed at high magnification. The digitized image information (∼10 GB uncompressed data per specimen) is accessible at data transfer speeds from 2 to 10 Mb/s via a network of five image servers located in different parts of Europe. Image streaming and rapid data transfer to an ordinary personal computer makes web-based virtual microscopy similar to conventional microscopy. Conclusion/Significance The potential of this novel technique in the field of medical parasitology to share identical parasitological specimens means that we can provide a “gold standard”, which can overcome several problems encountered in quality control of diagnostic parasitology. Thus, the WMP may have an impact on the reliability of data, which constitute the basis for our understanding of the vast problem of neglected tropical diseases. The WMP can be used also in the absence of a fast Internet communication. An ordinary PC, or even a laptop, may function as a local image server, e.g., in health centers in tropical endemic areas. PMID:18941514

  16. Malaria parasite diversity and transmission intensity affect development of parasitological immunity in a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of parasitological immunity against malaria affects the ability to detect infection, the efficiency of the local human parasite reservoir at infecting mosquitoes, and the response to reintroduction of parasites to previously cleared areas. Observations of similar age-trends in detected prevalence and mean parasitaemia across more than an order-of-magnitude of variation in baseline transmission complicate simple exposure-driven explanations. Methods Mathematical models often employ age-dependent immune factors to match the observed trends, while the present model uses a new detailed mechanistic model of parasite transmission dynamics to explain age-trends through the mechanism of parasite diversity. Illustrative simulations are performed for multiple field sites in Tanzania and Nigeria, and observed age-trends and seasonality in parasite prevalence are recreated in silico, proffering possible mechanistic explanations of the observational data. Results Observed temporal dynamics in measured parasitaemia are recreated for each location and age-prevalence outputs are studied. Increasing population-level diversity in malaria surface antigens delays development of broad parasitological immunity. A local parasite population with high diversity can recreate the observed trends in age-prevalence across more than an order of magnitude of variation in transmission intensities. Conclusions Mechanistic models of human immunity and parasite antigen diversity can recreate the observed temporal patterns for the development of parasitological immunity across a wide range of transmission intensities. This has implications for the distribution of disease burden across the population, the human transmission reservoir, design of elimination campaigns, and development and roll-out of potential vaccines. PMID:23241282

  17. "Not a very nice subject." Changing views of parasites and parasitology in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Vickerman, Keith

    2009-10-01

    The man in-the-street who frequently asks the question "Why am I here?" finds even more difficulty with the question "Why are parasites here?" The public's distaste for parasites (and by implication, for parasitologists!) is therefore understandable, as maybe was the feeling of early 20th century biologists that parasites were a puzzle because they did not conform to the then widely held association between evolution and progress, let alone the reason why a benevolent Creator should have created them. In mid-century, the writer, contemplating a career in parasitology was taken aback when he found that extolled contemporary biologists disdained parasites or thought little of parasitology as an intellectual subject. These attitudes reflected a lack of appreciation of the important role of parasites in generating evolutionary novelty and speciation, also unawareness of the value of parasite life-cycle studies for formulating questions of wider significance in biology, deficiencies which were gratifyingly beginning to be remedied in the latter half of the century. PMID:19660161

  18. [Historical context of parasitological studies in tropical area, malaria as an example].

    PubMed

    Lonc, Elzbieta; P?onka-Syroka, Bozena

    2007-01-01

    Review paper deals with the historical analysis of intellectual activity of some famous parasitologists working in tropics on malaria in the XIX/XX century: A. Laveran (1845-1922), R. Ross (1857-1932), P. Manson (1844-1922), B. Grassi (1854-1925), and other Nobelprize researchers: P. H. Müller (1899-1965) and J. W. von Jauregg (1857-1940). Those chief investigations are interpreted from the point of view of the so-called anthropology of knowledge based on L. Fleck's (1896-1961) philosophy and sociology of science. Parasitological investigations, especially in the field of malaria, were undertaken in the developed economically countries in answer to the social demands. It was connected with development of colonies and the needs of stabilization of epidemiological situation in tropics. To mid of the eigthies of 19th century the lack of positive effects resulted from the theoretical barriers and conservative thinking style of the European academic society. It caused that great parasitological discoveries of the etiological agents of parasitic diseases (like plasmodia, life cycle in malaria) took place behind university circles. They were done by the physicians - general practitioners--in the colony areas. Doctors A. Laveran, P. Manson and R. Ross were not restricted by traditional standards and the obliging normative concepts in the academic naturalism. Those medical men worked out a new impulse for parasitology and supported an idea based on the rule that each disease should be assigned with the materialistic biological factor (pathogen). In the years 1800-1900 the old and a new concepts were competed in the natural sciences and medicine. Near year 1900 a new way in the context of modern interpretations was brought into general use. It was proved experimentally that etiological theory of parasitic disease was more practically usuful. It resulted in the formation of the effective prophylactic theory as well as the development of research in the field of chemotherapy. For that reason this thinking style was accepted by the state authorities and armies interested in possessing colonies. The governments organized and financed scientific institutes of tropical medicine and the hygienic parasitological journals. Also the researchers (A. Laveran, R. Ross, P. Manson) were rewarded for their epoch-making investigations in tropical disease problems. At the same time the progress in parasitology was prompted and the old theories in old thinking style were eliminated as false because of their practical uselessness. Their followers lost status of authorities. This analysis proved that external factors of science, i.e. social needs in historic periods play real role in the promoting of changes of scientific standards in the perception of new standards. Social needs form the broad social-cultural context of scientific activity and they influence seriously the way of thinking and investigations practice. PMID:18075149

  19. Evaluation of Nifurtimox Treatment of Chronic Chagas Disease by Means of Several Parasitological Methods

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Catalina; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Ortiz, Sylvia; Schijman, Alejandro G.; Bisio, Margarita; Ferrada, Valentina; Herrera, Cinthya; Martínez, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Currently, evaluation of drug efficacy for Chagas disease remains a controversial issue with no consensus. In this work, we evaluated the parasitological efficacy of Nifurtimox treatment in 21 women with chronic Chagas disease from an area of endemicity in Chile who were treated according to current protocols. Under pre- and posttherapy conditions, blood (B) samples and xenodiagnosis (XD) samples from these patients were subjected to analysis by real-time PCR targeting the nuclear satellite DNA of Trypanosoma cruzi (Sat DNA PCR-B, Sat DNA PCR-XD) and by PCR targeting the minicircle of kinetoplast DNA of T. cruzi (kDNA PCR-B, kDNA PCR-XD) and by T. cruzi genotyping using hybridization minicircle tests in blood and fecal samples of Triatoma infestans feed by XD. In pretherapy, kDNA PCR-B and kDNA PCR-XD detected T. cruzi in 12 (57%) and 18 (86%) cases, respectively, whereas Sat DNA quantitative PCR-B (qPCR-B) and Sat DNA qPCR-XD were positive in 18 cases (86%) each. Regarding T. cruzi genotype analysis, it was possible to observe in pretherapy the combination of TcI, TcII, and TcV lineages, including mixtures of T. cruzi strains in most of the cases. At 13 months posttherapy, T. cruzi DNA was detectable in 6 cases (29.6%) and 4 cases (19.1%) by means of Sat DNA PCR-XD and kDNA PCR-XD, respectively, indicating treatment failure with recovery of live parasites refractory to chemotherapy. In 3 cases, it was possible to identify persistence of the baseline genotypes. The remaining 15 baseline PCR-positive cases gave negative results by all molecular and parasitological methods at 13 months posttreatment, suggesting parasite response. Within this follow-up period, kDNA PCR-XD and Sat DNA qPCR-XD proved to be more sensitive tools for the parasitological evaluation of the efficacy of Nifurtimox treatment than the corresponding PCR methods performed directly from blood samples. PMID:23836179

  20. Evaluation of nifurtimox treatment of chronic Chagas disease by means of several parasitological methods.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Catalina; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Ortiz, Sylvia; Schijman, Alejandro G; Bisio, Margarita; Ferrada, Valentina; Herrera, Cinthya; Martínez, Gabriela; Solari, Aldo

    2013-09-01

    Currently, evaluation of drug efficacy for Chagas disease remains a controversial issue with no consensus. In this work, we evaluated the parasitological efficacy of Nifurtimox treatment in 21 women with chronic Chagas disease from an area of endemicity in Chile who were treated according to current protocols. Under pre- and posttherapy conditions, blood (B) samples and xenodiagnosis (XD) samples from these patients were subjected to analysis by real-time PCR targeting the nuclear satellite DNA of Trypanosoma cruzi (Sat DNA PCR-B, Sat DNA PCR-XD) and by PCR targeting the minicircle of kinetoplast DNA of T. cruzi (kDNA PCR-B, kDNA PCR-XD) and by T. cruzi genotyping using hybridization minicircle tests in blood and fecal samples of Triatoma infestans feed by XD. In pretherapy, kDNA PCR-B and kDNA PCR-XD detected T. cruzi in 12 (57%) and 18 (86%) cases, respectively, whereas Sat DNA quantitative PCR-B (qPCR-B) and Sat DNA qPCR-XD were positive in 18 cases (86%) each. Regarding T. cruzi genotype analysis, it was possible to observe in pretherapy the combination of TcI, TcII, and TcV lineages, including mixtures of T. cruzi strains in most of the cases. At 13 months posttherapy, T. cruzi DNA was detectable in 6 cases (29.6%) and 4 cases (19.1%) by means of Sat DNA PCR-XD and kDNA PCR-XD, respectively, indicating treatment failure with recovery of live parasites refractory to chemotherapy. In 3 cases, it was possible to identify persistence of the baseline genotypes. The remaining 15 baseline PCR-positive cases gave negative results by all molecular and parasitological methods at 13 months posttreatment, suggesting parasite response. Within this follow-up period, kDNA PCR-XD and Sat DNA qPCR-XD proved to be more sensitive tools for the parasitological evaluation of the efficacy of Nifurtimox treatment than the corresponding PCR methods performed directly from blood samples. PMID:23836179

  1. "Anisakis Simplex" Infection in Mackerel: A Reliable Laboratory Exercise to Demonstrate Important Principles in Parasitology to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, I.; Tatner, M.; Paterson, V.

    2013-01-01

    Practical laboratory work in parasitology can be very limited, due to the difficulty in maintaining multi-host parasite life cycles, especially for a large, once-yearly undergraduate laboratory class for life science students. The use of mackerel, "Scomber scombrus," bought from a local fishmonger, is an ideal model to investigate important…

  2. "Anisakis Simplex" Infection in Mackerel: A Reliable Laboratory Exercise to Demonstrate Important Principles in Parasitology to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, I.; Tatner, M.; Paterson, V.

    2013-01-01

    Practical laboratory work in parasitology can be very limited, due to the difficulty in maintaining multi-host parasite life cycles, especially for a large, once-yearly undergraduate laboratory class for life science students. The use of mackerel, "Scomber scombrus," bought from a local fishmonger, is an ideal model to investigate important…

  3. [Parasitologic survey of schistosomiasis due to Schistosoma mansoni in Katana, Democratic Republic of Congo].

    PubMed

    Baluku, B; Bagalwa, M; Bisimwa, B

    2000-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that development of irrigation projects in endemic areas for schistosomiasis invariably leads to a recrudescence of the disease by increasing the habitat of the intermediate snail host of Schistosoma mansoni. This fatality was again demonstrated by experience in the Katana region of the Democratic Republic of Congo where development of 43 fresh water reservoirs for raising Tilapia nilotica led to multiplication of Biomphalaria pfeifferi. A parasitological study was conducted in three new villages around these basins and in neighboring villages. Stool examinations were performed in a total of 787 people. Infestation rates were 8.1 p. 100 and 4 p. 100 respectively. Infestation exceeded 25 p. 100 in children between the ages of 10 and 14 years. These findings underline the need for preventive measures. PMID:11100444

  4. Data on the parasitological status of golden jackal (Canis aureus L., 1758) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Takács, András; Szabó, László; Juhász, Lajos; Takács, András Attila; Lanszki, József; Takács, Péter Tamás; Heltai, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    In Hungary, twenty Canis aureus individuals were submitted to parasitological examinations in 2010-2012. Two Coccidia: Cystoisospora canis (15%) and Toxoplasma-type oocysts (5%), one Trematoda: Alaria alata (10%), six Cestoda: Mesocestoides lineatus (20%), Echinococcus granulosus (10%), Dipylidium caninums (5%), Taenia hydatigena (15%), Taenia pisiformis (20%), Taenia crassiceps (40%), and nine Nematoda: Angiostrongylus vasorum (10%), Crenosoma vulpis (30%), Capillaria aerophila (5%), Toxocara canis (20%), Toxascaris leonina (15%), Trichuris vulpis (10%), Ancylostoma caninum (45%), Uncinaria stenocephala (40%), Capillaria plica (45%) have been identified. Angiostronglyus vasorum has been reported from carnivores in Europe, Africa, South America and North America. The helminth A. vasorum or French heartworm is a metastrongylid nematode, widely distributed in Western Europe, that infects the pulmonary arterial tree of dogs, various species of foxes, wolves, Eurasian badgers, coyotes and stoats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural A. vasorum infection in golden jackal. PMID:24334089

  5. [Methodical features of the molding of diagnostic competences in medical parasitology workers].

    PubMed

    Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Iu; Avdiukhina, T I; Serdiuk, A P; Imamkuliev, K D

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides a rationale for a procedure to mold diagnostic competences in medical workers of the laboratories of therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions and hygiene and epidemiology centers, Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare. The methodical features of molding diagnostic competences in the above contingents are the design and organization of an educational process by applying systems integration and competence-based approaches; increased active self-directed learning of audience; a procedure to organize its unsupervised extracurricular activities. Professional habits and skills in laboratory specialists should be molded on the basis of didactic principles and in compliance with the found methodical patterns. The eventual result (molded competences) and its compliance with the practical health care requirements is assessed using all control types (incoming, running, intermediate, and ultimate ones). This ensures the stability and predictability of molding diagnostic competences in parasitology specialists. PMID:25850323

  6. Histopathological and parasitological study of the gastrointestinal tract of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to provide a systematic pathological and parasitological overview of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon, of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania. Methods Twenty mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum and obtained from the Control Zoonosis Center of the Municipality of Ribeirão das Neves, Belo Horizonte Metropolitan area, Minas Gerais (MG) state, Brazil, were analyzed. The dogs were divided into two groups: Group 1 comprised nine clinically normal dogs and group 2 comprised 11 clinically affected dogs. After necropsy, one sample was collected from each GIT segment, namely the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon. Furthermore, paraffin-embedded samples were used for histological and parasitological (immunohistochemistry) evaluation and a morphometrical study were carried out to determine the parasite load (immunolabeled amastigote forms of Leishmania). The Friedman and the Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The Friedman test was used to analyze each segment of the GIT within each group of dogs and the Mann Whitney test was used to compare the GIT segments between clinically unaffected and affected dogs. Results The infected dogs had an increased number of macrophages, plasma cells and lymphocytes, but lesions were generally mild. Parasite distribution in the GIT was evident in all intestinal segments and layers of the intestinal wall (mucosal, muscular and submucosal) irrespective of the clinical status of the dogs. However, the parasite load was statistically higher in the caecum and colon than in other segments of the GIT. Conclusion The high parasite burden evident throughout the GIT mucosa with only mild pathological alterations led us to consider whether Leishmania gains an advantage from the intestinal immunoregulatory response (immunological tolerance). PMID:22166041

  7. Hotspots of Malaria Transmission in the Peruvian Amazon: Rapid Assessment through a Parasitological and Serological Survey

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Aguirre, Angel; Speybroeck, Niko; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Carrasco-Escobar, Gabriel; Rodriguez, Hugo; Gamboa, Dionicia; Contreras-Mancilla, Juan; Alava, Freddy; Soares, Irene S.; Remarque, Edmond; D´Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Background With low and markedly seasonal malaria transmission, increasingly sensitive tools for better stratifying the risk of infection and targeting control interventions are needed. A cross-sectional survey to characterize the current malaria transmission patterns, identify hotspots, and detect recent changes using parasitological and serological measures was conducted in three sites of the Peruvian Amazon. Material and Methods After full census of the study population, 651 participants were interviewed, clinically examined and had a blood sample taken for the detection of malaria parasites (microscopy and PCR) and antibodies against P. vivax (PvMSP119, PvAMA1) and P. falciparum (PfGLURP, PfAMA1) antigens by ELISA. Risk factors for malaria infection (positive PCR) and malaria exposure (seropositivity) were assessed by multivariate survey logistic regression models. Age-specific seroprevalence was analyzed using a reversible catalytic conversion model based on maximum likelihood for generating seroconversion rates (SCR, λ). SaTScan was used to detect spatial clusters of serology-positive individuals within each site. Results The overall parasite prevalence by PCR was low, i.e. 3.9% for P. vivax and 6.7% for P. falciparum, while the seroprevalence was substantially higher, 33.6% for P. vivax and 22.0% for P. falciparum, with major differences between study sites. Age and location (site) were significantly associated with P. vivax exposure; while location, age and outdoor occupation were associated with P. falciparum exposure. P. falciparum seroprevalence curves showed a stable transmission throughout time, while for P. vivax transmission was better described by a model with two SCRs. The spatial analysis identified well-defined clusters of P. falciparum seropositive individuals in two sites, while it detected only a very small cluster of P. vivax exposure. Conclusion The use of a single parasitological and serological malaria survey has proven to be an efficient and accurate method to characterize the species specific heterogeneity in malaria transmission at micro-geographical level as well as to identify recent changes in transmission. PMID:26356311

  8. [Parasitology and entomology in the 29th century in Latin American narrative].

    PubMed

    Schenone, H

    2000-01-01

    In the present review of twelve pieces produced by distinguished 20th century Latin American writers--Jorge Luis Borges from Argentina, Jorge Amado and João Ubaldo Ribeiro from Brazil, José Donoso from Chile, Gabriel García Márquez from Colombia, Alejo Carpentier from Cuba, Miguel Angel Asturias from Guatemala, Octavio Paz from Mexico, Mario Vargas Llosa from Perú, Horacio Quiroga and Mario Benedetti from Uruguay and Arturo Uslar-Pietri from Venezuela--paragraphs or parts of paragraphs in which parasitological or entomological situations of the most varied hues are referred to or described, have been extracted in a selective form. Sometimes in these descriptions appear, local or regional expressions, without ignoring colorful folklore representations. For a easier interpretation these or part of these paragraph sentences have been arranged by thematic similarities. In a varied and kaleidoscopic vision, it will be possible to find protozoiasis (malaria, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, amebiasis), helminthiases (ascariasis, hydatidosis, trichinosis, schistosomiasis, cysticercosis, onchocerciasis), parasitoses produced by arthropods (pediculosis, scabies, tungiasis, myiasis), passing progressively to hemaphagous arthropods (mosquitoes, gnats, horse flies, bedbugs, ticks), venomous arthropods (Latrodectus spiders, scorpions, wasps, bees), mechanical vectors (flies and cockroaches), culminating with a conjunction of bucolic arthropods (butterflies, crickets, grasshoppers cicadas, ants, centipedes, beetles, glow worms, dragonflies). PMID:11338977

  9. Integrating genetic and parasitological approaches in the frame of multidisciplinary fish stock analysis.

    PubMed

    Cimmaruta, R; Mattiucci, S; Nascetti, G

    2007-09-01

    To assess fish stocks boundaries and state, the tools of population genetics have been widely used, contributing to the evaluation of relevant parameters such as the identification of stock boundaries, the assessment of gene flow and the estimation of effective population size. Also, increasing evidences show that the monitoring of the genetic diversity level is a reliable method to check the status of fish stocks. However, genetics cannot answer all the questions. For example, in high gene flow species the genetic approach could have not enough resolution to identify stock limits, while the use of parasites as biological tags could provide insights into stock structure. Even better, the so-called holistic approach, applying simultaneously a wide range of complementary techniques, is the only one considered able to provide a reliable and complete picture of fish stocks and to address a sustainable exploitation of marine resources. The work will present some examples from multidisciplinary studies concerning commercially relevant species with different biological features: the demersal European hake (Merluccius merluccius), the small pelagic horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) and the large pelagic swordfish (Xiphias gladius). In all these case studies merging genetic, parasitological and environmental data helped to reveal the real patterns of stocks structure. PMID:18410069

  10. Trypanosoma evansi: A clinical, parasitological and immunological evaluation of trypanosomosis using a chronic rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Iglesias, J.R.; Eleizalde, M.C.; Gómez-Piñeres, E.; Mendoza, M.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical, parasitological and immunological effects of a Venezuelan strain of Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi) throughout in experimentally inoculated rabbits over the course of infection and compared them with the same aspect in healthy animals. Body temperature was recorded in degrees Celsius, animal weight in kilograms, serum proteins in g/dl using a refractometer, haematocrit percentage by capillary centrifugation and the anti-T. evansi IgG titer by indirect ELISA immunoassay, from both infected animals and controls for 95 days. Infected animals showed a higher body temperature, total serum protein and anti- T. evansi antibody titer, and a lower haematocrit and weight gain than controls. These differences were related to the presence of the parasites in the blood as detected micro-haematocrit centrifugation technique (MHCT) and direct microscopic examination (DME). This study confirms the usefulness of rabbits as a model for the study of trypanosomosis; the clinical features of the disease can be observed and the three characteristic stages, prepatent period, acute and chronic phase clearly defined over the course of the infection. PMID:26623297

  11. Comparison of Clinical and Parasitological Data from Controlled Human Malaria Infection Trials

    PubMed Central

    Roestenberg, Meta; O'Hara, Geraldine A.; Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Epstein, Judith E.; Edwards, Nick J.; Scholzen, Anja; van der Ven, André J. A. M.; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Sauerwein, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposing healthy human volunteers to Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes is an accepted tool to evaluate preliminary efficacy of malaria vaccines. To accommodate the demand of the malaria vaccine pipeline, controlled infections are carried out in an increasing number of centers worldwide. We assessed their safety and reproducibility. Methods We reviewed safety and parasitological data from 128 malaria-naïve subjects participating in controlled malaria infection trials conducted at the University of Oxford, UK, and the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, The Netherlands. Results were compared to a report from the US Military Malaria Vaccine Program. Results We show that controlled human malaria infection trials are safe and demonstrate a consistent safety profile with minor differences in the frequencies of arthralgia, fatigue, chills and fever between institutions. But prepatent periods show significant variation. Detailed analysis of Q-PCR data reveals highly synchronous blood stage parasite growth and multiplication rates. Conclusions Procedural differences can lead to some variation in safety profile and parasite kinetics between institutions. Further harmonization and standardization of protocols will be useful for wider adoption of these cost-effective small-scale efficacy trials. Nevertheless, parasite growth rates are highly reproducible, illustrating the robustness of controlled infections as a valid tool for malaria vaccine development. PMID:22701640

  12. The use of fish metabolic, pathological and parasitological indices in pollution monitoring . I. North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeg, K.; Zander, S.; Diamant, A.; Körting, W.; Krüner, G.; Paperna, I.; Westernhagen, H. v.

    ??An integrated biological effect monitoring concept has been tested in flounder (Platichthys flesus L.) from four locations with different anthropogenic impact in the German Bight. During 3 years of sampling, biomarkers at all levels of biological organisation from the molecular to the ecosystem level were applied and tested on 742 individual fish of body lengths between 18 and 25 cm. At the ecosystem level, the fish were taken as a habitat for the parasite assemblage. The hypothesis was that changes in the environment might lead to changes in the species diversity of parasites and in the infection intensity of single species, as well as between heteroxenic and monoxenic parasite species (H/M ratio). At the molecular level, activity of the CYP1A-dependent monooxygenase ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) was used as a biomarker of exposure. At the subcellular level, the integrity of lysosomal membranes in hepatocytes was taken as an indicator of non-specific acute and chronic toxic effects. Both biomarkers are recommended by the ICES Advisory Committee on the Marine Environment for the application in biological effects monitoring programmes. In addition, neutral lipid content in the liver was used as a marker for pathologically induced fat accumulation. In the same individual fish, a new method for the measurement of macrophage aggregate activity in the liver was tested for its application and reliability in reflecting immunosuppression. Tests were accompanied by chemical analysis of standard organochlorine and heavy metal residues in flounder tissue. A total of 33 parasite species were found. As an indicator species, the mean abundance of Trichodina sp. reflected best the pollution gradient observed with highest infection intensity at the most polluted location. Species diversity was significantly higher in fish caught near the reference site and significantly lower in fish from the polluted Elbe estuary. The use of the heteroxenous/monoxenous species ratio as a marker was not useful at the locations investigated because of the dominance of heteroxenous species at all habitats. Since EROD activity and macrophage aggregate activity were dependent on sex and maturity of female flounder, only male fish were taken into consideration for the integrated evaluation of data. All biochemical and histochemical tests were able to reflect accurately the site-specific differences, as well as an observed pollution event at the end of 1995 as determined by chemical analyses. The correlation analysis revealed a connection not only between the single parasitological and biochemical parameters but also within these groups. The non-specific immune response and Trichodina infection intensity were correlated with all other parameters, leading to the assumption that these may serve as links between the lowest and the highest levels of biological organisation. The simultaneous use of metabolic and parasitological results facilitated the interpretation of the observed variations of the data and the distinction between natural variation and pollution-mediated effects.

  13. A combined parasitological molecular approach for noninvasive characterization of parasitic nematode communities in wild hosts.

    PubMed

    Budischak, Sarah A; Hoberg, Eric P; Abrams, Art; Jolles, Anna E; Ezenwa, Vanessa O

    2015-09-01

    Most hosts are concurrently or sequentially infected with multiple parasites; thus, fully understanding interactions between individual parasite species and their hosts depends on accurate characterization of the parasite community. For parasitic nematodes, noninvasive methods for obtaining quantitative, species-specific infection data in wildlife are often unreliable. Consequently, characterization of gastrointestinal nematode communities of wild hosts has largely relied on lethal sampling to isolate and enumerate adult worms directly from the tissues of dead hosts. The necessity of lethal sampling severely restricts the host species that can be studied, the adequacy of sample sizes to assess diversity, the geographic scope of collections and the research questions that can be addressed. Focusing on gastrointestinal nematodes of wild African buffalo, we evaluated whether accurate characterization of nematode communities could be made using a noninvasive technique that combined conventional parasitological approaches with molecular barcoding. To establish the reliability of this new method, we compared estimates of gastrointestinal nematode abundance, prevalence, richness and community composition derived from lethal sampling with estimates derived from our noninvasive approach. Our noninvasive technique accurately estimated total and species-specific worm abundances, as well as worm prevalence and community composition when compared to the lethal sampling method. Importantly, the rate of parasite species discovery was similar for both methods, and only a modest number of barcoded larvae (n = 10) were needed to capture key aspects of parasite community composition. Overall, this new noninvasive strategy offers numerous advantages over lethal sampling methods for studying nematode-host interactions in wildlife and can readily be applied to a range of study systems. PMID:25644900

  14. [Approaches to developing a procedure for mapping water basin regions, by using the parasitological criteria].

    PubMed

    Beér, S A; Él'piner, L I; Voronin, M V

    2011-01-01

    The structure of a parasite system is formed and its functioning takes place in qualitatively different environments. The aquatic environment serves as a source of new elements and modules, energy, and information for parasite systems. And the parasite systems, for their part, affect the physical and biological parameters of the environment. Many intestinal infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms generally characterized by an acute disease course are related to a water factor. Such are typhus, typhoids, dysentery, cholera, salmonellosis, virus hepatitis, and others. Many parasitic diseases caused by pathogenic intestinal protistae (lambliasis, amebiasis, balantidiasis), blood parasite protistae (malaria), helminthes (opisthorchiasis, fascioliasis, diphyllobothriasis, cercariosis, pseudoamphistomosis) are also closely related to a water factor. Ascaridiasis, hymenolepiasis, trichocephalosis, and echinococcosis have a less close but still self-evident relationship to a water factor. The clbse relationships of many parasitic diseases to a water factor are also determined by the fact that the life cycles of many parasites necessarily include various intermediate hosts and parasite vectors, such as fishes, mollusks, crustaceans, and insects, which are aquatic organisms at some stages of their life. The results of continuous exposure of people to parasitic diseases are quite similar to the suppressive effects of the environment in the ecologically troublesome regions. The most prognostically useful information is formed while mapping by medical and ecological regions, by employing a combination of current mathematical and cartographical methods. The former include cluster analysis, quartering method, informational logical analysis, which are all described in this article and others. Regional mapping using the parasitological criteria should achieve at least two goals: 1) a scientific one that aids in finding causative connections and to prognosticate a situation; 2) a practical one that assists in developing regional programs for disease control and prevention. It is necessary to use the recommendations described in detail in the article in order to have the maximum results during medical and ecological mapping by the regions with a future goal of obtaining useful prognostic information. PMID:21932540

  15. Experimental transmission of intestinal coccidiosis to piglets: clinical, parasitological and pathological findings.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Y; Morin, M; Girard, C; Higgins, R

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight piglets coming from a "specific pathogen free" herd were inoculated at three days of age with 50 000 or 100 000 sporulated oocysts of Isospora suis. Fecal samples were examined for oocyst shedding daily and several clinical parameters were recorded. Ten piglets were used as normal controls. Groups of piglets were euthanized from three days to 12 days postinoculation and routine necropsies were performed. Bacteriological, virological, parasitological and histopathological examinations were made on the intestinal tracts. The incubation period was four to five days. Clinical signs and microscopic intestinal lesions observed in the experimentally infected animals were similar to those reported in spontaneous cases of porcine neonatal coccidiosis. Lesions of villous atrophy in the small intestine seemed to result from the destruction of villous epithelial cells mainly during the peak of asexual reproduction which occurred around four to five days postinoculation. Intracellular coccidial organisms were difficult to find during the late atrophic and villous regrowth stages of the intestinal lesions. The prepatent period varied from four to seven days and the most common was five days. Eighty percent of the piglets kept alive more than four days postinoculation have shed oocysts. Piglets dosed with old sporulated oocysts (ten months old) shed many more oocysts than those infected with a fresh inoculum (less than two months old). The patent period was not determined precisely with the design of the experiment but some of the infected piglets shed oocysts for at least five days. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6230142

  16. [Malaria in the central health district of Dakar (Senegal). Entomological, parasitological and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Diallo, S; Konate, L; Ndir, O; Dieng, T; Dieng, Y; Bah, I B; Faye, O; Gaye, O

    2000-01-01

    We previously investigated malaria in the southern health district of the city of Dakar, which includes the oldest neighborhoods. In this study, we investigated malaria in the central health district, corresponding to the central area of the conurbation. The study was carried out at 12 sites, from March 1996 to February 1997. The sites were selected such that the entire district was covered and included 2 sites in the shanty town and three in an old village that has been absorbed into the city. We carried out prospective monthly entomological analyses with a view to identifying the vectors and the mode of transmission of malaria. We also carried out clinical and parasitological follow up to determine the incidence of parasitemia and of bouts of malaria. Insects were collected overnight from humans and the insects remaining the next morning in 10 bedrooms in the health district were collected. For clinical and parasitological follow up, families were visited at home once per week and their clinical state was assessed. Blood smears were taken to facilitate the detection of bouts of malaria. Body temperature was measured and we checked for the presence of organisms in the blood systematically during the last weekly visit of each month. For a total of 308 collections at night from human volunteers and 1,395 bedroom collections of residual fauna, we obtained 12,879 Culicidae females, 199 (1.5%) of which were anopheles mosquitoes, with Culex quinquefasciatus accounting for 98% of the remaining mosquitoes. As in the southern district, A. arabiensis was the only species of the A. gambiae complex collected. Anopheles mosquitoes accounted for only 0.3 bites per man per night and 0.07 females per room. They were therefore poorly represented in this district and were not detected at all at five sites. They were found in large numbers only during the rainy season, especially in September, when they accounted for 2.25 bites per man per night and 0.3 females per room at 3 sites in an undeveloped zone in which 81.4% of all the anopheles mosquitoes were collected. The parturition frequency of the biting females was 32.6% and that of the females collected in houses was 50.0%. None of the A. arabiensis females dissected (98.5% of those collected) carried Plasmodium sporozoites. The clinical and parasitological follow up concerned 2,583 individuals, aged from 1 month to 80 years, from 285 families resident in Dakar who volunteered for the study; 41.9% of these individuals were less than 15 years old and 92.2% had been living in Dakar for more than 2 years. Thick and thin blood smears taken monthly showed the frequency of the parasite to be 1.0% and that of gametocytes to be 0.1%. P. falciparum was the only parasite detected in the subjects. Plasmodium infections were observed in all age groups, with a frequency of 0.4% (adults over the age of 20 years) to 1.6% (children under two years of age). Parasitized subjects were detected in every month of the study, with a frequency of 0.4% (in January) to 1.9% (in December). The largest number of cases detected in a three-month period (38.8% of all cases) was that for October to December, the three-month period immediately after the rainy season (July to September). Parasite frequency, which was no higher than 1. 2% at 10 sites, was clearly higher at two sites in the shanty town (3.8 and 6.8%), mostly inhabited by immigrants from rural areas. At the end of the study year, satisfactory weekly follow up was considered to have been achieved for 1,067 of the participants. The annual incidence of parasitemia in this cohort was 5.1% and that of malaria was 2.4%. Incidence did not vary significantly with age and was between 1.8% and 7.6% for parasitemia and between 0.8% and 3.5% for malaria. However, significant differences in incidence were observed between areas. Incidence was higher at the two sites in the shanty town, with rates of 12.1% and 36.5% for parasitemia and 6.1% and 15.9% for malaria. (ABSTRACT TR PMID:11022155

  17. An internationally recognized quality assurance system for diagnostic parasitology in animal health and food safety, with example data on trichinellosis.

    PubMed

    Gajadhar, Alvin A; Forbes, Lorry B

    2002-01-01

    A quality assurance (QA) system was developed for diagnostic parasitology and implemented for several diagnostic assays including fecal flotation and sedimentation assays, trichomonad culture assay, and the testing of pork and horse meat for Trichinella to facilitate consistently reliable results. The system consisted of a validated test method, procedures to confirm laboratory capability, and protocols for documentation, reporting, and monitoring. Specific system components included a quality assurance manual, training program, proficiency panels, inter-laboratory check-sample exchange program, assay critical control points, controls, and audits. The quality assurance system of the diagnostic laboratory was audited according to ISO/IEC Standard 17025 by an international third party accrediting body and accredited as a testing laboratory for the specific parasitology tests. Test results generated from the laboratory were reliable and scientifically defensible according to the defined parameters of the tests and were therefore valid for a variety of purposes, including food safety, international trade, and declaration of disease status in an animal, herd, farm, or region. The system was applicable to various test methods for the detection of parasites in feces or other samples, and a digestion test system developed for Trichinella was used as an example. A modified tissue digestion assay was developed, validated, and implemented by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Centre for Animal Parasitology for efficiency and quality assurance. The details of the method were properly documented for routine testing and consisted of a homogenization process, an incubation at 45+/-2 degrees C, and two sequential sedimentations in separatory funnels to concentrate and clarify final aliquots for microscopic examination. To facilitate consistently reliable test results, 14 critical control points were identified and monitored, analysts were certified, and the test system verified through the use of validation data, proficiency samples, and training modules. PMID:11751008

  18. Comparison of Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction with Parasitological Methods for Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Human Fecal Samples.

    PubMed

    Sharifdini, Meysam; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in fecal samples compared with parasitological methods. A total of 466 stool samples were examined by conventional parasitological methods (formalin ether concentration [FEC] and agar plate culture [APC]). DNA was extracted using an in-house method, and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 18S ribosomal genes were amplified by nested PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Among 466 samples, 12.7% and 18.2% were found infected with S. stercoralis by FEC and APC, respectively. DNA of S. stercoralis was detected in 18.9% and 25.1% of samples by real-time PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Considering parasitological methods as the diagnostic gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of nested PCR were 100% and 91.6%, respectively, and that of real-time PCR were 84.7% and 95.8%, respectively. However, considering sequence analyzes of the selected nested PCR products, the specificity of nested PCR is increased. In general, molecular methods were superior to parasitological methods. They were more sensitive and more reliable in detection of S. stercoralis in comparison with parasitological methods. Between the two molecular methods, the sensitivity of nested PCR was higher than real-time PCR. PMID:26350449

  19. Bovine fasciolosis at increasing altitudes: Parasitological and malacological sampling on the slopes of Mount Elgon, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To clarify the extent and putative transmission zone of bovine fasciolosis on the slopes of Mount Elgon, Uganda, conjoint parasitological and malacological surveys, inclusive of inspection of animals at slaughter, were undertaken at increasing altitudes. Results A total of 239 cattle were sampled across eight locations ranging in elevation from 1112-2072 m. Faecal material was examined for presence of Fasciola eggs and sera were tested by ELISA for antibodies against Fasciola antigens. Bolstering this, 38 cattle at slaughter from 2 abattoir sites at 1150 m and 1947 m were inspected; in addition, wild buffalo stool (n = 10) opportunistically picked within Mount Elgon National Park (MENP) at 3640 m was examined. By faecal egg detection, prevalence of Fasciola gigantica at low (<1500 m) and high (>1500 m) altitude sites was 43.7% (95% CI 35.4-52.2) and 1.1% (95% CI 0.0-6.0), respectively, while by ELISA was much higher, low altitude - 77.9% (95% CI 69.7-85.4) and high altitude - 64.5% (95% CI 51.3-76.3). The decline in prevalence with increasing altitude was corroborated by abattoir sampling. Thirty seven aquatic habitats, ranging from 1139-3937 m in altitude were inspected for freshwater snails, 12 of which were within MENP. At lower altitudes, Lymnaea (Radix) natalensis was common, and often abundant, but at higher altitudes became much rarer ceasing to be found above 1800 m. On the other hand, Lymnaea (Galba) truncatula was found only at altitudes above 3000 m and within MENP alone. The snail identifications were confirmed by DNA analysis of the ribosomal 18S gene. Conclusions Active infections of F. gigantica in cattle are common in lower altitude settings but appear to diminish with increasing elevation. This is likely due to a growing paucity of intermediate hosts, specifically populations of L. natalensis for which a natural boundary of 1800 m appeared. Although F. hepatica was not encountered, the presence of several populations of L. truncatula at elevations over 3000 m point towards a potential transmission zone within MENP should this parasite be introduced. PMID:22958402

  20. Performance of Parasitological and Molecular Techniques for the Diagnosis and Surveillance of Gambiense Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Mumba Ngoyi, Dieudonné; Ali Ekangu, Rosine; Mumvemba Kodi, Marie France; Pyana, Patient Pati; Balharbi, Fatima; Decq, Mélanie; Kande Betu, Victor; Van der Veken, Wim; Sese, Claude; Menten, Joris; Büscher, Philippe; Lejon, Veerle

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recently, improvements have been made to diagnostics for gambiense sleeping sickness control but their performance remains poorly documented and may depend on specimen processing prior to examination. In a prospective study in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we compared the diagnostic performance of several parasite detection techniques, immune trypanolysis and of m18S PCR on whole blood stored in a stabilisation buffer or dried on filter paper. Methods Individuals with CATT whole blood (WB) titer ?1?4 or with clinical signs indicative for sleeping sickness were examined for presence of trypanosomes in lymph node aspirate (LNA) and/or in blood. Blood was examined with Capillary Centrifugation Technique (CTC), mini-Anion Exchange Centrifugation Technique (mAECT) and mAECT on buffy coat (BC). PCR was performed on whole blood (i) stored in guanidine hydrochloride EDTA (GE) stabilisation buffer and (ii) dried on filter paper, and repeatability and reproducibility were assessed. Immune trypanolysis (TL) was performed on plasma. Results A total of 237 persons were included. Among 143 parasitologically confirmed cases, 85.3% had a CATT-WB titre of ?1/8, 39.2% were positive in LNA, 47.5% in CTC, 80.4% in mAECT-WB, 90.9% in mAECT-BC, 95.1% in TL and up to 89.5% in PCR on GE-stabilised blood. PCR on GE-stabilised blood showed highest repeatability (87.8%) and inter-laboratory reproducibility (86.9%). Of the 94 non-confirmed suspects, respectively 39.4% and 23.4% were TL or PCR positive. Suboptimal specificity of PCR and TL was also suggested by latent class analysis. Conclusion The combination of LNA examination with mAECT-BC offered excellent diagnostic sensitivity. For PCR, storage of blood in stabilisation buffer is to be preferred over filter paper. TL as well as PCR are useful for remote diagnosis but are not more sensitive than mAECT-BC. For TL and PCR, the specificity, and thus usefulness for management of non-confirmed suspects remain to be determined. PMID:24921941

  1. Diagnosis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Colombia: the Sampling Site within Lesions Influences the Sensitivity of Parasitologic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, José Robinson; Agudelo, Sonia; Muskus, Carlos; Alzate, Juan Fernando; Berberich, Christof; Barker, Douglas; Velez, Ivan Darío

    2000-01-01

    Parasitologic confirmation of cutaneous leishmaniasis is obligatory before chemotherapy can be considered. Direct microscopic examination of scrapings taken from indurated borders of ulcers has been routinely used as primary method of diagnosis. In this report we compared the sensitivity of examination of dermal scrapings taken from the bottoms of ulcers (BDS) with that of dermal scrapings taken from indurated active margins of lesions (MDS) in a total of 115 patients. The sensitivities of the microscopic examination were 90.4 and 78.3% for BDS and MDS samples, respectively. When the PCR method was used with a group of 40 patients, we also observed a higher sensitivity when BDS samples were examined (80.8% in BDS samples versus 57.7% in MDS samples). The improvement of the diagnostic sensitivity in the BDS samples appears to be related to the higher parasite load and more easily detectable morphology of amastigotes in the centers of the ulcers. Other parasitologic diagnostic methods, such as culture and histopathologic examination of biopsies, are less sensitive (67.5 and 64.3%, respectively). Aspirate culture, however, was shown to be the most sensitive method for the diagnosis of patients with chronic ulcers. When microscopic examinations of both MDS and BDS samples are combined, the sensitivity of diagnosis may rise up to 94%. We therefore recommend this method as a primary routine procedure for diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:11015400

  2. Bovine trypanosomosis in the Upper West Region of Ghana: entomological, parasitological and serological cross-sectional surveys.

    PubMed

    Adam, Y; Marcotty, T; Cecchi, G; Mahama, C I; Solano, P; Bengaly, Z; Van den Bossche, P

    2012-06-01

    Baseline surveys were conducted in the Upper West Region of Ghana to assess the distribution and densities of tsetse species, as well as the prevalence of bovine trypanosomosis. The entomological survey was designed to cover the suitable tsetse habitats along the three main rivers in the study area (i.e. Black Volta, Kulpawn and Sissili). Results indicated the presence of Glossina tachinoides in all three river basins, whilst Glossina palpalis gambiensis was only found close to the southern limit of the study area. A random sampling of 1800 cattle of the West African Short Horn, Sanga and Zebu breeds from 36 randomly selected grid cells covering the study area showed substantial differences between parasitological and serological prevalences. The average parasitological prevalence was estimated at 2.5% (95% CI: 1.06-5.77) with the majority of the infections due to Trypanosoma vivax. Most of the infected cattle were found close to the major river systems. The serological prevalence, measured using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), test was 19% (95% CI: 14.03-25.35). Cattle with anti-trypanosomal antibodies were also found throughout the study area. PMID:21550616

  3. Malaria eradication in Mexico: Some historico-parasitological views oncold war, deadly fevers by Marcos Cueto, Ph.D

    PubMed Central

    Malagón, Filiberto

    2008-01-01

    This review of Professor Marcos Cueto's Cold War Deadly Fevers: Malaria Eradication in Mexico, 1955–1975 discusses some of the historical, sociological, political and parasitological topics included in Dr. Cueto's superbly well-informed volume. The reviewer, a parasitologist, follows the trail illuminated by Dr. Cueto through the foundations of the malaria eradication campaign; the release in Mexico of the first postage stamp in the world dedicated to malaria control; epidemiological facts on malarial morbidity and mortality in Mexico when the campaign began; the emergence of problem areas that impeded eradication; considerations on mosquitoes and malaria transmission in Mexico; the role of business and society in malaria eradication; the results of the campaign; the relationship between malaria and poverty; and the parasitological lessons to be learned from the history of malaria eradication campaigns. Dr. Cueto's excellent and well-informed exploration of malaria – not merely as a disease but as a social, economic and human problem – makes this book required reading.

  4. Triage and protocol recommendations for the parasitology laboratory based on an epidemiological investigation of parasite diagnostics in Ontario laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Allison; Krolik, Julia; Majury, Anna

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A study was performed using a subset of Ontario laboratory parasitology data, with three objectives: to describe parasitic infections in Ontario; to identify risk factors for acquiring a parasitic infection using routinely collected information; and to use this information to assess current protocols for parasite testing in laboratories and, in turn, to propose alternatives to optimize the allocation of laboratory resources. METHODS: All parasitology records from January 4, 2010 to September 14, 2010 were reviewed descriptively and risk factor analyses were performed using information collected from requisitions. These results were used to develop preliminary alternative protocols, which considered high-throughput screening tests and inclusion/exclusion criteria for ova and parasite testing; these were then retrospectively analyzed with the dataset to determine appropriateness. RESULTS: Of the 29,260 records analyzed, 10% were multiple samples from single patients submitted on the same day, of which 98% had the same result. Three percent of all parasite tests were positive, with the most prevalent parasites being (in ascending order) Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium species and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar. Age and sex were found to be weak risk factors, while rural living was found to be a moderate risk factor for D fragilis, G lamblia and Cryptosporidium infections. The strongest risk factor was travel history, especially for nonendemic parasites. The retrospective analysis of six alternative protocols identified four that may be more efficient than current procedures. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrated that current protocols may be redundant and can be optimized to target prevalent parasites and populations with high risk factors. PMID:25587292

  5. Parasitological, Hematological and Biochemical Characteristics of a Model of Hyper-microfilariaemic Loiasis (Loa loa) in the Baboon (Papio anubis)

    PubMed Central

    Wanji, Samuel; Eyong, Ebanga-Echi; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Ngwa, Che; Esuka, Elive; Kengne-Ouafo, Arnaud; Datchoua-Poutcheu, Fabrice; Enyong, Peter; Hopkins, Adrian; Mackenzie, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Loiasis, a filarial infection caused by Loa loa usually thought to cause relatively minor morbidity, can cause serious and often fatal reactions in patients carrying very high levels of circulating Loa loa microfilariae (mf) following administration of microfilaricidal drugs. An experimental model of this condition would greatly aid the definition of the optimal management of this important clinical presentation. Methodology/Principle Findings Fifteen baboons (Papio anubis) were infected with 600 infective larvae (L3) isolated from Chrysops vector flies. Animals were observed for any clinical changes; blood samples were collected every 1–2 months for 22 months, and analysed for parasitological, hematological and biochemical profiles using standard techniques. All animals became patent but remained clinically normal throughout the study. The parasitological pre-patent period was between 4–8 months, with a majority (60%) of animals becoming patent by 5 months post infection (MPI); all animals were patent by 8 MPI. Microfilarial loads increased steadily in all animals and reached a peak at 18 MPI. By 10 MPI >70% of animals had mf >8,000 mf/mL, and at 18 MPI >70% of animals had mf >30,000mf/mL with 50% of these animals with mf >50,000mf/mL. Absolute eosinophil, creatinine, Ca2+ and K+ levels were generally above normal values (NV). Positive associations were seen between microfilariaemia and eosinophilia, Hb, Ca2+, and gamma-GT values, whilst significant negative associations were seen between microfilariaemia and potassium, glucose and mononuclear leukocyte levels. Conclusions Infection of splenectomised baboons with L. loa can induce levels of circulating microfilariae, and corresponding haematological profiles, which parallel those seen in those humans in danger of the severe post-microfilariacide clinical responses. Utilization of this experimental model could contribute to the improved management of the loiasis related adverse responses in humans. PMID:26555070

  6. Parasitology and urban livestock farming in nigeria: prevalence of ova in faecal and soil samples and animal ectoparasites in Makurdi.

    PubMed

    Omudu, E A; Amuta, E U

    2007-03-01

    Domestic environmental pollution resulting from urban livestock farming was investigated in Makurdi using parasitological techniques. The test tube flotation technique was used for the parasitological analysis of animal faecal matter and soil samples collected from residential premises. Ectoparasitic fauna of dogs, goats, sheep and cattle cohabiting with humans within the same residential compound were also collected and identified. The hand-picking and body brushing methods were employed to search for ticks, fleas, lice and mites. Of the 150 soil samples examined, 55 (36.7 %) were positive for 1 or more eggs of helminth parasites. There was no significant difference in the distribution of eggs in the soil samples from the 3 areas sampled (Chi2 = 0.046, df = 2, P > 0.05). Ascaris species were the dominant parasite eggs found. Of the 180 faecal samples examined, 107 (59.4 %) were positive for 1 or more eggs of helminth parasites. Chi-square analysis showed no significant difference in the level of infection of different animal faeces sampled (Chi2 = 5.74, df = 4, P > 0.05). Ascaris species were again the dominating helminth parasite eggs found. There was also no significant difference in the prevalence of helminth eggs in the animal faecal samples from the 3 areas sampled (Chi2 = 5.99, df = 4, P > 0.05). A total of 1908 ectoparasites was recovered (ticks: 32.80 %; lice: 22.43 %; fleas: 22.06 % and mite: 22.69 %). There was no significant difference in infestation animals between sexes (Chi2 = 0.10, df = 4, P > 0.05). The predominant genus encountered for ticks were Amblyomma, while Linognathus (43.90 %), Ctenocephalides (97.38 %) and Sarcoptes (58.89 %) were most predominant for lice, fleas and mites respectively. The public health implications of the findings, especially as these relate to the increasing incidence and prevalence of zoonotic infections, are discussed. PMID:17665765

  7. Parasitological Confirmation and Analysis of Leishmania Diversity in Asymptomatic and Subclinical Infection following Resolution of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Chilama, Mariana; Gongora, Rafael E.; Valderrama, Liliana; Jojoa, Jimena; Alexander, Neal; Rubiano, Luisa C.; Cossio, Alexandra; Adams, Emily R.; Saravia, Nancy G.; Gomez, María Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Background The contribution of individuals with subclinical infection to the transmission and endemicity of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is unknown. Immunological evidence of exposure to Leishmania in residents of endemic areas has been the basis for defining the human population with asymptomatic infection. However, parasitological confirmation of subclinical infection is lacking. Methods We investigated the presence and viability of Leishmania in blood and non-invasive mucosal tissue samples from individuals with immunological evidence of subclinical infection in endemic areas for CL caused by Leishmania (Viannia) in Colombia. Detection of Leishmania kDNA was conducted by PCR-Southern Blot, and parasite viability was confirmed by amplification of parasite 7SLRNA gene transcripts. A molecular tool for genetic diversity analysis of parasite populations causing persistent subclinical infection based on PCR amplification and sequence analysis of an 82bp region between kDNA conserved blocks 1 and 2 was developed. Principal Findings Persistent Leishmania infection was demonstrated in 40% (46 of 114) of leishmanin skin test (LST) positive individuals without active disease; parasite viability was established in 59% of these (27 of 46; 24% of total). Parasite burden quantified from circulating blood monocytes, nasal, conjunctival or tonsil mucosal swab samples was comparable, and ranged between 0.2 to 22 parasites per reaction. kDNA sequences were obtained from samples from 2 individuals with asymptomatic infection and from 26 with history of CL, allowing genetic distance analysis that revealed diversity among sequences and clustering within the L. (Viannia) subgenus. Conclusions Our results provide parasitological confirmation of persistent infection among residents of endemic areas of L. (Viannia) transmission who have experienced asymptomatic infection or recovered from CL, revealing a reservoir of infection that potentially contributes to the endemicity and transmission of disease. kDNA genotyping establishes proof-of-principle of the feasibility of genetic diversity analysis in previously inaccessible and unexplored parasite populations in subclinically infected individuals. PMID:26659114

  8. The use of fish metabolic, pathological and parasitological indices in pollution monitoring . II. The Red Sea and Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamant, A.; Banet, A.; Paperna, I.; Westernhagen, H. v.; Broeg, K.; Kruener, G.; Koerting, W.; Zander, S.

      The complex interactions between parasites, hosts and the environment are influenced by the stability of the ecosystem. Heteroxenous parasites, with complex, multiple-host life cycles, can persist only in habitats where the full range of their required hosts are present. Conversely, in impoverished environments such as those impacted by environmental stress, monoxenous species that have simple, single-host life cycles are likely to predominate. In the present study, we analyzed the ratio between heteroxenous and monoxenous (H/M) parasites as well as parasite species richness (SH/SM) and species diversity in rabbitfish (Siganus rivulatus) collected from several sites in the Red Sea. The rabbitfish is a Suez Canal immigrant, well established in the eastern Mediterranean, and fish were also collected from a site on the Mediterranean coast of Israel. Separate treatment of the micro- and macroparasite components of the rabbitfish parasite communities in the Red Sea suggested that macroparasites only - monogenea and gut parasites - were better indicators than the parasite community as a whole. Quantification of macroparasites is accurate, saves time and effort, produces more accurate data and better differentiates between sites. Higher H/M ratios and SH/SM ratios were found in the rabbitfish collected at the ecologically stable habitat of the coral reef compared to rabbitfish from sandy habitat or mariculture-impacted sandy habitat. The results of the study emphasized the negative impacts of cage mariculture on the environment. The rabbitfish collected near the mariculture farms supported the poorest and least diverse parasite communities of all sampled sites, with virtual depletion of heteroxenous species, and even reduction of gill monogenean infections on the hosts. When results from the Mediterranean sites were compared with those of the Red Sea, the data showed full representation of monoxenous parasites (all but one of Red Sea origin), while heteroxenous species were completely absent. We may therefore regard the Mediterranean as a simulation model for a severely environmentally deteriorated, impoverished habitat, in which all or part of the intermediate host species have been depleted, enabling survival of the monoxenous parasite species only. Parasitological investigations were supplemented by testing the activity of cytochrome P 450- dependent mono-oxygenase EROD as a measure of exposure, and lysosomal stability as a measure of toxic effect in the liver of rabbitfish. The results underline the parasitological findings, showing that fish caught at the impacted sandy beach location in the Red Sea have significantly higher EROD activity and a decreased membrane stability compared with animals from the coral reef. In comparison, EROD activity values in rabbitfish from the Mediterranean Sea were double, while lysosomal membrane stability was half that measured at the most impacted Red Sea location.

  9. [Post-therapeutic evolution of patients presenting an immunological suspicion of trypanosomiasis without parasitological proof in support of it (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Frezil, J L; Coulm, J; Alary, J C

    1979-01-01

    The authors have recently preconised systematic treatment of every human being who is fluorescent positive. The evolution of antibodies of 26 subjects parasitologically negative and positive only in FAT test is described here after treatment with Arsobal. Statistically the antibodies decrease progressively like antibodies of Sleeping Sickness patients of first period usually did. Therefore it is possible to conclude that immunological suspects who were treated were realy sick and rightly cured. PMID:379493

  10. Evaluation of parasitological and molecular techniques for the diagnosis and assessment of cure of schistosomiasis mansoni in a low transmission area

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Liliane Maria Vidal; Gomes, Luciana Inácia; Oliveira, Edward; de Oliveira, Eduardo Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Áureo Almeida; Enk, Martin Johannes; Carneiro, Nídia Figueiredo; Rabello, Ana; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated parasitological and molecular techniques for the diagnosis and assessment of cure of schistosomiasis mansoni. A population-based study was performed in 201 inhabitants from a low transmission locality named Pedra Preta, municipality of Montes Claros, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Four stool samples were analysed using two techniques, the Kato-Katz® (KK) technique (18 slides) and the TF-Test®, to establish the infection rate. The positivity rate of 18 KK slides of four stool samples was 28.9% (58/201) and the combined parasitological techniques (KK+TF-Test®) produced a 35.8% positivity rate (72/201). Furthermore, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ELISA assay produced a positivity rate of 23.4% (47/201) using the first sample. All 72 patients with positive parasitological exams were treated with a single dose of Praziquantel® and these patients were followed-up 30, 90 and 180 days after treatment to establish the cure rate. Cure rates obtained by the analysis of 12 KK slides were 100%, 100% and 98.4% at 30, 90 and 180 days after treatment, respectively. PCR-ELISA revealed cure rates of 98.5%, 95.5% and 96.5%, respectively. The diagnostic and assessment of cure for schistosomiasis may require an increased number of KK slides or a test with higher sensitivity, such as PCR-ELISA, in situations of very low parasite load, such as after therapeutic interventions. PMID:25946244

  11. [Performance and parasitologic infestation of male dairy cattle supplemented with proteic salt containing or not homeopathic medicines].

    PubMed

    Signoretti, Ricardo D; Veríssimo, Cecília José; De Souza, Fernando Henrique M; Garcia, Tamires Da S; De Oliveira, Elisa Marcela; De Souza, Karen G; Mourão, Gerson Barreto

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and parasitologic infection of male dairy cattle submitted to supplemental proteic salt with and without the use of homeopathic medicines. Were used crossbred Gir x Holstein castrated males calves, with 10 months of age and live weight of 150.75 kg, distributed in a completely randomized design with eight replicates per treatment, totaling 16 animals. The calves of each treatment remained in a pasture of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu, managed in continuous grazing system for 8 months. The treatments employed were: supplementation with 300 g/animal/day of protein (40% of crude protein (CP) and 25% CP in the dry and rainy season, respectively) added or not with 5 g/animal/day of the homeopathic medicines FATOR PRO® and C & MC®. The addition of homeopathic medicines in the protein supplement did not affect (P > 0.05) the development of body male crossbred to pasture. The counting of the larvae and adults of ticks in scrapings were lower (P < 0.05) in animals that did not receive homeopathic medicines in the protein supplement. The females tick in the body anterior third (simplifying counting), nymphs in scrapings and the number of eggs per gram of helminths were not affected (P > 0.05) by the treatments. It was concluded that the use of homeopathic medicines did not affect the development of male crossbred Gir x Holstein dairy cattle neither their parasitic infection. PMID:20059813

  12. Comparison of parasitological, immunological and molecular methods for evaluation of fecal samples of immunosuppressed rats experimentally infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Leilane A; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia R; Paula, Fabiana M; Silva, Neide M; Silva, Cláudio V; Costa-Cruz, Julia M; Freitas, Michelle A R

    2015-12-01

    Definitive diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in humans is typically achieved by detection of larvae in fecal samples. However, limitations on sensitivity of parasitological methods emphasize the need for more robust diagnostic methods. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of three methods: eggs per gram of feces (EPG), coproantigen detection by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and DNA detection by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The assays were performed at 0 and 5, 8, 13, 21 and 39 days post-infection (dpi) using fecal samples from experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rats. In immunocompetent rats, eggs were detected in feces on days 5, 8 and 13 dpi; coproantigen detection and PCR amplification were successful at all post-infection time points (5, 8, 13, 21 and 39 dpi). In immunosuppressed rats, eggs were detected at 5, 8, 13 and 21; coproantigen detection and PCR amplification were successful at all post-infection time points. In conclusion, these results suggest that coproantigen detection and PCR may be more sensitive alternatives to traditional methods such as EPG for diagnosis of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection. PMID:26442899

  13. Effect of experimental infection with Haemonchus contortus on parasitological and local cellular responses in resistant and susceptible young Creole goats.

    PubMed

    Bambou, J C; Larcher, T; Ceï, W; Dumoulin, P J; Mandonnet, N

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the relationships of cellular changes in the abomasal mucosa and parasitological parameters, by comparing resistant and susceptible young Creole goats (kids) after experimental infection with Haemonchus contortus. The kids were infected over 2 periods (challenges 1 and 2) of 7 and 6 weeks, respectively. Fecal egg count (FEC), blood eosinophilia, packed cell volume (PCV), and body weight were weekly monitored. At the end of both challenges a subgroup of kids was slaughtered for nematode burden measurements and analysis of inflammatory cell infiltration in the abomasal mucosa. The average daily gain was higher in resistant kids after both challenges. Blood eosinophilia and FEC were higher in susceptible kids after both challenges. The number of immature worms and the means of female length were lower after challenge 2 whatever the genetic status. No differences were observed in the eosinophil and mononuclear cell infiltration between challenges 1 and 2 and resistant and susceptible kids. Globule leukocyte infiltration was found higher after the challenge 1 in resistant kids. This effect of the genetic status on globule leukocytes counts but not on the other inflammatory cell highlights the need for further study on the functional activity of these cell populations. PMID:23936855

  14. Performance of LBSap Vaccine after Intradermal Challenge with L. infantum and Saliva of Lu. longipalpis: Immunogenicity and Parasitological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian de Oliveira; Vitoriano-Souza, Juliana; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Braga, Samuel Leôncio; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; de Lana, Marta; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; Marques, Marcos José; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the search for new vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis has intensified. However, the pattern related to immune protection during long periods after experimental infection in vaccine trials is still not fully understood. Herein, we investigated the immunogenicity and parasitological levels after intradermal challenge with Leishmania infantum plus salivary gland extract in dogs immunized with a vaccine composed of L. braziliensis antigens plus saponin as an adjuvant (LBSap vaccine). The LBSap vaccine elicited higher levels of total anti-Leishmania IgG as well as both IgG1 and IgG2. Furthermore, dogs vaccinated had increased levels of lymphocytes, particularly circulating B cells (CD21+) and both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. LBSap also elicited an intense in vitro cell proliferation associated with higher levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes specific for vaccine soluble antigen and soluble lysate of L. infantum antigen even 885 days after experimental challenge. Furthermore, LBSap vaccinated dogs presented high IFN-γ and low IL-10 and TGF-β1 expression in spleen with significant reduction of parasite load in this tissue. Overall, our results validate the potential of LBSap vaccine to protect against L. infantum experimental infection and strongly support further evaluation of efficiency of LBSap against CVL in natural infection conditions. PMID:23189161

  15. Effect of Experimental Infection with Haemonchus contortus on Parasitological and Local Cellular Responses in Resistant and Susceptible Young Creole Goats

    PubMed Central

    Bambou, J. C.; Larcher, T.; Ceï, W.; Dumoulin, P. J.; Mandonnet, N.

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the relationships of cellular changes in the abomasal mucosa and parasitological parameters, by comparing resistant and susceptible young Creole goats (kids) after experimental infection with Haemonchus contortus. The kids were infected over 2 periods (challenges 1 and 2) of 7 and 6 weeks, respectively. Fecal egg count (FEC), blood eosinophilia, packed cell volume (PCV), and body weight were weekly monitored. At the end of both challenges a subgroup of kids was slaughtered for nematode burden measurements and analysis of inflammatory cell infiltration in the abomasal mucosa. The average daily gain was higher in resistant kids after both challenges. Blood eosinophilia and FEC were higher in susceptible kids after both challenges. The number of immature worms and the means of female length were lower after challenge 2 whatever the genetic status. No differences were observed in the eosinophil and mononuclear cell infiltration between challenges 1 and 2 and resistant and susceptible kids. Globule leukocyte infiltration was found higher after the challenge 1 in resistant kids. This effect of the genetic status on globule leukocytes counts but not on the other inflammatory cell highlights the need for further study on the functional activity of these cell populations. PMID:23936855

  16. On the use of posterior predictive probabilities and prediction uncertainty to tailor informative sampling for parasitological surveillance in livestock.

    PubMed

    Musella, Vincenzo; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagazio, Corrado; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Biggeri, Annibale; Catelan, Dolores

    2014-09-15

    Model-based geostatistics and Bayesian approaches are appropriate in the context of Veterinary Epidemiology when point data have been collected by valid study designs. The aim is to predict a continuous infection risk surface. Little work has been done on the use of predictive infection probabilities at farm unit level. In this paper we show how to use predictive infection probability and related uncertainty from a Bayesian kriging model to draw a informative samples from the 8794 geo-referenced sheep farms of the Campania region (southern Italy). Parasitological data come from a first cross-sectional survey carried out to study the spatial distribution of selected helminths in sheep farms. A grid sampling was performed to select the farms for coprological examinations. Faecal samples were collected for 121 sheep farms and the presence of 21 different helminths were investigated using the FLOTAC technique. The 21 responses are very different in terms of geographical distribution and prevalence of infection. The observed prevalence range is from 0.83% to 96.69%. The distributions of the posterior predictive probabilities for all the 21 parasites are very heterogeneous. We show how the results of the Bayesian kriging model can be used to plan a second wave survey. Several alternatives can be chosen depending on the purposes of the second survey: weight by posterior predictive probabilities, their uncertainty or combining both information. The proposed Bayesian kriging model is simple, and the proposed samping strategy represents a useful tool to address targeted infection control treatments and surbveillance campaigns. It is easily extendable to other fields of research. PMID:25131190

  17. Measurement of parasitological data by quantitative real-time PCR from controlled human malaria infection trials at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has allowed for precise quantification of parasites in the prepatent period and greatly improved the reproducibility and statistical power of controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) trials. Parasitological data presented here are from non-immunized, control-challenged subjects who participated in two CHMI trials conducted at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR). Methods Standardized sporozoite challenge was achieved through the bite of five Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes infected with the 3D7clone of the NF54 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Blood smears were scored positive when two unambiguous parasites were found. Analysis of parasitological PCR data was performed on log-transformed data using an independent sample t-test when comparing the two studies. The multiplication rate of blood-stage parasites was estimated using the linear model. Results On average, parasites were detected 4.91 days (95% CI?=?4.190 to 5.627) before smears. The earliest parasites were detected within 120 hours (5.01 days) after challenge. Parasite densities showed consistent cyclic patterns of blood-stage parasite growth in all volunteers. The parasite multiplication rates for both studies was 8.18 (95% CI?=?6.162 to 10.20). Data showed that at low parasite densities, a combination of sequestration and stochastic effects of low copy number DNA may impact qPCR detection and the parasite detection limit. Conclusion Smear positive is an endpoint which antimalarial rescue is imperative whereas early detection of parasitological data by qPCR can allow for better anticipation of the endpoint. This would allow for early treatment to reduce clinical illness and risk for study participants. To use qPCR as the primary endpoint in CHMI trials, an algorithm of two positives by qPCR where one of the positives must have parasite density of at least 2 parasites/?L is proposed. PMID:25066459

  18. Parasitological diagnosis combining an internally controlled real-time PCR assay for the detection of four protozoa in stool samples with a testing algorithm for microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L E S; Wallinga, J A; Ruijs, G J H M; Bruins, M J; Verweij, J J

    2009-09-01

    Molecular detection of gastrointestinal protozoa is more sensitive and more specific than microscopy but, to date, has not routinely replaced time-consuming microscopic analysis. Two internally controlled real-time PCR assays for the combined detection of Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis in single faecal samples were compared with Triple Faeces Test (TFT) microscopy results from 397 patient samples. Additionally, an algorithm for complete parasitological diagnosis was created. Real-time PCR revealed 152 (38.3%) positive cases, 18 of which were double infections: one (0.3%) sample was positive for E. histolytica, 44 (11.1%) samples were positive for G. lamblia, 122 (30.7%) samples were positive for D. fragilis, and three (0.8%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium. TFT microscopy yielded 96 (24.2%) positive cases, including five double infections: one sample was positive for E. histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, 29 (7.3%) samples were positive for G. lamblia, 69 (17.4%) samples were positive for D. fragilis, and two (0.5%) samples were positive for Cryptosporidium hominis/Cryptosporidium parvum. Retrospective analysis of the clinical patient information of 2887 TFT sets showed that eosinophilia, elevated IgE levels, adoption and travelling to (sub)tropical areas are predisposing factors for infection with non-protozoal gastrointestinal parasites. The proposed diagnostic algorithm includes application of real-time PCR to all samples, with the addition of microscopy on an unpreserved faecal sample in cases of a predisposing factor, or a repeat request for parasitological examination. Application of real-time PCR improved the diagnostic yield by 18%. A single stool sample is sufficient for complete parasitological diagnosis when an algorithm based on clinical information is applied. PMID:19624500

  19. Efficacy of Cyclooctadepsipeptides and Aminophenylamidines against Larval, Immature and Mature Adult Stages of a Parasitologically Characterized Trichurosis Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kulke, Daniel; Krücken, Jürgen; Harder, Achim; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Trichuris includes parasites of major relevance in veterinary and human medicine. Despite serious economic losses and enormous impact on public health, treatment options against whipworms are very limited. Additionally, there is an obvious lack of appropriately characterized experimental infection models. Therefore, a detailed parasitological characterization of a Trichuris muris isolate was performed in C57BL/10 mice. Subsequently, the in vivo efficacies of the aminophenylamidines amidantel, deacylated amidantel (dAMD) and tribendimidine as well as the cyclooctadepsipeptides emodepside and in particular PF1022A were analyzed. This was performed using various administration routes and treatment schemes targeting histotropic and further developed larval as well as immature and mature adult stages. Methodology/Principal Findings Duration of prepatent period, time-dependent localization of larvae during period of prepatency as well as the duration of patency of the infection were determined before drugs were tested in the characterized trichurosis model. Amidantel showed no effect against mature adult T. muris. Tribendimidine showed significantly higher potency than dAMD after oral treatments (ED50 values of 6.5 vs. 15.1 mg/kg). However, the opposite was found for intraperitoneal treatments (ED50 values of 15.3 vs. 8.3 mg/kg). When emodepside and PF1022A were compared, the latter was significantly less effective against mature adults following intraperitoneal (ED50 values of 6.1 vs. 55.7 mg/kg) or subcutaneous (ED50 values of 15.2 vs. 225.7 mg/kg) administration. Only minimal differences were observed following oral administration (ED50 values of 2.7 vs. 5.2 mg/kg). Triple and most single oral doses with moderate to high dosages of PF1022A showed complete efficacy against histotropic second stage larvae (3×100 mg/kg or 1×250 mg/kg), further developed larvae (3×10 mg/kg or 1×100 mg/kg) and immature adults (3×10 mg/kg or 1×100 mg/kg). Histotropic first stage larvae were only eliminated after three doses of PF1022A (3×100 mg/kg) but not after a single dose. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that the cyclooctadepsipeptides are a drug class with promising candidates for further evaluation for the treatment of trichurosis of humans and livestock animals in single dose regimens. PMID:24587460

  20. Results of parasitological examinations of faecal samples from cats and dogs in Germany between 2003 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Barutzki, Dieter; Schaper, Roland

    2011-08-01

    In a retrospective study, the results of parasitological examinations of faecal samples from 8,560 cats and 24,677 dogs between January 2003 and December 2010 in Germany were analysed. 30.4 % of the examined dogs and 22.8 % of the cats were infected with endoparasites. The examination of the faecal samples from dogs revealed stages of Giardia spp. (18.6 %), Toxocara canis (6.1 %), Toxascaris leonina (0.6 %), Ancylostomatidae (2.2 %), Trichuris vulpis (1.2 %), Capillaria spp. (1.3 %), Crenosoma vulpis (0.4 %), Angiostrongylus vasorum (0.5 %), Taeniidae (0.4 %), Dipylidiidae (< 0.1 %), Mesocestoides spp. (< 0.1 %), Isospora spp. (5.6 %), I. ohioensis-complex (3.9 %), I. canis (2.4 %), Sarcocystis spp. (2.2 %) and Hammondia heydorni/Neospora caninum (0.3 %). Dogs in the age groups up to 3 months and > 3 up to 6 months of age showed significantly higher infection rates with Giardia spp. (37.5 % and 38.2 %, respectively), Toxocara canis (12.0 % and 12.4 %, respectively), Toxascaris leonina (1.1 % and 1.6 %, respectively), Isospora spp. (23.4 % and 11.8 %, respectively), I. ohioensis-complex (15.6 % and 7.2 %, respectively) and I. canis (11.8 % and 5.2 %, respectively) compared to older dogs. In faecal samples from cats, stages of Giardia spp. (12.6 %), Toxocara cati (4.7 %), Toxascaris leonina (0.1 %), Ancylostoma tubaeforme (0.2 %), Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (0.5 %), Capillaria spp. (1.0 %), Taeniidae (0.6 %), Dipylidium caninum (< 0.1 %) Mesocestoides spp. (< 0.1 %), Isospora spp. (6.0 %), I. felis (4.4 %), I. rivolta (2.2 %), Toxoplasma gondii/Hammondia hammondi (0.8 %) and Sarcocystis spp. (0.3 %) were detected. Cats in the age groups up to 3 months and > 3 up to 6 months of age showed significantly higher infection rates with Giardia spp. (19.5 % and 24.0 %, respectively), T. cati (8.1 % and 6.9 %, respectively), Isospora spp. (12.8 % and 8.6 %, respectively), I. felis (10.0 % and 5.9%, respectively) and I. rivolta (4.6 % and 2.9%, respectively) compared to older cats. PMID:21739375

  1. Benefits from Network "Parasitology"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tornudd, Elin

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of experience gained by the Finnish central library for technology in off-line use of computer-based services, both selective dissemination of information and retrospective searches offered by the Royal Institute of Technology Library and the Biomedical Documentation Centre in Stockholm, as well as the Technological Library of Denmark…

  2. Physiology, pharmacology and parasitology.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, D R

    1997-02-01

    The developing resistance to current chemical classes of broad-spectrum anthelmintics and insecticides presents an undeniable threat to the long-term viability of the animal health industry. Alternative treatment strategies including vaccines, biological control and breeding of parasite-resistant animals are unlikely to be widely available in the near future and even then they will be integrated with chemotherapy. The significant cost of research and development of new therapeutics for food-producing animals, together with the small market share of animal health products, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, is a positive disincentive for drug development. The chemical actives that are currently available are all that we are likely to have for the foreseeable future and they must be used more efficiently. Understanding the pharmacokinetic behaviour of antiparasitics and recognising the potential for the animal's physiological characteristics to assist drug action is crucial. Careful administration, coupled with a reduction of feed intake before oral anthelmintic treatment, maximises drug availability and therefore increases efficacy of the benzimidazole and ivermectin compounds. This is a cost-effective option that can be employed immediately, which not only increases efficacy of "older" compounds but will be instrumental in prolonging the useful life of the newer drugs. Taking care to apply topical insecticide formulations directly along the backline immediately after shearing will maximise even diffusion of active around the sheep flanks to contact lice inhabiting sites remote from the point of drug application. The use of "intelligent" formulation and delivery of existing compounds, based on knowledge of host physiological and pharmacological responses, holds the key to effective antiparasitic treatment. PMID:9088985

  3. Course of Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection after Treatment Based on Parasitological and Serological Tests: A Systematic Review of Follow-Up Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sguassero, Yanina; Cuesta, Cristina B.; Roberts, Karen N.; Hicks, Elizabeth; Comandé, Daniel; Ciapponi, Agustín; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is endemic in Latin American countries outside the Caribbean. The current criterion for cure in the chronic phase of the disease is the negativization of at least two serological tests such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIF) and indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA). The serological evolution of treated subjects with chronic T. cruzi infection is variable. Treatment failure is indicated by a positive parasitological and/or molecular test (persistence of parasitemia). Objectives To summarize the pattern of response to treatment of parasitological, molecular and serological tests performed during the follow-up of subjects with chronic T. cruzi infection. Methods Electronic searches in relevant databases and screening of citations of potentially eligible articles were accomplished. Organizations focusing on neglected infectious diseases were asked for help in identifying relevant studies. Included studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, and cohort studies involving adults and children with chronic infection who received trypanocidal treatment (benznidazole or nifurtimox) and were followed over time. The assessment of risk of bias was performed separately for each study design. The Cochrane Collaboration’s tool and the guidelines developed by Hayden et al. were used. Two reviewers extracted all data independently. A third review author was consulted in case of discordant opinion. Additional analyses were defined in ad-hoc basis. Scatter plots for percentage of positive parasitological and molecular tests and for negative serological tests were developed by using the lowess curve technique. Heterogeneity was measured by I2. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic review protocols (Registration Number CRD42012002162). Results Out of 2,136 citations screened, 54 studies (six RCTs and 48 cohort studies) were included. The smoothed curves for positive xenodiagnosis and positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were characterized by a sharp decrease at twelve month posttreatment. Afterwards, they reached 10–20% and 40% for xenodiagnosis and PCR, respectively. The smoothed curves for negative conventional serological tests increased up to 10% after 48 months of treatment. In the long-term, the rate of negativization was between 20% and 45%. The main sources of bias identified across cohort studies were the lack of control for confounding and attrition bias. In general, RCTs were judged as low risk of bias in all domains. The level of heterogeneity across included studies was moderate to high. Additional analysis were incomplete because of the limited availability of data. In this regard, the country of origin of study participants might affect the results of parasitological and molecular tests, while the level of risk of bias might affect serological outcomes. Subgroup analysis suggested that seronegativization occurs earlier in children compared to adults. Conclusions We acknowledge that there is a dynamic pattern of response based on parasitological, molecular and serological tests in subjects chronically infected with T. cruzi after treatment. Our findings suggest a trypanocidal effect in the long-term follow-up. Further research is needed to explore potential sources of heterogeneity and to conduct reliable subgroup analysis. PMID:26436678

  4. A survey for helminth parasites in feral New World non-human primate populations and its comparison with parasitological data from man in the region.

    PubMed

    Michaud, C; Tantalean, M; Ique, C; Montoya, E; Gozalo, A

    2003-12-01

    A survey for helminth parasites in feral New World non-human primates was conducted and compared with parasitological data from man in the region. A total of 835 fecal samples were collected from feral Aotus nancymae, A. vociferans, Saguinus labiatus, S. mystax, Saimiri boliviensis peruviensis, S. sciureus macrodon, Lagothrix lagotricha and Cacajao calvus rubicundus. In addition, adult parasites were collected from necropsies performed on monkeys that died during quarantine and in captivity. Helminth parasites shared by non-human primates and man in Peru were Ancylostoma braziliensis and Ascaris lumbricoides, found in a captive L. lagotricha; Necator americanus, found in a captive C. calvus rubicundus; Hymenolepis diminuta, found in feral Aotus spp. and S. mystax; and a single Trichuris spp. specimen found in a feral S. sciureus macrodon. PMID:14641789

  5. [Parasitological profile of two forms of schistosomiasis (urinary and intestinal forms) at ten sites in Burkina Faso (Sub-Saharan Africa country)].

    PubMed

    Zongo, Dramane; Kabre, B Gustave; Dayeri, Dianou; Savadogo, Boubacar; Poda, Jean-Noël

    2013-01-01

    In spite of great progress in schistosomiasis control during the last decade in Burkina Faso, this disease remains a public health concern in the country. Indeed, our study consisted of the analysis of parasitological data related to Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni and in malacological investigations. The prevalence rate of Schistosoma haematobium varies from 3.3% to 50.4% and from 3.3% to 39.1% for Schistosoma mansoni, but only in the western part of Burkina Faso. Schoolboys are more infested than girls, but the phenomenon is reversed in adults. Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Bulinus truncatus, Bulinus senegalensis and Bulinus globosus were collected during this study. Thus, the behavioral factors as well as the dynamics and the distribution of the intermediate mollusks play a major role in the persistence of the disease. PMID:23916210

  6. Studies on Parasitologic and Haematologic Activities of an Enaminone Derivative of 4-Hydroxyquinolin-2(1H)-one Against Murine Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    PubMed Central

    El-Shennawy, Amal M.; Mohamed, Amira H.; Mohamed Abass

    2007-01-01

    The activity of a novel enaminone derivative of 4–hydroxyquinoline, BDHQ, was screened for its effectiveness against murine schistosomiasis by electron microscopy and parasitologic studies. The correlation of these studies with serum levels of IFN–gamma and IgE is described. Two groups of 10 mice each were treated with different doses of BDHQ, and their results were correlated with the control and praziquantel (PZQ)–treated groups. Parasitologic study revealed significant reduction in mature worms and tissue egg loads in BDHQ– and PZQ–treated groups, whereas immature worms revealed significant reduction in BDHQ groups only. The group treated with a higher dose of BDHQ showed significant reductions in intestinal ova count when compared with the PZQ–treated group. Ultrastructural examination of the worm revealed significant degeneration of the spines and tegument in all treated groups, while the genital system was affected in BDHQ–treated groups only. BDHQ showed considerable effect on cellular activation where serum levels of IFN–gamma were significantly increased in comparison to control, while anti–soluble worm antigen preparation (SWAP) IgE was significantly increased in comparison to both the control and PZQ–treated groups. Ultrastructural examination revealed cellular activation in buffy coat and the liver in both the BDHQ– and PZQ–treated groups in comparison to the untreated one, whereas in the bone marrow and spleen, evidence of cellular activation was remarkable in the BDHQ–treated groups. In conclusion, BDHQ exhibits high levels of activity against adult and juvenile stages of these parasites, which may be due to its mixed cellular and humoral immunologic mechanisms, as demonstrated by the significant increase of serum levels of IgE and IFN–gamma shown on electron microscopy. Therefore, our results support the comparative advantage that BDHQ has over PZQ. PMID:17435624

  7. Blastocystis Isolates from Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and from Asymptomatic Carriers Exhibit Similar Parasitological Loads, but Significantly Different Generation Times and Genetic Variability across Multiple Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Sanchez, Gie-Bele; Romero-Valdovinos, Mirza; Ramirez-Guerrero, Celedonio; Vargas-Hernandez, Ines; Ramirez-Miranda, Maria Elena; Martinez-Ocaña, Joel; Valadez, Alicia; Ximenez, Cecilia; Lopez-Escamilla, Eduardo; Hernandez-Campos, Maria Elena; Villalobos, Guiehdani; Martinez-Hernandez, Fernando; Maravilla, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis spp is a common intestinal parasite of humans and animals that has been associated to the etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); however, some studies have not found this association. Furthermore, many biological features of Blastocystis are little known. The objective of present study was to assess the generation times of Blastocystis cultures, from IBS patients and from asymptomatic carriers. A total of 100 isolates were obtained from 50 IBS patients and from 50 asymptomatic carriers. Up to 50 mg of feces from each participant were cultured in Barret's and in Pavlova's media during 48 h. Initial and final parasitological load were measured by microscopy and by quantitative PCR. Amplicons were purified, sequenced and submitted to GenBank; sequences were analysed for genetic diversity and a Bayesian inference allowed identifying genetic subtypes (ST). Generation times for Blastocystis isolates in both media, based on microscopic measures and molecular assays, were calculated. The clinical symptoms of IBS patients and distribution of Blastocystis ST 1, 2 and 3 in both groups was comparable to previous reports. Interestingly, the group of cases showed scarce mean nucleotide diversity (π) as compared to the control group (0.011±0.016 and 0.118±0.177, respectively), whilst high gene flow and small genetic differentiation indexes between different ST were found. Besides, Tajima's D test showed negative values for ST1-ST3. No statistical differences regarding parasitological load between cases and controls in both media, as searched by microscopy and by qPCR, were detected except that parasites grew faster in Barret's than in Pavlova's medium. Interestingly, slow growth of isolates recovered from cases in comparison to those of controls was observed (p<0.05). We propose that generation times of Blastocystis might be easily affected by intestinal environmental changes due to IBS probably because virulent strains with slow growth may be selected, reducing their genetic variability. PMID:25923708

  8. Blastocystis Isolates from Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and from Asymptomatic Carriers Exhibit Similar Parasitological Loads, but Significantly Different Generation Times and Genetic Variability across Multiple Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Guerrero, Celedonio; Vargas-Hernandez, Ines; Ramirez-Miranda, Maria Elena; Martinez-Ocaña, Joel; Valadez, Alicia; Ximenez, Cecilia; Lopez-Escamilla, Eduardo; Hernandez-Campos, Maria Elena; Villalobos, Guiehdani; Martinez-Hernandez, Fernando; Maravilla, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis spp is a common intestinal parasite of humans and animals that has been associated to the etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); however, some studies have not found this association. Furthermore, many biological features of Blastocystis are little known. The objective of present study was to assess the generation times of Blastocystis cultures, from IBS patients and from asymptomatic carriers. A total of 100 isolates were obtained from 50 IBS patients and from 50 asymptomatic carriers. Up to 50 mg of feces from each participant were cultured in Barret’s and in Pavlova’s media during 48 h. Initial and final parasitological load were measured by microscopy and by quantitative PCR. Amplicons were purified, sequenced and submitted to GenBank; sequences were analysed for genetic diversity and a Bayesian inference allowed identifying genetic subtypes (ST). Generation times for Blastocystis isolates in both media, based on microscopic measures and molecular assays, were calculated. The clinical symptoms of IBS patients and distribution of Blastocystis ST 1, 2 and 3 in both groups was comparable to previous reports. Interestingly, the group of cases showed scarce mean nucleotide diversity (π) as compared to the control group (0.011±0.016 and 0.118±0.177, respectively), whilst high gene flow and small genetic differentiation indexes between different ST were found. Besides, Tajima’s D test showed negative values for ST1-ST3. No statistical differences regarding parasitological load between cases and controls in both media, as searched by microscopy and by qPCR, were detected except that parasites grew faster in Barret’s than in Pavlova’s medium. Interestingly, slow growth of isolates recovered from cases in comparison to those of controls was observed (p<0.05). We propose that generation times of Blastocystis might be easily affected by intestinal environmental changes due to IBS probably because virulent strains with slow growth may be selected, reducing their genetic variability. PMID:25923708

  9. Supplementation of moist and dehydrated citrus pulp in the diets of sheep artificially and naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes on the parasitological parameters and performance.

    PubMed

    Nordi, E C P; Costa, R L D; David, C M G; Parren, G A E; Freitas, A C B; Lameirinha, L P; Katiki, L M; Bueno, M S; Quirino, C R; Gama, P E; Bizzo, H R; Chagas, A C S

    2014-10-15

    The inclusion of industrial byproducts such as citrus pulp in the composition of animal diets has been widely recommended due to sustainability aspects and their high level of carbohydrates. Limonene is found in citrus pulp and has been described elsewhere as a major compound of citrus essential oils with excellent anthelmintic activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parasitological parameters of lambs artificially infected (Experiment 1) with Haemonchus contortus and naturally infected (Experiment 2) by gastrointestinal nematodes, fed diets with dehydrated citrus pulp or silage of moist orange pulp. Both experiments had three treatments (C: control, DP: diet+dehydrated citrus pulp, and MP: diet+silage of moist orange pulp). The diets were isoproteic (11% crude protein) and the concentrate was corrected every 14 days according to animal weight. Parasitological parameters were evaluated for both experiments each 14 days (body weight, body condition; fecal egg counts-FEC, egg hatch assay-EHA, coproculture, and packed cell volume-PCV). Analysis of variance (GLM of the SAS software) was performed with repeated measures in time, and the means were compared by the Tukey test. Gas chromatography with mass spectrometry was used to detect constituents of dry or moist citrus pulp. Dehydrated citrus pulp had 0.02% essential oil (major compounds were 85.9% limonene and 7.6% valencene). Moist orange pulp contained 1.5% essential oil (major compounds were 65.5% limonene and 31.2% alpha- and gamma-terpineol). In both experiments, the weight gain among the treatments was similar (p>0.05) demonstrating that both moist and dehydrated orange pulp can be used to replace corn kernels to feed infected lambs. The supplementation with orange pulp did not decrease natural or artificial infections of gastrointestinal nematodes according to the FEC results (p>0.05). However, PCV increased from animals fed dehydrated and moist pulp in natural infection (Experiment 2, p<0.05) in comparison with the control group. In addition, the consumption of the dehydrated citrus pulp from animals infected with H. contortus (Experiment 1) caused lower hatching rates after 42 days of consumption (p<0.05), suggesting a tendency to shed fewer eggs to the environment. PMID:25282048

  10. Disseminated Encephalitozoon (Septata) intestinalis infection in a patient with AIDS: novel diagnostic approaches and autopsy-confirmed parasitological cure following treatment with albendazole.

    PubMed Central

    Sobottka, I; Albrecht, H; Schäfer, H; Schottelius, J; Visvesvara, G S; Laufs, R; Schwartz, D A

    1995-01-01

    Encephalitozoon intestinalis is a recently described microsporidian which causes intestinal and disseminated infections in severely immunocompromised patients with AIDS. Preliminary data suggest that albendazole can be an effective therapy for patients with E. intestinalis infection. However, relapses have been reported following treatment in some cases. These results were based upon examination of cytologic, biopsy, or stool samples with an inherent sampling bias. This report documents the first postmortem evaluation of a patient with E. intestinalis infection treated with albendazole. Antemortem microsporidial diagnosis was performed on nasal mucosal smear and duodenal biopsy specimens by electron microscopy and a newly developed indirect fluorescent-antibody method based upon in vitro cultivation of the organism. This case represents the initial report of using nasal cytologic specimens for ultrastructural and antibody-based species-level diagnosis of microsporidiosis. Following successful treatment of this infection with albendazole, the patient died of other causes. A thorough autopsy examination failed to reveal the presence of E. intestinalis in any tissue, providing confirmatory evidence for a complete parasitological cure with albendazole. PMID:8576351

  11. A serological, parasitological and clinical evaluation of untreated Chagas disease patients and those treated with benznidazole before and thirteen years after intervention

    PubMed Central

    Machado-de-Assis, Girley Francisco; Diniz, Glaucia Alessio; Montoya, Roberto Araújo; Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Coura, José Rodrigues; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Albajar-Viñas, Pedro; Torres, Rosália Morais; de Lana, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease is recommended for all patients with acute or recent chronic infection, but controversies remain regarding the benefit of chemotherapy and interpretations of the parasitological cure after etiological treatment. This study compares the laboratory and clinical evaluations of Chagas disease patients who were diagnosed 13 years earlier. Fifty-eight Chagas disease patients (29 treated with benznidazole and 29 untreated) were matched at the time of treatment based on several variables. Conventional serology revealed the absence of seroconversion in all patients. However, lower serological titres were verified in the treated group, primarily among patients who had the indeterminate form of the disease. Haemoculture performed 13 years after the intervention was positive for 6.9% and 27.6% of the treated and untreated patients, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction tests were positive for 44.8% and 13.8% of the treated and untreated patients, respectively. Patients who presented with the indeterminate form of the disease at the beginning of the study exhibited less clinical progression (17.4%) compared with the untreated group (56.5%). Therefore, this global analysis revealed that etiological treatment with benznidazole may benefit patients with respect to the clinical progression of Chagas disease and the prognosis, particularly when administered to patients with the indeterminate form of the disease. PMID:24037109

  12. Albendazolesulphoxide concentrations in plasma and hydatid cyst and prediction of parasitological and clinical outcomes in patients with liver hydatidosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Skuhala, Tomislava; Trkulja, Vladimir; Runje, Mislav; Vukeli?, Dalibor; Desnica, Boško

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the relationship between plasma and cyst concentrations of albendazolesulphoxide (ASO) and their effects on parasitological findings and disease recurrence in patients with liver hydatidosis. Methods The study was conducted at the University Hospital for Infectious Diseases “Dr. Fran Mihaljevi?,” Zagreb, Croatia, between August 2006 and January 2011. Consecutive patients (N?=?48, age 6-77 years) were treated with albendazole (3?×?5 mg/kg/d) over 28 days before surgical cyst removal (n?=?34) or percutaneous evacuation (PAIR) (n?=?14). Plasma ASO was determined on days 10 and 28 of treatment and cyst concentrations at surgery/PAIR. Results Disease recurred in 3 surgically treated patients. Variability of ASO concentrations was substantial. Plasma concentrations on day 10 were higher than on day 28 (geometric means ratio [GMR] 2.00; 95%CI 1.38-2.91, P?

  13. Parasitological and nutritional status of school-age and preschool-age children in four villages in Southern Leyte, Philippines: Lessons for monitoring the outcome of Community-Led Total Sanitation.

    PubMed

    Belizario, Vicente Y; Liwanag, Harvy Joy C; Naig, June Rose A; Chua, Paul Lester C; Madamba, Manuel I; Dahildahil, Roy O

    2015-01-01

    While preventive chemotherapy remains to be a major strategy for the prevention and control of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STH), improvements in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) comprise the long-term strategy to achieve sustained control of STH. This study examined the parasitological and nutritional status of school-age and preschool-age children in four villages in Southern Leyte, Philippines where two of the villages attained Open-Defecation-Free (ODF) status after introduction of Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS). A total of 341 children (89.0% of the total eligible population) submitted stool samples which were examined using the Kato-Katz technique. Results showed that 27.9% of the total stool samples examined had at least one type of STH (cumulative prevalence), while 7.9% had moderate-heavy intensity infections. Between the two villages where CLTS was introduced, Buenavista had a significantly higher cumulative prevalence of STH at 67.4% (p<0.001) and prevalence of moderate-heavy intensity STH at 23.5% (p=0.000), while Caubang had a significantly lower cumulative prevalence at 4.9% and prevalence of moderate-heavy intensity at 1.8%. On the other hand, the non-CLTS villages of Bitoon and Saub had similar rates for cumulative prevalence (16.7% and 16.8%, respectively; p=0.984) and prevalence of moderate-heavy intensity STH (2.0% and 3.1%, respectively; p=1.000). The findings may be explained by factors that include possible reversion to open defecation, non-utilization of sanitary facilities, and mass drug administration (MDA) coverage, although further studies that can accurately assess the impact of CLTS are recommended. While this study was descriptive, the data indicate no clear pattern among the parasitological and nutritional parameters, as well as the presence of CLTS in the village, suggesting the need to monitor the ODF status of villages on a regular basis even after the end of CLTS activities to ensure the sustainability of the CLTS approach. In order to achieve effective control of STH, deeper collaboration between the WASH and STH sectors are recommended where partners can work together in the area of monitoring and evaluation that may include improved parasitological and nutritional status in high-risk groups, as well as sustainable behavior change as outcome indicators. PMID:25255966

  14. 42 CFR 493.917 - Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... than six months before each calendar year. Samples must include both formalinized specimens and PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fixed specimens as well as blood smears, as appropriate for a particular parasite...

  15. [Diagnostic kits in parasitology: which controls?].

    PubMed

    Rossi, P

    2004-06-01

    The development of new diagnostic tools particularly for some parasitic "neglected diseases", is slowed or even hindered by limited resources assigned for basic and applied research in public institution and private sector. Even if the time-line and costs needed for developing a new In Vitro Diagnostic (IVD) test are generally lower compared to vaccines or new drugs, industry is poorly engaged in investing resources due to the perception of limited markets. To accelerate the development of diagnostics for the world's most deadly diseases, the World Health Organization's (WHO) Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), the United Nations Development Programme, the World Bank and the Gates Foundation, last year launched a new initiative, FIND (Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics, www.finddiagnostics.org). The aim is to "apply the latest biotechnology innovations to develop and validate affordable diagnostic tests for diseases of the developing world". Ideally, a new diagnostic test should be accurately evaluated prior to use in medical practice. The first step would be a pre-clinical evaluation, an analytic study to determine its laboratory performance. A crucial point in this phase is the calibration of reagents (antigens, antibodies, DNA probes, etc.) against a standard reference preparation. WHO, through the WHO International Laboratories for Biological Standards, "provides International Biological Reference Preparations which serve as reference sources of defined biological activity expressed in an internationally agreed unit" (www.who.int/biologicals/IBRP/index.htm). Standardization allows "comparison of biological measurements worldwide" and ensures the reliability of diagnostic procedures. These preparations are generally intended for use in the characterization of the activity of secondary reference preparations (regional, national or in-house working standards). Unfortunately, international reference standards for parasitic diseases are not available at present, except for Toxoplasma antibodies. The first international standard reagent for Anti-Toxoplasma Serum was established in 1968 and at present, an international standard reference serum, Anti-toxoplasma serum, human TOXM is available at the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC) in UK. Several collaborative, multicenter studies were carried out to assess the performance of different methods and commercial tests for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis, by providing to participating laboratories a panel of well-defined sera to be tested. A four-phase process following well-accepted methodological standards for the development of diagnostics, analogous to those internationally accepted for drugs and vaccines was recently proposed. The pre-clinical evaluation, the analytic study to assess sensitivity, specificity, predictive values in laboratory (phase I), should be followed by a proof of principle study to distinguish diseased from healthy persons in easily accessible populations (phase II). The evaluation of test performance in populations of intended use (phase III), and finally the delineation of cost-effectiveness and societal impact of new tests in comparison with existing tools (phase IV) should complete the validation procedure. In this context, national regulatory agencies play a major role in pre-market approval and post-market surveillance of IVDs. The European Community in 1998 approved a directive (Directive 98/79/EC) which rules the marketing of IVD medical devices, in order to harmonise the performance levels and standards in European countries. But, among IVDs for parasitic diseases, only those to detect congenital toxoplasmosis are submitted to defined procedures to provide the verification of products before their placing on the market and the surveillance after their marketing by a notified body, which perform appropriate examinations, tests and inspections to production facilities to verify if the device meets the requirements of the directive. In U.S.A., the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), through the Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Device Evaluation and Safety (OIVD), provides a comprehensive and regulatory activity for IVDs through pre-market evaluation and post-market surveillance. In developing countries, the scarcity of resources limits the procedures through which the national control authority can assure safety, quality and efficacy of products marketed, both imported and locally manufactured. PMID:15305705

  16. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedures--Parasitology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This manual presents techniques for the collection and examination of specimens in the diagnosis of parasitic disease and in field surveys conducted to determine the extent of parasitic infections in human and animal populations. It discusses areas in which parasites are most likely to be found and the relationships of parasites, vectors, and…

  17. Molecular parasitology in the twenty first century

    PubMed Central

    Docampo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Protist parasites cause important human and animal diseases and because of their early divergence from other eukaryotes they possess structural and biochemical characteristics not found in other cells. The completion of the genome projects of most human protist parasites and the development of novel molecular tools for their study guarantee a rapid progress in understanding how they invade, modify, and survive within their hosts. The ultimate goal of these studies will be the identification of targets for the design of drugs, diagnostics, and vaccines. In addition, the accessibility of some of these parasites to multiple genetic manipulations have transformed them in model systems in cell and molecular biology studies that could lead to the understanding of basic biological processes, as well as their evolution and pathogenesis. Here we discuss the biochemical and molecular peculiarities of these parasites and the molecular tools available for their study. PMID:22023438

  18. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedures--Parasitology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This manual presents techniques for the collection and examination of specimens in the diagnosis of parasitic disease and in field surveys conducted to determine the extent of parasitic infections in human and animal populations. It discusses areas in which parasites are most likely to be found and the relationships of parasites, vectors, and…

  19. Is real-time PCR-based diagnosis similar in performance to routine parasitological examination for the identification of Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum/Cryptosporidium hominis and Entamoeba histolytica from stool samples? Evaluation of a new commercial multiplex PCR assay and literature review.

    PubMed

    Laude, A; Valot, S; Desoubeaux, G; Argy, N; Nourrisson, C; Pomares, C; Machouart, M; Le Govic, Y; Dalle, F; Botterel, F; Bourgeois, N; Cateau, E; Leterrier, M; Le Pape, P; Morio, F

    2016-02-01

    Microscopy is the reference standard for routine laboratory diagnosis in faecal parasitology but there is growing interest in alternative methods to overcome the limitations of microscopic examination, which is time-consuming and highly dependent on an operator's skills and expertise. Compared with microscopy, DNA detection by PCR is simple and can offer a better turnaround time. However, PCR performances remain difficult to assess as most studies have been conducted on a limited number of positive clinical samples and used in-house PCR methods. Our aim was to evaluate a new multiplex PCR assay (G-DiaParaTrio; Diagenode Diagnostics), targeting Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum/Cryptosporidium hominis and Entamoeba histolytica. To minimize the turnaround time, PCR was coupled with automated DNA extraction (QiaSymphony; Qiagen). The PCR assay was evaluated using a reference panel of 185 samples established by routine microscopic examination using a standardized protocol including Ziehl-Neelsen staining and adhesin detection by ELISA (E. histolytica II; TechLab). This panel, collected from 12 French parasitology laboratories, included 135 positive samples for G. intestinalis (n = 38), C. parvum/C. hominis (n = 26), E. histolytica (n = 5), 21 other gastrointestinal parasites, together with 50 negative samples. In all, the G-DiaParaTrio multiplex PCR assay identified 38 G. intestinalis, 25 C. parvum/C. hominis and five E. histolytica leading to sensitivity/specificity of 92%/100%, 96%/100% and 100%/100% for G. intestinalis, C. parvum/C. hominis and E. histolytica, respectively. This new multiplex PCR assay offers fast and reliable results, similar to microscopy-driven diagnosis for the detection of these gastrointestinal protozoa, allowing its implementation in routine clinical practice. PMID:26548509

  20. Genome mining offers a new starting point for parasitology research.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhiyue; Wu, Zhongdao; Zhang, Limei; Ji, Pengyu; Cai, Yifeng; Luo, Shiqi; Wang, Hongxi; Li, Hao

    2015-02-01

    Parasites including helminthes, protozoa, and medical arthropod vectors are a major cause of global infectious diseases, affecting one-sixth of the world's population, which are responsible for enormous levels of morbidity and mortality important and remain impediments to economic development especially in tropical countries. Prevalent drug resistance, lack of highly effective and practical vaccines, as well as specific and sensitive diagnostic markers are proving to be challenging problems in parasitic disease control in most parts of the world. The impressive progress recently made in genome-wide analysis of parasites of medical importance, including trematodes of Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini, Schistosoma haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mansoni; nematodes of Brugia malayi, Loa loa, Necator americanus, Trichinella spiralis, and Trichuris suis; cestodes of Echinococcus granulosus, E. multilocularis, and Taenia solium; protozoa of Babesia bovis, B. microti, Cryptosporidium hominis, Eimeria falciformis, E. histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, Leishmania braziliensis, L. donovani, L. major, Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, Trichomonas vaginalis, Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi; and medical arthropod vectors of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles darlingi, A. sinensis, and Culex quinquefasciatus, have been systematically covered in this review for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic information contained in nuclear, mitochondrial, kinetoplast, plastid, or endosymbiotic bacterial genomes of parasites, further valuable insight into parasite-host interactions and development of promising novel drug and vaccine candidates and preferable diagnostic tools, thereby underpinning the prevention and control of parasitic diseases. PMID:25563615

  1. Marine parasitology with special reference to Japanese fisheries and mariculture.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, K

    1996-08-01

    Marine parasites with special relation to Japanese fisheries and mariculture include various types of pathogens: those causing mortality, deformity, weight loss, etc.; those giving unesthetic appearances to the hosts; those which are zoonotic. Japanese mariculture typically utilizes net cage culture systems in coastal areas. Parasite invasion in such systems is more difficult to control practically than in freshwater facilities. The limited use of chemicals and drugs for treatment makes the situation even more difficult to handle. About five species of parasites from marine organisms are known to be zoonotic. This is closely associated with the Japanese tradition of eating raw fishes and invertebrates. Infection of maricultured species with zoonotic trematodes, cestodes and nematodes has not been confirmed. On a more positive side, attempts have been made to utilize parasites as biological tags to obtain information on host biology, ecology, etc. Recent trends in Japanese mariculture include technical improvement in seed production and importation of large quantities of various species of culture seedlings. Drastic increase in the supply of seedlings of selected fish species has resulted in changes in culture methods and created parasite problems on a much larger scale. International trade of live fishes and shellfishes has introduced parasites hitherto unknown to Japan. An efficient quarantine system to prevent and control introduction and spread of marine parasites urgently needs to be established. PMID:8893467

  2. [Parasitologic and serological evaluation of caprines experimentally inoculated with Trypanosoma cruzi].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A J; Vitor, R W; Dias, J C

    1994-01-01

    The experimental infection by Trypanosoma cruzi was studied in nine young goats. These animals were inoculated by intraperitoneal route with 10(3) trypomastigotes/Kg body weight with strains 147 (Group 1) and 229 (Group 2), isolated from chronic Chagasic patients proceeding from Bambuí, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The infected animals were submitted to fresh blood examinations, xenodiagnosis, hemoculture and serology (IFAT and ELISA). The follow up of T. cruzi infection ranged from 7 to 30 months and it was possible to note a markable difference concerning the course of infection between the two groups. The parasite was visualized, for the first time in experimentally infected goats in the acute period through fresh blood examinations and xenodiagnosis and through hemoculture and xenodiagnosis during the chronic period of the Chagasic infection. These results suggest that, under some epidemiological conditions, goats may be important in the sylvatic and peridomiciliar transmission cycles of T. cruzi specially young animals. PMID:7997769

  3. A combined parasitological molecular approach for noninvasive characterization of parasitic nematode communities in wild hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most hosts are concurrently or sequentially infected with multiple parasites, thus fully understanding interactions between individual parasite species and their hosts depends on accurate characterization of the parasite community. For parasitic nematodes, non-invasive methods for obtaining quantita...

  4. [Mapping of parasitological environmental data: the tick Ixodes ricinus--a case of study].

    PubMed

    Kiewra, Dorota; Lonc, Elzbieta; Rydzanicz, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    While the mapping of health data is not new for epidemiologists the incorporation of differentiated environmental factors, e.g., temperature, rainfall, humidity, elevation, vegetation type, host abundance and distribution, zoonotic reservoirs of infection can create a new opportunities for parasitologists. Suitable tools for spatial modeling of health problems and pathogen occurrence in space and time are provided by geographic information system (GIS). It is computer-based system which integrates, storages, edits, analyses, shares and displays information. This software system is based on connection between information--data and their location. GIS applications allow users to create interactive queries, analyze spatial information, edit data and maps. GIS is very useful to define the habitats of parasites, especially for the ticks which are strong depended on environmental conditions. Mapping not only enables to create maps based on field monitoring but also to create forecasting maps for prevention and control strategies on small and large scale. Up to now ticks and tick-borne diseases (TBD) having strong relationship with the ecosystem are highly amenable to predictive mapping. The aim of study is the characterization of procedural steps with regard to entering field environmental data to GIS database and their visualization on digital maps. The field date of tick monitoring conducted in April 2008 in the Wrocław area (the Osobowicki Forest) made possible to create digital database. ArcView as one of three separate software products of ArcGIS (a scalable framework for implementing GIS) was used to create an interactive maps. Visualization of the data which are stored in tables of attributes made possible to show legibly the distribution of I. ricinus on the analysed area. Mapping of I. ricinus occurrence on digital maps enable to indicate areas of the highest risk of biting and potential tick-borne diseases. PMID:20209815

  5. Evaluation of Biochemical, Hematological and Parasitological Parameters of Protein-Deficient Hamsters Infected with Ancylostoma ceylanicum

    PubMed Central

    Pacanaro, Carina P.; Dias, Sílvia R.; Serafim, Luciana R.; Costa, Mariana P.; Aguilar, Edenil; Paes, Paulo R.; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I.; Rabelo, Élida M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hookworms infect millions of people worldwide and can cause severe clinical symptoms in their hosts. Prospective cohort studies in Brazil show high rates of hookworm reinfection in malnourished children compared to well-nourished children, despite previous treatment. Additionally, soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections can worsen the nutritional status of affected populations. Therefore, this study aims to clarify the effects of host malnutrition during Ancylostoma ceylanicum infection and how this infection affects host physiological parameters using a hamster model. Methodology/Principal Findings Hamsters were divided into four experimental groups: normal diet or low-protein diet (also referred to as “malnourished”) and A. ceylanicum infection or no infection. More severe pathogenesis was observed in the infected malnourished group, as demonstrated by significant decreases in the hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte number and packed-cell volume compared to the non-infected malnourished group. Greater numbers of adult parasites and eggs were observed in the malnourished group compared to the control group; however, the oviposition rate was lower in the malnourished group. In general, greater values of total lipids were observed in malnourished animals compared to control animals, including lipids excreted in the stool. Conclusions In this work, we have demonstrated that animals fed an isocaloric low-protein diet presented more severe pathogenesis when infected with A. ceylanicum. The increased lipid concentration in the liver and blood is related to the conversion of the excess carbohydrate into fatty acids that increase the concentration of triglycerides in general. Triglycerides were excreted in the feces, indicating that infection associated with malnutrition caused a greater loss of these molecules for this group of animals and confirming the hypothesis that both nutrition and infection are responsible for the malabsorption syndrome. Taken together, the results found in this work confirm the hypothesis that the nutritional condition of the host greatly influences the course of the infection. PMID:25254370

  6. Serological and parasitological prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in wild birds from Colorado.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Felix, T A; Kwok, O C H

    2010-10-01

    Ground-feeding birds are considered important in the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii because they serve as indicators of soil contamination by oocysts, and birds of prey are indicators of T. gondii prevalence in rodents and other small mammals. Cats excrete environmentally resistant oocysts after consuming tissues of T. gondii -infected birds. In the present study, sera and tissues from 382 wild birds from Colorado were tested for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 38 birds with the use of the modified agglutination test (MAT, 1?25 titer). Tissues (brains, hearts) of 84 birds were bioassayed in mice. Viable T. gondii was isolated from 1 of 1 barn owl (Tyto alba), 1 of 5 American kestrels (Falco sparverius), 1 of 7 ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), 1 of 4 rough-legged hawks (Buteo lagopus), 2 of 13 Swainson's hawks (Buteo swainsoni), and 1 of 25 red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). This is the first time T. gondii has been isolated from the barn owl, ferruginous hawk, rough-legged hawk, and Swainson's hawk. PMID:20950101

  7. Hematology, Parasitology, and Serology of Free-Ranging Coyotes (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Merrill, Anita; Kilgo, John; Ray, H., Scott; Karl V. Miller, Karl, V.; Baldwin, Charles, A.

    2009-07-01

    ABSTRACT: Blood and feces were collected from 34 adult (19 males, 15 females) and seven juvenile (three males, one female, three not reported) free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) on the US Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (South Carolina, USA). Significant (P,0.05) hematologic differences by sex were noted for red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Biochemical differences by sex occurred only for albumen (P,0.05). Twentyone adults were antibody positive for at least one of four viruses: canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1; 68%), West Nile virus (WNV; 60%), Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV; 38%), and Canine distemper virus (CDV; 15%). Of the seven Leptospira serovars tested for, seven (25%) of 28 adults were positive for one or more of five serovars: Pomona, Grippotyphosa, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Bratislava, and Autumnalis. Three (43%) of seven juveniles had seropositivity for a virus, one each for CDV, CAV-1, and WNV. No juveniles were seropositive for EEEV or any of the seven Leptospira serovars. Blood smears of 12 adults were positive for Dirofilaria immitis microfilaria, but blood smears from all juveniles were negative. Parvovirus was identified by electron microscopy from the feces of one adult. Ancylostoma spp., Trichuris spp., and Isospora spp. were observed in fecal samples. These data may aid in understanding the role of coyotes in disease ecology.

  8. Lack of Artemisinin Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum in Uganda Based on Parasitological and Molecular Assays

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Melissa D.; Watson, Quentin D.; Huezo, Stephanie J.; Ninsiima, Harriet; Tumwebaze, Patrick; Nsobya, Samuel L.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated markers of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum isolated in Kampala in 2014. By standard in vitro assays, all isolates were highly sensitive to dihydroartemisinin (DHA). By the ring-stage survival assay, after a 6-h DHA pulse, parasitemia was undetectable in 40 of 43 cultures at 72 h. Two of 53 isolates had nonsynonymous K13-propeller gene polymorphisms but did not have the mutations associated with resistance in Asia. Thus, we did not see evidence for artemisinin resistance in Uganda. PMID:26033725

  9. Are cryptic species a problem for parasitological biological tagging for stock identification of aquatic organisms?

    PubMed

    Bray, Rodney A; Cribb, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    The effective use of biological tags in stock assessment relies on the reliable identification of the parasites concerned. This may be compromised if cryptic species are not recognized. Here we review what is known about cryptic species in aquatic hosts and its potential importance in this respect. Although strictly cryptic species may be considered as species which can be distinguished only by molecular data, we accept the far looser but more practical definition of species that cannot be readily distinguished morphologically. Cryptic species appear to have been identified most frequently as occurring in separate host species; this is heartening in that this has no significant impact on tagging studies. But cryptic species have occasionally been identified in single hosts sympatrically and are relatively common in geographically distinct populations of the same host species. Ignorance of both kinds of occurrences has the capacity to undermine the reliability of tagging analysis. We review in detail what is known of intra- and interspecific genetic variation over geographical ranges in the trematodes, based on recent molecular studies. Although the existence of cryptic species and evidence of intraspecific variability may appear daunting, we suspect that these complexities will add, and indeed have already added, to the sophistication of the information that can be derived from tagging studies. PMID:24565166

  10. Trichinella spp. infection in horses of Romania: serological and parasitological survey.

    PubMed

    Blaga, Radu; Cretu, Carmen M; Gherman, Calin; Draghici, Alina; Pozio, Edoardo; Noeckler, Karsten; Kapel, Christian M O; Dida, Ion; Cozma, Vasile; Boireau, Pascal

    2009-02-23

    Herbivorous animals are usually, by virtue of their diet, outside the major transmission cycles of Trichinella spp. However, since 1975, the year of the first report of human trichinellosis caused by the consumption of infected horse meat, the domestic horse has appeared as a novel vector of Trichinella spp. infection to humans, with 15 outbreaks documented in France and Italy. Romania, one of the main countries exporting horses into the European Union (EU), experienced a dramatic increase of Trichinella spp. infection in both domestic pigs and humans in the 1990s. Some Trichinella spiralis-infected horses were exported to the EU during this period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Trichinella spp. infections in horses from Romania using both direct and indirect tests. Of 3000 serum samples tested in 2001, none were positive by ELISA using three different Trichinella antigens (crude; excretory/secretory, ES; stg-BSA antigens). Of 2992 serum samples tested in 2002, 17 (0.56%) showed optical density values higher than the cut-off in an ELISA using ES antigens and one was confirmed by western blot (WB). Four of the 17 ELISA positive horses, including the horse with a confirmed serology by WB, were subjected for intensive meat examination at slaughter, but no Trichinella spp. larvae were detected. Further, no Trichinella spp. larvae were detected by trichinelloscopy and artificial digestion of 25,838 horses slaughtered in Alexandria and Timisoara between 2001 and 2004. The false positive results obtained by serology confirm the previous work on the unreliability of serology for detection of Trichinella spp. infection in horses. Furthermore, the lack of detection of Trichinella spp. infected horses by artificial digestion, suggests a very low prevalence of infection in horses in Romania. PMID:19062194

  11. Experimental infection of calves with Haemonchus placei and Haemonchus contortus: Assessment of parasitological parameters.

    PubMed

    Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Buzzulini, Carolina; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Felippelli, Gustavo; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Salatta, Bruna; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Soares, Vando Edésio; Oliveira, Gilson Pereira de; Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Costa, Alvimar José da

    2016-02-15

    The present study evaluated the viability and possible effects of Haemonchus contortus infections in experimentally prime infected calves, comparing them to infections by Haemonchus placei. Ten male Holstein newborns were used. All calves were individually weighed for subsequent group formation, in which two animals were kept as a control group, inoculated with water (GI); four animals were inoculated with 10,000 third stage (L3) Haemonchus contortus larvae (GII); and the remaining four calves were inoculated with 10,000 third stage (L3) H. placei larvae (GIII). All experimental animals were necropsied on the 42nd day after inoculation. Based on results obtained by the present study, it can be concluded that bovine calves were susceptible to infections by both Haemonchus species (placei and contortus). H. contortus presented an inferior pre-patent period when compared to H. placei. No significant difference (P>0.05) was observed between Haemonchus burdens recovered from both infected groups (GII and GIII). Moreover, H. contortus females maintained an egg production rate similar to H. placei females in young animals, which can contribute to pasture contamination by both Haemonchus species. This could possibly lead to negative reflexes on helminth control based on a mixed pasture with bovines and ovines, especially when it involves younglings. PMID:26827856

  12. Pathological and parasitological characterization of infection by trematodes (Paramphistomatidae) in the large intestine of capybaras.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Isabela de Oliveira; Silva, Ana Patrícia Carvalho; Gardiner, Chris; Santos, Renato de Lima; Lima, Walter Dos Santos; Ecco, Roselene

    2015-09-01

    Gross and histological lesions caused by an intestinal parasite were described in three capybaras. The parasites presented a mean length of 14 mm and width of 7 mm, were round to oval or piriform, reddish and pedunculated, and adhered strongly to the mucosa of the large intestine. The intestinal mucosa at the parasite attachment site presented loss of surface epithelium and most glands, with replacement by fibrovascular proliferation that protruded from the mucosa and was involuted by the ventral sucker of the parasite. The lamina propria presented cellular debris, eosinophils, macrophages and plasma cells. The morphological characteristics, observed using serial histological sections, made it possible to classify the parasite as a trematode (Paramphistomatidae), compatible with Taxorchis schistocotyle. One capybara also harbored many ciliated protozoa in the large intestine (at the site of attachment of the parasite) and inside the caeca of the trematodes. In conclusion, this study described a multifocal necrotizing colitis associated with T. schistocotyle parasitism in capybaras. PMID:26444066

  13. [Dientamoeba fragilis and dientamoebiasis: aspects of clinical parasitology and laboratory diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Crotti, D; D'Annibale, M L

    2001-09-01

    The flagellate Dientamoeba fragilis is a potential intestinal pathogen of humans. It is probably undervalued overall because its identification relies on permanent stains directly on fresh fecal specimens (Giemsa) or preserved in PVA or SAF (Trichrome or Iron-hematoxylin). During 1999 we processed stoll samples of 151 subjects and we searched also D. fragilis. We processed 105 cases of enteritis (82 children and 23 adults) and 46 samples of formed stools to investigate only for intestinal parasites (12 children and 34 adults). The microscopical observations were made on smears directly in saline solution, and after Dobell solution, MIF and Giemsa stained. Iron hematoxylin and trichrome stains were performed in some circumstances only. D. fragilis was observed in 11.3% of cases, 7.6% among the group of enteritis and 13.8% among the other subjects. These positive 17 cases were observed more often among adults (76.5% of cases) than among children (23.5%). In our study area D. fragilis seems more frequent than Giardia intestinalis and represents the third important intestinal parasite, following Enterobius vermicularis (children) and Strongyloides stercoralis (elders). PMID:11921541

  14. Experimentally induced Faciola hepatica infection in white-tailed deer. I. Clinicopathological and parasitological features.

    PubMed Central

    Presidente, P J; McCraw, B M; Lumsden, J H

    1975-01-01

    Six white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and six sheep were inoculated with metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica. Two animals of each species were given 100, 500 or 2500 metacercariae. Clinicopathological features of these infections were determined by analyses of blood samples collected each week from inoculated deer and sheep as well as from two noninoculated animals of each species. One animal in each inoculated group was killed and examined at six weeks postinoculation and the remainder at 15 weeks postinoculation. Compared with the values obtained from noninoculated controls, eosinophilia, hyperproteinemia and hyperglobulinemia occured in inoculated deer. There were no other significant changes in hematological values or in serum aspartate aminotransferase levels. Marked leukocytosis and eosinophilia, with hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia, elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase levels and mild macrocytic normochromic anemia characterized the infection in lambs. Although approximately 29% of the inoculum was recovered from the hepatic parenchyma of the sheep, F. hepatica was found in only one of six inoculated deer. A patent infection was established in this deer and constitutes the second report of mature F. hepatica in this host. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1125833

  15. Parasitology as a Teaching Tool: Isolation of Apicomplexan Cysts from Store-Bought Meat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggleston, Tracy L.; Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Hager, Kristin M.

    2008-01-01

    There are obstacles to teaching science; however, these obstacles are not insurmountable. One obstacle is the students themselves. Students often labor under the misconception or anxiety that the course material will be too difficult to understand, or boring (mind-numbing), or that the information learned will not be applicable in their day-to-day…

  16. Systems parasitology: effects of Fasciola hepatica on the neurochemical profile in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Saric, Jasmina; Li, Jia V; Utzinger, Jürg; Wang, Yulan; Keiser, Jennifer; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Beckonert, Olaf; Sharabiani, Mansour T A; Fonville, Judith M; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    We characterize the integrated response of a rat host to the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica using a combination of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic profiles (liver, kidney, intestine, brain, spleen, plasma, urine, feces) and multiplex cytokine markers of systemic inflammation. Multivariate mathematical models were built to describe the main features of the infection at the systems level. In addition to the expected modulation of hepatic choline and energy metabolism, we found significant perturbations of the nucleotide balance in the brain, together with increased plasma IL-13, suggesting a shift toward modulation of immune reactions to minimize inflammatory damage, which may favor the co-existence of the parasite in the host. Subsequent analysis of brain extracts from other trematode infection models (i.e. Schistosoma mansoni, and Echinostoma caproni) did not elicit a change in neural nucleotide levels, indicating that the neural effects of F. hepatica infection are specific. We propose that the topographically extended response to invasion of the host as characterized by the modulated global metabolic phenotype is stratified across several bio-organizational levels and reflects the direct manipulation of host–nucleotide balance. PMID:20664642

  17. Parasitological study of a population of Tiber River eels (Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Orecchia, P; Bianchini, M; Catalini, N; Cataudella, S; Paggi, L

    1987-04-01

    A study was conducted on the parasitofauna of Anguilla anguilla caught in the section of the Tiber river south of Rome (Italy). The sample examined consisted of 417 specimens that were classified by stage (elver, young yellow eel, yellow eel and silver eel) and season of sampling. The following species were identified: Trypanosoma granulosum, Eimeria anguillae, Myxidium giardi, Sphaerospora reichenowi, Myxobolus sp., Trichodina anguilli, Ichthyohodo sp., Gyrodactylus anguillae, Bothriocephalus claviceps, Proteocephalus macrocephalus, Raphidascaris acus, Acanthocephalus clavula. Each parasite species was considered in its prevalence according to stage and season. For some parasite the pathogenic effect was also examined in a histological study of serial sections. The results of the statistical analysis of the single parasitic infection as related to different seasons pointed to marked seasonal trends only in some species (Trypanosoma granulosum and Gyrodactylus anguillae). The intensity of infection assessed for acanthocephalan infection only was found to affect neither weight nor condition index (weight/length3). No difference in weight or condition index was found to be ascribable to the presence or absence of a species. An attempt to find a rule-of-thumb algorithm to gauge the overall effect to parasitic diseases failed to give sufficiently significant results. PMID:3508508

  18. Chemogenomics and parasitology: small molecules and cell-based assays to study infectious processes.

    PubMed

    Muskavitch, Marc A T; Barteneva, Natasha; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2008-09-01

    Infectious diseases caused by protozoan parasites--malaria, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, Chagas' disease, toxoplasmosis--remain chronic problems for humanity. We lack vaccines and have limited drug options effective against protozoa. Research into anti-protozoan drugs has accelerated with improved in vitro cultivation methods, enhanced genetic accessibility, completed genome sequences for key protozoa, and increased prominence of protozoan diseases on the agendas of well-resourced public figures and foundations. Concurrent advances in high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies and availability of diverse small molecule libraries offer the promise of accelerated discovery of new drug targets and new drugs that will reduce disease burdens imposed on humanity by parasitic protozoa. We provide a status report on HTS technologies in hand and cell-based assays under development for biological investigations and drug discovery directed toward the three best-characterized parasitic protozoa: Trypanosoma brucei, Plasmodium falciparum, and Toxoplasma gondii. We emphasize cell growth assays and new insights into parasite cell biology speeding development of better cell-based assays, useful in primary screens for anti-protozoan drug leads and secondary screens to decipher mechanisms of action of leads identified in growth assays. Small molecules that interfere with specific aspects of protozoan biology, identified in such screens, will be valuable tools for dissecting parasite cell biology and developing anti-protozoan drugs. We discuss potential impacts on drug development of new consortia among academic, corporate, and public partners committed to discovery of new, effective anti-protozoan drugs. PMID:18795882

  19. Plasma disposition, milk excretion and parasitological efficacy of mebendazole in donkeys naturally infected by Cyathostominae.

    PubMed

    Gokbulut, Cengiz; Aksit, Dilek; Santoro, Mario; Roncoroni, Cristina; Mariani, Ugo; Buono, Francesco; Rufrano, Domenico; Fagiolo, Antonio; Veneziano, Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    Mebendazole (MBZ) has been licensed for use in horses and donkeys, however there are no data available in the literature regarding its pharmacokinetic disposition and efficacy in donkeys. This study was designed to determine the plasma disposition, milk excretion and anthelmintic efficacy of MBZ in donkeys naturally infected by Cyathostominae. The animals were allocated to three groups, each of six donkeys. One group was untreated control (C-group) and the others were treated using a paste formulation of MBZ administered per os at the manufacturer's recommended horse dosage of 10mg/kg body weight (MBZ 1) and at the double horse dosage 20mg/kg body weight (MBZ 2). Blood and milk samples were collected at various times between 1h and 120h post treatment and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector. Individual FECs (Faecal Egg Counts) were performed on each animal before the treatment (day-3) and weekly from day 7 until day 56 post treatment using a modified McMaster technique. The plasma concentrations and systemic exposure of MBZ in donkeys were relatively lower compared with the other methylcarbamate benzimidazoles. Dose-dependent plasma dispositions of MBZ were observed at the increased dosage (10mg/kg vs 20mg/kg) in donkeys. MBZ was not detected in any milk samples at a dosage of 10mg/kg. However, the parent drug reached 0.01μg/ml peak milk concentration at 10.66h and AUCmilk/AUCplasma value was 0.18±0.02 at a dosage of 20mg/kg bodyweight. This study indicated that per os administration of MBZ has a minimal disposition rate into the milk and may be used in lactating donkeys with zero milk-withdrawal period. The results of FECRT for both MBZ dosages were efficient (>95% efficacy) until day 28. This trial demonstrates that MBZ oral paste at horse dosage (10mg/kg B.W.) was effective and safety for the treatment of Cyathostominae in donkeys. Therefore, similar dosage regimens of MBZ could be used for horses and donkeys. PMID:26827868

  20. A phylogeny for the pomatiopsidae (Gastropoda: Rissooidea): a resource for taxonomic, parasitological and biodiversity studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Pomatiopsidae are reported from northern India into southern China and Southeast Asia, with two sub-families, the Pomatiopsinae (which include freshwater, amphibious, terrestrial and marine species) and the freshwater Triculinae. Both include species acting as intermediate host for species of the blood-fluke Schistosoma which cause a public health problem in East Asia. Also, with around 120 species, triculine biodiversity exceeds that of any other endemic freshwater molluscan fauna. Nevertheless, the origins of the Pomatiopsidae, the factors driving such a diverse radiation and aspects of their co-evolution with Schistosoma are not fully understood. Many taxonomic questions remain; there are problems identifying medically relevant species. The predicted range is mostly unsurveyed and the true biodiversity of the family is underestimated. Consequently, the aim of the study was to collect DNA-sequence data for as many pomatiopsid taxa as possible, as a first step in providing a resource for identification of epidemiologically significant species (by non-malacologists), for use in resolving taxonomic confusion and for testing phylogeographical hypotheses. Results The evolutionary radiation of the Triculinae was shown to have been rapid and mostly post late Miocene. Molecular dating indicated that the radiation of these snails was driven first by the uplift of the Himalaya and onset of a monsoon system, and then by late-Pliocene global warming. The status of Erhaia as Anmicolidae is supported. The genera Tricula and Neotricula are shown to be non-monophyletic and the tribe Jullieniini may be polyphyletic (based on convergent characters). Triculinae from northern Vietnam could be derived from Gammatricula of Fujian/Yunnan, China. Conclusions The molecular dates and phylogenetic estimates in this study are consistent with an Australasian origin for the Pomatiopsidae and an East to West radiation via Oligocene Borneo-Philippines island hopping to Japan and then China (Triculinae arising mid-Miocene in Southeast China), and less so with a triculine origin in Tibet. The lack of monophyly in the medically important genera and indications of taxonomic inaccuracies, call for further work to identify epidemiologically significant taxa (e.g., Halewisia may be potential hosts for Schistosoma mekongi) and highlight the need for surveys to determine the true biodiversity of the Triculinae. PMID:24548800

  1. A molecular and parasitological survey of Hepatozoon canis in domestic dogs in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Munir; Özübek, Sezayi; Altay, Kür?at; Balkaya, ?brahim; Utuk, Armagan Erdem; K?rbas, Ak?n; ?imsek, Sami; Dumanl?, Nazir

    2015-04-30

    In this study, asymptomatic dogs in nine provinces of Turkey were surveyed to investigate the prevalence and intensity of Hepatozoon canis infection. DNA obtained from blood samples collected from 694 domestic dogs (243 stray, 288 shelter, and 163 pets) of both genders and varying ages were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition, 285 thin blood smears prepared from these blood samples were also evaluated for microscopic examination. Direct microscopy revealed Hepatozoon gamonts in the peripheral blood of three of 285 (1.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21-3.04) tested. Using PCR, 155 of the 694 (22.3%; 95% CI: 19.28-25.61) were found to be positive for the presence of H. canis DNA. The prevalence of infection was higher in adult dogs (26.2%; 95% CI: 22.1-30.7) than young animals (16.4%; 95% CI: 12.2-21.3). Although the prevalence determined by PCR was higher in male dogs (24.5%; 95% CI: 19.6-29.9) than in female dogs (20.8%; 95% CI: 16.9-25.1), gender differences were not significant. Pet dogs had a lower prevalence of infection (10.4%; 95% CI: 6.2-16.2) compared to stray (26.3%; 95% CI: 20.9-32.3) and shelter dogs (25.7%; 95% CI: 20.7-31.1), but no significant association between stray and shelter dogs was found for the presence of the parasite. Partial sequences of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene shared 99-100% similarity with the corresponding H. canis isolates. This epidemiological survey revealed a high prevalence of H. canis in dogs from several provinces in Turkey, and it suggests that the age and origin are associated with the parasite. PMID:25771934

  2. Parasitology as a Teaching Tool: Isolation of Apicomplexan Cysts from Store-Bought Meat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggleston, Tracy L.; Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Hager, Kristin M.

    2008-01-01

    There are obstacles to teaching science; however, these obstacles are not insurmountable. One obstacle is the students themselves. Students often labor under the misconception or anxiety that the course material will be too difficult to understand, or boring (mind-numbing), or that the information learned will not be applicable in their day-to-day…

  3. PARASITOLOGY AND SEROLOGY OF FREE-RANGING COYOTES (CANIS LATRANS) IN NORTH CAROLINA, USA.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, M Colter; Swingen, Morgan B; Lashley, Marcus A; Flowers, James R; Palamar, Maria B; Apperson, Charles S; Olfenbuttel, Colleen; Moorman, Christopher E; DePerno, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    Coyotes (Canis latrans) have expanded recently into the eastern US and can serve as a source of pathogens to domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), livestock, and humans. We examined free-ranging coyotes from central North Carolina, US, for selected parasites and prevalence of antibodies against viral and bacterial agents. We detected ticks on most (81%) coyotes, with Amblyomma americanum detected on 83% of those with ticks. Fifteen (47%) coyotes were positive for heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis), with a greater detection rate in adults (75%) than juveniles (22%). Serology revealed antibodies against canine adenovirus (71%), canine coronavirus (32%), canine distemper virus (17%), canine parvovirus (96%), and Leptospira spp. (7%). We did not detect antibodies against Brucella abortus/suis or Brucella canis. Our results showed that coyotes harbor many common pathogens that present health risks to humans and domestic animals and suggest that continued monitoring of the coyote's role in pathogen transmission is warranted. PMID:25984773

  4. Parasitology, virology, and serology of free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from central Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michelle; Gerhold, Richard W; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Gulsby, William D; Maestas, Lauren; Rosypal, Alexa; Miller, Karl V; Miller, Debra L

    2014-10-01

    We examined 31 free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from central Georgia, USA, for select parasites and viral agents. Sixteen coyotes had adult heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis). Serum samples from 27 animals revealed antibodies against canine parvovirus (100%), canine distemper virus (48%), canine adenovirus (37%), and Trypanosoma cruzi (7%); none were detected against Leishmania spp. Twenty-two of 24 (92%) coyotes were positive for Toxoplasma gondii. Real-time PCR of feces revealed 32% of coyotes were shedding canine parvovirus, and sequencing revealed type 2b and 2c. Because coyotes could be a spillover host of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) pathogens, studies of the transmission of pathogens between coyotes and domestic dogs are warranted. PMID:25098300

  5. Parasitological and immunological aspects of early Ascaris spp. infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro Henrique; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Ana Clara; Silva, Flaviane Nunes; Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Dhom-Lemos, Lucas de Carvalho; Barbosa, Fernando Sérgio; Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; Gaze, Soraya; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2013-08-01

    Studies related to the immunobiological aspects of an Ascaris spp. infection are still scarce, especially those that aim to elucidate the early events of the immune response. In this study, we demonstrated a novel standardized method for early experimental Ascaris infection, providing additional information about the infectivity of eggs embryonated in vitro as well as the influence of host age on development of the infection. Finally, we characterised the immunopathology of early infection, focusing on the tissue and systemic cytokine profiles and the histopathology of infection in the lungs of BALB/c mice. Our results demonstrated that the highest egg infectivity occurred on the 100th and 200th days of in vitro embryonation and that 8 week-old BALB/c mice were more susceptible to infection than 16 week-old mice. Ascaris-infected mice showed an early, significant level of IL-5 production in the lungs 4 days p.i., followed by an increase in the level of neutrophils in the inflammatory infiltrate at 8 days p.i, which was correlated with the peak of larval migration in the tissue and a significant level of IL-6 production. The inflammatory infiltrate in the lungs was gradually replaced by mononuclear cells and eosinophils on the 10th and 12th days p.i., respectively, and an increase in TNF levels was observed. The downmodulation of systemic TCD4(+) cell numbers might suggest that T cell hyporesponsiveness was induced by the Ascaris spp. larvae, contributing to safeguarding parasite survival during larval migration. Taken together, the novel aspects of Ascaris infection presented here enabled a better understanding of the immunopathological events during larval migration, providing insight for further studies focused on immunisation and immunoprophylatic assays. PMID:23665127

  6. Epidemiology and control of intestinal schistosomiasis on the Sesse Islands, Uganda: integrating malacology and parasitology to tailor local treatment recommendations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intestinal schistosomiasis is often widespread among the populations living around Lake Victoria and on its islands. The Sesse Island group (containing some 84 islands), however, is typically assumed to be a low prevalence zone, with limited transmission, but has never been surveyed in detail. Here, we present a rapid mapping assessment, bringing together snail and parasite information, at 23 sites for the presence of intermediate host snails and at 61 sites for the prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis in school-aged children (N = 905). Two different diagnostic tools were used and compared at 45 of these sites: Kato-Katz thick faecal smears and circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) urine dipsticks. Results Biomphalaria snails were found at 11 sites but in low numbers; none was found shedding schistosome cercariae. At 22 out of the 45 sites, local prevalence by urine and/or stool diagnostics was in excess of 50%, although mean prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis overall was 34.6% (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 31.0-38.3%) by Kato-Katz and 46.5% (95% CI = 42.7-50.4%) by CCA if 'trace' reactions were considered infection-positive (if considered infection-negative, mean prevalence was 28.1% (95% CI = 24.7-31.7%)). Diagnostic congruence between CCA and Kato-Katz was poor and significant discordance in estimated prevalence by location was found, with each often inferring different mass drug administration regimes. Conclusions Accurate estimation of schistosome prevalence is important for determining present and future treatment needs with praziquantel; the wide range of schistosome prevalence across the Sesse Island group requires a treatment regime largely tailored to each island. In high prevalence locations, further malacological sampling is required to confirm the extent of local transmission, especially on the northern islands within the group. The observation that different diagnostic tests can provide varying results in terms of estimating prevalence by location, and hence change treatment recommendations, suggests that care must be taken in interpreting raw prevalence data. In particular, further research into the reasons for the differences in the poorer performance of the CCA test should be pursued. PMID:20663223

  7. Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in naturally-infected dogs and cats using serological, parasitological and molecular methods

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, G.F.; Cardinal, M.V.; Orozco, M.M.; Schijman, A.G.; Gürtler, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic dogs and cats are major domestic reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi and a risk factor for parasite transmission. In this study we assessed the relative performance of a polymerase chain reaction assay targeted to minicircle DNA (kDNA-PCR) in reference to conventional serological tests, a rapid dipstick test and xenodiagnosis to detect T. cruzi infection in dogs and cats from an endemic rural area in northeastern Argentina. A total of 43 dogs and 13 cats seropositive for T. cruzi by an immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA), which had been examined by xenodiagnosis, were also tested by kDNA-PCR. kDNA-PCR was nearly as sensitive as xenodiagnosis for detecting T. cruzi- infectious dogs and cats. kDNA-PCR was slightly more sensitive than xenodiagnosis in seropositive dogs (91% versus 86%, respectively) and cats (77% against 54%, respectively), but failed to detect all of the seropositive individuals. ELISA and IHA detected all xenodiagnosis-positive dogs and both outcomes largely agreed (kappa coefficient, κ = 0.92), whereas both assays failed to detect all of the xenodiagnosis-positive cats and their agreement was moderate (κ = 0.68). In dogs, the sensitivity of the dipstick test was 95% and agreed closely with the outcome of conventional serological tests (κ = 0.82). The high sensitivity of kDNA-PCR to detect T. cruzi infections in naturally-infected dogs and cats supports its application as a diagnostic tool complementary to serology and may replace the use of xenodiagnosis or hemoculture. PMID:23499860

  8. [Distribution of intestinal parasites among patients who presented at the parasitology laboratory of the Kocaeli University School of Medicine Hospital].

    PubMed

    Tamer, Gülden Sönmez; Calişkan, Seyda; Willke, Ayşe

    2008-01-01

    In this study, 5178 fecal samples collected from patients who applied to our university during May 2003 through June 2005 were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites. Out of 5178 samples, 4560 of them were collected with cellophane tape preparations. Fecal samples were examined using native- Lugol and the trichrome staining method after sedimentation by formal-ethyl acetate concentration. The prevalence of intestinal parasites was evaluated with respect to age, gender and the months in which cases were seen. One or more parasites were found in 553 (10.67%) of the 5178 stool samples. Of these, 39.8% were female and 60.2, male. The distribution of the intestinal parasites was as follows; G. intestinalis in 138 cases (24.9%), E. vermicularis in 129 cases (23.3%), D. fragilis in 10 cases (1.8%), I. bütschlii cysts in 26 cases (4.7%), Taenia spp in 17 cases (3.07%) and Chilomastix mesnili in one case (0.18%). The rate of the presence of intestinal parasites in the 0-14 age group was higher than that of other groups. The incidence of parasitic diseases was lower in this study as compared to the results previously reported from our hospital. In our region intestinal parasites were predominantly protozoan whereas a lower rate of helminth isolations was noticeable. Parasitic infections continue to be an important public health problem in our country. PMID:18645942

  9. Preliminary parasitological results of a pilot mollusciciding campaign to control transmission of Schistosoma mansoni in St Lucia*

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, P.; Woodstock, Lilian; Cook, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A mollusciciding campaign was begun in Cul-de-Sac Valley, St Lucia, at the end of 1970, following several years of epidemiological studies in which transmission of Schistosoma mansoni was found to be high in settlements on the valley floor but low in hillside settlements. Postcontrol (1971-73) findings in children, when compared with precontrol data and with data from an adjacent valley having a similar transmission pattern, show significant reductions in prevalence, incidence, and intensity of infection. PMID:1088109

  10. Overcoming language and cultural barriers: a graphical communication tool to perform a parasitological screening in two vulnerable populations from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Buyayisqui, María Pía; Bordoni, Noemí; Garbossa, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    This is an exploratory study of the application of a support tool for the detection of asymptomatic subjects carrying enteric parasites in two vulnerable populations in Argentina: a shantytown in the city of Buenos Aires and a rural Wichí indigenous community in the province of Chaco. The ethnic and cultural diversity, high illiteracy rate, and language barriers called for the development of an auxiliary resource to explain stool sample collection procedures. In individual interviews with each family, the authors used two instructional guidance leaflets in comic strip format depicting the procedures. They evaluated the acceptance of the graphical communication tool on the basis of the number of retrieved samples. Percentages of respondent families were 72.2% and 66.7%, respectively. Definitive validation of these instruments would allow their use in community studies, community service learning experiences, and research on aboriginal communities that would otherwise be excluded from studies on health status. PMID:23066862

  11. Parasitological and new molecular-phylogenetic characterization of the malaria parasite Plasmodium tejerai in South American penguins.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Patricia; Belo, Nayara O; Lacorte, Gustavo A; Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K M; Vanstreels, Ralph E T; Steindel, Mário; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Valki?nas, Gediminas; Braga, Erika M

    2013-04-01

    This study is the first report on mortality of Spheniscus magellanicus, penguin of South America, caused by Plasmodium tejerai, which was identified using morphological and molecular analyses. Blood stages (trophozoites, meronts and gametocytes) were reported and illustrated. The necropsy revealed marked splenomegaly and pulmonary edema, as well as moderate hepatomegaly and hydropericardium. The histopathology revealed the presence of tissue meronts in the macrophages and endothelial cells of multiple organs. The molecular analyses showed 5.6% of genetic divergence in cytochrome b gene between P. tejerai and Plasmodium relictum. Morphology of blood and tissue stages of P. tejerai is similar to P. relictum; the distinction between these two species requires experience in the identification of avian Plasmodium species. Molecular studies associated with reliably identified morphological species are useful for barcoding and comparisons with previous studies of wildlife malaria infections as well as for posterior phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. S. magellanicus is a new host record of P. tejerai, which is the virulent parasite and worth more attention in avian conservation and veterinary medicine projects in South America. PMID:23269202

  12. [Methods for estimating the demographic structure of the taiga tick (Ixodidae) based on results of standard parasitological observations].

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Iu S

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective estimation of the abundance dynamics of the taiga tick Ixodes persulcatus in mixed coniferous and leaf-bearing forests of the Udmurtia Republic in the period 1957-1986 was carried out. A possibility to estimate the absolute number of all stages of I. persulcatus based on relative indices. Females of I. persulcatus lay 20,250 eggs per 1 hectare, and this number of eggs gives birth to 15,000 larvae. From this number, 7870 larvae hibernate and 6550 individuals became fed. The number of nymphs is 5930, among which 5110 individuals live up to spring, and 1390 became fed. The number of adult mites in autumn is 1250; in subsequent spring this number decreases to 780. The mean number of engorged females is 8. The mortality rate of ticks caused by the deficit of hosts increases from preimaginal stages to adults; for larvae, nymphs and imago this index is 16.6, 72.8, and 97.9%, respectively. Quotas of individuals with 3-, 4- and 5-year life cycle among the unfed imago are 70.4, 28.0, and 1.6%, respectively. PMID:15656092

  13. [Parasitological factors impeding the transmission of the agent of babesiosis (Babesia microti) to man from the tick Ixodes persulcatus].

    PubMed

    Korenberg, E I; Nefedova, V V; Kovalevsky, Yu V; Sorokina, Yu V; Gorelova, N B

    2015-01-01

    Based on the analysis of own and literature data, it is concluded that the following ma- in permanent system of ecologicalarasitological factors prevents the effective vector functions of the tick I. persulcatus in transmission of B. microti: lack of distinct nymphs' anthropophily; small spontaneous invasion of hungry adults; a duration of the parasitic phase in humans is insufficient to complete the sporogonic development, because victims interrupt the phase. Therefore, not excluding the possibility of sporadic babesiosis disea- ses, it can be stated that within the boundaries of a vast territory, where the taiga tick is the only potential source of infection for humans, the B. microti infection has not, and will not reach significant values in infectious pathology. PMID:26016332

  14. Anisakids (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from stomachs of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) on St. Paul Island, Alaska: parasitological and pathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, T A; Lyons, E T; Spraker, T R

    2014-12-01

    Anisakid nematodes parasitize the alimentary tracts of aquatic vertebrates, including northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) (NFS). The main purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence, intensity, and species composition of anisakids in NFSs on St. Paul Island, Alaska, and to analyze changes in NFS infection with these nematodes during the last decades. The study was carried out on St. Paul Island, Alaska, in July-August 2011-2013. Stomachs of 443 humanely harvested NFS males were collected from five separate haul-out areas. A total of 4,460 anisakid specimens were collected and identified by morphological criteria. Gross and histological examinations of stomachs were also performed. The overall prevalence of NFS infection was 91.2%; overall mean intensity 10.9, and overall median intensity 6. Five species, Anisakis simplex s. l., Contracaecum osculatum s. l., Pseudoterranova decipiens s. l., P. azarazi and Phocascaris cystophorae, were found. The prevalence of Anisakis was 46.5%, its intensity 7.5. The prevalence and intensity of Contracaecum, Pseudoterranova, and Phocascaris were 33.6% and 3.5, 81.9% and 6.5, and 5.2% and 1.7, respectively. Significant differences in the prevalence of NFS infection were observed between separate haul-outs. Comparison of the present data with the results of studies performed in the North Pacific in the 1960s, showed a significant decrease in the intensity of NFS infection with anisakids during the last decades. The prevalence of mucosal lesions in NFS stomachs caused by anisakids also decreased from 92 to 20.9%. Possible reasons for the changes in NFS infection with anisakids are discussed. PMID:25216781

  15. Parasitological survey of mangrove oyster, Crassostrea rhizophorae, in the Pacoti River Estuary, Ceará State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sabry, Rachel Costa; Gesteira, Tereza Cristina Vasconcelos; Magalhães, Aimê Rachel Magenta; Barracco, Margherita Anna; Guertler, Cristhiane; Ferreira, Liana Pinho; Vianna, Rogério Tubino; da Silva, Patrícia Mirella

    2013-01-01

    The mangrove oyster, Crassostrea rhizophorae (Bivalvia, Ostreidae) is commonly collected by fisherwomen in the estuaries of the Ceará State (CE), Northeastern Brazil. Despite the socioeconomic importance of this natural resource, there are few studies on the health of the oysters in this region. This study aimed to survey pathological changes in the mangrove oyster C. rhizophorae in the estuary of the Pacoti River, CE. Adult oysters were collected in August 2008 (N=450) and December 2009 (N=450) at three sites of the Pacoti estuary and in 2010 (N=600) samplings were done quarterly at one site which has showed the higher prevalence de Perkinsus. Macroscopical and histological analyses were used to evaluate pathological changes, Ray's Fluid Thioglycollate Medium (RFTM) to detect Perkinsus spp. and polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and DNA sequencing to identify Perkinsus species. In 2009, RFTM assay detected Perkinsus sp. infecting the tissues of C. rhizophorae with low prevalences of 1.3%, 6.7% e 7.3% in sites 1, 2 and 3, respectively, and in 2010, in site 3, prevalence was 2% (12 of 600 oysters). PCR did not confirm any positive case in 2009 and only 5 in 2010. The phylogenetic analyses strongly indicate that the Perkinsus species infecting oysters C. rhizophorae of this study belongs to Perkinsus beihaiensis. The histology confirmed 11 cases of Perkinsus sp. infecting the C. rhizophorae in 2009, and only two cases in 2010. Nematopsis sp. was the protozoan observed with greater prevalence (up 96.7%). Other found protozoa were: Trichodina, Sphenophrya, Ancistrocoma - like and an unknown ovarian parasite. The metazoa found were the polychaete Polydora with high prevalences, a turbellarian, possibly of the genus Urastoma, an unidentified digenean metacercariae and larvae of cestode Tylocephalum. A continuous monitoring of diseases in bivalves from this natural population is recommended, since the phylogenetic analyses indicate the occurrence of P. beihaiensis infecting oysters C. rhizophorae whose pathogenic potential is unknown. PMID:23147104

  16. Clinical and Parasitological Protection in a Leishmania infantum-Macaque Model Vaccinated with Adenovirus and the Recombinant A2 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Gabriel; Teva, Antonio; Porrozzi, Renato; Pinto, Marcelo A.; Marchevsky, Renato S.; Rocha, Maria Gabrielle L.; Dutra, Miriam S.; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fernandes, Ana-Paula; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe vector-born disease of humans and dogs caused by Leishmania donovani complex parasites. Approximately 0.2 to 0.4 million new human VL cases occur annually worldwide. In the new world, these alarming numbers are primarily due to the impracticality of current control methods based on vector reduction and dog euthanasia. Thus, a prophylactic vaccine appears to be essential for VL control. The current efforts to develop an efficacious vaccine include the use of animal models that are as close to human VL. We have previously reported a L. infantum-macaque infection model that is reliable to determine which vaccine candidates are most worthy for further development. Among the few amastigote antigens tested so far, one of specific interest is the recombinant A2 (rA2) protein that protects against experimental L. infantum infections in mice and dogs. Methodology/Principal Findings Primates were vaccinated using three rA2-based prime-boost immunization regimes: three doses of rA2 plus recombinant human interleukin-12 (rhIL-12) adsorbed in alum (rA2/rhIL-12/alum); two doses of non-replicative adenovirus recombinant vector encoding A2 (Ad5-A2) followed by two boosts with rA2/rhIL-12/alum (Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum); and plasmid DNA encoding A2 gene (DNA-A2) boosted with two doses of Ad5-A2 (DNA-A2+Ad5-A2). Primates received a subsequent infectious challenge with L. infantum. Vaccines, apart from being safe, were immunogenic as animals responded with increased pre-challenge production of anti-A2-specific IgG antibodies, though with some variability in the response, depending on the vaccine formulation/protocol. The relative parasite load in the liver was significantly lower in immunized macaques as compared to controls. Protection correlated with hepatic granuloma resolution, and reduction of clinical symptoms, particularly when primates were vaccinated with the Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum protocol. Conclusions/Significance The remarkable clinical protection induced by A2 in an animal model that is evolutionary close to humans qualifies this antigen as a suitable vaccine candidate against human VL. PMID:24945284

  17. MicroRNA Transcriptome Profiling in Heart of Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice: Parasitological and Cardiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Isabela Cunha; Ferreira, Frederico Moraes; Nakaya, Helder I.; Baron, Monique Andrade; Vilar-Pereira, Gláucia; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Silva, Ana Maria Gonçalves; Real, Juliana Monte; De Brito, Thales; Chevillard, Christophe; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Ferreira, Ludmila Rodrigues Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, and it begins with a short acute phase characterized by high parasitemia followed by a life-long chronic phase with scarce parasitism. Cardiac involvement is the most prominent manifestation, as 30% of infected subjects will develop abnormal ventricular repolarization with myocarditis, fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by undefined mechanisms. Nevertheless, follow-up studies in chagasic patients, as well as studies with murine models, suggest that the intensity of clinical symptoms and pathophysiological events that occur during the acute phase of disease are associated with the severity of cardiac disease observed during the chronic phase. In the present study we investigated the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the disease progression in response to T. cruzi infection, as alterations in miRNA levels are known to be associated with many cardiovascular disorders. We screened 641 rodent miRNAs in heart samples of mice during an acute infection with the Colombiana T.cruzi strain and identified multiple miRNAs significantly altered upon infection. Seventeen miRNAs were found significantly deregulated in all three analyzed time points post infection. Among these, six miRNAs had their expression correlated with clinical parameters relevant to the disease, such as parasitemia and maximal heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval. Computational analyses identified that the gene targets for these six miRNAs were involved in networks and signaling pathways related to increased ventricular depolarization and repolarization times, important factors for QTc interval prolongation. The data presented here will guide further studies about the contribution of microRNAs to Chagas heart disease pathogenesis. PMID:26086673

  18. Cytological and parasitological analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid for the diagnosis of Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Barçante, J M P; Barçante, T A; Ribeiro, V M; Oliveira-Junior, S D; Dias, S R C; Negrão-Corrêa, D; Lima, W S

    2008-11-25

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a procedure that retrieves cells and other elements from the lungs for evaluation, which helps in the diagnosis of many pulmonary diseases. The aims of this work were to perform this procedure in dogs in the acute and chronic phases of an Angiostrongylus vasorum infection for cytological analysis and to evaluate the potential of this technique as a diagnostic method for this lung-heart worm. The BAL procedure was performed through the use of an endotracheal tube on seven A. vasorum infected dogs and on five non-infected dogs lined as a control group. Sixty days post-infection (dpi) active and live larvae were retrieved from the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) of all infected dogs. Furthermore, in one animal it was possible to retrieve larvae in its BALF before the pre-patent period. This work reports that the A. vasorum infection resulted in an increase of relative neutrophils and eosinophils counts. In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the alveolar macrophage relative count in infected animals from 60 to 330 dpi. This study shows that the BAL is an accurate technique for the diagnosis of canine angiostrongylosis. Moreover, the technique allows us to retrieve cells and other elements that line the lung surface for cytological evaluation, which provides information about inflammatory diseases, and the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary parasites such as A. vasorum. PMID:18842343

  19. Piscinoodinium pillulare (Schäperclaus, 1954) Lom, 1981 (Dinoflagellida) infection in cultivated freshwater fish from the northeast region of Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Parasitological and pathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Martins, M L; Moraes, J R; Andrade, P M; Schalch, S H; Moraes, F R

    2001-11-01

    The Aquaculture Center of Unesp, Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil, received fishes for diagnosis from fish farmers reporting fish crowding at pond edges and in water inlets. Fifty-three out of 194 cases showed round to oval, immobile whitish structures, measuring up to 162 microm diameter, identified as the dinoflagellate Piscinoodinium pillulare. In 34 diagnosed cases the parasites were present in the gills, in 2 on body surface, and 9 in both. Thirty-one out of 53 were tambacu hybrids hosts; 7, Piaractus mesopotamicus; 6, Colossoma macropomum; 5, Leporinus macrocephalus; 3, Oreochromis niloticus; and 1, Prochilodus lineatus. Fish showed increased mucous production on body surface and gills, while ecchymosis in the caudal peduncle and operculum was present. The gills also showed paleness, congestion, and petechiae. Histopathology presented a great number of trophonts situated between secondary lamellae, fixed to or detached from the epithelium. Primary lamellae presented interstitial hemorrhages, severe hyperplasia of the epithelium, goblet cells, and mononuclear infiltrates. The present work is the first report of P pillulare in Brazil and emphasizes the importance of this dinoflagellate which caused significant economic losses from 1995 through 1997. PMID:12071320

  20. Molecular diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in tropical areas: a comparison of conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction with parasitological methods.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana Martins de; Malta, Fernanda de Mello; Marques, Priscilla Duarte; Sitta, Renata Barnabé; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Gryschek, Ronaldo César Borges; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of conventional polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis from stool samples in tropical areas. Stool samples were collected from individuals and were determined to be positive for Strongyloides stercoralis (group I), negative for S. stercoralis (group II) and positive for other enteroparasite species (group III). DNA specific to S. stercoralis was found in 76.7% of group I samples by cPCR and in 90% of group I samples by qPCR. The results show that molecular methods can be used as alternative tools for detecting S. stercoralis in human stool samples in tropical areas. PMID:25946255

  1. Molecular and Parasitological Survey of Bovine Piroplasms in the Black Sea Region, Including the First Report of Babesiosis Associated with Babesia divergens in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aktas, M; Ozubek, S

    2015-11-01

    Clinical cases of babesiosis were evaluated, and the frequency of bovine Babesia and Theileria parasites was determined in cattle. Blood samples and thin blood smears were collected from 23 cattle exhibiting clinical signs of babesiosis. In addition, tick and blood samples were collected from 100 apparently healthy cattle cograzing from the same area. Egg masses obtained from fully engorged female ticks were included. DNA isolated from blood and tick samples was screened for Babesia and Theileria by reverse line blot assay. Piroplasms compatible with Babesia spp. were observed microscopically for symptomatic cattle as circular, oval, elongated, or pear-shaped bodies. Parasitemia ranged from 0.08 to 0.9% for Babesia bovis, 2.5 to 15.4% for Babesia bigemina, and 7.4% for Babesia divergens. Reverse line blot showed positivity in 13 (13%) of the sampled clinically normal cattle and revealed the presence of three Babesia species. Babesia bovis was the most prevalent (9/100, 9%), followed by Babesia occultans (3/100, 3%) and B. bigemina (1/100, 1%). One animal infected with B. bigemina was also infected with B. bovis. The single animal infected with B. divergens showed symptoms of babesiosis. Ticks were identified as Rhipicephalus annulatus, Rhipicephalus turanicus, and Ixodes ricinus. One female R. annulatus and its egg mass were infected with B. bigemina. Neither Theileria annulata nor Theileria buffeli/orientalis infections were observed in cattle or ticks. This is the first report of clinical babesiosis caused by B. divergens in cattle from Turkey. PMID:26336265

  2. Invasion Biology Meets Parasitology: A Case Study of Parasite Spill-Back with Egyptian Fasciola gigantica in the Invasive Snail Pseudosuccinea columella

    PubMed Central

    Grabner, Daniel S.; Mohamed, Faten A. M. M.; Nachev, Milen; Méabed, Eman M. H.; Sabry, Abdel Hameed A.; Sures, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The liver fluke Fasciola gigantica is a trematode parasite of ruminants and humans that occurs naturally in Africa and Asia. Cases of human fascioliasis, attributable at least in part to F. gigantica, are significantly increasing in the last decades. The introduced snail species Galba truncatula was already identified to be an important intermediate host for this parasite and the efficient invader Pseudosuccinea columella is another suspect in this case. Therefore, we investigated snails collected in irrigation canals in Fayoum governorate in Egypt for prevalence of trematodes with focus on P. columella and its role for the transmission of F. gigantica. Species were identified morphologically and by partial sequencing of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (COI). Among all 689 snails found at the 21 sampling sites, P. columella was the most abundant snail with 296 individuals (42.96%) and it was also the most dominant species at 10 sites. It was not found at 8 sites. Molecular detection by PCR and sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) revealed infections with F. gigantica (3.38%), Echinostoma caproni (2.36%) and another echinostome (7.09%) that could not be identified further according to its sequence. No dependency of snail size and trematode infection was found. Both high abundance of P. columella in the Fayoum irrigation system and common infection with F. gigantica might be a case of parasite spill-back (increased prevalence in local final hosts due to highly susceptible introduced intermediate host species) from the introduced P. columella to the human population, explaining at least partly the observed increase of reported fascioliasis-cases in Egypt. Eichhornia crassipes, the invasive water hyacinth, which covers huge areas of the irrigation canals, offers safe refuges for the amphibious P. columella during molluscicide application. As a consequence, this snail dominates snail communities and efficiently transmits F. gigantica. PMID:24523913

  3. A novel alternative method for 3D visualisation in Parasitology: the construction of a 3D model of a parasite from 2D illustrations.

    PubMed

    Teo, B G; Sarinder, K K S; Lim, L H S

    2010-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) models of the marginal hooks, dorsal and ventral anchors, bars and haptoral reservoirs of a parasite, Sundatrema langkawiense Lim & Gibson, 2009 (Monogenea) were developed using the polygonal modelling method in Autodesk 3ds Max (Version 9) based on two-dimensional (2D) illustrations. Maxscripts were written to rotate the modelled 3D structures. Appropriately orientated 3D haptoral hard-parts were then selected and positioned within the transparent 3D outline of the haptor and grouped together to form a complete 3D haptoral entity. This technique is an inexpensive tool for constructing 3D models from 2D illustrations for 3D visualisation of the spatial relationships between the different structural parts within organisms. PMID:20962723

  4. Effects of chronic infection with Trichostrongylus vitrinus and immune suppression with corticosteroid on parasitological, immune and performance variables in crossbred meat lambs.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, P J; Carmichael, I H; Walkden-Brown, S W

    2015-06-01

    The effects of, and interactions between chronic Trichostrongylus vitrinus infection and immune suppression with methylprednisolone were investigated for a period of 112 days in a grazed flock of 176 crossbred meat lambs. Worm egg count of non-immune-suppressed lambs increased rapidly from days 21 to 42 post-initial infection, and then steadily declined. Infection was associated with significantly decreased fat depth, eye muscle area and cold carcase weight, and increased circulating anti-T.?vitrinus IgG and IgA. Immune suppression led to sustained increases in WEC, and significantly greater worm count, liver weight, fat depth and carcase dressing percentage, and significantly reduced IgG and IgA anti-T.?vitrinus titres, lymphocyte counts, adrenal weight, eye muscle area and cold carcase weight. Both infection and immune suppression were associated with significant body weight reductions. Only 39% of reduced growth rate due to infection was attributable to the host immune response to T.?vitrinus. PMID:25843895

  5. Molecular and parasitological study of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Bushehr province, southwest of the Islamic Republic of Iran: a cross-sectional study during 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, Mehdi; Darabi, Hossein; Hajjaran, Homa; Shirzadi, Mohammad Reza; Fouladvand, Moradali; Charehdar, Soroor; Satvat, Mohammad Taghi; Pakbaz, Foroogh; Vahdat, Katayoun

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is one of the most important parasitic disease in Iran. CL is distributed among more than half of 31 provinces of Iran. Studies on epidemiological aspects of the disease and Leishmania species identification among infected humans are necessary for providing a comprehensive prevention and control program thus; this descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on all CL suspected patients who referred to Health Centers of Bushehr province from 2009 to 2012. Physical examinations were carried out in suspected individuals and CL cases were confirmed by microscopical examinations. Prepared slides from suspicious cases of CL were fixed with absolute methanol and stained by Giemsa 10 %. All the Giemsa-stained slides examined under a light microscope with high magnification (1,000×) and classified them based on grading of Leishmania parasites. DNA from each slide was extracted, separately. The ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 was amplified with specific primers and PCR products were digested by restrict enzymes (HaeIII), run them in 3 % gel agarose for electrophoresis and visualized on a UV transilluminator after staining with ethidium bromide. SPSS version 21 was used for data analyses. A total of 726 suspected CL cases were referred to Health Centers of Bushehr province from 2009 to 2012 and samples were only prepared from 188 of the patients whereas 43 (5.9 %) of them were microscopy positive. The most frequent of CL was observed in November (14 %) and December (12 %). The most distribution of CL lesions were observed on hands (32 %), feet (26 %), and face (21 %), respectively. The highest frequency of CL was observed in 1-9 years old (30 %). Altogether, 50 % of the patients showed one skin lesion and 2-10 skin lesions were occurred in the remained CL patients. Totally, 27 out of 43 (63 %) of the Giemsa stained slides were positive by PCR-RFLP assay because all the PCR-RFLP negative slides were prepared 3-4 years ago and kept without cover slip, and also observed scarce amastigotes during microscopy observations. Leishmania species were identified in 21 desirable slides which 14 of them were L. major and 7 of the remained isolates were identified L. tropica using PCR-RFLP. PMID:26345037

  6. Molecular diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in tropical areas: a comparison of conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction with parasitological methods

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Fabiana Martins; Malta, Fernanda de Mello; Marques, Priscilla Duarte; Sitta, Renata Barnabé; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Gryschek, Ronaldo César Borges; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of conventional polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis from stool samples in tropical areas. Stool samples were collected from individuals and were determined to be positive for Strongyloides stercoralis (group I), negative for S. stercoralis (group II) and positive for other enteroparasite species (group III). DNA specific to S. stercoralis was found in 76.7% of group I samples by cPCR and in 90% of group I samples by qPCR. The results show that molecular methods can be used as alternative tools for detecting S. stercoralis in human stool samples in tropical areas. PMID:25946255

  7. World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP): Guideline for the evaluation of drug efficacy against non-coccidial gastrointestinal protozoa in livestock and companion animals.

    PubMed

    Geurden, T; Olson, M E; O'Handley, R M; Schetters, T; Bowman, D; Vercruysse, J

    2014-08-29

    The current guideline was written to aid in the design, implementation and interpretation of studies for the assessment of drug efficacy against non-coccidial gastrointestinal protozoan parasites, with Giardia spp. as the leading example. The information provided in this guideline deals with aspects of how to conduct controlled studies using experimental infection models (dose determination and dose confirmation) and efficacy studies in commercial facilities (field effectiveness studies). Furthermore, the selection of suitable animals, housing, infection procedure, choice of diagnostic technique and data analysis are discussed. This guideline is intended to assist investigators in conducting specific studies, to provide specific information for registration authorities involved in the decision-making process, to assist in the approval and registration of new drugs and to facilitate the worldwide adoption of uniform procedures. The primary parameter for drug efficacy is the reduction in either parasite excretion or parasite counts and a minimum efficacy of 90% is required against non-coccidial gastrointestinal protozoa. A supporting efficacy parameter is a significant difference in the proportion of infected animals between treated and non-treated groups. Persistent efficacy is considered as an additional claim to therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25285343

  8. Trypanocide treatment among adults with chronic Chagas disease living in Santa Fe city (Argentina), over a mean follow-up of 21 years: parasitological, serological and clinical evolution.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Diana L; Streiger, Mirtha L; Arias, Enrique D; Bizai, María L; del Barco, Mónica; Amicone, Norberto A

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of treatment with nifurtimox and/or benznidazole among adults with chronic Chagas disease with no previous electrocardiographic disturbances was evaluated over a mean follow-up of 21 years, by means of conventional serology, xenodiagnosis, clinical examination, electrocardiograms and chest X-ray. One hundred and eleven patients, between 17 and 46 years old, were studied: 54 underwent treatment (nifurtimox 27, benznidazole 27) and 57 remained untreated (control group). Xenodiagnosis was performed on 65% of them: 36/38 of the treated and 9/34 of the untreated patients had previous positive xenodiagnosis. Post-treatment, 133 xenodiagnoses were performed on 41 patients, all resulting negative. In the control group, 29 xenodiagnoses were performed on 14 patients; 2 resulted positive. Sera stored during the follow-up were simultaneously analyzed through conventional serology tests (IHA; DA-2ME; IIF). The serological evolution in the treated group was: a) 37% underwent negative seroconversion (nifurtimox 11, benznidazole 9); b) 27.8% decreased titers (nifurtimox 9, benznidazole 6), 9 showed inconclusive final serology (nifurtimox 7, benznidazole 2); c) 35.2% remained positive with constant titers (nifurtimox 7; benznidazole 12). The control group conserved the initial antibody levels during the follow-up. In the clinical evolution, 2/54 (3.7%) of the treated and 9/57 (15.8%) of the untreated patients showed electrocardiographic disturbances attributable to Chagas myocardiopathy, with a statistically relevant difference (p<0.05). Treatment caused deparasitation in at least 37% of the chronically infected adults and a protective effect on their clinical evolution. PMID:17486245

  9. Parasitological examination for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.) in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) at Año Nuevo State Reserve, California (2012).

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Kuzmina, T A; Spraker, T R; Jaggi, N; Costa, D P; Crocker, D E; Tolliver, S C; Tift, M S

    2012-10-01

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris Gill, 1866), inhabiting rookeries on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve in central California, were investigated in 2012 for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.). Material collected and examined for hookworms included: blubber (n = 15), stomach and intestines (n = 21) from dead pups; feces from the rectum of weaned pups (n = 23); sand containing apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 28) and sand without apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 54); milk from females (n =23) at 5 days and about 23 to 26 days postpartum; and placenta from one female. Evidence of hookworm presence was not detected in any of the samples examined. Possible reasons why hookworms were not found in northern elephant seals on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve are discussed. PMID:22543700

  10. Nicolas Andry de Bois-Regard (Lyon 1658–Paris 1742): the inventor of the word “orthopaedics” and the father of parasitology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This is an historical essay about Nicolas Andry, a French medical doctor (Lyon 1658–Paris 1742) who wrote in 1741 the famous book called “L’orthopedie”, which was soon after translated into English (1742) “Orthopaedia or the art of correcting and preventing deformities in children”. His life and works are detailed as the containment of the book composed of two volumes and many engravings (the crooked tree has become the symbol of numerous orthopaedic societies around the world). A discussion of semantics (ORTHO-PEDIE) and evolution of the meaning of this word is also discussed. PMID:21804898

  11. Does treatment of intestinal helminth infections influence malaria? Background and methodology of a longitudinal study of clinical, parasitological and immunological parameters in Nangapanda, Flores, Indonesia (ImmunoSPIN Study)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Given that helminth infections are thought to have strong immunomodulatory activity, the question whether helminth infections might affect responses to malaria antigens needs to be addressed. Different cross-sectional studies using diverse methodologies have reported that helminth infections might either exacerbate or reduce the severity of malaria attacks. The same discrepancies have been reported for parasitemia. Methods/Design To determine the effect of geohelminth infections and their treatment on malaria infection and disease outcome, as well as on immunological parameters, the area of Nangapanda on Flores Island, Indonesia, where malaria and helminth parasites are co-endemic was selected for a longitudinal study. Here a Double-blind randomized trial will be performed, incorporating repeated treatment with albendazole (400 mg) or placebo at three monthly intervals. Household characteristic data, anthropometry, the presence of intestinal helminth and Plasmodium spp infections, and the incidence of malaria episodes are recorded. In vitro cultures of whole blood, stimulated with a number of antigens, mitogens and toll like receptor ligands provide relevant immunological parameters at baseline and following 1 and 2 years of treatment rounds. The primary outcome of the study is the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax infection. The secondary outcome will be incidence and severity of malaria episodes detected via both passive and active follow-up. The tertiary outcome is the inflammatory cytokine profile in response to parasite antigens. The project also facilitates the transfer of state of the art methodologies and technologies, molecular diagnosis of parasitic diseases, immunology and epidemiology from Europe to Indonesia. Discussion The study will provide data on the effect of helminth infections on malaria. It will also give information on anthelminthic treatment efficacy and effectiveness and could help develop evidence-based policymaking. Trial registration This study was approved by The Ethical Committee of Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, ref:194/PT02.FK/Etik/2006 and has been filed by ethics committee of the Leiden University Medical Center. Clinical trial number:ISRCTN83830814. The study is reported in accordance with the CONSORT guidelines for cluster-randomized studies. PMID:20338054

  12. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  13. 26 CFR 1.170A-9 - Definition of section 170(b)(1)(A) organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... biological, social and behavioral sciences. Such disciplines include chemistry (biochemistry, physical chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, etc.), behavioral sciences (psychiatry, physiological psychology..., toxicology, genetics, pathology, physiology, microbiology, parasitology, endocrinology, bacteriology,...

  14. 26 CFR 1.170A-9 - Definition of section 170(b)(1)(A) organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... biological, social and behavioral sciences. Such disciplines include chemistry (biochemistry, physical chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, etc.), behavioral sciences (psychiatry, physiological psychology..., toxicology, genetics, pathology, physiology, microbiology, parasitology, endocrinology, bacteriology,...

  15. 26 CFR 1.170A-9 - Definition of section 170(b)(1)(A) organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... biological, social and behavioral sciences. Such disciplines include chemistry (biochemistry, physical chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, etc.), behavioral sciences (psychiatry, physiological psychology..., toxicology, genetics, pathology, physiology, microbiology, parasitology, endocrinology, bacteriology,...

  16. COCCIDIAN PARASITES (APICOMPLEXA: EUCOCCIDORIDA) IN HARDY HEAD FISH, ATHERINOMORUS CAPRICORNENSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Authors describe coccidian merozoites (asexual stages) in theexocrine pancreas and oocysts in the gut epithelium of hardy heads,(Woodland) (family Atherinidae) collected at Heron Island, Queensland, Australia, during the pre-ICOPA (International Congress of Parasitology) workshop...

  17. EPIFLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPY AND SOLID PHASE CYTOMETRY AS CONFIRMATORY METHODS FOR THE ENUMERATION OF PROTOZOA BY FLOW CYTOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detection of infective protozoan parasites contained in large volume environmental samples represents a unique challenge in environmental parasitology. Compounding this problem is the fact that infective stages of many protozoan parasites do not readily replicate in media or ...

  18. Introduction to symposium: Arthropods and wildlife conservation: synergy in complex biological systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The symposium will discuss the effects of arthropods and other stressors on wildlife conservation programs. Speakers with affiliations in wildlife biology, parasitology and entomology will be included in the program. Research of national and international interest will be presented....

  19. [Serum filariasis due to Loa loa and Mansonella perstans in the continental area of equatorial Guinea. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Vila Montlleo, R

    1990-01-01

    For the first time, a parasitologic survey has been carried out in the Niefang District (continental area of equatorial Guinea) within a sample of 829 people aged of more than 10 years. Parasitologic incidence was 27.1 p.c. for Loa-Loa and 66.3 p.c. for Mansonella perstans. Significant differences were noted in the prevalence and in the mean density of microfilariae of both species according to the altitude of the villages surveyed. PMID:2077317

  20. 25 years of African trypanosome research: From description to molecular dissection and new drug discovery☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Parasitology conference was first held at the Marine Biological laboratory, Woods Hole, USA 25 years ago. Since that first meeting, the conference has evolved and expanded but has remained the showcase for the latest research developments in molecular parasitology. In this perspective, I reflect on the scientific discoveries focussed on African trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei spp.) that have occurred since the inaugural MPM meeting and discuss the current and future status of research on these parasites. PMID:25736427

  1. Impact of Indoor Residual Spraying of Lambda-Cyhalothrin on Malaria Prevalence and Anemia in an Epidemic-Prone District of Muleba, North-Western Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mashauri, Fabian M.; Kinung'hi, Safari M.; Kaatano, Godfrey M.; Magesa, Stephen M.; Kishamawe, Coleman; Mwanga, Joseph R.; Nnko, Soori E.; Malima, Robert C.; Mero, Chacha N.; Mboera, Leonard E. G.

    2013-01-01

    The Government of Tanzania introduced indoor residual spraying (IRS) in Muleba district in north-western Tanzania after frequent malaria epidemics. Malaria parasitological baseline and two cross-sectional follow-up surveys were conducted in villages under the IRS program and those not under IRS to assess the impact of IRS intervention. After two rounds of IRS intervention there was a significant reduction of malaria parasitological indices in both two villages. In IRS villages overall, parasitemia prevalence was reduced by 67.2%, splenomegaly was reduced by 75.8%, whereas anemia was reduced by 50.5%. There was also a decline of malaria parasite density from 896.4 at baseline to 128.8 at second follow-up survey. Similarly, there was also a reduction of malaria parasitological indices in non-IRS villages; however, parasitological indices in IRS villages remained far below the levels in non-IRS villages. The reduction of malaria parasitological indices in non-IRS villages might have been contributed by interventions other than IRS. PMID:23458959

  2. Immunodiagnosis of fascioliasis using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Fasciola gigantica paramyosin antigen

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Elhakam, Hany Mohamed Adel; Bauomy, Ibraheem Rabia; El Deeb, Somaya Osman; El Amir, Azza Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many immunological techniques have been developed over years using the different Fasciola antigens for diagnosis of parasitic infection and to replace the parasitological techniques, which are time consuming and usually lack sensitivity and reproducibility. Materials and Methods: In this study, Fasciola gigantica paramyosin (Pmy) antigen was early detected in cattle sera using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), to evaluate the Pmy antigen performance in diagnosis. This work was conducted on 135 cattle blood samples, which were classified according to parasitological investigation into, healthy control (30), fascioliasis (75), and other parasites (30) groups. Results: The sensitivity of Sandwich ELISA was 97.33%, and the specificity was 95%, in comparison with parasitological examination, which recorded 66.66% sensitivity and 100% specificity, respectively. Conclusions: It was clear that the native F. gigantica Pmy is considered as a powerful antigen in early immunodiagnosis of fascioliasis, using a highly sensitive and specific sandwich ELISA technique. PMID:23961441

  3. The potential of latent class analysis in diagnostic test validation for canine Leishmania infantum infection.

    PubMed Central

    Boelaert, M.; Aoun, K.; Liinev, J.; Goetghebeur, E.; Van der Stuyft, P.

    1999-01-01

    Accuracy assessment of diagnostic tests may be seriously biased if an imperfect reference test is used such as parasitology in the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. We compared classical validity analysis of serological tests for Leishmania infantum with Latent Class Analysis (LCA), to assess whether it circumvented the gold standard problem. Clinical status, three serological tests (IFAT, ELISA and DAT) and parasitological data were recorded for 151 dogs captured in an endemic area. Sensitivity and specificity estimates from the 2x2 contingency tables were broadly corroborated by LCA, but the latter method provided more precise estimates that were robust for the different fitted models. It furthermore yielded a higher prevalence of infection and indicated that parasitology was only 55% sensitive. LCA seems a promising technique for test validation, but caution is required when applying it to sparse data sets. The feasibility and applicability of LCA in infectious disease epidemiology is discussed. PMID:10694163

  4. Developing novel strategies to prevent parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Staines, Henry M; Croft, Simon L; Horrocks, Paul D

    2011-07-01

    The 49th Annual Spring Meeting of the British Society of Parasitology was held at Nottingham University, UK, on 11-14 April 2011. Although a meeting of a national parasitological society, the meeting attracted approximately 375 delegates from 30 countries worldwide. Of the various themes at this meeting, two were focused on the biology, etiology and development of therapeutics for the parasitic diseases; malaria and schistosomiasis. Here we report on three aspects of this meeting that are focused on the development of novel therapeutics to address the significant health burden imposed by these tropical diseases. PMID:21810050

  5. [Outstanding Soviet zoologist and parasitologist E. N. Pavlovsky--the creator of the theory of natural foci of disease].

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky?, L N

    2011-01-01

    The article presents information on the outstanding Soviet Zoology and Parasitology, Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Hero of Socialist Labour, Lieutenant-General of the Medical Service E. N. Pavlovsky, the author of more than 1500 scientific papers, the founder of scientific school, one of the few scholars the twentieth century, approaching the level of scientists and encyclopedists. Considered its contribution to the study of natural foci of diseases has promoted the development of environmental trends in parasitology. PMID:22606908

  6. Long-term follow-up of a patient since the acute phase of Chagas disease (South American trypanosomiasis): further treatment and cure of the infection.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Dias, Emmanuel; Nóbrega, Genard Carneiro da Cunha

    2015-10-01

    A woman had been followed since 1957 for acute phase Chagas disease. Parasitological and serological tests were positive, and treatment included benznidazole in 1974. Following treatment, parasitological test results were negative and conventional serology remained positive until 1994, with subsequent discordant results (1995-1997). The results became consistently negative since 1999. She had an indeterminate chronic form until 1974. Only two minor and transitory nonspecific alterations on electrocardiogram were noted, with the last nine records normal until June 2014. This case confirms the possibility of curing chronic disease and suggests the benefit of specific treatments for preventing long-term morbidity. PMID:26516979

  7. [Medical treatment of schistosomiasis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Barabe, P; De Lajudie, J P; Perrot, J P

    1980-01-01

    After a brief reassessment of the pathogenic problem, the authors review the presently available drugs and their respective dosage and side-effects. Then they consider each of the four parasitological types of schistosomiasis and indicate the most active treatment. PMID:7402062

  8. Antimony to Cure Visceral Leishmaniasis Unresponsive to Liposomal Amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Morizot, Gloria; Jouffroy, Romain; Faye, Albert; Chabert, Paul; Belhouari, Katia; Calin, Ruxandra; Charlier, Caroline; Miailhes, Patrick; Siriez, Jean-Yves; Mouri, Oussama; Yera, Hélène; Gilquin, Jacques; Tubiana, Roland; Lanternier, Fanny; Mamzer, Marie-France; Legendre, Christophe; Peyramond, Dominique; Caumes, Eric; Lortholary, Olivier; Buffet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report on 4 patients (1 immunocompetent, 3 immunosuppressed) in whom visceral leishmaniasis had become unresponsive to (or had relapsed after) treatment with appropriate doses of liposomal amphotericin B. Under close follow-up, full courses of pentavalent antimony were administered without life-threatening adverse events and resulted in rapid and sustained clinical and parasitological cure. PMID:26735920

  9. Artesunate/Amodiaquine Malaria Treatment for Equatorial Guinea (Central Africa)

    PubMed Central

    Charle, Pilar; Berzosa, Pedro; de Lucio, Aida; Raso, José; Nseng Nchama, Gloria; Benito, Agustín

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combination artesunate (AS)/amodiaquine (AQ) therapy, and 2) to determine the difference between recrudescence and resistance. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted in Equatorial Guinea. A total of 122 children 6–59 months of age from two regional hospitals were randomized and subjected to a 28-day clinical and parasitological follow-up. A blood sample on Whatman paper was taken on Days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 or on any day in cases of treatment failure, with the parasite DNA then being extracted for molecular analysis purposes. A total of 4 children were excluded, and 9 cases were lost to follow-up. There were 17 cases of late parasitological failure, 3 cases of late clinical failure, and 89 cases of adequate clinical and parasitological response. The parasitological failure rate was 18.3% (20 of 109) and the success rate 81.70% (95% confidence interval [72.5–87.9%]). After molecular correction, real treatment efficacy stood at 97.3%. Our study showed the good efficacy of combination AS/AQ therapy. This finding enabled this treatment to be recommended to Equatorial Guinea's National Malaria Control Program to change the official treatment policy as of March 2008. PMID:23530078

  10. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  11. Infection in the Classroom: Parasites as Models to Teach Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seville, R. Scott; Couch, Lee; Seed, Richard; Chappell, Cynthia; Patton, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    The American Society of Parasitologists established a five-year plan to educate various groups about parasites and parasitology, which were targeted at K-12 students and teachers, college students and teachers and biologists in other disciplines. This program also developed the idea to host a symposium and workshop for these targeted groups.

  12. Use of Case Studies for Stimulating Thinking and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    Noting that a case-study approach can stimulate student thinking and learning, this paper describes how students in a writing-intensive course on parasitology wrote brief medical case studies of parasites already studied for other students to read, evaluate, and identify the parasite. The paper presents a brief description of the course, an…

  13. Intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV in Cryptosporidium parvum correlate with fecundity of the parasite in dairy calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous reports have cited differences in clinical signs and oocyst output among strains of Cryptosporidium parvum. The purpose of this study was to determine if levels of the C. parvum intracellular viral symbiont CPV correlated with observed clinical and parasitological differences. Calves infe...

  14. Anti-cattle tick vaccines: Many candidate antigens, but will a commercially viable product emerge?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an invited paper from the editor-in-chief of International Journal for Parasitology who requested a Current Opinion manuscript to discuss the status of anti-cattle tick vaccine research. Arguably the world's most significant arthropod pest of cattle, control of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus...

  15. Antimony to Cure Visceral Leishmaniasis Unresponsive to Liposomal Amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    Morizot, Gloria; Jouffroy, Romain; Faye, Albert; Chabert, Paul; Belhouari, Katia; Calin, Ruxandra; Charlier, Caroline; Miailhes, Patrick; Siriez, Jean-Yves; Mouri, Oussama; Yera, Hélène; Gilquin, Jacques; Tubiana, Roland; Lanternier, Fanny; Mamzer, Marie-France; Legendre, Christophe; Peyramond, Dominique; Caumes, Eric; Lortholary, Olivier; Buffet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report on 4 patients (1 immunocompetent, 3 immunosuppressed) in whom visceral leishmaniasis had become unresponsive to (or had relapsed after) treatment with appropriate doses of liposomal amphotericin B. Under close follow-up, full courses of pentavalent antimony were administered without life-threatening adverse events and resulted in rapid and sustained clinical and parasitological cure. PMID:26735920

  16. Acute Chagas disease in El Salvador 2000-2012 - Need for surveillance and control

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Emi; de Aguilar, Ana Vilma Guevara; de Ramírez, Marta Alicia Hernández; Chévez, José Eduardo Romero; Nakagawa, Jun; Cedillos, Rafael Antonio; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Several parasitological studies carried out in El Salvador between 2000-2012 showed a higher frequency of acute cases of Chagas disease than that in other Central American countries. There is an urgent need for improved Chagas disease surveillance and vector control programs in the provinces where acute Chagas disease occurs and throughout El Salvador as a whole. PMID:24676660

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF CANINE VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS IN A PREVIOUSLY UNAFFECTED AREA BY CONVENTIONAL DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES AND CELL-BLOCK FIXATION.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Tuanne Rotti; Madeira, Maria de Fátima; Silva, Denise Amaro da; Perié, Carolina Dos Santos F S; V Mendes Júnior, Artur Augusto; Menezes, Rodrigo Caldas; Silva, Valmir Laurentino; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges

    2016-01-01

    After the report of a second case of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) in São Bento da Lagoa, Itaipuaçu, in the municipality of Maricá, Rio de Janeiro State, an epidemiological survey was carried out, through active search, totaling 145 dogs. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and rapid chromatographic immunoassay based on dual-path platform (DPP(r)) were used to perform the serological examinations. The parasitological diagnosis of cutaneous fragments was performed by parasitological culture, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. In the serological assessment, 21 dogs were seropositive by IFA, 17 by ELISA, and 11 by DPP(r), with sensitivity of 66.7%, 66.7% and 50%, and specificity of 87.2%, 90.2% and 94%, respectively for each technique. The immunohistochemistry of bone marrow using the cell-block technique presented the best results, with six positive dogs found, three of which tested negative by the other parasitological techniques. Leishmania sp. was isolated by parasitological culture in three dogs. The detection of autochthonous Leishmania infantum in Itaipuaçu, and the high prevalence of seropositive dogs confirm the circulation of this parasite in the study area and alert for the risk of expansion in the State of Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26910449

  18. Information on Vinchucas and Chagas disease.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenone, H.

    1981-12-01

    Following a significant increase in the number of vinchucas observed at La Silla during the last summer, the Director-General of ESO asked Prof. Hugo Schenone, Director of the Department of Microbiology and Parasitology of the University of Chile to pay a visit to La Silla to investigate the situation. The following gives a summary of the resulting report.

  19. ARCTIC BIODIVERSITY: FROM DISCOVERY TO FAUNAL BASELINES-REVEALING THE HISTORY OF A DYNAMIC ECOSYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of parasite biodiversity contributes to new and exciting approaches to understand the structure, history and future of the Arctic fauna. As a discovery- based process the Beringian Coevolution Project and activities under the umbrella of the Research Group for Arctic Parasitology serve as...

  20. Human infection with Bertiella studeri in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Bhaibulaya, M

    1985-09-01

    Bertiella studeri infection in a-26-year old Thai female was reported from Thailand. The intermittent diarrhoea and evacuation of a segment of the tapeworm brought the patient to the hospital. The parasitological description of the tapeworm specimen is reported. PMID:4095614

  1. Bayesian geostatistics in health cartography: the perspective of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anand P.; Gething, Peter W.; Piel, Frédéric B.; Hay, Simon I.

    2011-01-01

    Maps of parasite prevalences and other aspects of infectious diseases that vary in space are widely used in parasitology. However, spatial parasitological datasets rarely, if ever, have sufficient coverage to allow exact determination of such maps. Bayesian geostatistics (BG) is a method for finding a large sample of maps that can explain a dataset, in which maps that do a better job of explaining the data are more likely to be represented. This sample represents the knowledge that the analyst has gained from the data about the unknown true map. BG provides a conceptually simple way to convert these samples to predictions of features of the unknown map, for example regional averages. These predictions account for each map in the sample, yielding an appropriate level of predictive precision. PMID:21420361

  2. Occurrence of cymothoid isopod from Miri, East Malaysian marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Anand Kumar, A; Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Priya, E Rethna; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Leng, Alex Goh Kwang

    2015-06-01

    To identify the isopod parasite, which has been recorded from Miri, East Malaysian marine fishes. During the present study, four cymothoid isopods are reported three genera, including Cymothoa eremita, Lobothorax typus, Nerocila longispina and Nerocila loveni. Nerocila longispina and N. loveni are also previously reported from Malaysia and two additional cymothoids C. eremita and L. typus are reported for the first record of Miri coast, East Malaysia. New hosts were identified for N. loveni on Chirocentrus dorab for the first time in the world fauna. The Parasitological indexes were calculated. The site of attachment of the parasites on their hosts was also observed. These parasites can cause the damage in gill, eye and internal organ including swim bladder. Marine fish parasitology is a rapidly developing field of aquatic science. PMID:26064001

  3. Hematological and plasma biochemistry of the adult wild African grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus).

    PubMed

    Opara, Maxwell N; Fagbemi, Benjamin O

    2008-12-01

    Hematological and plasma biochemical values of wild grasscutters were evaluated to determine their potential to transmit zoonotic pathogens. Three 5-mL blood samples were collected from each of 1000 grasscutters caught in the wild for hematology, biochemical, and parasitological tests. Hematological and biochemical values were compared with those from captive-reared grasscutters. There are significantly (P < 0.05) higher lymphocyte, eosinophil, and basophil values for wild grasscutters compared to those that are captive reared. Parasitological examination revealed a 15% prevalence of blood protozoa in the wild grasscutters. Blood pathogens encountered were Trypanosoma sp. (66.7%) and Plasmodium sp. (33.3%), with 20.7% mixed infection. Sex does not significantly (P > 0.05) affect blood protozoa infection, while season does. We therefore concluded that wild grasscutters serve as efficient reservoir hosts for agents of African trypanosomiasis and malaria in the tropical humid rainforest region of Nigeria. PMID:19120259

  4. Parasite-host interactions of bat flies (Diptera: Hippoboscoidea) in Brazilian tropical dry forests.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Pedro Fonseca; Falcão, Luiz Alberto Dolabela; Graciolli, Gustavo; Borges, Magno Augusto Zazá

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the parasitology of ectoparasitic bat flies are scarce, and they are needed to identify patterns in parasitism. Hence, in the present study, we assessed community composition, prevalence, average infestation intensity, and specificity in the fly-bat associations in Brazilian tropical dry forests. In order to do that, we used the parasitological indices known as prevalence and average infestation intensity, along with an index of host specificity. We collected 1098 bat flies of 38 species. Five of the associations found are new to Brazil, 9 are new to southeastern Brazil, and 10 are new to science. Average infestation intensity varied from 1 to 9 and prevalence 0 to 100 %. In terms of specificity, 76 % of the bat flies were associated to a single host (monoxenic). These results highlight the low capacity of bat flies to survive on a not usual host especially due to an immunological incompatibility between parasites and hosts and dispersal barriers. PMID:26475479

  5. Isospora belli in a patient with liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Usluca, Selma; Inceboz, Tonay; Unek, Tarkan; Aksoy, Umit

    2012-01-01

    Isospora belli is an opportunistic protozoon which should be monitored in patients with gastrointestinal complaints such as abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhoea, in both immune-compromised and immune-competent patients. Our case was a 35 year-old male patient who had received a liver transplant because of cirrhosis and hepatic fibrosis. A diarrhoeic stool sample of the patient was sent to the laboratory for microbiological and parasitological analyses. Faecal occult blood was positive and bacteriological analysis was negative. Isospora belli infection was diagnosed by detection of the oocysts in stool samples. Per oral trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole treatment was given in 500 mg bid dose for 10 days. At the end of the treatment, no oocyst of Isospora belli was seen but non-pathogenic cysts of Entamoeba coli and vacuolar forms of Blastocystis hominis were observed. Two months later the patient had abdominal pain, fatigue and diarrhoea again and parasitological re-evaluation showed oocysts of Isospora belli. PMID:23339948

  6. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  7. First report of Polyplax sp. in a Persian squirrel (Scuirus anomalus) in Tabriz, Northwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Shahrokh; Bahadori, Farhad; Mostafaei, Tayebeh-Sadat; Ronaghi, Hooman

    2013-01-01

    The Persian squirrel (Scuirus anomalus) has a long furry tail, which is longer than half of the body, and lives in the Zagros forest. It is distributed in the west and northeast of Asia. In the summer 2011 a Persian squirrel with signs of hair loss and itch in head and tail was referred to the veterinary clinic. There were arthropods in the lesion in the first survey. Many of these parasites were collected and were sent to Parasitology Laboratory of Science and Research University in Tehran. Samples were processed and were identified according to lices diagnostic keys using a light microscope. Lice that were sent to the national parasitology museum were identified as Polyplax sp. too. PMID:24412876

  8. [The Guido Casini Fund].

    PubMed

    Bettini Prosperi, M

    1998-01-01

    The Parasitology Institute of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" keeps documents from the Societa per gli Studi della Malaria, from the Istituto Superiore di Malariologia Ettore Marchiafava and from the Ente Regionale per la Lotta Antianofelica in Sardegna (Erlaas). The papers arrived in the private Archive of Guido Casini, malariologist and secretary of the Istituto Marchiafava, who involved himself in many activities performed by those Bureaux and who recently gave the documentary sources as a donation to the Parasitology Institute. The intervention of reorganization and inventory of the Guido Casini Fund is in its final phase; it will allow to reconstruct the institutional events of these Bureaux and to point out their important sanitary, scientific and political contribution in Italy and abroad. PMID:11623695

  9. Current clinical efficacy of chloroquine for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections in urban Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania.

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Z.; Makwaya, C.; Minjas, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    Reported is the use of a 14-day WHO protocol, which takes into account the clinical, parasitological and haematological responses to antimalarial drugs, to determine the efficacy of chloroquine in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in young children (n = 200) in urban Dar es Salaam. Chloroquine failure was found in 43% of the children. Of these, 12.5% were considered to be early treatment failures and were given a single dose of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Fever subsided in all children treated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and there were no parasitological failures. In addition, children treated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine because of early treatment failure with chloroquine had better haematological recovery than the chloroquine-sensitive group. It is concluded that chloroquine can no longer be considered an effective therapy for P. falciparum malaria in young children in Dar es Salaam. PMID:10534897

  10. First record of trypanosomes from the blood of sculpins (Cottus ricei and C. cognatus) from Lake Superior, WI, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pronina, Svetlana V.; Pronin, Nikolai M.; Selgeby, Jim H.

    1999-01-01

    During parasitological research of fishes in Lake Superior (USA) in August-September 1994, infection with trypanosomes of the blood of sculpins (Cottus ricei and C. cognatus) was recorded for the first time. The descriptions of three morphological groups of the genus Trypanosoma: T. sp. I, found in blood of C. ricei, T. sp. II and T. sp. III from blood of C. cognatus, have been provided.

  11. Pterygodermatites ( Multipectines) pluripectinata n. sp. (Spirurida: Rictulariidae), a nematode parasite of the crab-eating fox Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1766) from Caatinga shrubland, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lux Hoppe, E G; Araújo de Lima, R C; Tebaldi, J H; Nascimento, A A

    2010-09-01

    In a parasitological survey of free-ranging Cerdocyon thous (Carnivora: Canidae) from Brazilian Caatinga shrubland, a new species of Pterygodermatites (Multipectines) was recovered from the small intestine of this host. Morphological analysis showed that P. (Multipectines) pluripectinata n. sp. is distinguished from all other congeneric species mainly by the numerous plate-like projections and male caudal morphology and spicular length. There are few records on the occurrence of this genus in Neotropical regions. PMID:20056009

  12. A preliminary survey of parasitic infections and nutritional status among school children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M M; el Hady, H M

    1989-06-01

    A total of 320 school children in the Model Institute of the Capital in Riyadh, were clinically and parasitologically examined. Thirty-five (10.94%) had intestinal parasites. Entamoeba coli (61.91%) was found more frequently among the commensals, while Giardia lamblia (28.57%) was the most common pathogenic parasite. All urines were parasite free. The low infection rate with Gardia could be explained by the good physical and nutritional status and better sanitary and living conditions. PMID:2708849

  13. [A case of coinfection by Balantidium coli and HIV in French Guiana].

    PubMed

    Clyti, E; Aznar, C; Couppie, P; el Guedj, M; Carme, B; Pradinaud, R

    1998-01-01

    A case of balantidial dysentery is reported in a patient infected with the HIV in French Guiana. This case is the first described in medical literature. The patient presented also a disseminated histoplasmosis. Immunosuppression probably favoured the evolution of asymptomatic carriage to clinical dysentery. This clinical case did not present any complications. Treatment with doxycycline had to be carried out for 20 days in order to obtain a clinical and parasitological cure. PMID:9846223

  14. [Spirocamallanus hilarii (Nematoda, Camallanidae) fresh water fishes parasite from the dam of Termas de Río Hondo, Santiago del Estero, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ramallo, G

    1997-01-01

    Spirocamallanus hilarii (Nematoda, Camallanidae) is cited parasitizing five fresh water fish species: Salminus maxillosus Leporinus obtusidens, Hoplias malabaricus malabaricus, Oligosarcus jenynsii and Pimelodus albicans, captured in Termas de Río Hondo pond, province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina. Morphologic and morphometric parasitological studies were done. The specimens described were drawned and photographed. In addition, the following parasitic infection indexes were calculated: Prevalence 26.5%, Mean 6.6 and Maximum Intensity 27. PMID:9640682

  15. Zoonotic diseases in Canada: an interdisciplinary challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J

    1996-01-01

    Although zoonotic diseases are generally rare in Canada, a wide range of pathogens can be transmitted from animal reservoirs to humans through insect vectors or direct contact with wild and domestic animals. Across the country researchers with backgrounds ranging from wildlife biology to parasitology and epidemiology are tracking a variety of zoonotic diseases, some of which are causing increasing concern among public health officials. PMID:8752067

  16. Treatment of Dientamoeba fragilis infection with paromomycin.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Olivier; Souayah, Hichem; Mouchet, Françoise; Dediste, Anne; van Gool, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with paromomycin (25-35 mg/kg/d for 7 days) was evaluated prospectively in 15 children with Dientamoeba fragilis infection after 1-month follow-up. At the end of the study, parasitologic effectiveness and clinical improvement were observed in 12/15 (80%) and 13/15 (87%) patients, respectively. Paromomycin appears to be an effective drug for treatment of D. fragilis infection in children. PMID:17195717

  17. Application and evaluation of a molecular approach for detection of the schistosomicidal effect of Mirazid® (myrrh) in the murine model

    PubMed Central

    Lotfy, Wael M.; Nageh, Aly M.; Hussein, Neveen A.; Hassan, Ashraf A.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional PCR technique was used for studying the schistosomicidal effect of Mirazid® in the murine model. Results of the molecular study were compared with the parasitological results (ova and worm count). The used PCR technique was more sensitive than the Kato-Katz thick smears. Mirazid® showed some schistosomicidal effects against murine Schistosoma mansoni. However, it was not efficient enough to cure any of the studied mice. PMID:25685466

  18. [Helminths of Falco peregrinus Tunstall, 1771 from Szczecin area].

    PubMed

    Kalisińska, Elzbieta; Kavetska, Katarzyna M; Okulewicz, Anna; Sitko, Jiljí

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, an emaciated female peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus was found near its nest, and died soon after. Parasitological research involved digestive tract and respiratory system, kidney and liver. In air sacs, nematode Serratospiculum tendo (Nitzsch, 1857), which causes the falcon disease serratospiculiasis, was found, and in the digestive tract trematodes Strigeafalconis Szidat, 1928, Conodiplostomum spathula (Creplin, 1829), and a cestode Cladotaenia cylindracea (Bloch, 1782). PMID:18702320

  19. Pathological lesions in European bison (Bison bonasus) with infestation by Ashworthius sidemi (Nematoda, Trichostrongylidae).

    PubMed

    Osi?ska, B; Demiaszkiewicz, A W; Lachowicz, J

    2010-01-01

    Asworthius sidemi Schulz, 1933 is a blood sucking gastrointestinal nematode, primarily typical for Asiatic deer. It was found for the first time in Poland in European bison in 1997. To estimate the level of invasion of A. sidemi and histopathological changes connected with the presence of the parasite in the years 2004-2007 parasitological and histopathological examinations of 54 European bison from Bia?owieza Forest were carried out. Parasitological examination was carried out by the sedimentation method and A. sidemi were diagnosed under a binocular microscope. Samples for histological examination were collected from the abomasum and duodenum walls as well as from regional lymph nodes. Tissue samples were then fixed with 10% buffered formalin, embedded in paraffin, cut in to 5 microm thick sections and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Parasitological examinations showed the presence of fourth stage larvae and juvenile forms of A. sidemi. The maximal intensity of invasion rose systematically from 4470 A. sidemi nematodes in 2004/2005 to 44310 in 2006/2007. Histopathological examinations showed infiltrations of inflammatory cells in the walls of abomasa and duodena at various levels of intensity (mainly lymphoid cells and eosinophils), hyperemiae, oedemae and lesions of mucosa and proliferation of lymphatic follicles. In individual cases of dysplasia of epithelial cells, atrophy or hyperplasia of glands and the presence of parasites in the lumen or walls of the abomasum/duodenum were observed. In one case, parasitic nodules were found. In regional lymph nodes proliferation of lymphatic follicles, presence of eosinophils and desolation of reproduction centers were observed. Intensification of histopathological changes was connected to a considerable degree with the developmental stage of A. sidemi as shown by parasitological examination. PMID:21077432

  20. Sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine in Nigerian children.

    PubMed Central

    Ekanem, O. J.; Weisfeld, J. S.; Salako, L. A.; Nahlen, B. L.; Ezedinachi, E. N.; Walker, O.; Breman, J. G.; Laoye, O. J.; Hedberg, K.

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine was evaluated in children under 5 years of age in two areas of southern Nigeria in 1987. A modification of the WHO Standard Field and Extended Tests (in vivo) was used, with follow-up on days, 2, 3, 7, and 14 after treatment with 25 mg chloroquine per kg body weight given over 3 days, or with standard doses of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. Clinical and parasitological evaluations were performed. At Igbo Ora, in Oyo State, where by day 7 chloroquine was clinically successful in 94.4% of 36 children and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine in 91.7% of 36 children, there were no parasitological failures in either treatment group. Fever regressed significantly more rapidly with chloroquine than with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. At Oban, in Cross River State, initial parasite densities decreased markedly with the chloroquine regimen but 63.6% of 44 children were parasitological failures on days 3, 7, or 14; and all of the 26 children who failed parasitologically and completed follow-up were successfully treated with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. By day 7, clinical success was demonstrated for 77.3% of the children treated with chloroquine. The in vitro sensitivity to chloroquine, quinine, and mefloquine at Igbo Ora indicated that isolates of P. falciparum were sensitive to chloroquine and quinine, but had reduced sensitivity to mefloquine. Because of its continued clinical efficacy, chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for children with uncomplicated malaria in Nigeria. Health providers are, however, encouraged to maintain supplies of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine as an alternative and to refer patients promptly if necessary. PMID:2189585

  1. Parasites of the mutton snapper Lutjanus analis (Perciformes: Lutjanidae) in Alagoas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Margarida; Carvalho, Bruno Ferreira Lyra; Cruz, Cristina; Saraiva, Aurélia

    2014-01-01

    A parasitological survey was carried out on a sample of sixty mutton snappers (Lutjanus analis) that were caught on the coast of Alagoas, northeastern Brazil. The parasite diversity and infection levels were low. The ectoparasite Rocinela signata Schioedte & Meinert, 1879 (Isopoda: Aegidae), and larvae of two endoparasites, Trypanorhyncha gen. sp. and Hysterothylacium sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae), were detected. The significance of these parasites is discussed in the context of their transmission pathways and potential impact. PMID:25054505

  2. Application of real-time PCR for the detection of Strongyloides spp. in clinical samples in a reference center in Spain.

    PubMed

    Saugar, José M; Merino, Francisco J; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Ortega, Sheila; Gárate, Teresa; Rodríguez, Esperanza

    2015-02-01

    Strongyloidiasis is one of the major intestinal helminthic infections in humans with a worldwide distribution, affecting especially tropical and subtropical regions. This disease can occur without any symptoms or as a potentially fatal hyperinfection or disseminated infection. Definitive diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection relies mainly on demonstration of larvae in stool, but at present there is no gold standard for this diagnosis. Our main objective was to evaluate a real-time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Strongyloides spp. and to compare it with routine parasitological methods. DNA from Strongyloides venezuelensis was used to optimize PCR protocols obtaining an analytical sensitivity of 0.1 pg of parasite DNA per sample. Sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR on fecal samples from 231 patients screened for suspected strongyloidiasis attending two hospitals in Madrid were 93.8% and 86.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found when comparing Ct-values of positive PCR between parasitological positive and negative samples. This study showed that real-time PCR is an effective tool for diagnosing strongyloidiasis and could be applied in association with parasitological methods in epidemiological studies in endemic areas. It would be also important to assess its performance in immunocompromised populations who are at risk of fatal disease. PMID:25447829

  3. A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of alternative treatment regimens for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in a multidrug-resistant falciparum area of Bangladesh--narrowing the options for the National Malaria Control Programme?

    PubMed

    Rahman, M R; Paul, D C; Rashid, M; Ghosh, A; Bangali, A M; Jalil, M A; Faiz, M A

    2001-01-01

    We performed an open, randomized chemotherapy trial comparing the recommended first-, second- and third-line drug regimens, as well as mefloquine, for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Bangladesh in 1996-97. The regimens were chloroquine for 3 days (CQ, Group I), quinine sulphate for 3 days followed by single-dose sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (Q3 + SP, Group II), quinine for 7 days (Q7, Group III), and mefloquine 20 mg/kg single dose (MEF, Group IV). Subjects were symptomatic patients, aged > or = 12 years, with parasite density 500-250,000/mm3 and no history of taking antimalarials during the previous week. Drug administration was supervised and subjects were followed clinically and with blood slides in the hospital for 8 days, then as outpatients on days 14, 21 and 28. A total of 413 subjects (149, 145, 49 and 70 in Groups I-IV, respectively) completed the study. Early treatment failures (persistent or worsening clinical manifestations by day 3 confirmed with parasitological examinations) occurred only in the chloroquine group. RII and RIII parasitological failures occurred in 56%, 12%, 8% and 14% in Group I-IV, respectively. There were significantly more clinical and parasitological failures with chloroquine than with Q3 + SP, which we now recommend as a better (but far from ideal) choice for first-line therapy. The alternative compounds show parasitogical evidence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance. Further studies are needed to determine the optimum treatment for malaria in Bangladesh. PMID:11816441

  4. Environmental Factors and Ecosystems Associated with Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Andréa Pereira; Costa, Francisco Borges; Soares, Herbert Sousa; Ramirez, Diego Garcia; de Carvalho Araújo, Andreina; da Silva Ferreira, Juliana Isabel Giuli; Tonhosolo, Renata; Dias, Ricardo Augusto; Gennari, Solange Maria; Marcili, Arlei

    2015-12-01

    Environment influences the composition, distribution, and behavior of the vectors and mammalian hosts involved in the transmission of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), affecting the epidemiology of the disease. In Brazil, the urbanization process and canine cases of VL are indicators for local health authorities. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of the canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) in Maranhão State, Brazil. Blood samples collected from 960 dogs from six municipalities and six different ecosystems (Baixada Maranhense, Mangue, Mata dos Cocais, Amazônia, Cerrado, and Restinga) to serological tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], indirect fluorescence antibody test [IFAT], and chromatographic immunoassay methods [Dual Path Platform technology, DPP(®)]) and parasitological diagnosis. From serological tests, 11.14% (107) of the dogs were positive for CVL, with 59.16% (568), 14.5% (148), and 131% (126) positives to ELISA, DPP, and IFAT tests, respectively. Only seven animals (0.73%) were positive in a parasitological test. We also performed parasite isolation and phylogenetic characterization. All isolates of dogs obtained from Maranhão were grouped in a single branch with Leishmania infantum chagasi from Brazil. The ecosystem Amazonia presented the highest positivity rates to CVL in serological and parasitological tests. Brazilian biomes/ecosystems suffer large degradation and may favor, depending on climatic conditions, the installation of new diseases. In the case of VL, dogs are reservoirs of parasites and sentinels for human infection. PMID:26684524

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Somalia.

    PubMed Central

    Warsame, M.; Abdillahi, A.; Duale, O. Nur; Ismail, A. Nur; Hassan, A. M.; Mohamed, A.; Warsame, A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum infections in Somalia. METHODS: Patients with clinical malaria in Merca, an area of high transmission of the disease, were treated with the standard regimens of chloroquine (25 mg/kg) or sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (25 mg sulfadoxine and 1.25 mg pyrimethamine per kg). Similar patients in Gabiley, an area of low transmission, received the standard regimen of chloroquine. The clinical and parasitological responses were monitored for 14 days. FINDINGS: Chloroquine treatment resulted in clinical failure in 33% (n = 60) and 51% (n = 49) of the patients in Merca and Gabiley respectively. There were corresponding parasitological failures of 77% RII/RIII and 35% RII/RIII. Patients who experienced clinical failure had significantly higher initial parasitaemia than those in whom there was an adequate clinical response, both in Merca (t = 2.2; P t = 2.8; P n = 50) of the patients achieved an adequate clinical response despite a parasitological failure rate of 76% RII/RIII. CONCLUSION: Chloroquine should no longer be considered adequate for treating clinical falciparum malaria in vulnerable groups in the areas studied. Doubts about the therapeutic life of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine in relation to malaria are raised by the high levels of resistance in the Merca area and underline the need to identify suitable alternatives. PMID:12378287

  6. Mebendazole compared with secnidazole in the treatment of adult giardiasis: a randomised, no-inferiority, open clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Pedro; Escobedo, Angel A; Ayala, Idalia; Alfonso, Maydel; Salazar, Yohana; Cañete, Roberto; Cimerman, Sergio; Galloso, Martha; Olivero, Ilmaems; Robaina, Maytee; Tornés, Karen

    2011-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of mebendazole and secnidazole in the treatment of giardiasis in adult patients, a single-centre, parallel group, open-label, randomized non-inferiority trial was carried out. One-hundred and 26 participants who had symptomatic Giardia mono-infection took part in the study. Direct wet mount and/or Ritchie concentration techniques and physical examinations were conducted at the time of enrolment and at the follow-up visit. The primary outcome measure was parasitological cure, performed at 3, 5, 10 days post-treatment. Negative faecal specimens for Giardia were ensured by the same parasitological techniques. At follow up (day 10) the parasitological cure rate for the per protocol populations was 88.7% (55/62) for MBZ and 91.8% (56/61) for SNZ. For the intention to treat populations the cure rate at the end of treatment was 85.9% (55/64) for MBZ and 90.3% (56/62) for SNZ. Both analyzes showed there was not significant statistical difference between MBZ and SNZ treatment efficacy. Both drugs were well tolerated, only mild, transient and self-limited side effects were reported and did not require discontinuation of treatment. A 3-day course of mebendazole seems to be as efficacious and safe for treatment of giardiasis as a single dose of secnidazole in adults. PMID:22174992

  7. Mebendazole Compared with Secnidazole in the Treatment of Adult Giardiasis: A Randomised, No-Inferiority, Open Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Pedro; Escobedo, Angel A.; Ayala, Idalia; Alfonso, Maydel; Salazar, Yohana; Cañete, Roberto; Cimerman, Sergio; Galloso, Martha; Olivero, Ilmaems; Robaina, Maytee; Tornés, Karen

    2011-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of mebendazole and secnidazole in the treatment of giardiasis in adult patients, a single-centre, parallel group, open-label, randomized non-inferiority trial was carried out. One-hundred and 26 participants who had symptomatic Giardia mono-infection took part in the study. Direct wet mount and/or Ritchie concentration techniques and physical examinations were conducted at the time of enrolment and at the follow-up visit. The primary outcome measure was parasitological cure, performed at 3, 5, 10 days post-treatment. Negative faecal specimens for Giardia were ensured by the same parasitological techniques. At follow up (day 10) the parasitological cure rate for the per protocol populations was 88.7% (55/62) for MBZ and 91.8% (56/61) for SNZ. For the intention to treat populations the cure rate at the end of treatment was 85.9% (55/64) for MBZ and 90.3% (56/62) for SNZ. Both analyzes showed there was not significant statistical difference between MBZ and SNZ treatment efficacy. Both drugs were well tolerated, only mild, transient and self-limited side effects were reported and did not require discontinuation of treatment. A 3-day course of mebendazole seems to be as efficacious and safe for treatment of giardiasis as a single dose of secnidazole in adults. PMID:22174992

  8. An explicit immunogenetic model of gastrointestinal nematode infection in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Prada Jiménez de Cisneros, Joaquín; Stear, Michael J.; Mair, Colette; Singleton, Darran; Stefan, Thorsten; Stear, Abigail; Marion, Glenn; Matthews, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are a global cause of disease and death in humans, wildlife and livestock. Livestock infection has historically been controlled with anthelmintic drugs, but the development of resistance means that alternative controls are needed. The most promising alternatives are vaccination, nutritional supplementation and selective breeding, all of which act by enhancing the immune response. Currently, control planning is hampered by reliance on the faecal egg count (FEC), which suffers from low accuracy and a nonlinear and indirect relationship with infection intensity and host immune responses. We address this gap by using extensive parasitological, immunological and genetic data on the sheep–Teladorsagia circumcincta interaction to create an immunologically explicit model of infection dynamics in a sheep flock that links host genetic variation with variation in the two key immune responses to predict the observed parasitological measures. Using our model, we show that the immune responses are highly heritable and by comparing selective breeding based on low FECs versus high plasma IgA responses, we show that the immune markers are a much improved measure of host resistance. In summary, we have created a model of host–parasite infections that explicitly captures the development of the adaptive immune response and show that by integrating genetic, immunological and parasitological understanding we can identify new immune-based markers for diagnosis and control. PMID:25121649

  9. [Professor Czes?aw Gerwel (MD)--100th anniversary of birthday].

    PubMed

    Kociecka, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    Professor Czes?aw Gerwel (1909-1974) physician and outstanding parasitologist set the base of clinical parasitology in Poland and organized first in Poland hospital ward for parasitic diseases in Poznan (1962) first affiliated with Chair of Biology and Parasitology at Medical School and later functioning as an independent clinical ward, which he headed until 1970. He initiated organization of District Parasitological Clinics by setting first such a clinic in Pozna?. He scientific work he focused on diagnostic problems as well as clinical pathology and treatment of parasitic diseases of gastrointestinal system. He participated in comprehensive studies of trichinosis. In 1941-1944 he was working in the National Institute of Hygiene in Warsaw, now National Institute of Public Health--PZH, which at that time operated under name "Das General gouvernerus Stattlichen Institut fur Hygiene in Warschau" in the section of typhus. He was involved in underground conspiracy of AK (Home Army) with pseudonym "Orlos" belonging to the group of people smuggling typhus vaccine produced in the PZH to Warsaw Ghetto and to underground troops. In 1942-1944 he studied medicine in Polish Underground University of Western Territories functioning in PZH under supervision of Feliks Przesmycki. PMID:20976963

  10. [Control of human African trypanosomiasis in Luba in equatorial Guinea:evaluation of three methods].

    PubMed

    Simarro, P P; Sima, F O; Mir, M; Mateo, M J; Roche, J

    1991-01-01

    The object of this study was to (a) reduce the prevalence of sleeping sickness by serological testing, parasitological examination, and treatment of every infected person; (b) determine the maximum acceptable interval between serological surveys; and (c) define the impact of vector control, using monopyramidal non-impregnated traps, on the transmission. For this sero-parasitological survey, the focus in Luba was divided into three zones as follows: Epicentre A (with high prevalence, 27.5%), Epicentre B (with average prevalence, 8.3%), and Peripheral C (with moderate prevalence, 3.0%). Differences in the prevalence rates in the Epicentres and Peripheral zone permitted the use of three different approaches for control and epidemiological follow-up of the disease: (1) Serological examination of the entire population was carried out by the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT), with six-month intervals in Epicentres A and B and once a year in the Peripheral zone C. (2) DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT: all IFAT seropositives were examined in Luba hospital for parasites, and every parasitologically confirmed patient was treated according to the WHO protocol of 1983. Another serological test (CATT) was applied to cases in which trypanosomes were not present and if this was positive, the CSF was examined. Cases with parasites and abnormal CSF were treated with melarsoprol, and those with a normal CSF received pentamidine. CATT-negative and parasite-negative cases were considered to be false-positives by IFAT and free of the disease. (3) Vector control: 74 monopyramidal traps (18 traps per km2) were set up in Epicentre A. The flies captured were collected once a month and sent to the programme's laboratory where they were identified and counted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1934239

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, amodiaquine and the sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-amodiaquine combination against uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in young children in Cameroon.

    PubMed Central

    Basco, Leonardo K.; Same-Ekobo, Albert; Ngane, Vincent Foumane; Ndounga, Mathieu; Metoh, Theresia; Ringwald, Pascal; Soula, Georges

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, amodiaquine, and the sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-amodiaquine combination for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in young children in Cameroon. METHODS: In a randomized study we evaluated the effectiveness and tolerance of (i) sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) (25 mg/kg body weight of sulfadoxine and 1.25 mg/kg of pyrimethamine in a single oral dose), (ii) amodiaquine (AQ) (30 mg/kg body weight in three divided daily doses), and (iii) the sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-amodiaquine combination (SP+AQ) (same doses as in the other two treatment groups, given simultaneously on day 0) in young children in southern Cameroon. The parasitological and clinical responses were studied until day 28 in accordance with the modified 1996 WHO protocol for the evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of antimalarial drugs. FINDINGS: Of 191 enrolled patients, 6 and 8 were excluded or lost to follow-up before day 14 and between day 14 and day 28, respectively. For the AQ-treated patients, parasitological and clinical evaluation on day 14 showed late treatment failure in 2 of 61 (3.3%) and adequate clinical response with parasitological failure in one (1.6%). There was an adequate clinical response in all patients treated with SP or SP+AQ. Therapeutic failure rates on day 28 were 13.6%, 10.2% and 0% in the SP, AQ, and SP+AQ groups, respectively. Anaemia improved in all three regimens. AQ produced faster fever clearance but was associated with more transient minor side-effects than SP. SP+AQ reduced the risk of recrudescence between day 14 and day 28 but increased the incidence of minor side-effects. CONCLUSION: SP+AQ can be recommended as a temporary means of slowing the spread of multidrug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum in Africa while the introduction of other combinations, including artemisinin derivatives, is awaited. PMID:12163917

  12. Funding options for research: facing the market as well as government.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G; Nossal, G

    1999-06-01

    Parasitology is a challenge. At one level, the structural and genetic complexities of parasites provide ample technical challenges in regard to an understanding of parasite variability and adaptability, epidemiological diversity, drug resistance, etc. The intricacies of host parasite relationships including the immunology of parasitism will continually surprise yet frustrate the vaccine developer and keep the bravest immunoparasitologist busy and creative for decades. As if the technical considerations were not challenging enough, we see difficulties arising in sustaining a research endeavour and preserving a critical mass of researchers through the generation of high-level, long-term funding support. Contributing to this situation is the fact that most parasitic diseases of major impact in humans are largely centred around the rural poor in tropical, less industrially-developed countries and therefore of little or of fickle interest to the strictly commercially oriented. Moreover, the focus in the rural industries has moved away from aspects of on-farm production with lower priority given to studies on even the 'economically-important' parasites of livestock. It is contended that this may change again with pressures and clear marketing advantages to preserving a 'clean and green' image for Australia's primary industries. Overall, the extraordinary technical and conceptual advances in recent times have been tempered by uncertainties in research funding and severe cuts from some traditional sources for both fundamental and strategic/applied research in Parasitology. Several have highlighted the fact that deliverables in terms of new methods of disease control have been sparse and some claims made in the past have certainly been exaggerated. Yet the prospects and achievements at the front end of the long R&D pathway have never been brighter. In this article we examine the merits of a 'portfolio approach' to generating research funds in Parasitology and Science and Technology in Australia more generally, with an emphasis on strategies that, through welding good science with clear, medium-term product objectives, increase research funding opportunities. PMID:10480719

  13. Predictive role of polymerase chain reaction in the early diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Elsa B; Rivero, Rocío; De Rissio, Ana María; Malagrino, Nora; Esteva, Mónica I; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Ruiz, Andrés Mariano

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of specific chemotherapy in congenital Chagas disease before the first year of life ranges between 90 and 100%. Between this age and 15 years of age, the efficacy decreases to around 60%. Therefore, early infection detection is a priority in vertical transmission. The aim of this work was to assess whether polymerase chain reaction (PCR) plays a predictive role in the diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease as compared to conventional parasitological and serological methods. To this end, we studied a total of 468 children born to Trypanosoma cruzi seroreactive mothers came from Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay, who lived in the city of Buenos Aires and suburban areas (Argentina), a non-endemic area of this country. These children were assessed by PCR from 2004 to 2009 with the specific primers Tcz1 and Tcz2, and 121 and 122. PCR allowed detecting 49 T. cruzi-positive children. Eight of these 49 children were excluded from the analysis: six because they did not complete follow-up and two because the first control was performed after 12 months of age. Parasitological methods allowed detecting 25 positive children, 7 of whom had been earlier diagnosed by PCR (1.53±2.00 vs. 6.71±1.46 months; p=0.0002). Serological methods allowed detecting 16 positive children, 12 of whom had been earlier diagnosed by PCR (1.46±1.48 vs. 11.77±4.40 months; p<0.0001). None of the children negative by PCR was positive by serological or parasitological methods. This study shows that PCR allows early diagnosis in congenital Chagas disease. At present, an early positive PCR is not indicative for treatment. However, a positive PCR would alert the health system to search only those infected infants diagnosed by early PCR and thus generate greater efficiency in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital T. cruzi infection. PMID:24892867

  14. Experimental evaluation of xenodiagnosis to detect trypanosomes at low parasitaemia levels in infected hosts

    PubMed Central

    Wombou Toukam, C.M.; Solano, P.; Bengaly, Z.; Jamonneau, V.; Bucheton, B.

    2011-01-01

    In Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT) endemic areas, there are a number of subjects that are positive to serological tests but in whom trypanosomes are difficult to detect with the available parasitological tests. In most cases and particularly in West Africa, these subjects remain untreated, thus posing a fundamental problem both at the individual level (because of a possible lethal evolution of the disease) and at the epidemiological level (since they are potential reservoirs of trypanosomes). Xenodiagnosis may constitute an alternative for this type of cases. The objective of this study was to update the use of xenodiagnosis to detect trypanosomes in infected host characterized by low parasitaemia levels. This was carried out experimentally by infecting cattle and pigs with Trypanosoma congolense and T. brucei gambiense respectively, and by feeding tsetse flies (Glossina morsitans submorsitans and G. palpalis gambiensis, from the CIRDES colonies) on these animals at a time when the observed blood parasitaemia were low or undetectable by the classical microscopic parasitological tests used for the monitoring of infected animals. Our results showed that: i) the G. p. gambiensis colony at CIRDES could not be infected with the T. b. gambiense stocks used; ii) midgut infections of G. m. submorsitans were observed with both T. congolense and T. b. gambiense; iii) xenodiagnosis remains positive even at very low blood parasitaemia for both T. congolense and T. b. gambiense; and iv) to implement T. b. gambiense xenodiagnosis, batches of 20 G. m. submorsitans should be dissected two days after the infective meal. These results constitute a first step toward a possible implementation of xenodiagnosis to better characterize the parasitological status of seropositive individuals and the modalities of parasite transmission in HAT foci. PMID:22091459

  15. Randomized Single-Blinded Non-inferiority Trial Of 7 mg/kg Pentamidine Isethionate Versus 4 mg/kg Pentamidine Isethionate for Cutaneous Leishmaniaisis in Suriname

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ricardo V. P. F.; Straetemans, Masja; Kent, Alida D.; Sabajo, Leslie O. A.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Lai A Fat, Rudy F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Standard treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Suriname entails three injections of pentamidine isethionate (PI) 4 mg/kg per injection in 7 days (7 day regimen). Compliance to treatment is low and may contribute to increasing therapy failure. A 3 day regimen, including 2 injections of 7 mg/kg in 3 days may increase compliance. Methods In a randomized, single-blinded non-inferiority trial conducted in Suriname, 84 CL patients received the 7 day regimen and 79 CL patients received the 3 day regimen. Primary objective was the proportion of patients clinically cured at 6 weeks follow-up. Secondary objectives were clinical cure at 12 weeks follow-up; parasitological cure at 6 and 12 weeks; adverse and drug related toxicity events recorded one week after the end of treatment and health related quality of life. The non-inferiority margin was set at 15%, 1 sided test, ? = 0.1. Results At 6 weeks follow-up 31 (39%) patients in the 3 day regimen and 41 (49%) patients in the 7 day regimen were clinically cured. Intention to treat (ITT) analyses showed that the difference in proportion clinically cured was -9.6% (90% Confidence Interval (CI): -22.3% to 3.2%). Per protocol (PP) analysis showed that the difference in proportion clinically cured was 0.2% (90% CI: -14.6% to 15.2%). ITT analysis showed that the difference in proportion parasitological cured at 6 weeks was -15.2% (90% CI:-28.0% to -2.5%). PP analyses showed similar results. Non-inferiority could not be concluded for all adverse and toxicological events. Conclusion We cannot conclude that the 3 day regimen is non-inferior to the 7 day regimen regarding proportion clinically and parasitological cured. Therefore there is no evidence to change the current standard practice of the 7 day regimen for the treatment of CL in Suriname. PMID:25793773

  16. Nomenclature for parasitic diseases: cohabitation with inconsistency for how long and why?

    PubMed

    Kassai, Tibor

    2006-06-15

    The author surveys the early history of nomenclature for parasitic diseases or infections which led to the existing usage of synonymous names with diverse spellings for denominating the same disease entities. In order to diminish heterogeneity in nomenclatural usage, principles of the standardized nomenclature of parasitic diseases (SNOPAD) have been put forward by the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology. Pros and cons regarding the SNOPAD concept are discussed in seeking consensus terminology. The need for a standard nomenclature may be judged differently. SNOPAD is just a guideline based on carefully reasoned and clearly defined principles for those authors and editors dissatisfied with the existing heterogeneous and inconsistent nomenclatural usage and wish to rely on a uniform and standard disease nomenclature. The major suggestion of SNOPAD is the use solely of suffix -osis when disease name is coined from the name of a parasite taxon. Meanwhile, the proposed principles were found sensible and accepted more in the field of veterinary, less in medical parasitology. In a recent survey it has been revealed that the majority (73.8%) of 126 national language parasitological textbooks or compendia from 21 countries of Europe published since 1990 adopted consistent '-osis' disease terminology and the rest (26.2%) used a mixture of disease names ending in '-osis' and '-iasis' inconsistently. For achieving substantial shift towards the use of more consistent disease terminology, the interest and support of the parasitologists' community is required. Editorials and database producers hold the key to further progress provided they see the advantages of the use of a single name of worldwide currency for each disease entity. PMID:16569483

  17. [Congenital Chagas disease in the city of Santa Fé. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Streiger, M; Fabbro, D; del Barco, M; Beltramino, R; Bovero, N

    1995-01-01

    We studied 6123 pregnant women and their 341 newborn (NB), from Santa Fe city, by the following serological tests for chagasic infection: Direct Agglutination with and without 2-mercaptoethanol, Indirect Hemagglutination and Indirect Immunofluorescence test, and by identification of parasites by Fresh drops, Strout and/or by Xenodiagnosis. The prevalence of seropositivity found in pregnant women was of 14.62% with a 73% of migratory history. The parasitological studies yielded 9/341 incidence of transplacentary infection. Clinical examinations were made in the infected newborn (NB). They were treated with Benznidazol or Nifurtimox, and post-treatment evolution was evaluated. We registered connatal infection in twin-brothers. Brothers/sisters (siblings) of infected NB were also studied. Some of them were seropositive and the others seronegative. Results here obtained show that this way of transmission is important, and should be considered even in low endemicity areas. The parasitological assays proved to be decisive for the NB infection diagnosis (Table 1). The serological assays enabled us to follow the non-infected NB up to their negativization. A 6 month follow-up is recommended. It is impossible to define only one clinical outline because both symptomatic and asymptomatic infected NB may be found with gestational age at term and pre-term and when born with a weight above or below 2000 g. We obtained parasitological and serological negativization in all cases. The chagasic pregnant woman does not necessarily transmit the infection to all her descendents. Only 2.64% are infected. It is possible to systematize the diagnosis without extra resources beyond the usual ones. PMID:7565049

  18. Evaluation of newly isolated probiotics in the protection against experimental intestinal trichinellosis.

    PubMed

    Temsahy, Mona M El; Ibrahim, Iman R; Mossallam, Shereen F; Mahrous, Hoda; Bary, Amany Abdel; Salam, Sara A Abdel

    2015-12-15

    The potential use of probiotics in controlling enteric infections has generated tremendous interest in the last decade. The protective efficacy of seven oral doses of two newly isolated Egyptian probiotic strains; Lactobacillus acidophilus P110 (L. acidophilus) and Lactobacillus plantarum P164 (L. plantarum) versus Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469 (L. casei) - against experimental intestinal trichinellosis - was assessed via parasitological, immunological and histopathological parameters, after verifying their in vivo safety and intestinal colonization. Parasitologically, the highest adult count reduction was observed in L. plantarum-fed infected sub-subgroup (56.98, 65.42 and 69.02%) - on the 5th, 12th and 17th days post infection (P.I.), respectively. Lesser percentage reductions were recorded in both the L. casei-fed infected sub-subgroup (36.19, 23.68 and 31.58%) and L. acidophilus-fed infected sub-subgroup (36.50, 11.8 and 7.61%) at the same intervals. On the 28th day post challenge, the highest larval count reduction was in L. plantarum-fed infected sub-subgroup (87.92%). While lower percentage yet still significant were observed in the L. casei-fed infected (74.88%) and L. acidophilus-fed infected sub-subgroups (60.98%). Immunologically, serum IFN-γ levels in the probiotic-fed non infected sub-subgroups were higher than those in the probiotic-fed infected sub-subgroups. Both showed higher levels of IFN-γ than the non probiotic-fed sub-subgroups. Histopathologically, intestinal sections of the probiotic-fed infected sub-subgroups showed amelioration of the inflammation and damage resulting from Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) infection. Results indicate that, through mechanical and immunological mechanisms, L. plantarum showed parasitological and histopathological protective superiority with respect to both L. casei and L. acidophilus against murineT. spiralis infection. PMID:26386829

  19. [Ulcerative colitis or amebic colitis--a case report].

    PubMed

    Koppatz, K; Wemmer, R; Schillat, I; Kühn, H G

    1990-01-01

    The large intestine reacts relatively monomorphically to different stimuli. From this differential-diagnostic problems may result. The history of a patient is described which could be pursued retrospectively and prospectively over 14 years and during the course of which the correction of the diagnosis ulcerous colitis into chronic relapsing amoebic colitis was necessary. As a conclusion is emphasized that in every symptomatology of colitis primarily bacterial and parasitologic examinations of the faeces should be brought about and it must be also thought of spontaneous amoebic infections in our country. PMID:2330735

  20. [ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL RISK FOR CONTAMINATION OF SURFACE WATER RESERVOIRS BY PATHOGENS OF HUMAN PARASITIC DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Khromenkova, E P; Dimidova, L L; Dumbadze, O S; Aidinov, G T; Shendo, G L; Agirov, A Kh; Batchaev, Kh Kh

    2015-01-01

    Sanitary and parasitological studies of the waste effluents and surface reservoir waters were conducted in the south of Russia. The efficiency of purification of waste effluents from the pathogens of parasitic diseases was investigated in the region's sewage-purification facilities. The water of the surface water reservoirs was found to contain helminthic eggs and larvae and intestinal protozoan cysts because of the poor purification and disinfection of service fecal sewage waters. The poor purification and disinvasion of waste effluents in the region determine the potential risk of contamination of the surface water reservoirs and infection of the population with the pathogens of human parasitic diseases. PMID:26152029

  1. Plasmodium knowlesi as a Threat to Global Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Roland; Wozniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a tropical disease caused by protozoans of the Plasmodium genus. Delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis are strongly associated with higher mortality. In recent years, a greater importance is attributed to Plasmodium knowlesi, a species found mainly in Southeast Asia. Routine parasitological diagnostics are associated with certain limitations and difficulties in unambiguous determination of the parasite species based only on microscopic image. Recently, molecular techniques have been increasingly used for predictive diagnosis. The aim of the study is to draw attention to the risk of travelling to knowlesi malaria endemic areas and to raise awareness among personnel involved in the therapeutic process. PMID:26537037

  2. Coproscopical investigations of the European otter (Lutra lutra) from Bia?owieza Primeval Forest.

    PubMed

    Górski, Pawe?; Zalewski, Andrzej; Kazimierczak, Katarzyna; Kotomski, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    The parasitofauna of the European otter (Lutra lutra) remains poorly known in Poland. In the presented study 106 fecal samples from otters living in the Bia?owieza Primeval Forest were examined, using standard flotation and sedimentation methods. We found that the overall prevalence of parasitic infections was 30.1%. Eggs of Alaria alata (0.9%), Opistorchis or Metorchis sp. (5.7%), Diphyllobothrium latum (1.9%) and Aonchotheca putori (1.9%) were identified, but in other cases the species of parasite could not be reliably determined. Parasitological dissections should give better results in future studies. PMID:20707304

  3. V-shaped Pits in Regions of Ancient Baekje Kingdom Paleoparasitologically Confirmed as Likely Human-Waste Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Shim, Sang-Yuck; Kim, Myeung Ju; Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Mi-Hyun; Jung, Suk Bae; Lee, Geon Il; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2014-01-01

    In a paleo-parasitological analysis of soil samples obtained from V-shaped pits dating to the ancient Baekje period in Korean history, we discovered Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Clonorchis sinensis eggs. In light of the samples' seriously contaminated state, the V-shaped pits might have served as toilets, cesspits, or dung heaps. For a long period of time, researchers scouring archaeological sites in Korea have had difficulties locating such structures. In this context then, the present report is unique because similar kind of the ancient ruins must become an ideal resource for successful sampling in our forthcoming paleoparasitological studies. PMID:25352710

  4. V-shaped pits in regions of ancient Baekje kingdom paleoparasitologically confirmed as likely human-waste reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Shim, Sang-Yuck; Kim, Myeung Ju; Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Mi-Hyun; Jung, Suk Bae; Lee, Geon Il; Chai, Jong-Yil; Seo, Min

    2014-10-01

    In a paleo-parasitological analysis of soil samples obtained from V-shaped pits dating to the ancient Baekje period in Korean history, we discovered Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Clonorchis sinensis eggs. In light of the samples' seriously contaminated state, the V-shaped pits might have served as toilets, cesspits, or dung heaps. For a long period of time, researchers scouring archaeological sites in Korea have had difficulties locating such structures. In this context then, the present report is unique because similar kind of the ancient ruins must become an ideal resource for successful sampling in our forthcoming paleoparasitological studies. PMID:25352710

  5. [Strigiphilus strigis (Mallophaga: Philopteridae) in a Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo interpositus) in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Dik, Bilal; Uslu, U?ur

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo b. interpositus) was brought to the laboratory of Parasitology Department and was inspected for ectoparasites. Five Mallophaga specimens were collected from the eagle owl and they were mounted on slides in Faure forte medium after being cleared in 10% KOH. Morphologic characteristics of the lice were inspected and measured under the light microscope. All of the specimens were identified as Strigiphilus strigis (Pontoppidan 1763). This paper presents the first detection of S. strigis in Turkey. PMID:17471417

  6. Case report of helminths and lung mite infection in the red-tailed monkey, Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti, in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kooriyama, Takanori; Inaba, Agumi; Nishida, Toshisada; Iwaki, Takashi

    2010-04-01

    We documented the presence of gastrointestinal nematodes and lung mites in two red-tailed monkeys, Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti, in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania. We detected lung mites, Pneumonyssus duttoni, in the trachea and bronchioles, and five species of nematodes, Oesophagostomum pachycephalum, Ternidens deminutus, Streptopharagus pigmentatus, Primasubulura distans, and Trichuris sp. in their gastrointestinal tracts. This is the first report of a parasitological survey for the red-tailed monkey in Mahale Mountains National Park, and O. pachycephalum, T. deminutus, and P. distans were found for the first time in the red-tailed monkey. PMID:20063040

  7. Highly diluted medication reduces parasitemia and improves experimental infection evolution by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is no published information about the use of different protocols to administer a highly diluted medication. Evaluate the effect of different protocols for treatment with biotherapic T. cruzi 17 dH (BIOTTc17dH) on clinical/parasitological evolution of mice infected with T. cruzi-Y strain. Methods A blind, randomized controlled trial was performed twice, using 60 28-day-old male Swiss mice infected with T. cruzi-Y strain, in five treatment groups: CI - treated with a 7% ethanol-water solution, diluted in water (10 ?L/mL) ad libitum; BIOTPI - treated with BIOTTc17dH in water (10 ?L/mL) ad libitum during a period that started on the day of infection; BIOT4DI - treated with BIOTTc17dH in water (10 ?L/mL) ad libitum beginning on the 4th day of infection; BIOT4-5–6 - treated with BIOTTc17dH by gavage (0.2?mL/ animal/day) on the 4th, 5th and 6th days after infection; BIOT7-8–9 - treated with BIOTTc17dH by gavage (0.2?mL/ animal/day) on the 7th, 8th and 9th days after infection. We evaluated: parasitemia; total parasitemia (Ptotal); maximum peak of parasites; prepatent period (PPP) - time from infection to detection of the parasite in blood; patent period (PP) - period when the parasitemia can be detected in blood; clinical aspects; and mortality. Results Parasitological parameters in the BIOTPI and mainly in the BIOT4PI group showed better evolution of the infection compared to the control group (CI), with lower Ptotal, lower maximum peak of parasites, higher PPP, lower PP and longer survival times. These animals showed stable body temperature and higher weight gain and water consumption, with more animals having normal-appearing fur for longer periods. In contrast, groups BIOT4-5–6 and BIOT7-8–9 showed worse evolution of the infection compared to the control group, considering both parasitological and clinical parameters. The correlation analysis combined with the other data from this study indicated that the prepatent period is the best parameter to evaluate the effect of a medication in this model. Conclusions The BIOT4DI group showed the best clinical and parasitological evolution, with lower parasitemia and a trend toward lower mortality and a longer survival period. The prepatent period was the best parameter to evaluate the effect of a medication in this model. PMID:22784664

  8. [Nematodes parasitizing fishes from Termas de Rio Hondo Pond, Santiago del Estero, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ramallo, G

    1999-01-01

    Cucullanus pinnai and Spinitectus jamundensis are cited parasitizing three freshwater fish species: Pimelodus albicans, Leporinus obtusidens and Prochilodus lineatus, captured in Termas de Río Hondo pond, province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina, in 1992 and 1995. The three fish species were parasited by S. jamundensis, but C. pinnai was found only in P. albicans and L. obtusidens. Morphologic and morphometric parasitological studies were carried out. The specimens described were drawned. In addition, the following parasitic infection indexes were calculated: prevalence, mean and maximum intensity. The two nematode species identified are described for the first time in Argentina and increased the host range cited for the parasite species studied in this work. PMID:10488583

  9. Investigation of parasites in sludges and disinfection techniques. Final report, August 1979-May 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, R.S.; Little, M.D.; Englande, A.J.; McDonell, D.B.; Bowman, D.D.

    1985-11-01

    The objectives of the research grant were to: assess the presence and densities of resistant stages of parasites in municipal wastewater sludges (sewage) in northern United States; compare the results of the study with the results of a previous study of sludges in southern United States; to evaluate several decontamination techniques for their effectiveness in inactivating parasites in waste sludges; and develop a standard method for the parasitologic examination of waste sludges. Sludge samples from all phases of treatment (i.e., primary, etc.) were collected during the fall, winter and summer from 48 municipal wastewater treatment plants located in New York, Ohio, Minnesota, and Washington.

  10. Dipylidium caninum infection.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Raúl Romero; Ruiz, Aurora Candil; Feregrino, Raul Romero; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Feregrino, Rodrigo Romero; Zavala, Jorge Tay

    2011-01-01

    Dipylidium caninum is a cestode that requires from the participation of an arthropod in its life cycle. This parasitosis occurs in dogs and cats, and occasionally in human beings. Human cases of D caninum infection have been reported in Europe, Philippines, China, Japan, Latin America and the United States; mostly children, one third of them being infants under 6 months old. The diagnosis of this disease is done by the parasitological study of the feces, observing the characteristics of the gravid proglottids. The treatment is performed by administering broad-spectrum anthelmintics. The authors report a case of a rare infection in a Mexican child. PMID:22674592

  11. Dipylidium caninum infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Raúl Romero; Ruiz, Aurora Candil; Feregrino, Raul Romero; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Feregrino, Rodrigo Romero; Zavala, Jorge Tay

    2011-01-01

    Dipylidium caninum is a cestode that requires from the participation of an arthropod in its life cycle. This parasitosis occurs in dogs and cats, and occasionally in human beings. Human cases of D caninum infection have been reported in Europe, Philippines, China, Japan, Latin America and the United States; mostly children, one third of them being infants under 6 months old. The diagnosis of this disease is done by the parasitological study of the feces, observing the characteristics of the gravid proglottids. The treatment is performed by administering broad-spectrum anthelmintics. The authors report a case of a rare infection in a Mexican child. PMID:22674592

  12. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice. PMID:26724377

  13. [One case of human nasal myiasis].

    PubMed

    Su, Hongxia; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Yulin

    2015-06-01

    Human myiasis is caused by the parasitic maggots of flies. We report a case of nasal myiasis in a 37-year-old woman in Henan. The patient presented with nasal foreign-body sensation, nansal itching sneezing, snuffle and such allergic symptoms in nasal cavity. Based on maggots that were bowed from the right nasal cavity, a detailed endoscopic examination, sinus CT scan and identification of the maggot's species done by parapsychologists of the parasitology teaching and reseach section of the Zhengzhou University School of Medicine, the diagnosis of human nasal infestation by oestrus ovis was definited. PMID:26514015

  14. Parasites of freshwater fishes in North America: why so neglected?

    PubMed

    Scholz, Tomáš; Choudhury, Anindo

    2014-02-01

    Fish parasitology has a long tradition in North America and numerous parasitologists have contributed considerably to the current knowledge of the diversity and biology of protistan and metazoan parasites of freshwater fishes. The Journal of Parasitology has been essential in disseminating this knowledge and remains a significant contributor to our understanding of fish parasites in North America as well as more broadly at the international level. However, with a few exceptions, the importance of fish parasites has decreased during the last decades, which is reflected in the considerable decline of funding and corresponding decrease of attention paid to these parasites in Canada and the United States of America. After the 'golden age' in the second half of the 20th Century, fish parasitology in Canada and the United States went in a new direction, driven by technology and a shift in priorities. In contrast, fish parasitology in Mexico has undergone rapid development since the early 1990s, partly due to extensive international collaboration and governmental funding. A critical review of the current data on the parasites of freshwater fishes in North America has revealed considerable gaps in the knowledge of their species composition, host specificity, life cycles, evolution, phylogeography, and relationships with their fish hosts. As to the key question, "Why so neglected?" this is probably because: (1) fish parasites are not in the forefront due to their lesser economic importance; (2) there is little funding for this kind of research, especially if a practical application is not immediately apparent; and (3) of shifting interests and a shortage of key personalities to train a new generation (they switched to marine habitats or other fields). Some of the opportunities for future research are outlined, such as climate change and cryptic species diversity. A significant problem challenging future research seems to be the loss of trained and experienced fish parasitologists. This has 2 major ramifications: the loss of expertise in identifying organisms that other biologists (e.g., ecologists, molecular biologists, evolutionists) work with, and an incomplete comprehension of ecosystem structure and function in the face of climate change, emerging diseases, and loss of biodiversity. PMID:24147814

  15. Giemsa-stained wet mount based method for reticulocyte quantification: a viable alternative in resource limited or malaria endemic settings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wenn-Chyau; Russell, Bruce; Lau, Yee-Ling; Fong, Mun-Yik; Chu, Cindy; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Nosten, Francois; Renia, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The quantity of circulating reticulocytes is an important indicator of erythropoietic activity in response to a wide range of haematological pathologies. While most modern laboratories use flow cytometry to quantify reticulocytes, most field laboratories still rely on 'subvital' staining. The specialist 'subvital' stains, New Methylene Blue (NMB) and Brilliant Crésyl Blue are often difficult to procure, toxic, and show inconsistencies between batches. Here we demonstrate the utility of Giemsa's stain (commonly used microbiology and parasitology) in a 'subvital' manner to provide an accurate method to visualize and count reticulocytes in blood samples from normal and malaria-infected individuals. PMID:23565221

  16. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses in adult patients with Chagas disease treated with a new formulation of benznidazole

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Marisa Liliana; Marson, Maria Elena; Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Mastrantonio, Guido; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Altcheh, Jaime; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Bournissen, Facundo García

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of Chagas disease with benznidazole (BNZ) is effective in children in all stages, but it is controversial in chronically infected adults. We report the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in six adult patients with Chagas disease treated with the new BNZ formulation (ABARAX®) in doses between 2.5-5.5 mg/Kg/day. All but one patient had plasmatic BNZ concentrations within the expected range. All patients finalised treatment with nondetectable Trypanosoma cruziquantitative polymerase chain reaction, which remained nondetectable at the six month follow-up. Our data suggests parasitological responses with the new BNZ and supports the hypothesis that treatment protocols with lower BNZ doses may be effective. PMID:26982179

  17. A case report of Hymenolepis diminuta infection in a Malaysian child.

    PubMed

    Rohela, M; Ngui, R; Lim, Y A L; Kalaichelvan, B; Wan Hafiz, W I; Mohd Redzuan, A N

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of Hymenolepis diminuta infection in a 2-year-old Malaysian child. This case was initially reported as 'normal' after the examination of proglottids shed from the anus of the child at a private laboratory on two occasions. The putative proglottids shed was then referred to the Parasite Southeast Asia Diagnostic (Para:SEAD) Laboratory, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya for further examination. Microscopic examination confirmed that the child was infected with H. diminuta based on the characteristic eggs found in the proglottids. She was treated with a single dose praziquantel (20 mg/kg of body weight) and recovered well. PMID:22735844

  18. A new initiative for the development of new diagnostic tests for human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Steverding, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis is a threat to millions of people living in sub-Saharan countries and is fatal unless treated. At present, the serological and parasitological tests used in the field for diagnosis of sleeping sickness have low specificity and sensitivity. There is clearly an urgent need for accurate tools for both diagnosis and staging of the disease. The Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics and the World Health Organization have announced that they will collaborate to develop and evaluate new diagnostic tests for human African trypanosomiasis. PMID:16638141

  19. [The clinico-immunological characteristics of intestinal schistosomiasis in the Republic of Guinea].

    PubMed

    Danilkin, B K; Danilkina, N P; Pozdniakova, L I; Shadrina, G V; Pozdniakov, S V; Allenov, M N

    1990-01-01

    The results of clinic and immunological examination of patients with intestinal schistosomiasis at the stage of developed infection in the natives of Guinea are presented. Polymorphism of clinical manifestations was accompanied by diagnostically significant changes in hematological (eosinophilia, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rates) and immunological (higher absolute count of B lymphocytes, IgM levels, amount of T suppressors, lower Tx/Tc ratio) parameters, which, together with the results of parasitological studies, are to be taken into account during the choice of treatment and control over its efficacy. PMID:2127070

  20. The Chewing Lice (Insecta, Phthiraptera) Fauna of the Swainson's Warbler, Limnothlypis swainsonii (Aves, Parulidae).

    PubMed

    Valim, Michel P; Reiley, Bryan M

    2015-09-01

    We examined Swainson's warblers (Limnothlypis swainsonii (Audubon, 1834), Aves: Parulidae) for lice fauna during 2?yr at three study sites in Arkansas, USA. A total of 66 individuals were examined; eight birds (10.6%) were parasitized with 16 lice of two new species belonging to two genera Myrsidea Waterson, 1915 (Amblycera: Menoponidae) and Brueelia Kéler, 1936 (Ischnocera: Philopteridae). Parasitological parameter data are given on the prevalence of lice on Swainson's warblers. Species descriptions and illustrations are provided for Myrsidea bensoni sp. nov. and Brueelia limnothlypiae sp. nov.; including a key for females of the genus Myrsidea that parasitize Parulidae (Passeriformes). PMID:26336250

  1. Infection with Crenosoma striatum lungworm in Long-eared Hedgehog (Hemiechinus auritus) in Kerman province southeast of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Hedgehogs are distributed in different areas of Iran. Unfortunately, clinical and parasitological studies on parasites of hedgehogs are very few. Crenosoma striatum is a common lungworm in hedgehogs. C. striatum infection can cause weight loss, dry cough, bronchitis with ulcerous reactions based on secondary bacterial infections, pulmonary damage, thickening of the tracheal wall, and pulmonary emphysema up to cardiovascular failure. In this survey, six dead hedgehogs (Hemiechinus auritus) were investigated for lungworm infection. All the six hedgehogs had C. striatum infection in their lungs. PMID:25732884

  2. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma evansi in dromedaries (Camelus dromedarius) from the Canary Islands (Spain) using an antibody Ab-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Molina, J M; Ruiz, A; Juste, M C; Corbera, J A; Amador, R; Gutiérrez, C

    1999-10-19

    After the description in Grand Canary Island of a case of dromedary trypanosomosis caused by Trypanosoma evansi in 1998, an indirect enzyme immunoassay for the detection of specific anti-T. evansi IgG (Ab-ELISA) was used to assess the seroprevalence of this disease on the Canary Islands. Seroprevalence was 9.0% in the four studied islands (Gran Canaria, Tenerife, Lanzarote and Fuerteventura), varying from 10.0 to 7.5% by island (not significantly different). Prevalence using Ab-ELISA was higher than that observed when a parasitological method (microscopic observation of blood smears) was used (1.3%). PMID:11018734

  3. Where are the parasites in food webs?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This review explores some of the reasons why food webs seem to contain relatively few parasite species when compared to the full diversity of free living species in the system. At present, there are few coherent food web theories to guide scientific studies on parasites, and this review posits that the methods, directions and questions in the field of food web ecology are not always congruent with parasitological inquiry. For example, topological analysis (the primary tool in food web studies) focuses on only one of six important steps in trematode life cycles, each of which requires a stable community dynamic to evolve. In addition, these transmission strategies may also utilize pathways within the food web that are not considered in traditional food web investigations. It is asserted that more effort must be focused on parasite-centric models, and a central theme is that many different approaches will be required. One promising approach is the old energetic perspective, which considers energy as the critical resource for all organisms, and the currency of all food web interactions. From the parasitological point of view, energy can be used to characterize the roles of parasites at all levels in the food web, from individuals to populations to community. The literature on parasite energetics in food webs is very sparse, but the evidence suggests that parasite species richness is low in food webs because parasites are limited by the quantity of energy available to their unique lifestyles. PMID:23092160

  4. The first clinical and laboratory evidence of co-infection by Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia canis in a Brazilian dog.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Júlia A G; Valente, Pâmela C L G; Paes, Paulo R O; Vasconcelos, Artur V; Silvestre, Bruna T; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2015-04-01

    Information on Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Brazil is very restricted. The aim of this study was to report clinical, parasitological, hematological and molecular evidence of a natural A. phagocytophilum infection of an urban Brazilian dog. The dog was an eight-month-old male French bulldog. Veterinary clinical examinations were performed three times: in April, June and December 2013. Biochemical and hematological analyses were performed during all examinations, and blood samples were collected for parasitological surveys in June and December. Morulae were present within neutrophils in blood smears from June. Both samples were PCR positive for A. phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia spp. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the phylogenetic topology placed samples from this study in close proximity to other A. phagocytophilum isolates. Ehrlichia isolates from this dog were 100% identical to E. canis isolates, thus E. canis and A. phagocytophilum co-infection was diagnosed in this dog. Lethargy and skin lesions were the clinical signs observed in this dog. Abnormal hematological parameters, among those, severe thrombocytopenia, were observed in all three occasions. This finding highlights the growing importance of A. phagocytophilum in South America. PMID:25661650

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of demodectic blepharitis.

    PubMed

    Inceboz, Tonay; Yaman, Aylin; Over, Leyla; Ozturk, Arif Taylan; Akisu, Ciler

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Demodex spp. in the eyelash follicles obtained from patients seen in our ophthalmology clinic, to define the symptoms of this infestation, and to examine the effectivity of the therapy. This study was conducted in Department of Ophthalmology and Parasitology, Dokuz Eylül University, School of Medicine. Our study included 82 cases that were seen in the Ophthalmology Department and Parasitology Department for various reasons. We have also observed that the presence of Demodex spp. provokes itching and redness in the eyes and that using baby shampoo for cleansing the face reduces the risk of infestation. After the treatment of 32 cases with 4% pilocarpin HCl gel, we achieved a total cure in 12 eyes (37.5%), partial improvement in 13 eyes (40.6%), (making a total of 25 eyes, 78.1%). The treatment was unsuccessful in 7 eyes (21.9%). In patients with Demodex spp. cleansing with baby shampoo and treating by pilocarpin gel may be used in treatment. PMID:19367544

  6. Sandwich mapping of schistosomiasis risk in Anhui Province, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Bergquist, Robert; Lynn, Henry; Gao, Fenghua; Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Shiqing; Li, Rui; Sun, Liqian; Xia, Congcong; Xiong, Chenglong; Zhang, Zhijie; Jiang, Qingwu

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis mapping using data obtained from parasitological surveys is frequently used in planning and evaluation of disease control strategies. The available geostatistical approaches are, however, subject to the assumption of stationarity, a stochastic process whose joint probability distribution does not change when shifted in time. As this is impractical for large areas, we introduce here the sandwich method, the basic idea of which is to divide the study area (with its attributes) into homogeneous subareas and estimate the values for the reporting units using spatial stratified sampling. The sandwich method was applied to map the county-level prevalence of schistosomiasis japonica in Anhui Province, China based on parasitological data collected from sample villages and land use data. We first mapped the county-level prevalence using the sandwich method, then compared our findings with block Kriging. The sandwich estimates ranged from 0.17 to 0.21% with a lower level of uncertainty, while the Kriging estimates varied from 0 to 0.97% with a higher level of uncertainty, indicating that the former is more smoothed and stable compared to latter. Aside from various forms of reporting units, the sandwich method has the particular merit of simple model assumption coupled with full utilization of sample data. It performs well when a disease presents stratified heterogeneity over space. PMID:26054518

  7. [Nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi isolated in Le Dantec University hospital of Dakar in 2014: Epidemiological, clinical and mycological study].

    PubMed

    Diongue, K; Diallo, M A; Badiane, A S; Seck, M C; Ndiaye, M; Ndoye, N W; Ndiaye, Y D; Dieye, B; Déme, A; Ndiaye, I M; Ndir, O; Ndiaye, D

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the incidence of superficial fungal infections involving nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi increased considerably. The objective of this work was to analyze the epidemiological, clinical and mycological fungal infections due to nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi diagnosed in the laboratory of parasitology-mycology of Le Dantec hospital in Dakar. With a retrospective study of the various cases of nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi isolated in the laboratory of parasitology-mycology during the period of November 2013 to December 2014, we collected 22 cases of infections in 11 men and 11 women; age ranging from 17 to 75 years with a mean of 45.3 years (sex ratio=1): eight cases of intertrigo, seven cases of onychomycosis, four cases of palmoplantar keratoderma (KPP), a case of onychomycosis associated with interdigital intertrigo, a case of infectious myositis and one case of African histoplasmosis. We have isolated and identified a total of 22 nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi: ten Fusarium, five Trichosporon, two Chrysosporium, two Geotrichum, one Rhodotorula, one Neoscytalidium dimidiatum and one Histoplasma capsulatum var. duboisii. So we are seeing the emergence of nondermatophytic and noncandidal increasingly isolated from superficial and local lesions. These fungi, generally contaminants or commensal, cause a problem regarding their direct involvement in pathological processes in which they are isolated. So we should respect the recommendations proposed for their involvement in pathological processes and, by a collaboration between clinician and biologist, demonstrate their real involvement through effective, targeted treatment. PMID:26138533

  8. Endo- and ectoparasites of large whales (Cetartiodactyla: Balaenopteridae, Physeteridae): Overcoming difficulties in obtaining appropriate samples by non- and minimally-invasive methods.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Carlos; Silva, Liliana M R; Prieto, Rui; Kleinertz, Sonja; Taubert, Anja; Silva, Monica A

    2015-12-01

    Baleen and sperm whales, belonging to the Order Cetartiodactyla, are the largest and heaviest existent mammals in the world, collectively known as large whales. Large whales have been subjected to a variety of conservation means, which could be better monitored and managed if physiological and pathophysiological information, such as pathogen infections, could already be gathered from free-swimming animals instead of carcasses. Parasitic diseases are increasingly recognized for their profound influences on individual, population, and even ecosystem health. Furthermore, a number of parasite species have gained importance as opportunistic neozoan infections in the marine environment. Nonetheless, traditional approaches to study parasitic diseases have been impractical for large whales, since there is no current routine method for the capture and handling of these large animals and there is presently no practical method to obtain blood samples remotely from free-ranging whales. Therefore, we here not only intend to review the endo- and ectoparasite fauna of large whales but also to provide new insights in current available methods for gathering parasitological data by using non- or minimally invasive sampling techniques. We focus on methods, which will allow detailed parasitological studies to gain a broader knowledge on parasitoses affecting wild, free-swimming large whale populations. PMID:26835249

  9. Identification of Leishmania spp. by Molecular Amplification and DNA Sequencing Analysis of a Fragment of rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 ? †

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Marcos E.; Steurer, Francis J.; Koru, Ozgur; Herwaldt, Barbara L.; Pieniazek, Norman J.; da Silva, Alexandre J.

    2011-01-01

    Isoenzyme analysis of cultured parasites is the conventional approach for Leishmania species identification. Molecular approaches have the potential to be more sensitive and rapid. We designed PCR generic primers to amplify a segment of the rRNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) from multiple Leishmania species. To validate the selected ITS2 fragment, we tested clinical specimens and compared the species results obtained by the molecular approach (PCR followed by DNA sequencing analysis) with those from the parasitologic approach (in vitro culture followed by isoenzyme analysis). Among the 159 patients with clinical specimens positive by both approaches, a total of eight Leishmania species were identified. The species results were concordant for all but two patients: for one patient, the results were Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis by the molecular approach versus L. (V.) braziliensis by the parasitologic approach; for the other patient, the results were L. (Leishmania) tropica versus L. (L.) major, respectively. ITS2 PCR, followed by sequencing analysis, can be used to detect and discriminate among Leishmania species. The results confirmed our hypothesis that a region of the ITS2 gene can complement the characterization of Leishmania parasites at the species level. The approach we developed can be used as a diagnostic tool in reference laboratories with adequate infrastructure to perform molecular characterization of pathogens. PMID:21752983

  10. High prevalence of dhfr triple mutant and correlation with high rates of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine treatment failures in vivo in Gabonese children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Drug resistance contributes to the global malaria burden. Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) polymorphisms confer resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Methods The study assessed the frequency of SP resistance-conferring polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum-positive samples from two clinical studies in Lambaréné. Their role on treatment responses and transmission potential was studied in an efficacy open-label clinical trial with a 28-day follow-up in 29 children under five with uncomplicated malaria. Results SP was well tolerated by all subjects in vivo. Three subjects were excluded from per-protocol analysis. PCR-corrected, 12/26 (46%) achieved an adequate clinical and parasitological response, 13/26 (50%) were late parasitological failures, while 1/26 (4%) had an early treatment failure, resulting in early trial discontinuation. Of 106 isolates, 98 (92%) carried the triple mutant dhfr haplotype. Three point mutations were found in dhps in a variety of haplotypic configurations. The 437G + 540E double mutant allele was found for the first time in Gabon. Conclusions There is a high prevalence of dhfr triple mutant with some dhps point mutations in Gabon, in line with treatment failures observed, and molecular markers of SP resistance should be closely monitored. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00453856 PMID:21569596

  11. Hidden biodiversity in an ancient lake: phylogenetic congruence between Lake Tanganyika tropheine cichlids and their monogenean flatworm parasites

    PubMed Central

    Vanhove, Maarten P. M.; Pariselle, Antoine; Van Steenberge, Maarten; Raeymaekers, Joost A. M.; Hablützel, Pascal I.; Gillardin, Céline; Hellemans, Bart; Breman, Floris C.; Koblmüller, Stephan; Sturmbauer, Christian; Snoeks, Jos; Volckaert, Filip A. M.; Huyse, Tine

    2015-01-01

    The stunning diversity of cichlid fishes has greatly enhanced our understanding of speciation and radiation. Little is known about the evolution of cichlid parasites. Parasites are abundant components of biodiversity, whose diversity typically exceeds that of their hosts. In the first comprehensive phylogenetic parasitological analysis of a vertebrate radiation, we study monogenean parasites infecting tropheine cichlids from Lake Tanganyika. Monogeneans are flatworms usually infecting the body surface and gills of fishes. In contrast to many other parasites, they depend only on a single host species to complete their lifecycle. Our spatially comprehensive combined nuclear-mitochondrial DNA dataset of the parasites covering almost all tropheine host species (N = 18), reveals species-rich parasite assemblages and shows consistent host-specificity. Statistical comparisons of host and parasite phylogenies based on distance and topology-based tests demonstrate significant congruence and suggest that host-switching is rare. Molecular rate evaluation indicates that species of Cichlidogyrus probably diverged synchronically with the initial radiation of the tropheines. They further diversified through within-host speciation into an overlooked species radiation. The unique life history and specialisation of certain parasite groups has profound evolutionary consequences. Hence, evolutionary parasitology adds a new dimension to the study of biodiversity hotspots like Lake Tanganyika. PMID:26335652

  12. Outbreak of Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia infections in travellers returning from the tropics.

    PubMed

    de Lalla, F; Rinaldi, E; Santoro, D; Nicolin, R; Tramarin, A

    1992-01-01

    Of 160 travellers from various regions in Italy who had taken part in a five-day organized trip to Phuket, Thailand, and been accommodated in the same luxury hotel, 17 showed either amebic abscess or colitis. A pretested questionnaire that focused on the consumption of foods and beverages well known to be a source of intestinal infection in endemic areas was available from these 17 patients as well as from 41 out of 74 asymptomatic travellers. Stool samples for parasitological examination were also available. In patients affected with amebic abscess, antibodies to Entamoeba histolytica were also determined. Overall, parasitological examinations were negative in eight (13.8%) patients, and 50 out of 58 (86.2%) were found to be positive. The prevalence of Giardia lamblia and E. histolytica infections was 67.2% and 72.4%, respectively, and 28 subjects (48.3%) were stool-positive for both of these protozoa. No other intestinal parasites were found. No particular food or beverage was consumed by all of the parasitized subjects and by none of the stool-negative individuals. However, the consumption of drinks with ice, ice cream and raw fruit in ice was significantly associated with E. histolytica and/or G. lamblia infections (Fisher's exact test, p ranging from 0.03 to 0.003). PMID:1582688

  13. [Co-occurrence of parasites sensu lato in alimentary tract of patients hospitalised in lower Silesia].

    PubMed

    Lonc, E; Klaus, A; Kiewra, D

    2000-01-01

    Up to now, the co-occurrence of parasites sensu stricto and fungi were confirmed mostly in the oral cavity. The aim of the present parallel parasitological and mycological investigations was to determine co-occurrence of protozoa, helminths and fungi (parasites sensu lato) both in smears from cavity and in stool samples of 93 patients undergoing the non-parasitological treatment in two hospitals of Lower Silesia (Poland). Among the examined patients parasites sensu lato (13 species) were found in 62 cases (63%). Trofozoites of Trichomonas tenax and/or Entamoeba gingivalis as well as fungi (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. tropicalis and C. pseudotropicalis) occurred in 10% of the examined patients. Almost all infected cases (90%) were joined with infection of common invasion of protozoa and fungi. In stool common invasion of parasites sensu lato (Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba coli, Ascaris lumbricoides, Taenia sp., Enterobius vermicularis as well as Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. pseudotropicalis, C. guilliermondii and Rhodotorula sp.) were found in 12% of the patiens. The co-occurrence of parasites and fungi was stated in the half of invasions. C. albicans was the most often co-occurring species in alimentary tract. PMID:16883695

  14. Application of an ELISA test using Schistosoma bovis adult worm antigens in travellers and immigrants from a schistosomiasis endemic area and its correlation with clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Javier; Arellano, Jose Luis Pérez; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Carranza, Cristina; Cordero, Miguel; Muro, Antoio

    2007-01-01

    We have recently evaluated an ELISA for the diagnosis of human schistosomiasis using S. bovis adult worm antigens (AWA Sb), showing a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 97% for patients diagnosed by egg detection. Nevertheless, the comparison of this AWA Sb ELISA with direct parasitological findings as the gold standard could introduce a selection bias, due to the well-known lack of sensitivity of direct methods in the detection of acute schistosomiasis and of low burden infections. The objective of the present work is to compare it with parasitological methods and commercial indirect haemagglutination test using S. mansoni antigens (WA Sm IHA) in 254 immigrants and travellers with different clinical settings; in addition, to find specific bands in the EITB of different phases of schistosomiasis. The AWA Sb ELISA showed 72% of seropositivity in patients with Katayama fever, while patients with eosinophilia and genito-urinary complaints showed 27% and 93%, respectively. The diagnosis yield was globally higher than direct egg detection or WA Sm IHA test with regard to the clinical setting. Finally, the utilization of EITB with S. bovis AWA permits the confirmation of diagnosis in chronic and acute phases of the disease. PMID:17464867

  15. Survey of Trypanosoma and Leishmania in wild and domestic animals in an Atlantic rainforest fragment and surroundings in the state of Espírito Santo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Igor da C L; Da Costa, Andrea P; Gennari, Solange M; Marcili, Arlei

    2014-05-01

    Trypanosoma and Leishmania infections affect wild and domestic animals and human populations. The growing process of deforestation and urbanization of Atlantic Rainforest areas has given rise to introduction of humans and domestic animals to the sylvatic cycles of Trypanosoma and Leishmania species. Serological, parasitological, and molecular surveys among wild and domestic animals in the Corrego do Veado Biological Reserve, which is an Atlantic Rainforest fragment in the state of Espírito Santo, southeastern Brazil, were evaluated. In total, 154 wild animals of 25 species and 67 domestic animals (47 dogs and 20 horses) were sampled. All the domestic animals were serologically negative for anti-Leishmania infantum chagasi antibodies and negative in parasitological approaches. Only the Order Chiroptera presented positive blood cultures and cryopreserved isolates. The phylogenetic trees based on SSU rDNA and gGAPDH genes confirmed the occurrence of Trypanosoma dionisii and provided the first record of Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei in southeastern Brazil. The studies conducted in Atlantic Rainforest remaining trees provide the knowledge of parasite diversity or detect parasites that can accelerate the loss of hosts diversity. PMID:24897863

  16. [Intestinal parasitoses in children of an Indian community of Bolivian altiplano].

    PubMed

    Basset, D; Gaumerais, H; Basset-Pougnet, A

    1986-01-01

    A survey about motion parasitosis has been carried out on one hundred Indians (Quechua ethnic group) living in a hamlet called Amarete located in the Bolivian Altiplano. This community is living in a place difficult to reach (11,100 feet) where many pre-Colombian traditions are still alive. All children were parasitized, 75% of them were carrier of 3 to 5 parasites. Infestation with ascaris (91%) is the most frequent and the risks of getting amebic dysentery (Entamoeba histolytica 41%) and balantidial (Balantidium coli 8%) are high. Many other parasites (8 kinds of protozoa , 5 kinds of helminths) can be observed; more especially, we noticed that 20% of the pupils used to be carrier operculated eggs. Tenia embryophores (more probably Taenia solium found in 2 children) made us aware of possibilities of cysticercosis. An other problem lays on general hygiene and hygiene of the water since feces danger is responsible of important parasitologic loads. Results are compared with a fecal study carried out on a population from the Altiplano region but living now in the plain. Amazonian Indian population in previous or recent contact with occidental civilization show the same variations of parasitologic repartition between Amarete hamlet and the transplanted population of Altiplano region. The role played by the acculturation could be discussed. PMID:3731367

  17. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Suspected Patients Referred To the Center for Research and Training in Skin Diseases and Leprosy, Tehran, Iran from 2008 To 2011

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMMADI, Akram MIR AMIN; KHAMESIPOUR, Ali; KHATAMI, Alireza; JAVADI, Amir; NASSIRI-KASHANI, Mansour; FIROOZ, Alireza; DOWLATI, Yahya; BEHNIA, Massoud; ESKANDARI, Seyyed Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major health problem in many parts of Iran, although diagnosis of CL especially in the endemic area is easy, but treatment and management of the disease is a global dilemma. Diagnosis of CL in non-endemic area is not as simple as in endemic foci. In this study, the status and the proportions of CL induced by Leishmania major and L. tropica among CL suspected patients referred to the Center for Research and Training in Skin Diseases and Leprosy, (CRTSDL) during 2008 to 2011 are described. Methods CL patients with suspected lesions were clinically examined. History of trip to zoonotic CL and/or anthroponotic CL endemic areas and the characteristics of their lesion(s) were recorded. Diagnosis of the lesion was done using direct smear microscopy, culture and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results A total of 404 (M = 256, F = 148) patients with 776 lesions were recruited and parasitologically examined. The results showed that 255 of the patients with 613 lesions; patients with lesion(s) induced by L. major=147 (M = 63, 43%, F = 84, 57%) and lesion(s) induced by L. tropica=108 (M = 35, 32%, F = 73, 68%). History of travel to endemic area was not always correlated with isolated Leishmania species. Conclusion Although travel history to endemic area is an important factor to be considered for diagnosis, but parasitological confirmation is necessary initiation of treatment. PMID:24454437

  18. Ctenocephalides felis felis vs. Ctenocephalides canis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae): some issues in correctly identify these species.

    PubMed

    Linardi, Pedro Marcos; Santos, Juliana Lúcia Costa

    2012-01-01

    Ctenocephalides felis felis is one of the most important ectoparasites of dogs and cats throughout the world, because of its geographical distribution, dual parasitological action as an infesting agent and a vector of diseases, the economic losses and the acquired resistance against common insecticides. In Brazil, it surpasses Ctenocephalides canis in distribution, number of host species infested, prevalence and epidemiological importance. However, in some studies the species have been misidentified on the basis of their morphological characters included in taxonomic keys. The morphological variations of chaetotaxy, especially those on the dorsal margin of the hind tibia and lateral metanotal area (LMA), found in certain specimens, have sometimes been erroneously treated as hybrids, in spite of the nonexistence of the two species of Ctenocephalides in the same municipality or region. This review focuses on the characteristics used for interspecific diagnosis and intraspecific variations found between the species. Data on distribution, hosts, prevalence and parasitological action are also presented as an auxiliary means for recognizing the species. PMID:23295817

  19. Sicarius uncinipenis and Deletrocephalus cesarpintoi in captive greater rheas of Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Isabela de Oliveira; Almeida, Lara Ribeiro de; Santos, Hudson Andrade Dos; Lima, Walter Dos Santos; Lara, Leonardo Bôscoli; Ecco, Roselene

    2014-01-01

    The present study details the pathological and parasitological findings of parasitic ventriculitis and nematode infections in the large intestines of two female Rhea americana americana birds. The birds were housed in captivity, and both exhibited poor body condition and lethargy. The rheas were sent to the Veterinary Hospital of the Veterinary School, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) and, despite medical care, the clinical condition of the birds did not improve. The birds died two days after admission, and were submitted to necropsy. Gross, histopathology and parasitological analysis resulted in the identification of Sicarius uncinipenis, which is associated with parasitic ventriculitis, while Deletrocephalus cesarpintoi was identified in the large intestine of both rheas. The apparent clinical indications, including loss of appetite and death, combined with the discovery of numerous parasites and other pathology changes, supported the conclusion that the death of the birds was caused by the parasitic infection. Further investigations of these infections in free-living and captive rheas are required, such that accurate data on the incidence and pathogenicity of these parasites can be obtained. PMID:25271456

  20. Trypanosomosis, Its Risk Factors, and Anaemia in Cattle Population of Dale Wabera District of Kellem Wollega Zone, Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Biyazen, Habtamu; Duguma, Reta; Asaye, Mebratu

    2014-01-01

    Cross-sectional study was conducted in Dale Wabera district of Kellem Wollega zone, Western Ethiopia, to determine the prevalence of bovine trypanosomosis and to evaluate association of bovine trypanosomosis to anaemia. Blood samples collected from 384 randomly selected cattle were subjected to parasitological and haematological analysis. For the parasitological survey, blood samples were examined using a buffy coat technique. The packed cell volume (PCV) value of each animal was also measured using hematocrit reader. The overall prevalence of trypanosomosis was 2.86%. The most common trypanosome species identified were Trypanosoma congolense (63.64%) followed by T. vivax (27.27%) and T. brucei (9%). The prevalence showed no significant difference in susceptibility between sex categories, age groups, and different body conditioned animals. The overall anaemia prevalence in the area was 19.27%. The anaemia prevalence was significantly higher in trypanosome positive cattle (54.54%) than in noninfected animals (18.23%) (P < 0.05). The mean PCV value of the infected animals was lower (22.36% ± 7.39%) compared to noninfected animals (27.86 ± 5.38%). There was statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in the PCV values of infected and noninfected animals. In conclusion, this study confirmed that trypanosomosis poses a threat to cattle production in the area and also contributed to the occurrence of anaemia. PMID:26464928

  1. Trypanosomosis, Its Risk Factors, and Anaemia in Cattle Population of Dale Wabera District of Kellem Wollega Zone, Western Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Biyazen, Habtamu; Duguma, Reta; Asaye, Mebratu

    2014-01-01

    Cross-sectional study was conducted in Dale Wabera district of Kellem Wollega zone, Western Ethiopia, to determine the prevalence of bovine trypanosomosis and to evaluate association of bovine trypanosomosis to anaemia. Blood samples collected from 384 randomly selected cattle were subjected to parasitological and haematological analysis. For the parasitological survey, blood samples were examined using a buffy coat technique. The packed cell volume (PCV) value of each animal was also measured using hematocrit reader. The overall prevalence of trypanosomosis was 2.86%. The most common trypanosome species identified were Trypanosoma congolense (63.64%) followed by T. vivax (27.27%) and T. brucei (9%). The prevalence showed no significant difference in susceptibility between sex categories, age groups, and different body conditioned animals. The overall anaemia prevalence in the area was 19.27%. The anaemia prevalence was significantly higher in trypanosome positive cattle (54.54%) than in noninfected animals (18.23%) (P < 0.05). The mean PCV value of the infected animals was lower (22.36% ± 7.39%) compared to noninfected animals (27.86 ± 5.38%). There was statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in the PCV values of infected and noninfected animals. In conclusion, this study confirmed that trypanosomosis poses a threat to cattle production in the area and also contributed to the occurrence of anaemia. PMID:26464928

  2. Response of falciparum malaria to different antimalarials in Myanmar.

    PubMed Central

    Ejov, M. N.; Tun, T.; Aung, S.; Sein, K.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the therapeutic efficacy of different treatments for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the hospitals in Sagaing, northern and eastern Shan, to facilitate updating the existing national antimalarial drug policy. The proposed 14-day trial for monitoring the efficacy of treatments of uncomplicated falciparum malaria is an efficient method for identifying treatment failure patterns at the intermediate level (township hospital) in the Union of Myanmar. Minimal clinical and parasitological data for days 0-14 were required to classify treatment failure and success. Clinical and parasitiological responses on day 3 and days 4-14 were used as clear examples of early and late treatment failure, respectively. Mefloquine is five times more likely to be effective than chloroquine and sulfadoxine pyrimethamine (S-P), whereas chloroquine and S-P treatments have nearly identical failure patterns. The alarming frequency of clinical and parasitological failure (failure rate > 50%) following chloroquine treatment was reported in Sagaing and following S-P treatment in Sagaing and eastern Shan. PMID:10212515

  3. Detection of pathogenic protozoa in the diagnostic laboratory: result reproducibility, specimen pooling, and competency assessment.

    PubMed

    Libman, M D; Gyorkos, T W; Kokoskin, E; Maclean, J D

    2008-07-01

    Stool microscopy as performed in clinical parasitology laboratories is a complex procedure with subjective interpretation. Quality assurance (QA) programs often emphasize proficiency testing as an assessment tool. We describe a result reproducibility assessment tool, which can form part of a broader QA program, and which is based on the blinded resubmission of selected clinical samples, using concordance between the reports of the initial and resubmitted specimen as an indicator. Specimens preserved in sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin can be stored for several months for use in such a program. The presence of multiple protozoa in one specimen does not affect concordance. Some dilution of specimens occurs in this process, and this may explain poor concordance when specimens with low protozoal concentrations are resubmitted. Evaluation of this tool in a large parasitology laboratory revealed concordance rates for pathogenic protozoa (Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, Giardia lamblia, and Dientamoeba fragilis) of about 80%, which may be considered for use as a benchmark value. We also used this tool to demonstrate that when pairs of specimens from one patient are pooled to create a single specimen, concordance between the results of the individual and pooled specimens is high. PMID:18448690

  4. Hematologic and Clinical Aspects of Experimental Ovine Anaplasmosis Caused by Anaplasma ovis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yasini, SP; Khaki, Z; Rahbari, S; Kazemi, B; Amoli, J Salar; Gharabaghi, A; Jalali, SM

    2012-01-01

    Background Anaplasma ovis infections can cause clinical symptoms in acute phase and lead to huge economic losses in flocks. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hematological and parasitological changes in experimental anaplasmosis in sheep with Iranian strain of A. ovis. Method Five male sheep without any blood parasite infection were selected. One hundred ml heparinized blood was collected from splenectomised sheep that showed 6% A. ovis parasitemia. Inoculums of 20 ml blood were administered intravenously to each test animal. Hematological, parasitological and clinical changes of experimental anaplasmosis were studied in 0-38 days post infection. Result Parasitemia was detected 3 days post infection and reached its maximum level on the day 12 of experiment in test animals. Then the parasitemia was declined, but the organism could be found persistently until the last day of study. The red cell counts, packed cell volume and hemoglobin concentration were decreased and mean corpuscular volume was increased significantly during the infection period. Reticulocytosis and basophilic stippling were also detected. No significant changes were observed in total and differential leukocyte count and animal body temperature. Conclusion Experimental A. ovis infection in sheep resulted in marked normocytic normochromic anemia at the beginning of the infection which became macrocytic normochromic by the development of the disease. There were negative correlations between parasitemia and RBC, PCV and Hb values, therefore hematological assessment can be considered as a practical diagnostic tool in ovine anaplasmosis. PMID:23323097

  5. Percutaneous aspiration-injection-reaspiration drainage plus albendazole or mebendazole for hepatic cystic echinococcosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Smego, Raymond A; Bhatti, Sabha; Khaliq, Amir A; Beg, M Asim

    2003-10-15

    Using meta-analysis methodology, we compared the clinical outcomes for 769 patients with hepatic cystic echinococcosis treated with percutaneous aspiration-injection-reaspiration (PAIR) plus albendazole or mebendazole (group 1) with 952 era-matched historical control subjects undergoing surgical intervention (group 2). The rate of clinical and parasitologic cure (P<.0001) was greater in patients receiving PAIR plus chemotherapy. Disease recurrence (P<.0001), major complications (anaphylaxis, biliary fistula, cyst infection, liver/intra-abdominal abscess, and sepsis; P<.0001), minor complications (P<.0001), and death (P<.0824) occurred more frequently among surgical control subjects. Fever (P<.002) and minor allergic reactions subjects (P<.0001) were more common among PAIR-treated subjects. The mean durations of hospital stay were 2.4 days for group 1 and 15.0 days for group 2 (P<.001). Compared with surgery, PAIR plus chemotherapy is associated with greater clinical and parasitologic efficacy; lower rates of morbidity, mortality, and disease recurrence; and shorter hospital stays. PMID:14523772

  6. Identification and Characterization of Hundreds of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Growth from a Kinase-Targeted Library Screening Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Rosario; Luengo-Arratta, Sandra A.; Seixas, João D.; Amata, Emanuele; Devine, William; Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Rojas-Barros, Domingo I.; Jimenez, Elena; Ortega, Fatima; Crouch, Sabrinia; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Fiandor, Jose Maria; Martin, Jose Julio; Berlanga, Manuela; Gonzalez, Silvia; Manzano, Pilar; Navarro, Miguel; Pollastri, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    In the interest of identification of new kinase-targeting chemotypes for target and pathway analysis and drug discovery in Trypanosomal brucei, a high-throughput screen of 42,444 focused inhibitors from the GlaxoSmithKline screening collection was performed against parasite cell cultures and counter-screened against human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. In this way, we have identified 797 sub-micromolar inhibitors of T. brucei growth that are at least 100-fold selective over HepG2 cells. Importantly, 242 of these hit compounds acted rapidly in inhibiting cellular growth, 137 showed rapid cidality. A variety of in silico and in vitro physicochemical and drug metabolism properties were assessed, and human kinase selectivity data were obtained, and, based on these data, we prioritized three compounds for pharmacokinetic assessment and demonstrated parasitological cure of a murine bloodstream infection of T. brucei rhodesiense with one of these compounds (NEU-1053). This work represents a successful implementation of a unique industrial-academic collaboration model aimed at identification of high quality inhibitors that will provide the parasitology community with chemical matter that can be utilized to develop kinase-targeting tool compounds. Furthermore these results are expected to provide rich starting points for discovery of kinase-targeting tool compounds for T. brucei, and new HAT therapeutics discovery programs. PMID:25340575

  7. Monthly application of 10 per cent moxidectin and 2.5 per cent imidacloprid spot-on to prevent relapses in generalised demodicosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Leone, F; Vercelli, A; Cornegliani, L

    2012-09-15

    Canine generalised demodicosis (GD) can be difficult to cure, with some dogs requiring life-long treatment. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of monthly 10 per cent moxidectin/2.5 per cent imidacloprid spot-on in maintaining long-term (12 months) clinical and parasitological remission in dogs with relapsing GD. Fourteen dogs were included: 10 with juvenile-onset GD (JOGD) and four with adult-onset GD (AOGD). All dogs had been treated previously and relapsed (1-4 times). Each dog was treated again with either milbemycin oxime 2 mg/kg or ivermectin 400 ?g/kg orally once daily, until two consecutive negative skin scrapings at one-month intervals (total 4-7 months of treatment). After treatment discontinuation, 10 per cent moxidectin/2.5 per cent imidacloprid spot-on was applied monthly for 12 months. Dogs were rechecked after 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months, and multiple skin scrapings were taken. Twelve dogs completed the study and were clinically normal and parasitologically negative at each recheck (four dogs with AOGD and eight with JOGD). One dog died suddenly for unrelated reasons, and one dog relapsed. Results of this pilot study suggest that monthly application of 10 per cent moxidectin/2.5 per cent imidacloprid spot-on may be effective as maintenance therapy in relapsing cases of GD. PMID:22791522

  8. Preliminary Investigation of the Contribution of CYP2A6, CYP2B6, and UGT1A9 Polymorphisms on Artesunate-Mefloquine Treatment Response in Burmese Patients with Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Phompradit, Papichaya; Muhamad, Poonuch; Cheoymang, Anurak; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2014-01-01

    CYP2A6, CYP2B6, and UGT1A9 genetic polymorphisms and treatment response after a three-day course of artesunate-mefloquine was investigated in 71 Burmese patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Results provide evidence for the possible link between CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 polymorphisms and plasma concentrations of artesunate/dihydroartemisinin and treatment response. In one patient who had the CYP2A6*1A/*4C genotype (decreased enzyme activity), plasma concentration of artesunate at one hour appeared to be higher, and the concentration of dihydroartemisinin was lower than for those carrying other genotypes (415 versus 320 ng/mL). The proportion of patients with adequate clinical and parasitologic response who had the CYP2B6*9/*9 genotype (mutant genotype) was significantly lower compared with those with late parasitologic failure (14.0% versus 19.0%). Confirmation through a larger study in various malaria-endemic areas is required before a definite conclusion on the role of genetic polymorphisms of these drug-metabolizing enzymes on treatment response after artesunate-based combination therapy can be made. PMID:24891466

  9. [Malaria index according to age and seasons in the health region of Katana, in mountainous Kivu, Zaire].

    PubMed

    Delacollette, C; Van der Stuyft, P; Molima, K; Hendrix, L; Wéry, M

    1990-12-01

    A longitudinal malaria survey was undertaken in children under five in 5 villages of Katana Rural Health Zone in Kivu, East Zaire. During the year 1983, seasonal fluctuations ranging from 25 to 44% were observed in the parasitological index as well as concomitant variations from 5 to 18% in the splenic index. More malaria transmission seems to occur during the long dry season (June to September). In order to prepare an operational research project to be conducted in two geographically delimited areas of the Health Zone, a complementary survey was organised in February 1985. This survey yielded details on parasitological, splenic and serological index in relation to age. These malaria indices were similar in the two areas and all gradually increased with age to reach maxima of respectively 42%, 13% and 55%. The Katana region, situated at an altitude of 1500 meters, on the shores of lake Kivu, is apparently characterized by an unstable and meso-endemic malaria. The applicability and feasibility of some alternative malaria control strategies are discussed. PMID:2291691

  10. [Human onchocerciasis in Africa].

    PubMed

    Boussinesq, M

    1997-01-01

    Before the 1980s, the only available method for control of onchocerciasis was elimination of blackfly vector populations. This strategy was used with considerable success in the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP). The discovery of ivermectin, the first effective drug suitable for mass treatment of onchocerciasis, has revived international interest not only in fundamental research but also in development of new strategies to control onchocerciasis in the countries outside the OCP area. This report gives an overview of current parasitological, clinical, epidemiological and diagnostic data about onchocerciasis. Although little is known about the early development of Onchocerca volvulus in the human host, significant insight has been gained into the population dynamics of the parasite. The pathogenesis of cutaneous and ocular manifestations in onchocerciasis is now better understood. Epidemiological studies are under way to evaluate the extent of systemic manifestations. Recently developed diagnostic methods are more sensitive than conventional parasitological techniques. A new method for rapid assessment of endemic level has provided a detailed picture of the distribution of onchocerciasis. Species- and strain-specific DNA probes have been developed for identification of parasites in West Africa. New methods for quantifying disability allow evaluation of the socio-economic impact of the cutaneous and ocular complications of onchocerciasis. PMID:9612783

  11. Changing patterns of malaria during 1996-2010 in an area of moderate transmission in Southern Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria is reportedly receding in different epidemiological settings, but local long-term surveys are limited. At Mlomp dispensary in south-western Senegal, an area of moderate malaria transmission, year-round, clinically-suspected malaria was treated with monotherapy as per WHO and national policy in the 1990s. Since 2000, there has been a staggered deployment of artesunate-amodiaquine after parasitological confirmation; this was adopted nationally in 2006. Methods Data were extracted from clinic registers for the period between January 1996 and December 2010, analysed and modelled. Results Over the 15-year study period, the risk of malaria decreased about 32-times (from 0.4 to 0.012 episodes person-year), while anti-malarial treatments decreased 13-times (from 0.9 to 0.07 treatments person-year) and consultations for fever decreased 3-times (from 1.8 to 0.6 visits person-year). This was paralleled by changes in the age profile of malaria patients so that the risk of malaria is now almost uniformly distributed throughout life, while in the past malaria used to concern more children below 16 years of age. Conclusions This study provides direct evidence of malaria risk receding between 1996-2010 and becoming equal throughout life where transmission used to be moderate. Infection rates are no longer enough to sustain immunity. Temporally, this coincides with deploying artemisinin combinations on parasitological confirmation, but other contributing causes are unclear. PMID:21787420

  12. Association of Blastocystis hominis genetic subtypes with urticaria.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Dina M Abdel; Hassanin, Omayma M; Zuel-Fakkar, Nehal Mohamed

    2011-03-01

    Although intestinal parasites are a possible cause of skin disorders, there are few case reports concerning the role of Blastocystis hominis in urticaria. To clarify this association, we determined the frequency of B. hominis genetic subtype in urticarial patients by stool culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and evaluated the clinical and parasitological recovery of urticarial patients after treatment with metronidazole. Of 54 urticarial patients (group I), 18 (33.3%) were diagnosed as acute urticaria (group IA) and 36 (66.7%) were diagnosed as chronic (group IB). Thirty-three (61.1%) out of 54 urticarial (group I) patients were Blastocystis positive by stool culture and PCR. Out of these 33 patients, 21 were symptomatic and 12 were asymptomatic. The amoeboid form was found in 20 (95.2%) out of 21 symptomatic Blastocystis urticarial patients assuring their pathogenic potential. Of 50 normal control group (group II), four (8%) Blastocystis isolates were found with no amoeboid form. B. hominis subtype 3 was the only detected genotype in both groups. Of 20 symptomatic Blastocystis urticarial patients, 12 (60%) patients recovered symptomatically and parasitologically after one course of metronidazole. Recovery reached 100% on repeating the treatment for a second course with disappearance of the amoeboid form. It was concluded that acute urticaria of unknown etiology and chronic idiopathic urticaria patients who are resistant to the ordinary regimen of urticaria treatment might be examined for infection with B. hominis, in order to prescribe the proper specific anti-protozoan treatment. PMID:20922413

  13. Comparative Study of the Accuracy of Different Techniques for the Laboratory Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis Mansoni in Areas of Low Endemicity in Barra Mansa City, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Espírito-Santo, Maria Cristina Carvalho; Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Pinto, Pedro Luiz Silva; Sanchez, Maria Carmen Arroyo; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Castilho, Vera Lúcia Pagliusi; Gonçalves, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Carrilho, Flair José; Gryschek, Ronaldo Cesar Borges

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis constitutes a major public health problem, with an estimated 200 million people infected worldwide. Many areas of Brazil show low endemicity of schistosomiasis, and the current standard parasitological techniques are not sufficiently sensitive to detect the low-level helminth infections common in areas of low endemicity (ALEs). This study compared the Kato-Katz (KK); Hoffman, Pons, and Janer (HH); enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay- (ELISA-) IgG and ELISA-IgM; indirect immunofluorescence technique (IFT-IgM); and qPCR techniques for schistosomiasis detection in serum and fecal samples, using the circumoval precipitin test (COPT) as reference. An epidemiological survey was conducted in a randomized sample of residents from five neighborhoods of Barra Mansa, RJ, with 610 fecal and 612 serum samples. ELISA-IgM (21.4%) showed the highest positivity and HH and KK techniques were the least sensitive (0.8%). All techniques except qPCR-serum showed high accuracy (82–95.5%), differed significantly from COPT in positivity (P < 0.05), and showed poor agreement with COPT. Medium agreement was seen with ELISA-IgG (Kappa = 0.377) and IFA (Kappa = 0.347). Parasitological techniques showed much lower positivity rates than those by other techniques. We suggest the possibility of using a combination of laboratory tools for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis in ALEs. PMID:26504777

  14. Revisiting the Posttherapeutic Cure Criterion in Chagas Disease: Time for New Methods, More Questions, Doubts, and Polemics or Time to Change Old Concepts?

    PubMed Central

    de Lana, Marta; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2015-01-01

    One of the most relevant issues beyond the effectiveness of etiological treatment of Chagas disease is the lack of consensual/feasible tools to identify and certify the definitive parasitological cure. Several methods of distinct natures (parasitological, serological, and molecular) have been continuously proposed and novel perspectives are currently under investigation. Although the simultaneous use of distinct tests may offer better contributions and advances, it also leads to controversies of interpretation, with lack of mutual consent of cure criterion amongst researchers and physicians. In fact, when distinct host compartments (blood/tissues) are evaluated and explored, novel questions may arise due to the nature and sensitivity limit of each test. This short analytical review intends to present a chronological and critical overview and discuss the state-of-the-art distinct devices available for posttherapeutic cure assessment in Chagas disease, their contributions, meanings, and interpretation, aiming to point out the major gaps and propose novel insight for future perspectives of posttherapeutic management of Chagas disease patients. PMID:26583124

  15. Endo- and ectoparasites of large whales (Cetartiodactyla: Balaenopteridae, Physeteridae): Overcoming difficulties in obtaining appropriate samples by non- and minimally-invasive methods

    PubMed Central

    Hermosilla, Carlos; Silva, Liliana M.R.; Prieto, Rui; Kleinertz, Sonja; Taubert, Anja; Silva, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Baleen and sperm whales, belonging to the Order Cetartiodactyla, are the largest and heaviest existent mammals in the world, collectively known as large whales. Large whales have been subjected to a variety of conservation means, which could be better monitored and managed if physiological and pathophysiological information, such as pathogen infections, could already be gathered from free-swimming animals instead of carcasses. Parasitic diseases are increasingly recognized for their profound influences on individual, population, and even ecosystem health. Furthermore, a number of parasite species have gained importance as opportunistic neozoan infections in the marine environment. Nonetheless, traditional approaches to study parasitic diseases have been impractical for large whales, since there is no current routine method for the capture and handling of these large animals and there is presently no practical method to obtain blood samples remotely from free-ranging whales. Therefore, we here not only intend to review the endo- and ectoparasite fauna of large whales but also to provide new insights in current available methods for gathering parasitological data by using non- or minimally invasive sampling techniques. We focus on methods, which will allow detailed parasitological studies to gain a broader knowledge on parasitoses affecting wild, free-swimming large whale populations. PMID:26835249

  16. Effect of bait decomposition on the attractiveness to species of Diptera of veterinary and forensic importance in a rainforest fragment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Diego L; Soares, Thiago F; Vasconcelos, Simão D

    2016-01-01

    Insects associated with carrion can have parasitological importance as vectors of several pathogens and causal agents of myiasis to men and to domestic and wild animals. We tested the attractiveness of animal baits (chicken liver) at different stages of decomposition to necrophagous species of Diptera (Calliphoridae, Fanniidae, Muscidae, Phoridae and Sarcophagidae) in a rainforest fragment in Brazil. Five types of bait were used: fresh and decomposed at room temperature (26 °C) for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. A positive correlation was detected between the time of decomposition and the abundance of Calliphoridae and Muscidae, whilst the abundance of adults of Phoridae decreased with the time of decomposition. Ten species of calliphorids were registered, of which Chrysomya albiceps, Chrysomya megacephala and Chloroprocta idioidea showed a positive significant correlation between abundance and decomposition. Specimens of Sarcophagidae and Fanniidae did not discriminate between fresh and highly decomposed baits. A strong female bias was registered for all species of Calliphoridae irrespective of the type of bait. The results reinforce the feasibility of using animal tissues as attractants to a wide diversity of dipterans of medical, parasitological and forensic importance in short-term surveys, especially using baits at intermediate stages of decomposition. PMID:26547564

  17. Entomology in translation: interpreting French medical entomological knowledge in colonial Mali.

    PubMed

    Giles-Vernick, T

    2008-12-01

    This essay examines how knowledge and practices around entomology and parasitology travelled and the consequences of their mobility. In exploring three anti-malaria campaigns in French Soudan before 1960, it argues that the history of medical entomology's travels entailed multiple temporal, spatial, social translations that African medical personnel, intellectuals, healers, and farmers in French Soudan reinterpreted, appropriated, and sometimes wholly rejected. This essay also focuses on "erroneous" translations, detailing how and why middle class medical personnel and intellectuals interpreted and reformulated farmers' and healers' diagnostic categories that may or may not be malaria. Anti-mosquito and antilarval interventions, and more generally anti-malaria interventions, influenced how African colonial subjects and health workers understood certain vectors and of certain maladies. These understandings, in turn, shaped the consequences of subsequent public health measures. Histories of translated parasitological and entomological knowledge and etiologies of illness have critical implications for contemporary malaria control efforts: interventions to reduce malaria transmission through various kinds of entomological controls that require active participation of local populations cannot be effective if all participants cannot agree upon what is being controlled or prevented. PMID:20055237

  18. Affinity purified oval antigen for diagnosis of Opisthorchiasis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Wongsaroj, T; Sakolvaree, Y; Chaicumpa, W; Maleewong, W; Kitikoon, V; Tapchaisri, P; Chongsa-nguan, M; Cross, J H

    2001-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against an oval antigen of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini which is the causative agent of a parasitosis, i.e. opisthorchiasis in Thailand. The antibodies were used in an affinity column to purify the O. viverrini oval antigen from a crude extract of adult parasites by chromatography. The oval antigen was then used in a membrane (dot) ELISA for detecting antibodies in serum samples of parasitologically confirmed Opisthorchis viverrini infected individuals (adult parasites were found in stools after praziquantel treatment and salt purgation), as well as of individuals infected with other parasites and parasite-free controls. The MAb-based dot-ELISA using the affinity purified O. viverrini oval antigen revealed 100% sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting O. viverrini infection. The test is simple, rapid and highly reproducible. Several samples can be tested at the same time without the requirement for special equipment or much increase in testing time; thus it is suitable for mass screening for O. viverrini exposure, especially in new endemic areas. Furthermore using serum specimens could increase patient and community compliance compared to the conventional parasitological survey which uses stool samples for the detection of O. viverrini ova, without treatment and subsequent salt purgation, this conventional method shows a low sensitivity and is also unpleasant to both the sample donors and the laboratory technicians which has historically shown a further negative impact on the final outcome. PMID:12009074

  19. Microbiological laboratory results from Haiti: June-October 1995.

    PubMed Central

    Drabick, J. J.; Gambel, J. M.; Huck, E.; De Young, S.; Hardeman, L.

    1997-01-01

    From June to October 1995, the U.S. Army's 86th Combat Support Hospital was deployed in Haiti in support of the United Nations peacekeeping mission. The hospital's mission was to provide comprehensive health care to United Nations military and civilian personnel in Haiti. The hospital's laboratory, with microbiological and parasitological capability, was a critical asset in light of the infectious disease threats in Haiti. A total of 356 microbiological (5.4%) and 887 parasitological (13.4%) tests were performed, out of a total of 6628 laboratory tests. One finding was the discovery of antibiotic-resistant urinary isolates of Escherichia coli. These were from community-acquired infections and included strains resistant to ampicillin (6/15), trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole (6/15), and ciprofloxacin (2/15). Ampicillin (8/15) and trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole (3/15) resistance was also noted in Shigella spp. However, no chloroquine-resistant strains of malaria were encountered. Dengue virus, also mosquito borne, was a major pathogen. Antimicrobial-resistant nosocomial pathogens were also encountered. Deployed laboratories should be able to determine antimicrobial susceptibility and perform microbial identification to guide clinical management, conduct medical surveillance, and detect emerging resistance. PMID:9185362

  20. Hidden biodiversity in an ancient lake: phylogenetic congruence between Lake Tanganyika tropheine cichlids and their monogenean flatworm parasites.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Maarten P M; Pariselle, Antoine; Van Steenberge, Maarten; Raeymaekers, Joost A M; Hablützel, Pascal I; Gillardin, Céline; Hellemans, Bart; Breman, Floris C; Koblmüller, Stephan; Sturmbauer, Christian; Snoeks, Jos; Volckaert, Filip A M; Huyse, Tine

    2015-01-01

    The stunning diversity of cichlid fishes has greatly enhanced our understanding of speciation and radiation. Little is known about the evolution of cichlid parasites. Parasites are abundant components of biodiversity, whose diversity typically exceeds that of their hosts. In the first comprehensive phylogenetic parasitological analysis of a vertebrate radiation, we study monogenean parasites infecting tropheine cichlids from Lake Tanganyika. Monogeneans are flatworms usually infecting the body surface and gills of fishes. In contrast to many other parasites, they depend only on a single host species to complete their lifecycle. Our spatially comprehensive combined nuclear-mitochondrial DNA dataset of the parasites covering almost all tropheine host species (N = 18), reveals species-rich parasite assemblages and shows consistent host-specificity. Statistical comparisons of host and parasite phylogenies based on distance and topology-based tests demonstrate significant congruence and suggest that host-switching is rare. Molecular rate evaluation indicates that species of Cichlidogyrus probably diverged synchronically with the initial radiation of the tropheines. They further diversified through within-host speciation into an overlooked species radiation. The unique life history and specialisation of certain parasite groups has profound evolutionary consequences. Hence, evolutionary parasitology adds a new dimension to the study of biodiversity hotspots like Lake Tanganyika. PMID:26335652

  1. Evaluation of an immunochemotherapeutic protocol constituted of N-methyl meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) and the recombinant Leish-110f + MPL-SE vaccine to treat canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Miret, Jorge; Nascimento, Evaldo; Sampaio, Weverton; França, João Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Vale, André; Dias, Edelberto Santos; Vieira, Edvá; da Costa, Roberto Teodoro; Mayrink, Wilson; Campos Neto, Antonio; Reed, Steven

    2008-03-17

    The evaluation of the efficacy of an immunochemotherapy protocol to treat symptomatic dogs naturally infected with Leishmania chagasi was studied. This clinical trial had the purpose to test the combination of N-methyl meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime and the second generation recombinant vaccine Leish-110f plus the adjuvant MPL-SE to treat the canine leishmaniasis (CanL). Thirty symptomatic naturally infected mongrel dogs were divided into five groups. Animals received standard treatment with Glucantime or treatment with Glucantime Leish-110f + MPL-SEas immunochemotherapy protocol. Additional groups received Leish-110f + MPL-SE only, MPL-SE only, or placebo. Evaluation of haematological, biochemical (renal and hepatic function) and plasmatic proteins, immunological (humoral and cellular immune response) and the parasitological test revealed improvement of the clinical parameters and parasitological cure in dogs in both chemotherapy alone and immunochemotherapy cohorts. However, the immunotherapy and immunochemotherapy cohorts had reduced number of deaths, higher survival probability, and specific cellular reactivity to leishmanial antigens, in comparison with chemotherapy cohort only and control groups (adjuvant alone and placebo). These results support the notion of using well-characterized recombinant vaccine as an adjunct to improve the current chemotherapy of CanL. PMID:18328956

  2. Comparative Analysis of Pathogenic Organisms in Cockroaches from Different Community Settings in Edo State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Orue, Philip Ogbeide; Iyamu, Mercy Itohan; Ehiaghe, Joy Imuetiyan; Isaac, Osesojie

    2014-01-01

    Cockroaches are abundant in Nigeria and are seen to harbour an array of pathogens. Environmental and sanitary conditions associated with demographic/socio-economic settings of an area could contribute to the prevalence of disease pathogens in cockroaches. A total of 246 cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) in urban (Benin, n=91), semi-urban (Ekpoma, n=75) and rural (Emuhi, n=70) settings in Edo State, Nigeria were collected within and around households. The external body surfaces and alimentary canal of these cockroaches were screened for bacterial, fungal, and parasitological infections. Bacillus sp. and Escherichia coli were the most common bacteria in cockroaches. However, Enterococcus faecalis could not be isolated in cockroaches trapped from Ekpoma and Emuhi. Aspergillus niger was the most prevalent fungus in Benin and Ekpoma, while Mucor sp. was predominant in Emuhi. Parasitological investigations revealed the preponderance of Ascaris lumbricoides in Benin and Emuhi, while Trichuris trichura was the most predominant in Ekpoma. The prevalence and burden of infection in cockroaches is likely to be a reflection of the sanitary conditions of these areas. Also, cockroaches in these areas making incursions in homes may increase the risk of human infections with these disease agents. PMID:24850961

  3. Studies on the role of tumor necrosis factor- alpha (TNF-?) in hepatocytes induced apoptosis in vaccinated, Schistosoma mansoni-challenged mice.

    PubMed

    Etewa, Samia E; Abd El-Aal, Naglaa F; Abdel-Rahman, Sara A; Abd El Bary, Eman H; El-Shafei, Mahmoud A

    2015-04-01

    Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-?) plays a complex role in pathophysiological changes caused by schistosomiasis in the liver cells as induced apoptosis. So, The highlighted experimentally the role of TNF-? in hepatocytes apoptosis, using that as an assessment of the efficacy of antischistosomal vaccination by mixed crude antigens preparations [Cercarial antigen preparation (CAP) + soluble worm antigen preparation (SWAP) + soluble egg antigen(SEA)] by parasitological, histo-pathological and histochemical studies using Feulgen stain of hepatoytes DNA, a serological study also of serum TNF-? level by ELISA. Fifty two laboratory bred Albino male mice, were used in this study. They were classified into four groups (13 mice in each group), G1: normal control, G2 as infected control while G3 supported by Freund's Adjuvant (F. Adj) then infected and G4 vaccinated with combined antigens (CAP, SWAP and SEA) + F. Adj, then infected. Mice were sacrificed by cervical dislocation 9 weeks post infection, parasitological (Kato-Katz thick smear for egg count), histopathologial {haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of hepatic sections}, histochemical (feulgen staining of hepatocytes DNA) and ELISA to estimate serum TNF-? level were performed. The data showed that vaccination with combined antigens showed protective effect on vaccinated then Schistosoma challenged mice, hepatocytes induced apoptosis was directly proportional with the TNF-? serum level, and the protection degree of potential combined vaccine was inversely proportional with serum TNF-? level and induced apoptosis. PMID:26012218

  4. Trichobilharzia regenti (Schistosomatidae): 3D imaging techniques in characterization of larval migration through the CNS of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bulantová, Jana; Macháček, Tomáš; Panská, Lucie; Krejčí, František; Karch, Jakub; Jährling, Nina; Saghafi, Saiedeh; Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Horák, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Migration of parasitic worms through the host tissues, which may occasionally result in fatal damage to the internal organs, represents one of the major risks associated with helminthoses. In order to track the parasites, traditionally used 2D imaging techniques such as histology or squash preparation do not always provide sufficient data to describe worm location/behavior in the host. On the other hand, 3D imaging methods are widely used in cell biology, medical radiology, osteology or cancer research, but their use in parasitological research is currently occasional. Thus, we aimed at the evaluation of suitability of selected 3D methods to monitor migration of the neuropathogenic avian schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti in extracted spinal cord of experimental vertebrate hosts. All investigated methods, two of them based on tracking of fluorescently stained larvae with or without previous chemical clearing of tissue and one based on X-ray micro-CT, exhibit certain limits for in vivo observation. Nevertheless, our study shows that the tested methods as ultramicroscopy (used for the first time in parasitology) and micro-CT represent promising tool for precise analyzing of parasite larvae in the CNS. Synthesis of these 3D imaging techniques can provide more comprehensive look at the course of infection, host immune response and pathology caused by migrating parasites within entire tissue samples, which would not be possible with traditional approaches. PMID:26897588

  5. Efficacy of a Novel Sublingual Spray Formulation of Artemether in African Children with Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rulisa, Stephen; Ansah, Patrick; Sirima, Sodiomon

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of sublingual artemether (ArTiMist) was investigated in two studies. In study 1, 31 children were randomized to sublingual artemether (n = 16) or intravenous (i.v.) quinine (n = 15). In study 2, 151 children were randomized to sublingual artemether (n = 77) or i.v. quinine (n = 74). For both studies, patients weighed between 5 and 15 kg and had either severe or complicated malaria based on WHO criteria, or they had uncomplicated malaria but were unable to tolerate oral medication as a result of nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Patients received either 3 mg/kg of body weight of sublingual artemether or a loading dose of 20 mg/kg of i.v. quinine followed by 10 mg/kg every 8 h i.v. thereafter. The primary endpoint was parasitological success, defined as a reduction in parasite count of ?90% of that at baseline at 24 h after the first dose. Other endpoints based on parasite clearance and clinical response were evaluated. In study 1, there were parasitological success rates of 93.3% (14/15) and 66.7% (10/15) for the sublingual artemether and quinine treatments, respectively. In study 2, 94.3% (66/70) of the ArTiMist-treated patients and 39.4% (28/71) of the quinine-treated patients had parasitological success (P < 0.0001). Indicators of parasite clearance (parasite clearance time [PCT], time for parasite count to fall by 50% [PCT50], time for parasite count to fall by 90% [PCT90], and percent reduction in parasitemia from baseline at 24 h [PRR24]) were significantly superior for children treated with sublingual artemether compared to those treated with i.v. quinine. There were no differences between treatments for the clinical endpoints, such as fever clearance time. The local tolerability of sublingual artemether was good. Sublingual artemether leads to rapid parasite clearance and clinical recovery. (Studies 1 and 2 are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration numbers NCT01047436 and NCT01258049, respectively.) PMID:26303805

  6. Chlorproguanil?Dapsone?Artesunate versus Artemether?Lumefantrine: A Randomized, Double-Blind Phase III Trial in African Children and Adolescents with Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Zul; Umeh, Rich E.; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Esamai, Fabian; Ezedinachi, Emmanuel U.; Oguche, Stephen; Borrmann, Steffen; Sowunmi, Akintunde; Duparc, Stephan; Kirby, Paula L.; Pamba, Allan; Kellam, Lynda; Guiguemdé, Robert; Greenwood, Brian; Ward, Stephen A.; Winstanley, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chlorproguanil?dapsone?artesunate (CDA) was developed as an affordable, simple, fixed-dose artemisinin-based combination therapy for use in Africa. This trial was a randomized parallel-group, double-blind, double-dummy study to compare CDA and artemether?lumefantrine (AL) efficacy in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and further define the CDA safety profile, particularly its hematological safety in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) -deficient patients. Methods and Findings The trial was conducted at medical centers at 11 sites in five African countries between June 2006 and August 2007. 1372 patients (?1 to <15 years old, median age 3 years) with acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were randomized (2?1) to receive CDA 2/2.5/4 mg/kg once daily for three days (N?=?914) or six-doses of AL over three days (N?=?458). Non-inferiority of CDA versus AL for efficacy was evaluated in the Day 28 per-protocol (PP) population using parasitological cure (polymerase chain reaction [PCR]-corrected). Cure rates were 94.1% (703/747) for CDA and 97.4% (369/379) for AL (treatment difference –3.3%, 95%CI –5.6, ?0.9). CDA was non-inferior to AL, but there was simultaneous superiority of AL (upper 95%CI limit <0). Adequate clinical and parasitological response at Day 28 (uncorrected for reinfection) was 79% (604/765) with CDA and 83% (315/381) with AL. In patients with a G6PD-deficient genotype (94/603 [16%] hemizygous males, 22/598 [4%] homozygous females), CDA had the propensity to cause severe and clinically concerning hemoglobin decreases: the mean hemoglobin nadir was 75 g/L (95%CI 71, 79) at Day 7 versus 97 g/L (95%CI 91, 102) for AL. There were three deaths, unrelated to study medication (two with CDA, one with AL). Conclusions Although parasitologically effective at Day 28, the hemolytic potential of CDA in G6PD-deficient patients makes it unsuitable for use in a public health setting in Africa. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00344006 PMID:19690618

  7. Efficacy of a novel sublingual spray formulation of artemether in African children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Bendel, Daryl; Rulisa, Stephen; Ansah, Patrick; Sirima, Sodiomon

    2015-11-01

    The efficacy of sublingual artemether (ArTiMist) was investigated in two studies. In study 1, 31 children were randomized to sublingual artemether (n = 16) or intravenous (i.v.) quinine (n = 15). In study 2, 151 children were randomized to sublingual artemether (n = 77) or i.v. quinine (n = 74). For both studies, patients weighed between 5 and 15 kg and had either severe or complicated malaria based on WHO criteria, or they had uncomplicated malaria but were unable to tolerate oral medication as a result of nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Patients received either 3 mg/kg of body weight of sublingual artemether or a loading dose of 20 mg/kg of i.v. quinine followed by 10 mg/kg every 8 h i.v. thereafter. The primary endpoint was parasitological success, defined as a reduction in parasite count of ?90% of that at baseline at 24 h after the first dose. Other endpoints based on parasite clearance and clinical response were evaluated. In study 1, there were parasitological success rates of 93.3% (14/15) and 66.7% (10/15) for the sublingual artemether and quinine treatments, respectively. In study 2, 94.3% (66/70) of the ArTiMist-treated patients and 39.4% (28/71) of the quinine-treated patients had parasitological success (P < 0.0001). Indicators of parasite clearance (parasite clearance time [PCT], time for parasite count to fall by 50% [PCT50], time for parasite count to fall by 90% [PCT90], and percent reduction in parasitemia from baseline at 24 h [PRR24]) were significantly superior for children treated with sublingual artemether compared to those treated with i.v. quinine. There were no differences between treatments for the clinical endpoints, such as fever clearance time. The local tolerability of sublingual artemether was good. Sublingual artemether leads to rapid parasite clearance and clinical recovery. (Studies 1 and 2 are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration numbers NCT01047436 and NCT01258049, respectively.). PMID:26303805

  8. Quality of uncomplicated malaria case management in Ghana among insured and uninsured patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The National Health Insurance Act, 2003 (Act 650) established the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana with the aim of increasing access to health care and improving the quality of basic health care services for all citizens. The main objective is to assess the effect of health insurance on the quality of case management for patients with uncomplicated malaria, ascertaining any significant differences in treatment between insured and non-insured patients. Method A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 523 respondents diagnosed with malaria and prescribed malaria drugs from public and private health facilities in 3 districts across Ghana’s three ecological zones. Collected information included initial examinations performed on patients (temperature, weight, age, blood pressure and pulse); observations of malaria symptoms by trained staff, laboratory tests conducted and type of drugs prescribed. Insurance status of patients, age, gender, education level and occupation were asked in the interviews. Results Of the 523 patients interviewed, only 40 (8%) were uninsured. Routine recording of the patients’ age, weight, and temperature was high in all the facilities. In general, assessments needed to identify suspected malaria were low in all the facilities with hot body/fever and headache ranking the highest and convulsion ranking the lowest. Parasitological assessments in all the facilities were also very low. All patients interviewed were prescribed ACTs which is in adherence to the drug of choice for malaria treatment in Ghana. However, there were no significant differences in the quality of malaria treatment given to the uninsured and insured patients. Conclusion Adherence to the standard protocol of malaria treatment is low. This is especially the case for parasitological confirmation of all suspected malaria patients before treatment with an antimalarial as currently recommended for the effective management of malaria in the country. The results show that about 16 percent of total sample were parasitologically tested. Effective management of the disease demands proper diagnosis and treatment and therefore facilities need to be adequately supplied with RDTs or be equipped with well functioning laboratories to provide adequate testing. PMID:25056139

  9. History and development of research on wildlife parasites in southern Africa, with emphasis on terrestrial mammals, especially ungulates

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Kerstin; Horak, Ivan G.; Penzhorn, Banie

    2014-01-01

    The history of wildlife parasitology in South Africa, and to some extent southern Africa, is reviewed, giving a brief overview of the early years and following its development from the founding of the Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in 1908 until the turn of the century. An emphasis is placed on game species. The main findings on protozoan parasites, including those of carnivores, are presented, starting in the 1890s and leading up to the first decade of the 21st century. Important developments with regard to the studies of arthropod and helminth parasites took place during a period of three decades, starting from the 1970s. Because of the sheer volume of work done by parasitologists during this time, this particular part of the overview concentrates on South African authors or authors working in South Africa at the time, and is limited to hosts that are members of the order Perissodactyla and the superorder Cetartiodactyla. PMID:25830101

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF Leishmania infantum IN PUERTO IGUAZÚ, MISIONES, ARGENTINA

    PubMed Central

    ACOSTA, Lucrecia; DÍAZ, Ricardo; TORRES, Pedro; SILVA, Gustavo; RAMOS, Marina; FATTORE, Gladys; DESCHUTTER, Enrique J.; BORNAY-LLINARES, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

     The emergence of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) in Latin America is a growing public health problem. The urbanization of ZVL has been observed in different countries around the world, and there are a growing number of reports drawing attention to the emergence of this infection in new locations, as well as its increase in previously established areas of endemicity. In the city of Posadas, Misiones province, Northeastern Argentina, the transmission of ZVL associated with canines and Lutzomyia longipalpis was first reported in 2006. In the city of Puerto Iguazú, also in Misiones province, the first human case of ZVL was reported in February 2014. From 209 surveyed dogs, 15 (7.17%) were identified as positive by serological and/or parasitological methods. Amplification was observed in 14 samples and in all cases the species implicated was Leishmania infantum. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of L. infantum from dogs in this area. PMID:25923899

  11. [Perspectives of veterinary science--from the viewpoint of consumer health protection].

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, G

    2001-07-01

    Concerning the causal chain "healthy animal--healthy food--healthy man" there's no doubt that mainly veterinarians are responsible for a safe preharvest area. In the food processing sector, of which economical importance is increasing in inverse proportion to agricultural activity of developed nations, the veterinarians must win through against many other professions. In this competition the specific veterinarian competence to prevent or to control microbiological, parasitological and some chemical hazards should be used. Therefore scientific work in veterinary public health has to concentrate on risk management. Additionally to developing methods for rapid and/or discriminative determination of causative agents the implementation of integrated quality assurance systems is needed in future according to the spirit of "intelligent" food hygiene. PMID:11505847

  12. [Acanthamoeba sp. keratitis: first case confirmed by isolation and molecular typification in Bahía Blanca, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Gertiser, M L; Giagante, E; Sgattoni, E; Basabe, N; Rivero, F; Luján, H; Occhionero, M; Paniccia, L; Visciarelli, E; Costamagna, S R

    2010-01-01

    Some species of the Acanthamoeba genus cause keratitis, a very painful, most likely unilateral corneal infection , associated with eye and vision impairment. We here present a case of a 31-year-old female patient, a regular user of soft contact lenses without good practices of lens hygiene and handling. The patient attended medical consultation after two months of inflammation and pain in her right eye. After ophthalmological studies, and due to suspicion of a parasitic infection, a biopsy was performed and the sample submitted for bacteriological and parasitological analyses. Moreover, contact lens holders and lens cleaning solutions were studied. The samples yielded negative results for bacterial infection. However, cultivation of all samples showed the presence of amoeboid parasites. Isolated amoebae were morphologically and molecularly classified as members of the Acanthamoeba genus. This is the first case of keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba in Bahía Blanca, Buenos Aires Province, where the parasite was identified by specific and sensitive molecular techniques. PMID:20589334

  13. Metazoan parasite infracommunities in five sciaenids from the central Peruvian Coast.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M E; Luque, J

    1998-01-01

    Parasitological analysis of 237 Menticirrhus ophicephalus, 124 Paralonchurus peruanus, 249 Sciaena deliciosa, 50 Sciaena fasciata and 308 Stellifer minor from Callao (Perú) yielded 37 species of metazoan parasites (14 Monogenea, 11 Copepoda, 4 Nematoda, 3 Acanthocephala, 1 Digenea, 1 Aspidobothrea, 1 Eucestoda, 1 Isopoda and 1 Hirudinea). Only one species, the copepoda Bomolochus peruensis, was common to all five hosts. The majority of the components of the infracommunities analyzed are ectoparasites. The Brillouin index (H) and evenness (J') were applied to the fully sampled metazoan parasite infracommunities. High values of prevalence and mean abundance of infection are associated to the polyonchoinean monogeneans; the low values of J' reinforce the strong dominance of this group in the studied communities. The paucity of the endoparasite fauna may be a consequence of the unstable environment due to an upwelling system, aperiodically affected by the El Niño Southern Oscillation phenomena. PMID:9698888

  14. Estimation of malaria incidence in northern Namibia in 2009 using Bayesian conditional-autoregressive spatial–temporal models☆

    PubMed Central

    Alegana, Victor A.; Atkinson, Peter M.; Wright, Jim A.; Kamwi, Richard; Uusiku, Petrina; Katokele, Stark; Snow, Robert W.; Noor, Abdisalan M.

    2013-01-01

    As malaria transmission declines, it becomes increasingly important to monitor changes in malaria incidence rather than prevalence. Here, a spatio-temporal model was used to identify constituencies with high malaria incidence to guide malaria control. Malaria cases were assembled across all age groups along with several environmental covariates. A Bayesian conditional-autoregressive model was used to model the spatial and temporal variation of incidence after adjusting for test positivity rates and health facility utilisation. Of the 144,744 malaria cases recorded in Namibia in 2009, 134,851 were suspected and 9893 were parasitologically confirmed. The mean annual incidence based on the Bayesian model predictions was 13 cases per 1000 population with the highest incidence predicted for constituencies bordering Angola and Zambia. The smoothed maps of incidence highlight trends in disease incidence. For Namibia, the 2009 maps provide a baseline for monitoring the targets of pre-elimination. PMID:24238079

  15. The parasite fauna of stray domestic cats (Felis catus) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Rolf K; Thomas, Katja; Sivakumar, Saritha; O'Donovan, Declan

    2009-07-01

    Two hundred forty feral domestic cats trapped between 2004 and 2008 in the city centre and the suburb districts of Dubai, as well as in desert biotopes, were subjected to a complete parasitological dissection. The established parasite fauna consisted of Cystoisospora felis (12.9%), Cystoisospora rivolta (9.2%), Toxoplasma/Hammondia (0.8%), Heterophyes heterophyes (2.5%), Heterophyopsis continua (0.4%), Joyeuxiella spp. (65.8%), Diplopylidium noelleri (37.1%), Hydatigera taeniaeformis (16.7%), Taenia hydatigena (0.4%), Ancylostoma ceylanicum (8.8%), Ollulanus tricuspis (0.8%), Toxocara mystax (2.9%), Toxascaris leonina (0.8%), Pterygodermatites affinis (35.0%), Centrorhynchus aluconis (4.6%), Rhipicephalus sanguineus (4.2%), Xenopsylla astia (3.8%) and Synosternus pallidus (4.2%). PMID:19238440

  16. PubMed Central

    Viens, P.; Morisset, R.; Clermont, R.

    1982-01-01

    Intestinal bilharziasis (or schistosomiasis) is becoming more and more frequent among Canadian travellers who come in contact with natural soft waters in tropical countries. The clinical signs accompanying contamination, the prodrome and the chronic phase are inconstant, but eosinophilia is often the warning sign, and specific seroparasitologic findings suggest the diagnostic investigation, Five tourists from Quebec became infected while travelling in Martinique. The clinical, parasitologic and serologic features that led to the diagnosis are described. The prodome (a flu-like syndrome with eosinophilia) is underlined. Treatment with niridazole was effective, as confirmed by the absence of Schistosoma mansoni eggs (or the presence of dead eggs) in specimens from rectal biopsies performed subsequently. Images FIG. 2 PMID:7059888

  17. [Prevalence of Anaplasma marginale and specific antibodies in new born calves].

    PubMed

    Rey Valeirón, Catalina; Aso, Pedro María; Coronado, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    Anaplasma marginale is an intraerythrocytic rickettsia that affects the cattle and constitute a constraint for its production. The transplacental transmission of A. marginale could be of importance under field conditions, but until now no data is available to interpret its relevance in Venezuela. The goal of this work was to evaluate both the presence of A. marginale and the antibody response against the rickettsia in new born calves. Fourteen calves, one week old, were simultaneously bled for parasitological tests, packed cell volume measurement and to obtain sera for immunoenzymatic assays. All the animals showed parasitemia between seventeen and thirty days old. The antibody IgM and IgG response at this time was low. Probably, these calves acquired A. marginale infection through transplacental route and a very low level of immunity by the colostrum. PMID:14976783

  18. Estimation of malaria incidence in northern Namibia in 2009 using Bayesian conditional-autoregressive spatial-temporal models.

    PubMed

    Alegana, Victor A; Atkinson, Peter M; Wright, Jim A; Kamwi, Richard; Uusiku, Petrina; Katokele, Stark; Snow, Robert W; Noor, Abdisalan M

    2013-12-01

    As malaria transmission declines, it becomes increasingly important to monitor changes in malaria incidence rather than prevalence. Here, a spatio-temporal model was used to identify constituencies with high malaria incidence to guide malaria control. Malaria cases were assembled across all age groups along with several environmental covariates. A Bayesian conditional-autoregressive model was used to model the spatial and temporal variation of incidence after adjusting for test positivity rates and health facility utilisation. Of the 144,744 malaria cases recorded in Namibia in 2009, 134,851 were suspected and 9893 were parasitologically confirmed. The mean annual incidence based on the Bayesian model predictions was 13 cases per 1000 population with the highest incidence predicted for constituencies bordering Angola and Zambia. The smoothed maps of incidence highlight trends in disease incidence. For Namibia, the 2009 maps provide a baseline for monitoring the targets of pre-elimination. PMID:24238079

  19. Parasites as accumulation indicators of heavy metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Sures, B; Siddall, R; Taraschewski, H

    1999-01-01

    Parasites are attracting increasing interest from parasite ecologists as potential indicators of environmental quality because of the variety of ways in which they respond to anthropogenic pollution. However, until recently, little was known about the accumulation of toxins within parasites. Certain parasites, particularly intestinal acanthocephalans and cestodes of fish, can accumulate heavy metals at concentrations that are orders of magnitude higher than those in the host tissues or the environment. In this review, Bernd Sures, Roy Siddall and Horst Taraschewski discuss the recently described phenomenon of conspicuous metal accumulation by parasites and how this might be applied to environmental monitoring. They also suggest how environmental science and parasitology might profit from each other in the near future. PMID:10234173

  20. Status and prospects of DNA barcoding in medically important parasites and vectors.

    PubMed

    Ondrejicka, Danielle A; Locke, Sean A; Morey, Kevin; Borisenko, Alex V; Hanner, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    For over 10 years, DNA barcoding has been used to identify specimens and discern species. Its potential benefits in parasitology were recognized early, but its utility and uptake remain unclear. Here we review studies using DNA barcoding in parasites and vectors affecting humans and find that the technique is accurate (accords with author identifications based on morphology or other markers) in 94-95% of cases, although aspects of DNA barcoding (vouchering, marker implicated) have often been misunderstood. In a newly compiled checklist of parasites, vectors, and hazards, barcodes are available for 43% of all 1403 species and for more than half of 429 species of greater medical importance. This is encouraging coverage that would improve with an active campaign targeting parasites and vectors. PMID:25447202

  1. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Schistosomiasis Japonica in Lake and Marshland Areas in China: The Effect of Snail Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Gao, Jie; Chi, Meina; Luo, Can; Lynn, Henry; Sun, Liqian; Tao, Bo; Wang, Decheng; Zhang, Zhijie; Jiang, Qingwu

    2014-01-01

    The progress of the integrated control policy for schistosomiasis implemented since 2005 in China, which is aiming at reducing the roles of bovines and humans as infection sources, may be challenged by persistent presence of infected snails in lake and marshland areas. Based on annual parasitologic data for schistosomiasis during 2004–2011 in Xingzi County, a spatio-temporal kriging model was used to investigate the spatio-temporal pattern of schistosomiasis risk. Results showed that environmental factors related to snail habitats can explain the spatio-temporal variation of schistosomiasis. Predictive maps of schistosomiasis risk illustrated that clusters of the disease fluctuated during 2004–2008; there was an extensive outbreak in 2008 and attenuated disease occurrences afterwards. An area with an annually constant cluster of schistosomiasis was identified. Our study suggests that targeting snail habitats located within high-risk areas for schistosomiasis would be an economic and sustainable way of schistosomiasis control in the future. PMID:24980498

  2. A waterborn zoonotic helminthiase in an Italian diver: a case report of a cutaneous Sparganum infection and a review of European cases.

    PubMed

    Bracaglia, Giorgia; Ranno, Stefania; Mancinelli, Livia; Santoro, Maristella; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Massone, Cesare; Sangueza, Omar; Bravo, Francisco G; Diociaiuti, Andrea; Nicastri, Emanuele; Muraca, Maurizio; El Hachem, May; Boldrini, Renata; Callea, Francesco; Putignani, Lorenza

    2015-12-01

    Many waterborne helminthes are opportunistic parasites that can travel directly from animals to man and may contain forms capable of penetrating the skin. Among these, Sparganum is the pseudophyllidean tapeworm that belongs to the genus Spirometra, which is responsible for parasitic zoonosis; it is rarely detected in Europe and is caused by the plerocercoid infective larva. Thus far, only six cases of cutaneous and ocular sparganosis have been reported in Europe; two and four cases have occurred in France and Italy, respectively. Herein, we describe a new case of sparganosis in Italy that affected a male diver who presented to the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital of Rome. The patient's skin biopsy was submitted to the Parasitology department who, in consultation with Pathology, concluded that the morphologic and microscopic findings were those of Sparganum spp. larvae. The patient recovered following a single dose of 600 mg praziquantel. PMID:26751512

  3. [Role of giardiasis in non-ulcer dyspepsia].

    PubMed

    Cotte-Roche, C; Roche, H; Chaussade, S; Dupouy-Camet, J; Tulliez, M; Couturier, D; Guerre, J

    1991-05-25

    In 1987 and 1988, 340 consecutive patients attended the endoscopy centre of Cochin hospital, Paris, and underwent oesophago-gastroduodenal endoscopy in a search for Giardia lamblia parasitology and histology. Two-hundred and eight of these patients presented with non-ulcer dyspepsia and entered a prospective study aimed at determining the advisability of a systematic search for Giardia lamblia in this population. Six biopsies were positive for giardiasis, including 3 in patients with acquired immunodeficiency, 1 in a case of chronic diarrhoea with atrophic villi and 2 in dyspeptic patients. Giardiasis, therefore, cannot be regarded as a cause of non-ulcer dyspepsia, and a systematic search for the parasite is of little interest in such cases. However, giardiasis remains a cosmopolitan parasitic disease with a non-negligible prevalence in France among subjects at risk, such as communities, children, travellers, homosexuals and immunodeficient patients. PMID:1829198

  4. Wintergreen oil: a novel method in Wheatley's trichrome staining technique.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Fatmah Md; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Yasin, Azlin Mohd; Moktar, Norhayati

    2012-10-01

    Permanent staining of faecal smears by Wheatley's trichrome technique has been used by many scientists for the detection of parasites in the past and it was found to be highly sensitive. This study was conducted to evaluate the use of Wintergreen oil in comparison with xylene in Wheatley's trichrome staining technique, as the reference technique. In a blind comparison study, 500 collected faecal samples from aboriginal communities were examined. Wintergreen oil was found to be more superior than xylene as a clearing agent in the Wheatley's trichrome staining of polyvinyl alcohol-fixed faecal smears for the identification of intestinal protozoa. Elimination of toxic, carcinogenic, and fire hazards makes Wintergreen oil the preferred choice in routine parasitology examinations. PMID:22986100

  5. Control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Myanmar: results of 7 years of deworming.

    PubMed

    Tun, Aung; Myat, Su Mon; Gabrielli, Albis Francesco; Montresor, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    After a baseline survey in 2003 which showed an overall parasitological prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths of 69.7% in school children (prevalence of ascariasis 48.5%, prevalence of trichuriasis 57.5% and prevalence of hookworm infection 6.5), a national deworming programme was established. After 7 years of implementation, it had resulted in a significant reduction of STH prevalence (prevalence of any STH 21%, prevalence of ascariasis 5.8%, prevalence of trichuriasis 18.6% and prevalence of hookworm infection 0.3%) as well as a reduction of the infections of moderate-heavy intensity from 18.5% at baseline to less than 7%. The results are encouraging and a reduction of the frequency of deworming can be envisaged in two of four ecological areas of Myanmar. PMID:23701018

  6. DNA barcoding of schistosome cercariae reveals a novel sub-lineage within Schistosoma rodhaini from Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary, Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Standley, C J; Stothard, J R

    2012-10-01

    While Schistosoma rodhaini is typically considered a parasite of small mammals and is very scantly distributed in the Lake Victoria basin, it is known to hybridize with the more widespread Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of intestinal schistosomiasis. As part of broader parasitological and malacological surveys for S. mansoni across Lake Victoria, schistosome cercariae were harvested from a field-caught Biomphalaria choanomphala taken on Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary, Uganda. Upon DNA barcoding, these cercariae were found to be a mixture of both S. rodhaini and S. mansoni, with further phylogenetic analysis revealing a hitherto unknown sub-lineage within S. rodhaini. Despite repeated sampling for eggs and miracidia from both chimpanzees and staff on Ngamba Island Sanctuary, detection of S. rodhaini within local definitive hosts awaits additional efforts, which should be mindful of a potential host role of spotted-necked otters. PMID:22448675

  7. Isospora lutrae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), a new coccidium from the European otter Lutra lutra (L.) (Carnivora: Mustelidae) from Spain.

    PubMed

    Torres, J; Modrý, D; Fernández, J; Slapeta, J R; Koudela, B

    2000-09-01

    Parasitological examination of European otter originating from Extremadura, Spain revealed the presence of a new isosporan species. Oöcysts of Isospora lutrae n. sp. are spherical to subspherical, 31.2 (27.5-32) x 29.6 (28-31) microm and have a smooth wall c. 1 microm thick. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 18.2 (17-19) x 14.4 (14-16) microm and lack Stieda and substieda bodies. A spherical sporocyst residuum is present, consisting of granules scattered among the sporozoites. Sporozoites are spindle-shaped, 12.4 x 2.5 microm and have anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Based on its unique morphologic structure and host, I. lutrae is considered to be new. PMID:10937667

  8. Stocks and seasonal migrations of the flounder Xystreurys rasile as indicated by its parasites.

    PubMed

    Alarcos, A J; Timi, J T

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to compare the structure and composition of parasite assemblages of the flounder Xystreurys rasile in two regions of the Argentine Sea in order to evaluate the hypothesis for the existence of different stocks, and (2) to test the hypothesis for X. rasile migration from the Argentine-Uruguayan Common Fishing Zone (AUCFZ) towards more southern waters during spring. Parasitological evidence shows that at least two stocks of X. rasile inhabit the coastal and shelf waters of the northern Argentine Sea, one in El Rincón and the other in the AUCFZ. These stocks should be considered as discrete entities in management plans to ensure a sustainable use of these resources. The results also confirm the existence of migratory patterns in the northern stock. PMID:23991872

  9. Evaluation of a chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in a nonendemic setting

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Luis; Marques, Alexandre Ferreira; Gállego, Montserrat; Sanz, Sílvia; Tebar, Sílvia; Riera, Cristina; Quintó, Llorenç; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Almeida, Igor C; Gascon, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    The disappearance of lytic, protective antibodies (Abs) from the serum of patients with Chagas disease is accepted as a reliable indicator of parasitological cure. The efficiency of a chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on a purified, trypomastigote-derived glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored mucin antigen for the serologic detection of lytic Abs against Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated in a nonendemic setting using a panel of 92 positive and 58 negative human sera. The technique proved to be highly sensitive {100%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 96-100} and specific (98.3%; 95% CI = 90.7-99.7), with a kappa score of 0.99. Therefore, this assay can be used to detect active T. cruzi infection and to monitor trypanosomicidal treatment. PMID:24271047

  10. Use of RNAlater® as a preservation method for parasitic coprology studies in wild-living chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Drakulovski, P.; Locatelli, S.; Butel, C.; Pion, S.; Krasteva, D.; Mougdi-Pole, E.; Delaporte, E.; Peeters, M.; Mallié, M.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the use of an RNA stabilisation buffer, RNAlater® (Ambion, Austin, Texas), as a preservation medium for parasitic coprology analysis of faecal samples collected from chimpanzees living in the wild (Pan troglodytes troglodytes). Thirty faecal samples collected in the forests of south-east Cameroon (Mambele area) from 2003 to 2011 were preserved in RNAlater® at ?80 °C and analysed for their parasite content. We identified and counted parasitic elements and assessed their shape, size and morphology in relation to the storage time of the samples. We found that parasite elements were identifiable in RNAlater® preserved samples after as many as 7 years, showing that RNAlater® could be an effective and reliable preservation medium for coprology. Thus, its use could be an interesting way to optimise sample collection for several types of studies (parasitology and bacteriology/virology) at once, especially considering the logistically challenging and time-consuming field campaigns needed to obtain these faecal samples. PMID:23850999

  11. Mother-to-Child Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Gebrekristos, Hirut T; Buekens, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    Among the world's most neglected tropical diseases, Chagas disease is vector-borne and caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. T cruzi infection is endemic to South and Central America as well as Mexico. Due to population migration, T cruzi is increasingly becoming a public health problem in nonendemic settings. Success with vector control strategies has led to a relative increase in the burden attributable to congenital transmission of T cruzi. In endemic settings, approximately 5% of infected pregnant women transmit to their offspring. Congenital T cruzi infection is generally asymptomatic and parasitological and serological testing is required for diagnosis. This review highlights research gaps with a focus on (1) improving screening, diagnostic, and treatment options and (2) designing epidemiologic studies to understand risk factors for congenital T cruzi. PMID:25232476

  12. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andréa Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Sérgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrícia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhães; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  13. A novel myxozoan parasite of terrestrial mammals: description of Soricimyxum minuti sp. n. (Myxosporea) in pygmy shrew Sorex minutus from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Szekely, Csaba; Cech, Gabor; Atkinson, Stephen D; Molnar, Kalman; Egyed, Laszlo; Gubanyi, Andras

    2015-01-01

    As part of a biodiversity study in northwestern Hungary, we conducted a parasitological survey of small mammals. In both common shrews (Sorex araneus Linnaeus) and pygmy shrews (Sorex minutus Linnaeus), we found myxospores of a species of Soricimyxum Prunescu, Prunescu, Pucek et Lom, 2007 (Myxosporea) and plasmodia in the bile ducts within the liver. Spores from both species of shrewswere morphologically and morphometrically indistinguishable, but differed in their SSU rRNA gene sequences by 3.3%. We identified spores and developmental stages from the common shrew as Soricimyxum fegati Prunescu, Prunescu, Pucek et Lom, 2007, based on morphometric data and DNA sequence similarity. Spores from the pygmy shrew were only 96.7% similar to S. fegati, hence we identified them as a novel myxosporean Soricimyxum minuti sp. n. This is only the second myxosporean parasite species described from mammals. PMID:26370293

  14. Internal parasites of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Raś-Noryńska, Małgorzata; Sokół, Rajmund

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays a growing number of exotic reptiles are kept as pets. The aim of this study was to determine the species of parasites found in reptile patients of veterinary practices in Poland. Fecal samples obtained from 76 lizards, 15 turtles and 10 snakes were examined by flotation method and direct smear stained with Lugol's iodine. In 63 samples (62.4%) the presence of parasite eggs and oocysts was revealed. Oocysts of Isospora spp. (from 33% to 100% of the samples, depending on the reptilian species) and Oxyurids eggs (10% to 75%) were predominant. In addition, isolated Eimeria spp. oocysts and Giardia intestinalis cysts were found, as well as Strongylus spp. and Hymenolepis spp. eggs. Pet reptiles are often infected with parasites, some of which are potentially dangerous to humans. A routine parasitological examination should be done in such animals. PMID:26342508

  15. [Investigation of the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in aviary birds in homes in the Van province].

    PubMed

    Gül, Abdurrahman; Ciçek, Mutalip

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in aviary birds in the Van province. For this purpose, fecal samples were collected from aviary birds (6 parrots, 5 nightingales, 24 canaries and 35 lovebirds) in Van. In the parasitology laboratory, seventy fecal samples were examined using the native and sedimentation technique for helminth eggs, Eimeria sp. oocysts and Giardia sp. cysts. The same samples were examined by modified-acid-fast staining for Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites was found to be 8.57% (6/70) in Van. Eimeria sp. oocysts were detected in lovebird (8.57%) and canaries (8.33%). Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were detected only in parrots (16.67%). Helminth eggs and Giardia sp. cysts were not found in aviary birds. However no parasites were detected in nightingales. PMID:19851967

  16. [EXPERIENCE IN TREATING HELMINTHISM WITH MICRONIZED ALBENDAZOLE (GELMODOL)].

    PubMed

    Zavoikin, V D; Tumolskaya, N I; Mazmanyan, M V; Zelya, O P; Tikhonova, D V

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives the results of treatment with micronized albendazole (Gelmodol-BM, World Medicine, UK) in 87 patients of the Department of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Diseases, Clinical and Diagnostic Center, Clinical Center, I.M.Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University. Thirty-two patients with echinococcosis 8 with alveococcosis (including 4 inoperable patients), 10 with ascariasis, 10 with toxocariasis, 15 with enterobiasis, and 12 people diagnosed with larva migrans were treated in 2013-2014. The drug's routine doses and dosage regimens were used. Albendazole (Gelmodol, World Medicine, UK) showed a high efficacy with good tolerability, which is highly competitive with that of the drugs manufactured by IPCA Laboratories Ltd., India (such as nemozole). Both medicaments above-mentioned may be successfully used in the treatment of many helminthisms. PMID:26827590

  17. Dysentery caused by Balantidium coli in a patient with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yazar, Süleyman; Altuntas, Fevzi; Sahin, Izzet; Atambay, Metin

    2004-01-01

    Balantidium coli is the only parasitic ciliate of man. It is a flattened oval organism covered with cilia, and a gullet at the anterior end. It is infrequently pathogenic for man, although epidemic buds in tropical zones have been described. The infection fundamentally affects the colon and causes variable clinic pictures, from asymptomatic to serious dysenteric forms. We present a case of parasitologically diagnosed as causes of diarrhea in a patient with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma from Turkey. In order to find out the causative etiologic agent of diarrhea, stool samples were examined by native, lugol and flotation methods and we detected moving trophozoites, which were approximately 60 μm long and 35 μm wide. These bodies were diagnosed as Balantidium coli. This case underlines that Balantidium coli should also be considered as a possible pathogen in immunocompromised patients with diarrhea. PMID:14760781

  18. [Tinea capitis in the University Hospital of Constantine (Algeria)].

    PubMed

    Benmezdad, A; Moulahem, T; Benyezzar, M; Djaballah, M; Beldjoudi, W; Fendri, A H

    2012-12-01

    Although benign, tinea capitis are a public health problem and a frequent complaint in children. In Algeria, these disorders have long been known; their high frequency was related to unfavorable social conditions of people both in cities than in rural areas. Our aim is the study of tinea capitis diagnosed in the laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology of the University Hospital of Constantine through a retrospective review of 15 consecutive years from 1997 to 2011. Currently the clinical and biological differ from those described by ancient authors; dermatophytic flora has evolved significantly and favus, once quite common in our country, is hardly ever found. In addition, we are witnessing a resurgence of zoophilic tinea particularly those caused by Microsporum canis. PMID:23518171

  19. First case of amebic liver abscess 22 years after the first occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Nespola, Benoît; Betz, Valérie; Brunet, Julie; Gagnard, Jean-Charles; Krummel, Yves; Hansmann, Yves; Hannedouche, Thierry; Christmann, Daniel; Pfaff, Alexander W.; Filisetti, Denis; Pesson, Bernard; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man consulted in November 2012 for abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant. The patient had a history of suspected hepatic amebiasis treated in Senegal in 1985 and has not traveled to endemic areas since 1990. Abdominal CT scan revealed a liver abscess. At first, no parasitological tests were performed and the patient was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Only after failure of this therapy, serology and PCR performed after liver abscess puncture established the diagnosis of hepatic amebiasis. The patient was treated with metronidazole and tiliquinol-tilbroquinol. Amebic liver abscess is the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestation. Hepatic amebiasis 22 years after the last visit to an endemic area is exceptional and raises questions on the mechanisms of latency and recurrence of these intestinal protozoan parasites. PMID:26088504

  20. Use of Proficiency Testing as a Tool to Improve Quality in Microbiology Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Heather L.; Anderson, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency testing (PT) is a valuable tool for assessing laboratory performance and verifying the accuracy and reliability of test results. Participation is required by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) of 1988 for each of the microbiology subspecialties (bacteriology, mycobacteriology, mycology, parasitology, and virology), and the regulations include specific PT requirements for each subspecialty. To determine the use and perceived value of PT beyond meeting CLIA requirements, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded a cooperative agreement with the Association of Public Health Laboratories to convene a series of focus groups to query laboratory professionals responsible for PT. The seven focus groups were comprised of 60 laboratory professionals representing large and small clinical laboratories, microbiology subspecialties, and public health. While participants acknowledged the need to perform PT to meet regulatory requirements, many also cited benefits and challenges beyond regulatory compliance.

  1. Why the radiation-attenuated cercarial immunization studies failed to guide the road for an effective schistosomiasis vaccine: A review

    PubMed Central

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a debilitating parasitic disease caused by platyhelminthes of the genus Schistosoma, notably Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium, and Schistosoma japonicum. Pioneer researchers used radiation-attenuated (RA) schistosome larvae to immunize laboratory rodent and non-human primate hosts. Significant and reproducible reduction in challenge worm burden varying from 30% to 90% was achieved, providing a sound proof that vaccination against this infection is feasible. Extensive histopathological, tissue mincing and incubation, autoradiographic tracking, parasitological, and immunological studies led to defining conditions and settings for achieving optimal protection and delineating the resistance underlying mechanisms. The present review aims to summarize these findings and draw the lessons that should have guided the development of an effective schistosomiasis vaccine. PMID:26257924

  2. Successfully controlling malaria in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, L; Frean, J; Moonasar, D

    2014-03-01

    Following major successes in malaria control over the past 75 years, South Africa is now embarking on a malaria elimination campaign with the goal of zero local transmission by the year 2018. The key control elements have been intensive vector control, primarily through indoor residual spraying, case management based on parasitological diagnosis using evidence-based drug policies with artemisinin-based combination therapy since 2001, active health promotion in partnership with communities living in the malaria transmission areas, and cross-border collaborations. Political commitment and long-term funding for the malaria control programme have been a critical component of the programme's success. Breaking the cycle of transmission through strengthening of active surveillance using sensitive molecular tests and field treatment of asymptomatic persons, monitoring for antimalarial drug resistance and insecticide resistance, strengthening cross-border initiatives, and ongoing programme advocacy in the face of a significant decrease in disease burden are key priorities for achieving the elimination goal. PMID:24893497

  3. A new data management system for the French National Registry of human alveolar echinococcosis cases.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, Amandine; Knapp, Jenny; Demonmerot, Florent; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Raoul, Francis; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence; Vuitton, Dominique Angèle; Damy, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is an endemic zoonosis in France due to the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis. The French National Reference Centre for Alveolar Echinococcosis (CNR-EA), connected to the FrancEchino network, is responsible for recording all AE cases diagnosed in France. Administrative, epidemiological and medical information on the French AE cases may currently be considered exhaustive only on the diagnosis time. To constitute a reference data set, an information system (IS) was developed thanks to a relational database management system (MySQL language). The current data set will evolve towards a dynamic surveillance system, including follow-up data (e.g. imaging, serology) and will be connected to environmental and parasitological data relative to E. multilocularis to better understand the pathogen transmission pathway. A particularly important goal is the possible interoperability of the IS with similar European and other databases abroad; this new IS could play a supporting role in the creation of new AE registries. PMID:25526544

  4. Principles and applications of polymerase chain reaction in medical diagnostic fields: a review

    PubMed Central

    Valones, Marcela Agne Alves; Guimarães, Rafael Lima; Brandão, Lucas André Cavalcanti; de Souza, Paulo Roberto Eleutério; de Albuquerque Tavares Carvalho, Alessandra; Crovela, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in molecular methods have revolutionized the detection and characterization of microorganisms in a broad range of medical diagnostic fields, including virology, mycology, parasitology, microbiology and dentistry. Among these methods, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) has generated great benefits and allowed scientific advancements. PCR is an excellent technique for the rapid detection of pathogens, including those difficult to culture. Along with conventional PCR techniques, Real-Time PCR has emerged as a technological innovation and is playing an ever-increasing role in clinical diagnostics and research laboratories. Due to its capacity to generate both qualitative and quantitative results, Real-Time PCR is considered a fast and accurate platform. The aim of the present literature review is to explore the clinical usefulness and potential of both conventional PCR and Real-Time PCR assays in diverse medical fields, addressing its main uses and advances. PMID:24031310

  5. Spontaneous postpartum clearance of Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in pregnant women, Benin.

    PubMed

    Bottero, Julie; Briand, Valérie; Agbowai, Carine; Doritchamou, Justin; Massougbodji, Achille; Cot, Michel

    2011-02-01

    The question of malaria in the postpartum period is controversial. Malaria was investigated during a randomized trial of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy in Benin. Women infected at delivery were tested for parasitemia in the early postpartum period; they had not received treatment unless they were symptomatic. Among the 35 of 1,346 infected women, parasitologic follow-up results could not be interpreted in 15 because they were treated for symptoms, 18 cleared parasitemia spontaneously within five days postpartum, and 2 had a strong decrease in parasitemia before being treated. Because the placenta is the privileged site for sequestration of parasites, it facilitates their persistence during pregnancy, and its elimination may rapidly induce their clearance. PMID:21292897

  6. Immunosuppression in Kenyan visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, M; Koech, D K; Iha, D W; Bryceson, A D

    1983-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses were evaluated in 15 patients with active visceral leishmaniasis from Masinga location in eastern Kenya where the disease is endemic. Age and sex matched controls were selected from a village school in the same area. In vivo studies were carried out by skin testing with leishmanin, tuberculin, streptococcal and candida antigens. Lymphocyte blastogenic transformation to the mitogens phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) and the antigens purified protein derivative (PPD), streptokinase-streptodornase (SKSD) and leishmanial antigen (LA) was studied in vitro. The results showed that immunosuppression in visceral leishmaniasis in Kenya was both specific and non-specific. In the majority of patients there was complete anergy to all antigens in vivo and in vitro. The suppression of responses to mitogens was less marked. Recovery of non-specific responses preceded the development of specific immunity. In a small number of patients (23%) immune unresponsiveness to leishmanial antigens persisted 1 year after parasitological cure. PMID:6839538

  7. [Peculiarities of the biology and parasite fauna of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in the Pista River (White Sea Basin), according to the Gyrodactylus salaris infestation].

    PubMed

    Ieshko, E P; Shchurov, I L; Shul'man, B S; Barskaia, Iu Iu; Lebedeva, D I; Shirokov, V A

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile salmon Salmo salar m. sebago Girard from the Pista River system (the White Sea Basin) was investigated. The data on species composition and occurrence peculiarities of Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 are given. This monogenean is the alien species for the river system and it is recorded for the first time. It is shown that the distribution of the parasite abundance is can be described as the negative binomial distribution; variations of its parameters (k and p) were also characterized. Parasitological data obtained, as well as the data describing the characteristics of growth and age structure of juvenile salmon population, suggest the potential influence of G. salaris infection on the degree of survival of fishes in the lake-river system examined. PMID:23285741

  8. The nematode community in the Atlantic rainforest lizard Enyalius perditus Jackson, from south-eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barreto-Lima, A F; Toledo, G M; Anjos, L A

    2012-12-01

    Studies focusing on communities of helminths from Brazilian lizards are increasing, but there are many blanks in the knowledge of parasitic fauna of wild fauna. This lack of knowledge hampers understanding of ecological and parasitological aspects of involved species. Moreover, the majority of research has focused on parasitic fauna of lizards from families Tropiduridae and Scincidae. Only a few studies have looked at lizards from the family Leiosauridae, including some species of Enyalius. This study presents data on the gastrointestinal parasite fauna of Enyalius perditus and their relationships with ecological aspects of hosts in a disturbed Atlantic rainforest area in the state of Minas Gerais, south-eastern Brazil. Two nematode species, Oswaldocruzia burseyi [(Molineidae) and Strongyluris oscari (Heterakidae) were found. Nematode species showed an aggregated distribution in this host population, with O. burseyi being more aggregated than S. oscari. The present study extends the range of occurrence of O. burseyi to the Brazilian continental area. PMID:22008646

  9. [Investigation of vectors and reservoirs in an acute Chagas outbreak due to possible oral transmission in Aguachica, Cesar, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Soto, Hugo; Tibaduiza, Tania; Montilla, Marleny; Triana, Omar; Suárez, Diana Carolina; Torres Torres, Mariela; Arias, María Teresa; Lugo, Ligia

    2014-04-01

    Colombia recorded 11 cases of acute Chagas disease and 80 cases of oral contamination with Trypanosoma cruzi. The current study analyzes the entomological and parasitological characteristics of the outbreak in Aguachica, Cesar Department, in 2010. An interdisciplinary group of health professionals and regional university personnel conducted the laboratory tests in the patients and the investigation of the transmission focus. Eleven cases of acute Chagas diseases were detected in a single family in a dwelling with domiciliated triatomines and Rhodnius pallescens, Pantrongylus geniculatus, Eratyrus cuspidatus, and two Didelphis marsupialis opossums infected with T. cruzi in Attalea butyracea and Elaeis oleifera palm trees in the urban area of Aguachica. The study analyzes the role of R. pallescens and palm trees in the wild cycle of T. cruzi and in oral transmission of Chagas disease. Sporadic incursions by wild R. pallescens, P. geniculatus, and E. cuspidatus from the nearby palm trees into human dwellings may cause increasingly frequent outbreaks of oral Chagas disease. PMID:24896050

  10. Metazoan parasites of Brama australis from southern Chile: a tool for stock discrimination?

    PubMed

    Oliva, M E; Espinola, J F; Ñacari, L A

    2016-03-01

    The metazoan parasites of 403 specimens of the southern ray's bream Brama australis from three localities in southern Chile (Lebu 36° 70' S; 73° 40' W, Calbuco 41° 50' S; 73° 08' W and Punta Arenas 53° 10' S; 70° 50' W) were recorded. More than 23 400 parasite specimens belonging to 12 taxa were registered. Metazoan parasites were dominated by the copepod Hatschekia conifera, constituting 97% of the total number of parasites; the larval cestode Hepatoxylon trichiuri was the second most important parasite (2·1% of the total number of parasites). The remaining 10 species constituted <1% of the metazoan parasites. Parasitological evidence, based on univariate and multivariate analysis, does not support the existence of discrete stocks in the studied zone. PMID:26813161

  11. Comparison of formalin-ethyl ether sedimentation, formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation, and zinc sulfate flotation techniques for detection of intestinal parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Truant, A L; Elliott, S H; Kelly, M T; Smith, J H

    1981-01-01

    Formalin-ethyl ether sedimentation, Formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation, and zinc sulfate flotation techniques were compared using over 250 clinical parasitology specimens. Fifty positive specimens were identified, and a variety of parasites, including amoebae, flagellates, cestodes, nematodes, and trematodes, were encountered. The Formalin-ether and Formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation procedures gave identical results for the detection of cysts, ova, and larvae, and these methods offered an advantage over the flotation procedure for the detection of selected ova. However, the zinc sulfate procedure was more effective for the detection of protozoan cysts, Hymenolepis nana, and hookworm eggs. The results indicate that the Formalin-ethyl acetate procedure provides a suitable alternative to the Formalin-ether method, and they demonstrate the value of using both flotation and sedimentation procedures in the analysis of fecal specimens for parasites. PMID:7240400

  12. Endoparasites of horses from the Formiga city, located in center-west region of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Buzzulini, Carolina; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo Abud; Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Oliveira, Gilson Pereira de; Costa, Alvimar José da

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of studying the endoparasite fauna of horses from the Formiga city, located in center-west region of the state of Minas Gerais, 25 animals that were naturally infected with helminths were evaluated. By means of parasitological necropsies, different endoparasites were found. The subfamily Cyathostominae presented the highest incidence, followed by Trichostrongylus axei, Oxyuris equi, Triodontophorus serratus, Strongyloides westeri, Strongylus edentatus, Habronema muscae, Parascaris equorum, Probstmayria vivipara, Strongylus vulgaris, Gasterophilus nasalis, Anoplocephala magna and Anoplocephala perfoliata. In the present study, if the species Probstmayria vivipara was not considered in the prevalence, the frequency of Cyathostominae was equivalent to 94.85%. The results obtained in this study allowed us to detect and identify different species of helminths in horses, and confirmed the high incidence of nematodes belonging to the subfamily Cyathostominae in the center-west region of Minas Gerais. PMID:25517536

  13. Massive infestation by Amyloodinium ocellatum (Dinoflagellida) of fish in a highly saline lake, Salton Sea, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, B I; Matey, V E

    1999-12-22

    Persistent fish infestation by the parasitic dinoflagellate Amyloodinium ocellatum was found at a highly saline lake, Salton Sea, California, USA. The seasonal dynamics of the infestation of young tilapia was traced in 1997-1998. First appearing in May, it became maximal in June-August, decreased in October and was not detectable in November. Outbreak of the infestation and subsequent mortality of young fish was registered at the Sea at a water temperature and salinity of 40 degrees C and 46 ppt, respectively. Some aspects of the ultrastructure of parasitic trophonts of A. ocellatum and their location on the fish from different size groups are considered. The interactions of parasitological and environmental factors and their combined effect upon fish from the Salton Sea are discussed. PMID:11407406

  14. Protozoan and myxozoan infections in wild gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) from North Lake of Tunis, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bahri, Sihem

    2012-06-01

    A total of 150 gilthead seabream Sparus aurata L., from North Lake of Tunis, Tunisia, were studied for protozoan and myxozoan parasites. The parasitological survey revealed the presence of ectoparasites (Amyloodinium ocellatum Brown, 1931, Trichodina lepsii Lom, 1962 on the gills) and endoparasites (Ceratomyxa sparusaurati Sitjà-Bobadilla, Palenzuela et Alvarez-Pellitero, 1995 infecting the gallbladder, and Eimeria sparis Sitjà-Bobadilla, Palenzuela et Alvarez-Pellitero, 1996 parasitizing the intestine). This is the first record of Amyloodinium ocellatum, Trichodina lepsii, Ceratomyxa sparusaurati, and Eimeria sparis in S. aurata from Tunisian waters. Data on prevalence and intensity of infection are provided. A comparison of the present species with previously described species in cultured gilthead seabream from other Mediterranean countries is also presented. In this study Trichodina lepsii is identified for the first time in Sparus aurata. A taxonomic description of this species based on silver nitrate method is provided. PMID:22807047

  15. Histopathology of protozoal infection in animals: a retrospective study at the University of Philippines College of Veterinary Medicine (1972-2010).

    PubMed

    Baticados, Abigail M; Baticados, Waren N

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the first parasitological survey of protozoal infections on tissue slide sections of field cases processed at the histopathology laboratory of the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB). Over 80% of the field cases were from Region 4 (CALABARZON) and the rest were equally distributed from other areas of the Philippines, namely: Region 2 (Cagayan Valley), Metropolitan Manila (National Capital Region), Region III (Central Luzon) and Region VI (Western Visayas). Histopathological analyses of tissue sections from 51 archived cases (1972-2010) of parasitic aetiology were performed. Microscopic examination of a total of 286 histopathological slides revealed the presence of several protozoa, including sarcosporidiosis, hepatic coccidiosis, intestinal coccidiosis, balantidiosis and leucocyto-zoonosis. In addition, the finding of Balantidium and Sarcocystis may have zoonotic implications and can therefore be used as markers of public health importance. PMID:22485007

  16. Dysentery caused by Balantidium coli in a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yazar, Süleyman; Altuntas, Fevzi; Sahin, Izzet; Atambay, Metin

    2004-02-01

    Balantidium coli is the only parasitic ciliate of man. It is a flattened oval organism covered with cilia, and a gullet at the anterior end. It is infrequently pathogenic for man, although epidemic buds in tropical zones have been described. The infection fundamentally affects the colon and causes variable clinic pictures, from asymptomatic to serious dysenteric forms. We present a case of parasitologically diagnosed as causes of diarrhea in a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma from Turkey. In order to find out the causative etiologic agent of diarrhea, stool samples were examined by native, lugol and flotation methods and we detected moving trophozoites, which were approximately 60 microm long and 35 microm wide. These bodies were diagnosed as Balantidium coli. This case underlines that Balantidium coli should also be considered as a possible pathogen in immunocompromised patients with diarrhea. PMID:14760781

  17. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2013].

    PubMed

    de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique Ruiz; Orta Mira, Nieves; Del Remedio Guna Serrano, M; Medina González, Rafael; Rosario Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2015-07-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) include controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology, molecular microbiology and HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral loads. This manuscript presents the analysis of results obtained of the participants from the 2013 SEIMC External Quality Control Programme, except viral loads controls, that they are summarized in a manuscript abroad. As a whole, the results obtained in 2013 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous editions. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. Once again, the results of this program highlighted the need to implement both internal and external controls in order to assure the maximal quality of the microbiological tests. PMID:26320989

  18. Canine rangeliosis: the need for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Martins, Danieli Brolo; Soares, João Fabio; França, Raqueli Teresinha

    2013-03-01

    Rangeliosis is a hemoparasitosis that affects dogs in Brazil. The disease has similar clinical and pathological characteristics to other hemo-protozoan infections. So, this paper has aimed to report a clinical case of infection by Rangelia vitalii in one dog, focusing on the need for the differential diagnosis to other infectious diseases. The animal showed apathy, anemia, thrombocytopenia, alteration of leucogram, and bleeding. The first difference was the observation of parasites in blood smears, where R. vitalii was visualized within leukocytes and erythrocytes. The confirmation of the clinical diagnosis was made by molecular test to R. vitalii. The dog was debilitated, and died a few hours after treatment at the veterinary hospital. At necropsy, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and mild jaundice in the abdominal viscera were found. This article draws attention to the need for the parasitological, serological, and molecular to differential diagnosis in order to differentiate from other clinically similar disorders. PMID:23052787

  19. Urbanization, malaria transmission and disease burden in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Simon I.; Guerra, Carlos A.; Tatem, Andrew J.; Atkinson, Peter M.; Snow, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to quantify Africa’s malaria burden but none has addressed how urbanization will affect disease transmission and outcome, and therefore mortality and morbidity estimates. In 2003, 39% of Africa’s 850 million people lived in urban settings; by 2030, 54% of Africans are expected to do so. We present the results of a series of entomological, parasitological and behavioural meta-analyses of studies that have investigated the effect of urbanization on malaria in Africa. We describe the effect of urbanization on both the impact of malaria transmission and the concomitant improvements in access to preventative and curative measures. Using these data, we have recalculated estimates of populations at risk of malaria and the resulting mortality. We find there were 1,068,505 malaria deaths in Africa in 2000 — a modest 6.7% reduction over previous iterations. The public-health implications of these findings and revised estimates are discussed. PMID:15608702

  20. Tannin containing legumes as a model for nutraceuticals against digestive parasites in livestock.

    PubMed

    Hoste, H; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Mueller-Harvey, I; Sotiraki, S; Louvandini, H; Thamsborg, S M; Terrill, T H

    2015-08-15

    Parasitic infections with gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) still represent a worldwide major pathological threat associated with the outdoor production of various livestock species. Because of the widespread resistance to synthetic chemical anthelmintics, there is a strong impetus to explore novel approaches for a more integrated management of these infections. The use of nutraceuticals in the control of GINs is one of the alternatives which has been widely studied for 20 years. The objectives of this review are: (i) to define and illustrate the concept of 'nutraceutical' in the context of veterinary parasitology based on data obtained on the most studied models to control GINs in small ruminants, the tannin-containing legumes (Fabaceae); (ii) to illustrate how the 'nutraceutical concept' could be expanded to other plants, other livestock production systems and other GI parasitic diseases, and (iii) to explain how this concept is opening up new research fields for better understanding the interactions between the host, the digestive parasites and the environment. PMID:26190131

  1. A human case of Hymenolepis diminuta in a child from eastern Sicily.

    PubMed

    Patamia, Ildebrando; Cappello, Elisa; Castellano-Chiodo, Donato; Greco, Filippo; Nigro, Luciano; Cacopardo, Bruno

    2010-06-01

    We report a case of Hymenolepis diminuta infection in a 2-year-old child living in a suburban area of Catania, Italy. This case was initially referred to us as Dipylidium caninum infection, which was not cured after being treated twice with mebendazole. However, by analyzing the clinical presentation and stool samples we arrived to the diagnosis of H. diminuta infection. The case presented with atypical allergic manifestations which had never been reported as clinical features of symptomatic H. diminuta infection; remittent fever with abdominal pain, diffuse cutaneous itching, transient thoracic rash, and arthromyalgias. The patient was treated with a 7-day cycle of oral niclosamide, which proved to be safe and effective. This case report emphasizes that a correct parasitological diagnosis requires adequate district laboratories and trained personnel. In addition, we recommend the importance of reporting all H. diminuta infection cases, in order to improve knowledge on epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment protocols. PMID:20585535

  2. Endoparasites of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Magi, M; Macchioni, F; Dell'omodarme, M; Prati, M C; Calderini, P; Gabrielli, S; Iori, A; Cancrini, G

    2009-07-01

    A parasitologic study on 129 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Tuscany (central Italy) was carried out in 2004-2006. Five intestinal species were found at necropsy: Dipylidium caninum (prevalence 57.3%), Mesocestoides lineatus (45.4%), Uncinaria stenocephala (39.1%), Toxocara canis (9.1%), and Toxascaris leonina (5.4%). Other parasites not associated with the intestine included Crenosoma vulpis (14.7%), Capillaria aerophila (7.0%), Angiostrongylus vasorum (7.0%), and filarial parasites (17.8%). Coprologic tests were less sensitive and less specific in identifying parasites than direct examinations at necropsy. Trichinella larvae were not found in muscles submitted to artificial digestion. By immunologic assay, antigens of Echinococcus spp. were detected in fecal samples of 20 foxes, but results could not be confirmed by fecal examination or molecular tests. PMID:19617506

  3. A Human Case of Hymenolepis diminuta in a Child from Eastern Sicily

    PubMed Central

    Patamia, Ildebrando; Cappello, Elisa; Castellano-Chiodo, Donato; Greco, Filippo; Cacopardo, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of Hymenolepis diminuta infection in a 2-year-old child living in a suburban area of Catania, Italy. This case was initially referred to us as Dipylidium caninum infection, which was not cured after being treated twice with mebendazole. However, by analyzing the clinical presentation and stool samples we arrived to the diagnosis of H. diminuta infection. The case presented with atypical allergic manifestations which had never been reported as clinical features of symptomatic H. diminuta infection; remittent fever with abdominal pain, diffuse cutaneous itching, transient thoracic rash, and arthromyalgias. The patient was treated with a 7-day cycle of oral niclosamide, which proved to be safe and effective. This case report emphasizes that a correct parasitological diagnosis requires adequate district laboratories and trained personnel. In addition, we recommend the importance of reporting all H. diminuta infection cases, in order to improve knowledge on epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment protocols. PMID:20585535

  4. Trichodina colisae (Ciliophora: Trichodinidae): new parasite records for two freshwater fish species farmed in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jerônimo, Gabriela Tomas; Marchiori, Natália da Costa; Pádua, Santiago Benites de; Dias Neto, José; Pilarski, Fabiana; Ishikawa, Márcia Mayumi; Martins, Maurício Laterça

    2012-01-01

    Family Trichodinidae comprises ciliate protozoa distributed worldwide; they are considered some of the main parasitological agents infecting cultivated fish. However, the trichodinidae parasitizing important fish species cultured in Brazil are unknown, and more taxonomic studies on this group of parasites are required. This research morphologically characterizes Trichodina colisae Asmat & Sultana, (2005) of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus) and patinga hybrid (P. mesopotamicus × P. brachypomus) cultivated in the central and southeast regions of the country. Fresh assemblies were made from mucus scraped from the skin, fins and gills, fixed with methanol and, subsequently, impregnated with silver nitrate and stained with Giemsa for assessment under light microscopy. This research reports not only the second occurrence of T. colisae in the world, but also its first occurrence in South America. PMID:23207983

  5. Sugarcane and mulberry silage supplementation of sheep during the peripartum period.

    PubMed

    David, Caroline Marçal Gomes; Costa, Ricardo Lopes Dias da; Parren, Guadalupe Aparecida Espicaski; Rua, Miguel Alejandro Silva; Nordi, Ellen Carolina Pereira; Okamoto, Fumiko; Paz, Cláudia Cristina Paro

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementation with silage made from sugarcane alone or mulberry and sugarcane on the gastrointestinal nematodes and hematological parameters in peripartum Santa Inês ewes. Three groups, each of 15 ewes, were supplemented with either 100 % sugarcane silage or sugarcane silage and mulberry at ratios of either 75:25 or 50:50. The variables analyzed were weight, body condition, packed cell volume, total plasma protein, hemoglobin, total leukocytes, eosinophils, and number of parasite eggs per gram of feces. All variables were measured individually every 14 days, making ten samples per ewe. Diets with sugarcane added to different proportions of mulberry branches did not influence the blood and parasitological parameters of Santa Inês sheep naturally infected in the peripartum period. PMID:25761641

  6. Wildlife parasites in a One Health world.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Emily J; Simon, Audrey; Bachand, Nicholas; Stephen, Craig

    2015-05-01

    One Health has gained a remarkable profile in the animal and public health communities, in part owing to the pressing issues of emerging infectious diseases of wildlife origin. Wildlife parasitology can offer insights into One Health, and likewise One Health can provide justification to study and act on wildlife parasites. But how do we decide which wildlife parasites are One Health issues? We explore toxoplasmosis in wildlife in the Canadian Arctic as an example of a parasite that poses a risk to human health, and that also has potential to adversely affect wildlife populations of conservation concern and importance for food security and cultural well-being. This One Health framework can help communities, researchers, and policymakers prioritize issues for action in a resource-limited world. PMID:25662272

  7. Field study analysis of the influences of deworming regimens and housing conditions on parasites and sperm output in 21 European boar studs.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Martin; Ammon, Christian; Nürnberg, Gerd; Rüdiger, Karin; Jung, Markus; Demeler, Janina

    2016-03-01

    The current study reports the parasitological results of a quality control audit in 21 European boar studs. Field investigations were performed over a 2-year period (2012-2013) during the winter and spring. From each stud, an average of 30 (range, 25-33) individual faecal samples and ejaculates from 615 randomly selected Pietrain boars were analysed. Statistical analysis revealed a significant effect (P?

  8. Helminth fauna of the Iberian lynx, Lynx pardinus.

    PubMed

    Torres, J; Garciá-Perea, R; Gisbert, J; Feliu, C

    1998-09-01

    Specimens of 12 helminth species were collected from carcasses of eight Lynx pardinus (Temminck, 1827), a carnivore endemic to the Iberian Peninsula. These species included: Brachylaima sp. (12.5%) (Trematoda); Taenia pisiformis (12.5%), T. polyacantha (25%), T. taeniaeformis (25%) and Mesocestoides litteratus (37.5%) (Cestoda); Eucoleus aerophilus (12.5%), Ancylostoma tubaeforme (12.5%), Toxocara cati (37.5%), Toxascaris leonina (62.5%), Vigisospirura potekhina potekhina (12.5%), Mastophorus muris (12.5%) and Physaloptera praeputialis (12.5%) (Nematoda). The helminth fauna in Iberian lynx is compared with that of L. canadensis and L. rufus in America, and for L. lynx in Eurasia. The potential relationships between the parasitological data and some geographical, historical and dietary factors are discussed. PMID:9765373

  9. Risk Factors for Asthma in a Helminth Endemic Area in Bahia, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Luciana S.; Costa, Daniela M.; Almeida, Maria Cecília F.; Souza, Robson P.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Araujo, Maria Ilma; Oliveira, Ricardo R.

    2012-01-01

    Protective factors associated with atopy or asthma in rural areas include socioeconomic level, overcrowding, and helminth infection. However, little epidemiological information was originated from schistosomiasis areas. This study aimed to investigate factors associated with asthma in a schistosomiasis endemic area. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on demographics, socioeconomic, and environmental features. The ISAAC questionnaire was used to identify individuals with asthma. Parasitological exam was done in all participants and skin prick test to aeroallergens in all asthmatics. Prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni infection was 57.4% and Ascaris lumbricoides, 30.8%. Asthma was found in 13.1% of the population, and 35.1% of them had a positive SPT. Active and passive smoking was positively associated with asthma, whereas A. lumbricoides was negatively associated. In a schistosomiasis hyperendemic region, current infection with A. lumbricoides is protective against asthma. However, we cannot rule out the involvement of S. mansoni infection in this process. PMID:22970348

  10. Anthelmintic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    C. elegans is sensitive to the majority of anthelmintic drugs that are used against parasitic worm infections of humans and livestock. This has provided the opportunity to use molecular genetic techniques in the worm for mode of action studies. These approaches continue to be of considerable value to the field of parasitology. In addition, there are numerous examples of anthelmintic drugs providing exceptionally useful pharmacological tools to delineate fundamental aspects of cell signalling in C. elegans. This has primarily been achieved through the use of anthelmintics in forward genetic screens followed by the mapping and characterization of genes that confer altered susceptibility to the drug. Less fruitful so far, but nonetheless useful, has been the direct use of C. elegans for anthelmintic discovery programmes. In this brief review we provide an introduction to the use of C. elegans as a 'model parasite', outline the actions of the main classes of anthelmintics, and highlight approaches that have been of particular value. PMID:17988075

  11. [Prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in Reggio Emilia (Italy) during 2009].

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Carlotta; Ricci, Lidia; Vecchia, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this survey is to assess the prevalence of intestinal parasites in Reggio Emilia during 2009. We analyzed 1961 samples from 1503 subjects: a copro-parasitological standard examination was performed in 1416 of the subjects and the scotch-test in the remaining 87. Of the 1503 subjects examined, 111 (7.4%) were positive for one or more parasites. Pathogenic parasites were found in 44 subjects (39.6% of all positive subjects) and non-pathogenic protozoa were found in 67 subjects (60.4% of all positive subjects). The most commonly found species were, of the protozoa, Blastocystis hominis, Dientamoeba fragilis and Giardia intestinalis and, of the helminths, Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia Spp. This epidemiological survey shows the need to pay more attention to immigrants and travellers to endemic areas as potential carriers of major parasitic infections in the community. PMID:20956870

  12. Evaluation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of Dientamoeba fragilis.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Gorrini, Chiara; Montecchini, Sara; Peruzzi, Simona; Piccolo, Giovanna; Rossi, Sabina; Gargiulo, Franco; Manca, Nino; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    The diagnostic value of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the 5.8S rDNA of Dientamoeba fragilis was investigated as compared with conventional parasitologic methods including cultivation testing 959 fecal samples from 491 patients attending a tertiary-care hospital and suspected of having an intestinal parasitosis. The real-time PCR assay revealed 117 additional D. fragilis-positive samples as compared with conventional methods, showing 100% sensitivity and specificity in our experience. On the whole, D. fragilis infection was detected in 186 samples from 105 patients (21.4%, third in frequency among the diagnosed intestinal parasitoses). The evaluated real-time PCR assay represents an effective tool to obtain both an accurate diagnosis and a reliable epidemiologic picture of dientamoebiasis. PMID:20462728

  13. Dientamoeba fragilis--a protozoal infection which may cause severe bowel distress.

    PubMed

    Norberg, A; Nord, C E; Evengård, B

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective study of 87 patients diagnosed with the protozoan Dientamoeba fragilis was performed due to a recent increase in the number of patients diagnosed with this organism at the Unit of Clinical Parasitology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Medical records were reviewed. The highest incidence was found in pre-school boys, who also had the longest duration of symptoms, with a range of 1-630 weeks. A majority of the patients had symptoms of diarrhea, abdominal pain and flatus. The diarrhea varied from watery to loose, blood being reported only sporadically. Most patients had traveled outside Europe and had no other parasites in their stools. This study indicates potential pathologic properties in D. fragilis, and prospective studies are recommended. PMID:12691546

  14. Urogenital myiasis caused by Psychoda albipennis in a child.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ay?egül Do?an; Iraz, Meryem; ?pek, Duygu Neval Say?n

    2015-03-01

    Urogenital myiasis results when flies lay their eggs near the exit of the urethra and the larvae proceed upward along the urogenital tract. In this case report, a 10 year-old female patient diagnosed with urogenital myiasis was reported. The patient presented with complaints including painful and frequent urination, genital pruritus and moving larvae in urine. The patient had received Enterobius vermicularis treatment previously for two times. A 24-hour urine sample was collected and two black larvae were found in the urine. It was found that these larvae were fourth-stage larvae of Psychoda albipennis. Although there was no risk factor, the patient was affected with this rare parasitological disease. This case was presented to draw attention to myiasis in children. Myiasis may be observed in individuals with a favourable hygiene status and a high socioeconomical level. If a detailed history is not taken and appropriate laboratory tests are not performed, the diagnosis may be missed. PMID:26078699

  15. A Case of Secondary Ophthalmomyiasis Caused by Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Berenji, Fariba; Hosseini-Farash, Bibi Razieh; Marvi-Moghadam, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is the invasion of vertebrates' tissue by the larvae of a fly of the order Diptera. The objective of this paper is to present a rare case of secondary myiasis of ocular infestation by Chrysomya bezziana. A 55-year-old female from Sar village of Mazandaran Province, northern Iran), referred to Khatam Al-Anbia Hospital of Mashhad with extensive destruction of left orbital cavity. Existence of larvae was the major complaint in recent months. Some live larvae were removed from her destructed left eye. Primary diagnosis was myiasis of left upper lid (LUL) and suspected recurrent Basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The laboratory diagnosis was done in parasitology lab of Imam Reza Hospital of Mashhad and collected larvae were identified and confirmed to be larvae of the C. bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae). It is a case report of secondary ophtalmiomyiasis due to C. bezziana of a patient lives in Mazandaran Province. PMID:26114150

  16. A Case of Secondary Ophthalmomyiasis Caused by Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Berenji, Fariba; Hosseini-Farash, Bibi Razieh; Marvi-Moghadam, Narges

    2015-06-01

    Myiasis is the invasion of vertebrates' tissue by the larvae of a fly of the order Diptera. The objective of this paper is to present a rare case of secondary myiasis of ocular infestation by Chrysomya bezziana. A 55-year-old female from Sar village of Mazandaran Province, northern Iran), referred to Khatam Al-Anbia Hospital of Mashhad with extensive destruction of left orbital cavity. Existence of larvae was the major complaint in recent months. Some live larvae were removed from her destructed left eye. Primary diagnosis was myiasis of left upper lid (LUL) and suspected recurrent Basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The laboratory diagnosis was done in parasitology lab of Imam Reza Hospital of Mashhad and collected larvae were identified and confirmed to be larvae of the C. bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae). It is a case report of secondary ophtalmiomyiasis due to C. bezziana of a patient lives in Mazandaran Province. PMID:26114150

  17. Urogenital myiasis caused by Psychoda albipennis in a child

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Ay?egül Do?an; Iraz, Meryem; ?pek, Duygu Neval Say?n

    2015-01-01

    Urogenital myiasis results when flies lay their eggs near the exit of the urethra and the larvae proceed upward along the urogenital tract. In this case report, a 10 year-old female patient diagnosed with urogenital myiasis was reported. The patient presented with complaints including painful and frequent urination, genital pruritus and moving larvae in urine. The patient had received Enterobius vermicularis treatment previously for two times. A 24-hour urine sample was collected and two black larvae were found in the urine. It was found that these larvae were fourth-stage larvae of Psychoda albipennis. Although there was no risk factor, the patient was affected with this rare parasitological disease. This case was presented to draw attention to myiasis in children. Myiasis may be observed in individuals with a favourable hygiene status and a high socioeconomical level. If a detailed history is not taken and appropriate laboratory tests are not performed, the diagnosis may be missed. PMID:26078699

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Artesunate: A Pooled Analysis of Individual Data From Patients With Severe Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zaloumis, S G; Tarning, J; Krishna, S; Price, R N; White, N J; Davis, T M E; McCaw, J M; Olliaro, P; Maude, R J; Kremsner, P; Dondorp, A; Gomes, M; Barnes, K; Simpson, J A

    2014-01-01

    There are ~660,000 deaths from severe malaria each year. Intravenous artesunate (i.v. ARS) is the first-line treatment in adults and children. To optimize the dosing regimen of i.v. ARS, the largest pooled population pharmacokinetic study to date of the active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was performed. The pooled dataset consisted of 71 adults and 195 children with severe malaria, with a mixture of sparse and rich sampling within the first 12?h after drug administration. A one-compartment model described the population pharmacokinetics of DHA adequately. Body weight had the greatest impact on DHA pharmacokinetics, resulting in lower DHA exposure for smaller children (6–10?kg) than adults. Post hoc estimates of DHA exposure were not significantly associated with parasitological outcomes. Comparable DHA exposure in smaller children and adults after i.v. ARS was achieved under a dose modification for intramuscular ARS proposed in a separate analysis of children. PMID:25372510

  19. Dermanyssus gallinae infestation: an unusual cause of scalp pruritus treated with permethrin shampoo.

    PubMed

    Dogramaci, Asena Cigdem; Culha, Gulnaz; Ozçelik, Semra

    2010-09-01

    Dermanyssus gallinae is a blood parasite of wild birds, but it is also a pest in the poultry industry. It occasionally bites mammals and thus rarely creates skin problems such as itching, papules, vesicles, and dermatitis. A 92-year-old man presented with severe itch on his head, particularly at night. He had been misdiagnosed with senile pruritus and treated with antihistamines and topical corticosteroids with temporary relief of the symptoms. On the basis of clinical and parasitological findings, D. gallinae dermatitis was diagnosed. Decontamination of the patient's immediate environment was not helpful. The patient was successfully treated using a 1% permethrin shampoo once a week for 2 weeks. During 3 months of follow-up he was free of symptoms. The case is of significance because most dermatologists have difficulty identifying ectoparasitoses, such as those that arise within new or atypical conditions. PMID:20687864

  20. [Accidental myiasis by Ornidia obesa in humans].

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Silvia G; Faccio, Lucian; Otto, Mateus Anderson; Soares, João Fabio; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mazzanti, Alexandre

    2008-09-01

    Dipterous of the genus Ornidia are pollinator bugs, but immature stages can be found in organic matter in decomposition. This article refers to a found of larvae of Ornidia obesa in humans feces. An eight years old child was treated in a medical clinic due to the presence of two larvae and one pupae in the feces, hyperthermia, intestinal obstruction and strong abdominal pain. Medical therapy consisted of Mebendazol and Ivermectin in the indicated doses. 24 hours after the administration of the drugs, several larvae were expelled with diarrheic feces. The material was taken to the Parasitological Veterinary Lab, and the larvae were classified belonging to the genus Ornidia. According to the literature, this specie of Diptera is not incriminated to cause myiasis in vertebrates. We think that this study reports a case of accidental myiasis in humans, were the patient may have ingested food with immature stages of the fly (eggs or larvae). PMID:20059825

  1. Effect of artemether on cytokine profile and egg induced pathology in murine schistosomiasis mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Madbouly, Neveen A.; Shalash, Ibraheem R.; El Deeb, Somaya O.; El Amir, Azza M.

    2014-01-01

    Artemether (ART), the methylated derivative of artemisinin, is an efficacious antimalarial drug that also displays antischistosomal properties. This study was designed to evaluate the immunomodulatory action of a single intramuscular dose (50 mg/kg body weight) of ART in comparison with PZQ treatment (42 days PI). ART administration was 7, 14, 21 and 45 days PI. ART effect was studied parasitologically, histopathologically and immunologically. It was found that maximum effect was reached when ART treatment interfered with 14 or 21 days old schistosomula. ART treatment 14 or 21 days PI was associated with shift from Th2 to Th1 predominancy (decrease in IL-4 and upgrading of serum IFN-γ levels). In conclusion, ART is a promising drug in control of schistosomiasis mansoni due to its reductive effect on worm burden and its role in improvement of hepatic granulomatous lesions. PMID:26644922

  2. Redescription of Clinostomum phalacrocoracis metacercariae (Digenea: Clinostomidae) in cichlids from Lake Kinneret, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Caffara, Monica; Davidovich, Nadav; Falk, Rama; Smirnov, Margarita; Ofek, Tamir; Cummings, David; Gustinelli, Andrea; Fioravanti, Maria L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinostomidae are digeneans characterized by a complex taxonomic history, continuously under revision based on both morphological and molecular analysis. Among the 14 species considered valid so far Clinostomum phalacrocoracis has been well described only at the adult stage, whereas the morphology of the metacercarial stage has been reported only once. During a parasitological survey carried out on 262 wild cichlids sampled from Lake Kinneret (Israel) metacercariae referable to C. phalacrocoracis were found in 18 fingerlings. In this study, we report this clinostomid species for the first time in wild fish from Israel describing the metacercarial stage of Clinostomum phalacrocoracis, coupling its morphological description with molecular analysis carried out on ITS rDNA and COI mtDNA sequences. PMID:24986336

  3. Diphyllobothrium sp. in Canis familiaris from the subtropical area of Argentina (Puerto Iguazú, Misiones).

    PubMed

    Rivero, María R; Motta, Carlos E; Salas, Martín M; Chiaretta, Alicia; Salomón, Oscar D

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the first finding of Diphyllobothrium sp. eggs in Canis familiaris (domestic dog) from Puerto Iguazú, a subtropical city of Misiones province, Argentina. In 2013, two positive cases of Diphyllobothrium sp. eggs were detected during an annual parasitological survey of dogs. Dog feces were collected in vials containing 10% formalin and processed using Telemann's sedimentation and Sheather's flotation techniques. The two cases were detected in rural areas of the municipality. Since Misiones is not a part of the endemic area of diphyllobothriasis and given the fact that it is located in the three-border area of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay, we consider this finding of great importance to public health. We stress the need for updating the current knowledge about the life cycle of these parasites considering the range of intermediate and definitive hosts, their zoonotic potential, and the epidemiological situation in non-endemic areas. PMID:26210607

  4. Procedures for the salvage and necropsy of the dugong (Dugong dugon)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eros, Carole; Marsh, Helene; Bonde, Robert K.; O'Shea, Thomas A.; Beck, Cathy A.; Recchia, Cheri; Dobbs, Kirstin; Turner, Malcolm; Lemm, Stephanie; Pears, Rachel; Bowater, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Data and specimens collected from dugong carcasses and live stranded individuals provide vital information for research and management agencies. The ability to assign a cause of death (natural and/or human induced) to a carcass assists managers to identify major threats to a population in certain areas and to evaluate and adapt management measures. Data collectedfrom dugong carcasses have contributed to research in areas such as life history, feeding biology, investigating the stock structure/genetics of dugongs, contaminants studies, heavy metal analyses, parasitology, and the effects of habitat change. Adapted from the 'Manual of Procedures for the Salvage and Necropsy of Carcasses of the West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus),' this manual provides a detailed guide for dugong (Dugong dugon) carcass handling and necropsy procedures. It is intended to be used as a resource and training guide for anyone involved in dugong incidents who may lack dugong expertise.

  5. A new approach to preservation of some organs using alkyd resin.

    PubMed

    Ar?, H H; Ç?naro?lu, S

    2011-02-01

    Organ preservation using alkyd resin was studied. In this new approach, water and lipids in some organs were removed and replaced by glycerol and alkyd resin using minimum equipment and inexpensive chemical substances such as varnish, thinner and glycerol. For reference, materials prepared with a conventional fixation and dehydration procedure were compared with those obtained by the new embedding and impregnation process followed by hardening. The materials obtained by the new method were dry, odourless, flexible, durable and natural in colour and texture. These materials can be used for a long time without decay and are suitable as teaching materials in anatomy, pathology and parasitology and as museum specimens. They can also be used in surgery lessons as teaching materials and in stereological microscopy studies. PMID:20538308

  6. Helminth Parasites of Juvenile Green Turtles Chelonia mydas (Testudines: Cheloniidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Werneck, M R; Silva, R J

    2015-12-01

    The present study offers a parasitological analysis of juvenile individuals of the green turtle ( Chelonia mydas ) found on the Brazilian coast between 2004 and 2011. Helminths were found in 90 out of 136 individuals (66.2%, CI = 57.7-74.0). In total, 29,411 helminths were collected, belonging to the families Brachycoeliidae, Cladorchiidae, Microscaphidiidae, Pronocephalidae, Rhytidodidae, and Spirorchiidae. Mean species richness was 4.74 (CI = 4.03-5.46), the mean intensity was 327 (CI = 223-489), and the mean abundance was 216 (CI = 146-339). This study also reports new geographical records for: Angiodictyum longum, Angiodictyum parallelum, Rameshwarotrema uterocrescens, Pyelosomum cochlear, Schizamphistomum scleroporum, Cymatocarpus solearis, and Neospirorchis sp. This is the first analysis of helminth composition in juveniles of green turtles. PMID:26312398

  7. Seroepidemiological study of visceral leishmaniasis among humans and animal reservoirs in Bushehr province, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, M; Hamzavi, Y; Edrissian, G H; Forouzani, A

    2001-11-01

    Using direct agglutination tests, a survey of visceral leishmaniasis was carried out among children and adults from 13 villages and from nomadic tribes in Bushehr province during 1998-99. Of the 1496 plasma samples, the overall seropositive rate (titres > or = 1:3200) was 3.4%. Almost all cases (94.1%) were in children under 10 years old. Eighteen patients were diagnosed with kala azar; fever and splenomegaly were the predominant signs and symptoms. Parasitology and serology examinations of local animals identified dogs and jackals infected with Leishmania infantum. Suggestions for control of visceral leishmaniasis in this area are to eliminate stray dogs, identify cases among humans and suspected leashed dogs, and treat infected individuals. PMID:15332732

  8. Cardio-Pulmonary Parasitic Nematodes Affecting Cats in Europe: Unraveling the Past, Depicting the Present, and Predicting the Future

    PubMed Central

    Traversa, Donato; Di Cesare, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Various cardio-pulmonary parasitic nematodes infecting cats have recently been fascinating and stimulating the attention of the Academia, pharmaceutical companies, and veterinary practitioners. This is the case of the metastrongyloids: Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior, the trichuroid: Capillaria aerophila (syn. Eucoleus aerophilus), and the filarioid: Dirofilaria immitis. Apparently, these parasites have been emerging in several European countries, thus, gaining an important role in feline parasitology and clinical practice. Under a practical standpoint, a sound knowledge of the biological, epidemiological, and clinical impact of cardio-respiratory parasitoses affecting cats, in addition to a potential risk of introduction, establishment, and spreading of “new” parasites in Europe is mandatory in order to understand the present and future impact for feline medicine and to address new strategies of control and treatment. The purpose of the present article is to review the current knowledge of heartworm and lungworm infections in cats, discussing and comparing past and present issues, and predicting possible future scenarios. PMID:26664917

  9. [Case report: dirofilariasis in a dog].

    PubMed

    Arnold, P; Deplazes, P; Ruckstuhl, H; Flückiger, M

    1994-01-01

    A Siberian Husky from the Milan region was referred to the Clinic for clarification of a history of weight loss and rapid fatigue. On clinical examination increased vesicular sounds and dyspnea after physical excitement and effort were the only abnormal findings demonstrable. Radiologically demonstrated changes of the pulmonary arteries led to a tentative diagnosis of Dirofilariosis. The parasitological diagnosis based on serology and the morphology of microfilariae isolated from the blood indicated an infection by microfilariae and adult stages of Dirofilaria immitis. After premedication with Aspirin, the patient was treated against adult filariae with Caparsolate, and a month later with Ivermectin against the microfilariae. At the time of reexamination, 5 months after initiation of therapy, the dog was clinically healthy and free of any demonstrable infection with Dirofilaria. In a second, clinically normal Husky from the same kennel, isolated Dirofilaria repens microfilariae were demonstrated. This dog was not treated. PMID:8091180

  10. Towards a paradigm shift in the treatment of chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Viotti, R; Alarcón de Noya, B; Araujo-Jorge, T; Grijalva, M J; Guhl, F; López, M C; Ramsey, J M; Ribeiro, I; Schijman, A G; Sosa-Estani, S; Torrico, F; Gascon, J

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for Chagas disease with currently available medications is recommended universally only for acute cases (all ages) and for children up to 14 years old. The World Health Organization, however, also recommends specific antiparasite treatment for all chronic-phase Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, even though in current medical practice this remains controversial, and most physicians only prescribe palliative treatment for adult Chagas patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The present opinion, prepared by members of the NHEPACHA network (Nuevas Herramientas para el Diagnóstico y la Evaluación del Paciente con Enfermedad de Chagas/New Tools for the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Chagas Disease Patients), reviews the paradigm shift based on clinical and immunological evidence and argues in favor of antiparasitic treatment for all chronic patients. We review the tools needed to monitor therapeutic efficacy and the potential criteria for evaluation of treatment efficacy beyond parasitological cure. Etiological treatment should now be mandatory for all adult chronic Chagas disease patients. PMID:24247135

  11. [Model for sanitary-helminthological supervision and search for the measures for disinfestation of soil and water in the beef tapeworm infection foci in conditions of Kabardino-Balkaria].

    PubMed

    Sarbasheva, M M; Bittirova, A A; Atabieva, Zh A; Bittirov, A M

    2014-01-01

    The soil and water runoff from the livestock facilities are potentially dangerous for the infection of animal with eggs Taeniarhynchus saginatus. The complex antihelminthic measures and the basis of sanitary and parasitological model of prevention of parasitic diseases of humans and animals in Kabardino-Balkaria allowed within 3-4 years to diminish the contamination of soil with cestode eggs in 4-4.8 times. EGAT drug concentration of 50% and exposure in the range 1-20 days in a clean slurry causes the death to 47% of the eggs T. saginatus, in soil--up to 52% sewage sludge--45% in sewage--49%, that indicates its lack of ovicidal efficacy against cestode eggs. PMID:25306696

  12. The investigation of congenital infection by Trypanosoma cruzi in an endemic area of Chile: three protocols explored in a pilot project

    PubMed Central

    Zulantay, I; Corral, G; Guzman, M C; Aldunate, F; Guerra, W; Cruz, I; Araya, A; Tapia, V; Marquez, F; Muñoz, C; Apt, W

    2011-01-01

    Given the increasing travel of pregnant women from areas were Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic, the congenital transmission of the parasite has become a global public-health problem. In a recent pilot study, which ran in Chile from 2006 to 2010, three strategies for exploring and managing T. cruzi-infected mothers and their infected or uninfected neonates were investigated. Any protocols applied to the investigation of such mother-and-child pairs need to include the detection of infection in pregnant women, the detection of infection, if any, in the children born to the women, the appropriate treatment of the infected neonates, and the serological–parasitological follow-up of all of the neonates until their medical discharge. PMID:21396248

  13. OVER-DIAGNOSIS AND CO-MORBIDITY OF SEVERE MALARIA IN AFRICAN CHILDREN: A GUIDE FOR CLINICIANS

    PubMed Central

    GWER, SAMSON; NEWTON, CHARLES RJC; BERKLEY, JAMES A

    2009-01-01

    Severe malaria is clinically similar other severe febrile illnesses. However, in endemic areas, parasitological confirmation of parasitemia is often unavailable or unreliable. False positive malaria microscopy is common. The most important consequence of treating only for malaria when no parasitemia exists is failure to address other life threatening conditions. Invasive bacterial infections are detected in up to a third of children with clinical features of severe malaria but a negative slide. Even among genuinely parasitized children, severe illness is not always due to malaria in endemic areas. We believe that routine use of parenteral antibiotics among children with a positive malaria slide and life-threatening disease is warranted because invasive bacterial infections are likely to be under-ascertained and are associated with increased mortality. Published data on co-morbidity with HIV infection and malnutrition are reviewed. A structured approach to assessment and care is essential, and is largely independent of underlying etiology. PMID:18165469

  14. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni Antibodies in a Low-Endemicity Area Using Indirect Immunofluorescence and Circumoval Precipitin Test

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho do Espírito-Santo, Maria Cristina; Pinto, Pedro Luiz; Gargioni, Cybele; Viviana Alvarado-Mora, Monica; Pagliusi Castilho, Vera Lúcia; Pinho, João Ranato Rebello; de Albuquerque Luna, Expedito José; Borges Gryschek, Ronaldo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Parasitological diagnostic methods for schistosomiasis lack sensitivity, especially in regions of low endemicity. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni infections by antibody detection using the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA-IgM) and circumoval precipitin test (COPT). Serum samples of 572 individuals were randomly selected. The IFA-IgM and COPT were used to detect anti-S. mansoni antibodies. Of the patients studied, 15.9% (N = 91) were IFA-IgM positive and 5.1% (N = 29) had COPT reactions (P < 0.001 by McNemar's test). Immunodiagnostic techniques showed higher infection prevalence than had been previously estimated. This study suggests that combined use of these diagnostic tools could be useful for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis in epidemiological studies in areas of low endemicity. PMID:24639303

  15. Checklist of Helminth parasites of Amphibians from South America.

    PubMed

    Campião, Karla Magalhães; Morais, Drausio Honorio; Dias, Olívia Tavares; Aguiar, Aline; Toledo, Gislayne De Melo; Tavares, Luiz Eduardo Roland; Da Silva, Reinaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Parasitological studies on helminths of amphibians in South America have increased in the past few years. Here, we present a list with summarized data published on helminths of South American amphibians from 1925 to 2012, including a list of helminth parasites, host species, and geographic records. We found 194 reports of helminths parasitizing 185 amphibian species from eleven countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Equador, French Guyana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. Helminth biodiversity includes 278 parasite species of the groups Acanthocephala, Nematoda, Cestoda, Monogenea and Trematoda. A list of helminth parasite species per host, and references are also presented. This contribution aims to document the biodiversity of helminth parasites in South American amphibians, as well as identify gaps in our knowledge, which in turn may guide subsequent studies.  PMID:25082165

  16. Parasites or Cohabitants: Cruel Omnipresent Usurpers or Creative “Éminences Grises”?

    PubMed Central

    Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Lenzi, Henrique L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents many types of interplays between parasites and the host, showing the history of parasites, the effects of parasites on the outcome of wars, invasions, migrations, and on the development of numerous regions of the globe, and the impact of parasitic diseases on the society and on the course of human evolution. It also emphasizes the pressing need to change the look at the parasitism phenomenon, proposing that the term “cohabitant” is more accurate than parasite, because every living being, from bacteria to mammals, is a consortium of living beings in the pangenome. Even the term parasitology should be replaced by cohabitology because there is no parasite alone and host alone: both together compose a new adaptive system: the parasitized-host or the cohabitant-cohabited being. It also suggests switching the old paradigm based on attrition and destruction, to a new one founded on adaptation and living together. PMID:21785696

  17. Insect ectoparasites from wild passerine birds in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Sychra, O; Literák, I; Podzemný, P; Benedikt, V

    2008-12-01

    Wild passerine birds (Passeriformes) from northeastern part of the Czech Republic were examined for ectoparasites. Three species of louse-flies of the genus Ornithomya (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), two species of fleas of the genera Ceratophyllus and Dasypsyllus (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae), and 15 species of chewing lice belonging to the genera Myrsidea, Menacanthus (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae), Brueelia, Penenirmus, Philopterus (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) were found on 82 birds of 23 species. New chewing louse-host records are Hippolais icterina for Menacanthus currucae; Motacilla cinerea for Menacanthus pusillus; Turdus philomelos and Motacilla cinerea for Brueelia merulensis; and Sylvia atricapilla for Menacanthus eurysternus. Brueelia neoatricapillae is cited for the first time for the Czech Republic. Parasitological parameters such as prevalence, intensity and abundance are also discussed. PMID:19202768

  18. Decisions for the future

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Music and science have always been my passion. Ultimately, though, the scale was tipped in favor of science. And I lived out my science dreams in trying to grasp as many facets of it as possible. As a biologist, I didn’t stay in one stream and thus, I have embraced not only molecular biology but parasitology as well. This was way back 1980s, when such a research career was viewed highly unusual in a Japanese context. My commitment to malaria and vaccine development follows the same path. I believe one has to integrate knowledge on a wide variety of academic fields— gene expressions, protein structure, epidemiology, immunology—to achieve significant success. Similar to life itself, one has to be prepared well to be able to accept and interpret as widely as possible what one may term as “accidental results” or “accidental elements.” PMID:24832717

  19. Helminth parasitic infections of the central nervous system: a diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmad A; Bruschi, Fabrizio; Ganna, Ahmed A

    2014-04-01

    Helminth parasitic infections of the central nervous system (CNS) occur worldwide with high prevalence in tropical and subtropical countries. Clinical evaluation of patients is mandatory, and it is convenient to group the clinical manifestations into syndromes: for example space-occupying lesions, meningitis, and encephalitis. The history should focus on residence or travel to endemic areas, diet, activities, intercurrent medical conditions, and associated clinical clues. Direct parasitological diagnosis can be reached by cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral tissue examination either by microscopy, culture, or immunological techniques. Immunodiagnosis by detection of parasite antibodies or antigens in serum could provide indirect evidence of parasitic infections. In addition, various imaging and radiological techniques e.g., computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) complement the diagnostic work-up of CNS diseases. Finally, the helminthic CNS infections of global impact, such as schistosomiasis, neurotoxocariasis, Strongyloides infection, neurotrichinosis, neurocysticercosis, and echinococcosis will be briefly discussed as regards the principal clinical and diagnostic features. PMID:24961012

  20. CHAGASIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS IN AN HIV INFECTED PATIENT WITH MODERATE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION: PROLONGED SURVIVAL AND CHALLENGES IN THE HAART ERA

    PubMed Central

    BUCCHERI, Renata; KASSAB, Maria José; de FREITAS, Vera Lucia Teixeira; da SILVA, Sheila Cristina Vicente; BEZERRA, Rita C.; KHOURY, Zarifa; SHIKANAI-YASUDA, Maria Aparecida; VIDAL, José E.

    2015-01-01

    The reactivation of Chagas disease in HIV infected patients presents high mortality and morbidity. We present the case of a female patient with confirmed Chagasic meningoencephalitis as AIDS-defining illness. Interestingly, her TCD4+ lymphocyte cell count was 318 cells/mm3. After two months of induction therapy, one year of maintenance with benznidazol, and early introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the patient had good clinical, parasitological and radiological evolution. We used a qualitative polymerase chain reaction for the monitoring of T. cruzi parasitemia during and after the treatment. We emphasize the potential value of molecular techniques along with clinical and radiological parameters in the follow-up of patients with Chagas disease and HIV infection. Early introduction of HAART, prolonged induction and maintenance of antiparasitic therapy, and its discontinuation are feasible, in the current management of reactivation of Chagas disease.

  1. Detection and quantification of viable Ascaris sp. and other helminth eggs in sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Veridiana Karmann; Cutolo, Silvana Audra; Doria, Maria do Carmo Oliveira; Razzolini, Maria Tereza Pepe

    2013-01-01

    Some epidemiologic studies conducted in developing countries demonstrated a high incidence of enteroparasites, Ascaris sp. being the most prevalent. Therefore, the use of sewage sludge in agriculture may pose risks to human health. In order to protect public health, a Brazilian regulation has established standards regarding its use in rural areas. The objective of this study was to quantify Ascaris sp. and other helminth eggs in sewage sludge from five wastewater treatment plants from a dense metropolitan region, and also to check compliance with the law. The analysis was carried according to USEPA 2003 . A rich parasitological fauna was found, with a prevalence of the eggs of Ascaris sp. (9.55%). The samples analyzed presented a large variety of helminth eggs, and Ascaris sp. proved to be the most prevalent which put in evidence that its application poses public health concerns. PMID:23072414

  2. Multicentre trials of praziquantel in human schistosomiasis: design and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A.; Wegner, D. H. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper outlines the experimental design and techniques used in the initial multicentre clinical experiences with praziquantel in the treatment of human infections due to Schistosoma haematobium, S. mansoni, and S. japonicum. Trials were conducted in Brazil, Japan, the Philippines, and Zambia. Close professional cooperation between informed representatives of the manufacturers of the drug and WHO led to the use of a standard clinical trial design and agreed technical protocols, although parasitological methods of therapeutic assessment varied with the species of infecting parasite. Double-blind studies of tolerance were conducted at three different dose levels and subsequently, in Brazil and Zambia, single-blind trials of parasiticidal efficacy were carried out. The results of the various trials are reported separately. This type of close professional cooperation is a useful model for initial clinicopharmacological studies of parasiticidal drugs—an area beset with difficulties for both industry and international agencies. PMID:317254

  3. Historical perspectives and current global challenges of Trichinella and trichinellosis.

    PubMed

    Gajadhar, A A; Gamble, H R

    2000-12-01

    Trichinella spiralis and related species of Trichinella have had a long history of causing human disease, and as a foodborne pathogen have had a major impact on international commerce of pork and other meat animal species which are known to transmit the parasite. Our knowledge of Trichinella has increased substantially over the past few years particularly in the areas of phylogeny, host diversity, epidemiology and control. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of our understanding of Trichinella from its discovery to present time. Past and current challenges of the control of Trichinella and trichinellosis are summarized. As editors of this special issue of Veterinary Parasitology, we introduce a series of invited review articles prepared by experts from around the world, summarizing recent knowledge in Trichinella and trichinellosis. PMID:11099836

  4. A new data management system for the French National Registry of human alveolar echinococcosis cases

    PubMed Central

    Charbonnier, Amandine; Knapp, Jenny; Demonmerot, Florent; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Raoul, Francis; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence; Vuitton, Dominique Angèle; Damy, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is an endemic zoonosis in France due to the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis. The French National Reference Centre for Alveolar Echinococcosis (CNR-EA), connected to the FrancEchino network, is responsible for recording all AE cases diagnosed in France. Administrative, epidemiological and medical information on the French AE cases may currently be considered exhaustive only on the diagnosis time. To constitute a reference data set, an information system (IS) was developed thanks to a relational database management system (MySQL language). The current data set will evolve towards a dynamic surveillance system, including follow-up data (e.g. imaging, serology) and will be connected to environmental and parasitological data relative to E. multilocularis to better understand the pathogen transmission pathway. A particularly important goal is the possible interoperability of the IS with similar European and other databases abroad; this new IS could play a supporting role in the creation of new AE registries. PMID:25526544

  5. Identification of Leishmania infantum in Puerto Iguazú, Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Lucrecia; Díaz, Ricardo; Torres, Pedro; Silva, Gustavo; Ramos, Marina; Fattore, Gladys; Deschutter, Enrique J; Bornay-Llinares, Fernando J

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) in Latin America is a growing public health problem. The urbanization of ZVL has been observed in different countries around the world, and there are a growing number of reports drawing attention to the emergence of this infection in new locations, as well as its increase in previously established areas of endemicity. In the city of Posadas, Misiones province, Northeastern Argentina, the transmission of ZVL associated with canines and Lutzomyia longipalpis was first reported in 2006. In the city of Puerto Iguazú, also in Misiones province, the first human case of ZVL was reported in February 2014. From 209 surveyed dogs, 15 (7.17%) were identified as positive by serological and/or parasitological methods. Amplification was observed in 14 samples and in all cases the species implicated was Leishmania infantum. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of L. infantum from dogs in this area. PMID:25923899

  6. Effects of treatment with topical ivermectin three and eight weeks after turnout on nematode control and the performance of second-season beef suckler cattle.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S M; McMullin, P F; Mallon, T R; Kelly, A; Grimshaw, W T

    1995-06-01

    Two groups of yearling suckled beef calves born between January and May of the preceding year and another two groups of lighter and slightly younger calves born between the previous March and July were grazed during their second year on four separate paddocks known to be contaminated with infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes. One of the heavier and one of the lighter groups were treated with a topical formulation of ivermectin three weeks and eight weeks after turnout. The treatment of the heavier group had only relatively minor parasitological effects and no effect on weight gains, whereas the treatment of the lighter cattle resulted in increased weight gains due to effective nematode control. The paper highlights that small differences in previous performances, age and exposure to parasites can have a substantial impact on the benefits accrued from anthelmintic treatment. PMID:7676580

  7. Cardio-Pulmonary Parasitic Nematodes Affecting Cats in Europe: Unraveling the Past, Depicting the Present, and Predicting the Future.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Donato; Di Cesare, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Various cardio-pulmonary parasitic nematodes infecting cats have recently been fascinating and stimulating the attention of the Academia, pharmaceutical companies, and veterinary practitioners. This is the case of the metastrongyloids: Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior, the trichuroid: Capillaria aerophila (syn. Eucoleus aerophilus), and the filarioid: Dirofilaria immitis. Apparently, these parasites have been emerging in several European countries, thus, gaining an important role in feline parasitology and clinical practice. Under a practical standpoint, a sound knowledge of the biological, epidemiological, and clinical impact of cardio-respiratory parasitoses affecting cats, in addition to a potential risk of introduction, establishment, and spreading of "new" parasites in Europe is mandatory in order to understand the present and future impact for feline medicine and to address new strategies of control and treatment. The purpose of the present article is to review the current knowledge of heartworm and lungworm infections in cats, discussing and comparing past and present issues, and predicting possible future scenarios. PMID:26664917

  8. Endoparasites of Wild Rodents in Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nateghpour, Mehdi; Motevalli-Haghi, Afsaneh; Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Mobedi, Iraj; Farivar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to collect wild rodents for endoparasites determination in some parts of Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran nearby Pakistan and Afghanistan countries. Methods: A total of 100 wild rodents were captured alive with cage traps. Various samples were collected from blood and feces, also impression smear prepared from different organs. The samples were prepared by formalin-ether or stained with Giemsa, after that were examined under microscope. Results: All the caught rodents (47 Tatera indica, 44 Meriones hurriana, 5 Gerbilus nanus and 4 Meriones libycus) were studied for endoparasites emphasizing to their zoonotic aspects. Endoparasites including Spirurida, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana feraterna, Trichuris trichiura, Skerjabino taenia, Trichostrongylus spp, Entamoeba muris, Chilomastix mesnili and Leishmania spp were parasitologically identified. Conclusion: Among 9 genera or species of the identified parasites at least 5 of them have zoonotic and public health importance. PMID:26114139

  9. Epidemiology of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the endemic area of Jericho, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Jawabreh, A; Barghuthy, F; Schnur, L F; Jacobson, R L; Schönian, G; Abdeen, Z

    2003-07-01

    This study of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Jericho city and the adjacent Aqbat-Jaber refugee camp investigated the seroprevalance of Leishmania major and the risk factors associated with acquiring the disease. Clinical and parasitology identification of cases showed children and young men were more affected, with the head most affected in children. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to test sera from 190 individuals. The overall seroprevalence of cutaneous leishmaniasis was 26.3%. A case-control study of 247 individual in 37 households showed that a higher level of education of the head of the household and having children sleep under bed nets were significantly related to a lower incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:15748077

  10. Cryptosporidium contamination in harvesting areas of bivalve molluscs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Méndez-Hermida, Fernando; Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; Ares-Mazás, Elvira

    2006-01-01

    Cryptosporidium contamination was evaluated in areas in Galicia (northwestern Spain) where bivalve molluscs are harvested. Galicia is the main mussel-producing region in Europe. Data were collected on water contamination of effluents that are discharged into these areas. Cryptosporidium spp. were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and molecular methods in 71% of the river water samples (n = 7), 64% of raw sewage samples (n = 11), 50% of effluents from wastewater treatment plants (n = 16), and 29.3% of the mussel samples (Mytilus galloprovincialis, n = 184). Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in all samples of contaminated mussels, Cryptosporidium muris was found in three samples of effluent from wastewater treatment plants, and Cryptosporidium baileyi was found in a sample of raw sewage. Further studies are needed to determine the parasitological quality of water in these shellfish harvesting and recreational areas. Cryptosporidium could be a public health risk from consumption of raw or undercooked contaminated molluscs and use of contaminated waters for recreational purposes. PMID:16416917

  11. Causes of mortality of albatross chicks at Midway Atoll

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sileo, L.; Sievert, P.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    As part of an investigation of the effect of plastic ingestion on seabirds in Hawaii, we necropsied the carcasses of 137 Laysan albatross (Diomedea immutabilis) chicks from Midway Atoll in the Pacific Ocean during the summer of 1987. Selected tissues were collected for microbiological, parasitological, toxicological or histopathological examinations. Dehydration was the most common cause of death. Lead poisoning, trauma, emaciation (starvation) and trombidiosis were other causes of death; nonfatal nocardiosis and avian pox also were present. There was no evidence that ingested plastic caused mechanical lesions or mortality in 1987, but most of the chicks had considerably less plastic in them than chicks from earlier years. Human activity (lead poisoning and vehicular trauma) caused mortality at Midway Atoll and represented additive mortality for pre-fledgling albatrosses.

  12. Multiple parasites mediate balancing selection at two MHC class II genes in the fossorial water vole: insights from multivariate analyses and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Tollenaere, C; Bryja, J; Galan, M; Cadet, P; Deter, J; Chaval, Y; Berthier, K; Ribas Salvador, A; Voutilainen, L; Laakkonen, J; Henttonen, H; Cosson, J-F; Charbonnel, N

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the factors mediating selection acting on two MHC class II genes (DQA and DRB) in water vole (Arvicola scherman) natural populations in the French Jura Mountains. Population genetics showed significant homogeneity in allelic frequencies at the DQA1 locus as opposed to neutral markers (nine microsatellites), indicating balancing selection acting on this gene. Moreover, almost exhaustive screening for parasites, including gastrointestinal helminths, brain coccidia and antibodies against viruses responsible for zoonoses, was carried out. We applied a co-inertia approach to the genetic and parasitological data sets to avoid statistical problems related to multiple testing. Two alleles, Arte-DRB-11 and Arte-DRB-15, displayed antagonistic associations with the nematode Trichuris arvicolae, revealing the potential parasite-mediated selection acting on DRB locus. Selection mechanisms acting on the two MHC class II genes thus appeared different. Moreover, overdominance as balancing selection mechanism was showed highly unlikely in this system. PMID:18624885

  13. [Cestode of the family Hymenolepididae from ducks of Chukotka: Microsomacanthus parasobolevi sp. n.--a widely distributed parasite of eider ducks].

    PubMed

    Regel', K V

    2005-01-01

    A new species of the genus Microsomacanthus Lopez-Neyra, 1942 is described. The material was collected from eider ducks (Somateria mollissima, S. fischeri, and S. spectabilis) in the Chaunskaya lowland (North-Western Chukotka). Microsomacanthus parasobolevi sp. n. differs from the closest species of this genus (M. polystictae Regel, 1988, M. sobolevi Spassky et Jurpalova, 1964; M. strictophalius Tolkatchieva, 1966) by the structure and size of the copulatory organ. Wide distribution of the new species was detected based on the cestodes collections from eider ducks of the Eastern Chukotka, Lena River mouth (in the museum of the Institute of the Parasitology RAS) and Iceland (Karl Skirnisson's cestode collection of the common eider). Furthermore, this species was reported once of the common eider in Newfoundland and Labrador, but erroneously identified as Hymenglejns (Microsomacanthnis) formosoides Spasskaja et Spassky, 1961 by Bishop and Threlfall (1974). PMID:15907028

  14. A report on the genital myiasis by Wohlfahrtia magnifica in camel herds in southwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pirali Kheirabadi, Khodadad; Dehghani Samani, Amir; Rajabi Vardanjani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Myiasis is a disease of vertebrate animals caused by different fly larvae. Wohlfahrtia magnifica is responsible for serious losses in animal husbandry in Eurasia. Larvae of W. magnifica parasitize several warm-blooded vertebrates and are responsible for a severe traumatic myiasis of mucosal membranes or wounds. This myiasis has been reported in many European areas, but for the first time was reported from Iran. Larvae infestation was observed in five camels out of 35 (14.28%) around the perinea and vaginal region of camels in a herd in southwest of Iran. The larvae samples were collected and transferred to the laboratory of parasitology for identification. This is the first report of infestation of a camel herd (camelus dromedarius) in Iran. The treatment was performed and prevented the loss from camels and improved their physical condition. Although the myiasis is not a lethal disorder, however knowledge of the disease is necessary from preventive, diagnostic and curative standpoint. PMID:25610587

  15. Human host determinants influencing the outcome of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections

    PubMed Central

    Bucheton, B; MacLeod, A; Jamonneau, V

    2011-01-01

    Since first identified, human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness has been described as invariably fatal. Increasing data however argue that infection by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the causative agent of HAT, results in a wide range of outcomes in its human host and importantly that a number of subjects in endemic areas are apparently able to control infection to low levels, undetectable by the classical parasitological tests used in the field. Thus, trypanotolerance seems to occur in humans as has already been described in cattle or in the rodent experimental models of infection. This review focuses on the description of the diversity of outcomes resulting from T. b. gambiense in humans and on the host factors involved. The consequences/impacts on HAT epidemiology resulting from this diversity are also discussed with regard to implementing sustainable HAT control strategies. PMID:21385185

  16. Salivary Biomarkers in the Control of Mosquito-Borne Diseases.

    PubMed

    Doucoure, Souleymane; Drame, Papa Makhtar

    2015-01-01

    Vector control remains the most effective measure to prevent the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. However, the classical entomo-parasitological methods used to evaluate the human exposure to mosquito bites and the effectiveness of control strategies are indirect, labor intensive, and lack sensitivity in low exposure/transmission areas. Therefore, they are limited in their accuracy and widespread use. Studying the human antibody response against the mosquito salivary proteins has provided new biomarkers for a direct and accurate evaluation of the human exposure to mosquito bites, at community and individual levels. In this review, we discuss the development, applications and limits of these biomarkers applied to Aedes- and Anopheles-borne diseases. PMID:26593952

  17. Towards a Paradigm Shift in the Treatment of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón de Noya, B.; Araujo-Jorge, T.; Grijalva, M. J.; Guhl, F.; López, M. C.; Ramsey, J. M.; Ribeiro, I.; Schijman, A. G.; Sosa-Estani, S.; Torrico, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for Chagas disease with currently available medications is recommended universally only for acute cases (all ages) and for children up to 14 years old. The World Health Organization, however, also recommends specific antiparasite treatment for all chronic-phase Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, even though in current medical practice this remains controversial, and most physicians only prescribe palliative treatment for adult Chagas patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The present opinion, prepared by members of the NHEPACHA network (Nuevas Herramientas para el Diagnóstico y la Evaluación del Paciente con Enfermedad de Chagas/New Tools for the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Chagas Disease Patients), reviews the paradigm shift based on clinical and immunological evidence and argues in favor of antiparasitic treatment for all chronic patients. We review the tools needed to monitor therapeutic efficacy and the potential criteria for evaluation of treatment efficacy beyond parasitological cure. Etiological treatment should now be mandatory for all adult chronic Chagas disease patients. PMID:24247135

  18. Comparison of data-fitting models for schistosomiasis: a case study in Xingzi, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Xiong, Cheng-Long; Zhang, Zhi-Jie; Bergquist, Robert; Wang, Zeng-Liang; Gao, Jie; Li, Rui; Tao, Bo; Jiang, Qiu-Lin; Jiang, Qingwu

    2013-11-01

    When modelling prevalence data, epidemiological studies usually employ either Gaussian, binomial or Poisson models. However, reasons are seldom given in the literature why the chosen model was felt to be the most appropriate. In this study, we compared all three models for fitting schistosomiasis risk in Xingzi county, Jiangxi province, People's Republic of China. Parasitological data from conventional surveys were available for 36,208 individuals aged between 6 and 65 years from 42 sampled villages and used in combination with environmental data to map the spatial patterns of schistosomiasis risk. The results show that the Poisson model fitted the data best and this model identified the role of environmental risk factors in explaining the geographical variation of schistosomiasis risk. These factors were further used to develop a predictive map, which has important implications for the control and eventual elimination of schistosomiasis in the People's Republic of China. PMID:24258889

  19. The impact of multiple infections on wild animal hosts: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Frédéric; Morand, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Field parasitological studies consistently demonstrate the reality of polyparasitism in natural systems. However, only recently, studies from ecological and evolutionary fields have emphasised a broad spectrum of potential multiple infections-related impacts. The main goal of our review is to reunify the different approaches on the impacts of polyparasitism, not only from laboratory or human medical studies but also from field or theoretical studies. We put forward that ecological and epidemiological determinants to explain the level of polyparasitism, which regularly affects not only host body condition, survival or reproduction but also host metabolism, genetics or immune investment. Despite inherent limitations of all these studies, multiple infections should be considered more systematically in wildlife to better appreciate the importance of parasite diversity in wildlife, cumulative effects of parasitism on the ecology and evolution of their hosts. PMID:22957114

  20. Visceral leishmaniasis in zoo and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Souza, Tayse Domingues; Turchetti, Andréia Pereira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2014-03-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an emerging zoonosis caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum. Although the domestic dog is the main vertebrate host, many zoo and wild mammal species have been diagnosed with L. infantum infection, especially in endemic areas. There are many available diagnostic approaches, including serological, parasitological and molecular tests. Among wild animals, carnivores and primates are more often clinically affected, with some species, such as the bush dog (Speothos venaticus) being especially susceptible to development of clinical signs. There are also reports and research articles of VL in felids, rodents, and marsupials. This work aims to review the occurrence of VL in zoo and wildlife and raise awareness of its importance in the field of conservational veterinary medicine. PMID:24439771

  1. [Instituto de Investigaciones Clinicas "Dr. Américo Negrette": 55 years of excellent research versus global economic recession].

    PubMed

    Valero Cedeño, Nereida Josefina

    2014-12-01

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas "Dr. Américo Negrette" belongs to the Faculty of Medicine at University of Zulia in Maracaibo, Zulia State, Venezuela. It was created on December 4, 1959 by Dr. Américo Negrette. Today, with 55 years of existence, the Institute seeks to fulfill the mission that characterizes it, based on the values instilled by its founder and maintained by subsequent generations, whose research projects are implemented through seven research sections: Biochemistry, Hematologic Research, Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Immunology and Cell Biology, Clinical Neurochemistry, Parasitology and Virology. The research originated in these laboratories have become national and international points of reference, despite the current economic situation with budget deficits that put at risk the quality and originality of their projects with negative consequences on the productivity and applications for health population, reasons of biomedical research. PMID:25558749

  2. Moxidectin Efficacy in a Goat Herd with Chronic and Generalized Sarcoptic Mange

    PubMed Central

    Giadinis, Nektarios D.; Farmaki, Rania; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Elias; Karatzias, Harilaos; Koutinas, Alexander F.

    2011-01-01

    A case of sarcoptic mange affecting almost all the animals of a dairy goat herd is described. This pruritic skin disease led progressively to high mortality and dramatic drop of milk yield. The lesions of the affected goats were typical of a chronic and generalized-diffuse sarcoptic mange. Diagnosis was confirmed by skin scrapings and histopathology in which many mites were demonstrated. All surviving goats were treated with injectable moxidectin solution 1% (CYDECTIN-Fort Dodge) at the dose of 0.2?mg/kg, applied every 15 days for four times, subcutaneously. Although pruritus had decreased soon after the first treatment, a satisfactory healing of cutaneous lesions was witnessed 6 weeks after the beginning of moxidectin trial. Parasitological cure was achieved in all affected animals by the end of the trial. In the four monthly followups, no evidence of sarcoptic mange could be found. PMID:21776348

  3. [Age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda: Ligulidae) plerocercoids and probability of its usage for the calculation of host death rate].

    PubMed

    Pronin, N M; Pronina, S V

    2014-01-01

    Results of special parasitological dissections of roach samples from catches with the same fishing gear and at the same station (Monakhovo Cove, Chivyrkui Bay of the Lake Baikal) and at the same time in different years (1998-2002) are given. Stability of age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalisis in different years with the maximum of prevalence and mean abundance in fish of 3+ age, and the following sharp decrease in these rates in elder age groups, was revealed. Basing on prevalence decreasing of a single roach generation, the rate of fish mortality during its growth from age group 3+ to 4+ was estimated as 15.9-20.7%. PMID:25693329

  4. Salivary Biomarkers in the Control of Mosquito-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Doucoure, Souleymane; Drame, Papa Makhtar

    2015-01-01

    Vector control remains the most effective measure to prevent the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. However, the classical entomo-parasitological methods used to evaluate the human exposure to mosquito bites and the effectiveness of control strategies are indirect, labor intensive, and lack sensitivity in low exposure/transmission areas. Therefore, they are limited in their accuracy and widespread use. Studying the human antibody response against the mosquito salivary proteins has provided new biomarkers for a direct and accurate evaluation of the human exposure to mosquito bites, at community and individual levels. In this review, we discuss the development, applications and limits of these biomarkers applied to Aedes- and Anopheles-borne diseases. PMID:26593952

  5. FLOTAC can detect parasitic and pseudoparasitic elements in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, L; Mihalca, A D; Cirillo, R; Maurelli, M P; Montesano, M; Capasso, M; Cringoli, G

    2012-03-01

    Reptiles have increased in popularity worldwide; snakes and lizards are frequently used as pets. As a consequence of their popularity, the interest of the scientific community in these animals has increased. In order to acquire epidemiological data on the parasitic infections affecting reptiles in Italy a survey was carried out in 125 snakes and 25 lizards bred in the Campania region of southern Italy. Individual fecal samples were collected and FLOTAC was used for copromicroscopic diagnosis. Eimeriidae, oxyurids, strongylids, other gastro-intestinal nematodes and pulmonary nematodes were the most representative parasites found. Eggs of pseudoparasites (mites, oxyurids and trichurids affecting rodents) were also found. The use of FLOTAC for diagnosis of parasitic infections in reptiles has demonstrated to be a rapid and sensitive test to improve diagnosis and acquire new information on the parasitological fauna of reptiles. PMID:22306152

  6. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of affinity-purified Plasmodium falciparum exoantigens in Aotus nancymai monkeys.

    PubMed

    James, M A; Fajfar-Whetstone, C J; Kakoma, I; Buese, M M; Clabaugh, G W; Hansen, R; Ristic, M

    1991-03-01

    Soluble Plasmodium falciparum polypeptides, affinity-purified from culture supernatant fluids using sequential immunoadsorptions employing both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, induced protective immunity against experimental falciparum malaria in Peruvian Aotus nancymai monkeys. Susceptible monkeys were vaccinated with polypeptides affinity-purified from supernatant fluids of P. falciparum Indochina I/CDC cultures. Eighteen animals (6 immunized with purified antigens plus adjuvants, 6 injected with only the adjuvant preparation, and 6 untreated) were challenged with whole blood containing monkey-adapted virulent organisms of the Indochina I/CDC strain. Selected hematologic, serologic and parasitologic profiles served as potential indicators of protection. This immunogen, when fortified with an aluminum hydroxide/Quil-A saponin adjuvant combination, elicited good antibody responses to major P. falciparum antigens. Protection in vaccinated animals was evidenced by a significantly limited reduction in hematocrit and hemoglobin levels and a relatively moderate course of infection after homologous needle-challenge with Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum parasites. PMID:2052857

  7. Parasites of Merluccius capensis and M. paradoxus from the coast of Namibia.

    PubMed

    Reimer, L W

    1993-05-01

    84 specimens of the sea hake Merluccius capensis and 60 of M. paradoxus were investigated parasitologically along the coast of Namibia in 1988. Between both fish species there was a high coincidence. 18 species of parasites could be stated. Distinction is remarkable between the north and south parts of the investigation area with a boundary at about 25 degrees 30' south. Southern to this border line of probably different fish stocks Brachiella merluccii is absent and the prevalence of Scolex pleuronectis and Leptotheca spec. is significantly higher. In M. capensis parasitation by Leptotheca spec., Anthocotyle merluccii and Anisakis spec. 1. is increasing with higher age groups. In M. paradoxus parasitation by Leptotheca spec. and Anthocotyle merluccii is decreasing with higher age groups and that of Clestobothrium crassiceps remains the same level. PMID:8334458

  8. Cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania chagasi/Le. infantum in an endemic area of Guarico State, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    De Lima, H; Rodríguez, N; Feliciangeli, M D; Barrios, M A; Sosa, A; Agrela, I; Sánchez, E; Lopez, O

    2009-07-01

    This study reports cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania chagasi/Le. infantum in Venezuela, with some atypical characteristics. Out of 63 cases of CL in the suburbs of Altagracia de Orituco, Guarico State, Venezuela, 30 presented clinical, parasitological, immunological and epidemiological features different from those of the classical CL known in the country. The initial lesion was small and nodular, which, if not treated, might progress to a superficial ulcer. No secondary infection was observed. The identification of the isolates was carried out by molecular techniques. Twelve species of phlebotomine sandflies were caught, the most abundant being Lutzomyia evansi and Lu. longipalpis s.l., known vectors of Le. chagasi/Le. infantum. The existence of Le. chagasi/Le. infantum and its vectors in an endemic area of CL has implications and we suggest that epidemiological studies should be carried out to obtain a clearer picture of the extent of this CL form in Venezuela. PMID:19150102

  9. Molecular tools for analysis of gene function in parasitic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Markus; Agop-Nersesian, Carolina; Sullivan, William J

    2007-07-01

    With the completion of several genome sequences for parasitic protozoa, research in molecular parasitology entered the "post-genomic" era. Accompanied by global transcriptome and proteome analysis, huge datasets have been generated that have added many novel candidates to the list of drug and vaccine targets. The challenge is now to validate these factors and to bring science back to the bench to perform a detailed characterization. In some parasites, like Trypanosoma brucei, high-throughput genetic screens have been established using RNA interference [for a detailed review, see Motyka and Englund (2004)]. In most protozoan parasites, however, more time-consuming approaches have to be employed to identify and characterize the function of promising candidates in detail. This review aims to summarize the status of molecular genetic tools available for a variety of protozoan pathogens and discuss how they can be implemented to advance our understanding of parasite biology. PMID:17401559

  10. Camel trypanosomosis in the Canary Islands: assessment of seroprevalence and infection rates using the card agglutination test (CATT/T. evansi) and parasite detection tests.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, C; Juste, M C; Corbera, J A; Magnus, E; Verloo, D; Montoya, J A

    2000-06-10

    Trypanosomosis due to Trypanosoma evansi (surra) is a major enzootic disease of the dromedary camel. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to assess seroprevalence and infection rates in the Canary Islands using antibody(-card agglutination test-CATT/T. evansi) and parasite detection tests (micro-Haematocrit Centrifugation technique, Giemsa stained blood smears, microscopic examination of lymph node aspirates and mouse inoculation). PCV was also determined. 745 dromedary camels (483 females and 262 males) were examined. Trypanosomes were detected in seven animals. 36 animals yielded CATT positive results while 709 animals were negative. All parasitologically positive animals were also CATT positive. Results showed a good correlation between CATT positive and low PCV and a higher seroprevalence in older animals. Trypanocidal drugs have not been registered in Spain and, consequently, if vigilance is not exercised the prevalence could be increased in the future. PMID:10828522

  11. Hematological parameters associated with parasitism in pike, Esox lucius caught from Anzali wetland.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Farzin Jamalzad; Khara, Hossein; Rohi, Javad Daghigh; Sayadborani, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    This study involved 120 pike, Esox lucius, captured from Anzali wetland. Parasite fauna were identified in captured fish. Also, changes of haematological parameters were compared both infected and uninfected fish. Parasitological inspections revealed the following infestations: Skin: Lernea cyprinacea, Argulus foliaceus (Crustacean) and Tricodina sp. (Ciliatea). Gill: Dactylogyrus sp. (Digenea) and Tetraonchus monenteron (Monogenea). Eye: Diplostomum spathaceum (Digenea). Gut: Eustrongylides exises, Rhipdocotyle illense, Raphidascaris acus (Nematode), Corynosoma Strumosum (Acanthocephala). Most prevalence and intensity were related to Eustrongylides exises and Rhipdocotyle illense. Following haematological parameters were evaluated: haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte and leukocyte counts, mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell haemoglobin, mean cell haemoglobin concentration lymphocytes, monocytes and eosinophils. Significant difference was found for MCV between infected and uninfected fish. PMID:26064009

  12. Intestinal coccidiosis of anadromous and landlocked alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, caused by Goussia ameliae n. sp. and G. alosii n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lovy, Jan; Friend, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Anadromous alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, have experienced significant population level declines caused by factors including habitat destruction. Alewives occur in two different life histories, anadromous and landlocked forms. The landlocked alewife evolved from ancestral anadromous populations, resulting in an exclusively freshwater and phenotypically unique form. The occurrence of parasites in a host is linked to the environment, making alewives an ideal model to compare parasitology within a single species with contrasting life histories. Currently, little information exists on the presence and impacts of parasites in these fish populations; the present study sets out to better understand coccidiosis in the threatened anadromous populations and to understand how coccidian parasites compare in both life history forms. The intestinal coccidian, Goussia ameliae n. sp., was described infecting the pyloric cecum of 76% and 86% of young-of-the-year and adult anadromous alewives, respectively, from the Maurice River, New Jersey, USA. The coccidian was found in landlocked alewife populations with a prevalence of 92% and 34% in YOY and adult fish, respectively. An analysis of the small subunit 18S ribosomal RNA gene of G. ameliae from both life history forms demonstrated that the coccidian had 100% sequence identity, confirming the same parasite species in both forms. Though genetic analysis demonstrated G. ameliae to be identical, some differences were observed in sporulation and morphology of the parasite within the two populations. The sporocysts in anadromous populations were shorter and wider, and sporulation timing differed from that of landlocked fish. These differences may either be attributed to differences in the host type or to the sporulation environment. Lastly, alewives from landlocked populations were frequently co-infected with a second coccidian species in the posterior intestine, which occurred at a lower prevalence. This species, G. alosii n. sp., was described based on morphological characters of the sporulated oocysts in fresh parasitological preparations. PMID:25853050

  13. Immunodiagnosis of opisthorchiasis using parasite cathepsin F.

    PubMed

    Teimoori, Salma; Arimatsu, Yuji; Laha, Thewarach; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sereerak, Piya; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-12-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini, a food-borne trematode parasite endemic in the lower Mekong countries, is conventionally diagnosed by stool examination. However, parasitological stool-based diagnosis can be unreliable in light infections. The goal of this study was to develop the immunodiagnosis of opisthorchiasis using cathepsin F cysteine protease of O. viverrini in both indirect and sandwich ELISA assays. A recombinant O. viverrini cathepsin F (rOv-CF) of 40 kDa was expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), affinity purified, and deployed in ELISA assays. Human sera from 272 cases were investigated by indirect rOv-CF-based ELISA. Positive antibody response to rOv-CF was found in 137 out of 272 cases (50.37 %) using a cutoff OD (0.400) determined by ROC analysis. In comparison to parasitological stool examined for fluke eggs, the gold standard, the rOv-CF indirect ELISA showed a sensitivity and specificity of 62.1 and 84.05 %, respectively. Serum antibody levels correlated well with egg counts per gram feces (EPG) (P?

  14. Blastocystis spp., Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba histolytica exhibit similar symptomatic and epidemiological patterns in healthcare-seeking patients in Karachi.

    PubMed

    Haider, Syeda Sadaf; Baqai, Rakhshanda; Qureshi, Fouad M; Boorom, Kenneth

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we collected data on the incidence of enteric parasites in healthcare-seeking individuals along with their symptoms to quantify the potential roles of factors such as age, sex, and seasonality in infection. We performed analysis to identify factors which could help differentiate parasitic infection from other causes of gastrointestinal illness in a community. The size of the patient population (n = 339), patient selection methodology, collection methods, and statistical analysis followed approaches from similar studies in core clinical journals. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of Karachi's Ethical Review Board. Fecal specimens (n = 339) submitted by symptomatic patients were collected from two clinical laboratories, along with information about the patients' age, sex, and symptoms. We found that symptoms of fever, vomiting, and constipation were 100 % predictive of finding a parasitic infection, while diarrhea was 88 % predictive of a parasitic infection. Gastrointestinal parasite-positive patients reported diarrhea (~60 %), vomiting (~30 %), fever (~25 %) and constipation (~25 %), while parasite-negative patients exhibited a symptomatic profile without fever, vomiting, and constipation. The distribution of symptoms in parasite-positive patients remained relatively invariant regardless of the parasite identified. Blastocystis spp.-mono-infected patients reported a similar profile to patients positive for Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar and Cryptosporidium spp. Most parasitic infections exhibited a strong seasonal pattern, with a peak incidence in summer months. Infection by Blastocystis spp. was the most prevalent, and it was the only infection mathematically correlated to rainfall by Pearson's method. We observed no increase in healthcare-seeking behavior following a stressful community event, namely, the attempted assassination of Benazir Bhutto in Karachi. The data suggest that parasitological testing would produce a high yield of positive results when performed on healthcare-seeking patients in Karachi in 2007 with symptoms of fever, vomiting, or constipation and a low yield when performed on patients noting only abdominal pain. Parasitological testing also produces a higher yield on patients seen in summer months. PMID:22763702

  15. Sensitivity and Specificity of In Situ Hybridization for Diagnosis of Cutaneous Infection by Leishmania infantum in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Fabiano B.; Wise, Annabel G.; Madeira, Maria F.; Oliveira, Raquel V. C.; Schubach, Tânia M. P.; Kiupel, Matti; Langohr, Ingeborg M.

    2013-01-01

    An accurate diagnosis of infection by Leishmania infantum in dogs is fundamental for the control of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Histopathology (HP) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) are frequently used for the histological diagnosis of L. infantum in dogs but have shown limited accuracy. To improve the sensitivity and specificity of the histological diagnosis of VL, we evaluated automated in situ hybridization (ISH) using a generic probe for Leishmania and a specific probe for L. infantum in surgical skin biopsy specimens of dogs. The ISH results were compared with those of HP and IHC, using parasitological culture as the reference standard. Skin samples from 51 dogs with cutaneous L. infantum infection and 51 noninfected dogs were randomly selected from samples of dogs from various cities in Brazil where canine VL is endemic. These samples were processed for parasitological culture, HP, IHC, and ISH using both probes. The sensitivities of ISH using the specific probe, ISH using the generic probe, IHC, and HP were, respectively, 74.5%, 70.6%, 69.5%, and 57.6%. The specificity of both ISH probes tested was 100%, and there was no cross-hybridization of the generic and specific probes with selected pathogenic fungi and protozoa. The specific probe discriminated L. infantum from the other species of Leishmania that infect dogs in the New World. ISH is highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of L. infantum in histologic samples of skin from infected dogs and can be used on routine biopsy material to make a diagnosis of leishmaniasis. PMID:23135932

  16. Description of Pseudorhabdosynochus justinei n. sp. (Monogenea: Diplectanidae) and redescription of P. vagampullum (Young, 1969) Kritsky & Beverley-Burton, 1986 from the gills of the longfin grouper Epinephelus quoyanus (Valenciennes) (Perciformes: Serranidae) in Dapeng Bay, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bijian; Yang, Tingbao

    2007-03-01

    Pseudorhabdosynochus justinei n. sp. is reported and described from the gills of the longfin grouper Epinephelus quoyanus in Dapeng Bay, South China Sea off the town of Nan'ao, Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China. P. justinei n. sp. is characterised by the presence of a male copulatory organ (MCO) composed of a moderately quadriloculate organ, a short cone and a long, variable internal tube, and a sclerotised vagina comprising anterior 'trumpet' with a characteristic sclerotised ring, slightly medially curved canal, heavily sclerotised principal chamber and star-shaped lateral structure with accessory chambers. It is differentiated from the most similar species, P. caledonicus Justine, 2005, by the absence of a thinly sclerotised posterior tube of the MCO and by the size and morphology of the sclerotised vagina. P. vagampullum (Young, 1969) is redescribed based on specimens collected from the same species of host and locality as P. justinei n. sp. In comparison with the original description by Young [Young, P. C. (1969). Journal of Helminthology, 43, 223-254] and the redescription by Justine [Justine, J.-L. (2005a). Systematic Parasitology, 62, 1-37; (2005b). Systematic Parasitology, 62, 39-45] based on old museum material, the new specimens of P. vagampullum clearly showed the internal anatomy of the terminal genitalia, especially the sclerotised vagina, consisting of a distal, cylindrical canal with an anterior 'trumpet' continuing as an unsclerotised, curved, bulb-shaped vaginal pore, a conical principal chamber and a star-shaped lateral structure with an accessory chambers leading to the seminal receptacle via a fine, unsclerotised duct. PMID:17143574

  17. Therapeutic efficacy test in malaria falciparum in Antioquia, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Silvia; Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Piñeros, Juan G; Ríos, Alexandra; Álvarez, Tania; Álvarez, Gonzalo; Tobón, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the frequency of failure of eight treatments for non-complicated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum in patients from Turbo (Urabá region), El Bagre and Zaragoza (Bajo Cauca region), applying the 1998 protocol of the World Health Organization (WHO). Monotherapies using chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ) and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), and combinations using chloroquine-sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (CQ-SP), amodiaquine-sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ-SP), mefloquine-sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (MQ-SP) and artesunate-sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AS-SP), were examined. Methodology A balanced experimental design with eight groups. Samples were selected based on statistical and epidemiological criteria. Patients were followed for 21 to 28 days, including seven or eight parasitological and clinical evaluations, with an active search for defaulting patients. A non-blinded evaluation of the antimalarial treatment response (early failure, late failure, adequate response) was performed. Results Initially, the loss of patients to follow-up was higher than 40%, but the immediate active search for the cases and the monetary help for transportation expenses of patients, reduced the loss to 6%. The treatment failure was: CQ 82%, AQ 30%, MQ 4%, SP 24%, CQ-SP 17%, AQ-SP 2%, MQ-S-P 0%, AS-SP 3%. Conclusion The characteristics of an optimal epidemiological monitoring system of antimalarial treatment response in Colombia are discussed. It is proposed to focus this on early failure detection, by applying a screening test every two to three years, based on a seven to 14-day follow-up. Clinical and parasitological assessment would be carried out by a general physician and a field microscopist from the local hospital, with active measures to search for defaulter patients at follow-up. PMID:16504002

  18. WATER FROM DIFFERENT SOURCES USED FOR THE IRRIGATION OF VEGETABLES TO BE MARKETED: RESEARCH ON Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., AND COLIFORMS IN PARANA, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    TIYO, Rogerio; de SOUZA, Carla Zangari; NISHI, Letícia; BRUSTOLIN, Camila Fernanda; RATTI, Bianca Altrão; FALAVIGNA GUILHERME, Ana Lucia

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this work was to compare, from a parasitological ( Cryptosporidiumspp. and Giardia duodenalis), bacteriological (total and thermotolerants coliforms) and physicochemical perspective, water sources used for drinking and irrigation of vegetables intended to be sold for human consumption. From January 2010 to May 2011, samples of different water sources from vegetable producing properties were collected; 100 liters for parasitological analysis, 200 mL for bacteriological analysis, and five liters for physicochemical analysis. Water samples were filtered under vacuum with a kit containing a cellulose acetate membrane filter, 1.2 µm (Millipore(r), Barueri, SP, Brazil). The material retained on the membrane was mechanically extracted and analyzed by direct immunofluorescence (Merifluor(r)kit). From 20 rural properties investigated, 10 had artesian wells (40 samples), 10 had common wells (40 samples), and one had a mine (four samples), the latter contaminated by Cryptosporidiumspp. In samples from artesian wells, 90 to 130 meters depth, 42.5% were positive for total coliforms and 5.0% were identified to have abnormal coloration. From the samples of common wells, 14 to 37 meters depth, 87.5% were contaminated with total coliforms, 82.5% were positive for thermotolerant coliforms, and 12.5% had color abnormalities. We did not detect the presence of Giardiaspp. or Cryptosporidiumspp. in artesian and common wells. The use of artesian or common wells is an important step in the control of the spreading of zoonoses, particularly Cryptosporidiumspp. and Giardiaspp., as well as artesian wells for coliform control in local production of vegetables to be marketed. PMID:26422158

  19. A Comparison of Multiple Methods for Estimating Parasitemia of Hemogregarine Hemoparasites (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) and Its Application for Studying Infection in Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Maia, João P.; Harris, D. James; Carranza, Salvador; Gómez-Díaz, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Identifying factors influencing infection patterns among hosts is critical for our understanding of the evolution and impact of parasitism in natural populations. However, the correct estimation of infection parameters depends on the performance of detection and quantification methods. In this study, we designed a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the 18 S rRNA gene to estimate prevalence and intensity of Hepatozoon infection and compared its performance with microscopy and PCR. Using qPCR, we also compared various protocols that differ in the biological source and the extraction methods. Our results show that the qPCR approach on DNA extracted from blood samples, regardless of the extraction protocol, provided the most sensitive estimates of Hepatozoon infection parameters; while allowed us to differentiate between mixed infections of Adeleorinid (Hepatozoon) and Eimeriorinid (Schellackia and Lankesterella), based on the analysis of melting curves. We also show that tissue and saline methods can be used as low-cost alternatives in parasitological studies. The next step was to test our qPCR assay in a biological context, and for this purpose we investigated infection patterns between two sympatric lacertid species, which are naturally infected with apicomplexan hemoparasites, such as the genera Schellackia (Eimeriorina) and Hepatozoon (Adeleorina). From a biological standpoint, we found a positive correlation between Hepatozoon intensity of infection and host body size within each host species, being significantly higher in males, and higher in the smaller sized host species. These variations can be associated with a number of host intrinsic factors, like hormonal and immunological traits, that require further investigation. Our findings are relevant as they pinpoint the importance of accounting for methodological issues to better estimate infection in parasitological studies, and illustrate how between-host factors can influence parasite distributions in sympatric natural populations. PMID:24743340

  20. A standardised faecal collection protocol for intestinal helminth egg counts in Asian elephants, Elephas maximus.

    PubMed

    Lynsdale, Carly L; Santos, Diogo J Franco Dos; Hayward, Adam D; Mar, Khyne U; Htut, Win; Aung, Htoo Htoo; Soe, Aung Thura; Lummaa, Virpi

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative assessment of parasite infection is necessary to measure, manage and reduce infection risk in both wild and captive animal populations. Traditional faecal flotation methods which aim to quantify parasite burden, such as the McMaster egg counting technique, are widely used in veterinary medicine, agricultural management and wildlife parasitology. Although many modifications to the McMaster method exist, few account for systematic variation in parasite egg output which may lead to inaccurate estimations of infection intensity through faecal egg counts (FEC). To adapt the McMaster method for use in sampling Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), we tested a number of possible sources of error regarding faecal sampling, focussing on helminth eggs and using a population of over 120 semi-captive elephants distributed across northern Myanmar. These included time of day of defecation, effects of storage in 10% formalin and 10% formol saline and variation in egg distribution between and within faecal boluses. We found no significant difference in the distribution of helminth eggs within faecal matter or for different defecation times, however, storage in formol saline and formalin significantly decreased egg recovery. This is the first study to analyse several collection and storage aspects of a widely-used traditional parasitology method for helminth parasites of E. maximus using known host individuals. We suggest that for the modified McMaster technique, a minimum of one fresh sample per elephant collected from any freshly produced bolus in the total faecal matter and at any point within a 7.5 h time period (7.30am-2.55 pm) will consistently represent parasite load. This study defines a protocol which may be used to test pre-analytic factors and effectively determine infection load in species which produce large quantities of vegetative faeces, such as non-ruminant megaherbivores. PMID:26236632

  1. Distantiae Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: A New Epidemiological Feature of Acute Chagas Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Bilac, Daniele; de Araújo, Vitor Antônio Louzada; Neto, Sócrates Fraga da Costa; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; da Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho Ferreira; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The new epidemiological scenario of orally transmitted Chagas disease that has emerged in Brazil, and mainly in the Amazon region, needs to be addressed with a new and systematic focus. Belém, the capital of Pará state, reports the highest number of acute Chagas disease (ACD) cases associated with the consumption of açaí juice. Methodology/Principal Findings The wild and domestic enzootic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in the two locations (Jurunas and Val-de Cães) that report the majority of the autochthonous cases of ACD in Belém city. Moreover, we evaluated the enzootic cycle on the three islands that provide most of the açaí fruit that is consumed in these localities. We employed parasitological and serological tests throughout to evaluate infectivity competence and exposure to T. cruzi. In Val-de-Cães, no wild mammal presented positive parasitological tests, and 56% seroprevalence was observed, with low serological titers. Three of 14 triatomines were found to be infected (TcI). This unexpected epidemiological picture does not explain the high number of autochthonous ACD cases. In Jurunas, the cases of ACD could not be autochthonous because of the absence of any enzootic cycle of T. cruzi. In contrast, in the 3 island areas from which the açaí fruit originates, 66.7% of wild mammals and two dogs displayed positive hemocultures, and 15.6% of triatomines were found to be infected by T. cruzi. Genotyping by mini-exon gene and PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) targeting revealed that the mammals and triatomines from the islands harbored TcI and Trypanosoma rangeli in single and mixed infections. Conclusion/Significance These findings show that cases of Chagas disease in the urban area of Belém may be derived from infected triatomines coming together with the açaí fruits from distant islands. We term this new epidemiological feature of Chagas disease as “Distantiae transmission”. PMID:24854494

  2. Expression of Regulatory T Cells in Jejunum, Colon, and Cervical and Mesenteric Lymph Nodes of Dogs Naturally Infected with Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Maria M.; Deoti, Beatriz; Amorim, Izabela F.; Pinto, Aldair J. W.; Moraes, Andrea; Carvalho, Carolina S.; Magno da Silva, Sydnei; de Assis, Ana C. B.; de Faria, Ana M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Using flow cytometry, we evaluated the frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mononuclear cells in the jejunum, colon, and cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum and in uninfected controls. All infected dogs showed chronic lymphadenitis and enteritis. Despite persistent parasite loads, no erosion or ulcers were evident in the epithelial mucosa. The colon harbored more parasites than the jejunum. Frequencies of total CD4+, total Foxp3, and CD4+ Foxp3+ cells were higher in the jejunum than in the colon. Despite negative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) serum results for cytokines, levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were higher in the jejunum than in the colon for infected dogs. However, IL-4 levels were higher in the colon than in the jejunum for infected dogs. There was no observed correlation between clinical signs and histopathological changes or immunological and parasitological findings in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of canines with visceral leishmaniasis. However, distinct segments of the GIT presented different immunological and parasitological responses. The jejunum showed a lower parasite load, with increased frequencies and expression of CD4, Foxp3, and CD8 receptors and IL-10, TGF-β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α cytokines. The colon showed a higher parasite load, with increasing expression of IL-4. Leishmania infantum infection increased expression of CD4, Foxp3, IL-10, TGF-β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α and reduced CD8 and IL-4 expression in both the jejunum and the colon. PMID:24935975

  3. Expression of regulatory T cells in jejunum, colon, and cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Maria M; Deoti, Beatriz; Amorim, Izabela F; Pinto, Aldair J W; Moraes, Andrea; Carvalho, Carolina S; da Silva, Sydnei Magno; de Assis, Ana C B; de Faria, Ana M C; Tafuri, Wagner L

    2014-09-01

    Using flow cytometry, we evaluated the frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mononuclear cells in the jejunum, colon, and cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum and in uninfected controls. All infected dogs showed chronic lymphadenitis and enteritis. Despite persistent parasite loads, no erosion or ulcers were evident in the epithelial mucosa. The colon harbored more parasites than the jejunum. Frequencies of total CD4(+), total Foxp3, and CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells were higher in the jejunum than in the colon. Despite negative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) serum results for cytokines, levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were higher in the jejunum than in the colon for infected dogs. However, IL-4 levels were higher in the colon than in the jejunum for infected dogs. There was no observed correlation between clinical signs and histopathological changes or immunological and parasitological findings in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of canines with visceral leishmaniasis. However, distinct segments of the GIT presented different immunological and parasitological responses. The jejunum showed a lower parasite load, with increased frequencies and expression of CD4, Foxp3, and CD8 receptors and IL-10, TGF-β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α cytokines. The colon showed a higher parasite load, with increasing expression of IL-4. Leishmania infantum infection increased expression of CD4, Foxp3, IL-10, TGF-β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α and reduced CD8 and IL-4 expression in both the jejunum and the colon. PMID:24935975

  4. Antitrypanosomal Activity of Fexinidazole Metabolites, Potential New Drug Candidates for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Alvaro F. S.; Mazzeti, Ana Lia; Marques, Luiz F.; Gonçalves, Karolina R.; Mota, Ludmilla W. R.; Diniz, Lívia de F.; Caldas, Ivo S.; Talvani, André; Shackleford, David M.; Koltun, Maria; Saunders, Jessica; White, Karen L.; Scandale, Ivan; Charman, Susan A.; Chatelain, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to verify the in vivo efficacy of sulfoxide and sulfone fexinidazole metabolites following oral administration in a murine model of Chagas disease. Female Swiss mice infected with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi were treated orally once per day with each metabolite at doses of 10 to 100 mg/kg of body weight for a period of 20 days. Parasitemia was monitored throughout, and cures were detected by parasitological and PCR assays. The results were compared with those achieved with benznidazole treatment at the same doses. Fexinidazole metabolites were effective in reducing the numbers of circulating parasites and protecting mice against death, compared with untreated mice, but without providing cures at daily doses of 10 and 25 mg/kg. Both metabolites were effective in curing mice at 50 mg/kg/day (30% to 40%) and 100 mg/kg/day (100%). In the benznidazole-treated group, parasitological cure was detected only in animals treated with the higher dose of 100 mg/kg/day (80%). Single-dose pharmacokinetic parameters for each metabolite were obtained from a parallel group of uninfected mice and were used to estimate the profiles following repeated doses. Pharmacokinetic data suggested that biological efficacy most likely resides with the sulfone metabolite (or subsequent reactive metabolites formed following reduction of the nitro group) following administration of either the sulfoxide or the sulfone and that prolonged plasma exposure over the 24-h dosing window is required to achieve high cure rates. Fexinidazole metabolites were effective in treating T. cruzi in a mouse model of acute infection, with cure rates superior to those achieved with either fexinidazole itself or benznidazole. PMID:24841257

  5. [Chronic diarrhea: value of microbiology in diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kist, M

    2000-09-28

    Chronic diarrhoea of the adult is defined as diarrhea during 30 days or longer. Frequent causes of chronic diarrhea in the immunocompetent adult without recent travel to developing countries are noninfectious processes, including laxatives misuse, diseases causing chronic maldigestion, osmotically active artificial sweeteners (i.e. sorbitol), hormonal disorders or drugs with intestinal side effects. Infectious agents as the cause of chronic diarrhea are important in two populations, namely in travelers returning from tropical countries bearing a significant risk of intestinal parasitic infections and in immunocompromised patients, especially AIDS patients with CD4 cell counts below 50 per microliter. Intestinal parasites and C. difficile, Y. enterocolitica, Shigellae and Cytomegalovirus are the most important causative agents of chronic diarrhea. Intestinal pathogens were identified in 46% of chronic, but only in 16.5% of acute diarrhea episodes of HIV-infected patients. An extensive medical history including recent travel as well as the detailed characteristics of onset of symptoms and of their time course is essential for the diagnosis. All patients should have a complete differential blood count, ESR, determination of electrolytes, liver enzymes, creatinine, blood glucose, and serum albumin. Tests to exclude hyperthyriodism, or pancreatic insufficiency as well as a d-xylose absorption test can be included, if appropriate. Microbiological-parasitological investigations are obligatory in patients with chronic diarrhea returning from countries with increased risk of traveler diarrhea, in cases of suspected immunodeficiency, if sudden onset of symptoms with fever is reported, after antibiotic treatment, and in children below six years of age. As a rule, stool specimens are appropriate, for the detection of cytomegalovirus colonic biopsies are necessary. In the latter case colonosigmoidoscopy has no diagnostic advantage. One single stool specimen is sufficient for the detection of bacteria or toxins, in contrast to parasitological investigations, where only three consecutive specimens provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity. PMID:11068510

  6. Efficacy of Direct Detection of Pathogens in Naturally Infected Mice by Using a High-Density PCR Array

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kenneth S; Perkins, Cheryl L; Havens, Richard B; Kelly, Mee-Jin E; Francis, Brian C; Dole, Vandana S; Shek, William R

    2013-01-01

    We used a high-density array of real-time PCR assays for commonly reported rodent infectious agents (PRIA) to test naturally infected index mice and sentinel mice exposed by contact and soiled-bedding transfer. PRIA detected 14 pathogens—including viruses, bacteria, fur mites, pinworms, and enteric protozoa—in 97.2% of 28 pooled fecal samples, fur–perianal swabs, and oral swabs from 4 cages containing a total of 10 index mice. Among these pathogens, PRIA (like conventional health monitoring methods) failed to detect Mycoplasma pulmonis, Pasteurella pneumotropica, and Giardia spp. in all of the 9 contact and 9 soiled-bedding sentinels. PRIA demonstrated murine adenovirus and Cryptosporidium and Spironucleus spp. in contact but not soiled-bedding sentinels and detected Helicobacter and pinworms in fewer than half of the soiled-bedding sentinels. Of the 4 species of Helicobacter that species-specific PCR assays identified in index mice, only H. ganmani was found in soiled-bedding and contact sentinels. PRIA detected all of the pathogens in sentinels that were identified by conventional methods. Myobia musculi was detected by PCR in index and sentinel mice but missed by conventional parasitologic examinations. In summary, PRIA reproducibly detected diverse pathogens in heavily pooled specimens collected noninvasively from infected index mice antemortem. The inability of PRIA and conventional health monitoring methods (that is, parasitology, microbiology, and serology) to demonstrate transmission of some pathogens to contact sentinels and the inefficient transmission of others to soiled-bedding sentinels underscores the importance of direct PCR testing to determine the pathogen status of rodents in quarantine and during routine colony surveillance. PMID:24351765

  7. Immunodetection of Fasciola gigantica Circulating Antigen in Sera of Infected Individuals for Laboratory Diagnosis of Human Fascioliasis

    PubMed Central

    Attallah, Abdelfattah M.; Bughdadi, Faisal A.; El-Shazly, Atef M.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the laboratory diagnosis of human fascioliasis is based on the parasitological examination of parasite eggs in stool specimens and serological detection of specific antibodies in serum samples, which are often unreliable diagnostic approaches. Ideally, a sensitive and specific diagnostic test for Fasciola infection should be based on the detection of circulating Fasciola antigen, which implies active infection. Here, a 27-kDa-molecular-mass antigen was identified in a Fasciola gigantica adult worm antigen preparation, excretory-secretory products, and sera from F. gigantica-infected individuals, and it was not detected in antigenic extracts of other parasites and sera from noninfected individuals. The target antigen was isolated and partially characterized as a protein. Immunoperoxidase staining located the target epitope within teguments and guts of F. gigantica adult worms. The performance characteristics of a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on F. gigantica circulating antigen detection in serum (FgCA-27 ELISA) were investigated using sera of 120 parasitologically diagnosed F. gigantica-infected individuals and 80 noninfected individuals. The area under the receiving operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for ELISA was significantly high (AUC = 0.961, P < 0.0001) for discriminating Fasciola-infected and noninfected individuals. The developed assay showed high degrees of sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency (>93%), and a significant correlation (r = 0.715, P < 0.0001) between antigen level and parasite egg count was shown. In conclusion, a 27-kDa Fasciola antigen was identified in sera of F. gigantica-infected individuals. A highly sensitive and specific Fasciola antigen detection assay, FgCA-27 ELISA, was developed for laboratory diagnosis of human fascioliasis. PMID:23945158

  8. A longitudinal study of Babesia microti infection in seropositive blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Leiby, David A.; Johnson, Stephanie T.; Won, Kimberly Y.; Nace, Eva K.; Slemenda, Susan B.; Pieniazek, Norman J.; Cable, Ritchard G.; Herwaldt, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Babesia infection is caused by intraerythrocytic tickborne parasites. Cases of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis have been increasingly recognized. To date, no Babesia test has been licensed for screening US blood donors. We conducted a longitudinal study to assess the course and markers of Babesia infection among seropositive donors identified in a seroprevalence study. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Eligible donors had B. microti indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) titers ?1:64. Enrollees were monitored up to 3 years, by IFA and three methods for evidence of parasitemia: B. microti nested PCR analysis (at two laboratories), hamster inoculation, and blood-smear examination. RESULTS Among 115 eligible donors, 84 (73%) enrolled. Eighteen enrollees (21%) had evidence of parasitemia for 30 total specimens (17% of 181), which were collected in 9 different months and tested positive by various approaches: PCR (25 specimens/16 persons), hamster inoculation (13 specimens/8 persons), and blood smear (1 specimen positive by all three approaches). Overall, 14 persons had ?1 specimen with positive PCR results at both laboratories (12 persons) and/or had parasitologically confirmed infection (8 persons). Three of nine persons who had >1 specimen with evidence of parasitemia had nonconsecutive positives. Several enrollees likely had been infected ?1 year when their last positive specimen was collected. The final three specimens for seven persons tested negative by all study methods, including IFA. CONCLUSION Seropositive blood donors can have protracted low-level parasitemia that is variably and intermittently detected by parasitologic and molecular methods. Donor-screening algorithms should include serologic testing and not solely rely on molecular testing. PMID:24673297

  9. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100?µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100?µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100?µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100?µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. PMID:25278142

  10. Acute respiratory infection and bacteraemia as causes of non-malarial febrile illness in African children: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Florida; Reyburn, Rita; Reyburn, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    The replacement of “presumptive treatment for malaria” by “test before treat” strategies for the management of febrile illness is raising awareness of the importance of knowing more about the causes of illness in children who are suspected to have malaria but return a negative parasitological test. The most common cause of non-malarial febrile illness (NMFI) in African children is respiratory tract infection. Whilst the bacterial causes of NMFI are well known, the increasing use of sensitive techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests is revealing large numbers of viruses that are potential respiratory pathogens. However, many of these organisms are commonly present in the respiratory tract of healthy children so causality and risk factors for pneumonia remain poorly understood. Infection with a combination of viral and bacterial pathogens is increasingly recognised as important in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. Similarly, blood stream infections with organisms typically grown by aerobic culture are well known but a growing number of organisms that can be identified only by PCR, viral culture, or serology are now recognised to be common pathogens in African children. The high mortality of hospitalised children on the first or second day of admission suggests that, unless results are rapidly available, diagnostic tests to identify specific causes of illness will still be of limited use in guiding the potentially life saving decisions relating to initial treatment of children admitted to district hospitals in Africa with severe febrile illness and a negative test for malaria. Malaria control and the introduction of vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal disease are contributing to improved child survival in Africa. However, increased parasitological testing for malaria is associated with increased use of antibiotics to which resistance is already high. PMID:26594615

  11. Parasite communities in stray cat populations from Lisbon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Waap, H; Gomes, J; Nunes, T

    2014-12-01

    Stray cats live in high-density colonies in urban areas and pose a health hazard to household cats and humans. In Portugal, information on the parasitic fauna of stray cats is limited and relies mostly on results from faecal analysis. The present survey aimed to determine the prevalence, diversity and intensity of parasites in stray cats from the urban area of Lisbon by means of parasitological necropsy. Internal organs were collected from 162 cats captured in different areas of the city and systematically subjected to parasitological dissection. Helminths were identified by macro- and microscopic examination and protozoa by faecal floatation and sedimentation techniques. The overall prevalence of parasites was 90.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 85.3-94.6%). A total of 12 parasite species was recorded: Cystoisospora felis (14.2%), Cystoisospora rivolta (46.3%), Sarcocystis sp. (1.2%), Ancylostoma tubaeforme (19.1%), Toxocara cati (38.3%), Ollulanus tricuspis (30.9%), Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (12.4%), Eucoleus aerophilus (0.6%), Taenia taeniaeformis (3.1%), Dipylidium caninum (53.1%), Joyeuxiella pasqualei (15.4%) and Diplopylidium nölleri (3.7%). Overall mean species richness was 2.36 ±  1.52. Helminth mean intensity was highest for O. tricuspis (285.8), followed by D. caninum (42.4), J. pasqualei (14.4), A. tubaeforme (8.1) and T. cati (5.9). The prevalence and variety of parasites found in our sampling are substantially higher than the numbers previously reported in Portugal. Some of the parasites, including T. cati and A. tubaeforme, are zoonotic, which emphasizes the need for parasite control strategies based on demographic containment of stray cat populations in urban areas to promote public health protection. PMID:23719370

  12. Spatial and temporal variations relevant to tsetse control in the Bipindi focus of southern Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a public health problem in many poor countries. Due to lack of financial resources in these countries, cost-effective strategies are needed for efficient control of this scourge, especially the tsetse vector. It was shown that perennial water sources maintain a favourable biotope for tsetse flies and thus the transmission dynamics of sleeping sickness. The present paper aimed at assessing the transmission dynamics of HAT in a forest environment where the hydrographic network is important. Methods Two entomological surveys were carried out in July 2009 and March 2010 in the Bipindi sleeping sickness focus of the South Region of Cameroon. Entomological and parasitological data were collected during both trapping periods (including the climate variations throughout a year) and compared to each other. The level of risk for transmission of the disease during each trapping period was also evaluated at the trap level and materialised on the map of the Bipindi focus. Results Glossina palpalis palpalis was the most prevalent tsetse fly species captured in this focus. The overall densities of tsetse flies as well as the risk for transmission of HAT in the Bipindi focus were significantly higher in July than in March. At the trap level, we observed that these parameters were almost constant, whatever the trapping period, when the biotope included perennial water sources. Conclusions This study shows that the spatial distribution of traps, as well as the temporal climatic variations might influence entomological and parasitological parameters of HAT and that the presence of perennial water sources in biotopes would favour the development of tsetse flies and thus the transmission of sleeping sickness. These factors should, therefore, be taken into account in order to provide more efficient vector control. PMID:23815985

  13. Can latent synergism of intestinal pathogens be responsible for inflammaging process causing Reiter's syndrome in a young patient HLA-B27 infected by atypical pathogens? A holistic view and clinical biochemical reinterpretation.

    PubMed

    Del Boccio, M; Lobefalo, L; Pennelli, A; Toniato, E; Martinotti, S; Tenaglia, R; Neri, G; Del Boccio, G; Gallenga, P E

    2012-01-01

    A case of a genetically HLA-B27 patient fully investigated by molecular analyses, following a holistic vision and an anamnestic assessment of multi-site ecosystems is repeated. VDRL, Lupus anti-coagulant (LAC) and Widal-Wright (WWR), resulted positive. The antibodies (IgG/IgA anti-Ct) against chronic Chlamydia trachomatis inflammation were positive. In the context of all the enzymatic activities in reference range, the AMS and the ALP enzymatic activities showed an increasing trend and a time course augment depending respectively. Cultures, parasitological, digestibility tests and molecular analyses were then performed to investigate the different human ecosystems. Parasitological research and digestibility test were performed, resulting a latent chronic bowel inflammation, including certain enteroinvasive pathogens, such as, Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia and Campylobacter (Enteric Pathogens Group, EPG) and Escherichia Coli pathogens (Escherichia Coli Pathogens Group, ECPG). The Salmonella typhi-DNA resulted positive, while 90% of the total microbic charge (TMC) was represented by C. freundi in culture analyses. Interpreting the VDRL positive test as early triggering of autoimmune disease, a few acute phase proteins as a pauci-symptomatic chronic phlogistic process, the amylase and alkaline phosphatase alterations as tissue markers of early intestinal inflammation, the Widal's reaction positivity together with the precocious clinical and faecal manifestations, this study suggests the prime triggering role of these atypical pathogens to cause a chronic low grade autoimmune response against the tissue/organ susceptible target, causing inflammaging phenomenon in young patient with chronic latent infection by Salmonella typhi, leading to Reiter's syndrome, in HLA-B27 positive patient. PMID:23241124

  14. Preliminary analysis of ectoparasites of the sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus (Mitchill, 1815) originating from different water habitats.

    PubMed

    Popielarczyk, Renata; Kolman, Ryszard

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study has been to carry out a preliminary parasitological analysis of sturgeon specimens in the context of the presence of external parasites, and to determine their possible influence on the health of the fish. The examination of external parasites was performed on specimens of A. oxyrinchus oxyrinchus captured from an open system pond (the Fish Farm in Kuźniczka, Poland) and from the St John River (Canada), in the spring and summer of 2008. Mucus collected from the skin surface of the pectoral fin and around the gills of A. oxyrinchus oxyrinchus individuals was fixed in 30% ethyl alcohol. The preparations were examined under a microscope. In total, 227 specimens of parasites were isolated from the skin of A. oxyrinchus oxyrinchus. The parasites belonged to three taxa: Protozoa, Monogenea and Crustacea. The degree of parasitic infestation by particular parasites in the analyzed samples ranged from 27.2 to 100%, and the value of the mean infestation varied from 1 to 13.6. Among the determined parasites, Trichodina sp. were characterized by the highest parasitological parameters. The other determined protozoan, i.e. Apiosoma sp., was found on the skin of half the examined individuals of A. oxyrinchus captured from the flow-through pond. Several individuals of the monogenetic fluke Gyrodactylus sp. were found on the skin of A. oxyrinchus oxyrinchus originating from the pond. Ergasilus sieboldi was identified in the samples obtained from both water habitats. Three individuals of the crustacean Argulus coregoni were observed on the skin of fish captured in the St John River. PMID:24881285

  15. Antitrypanosomal Treatment with Benznidazole Is Superior to Posaconazole Regimens in Mouse Models of Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Khare, Shilpi; Liu, Xianzhong; Stinson, Monique; Rivera, Ianne; Groessl, Todd; Tuntland, Tove; Yeh, Vince; Wen, Ben; Molteni, Valentina; Glynne, Richard; Supek, Frantisek

    2015-10-01

    Two CYP51 inhibitors, posaconazole and the ravuconazole prodrug E1224, were recently tested in clinical trials for efficacy in indeterminate Chagas disease. The results from these studies show that both drugs cleared parasites from the blood of infected patients at the end of the treatment but that parasitemia rebounded over the following months. In the current study, we sought to identify a dosing regimen of posaconazole that could permanently clear Trypanosoma cruzi from mice with experimental Chagas disease. Infected mice were treated with posaconazole or benznidazole, an established Chagas disease drug, and parasitological cure was defined as an absence of parasitemia recrudescence after immunosuppression. Twenty-day therapy with benznidazole (10 to 100 mg/kg of body weight/day) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in antiparasitic activity, and the 100-mg/kg regimen effected parasitological cure in all treated mice. In contrast, all mice remained infected after a 25-day treatment with posaconazole at all tested doses (10 to 100 mg/kg/day). Further extension of posaconazole therapy to 40 days resulted in only a marginal improvement of treatment outcome. We also observed similar differences in antiparasitic activity between benznidazole and posaconazole in acute T. cruzi heart infections. While benznidazole induced rapid, dose-dependent reductions in heart parasite burdens, the antiparasitic activity of posaconazole plateaued at low doses (3 to 10 mg/kg/day) despite increasing drug exposure in plasma. These observations are in good agreement with the outcomes of recent phase 2 trials with posaconazole and suggest that the efficacy models combined with the pharmacokinetic analysis employed here will be useful in predicting clinical outcomes of new drug candidates. PMID:26239982

  16. Profiling Nonrecipients of Mass Drug Administration for Schistosomiasis and Hookworm Infections: A Comprehensive Analysis of Praziquantel and Albendazole Coverage in Community-Directed Treatment in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Chami, Goylette F.; Kontoleon, Andreas A.; Bulte, Erwin; Fenwick, Alan; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Dunne, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repeated mass drug administration (MDA) with preventive chemotherapies is the mainstay of morbidity control for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths, yet the World Health Organization recently reported that less than one-third of individuals who required preventive chemotherapies received treatment. Methods. Coverage of community-directed treatment with praziquantel (PZQ) and albendazole (ALB) was analyzed in 17 villages of Mayuge District, Uganda. National drug registers, household questionnaires, and parasitological surveys were collected to track 935 individuals before and after MDA. Multilevel logistic regressions, including household and village effects, were specified with a comprehensive set of socioeconomic and parasitological variables. The factors predicting who did not receive PZQ and ALB from community medicine distributors were identified. Results. Drug receipt was correlated among members within a household, and nonrecipients of PZQ or ALB were profiled by household-level socioeconomic factors. Individuals were less likely to receive either PZQ or ALB if they had a Muslim household head or low home quality, belonged to the minority tribe, or had settled for more years in their village. Untreated individuals were also more likely to belong to households that did not purify drinking water, had no home latrine, and had no members who were part of the village government. Conclusions. The findings demonstrate how to locate and target individuals who are not treated in MDA. Infection risk factors were not informative. In particular, age, gender, and occupation were unable to identify non-recipients, although World Health Organization guidelines rely on these factors. Individuals of low socioeconomic status, minority religions, and minority tribes can be targeted to expand MDA coverage. PMID:26409064

  17. Efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in children in Zaire and Uíge Provinces, angola.

    PubMed

    Plucinski, Mateusz M; Talundzic, Eldin; Morton, Lindsay; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Macaia, Aleixo Panzo; Fortes, Filomeno; Goldman, Ira; Lucchi, Naomi; Stennies, Gail; MacArthur, John R; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2015-01-01

    The development of resistance to antimalarials is a major challenge for global malaria control. Artemisinin-based combination therapies, the newest class of antimalarials, are used worldwide but there have been reports of artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia. In February through May 2013, we conducted open-label, nonrandomized therapeutic efficacy studies of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) in Zaire and Uíge Provinces in northern Angola. The parasitological and clinical responses to treatment in children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum monoinfection were measured over 28 days, and the main outcome was a PCR-corrected adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) proportion on day 28. Parasites from treatment failures were analyzed for the presence of putative molecular markers of resistance to lumefantrine and artemisinins, including the recently identified mutations in the K13 propeller gene. In the 320 children finishing the study, 25 treatment failures were observed: 24 in the AL arms and 1 in the DP arm. The PCR-corrected ACPR proportions on day 28 for AL were 88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78 to 95%) in Zaire and 97% (91 to 100%) in Uíge. For DP, the proportions were 100% (95 to 100%) in Zaire, and 100% (96 to 100%) in Uíge. None of the treatment failures had molecular evidence of artemisinin resistance. In contrast, 91% of AL late-treatment failures had markers associated with lumefantrine resistance on the day of failure. The absence of molecular markers for artemisinin resistance and the observed efficacies of both drug combinations suggest no evidence of artemisinin resistance in northern Angola. There is evidence of increased lumefantrine resistance in Zaire, which should continue to be monitored. PMID:25367912

  18. Epidemiological aspects of canine visceral leishmaniosis in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, Mehdi; Hajjaran, Homa; Hamzavi, Yazdan; Mobedi, Iraj; Arshi, Shahnam; Zarei, Zabih; Akhoundi, Behnaz; Naeini, Koroush Manouchehri; Avizeh, Reza; Fakhar, Mehdi

    2005-05-15

    An epidemiological study to examine the sero-prevalence of zoonotic visceral leishmaniosis (ZVL) among domestic and wild canines in endemic foci of Iran was carried out during 1999-2003 to assess the distribution of the disease and the possible association between infection in dogs, wild canines and people. Anti-leishmanial antibodies were detected by the direct agglutination test (DAT). Parasitological study was performed for all captured wild canines and were detected in some of the seropositive dogs with specific clinical signs (n=107). Serum samples (n=1568) were collected from domestic dogs in villages that are known endemic foci of human visceral leishmaniosis (HVL). Wild canine sera were collected from jackals (Canis aureus, n=10), foxes (Vulpes vulpes, n=10) and wolves (Canis lupus, n=10). Of the 1568 serum sampled collected from domestic dogs, 222 (14.2%) were positive by DAT (1:320 and above). No statistically significant difference was found between male (15.2%) and female (11.8%) sero-prevalence (P=0.083). Dogs of 8 years and above showed the highest sero-prevalence (40.6%). Only 23.9% of the seropositive domestic dogs had clinical signs. Parasitology and serology tests that were performed in 30 wild canines showed 10% these animals were infected by Leishmania infantum. Ten out of 11 Leishmania spp. isolated from the dogs and wild canines were identified as L. infantum and one other as L. tropica by molecular and biochemical techniques. For the first time in Iran, L. infantum and L. tropica were isolated from viscera of both a wolf and a domestic dog. PMID:15845279

  19. Schistosomiasis in pre-school-age children and their mothers in Chikhwawa district, Malawi with notes on characterization of schistosomes and snails

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To complement ongoing schistosomiasis control within national control programmes (NCPs) that administer praziquantel to school-age children, assessing the risk and extent of schistosomiasis in pre-school-age children (PSAC) is important. Methods In June 2012, schistosomiasis in Chikhwawa district, Malawi was assessed across 12 villages examining pre-school-age children (PSAC) and their mothers by serological and parasitological diagnosis, as supplemented with urine-antigen and questionnaire-interview methods. Urinary tract morbidity was inferred by haematuria and albuminuria assays. Results In total, 49.5% (CI95 42.6-56.4) of 208 PSAC and 94.5% (CI95 90.9-98.1) of 165 mothers were seropositive for schistosomiasis, in 2 villages seroprevalence exceeded 75% in PSAC. Egg-patent urogenital and intestinal schistosomiasis was observed; 17.7% (CI95 12.4-23.2) of PSAC and 45.1% (CI95 37.4-52.8) of mothers having active schistosomiasis by parasitological and urine-antigen testing combined. PSAC often had extensive daily water contact and many (~25%) had haematuria and albuminuria. As eggs with an atypical morphology of Schistosoma haematobium were observed, a general selection of schistosome eggs was characterized by DNA barcoding, finding Group I S. haematobium and Group IV and V S. mansoni. Malacological surveys encountered several populations of Bulinus globosus but failed to find Biomphalaria. Conclusions Both PSAC and their mothers appear to be at significant risk of schistosomiasis and should be considered for treatment within the NCP of Malawi. PMID:24690282

  20. A longitudinal epidemiological survey of bovine trypanosomosis and its vectors in the White Volta river basin of Northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mahama, C I; Desquesnes, M; Dia, M L; Losson, B; De Deken, R; Speybroeck, N; Geerts, S

    2005-03-31

    A longitudinal epidemiological survey of bovine trypanosomosis and its vectors was carried out in the Volta river basin of Northern Ghana to determine the relationship between cattle management and the incidence of bovine trypanosomosis. Two groups of sentinel cattle under different systems of management, classified as "fully-sedentary" and "partially-sedentary" (depending on the type of management) were followed over a 1-year period starting from March 2003 onwards. Cattle were screened at intervals of 3 months using the buffy coat technique (BCT). Buffy coat specimen from animals that were positive for the BCT and those that were negative, but with a packed cell volume (PCV) of less than 21% were further tested using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma from all animals were tested for antibody using the indirect antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Trypanosomosis challenge was determined in tandem with the epidemiological survey with watering sites of sentinel cattle being the foci of interest. The parasitological prevalence at the start of the survey was higher in the fully-sedentary group (9%) than in the partially-sedentary group (3%). In subsequent visits, however, the parasitological incidence was consistently higher in the partially-sedentary group than in the fully-sedentary group. The mean seroprevalence (ELISA) of both groups increased from 3% in March to 54% in December. Statistical analysis of the serological results using a random effect logistic regression, showed a significant difference in incidence of bovine trypanosomosis between the two groups. There was also a significant effect of time. The influence of cattle herding on host-vector-parasite interface and its consequence on the incidence of trypanosomosis are discussed. PMID:15740857

  1. Macroparasites and their communities of the European eel Anguilla anguilla (Linnaeus) in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Scholz, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of parasitological examinations of the European eel Anguilla anguilla (Linnaeus) in the Czech Republic, carried out at the Institute of Parasitology, Czech Academy of Sciences (previously the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences) within the period of 50 years (1958-2008). Even though this survey is limited to the Czech Republic, it provides extensive data probably incomparable with any other study anywhere regarding the number of eels examined and parasites found. A total of 723 eels was examined from 42 localities that belong to all of the three main river drainage systems in the country, i.e. the Elbe, Danube and Oder river basins. Of the 31 species of adult and larval macroparasites including Monogenea (4 species), Trematoda (3), Cestoda (3), Nematoda (11), Acanthocephala (5), Hirudinea (1), Bivalvia (1), Copepoda (1), Branchiura (1) and Acariformes (1), most of them (30) were recorded from the Elbe River basin. These parasites can be divided into three main groups regarding their host specificity: parasites specific for eels (26%), non-specific adult parasites occurring also in other fishes (61%) and non-specific larvae (13%). The highest number (19) of parasite species was recorded in the Mácha Lake fishpond system in northern Bohemia. The parasite communities in eels from the individual localities exhibited large differences in their species composition and diversity depending on local ecological conditions. The parasite fauna of A. anguilla in the Czech Republic is compared with that in other European countries. The nematode Cucullanus egyptae Abdel-Ghaffar, Bashtar, Abdel-Gaber, Morsy, Mehlhorn, Al Quraishy et Mohammed, 2014 is designated as a species inquirenda. PMID:26130652

  2. Intestinal coccidiosis of anadromous and landlocked alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, caused by Goussia ameliae n. sp. and G. alosii n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae).

    PubMed

    Lovy, Jan; Friend, Sarah E

    2015-08-01

    Anadromous alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, have experienced significant population level declines caused by factors including habitat destruction. Alewives occur in two different life histories, anadromous and landlocked forms. The landlocked alewife evolved from ancestral anadromous populations, resulting in an exclusively freshwater and phenotypically unique form. The occurrence of parasites in a host is linked to the environment, making alewives an ideal model to compare parasitology within a single species with contrasting life histories. Currently, little information exists on the presence and impacts of parasites in these fish populations; the present study sets out to better understand coccidiosis in the threatened anadromous populations and to understand how coccidian parasites compare in both life history forms. The intestinal coccidian, Goussia ameliae n. sp., was described infecting the pyloric cecum of 76% and 86% of young-of-the-year and adult anadromous alewives, respectively, from the Maurice River, New Jersey, USA. The coccidian was found in landlocked alewife populations with a prevalence of 92% and 34% in YOY and adult fish, respectively. An analysis of the small subunit 18S ribosomal RNA gene of G. ameliae from both life history forms demonstrated that the coccidian had 100% sequence identity, confirming the same parasite species in both forms. Though genetic analysis demonstrated G. ameliae to be identical, some differences were observed in sporulation and morphology of the parasite within the two populations. The sporocysts in anadromous populations were shorter and wider, and sporulation timing differed from that of landlocked fish. These differences may either be attributed to differences in the host type or to the sporulation environment. Lastly, alewives from landlocked populations were frequently co-infected with a second coccidian species in the posterior intestine, which occurred at a lower prevalence. This species, G. alosii n. sp., was described based on morphological characters of the sporulated oocysts in fresh parasitological preparations. PMID:25853050

  3. A standardised faecal collection protocol for intestinal helminth egg counts in Asian elephants, Elephas maximus

    PubMed Central

    Lynsdale, Carly L.; Santos, Diogo J. Franco dos; Hayward, Adam D.; Mar, Khyne U.; Htut, Win; Aung, Htoo Htoo; Soe, Aung Thura; Lummaa, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative assessment of parasite infection is necessary to measure, manage and reduce infection risk in both wild and captive animal populations. Traditional faecal flotation methods which aim to quantify parasite burden, such as the McMaster egg counting technique, are widely used in veterinary medicine, agricultural management and wildlife parasitology. Although many modifications to the McMaster method exist, few account for systematic variation in parasite egg output which may lead to inaccurate estimations of infection intensity through faecal egg counts (FEC). To adapt the McMaster method for use in sampling Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), we tested a number of possible sources of error regarding faecal sampling, focussing on helminth eggs and using a population of over 120 semi-captive elephants distributed across northern Myanmar. These included time of day of defecation, effects of storage in 10% formalin and 10% formol saline and variation in egg distribution between and within faecal boluses. We found no significant difference in the distribution of helminth eggs within faecal matter or for different defecation times, however, storage in formol saline and formalin significantly decreased egg recovery. This is the first study to analyse several collection and storage aspects of a widely-used traditional parasitology method for helminth parasites of E. maximus using known host individuals. We suggest that for the modified McMaster technique, a minimum of one fresh sample per elephant collected from any freshly produced bolus in the total faecal matter and at any point within a 7.5 h time period (7.30am–2.55 pm) will consistently represent parasite load. This study defines a protocol which may be used to test pre-analytic factors and effectively determine infection load in species which produce large quantities of vegetative faeces, such as non-ruminant megaherbivores. PMID:26236632

  4. Detection and differentiation of coccidian oocysts by real-time PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Laura F; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2011-08-01

    Rapid and reliable detection and identification of coccidian oocysts are essential for animal health and foodborne disease outbreak investigations. Traditional microscopy and morphological techniques can identify large and unique oocysts, but they are often subjective and require parasitological expertise. The objective of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay using melting curve analysis (MCA) to detect, differentiate, and identify DNA from coccidian species of animal health, zoonotic, and food safety concern. A universal coccidia primer cocktail was designed and employed to amplify DNA from Cryptosporidium parvum, Toxoplasma gondii, Cyclospora cayetanensis, and several species of Eimeria, Sarcocystis, and Isospora using qPCR with SYBR Green detection. MCA was performed following amplification, and melting temperatures (T(m)) were determined for each species based on multiple replicates. A standard curve was constructed from DNA of serial dilutions of T. gondii oocysts to estimate assay sensitivity. The qPCR assay consistently detected DNA from as few as 10 T. gondii oocysts. T(m) data analysis showed that C. cayetanensis, C. parvum, Cryptosporidium muris, T. gondii, Eimeria bovis, Eimeria acervulina, Isospora suis, and Sarcocystis cruzi could each be identified by unique melting curves and could be differentiated based on T(m). DNA of coccidian oocysts in fecal, food, or clinical diagnostic samples could be sensitively detected, reliably differentiated, and identified using qPCR with MCA. This assay may also be used to detect other life-cycle stages of coccidia in tissues, fluids, and other matrices. MCA studies on multiple isolates of each species will further validate the assay and support its application as a routine parasitology screening tool. PMID:21506835

  5. Untreated Human Infections by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Are Not 100% Fatal

    PubMed Central

    Jamonneau, Vincent; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Kaboré, Jacques; Kaba, Dramane; Koffi, Mathurin; Solano, Philippe; Garcia, André; Courtin, David; Laveissière, Claude; Lingue, Kouakou; Büscher, Philippe; Bucheton, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The final outcome of infection by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the main agent of sleeping sickness, has always been considered as invariably fatal. While scarce and old reports have mentioned cases of self-cure in untreated patients, these studies suffered from the lack of accurate diagnostic tools available at that time. Here, using the most specific and sensitive tools available to date, we report on a long-term follow-up (15 years) of a cohort of 50 human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients from the Ivory Coast among whom 11 refused treatment after their initial diagnosis. In 10 out of 11 subjects who continued to refuse treatment despite repeated visits, parasite clearance was observed using both microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Most of these subjects (7/10) also displayed decreasing serological responses, becoming progressively negative to trypanosome variable antigens (LiTat 1.3, 1.5 and 1.6). Hence, in addition to the “classic” lethal outcome of HAT, we show that alternative natural progressions of HAT may occur: progression to an apparently aparasitaemic and asymptomatic infection associated with strong long-lasting serological responses and progression to an apparently spontaneous resolution of infection (with negative results in parasitological tests and PCR) associated with a progressive drop in antibody titres as observed in treated cases. While this study does not precisely estimate the frequency of the alternative courses for this infection, it is noteworthy that in the field national control programs encounter a significant proportion of subjects displaying positive serologic test results but negative results in parasitological testing. These findings demonstrate that a number of these subjects display such infection courses. From our point of view, recognising that trypanotolerance exists in humans, as is now widely accepted for animals, is a major step forward for future research in the field of HAT. PMID:22720107

  6. Accuracy of Five Algorithms to Diagnose Gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Checchi, Francesco; Chappuis, François; Karunakara, Unni; Priotto, Gerardo; Chandramohan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Algorithms to diagnose gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness) are often complex due to the unsatisfactory sensitivity and/or specificity of available tests, and typically include a screening (serological), confirmation (parasitological) and staging component. There is insufficient evidence on the relative accuracy of these algorithms. This paper presents estimates of the accuracy of five algorithms used by past Médecins Sans Frontières programmes in the Republic of Congo, Southern Sudan and Uganda. Methodology and Principal Findings The sequence of tests in each algorithm was programmed into a probabilistic model, informed by distributions of the sensitivity, specificity and staging accuracy of each test, constructed based on a literature review. The accuracy of algorithms was estimated in a baseline scenario and in a worst-case scenario introducing various near worst-case assumptions. In the baseline scenario, sensitivity was estimated as 85–90% in all but one algorithm, with specificity above 99.9% except for the Republic of Congo, where CATT serology was used as independent confirmation test: here, positive predictive value (PPV) was estimated at <50% in realistic active screening prevalence scenarios. Furthermore, most algorithms misclassified about one third of true stage 1 cases as stage 2, and about 10% of true stage 2 cases as stage 1. In the worst-case scenario, sensitivity was 75–90% and PPV no more than 75% at 1% prevalence, with about half of stage 1 cases misclassified as stage 2. Conclusions Published evidence on the accuracy of widely used tests is scanty. Algorithms should carefully weigh the use of serology alone for confirmation, and could enhance sensitivity through serological suspect follow-up and repeat parasitology. Better evidence on the frequency of low-parasitaemia infections is needed. Simulation studies should guide the tailoring of algorithms to specific scenarios of HAT prevalence and availability of control tools. PMID:21750745

  7. Accuracy of Individual Rapid Tests for Serodiagnosis of Gambiense Sleeping Sickness in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jamonneau, Vincent; Camara, Oumou; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Peylhard, Moana; Koffi, Mathurin; Sakande, Hassane; N’Dri, Louis; Sanou, Djénéba; Dama, Emilie; Camara, Mamadou; Lejon, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Background Individual rapid tests for serodiagnosis (RDT) of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are particularly suited for passive screening and surveillance. However, so far, no large scale evaluation of RDTs has been performed for diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense HAT in West Africa. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 2 commercial HAT-RDTs on stored plasma samples from West Africa. Methodology/Principal findings SD Bioline HAT and HAT Sero-K-Set were performed on 722 plasma samples originating from Guinea and Côte d’Ivoire, including 231 parasitologically confirmed HAT patients, 257 healthy controls, and 234 unconfirmed individuals whose blood tested antibody positive in the card agglutination test but negative by parasitological tests. Immune trypanolysis was performed as a reference test for trypanosome specific antibody presence. Sensitivities in HAT patients were respectively 99.6% for SD Bioline HAT, and 99.1% for HAT Sero-K-Set, specificities in healthy controls were respectively 87.9% and 88.3%. Considering combined positivity in both RDTs, increased the specificity significantly (p?0.0003) to 93.4%, while 98.7% sensitivity was maintained. Specificities in controls were 98.7–99.6% for the combination of one or two RDTs with trypanolysis, maintaining a sensitivity of at least 98.1%. Conclusions/Significance The observed specificity of the single RDTs was relatively low. Serial application of SD Bioline HAT and HAT Sero-K-Set might offer superior specificity compared to a single RDT, maintaining high sensitivity. The combination of one or two RDTs with trypanolysis seems promising for HAT surveillance. PMID:25642701

  8. Willingness-to-pay for a rapid malaria diagnostic test and artemisinin-based combination therapy from private drug shops in Mukono District, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Pedrazzoli, Debora; Mbonye, Anthony; Clarke, Sian; Cundill, Bonnie; Magnussen, Pascal; Yeung, Shunmay

    2013-03-01

    In Uganda, as in many parts of Africa, the majority of the population seek treatment for malaria in drug shops as their first point of care; however, parasitological diagnosis is not usually offered in these outlets. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria have attracted interest in recent years as a tool to improve malaria diagnosis, since they have proved accurate and easy to perform with minimal training. Although RDTs could feasibly be performed by drug shop vendors, it is not known how much customers would be willing to pay for an RDT if offered in these settings. We conducted a contingent valuation survey among drug shop customers in Mukono District, Uganda. Exit interviews were undertaken with customers aged 15 years and above after leaving a drug shop having purchased an antimalarial and/or paracetamol. The bidding game technique was used to elicit the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for an RDT and a course of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) with and without RDT confirmation. Factors associated with WTP were investigated using linear regression. The geometric mean WTP for an RDT was US$0.53, US$1.82 for a course of ACT and US$2.05 for a course of ACT after a positive RDT. Factors strongly associated with a higher WTP for these commodities included having a higher socio-economic status, no fever/malaria in the household in the past 2 weeks and if a malaria diagnosis had been obtained from a qualified health worker prior to visiting the drug shop. The findings further suggest that the WTP for an RDT and a course of ACT among drug shop customers is considerably lower than prevailing and estimated end-user prices for these commodities. Increasing the uptake of ACTs in drug shops and restricting the sale of ACTs to parasitologically confirmed malaria will therefore require additional measures. PMID:22589226

  9. Parasites of fish larvae: do they follow metabolic energetic laws?

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Gabriela; Landaeta, Mauricio F; Palacios-Fuentes, Pamela; George-Nascimento, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Eumetazoan parasites in fish larvae normally exhibit large body sizes relative to their hosts. This observation raises a question about the potential effects that parasites might have on small fish. We indirectly evaluated this question using energetic metabolic laws based on body volume and the parasite densities. We compared the biovolume as well as the numeric and volumetric densities of parasites over the host body volume of larval and juvenile-adult fish and the average of these parasitological descriptors for castrator parasites and the parasites found in the fish studied here. We collected 5266 fish larvae using nearshore zooplankton sampling and 1556 juveniles and adult fish from intertidal rocky pools in central Chile. We considered only the parasitized hosts: 482 fish larvae and 629 juvenile-adult fish. We obtained 31 fish species; 14 species were in both plankton and intertidal zones. Fish larvae exhibited a significantly smaller biovolume but larger numeric and volumetric densities of parasites than juvenile-adult fish. Therefore, fish larvae showed a large proportion of parasite biovolume per unit of body host (cm(3)). However, the general scaling of parasitological descriptors and host body volume were similar between larvae and juvenile-adult fish. The ratio between the biovolume of parasites and the host body volume in fish larvae was similar to the proportion observed in castrator parasites. Furthermore, the ratios were different from those of juvenile-adult fish, which suggests that the presence of parasites implies a high energetic cost for fish larvae that would diminish the fitness of these small hosts. PMID:26193824

  10. Chronic Malaria Revealed by a New Fluorescence Pattern on the Antinuclear Autoantibodies Test

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Benjamin; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Jaureguiberry, Stéphane; Arnaud, Laurent; Courtin, Regis; Kassab, Petra; Prendki, Virginie; Paris, Luc; Ghillani-Dalbin, Pascale; Thellier, Marc; Caumes, Eric; Amoura, Zahir; Mazier, Dominique; Musset, Lucile; Buffet, Pierre; Miyara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Background Several clinical forms of malaria such as chronic carriage, gestational malaria or hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly may follow a cryptic evolution with afebrile chronic fatigue sometimes accompanied by anemia and/or splenomegaly. Conventional parasitological tests are often negative or not performed, and severe complications may occur. Extensive explorations of these conditions often include the search for antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA). Methods We analysed fluorescence patterns in the ANA test in patients with either chronic cryptic or acute symptomatic malaria, then conducted a one-year prospective study at a single hospital on all available sera drawn for ANA detections. We then identified autoantibodies differentially expressed in malaria patients and in controls using human protein microarray. Results We uncovered and defined a new, malaria-related, nucleo-cytoplasmic ANA pattern displaying the specific association of a nuclear speckled pattern with diffuse cytoplasmic perinuclearly-enhanced fluorescence. In the one-year prospective analysis, 79% of sera displaying this new nucleo-cytoplasmic fluorescence were from patients with malaria. This specific pattern, not seen in other parasitic diseases, allowed a timely reorientation of the diagnosis toward malaria. To assess if the autoantibody immune response was due to autoreactivity or molecular mimicry we isolated 42 autoantigens, targets of malarial autoantibodies. BLAST analysis indicated that 23 of recognized autoantigens were homologous to plasmodial proteins suggesting autoimmune responses directly driven by the plasmodial infection. Conclusion In patients with malaria in whom parasitological tests have not been performed recognition of this new, malaria-related fluorescence pattern on the ANA test is highly suggestive of the diagnosis and triggers immediate, easy confirmation and adapted therapy. PMID:24551116

  11. Simplified protocol for DNA extraction and amplification of 2 molecular markers to detect and type Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Uda-Shimoda, Carla Fernanda; Colli, Cristiane Maria; Pavanelli, Mariana Felgueira; Falavigna-Guilherme, Ana Lúcia; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of 3 kits: QIAmp® DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), PureLink PCR Purification®, and PureLink™ Genomic DNA® (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) for DNA extraction, and of 2 molecular markers (heat shock protein [HSP] and ?-giardin genes) for detection and genotyping of Giardia duodenalis stool samples. The detection and typing limits of the markers were determined by the DNA concentration of trophozoites and cysts and were tested in 26 clinical samples. Of the 3 kits tested, the PureLink PCR Purification gave the best results when tested with clinical samples with low, intermediate, and high numbers of cysts. The DNA extracted from trophozoites and cysts was diluted successively in 1:2 ratios until it was no longer possible to observe the amplified product in polyacrylamide gel. Similarly, a suspension of cysts was diluted until no cysts were observed, and then the DNA was extracted. The amount of DNA of trophozoites and cysts for the typing of the parasite was smaller for the HSP marker than for ?-giardin. Combined use of both markers allowed us to detect DNA of Giardia in parasitologically positive samples in a higher percentage (75%) than the results obtained for each marker and in 1 parasitologically negative sample, indicating that this combination increased the potential to accurately detect and genotype this parasite. We also concluded that the HSP marker has a higher limit of detection and typing than the ?-giardin marker and that the DNA extraction method tested for G. duodenalis is simpler and more efficient than those that are currently in use and can be applied on a large scale. PMID:24207076

  12. [Evaluation of the diagnostic value of the ELISA tests developed by using EgHF, Em2 and EmII/3-10 antigens in the serological diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis].

    PubMed

    Pekta?, Bayram; Altinta?, Nazmiye; Akpolat, Nezahat; Gottstein, Bruno

    2014-07-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE), caused by larva stage of Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the lethal parasitic diseases of man and a major public health problem in many countries in the northern hemisphere. When the living conditions and habits in Turkey were considered in terms of relation with the life cycle of the parasite, it was suggested that AE has been much more common than reported mainly from the Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey. Since in vitro serologic diagnosis tests with high specificity for AE have not been used in our country, most of the cases with liver lesions were misdiagnosed by radiological investigations as malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of the in-house ELISA methods developed by using three different antigens (EgHF, Em2, EmII/3-10) in the serological diagnosis of AE. The study samples included a total of 100 sera provided by Bern University Parasitology Institute where samples were obtained from patients with helminthiasis and all were confirmed by clinical, parasitological and/or histopathological means. Ten samples from each of the cases infected by E.multilocularis, E.granulosus, Taenia solium, Wuchereria bancrofti, Strongyloides stercolaris, Ascaris lumbricoides, Toxocara canis, Trichinella spiralis, Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma haematobium were studied. In the study, EgHF (E.granulosus hydatid fluid) antigens were prepared in our laboratory from the liver cyst fluids of sheeps with cystic echinococcosis, however Em2 (E.multilocularis metacestode-purified laminated layer) and EmII/3-10 (E.multilocularis recombinant protoscolex tegument) antigens were provided by Bern University Parasitology Institute. Flat bottom ELISA plates were covered with EgHF, Em2 and EmII/3-10 antigens in the concentrations of 2.5 µg, 1 µg and 0.18 µg per well, respectively, and all sera were tested by EgHF-ELISA, Em2-ELISA and EmII/3-10-ELISA methods. For each tests, the samples which were reactive above the cut-off value (mean OD of negative controls+2 SD) were accepted as positive. The sensitivity of the ELISA tests performed with EgHF, Em2 and Em2II/3-10 antigens were estimated as 100%, 90% and 90%, respectively, whereas the specificity were 63%, 91% and 91%, respectively. When Em2-ELISA and EmII/3-10-ELISA tests were evaluated together, the specificity increased to 96%. Our data indicated that the highest sensitivity (100% with EgHF-ELISA) and specificity (96% with Em2-ELISA + EmII/3-10-ELISA) for the serodiagnosis of AE can be achieved by the combined use of the ELISA tests with three different antigens. It was concluded that the early and accurate diagnosis of AE in our country which is endemic for that disease, could be supported by the use of highly specific serological tests such as Em2-ELISA ve EmII/3-10-ELISA contributing radiological data. PMID:25052112

  13. Toward Diagnosing Leishmania infantum Infection in Asymptomatic Dogs in an Area Where Leishmaniasis Is Endemic?

    PubMed Central

    Otranto, D.; Paradies, P.; de Caprariis, D.; Stanneck, D.; Testini, G.; Grimm, F.; Deplazes, P.; Capelli, G.

    2009-01-01

    The most frequently used diagnostic methods were compared in a longitudinal survey with Leishmania infantum-infected asymptomatic dogs from an area of Italy where leishmaniasis is endemic. In February and March 2005, 845 asymptomatic dogs were tested by an immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), a dipstick assay (DS), and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for L. infantum and by IFAT for Ehrlichia canis. Dogs seronegative for L. infantum were further parasitologically evaluated by microscopic examination of lymph node tissues and PCR of skin samples. A total of 204 animals both serologically and parasitologically negative for L. infantum at the first sampling were enrolled in the trial and were further examined for canine leishmaniasis (CanL) and canine monocytic ehrlichiosis in November 2005 (i.e., the end of the first sandfly season) and March 2006 and 2007 (1- and 2-year follow-ups, respectively). At the initial screening, the overall rates of L. infantum seroprevalence were 9.5% by IFAT, 17.1% by ELISA, and 9.8% by DS and the overall rate of E. canis seroprevalence was 15%. The rates of concordance between the results of IFAT and DS were almost equal, whereas the rate of concordance between the results of IFAT and DS and those of the ELISA was lower. The results of the annual incidence of Leishmania infection were variable, depending on the test employed, with the highest values registered for PCR (i.e., 5.7% and 11.4% at the 1- and 2-year follow-ups, respectively), followed by ELISA, IFAT, and DS. Over the 2 years of observation, 55 animals (i.e., 26.9%) became positive for L. infantum by one or more diagnostic tests at different follow-up times, with 12.7% showing clinical signs related to CanL, while the remaining 87.3% were asymptomatic. A diagnostic scheme for assessment of the L. infantum infection status in asymptomatic dogs is suggested. PMID:19129471

  14. Toward diagnosing Leishmania infantum infection in asymptomatic dogs in an area where leishmaniasis is endemic.

    PubMed

    Otranto, D; Paradies, P; de Caprariis, D; Stanneck, D; Testini, G; Grimm, F; Deplazes, P; Capelli, G

    2009-03-01

    The most frequently used diagnostic methods were compared in a longitudinal survey with Leishmania infantum-infected asymptomatic dogs from an area of Italy where leishmaniasis is endemic. In February and March 2005, 845 asymptomatic dogs were tested by an immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), a dipstick assay (DS), and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for L. infantum and by IFAT for Ehrlichia canis. Dogs seronegative for L. infantum were further parasitologically evaluated by microscopic examination of lymph node tissues and PCR of skin samples. A total of 204 animals both serologically and parasitologically negative for L. infantum at the first sampling were enrolled in the trial and were further examined for canine leishmaniasis (CanL) and canine monocytic ehrlichiosis in November 2005 (i.e., the end of the first sandfly season) and March 2006 and 2007 (1- and 2-year follow-ups, respectively). At the initial screening, the overall rates of L. infantum seroprevalence were 9.5% by IFAT, 17.1% by ELISA, and 9.8% by DS and the overall rate of E. canis seroprevalence was 15%. The rates of concordance between the results of IFAT and DS were almost equal, whereas the rate of concordance between the results of IFAT and DS and those of the ELISA was lower. The results of the annual incidence of Leishmania infection were variable, depending on the test employed, with the highest values registered for PCR (i.e., 5.7% and 11.4% at the 1- and 2-year follow-ups, respectively), followed by ELISA, IFAT, and DS. Over the 2 years of observation, 55 animals (i.e., 26.9%) became positive for L. infantum by one or more diagnostic tests at different follow-up times, with 12.7% showing clinical signs related to CanL, while the remaining 87.3% were asymptomatic. A diagnostic scheme for assessment of the L. infantum infection status in asymptomatic dogs is suggested. PMID:19129471

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detection of Leishmania DNA in buffy coat from visceral leishmaniasis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains as one of the most neglected tropical diseases with over 60% of the world’s total VL cases occurring in the Indian subcontinent. Due to the invasive risky procedure and technical expertise required in the classical parasitological diagnosis, the goal of the VL experts has been to develop noninvasive procedure(s) applicable in the field settings. Several serological and molecular biological approaches have been developed over the last decades, but only a few are applicable in field settings that can be performed with relative ease. Recently, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has emerged as a novel nucleic acid amplification method for diagnosis of VL. In this study, we have evaluated the LAMP assay using buffy coat DNA samples from VL patients in Bangladesh and compared its performance with leishmania nested PCR (Ln-PCR), an established molecular method with very high diagnostic indices. Methods Seventy five (75) parasitologically confirmed VL patients by spleen smear microcopy and 101 controls (endemic healthy controls ?25, non-endemic healthy control-26, Tuberculosis-25 and other diseases-25) were enrolled in this study. LAMP assay was carried out using a set of four primers targeting L. donovani kinetoplast minicircle DNA under isothermal (62 °C) conditions in a heat block. For Ln-PCR, we used primers targeting the parasite’s small-subunit rRNA region. Results LAMP assay was found to be positive in 68 of 75 confirmed VL cases, and revealed its diagnostic sensitivity of 90.7% (95.84-81.14, 95% CI), whereas all controls were negative by LAMP assay, indicating a specificity of 100% (100–95.43, 95% CI). The Ln-PCR yielded a sensitivity of 96% (98.96-87.97, 95% CI) and a specificity of 100% (100–95.43, 95% CI). Conclusion High diagnostic sensitivity and excellent specificity were observed in this first report of LAMP diagnostic evaluation from Bangladesh. Considering its many fold advantages over conventional PCR and potential to be used as a simple and rapid test in the VL endemic areas of the Indian subcontinent, our findings are encouraging, but further evaluation of LAMP is needed. PMID:23206441

  16. Impact of Six Years Community Directed Treatment with Ivermectin in the Control of Onchocerciasis, Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Abdi; Belay, Tariku; Yehalaw, Delenasaw; Taha, Mohammed; Zemene, Endalew; Zeynudin, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background The African Program for Onchocerciais Control (APOC) with a main strategy of community directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) was established with the aim of eliminating Onchocerciasis as a disease of public health and socio-economic importance. The study area was a hyper endemic area just before the implementation of CDTI. It has been implemented for six years in this district but yet not been evaluated. So, the objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of six years CDTI on parasitological and clinical indices of Onchocerciasis Methods This study employed a pre-post impact evaluation design. The minimum sample size for this study was 1318; the respondents were selected by multi-stage sampling technique. Data on socio-demographic characteristics using a semi-structured questionnaire, clinical examination for skin signs and symptoms of Onchocerciasis and two bloodless skin snips from each side of the gluteal fold were taken from the entire study participants. SPSS version 16.0 and Medcalc version 12.2.1.0 were used for analysis. Result The microfilaridermia reduced from the pre-intervention value of 74.8% to 40.7%, indicating a 45.6% reduction, mean intensity from 32.1(SD = 61.5) mf/mg skin snip to 18.7(SD = 28.7)indicating 41.75% reduction, CMFL from 19.6 mf/mg skin snip to 4.7 indicating 76% reduction. The result also showed that microfilaridermia and mean intensity decreased as the number of treatment taken increased. Pruritis, leopard skin, onchocercomata and hanging groin reduced by 54.4%, 61.3%, 77.7% and 88.5% respectively. Conclusions The implementation of CDTI significantly reduced the parasitological and clinical indices of Onchocerciasis, so, efforts should be made to improve the annual treatment coverage and sustainability of CDTI to drastically reduce the micro filarial load to the level the disease would no longer be a public health problem. PMID:26942910

  17. Urbanization and tropical health--then and now.

    PubMed

    Utzinger, J; Keiser, J

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 100 years ago, the percentage of the world's population living in urban settings has more than tripled and is now approaching 50%. Urbanization will continue at a high pace, particularly in the less developed regions of Africa and Asia. The profound demographic, ecological and socio-economic transformations that accompany the process of urbanization have important impacts on health and well-being. In industrialized countries, urbanization led to the so-called 'epidemiological transition', from acute infectious and deficiency diseases to chronic non-communicable diseases, many decades ago. In the developing world, surprisingly little research has been carried out on the health-related aspects of urbanization. In a temporal analysis of publications in the Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, for example, in which the first volume in every decade from 1907 was examined, only 16 (2.6%) of the 604 articles investigated focused on epidemiological and/or public-health issues in urban tropical settings. This review begins with the question 'what is urban?' and then provides a summary of the trends seen in urbanization, and its impacts on human health, over the past century, on both a global and regional scale. For the main tropical diseases, estimates of the at-risk populations and the numbers of cases are updated and then split into urban and non-urban categories. The inhabitants of urban slums are particularly vulnerable to many of these diseases and require special attention if internationally-set targets for development are to be met. Heterogeneity, a major feature of urban settings in the tropics that complicates all efforts at health improvement, is demonstrated in an exploration of a densely populated municipality of a large West African town. Urban planners, public-health experts and other relevant stakeholders clearly need to make much more progress in alleviating poverty and enhancing the health and well-being of urban residents, in an equity-effective and sustainable manner. PMID:16899152

  18. A systematic review of the efficacy of prophylactic control measures for naturally-occurring canine leishmaniosis, part I: vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Wylie, C E; Carbonell-Antoñanzas, M; Aiassa, E; Dhollander, S; Zagmutt, F J; Brodbelt, D C; Solano-Gallego, L

    2014-11-01

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is an important zoonotic disease; however, the efficacy of available vaccines for the prevention of naturally-occurring Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) infection in dogs remains unclear. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of currently available vaccines to prevent naturally-occurring L. infantum infection in dogs. Four bibliographic databases (CAB Direct 2011, Web of Science 2011, U.S. National Library of Medicine 2011 and Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) were searched along with eight sets of conference proceedings and the International Veterinary Information Service (IVIS) database, from 1980 to November 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised clinical trials (NRCTs), cohort studies and case-control studies that investigated vaccine efficacy for natural L. infantum infection in dogs were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed each study against the inclusion criteria, independently extracted relevant data from all included studies and assessed the risk of methodological shortcomings in each individual study. The odds ratio (OR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference for continuous outcomes were calculated. Meta-analysis was not performed due to heterogeneity of the studies identified. The search was conducted for all mitigations for CanL and yielded the title and abstract of 937 articles, from which 84 articles were screened based on full text. Twelve studies on vaccinations (five RCTs, seven NRCTs) were identified. Ten studies were at a high risk of methodological shortcomings, whilst two were at an unclear risk. The use of 200 ?g ALM protein, Leishmune(®), CaniLeish(®), LiESAp with MDP, and ALM with BCG tended to significantly reduce the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. The use of lyophilized protein vaccine significantly increased the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. There is peer-reviewed evidence that control measures are effective in preventing CanL with the results suggesting that between 6 and 54% of infections could be prevented with vaccination. However, this evidence is based on a small number of RCTs, all of which are either at high or unclear risk of methodological shortcomings. Well-designed, adequately powered and properly reported randomised clinical trials are needed to clearly establish efficacy of vaccines as CanL control measures. PMID:25074635

  19. Management of imported malaria in Europe.

    PubMed

    Askling, Helena H; Bruneel, Fabrice; Burchard, Gerd; Castelli, Francesco; Chiodini, Peter L; Grobusch, Martin P; Lopez-Vélez, Rogelio; Paul, Margaret; Petersen, Eskild; Popescu, Corneliu; Ramharter, Michael; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    In this position paper, the European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Study Group on Clinical Parasitology, summarizes main issues regarding the management of imported malaria cases. Malaria is a rare diagnosis in Europe, but it is a medical emergency. A travel history is the key to suspecting malaria and is mandatory in patients with fever. There are no specific clinical signs or symptoms of malaria although fever is seen in almost all non-immune patients. Migrants from malaria endemic areas may have few symptoms.Malaria diagnostics should be performed immediately on suspicion of malaria and the gold- standard is microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick and thin blood films. A Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) may be used as an initial screening tool, but does not replace urgent microscopy which should be done in parallel. Delays in microscopy, however, should not lead to delayed initiation of appropriate treatment. Patients diagnosed with malaria should usually be hospitalized. If outpatient management is preferred, as is the practice in some European centres, patients must usually be followed closely (at least daily) until clinical and parasitological cure. Treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria is either with oral artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) or with the combination atovaquone/proguanil. Two forms of ACT are available in Europe: artemether/lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine. ACT is also effective against Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium knowlesi, but these species can be treated with chloroquine. Treatment of persistent liver forms in P. vivax and P. ovale with primaquine is indicated after excluding glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. There are modified schedules and drug options for the treatment of malaria in special patient groups, such as children and pregnant women. The potential for drug interactions and the role of food in the absorption of anti-malarials are important considerations in the choice of treatment.Complicated malaria is treated with intravenous artesunate resulting in a much more rapid decrease in parasite density compared to quinine. Patients treated with intravenous artesunate should be closely monitored for haemolysis for four weeks after treatment. There is a concern in some countries about the lack of artesunate produced according to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). PMID:22985344

  20. A Combination of the Kato-Katz Methods and ELISA to Improve the Diagnosis of Clonorchiasis in an Endemic Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jingshan; Li, Yihong; Shu, Jing; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Fengmin

    2012-01-01

    Background Examination of feces by light microscopy is widely used for specific parasitological diagnosis of clonorchiasis. However, the true incidence of infection is underestimated owing to the high missing diagnosis rate of this method. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is widely used for the detection and control of clonorchiasis but the practicality of this method is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ELISA as a supplementary method for the diagnosis of clonorchiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study recruited 2,359 clinically suspected patients from Heilongjiang Province, China. In all, 954 cases were identified as antibody-positive by immunoglobulin (IgG)-ELISA and 495 individuals were diagnosed as egg-positive by the Kato-Katz (KK) method. The seropositive and egg-negative individuals were re-examined by repeated egg counts and/or the number of KK slides and 18 (18.18%) cases were confirmed as clonorchiasis. The 40.44%, antibody-positive rate determined by IgG-ELISA was significantly higher (P<0.05) than the 21.75% egg-positive rate found by examination of feces. A Bayesian approach indicated that the prevalence of clonorchiasis in this region was 22.27% and that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of IgG-ELISA were 98.7%, 76.53%, 54.66% and 99.52%, respectively. The agreement between the two methods was moderate (kappa value = 0.564). The clonorchiasis patients lived mainly along the Songhua River. The risk factors, except for ethnic factors, were estimated effectively by both methods. Conclusions/Significance The present study suggested that clonorchiasis was widely distributed in Heilongjiang Province, China. The missing diagnosis rate was high using the KK technique alone. The combination of immunological methods and parasitological techniques could improve diagnostic accuracy and reduce the missing diagnosis rate. ELISA used as an auxiliary diagnostic method was realistic and practical for a large-scale screening test, monitoring the prevalence and assessing the risk factors of clonorchiasis. PMID:23056547

  1. The impact of mass drug administration and long-lasting insecticidal net distribution on Wuchereria bancrofti infection in humans and mosquitoes: an observational study in northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) in Uganda is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti and transmitted by anopheline mosquitoes. The mainstay of elimination has been annual mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin and albendazole, targeted to endemic districts, but has been sporadic and incomplete in coverage. Vector control could potentially contribute to reducing W. bancrofti transmission, speeding up progress towards elimination. To establish whether the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) can contribute towards reducing transmission of W. bancrofti in a setting with ongoing MDA, a study was conducted in an area of Uganda highly endemic for both LF and malaria. Baseline parasitological and entomological assessments were conducted in 2007, followed by high-coverage LLIN distribution. Net use and entomological surveys were carried out after one year, and final parasitological and entomological evaluations were conducted in 2010. Three rounds of MDA had taken place before the study commenced, with a further three rounds completed during the course of the study. Results In 2007, rapid mapping indicated 22.3% of schoolchildren were W. bancrofti antigen positive, and a baseline survey during the same year found age-adjusted microfilaraemia prevalence was 3.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.6-5.3%). In 2010, age-adjusted microfilaraemia prevalence had fallen to 0.4%, while antigenaemia rates were 0.2% in children < 5 years and 6.0% in ≥ 5 years. In 2010, universal coverage of mosquito nets in a household was found to be protective against W. bancrofti antigen (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.22-0.89). Prevalence of W. bancrofti larvae in anopheline mosquitoes had decreased significantly between the 2007 and 2010 surveys, but there was an apparent increase in vector densities. Conclusion A marked reduction in W. bancrofti infection and infectivity in humans was observed in the study area, where both MDA and LLINs were used to reduce transmission. The extent to which LLINs contributed to this decline is equivocal, however. Further work investigating the impact of vector control on anopheline-transmitted LF in an endemic area not benefitting from MDA would be valuable to determine the effect of such interventions on their own. PMID:21756371

  2. Mapping B-Cell Epitopes for the Peroxidoxin of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and Its Potential for the Clinical Diagnosis of Tegumentary and Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Santos, Thaís Teodoro de Oliveira; Silva, Ana Luíza Teixeira; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; de Carvalho, Silvio Fernando Guimarães; Coelho, Eduardo Antônio Ferraz; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The search toward the establishment of novel serological tests for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis and proper differential diagnosis may represent one alternative to the invasive parasitological methods currently used to identify infected individuals. In the present work, we investigated the potential use of recombinant peroxidoxin (rPeroxidoxin) of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis as a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of human tegumentary (TL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). Linear B-cell epitope mapping was performed to identify polymorphic epitopes when comparing orthologous sequences present in Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent for Chagas disease (CD), and the Homo sapiens and Canis familiaris hosts. The serological assay (ELISA) demonstrated that TL, VL and CVL individuals showed high levels of antibodies against rPeroxidoxin, allowing identification of infected ones with considerable sensitivity and great ability to discriminate (specificity) between non-infected and CD individuals (98.46% and 100%; 98.18% and 95.71%; 95.79% and 100%, respectively). An rPeroxidoxin ELISA also showed a greater ability to discriminate between vaccinated and infected animals, which is an important requirement for the public campaign control of CVL. A depletion ELISA assay using soluble peptides of this B-cell epitope confirmed the recognition of these sites only by Leishmania-infected individuals. Moreover, this work identifies two antigenic polymorphic linear B-cell epitopes of L. braziliensis. Specific recognition of TL and VL patients was confirmed by significantly decreased IgG reactivity against rPeroxidoxin after depletion of peptide-1- and peptide-2-specific antibodies (peptide 1: reduced by 32%, 42% and 5% for CL, ML and VL, respectively; peptide-2: reduced by 24%, 22% and 13% for CL, ML and VL, respectively) and only peptide-2 for CVL (reduced 9%). Overall, rPeroxidoxin may be a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of TL, VL or CVL, as it has a higher agreement with parasitological assays and is better than other reference tests that use soluble Leishmania antigens for diagnosing CVL in Brazil (EIE-LVC, Bio-manguinhos, FIOCRUZ). PMID:24921246

  3. Gastrointestinal parasites of free-living Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in the Northern Red Sea, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kleinertz, S; Hermosilla, C; Ziltener, A; Kreicker, S; Hirzmann, J; Abdel-Ghaffar, F; Taubert, A

    2014-04-01

    The present study represents the first report on the gastrointestinal parasite fauna infecting the free-living and alive Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) inhabiting waters of the Red Sea at Hurghada, Egypt. A total of 94 individual faecal samples of the examined bottlenose dolphins were collected during several diving expeditions within their natural habitats. Using classical parasitological techniques, such as sodium acetate acetic acid formalin method, carbol fuchsin-stained faecal smears, coproantigen ELISA, PCR and macroscopical analyses, the study revealed infections with 21 different parasite species belonging to protozoans and metazoans with some of them bearing zoonotic and/or pathogenic potential. Four identified parasite species are potential zoonotic species (Giardia spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Diphyllobothrium spp., Ascaridida indet.); three of them are known to have high pathogenic potential for the examined dolphin species (Nasitrema attenuata, Zalophotrema spp. and Pholeter gastrophilus) and some appear to be directly associated with stranding events. In detail, the study indicates stages of ten protozoan species (Giardia spp., Sarcocystis spp., Isospora (like) spp., Cystoisospora (like) spp., Ciliata indet. I and II, Holotricha indet., Dinoflagellata indet., Hexamita (like) spp., Cryptosporidium spp.), seven trematode species (N. attenuata, Nasitrema spp. I and II, Zalophotrema curilensis, Zalophotrema spp., Pholeter gastrophilus, Trematoda indet.), one cestode species (Diphyllobothrium spp.), two nematode species (Ascaridida indet, Capillaria spp.) and one crustacean parasite (Cymothoidae indet.). Additionally, we molecularly identified adult worms of Anisakis typica in individual dolphin vomitus samples by molecular analyses. A. typica is a common parasite of various dolphin species of warmer temperate and tropical waters and has not been attributed as food-borne parasitic zoonoses so far. Overall, these parasitological findings include ten new host records for T. aduncus (i.e. in case of Giardia spp., Sarcocystis spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Nasitrema spp., Zalophotrema spp., Pholeter gastrophilus, A. typica, Capillaria spp., Diphyllobothrium spp. and Cymothoidae indet.). The present results may be used as a baseline for future monitoring studies targeting the impact of climate or other environmental changes on dolphin's health conditions and therefore contribute to the protection of these fascinating marine mammals. PMID:24477747

  4. [Zoonotic worms from carnivorous pets: risk assessment and prevention].

    PubMed

    Guillot, Jacques; Bouree, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    A wide range of parasites can infect carnivorous pets. Some are more significant than others, owing to their prevalence, their pathogenicity for animal hosts, or their capacity to cause human disease. This article focuses on roundworms (Toxocara spp.) and tapeworms (Echinococcus spp.), which are emerging public health hazards in France. When humans ingest infective Toxocara eggs, the eggs hatch and release larvae that can migrate anywhere in the body, causing a disease called visceral larva migrans. Common target organs are the eyes, brain, liver, and lungs, with a risk of permanent visual, neurological and other tissue damage. Epidemiological studies have identified geophagy and pet dogs (particularly puppies) as the principal risk factors for human toxocarosis. Childrens' play habits and their attraction to pets put them at a higher risk for infection than adults. Eggs of the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus hatch and release embryos that migrate to various organs and form voluminous cysts, causing a disease called cystic echinococcosis. Human alveolar echinococcosis is caused by the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, which usually develops in the liver. Larval growth is slow, resulting in an asymptomatic phase of several years before diagnosis. Left untreated, the condition may be lethal. In central and eastern European areas where Echinococcus multilocularis is endemic, dogs that have access to rodents should be considered as potential hazards for humans. Rational measures for preventing animal and human infection include pet owner education and regular deworming of dogs and cats. Education of pet owners should focus on prevention, and will include personal hygiene, clearing up pet feces regularly to reduce environmental contamination, and minimizing exposure of children to potentially contaminated environments. Because puppies, kittens, pregnant and nursing animals and hunting dogs are at the highest risk of roundworm or tapeworm infection--and are therefore responsible for most environmental contamination and human disease--antihelminthic treatments are most effective when they are initiated early and target these animal populations. Various guidelines for the treatment and control of parasitic infections in carnivorous pets have been proposed in the United States (by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Companion Animal Parasitology Council) and in Europe (by the European Scientific Counsel Companion Animal Parasitology). In France a non profit organization (CEPHA, Comité d'Experts en Parasitologie Humaine et Animale) was recently created to participate in the prevention of parasitic zoonoses associated with companion animals. PMID:17645108

  5. How to Improve the Early Diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: Relationship between Validated Conventional Diagnosis and Quantitative DNA Amplification in Congenitally Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Bua, Jacqueline; Volta, Bibiana J.; Perrone, Alina E.; Scollo, Karenina; Velázquez, Elsa B.; Ruiz, Andres M.; De Rissio, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Background According to the Chagas congenital transmission guides, the diagnosis of infants, born to Trypanosoma cruzi infected mothers, relies on the detection of parasites by INP micromethod, and/or the persistence of T. cruzi specific antibody titers at 10–12 months of age. Methodology and Principal Findings Parasitemia levels were quantified by PCR in T. cruzi-infected children, grouped according to the results of one-year follow-up diagnosis: A) Neonates that were diagnosed in the first month after delivery by microscopic blood examination (INP micromethod) (n = 19) had a median parasitemia of 1,700 Pe/mL (equivalent amounts of parasite DNA per mL); B) Infants that required a second parasitological diagnosis at six months of age (n = 10) showed a median parasitemia of around 20 Pe/mL and 500 Pe/mL at 1 and 6 months old, respectively, and C) babies with undetectable parasitemia by three blood microscopic observations but diagnosed by specific anti - T. cruzi serology at around 1 year old, (n = 22), exhibited a parasitemia of around 5 Pe/mL, 800 Pe/mL and 20 Pe/mL 1, 6 and 12 month after delivery, respectively. T. cruzi parasites were isolated by hemoculture from 19 congenitally infected children, 18 of which were genotypified as DTU TcV, (former lineage TcIId) and only one as TcI. Significance This report is the first to quantify parasitemia levels in more than 50 children congenitally infected with T. cruzi, at three different diagnostic controls during one-year follow-up after delivery. Our results show that the parasite burden in some children (22 out of 51) is below the detection limit of the INP micromethod. As the current trypanocidal treatment proved to be very effective to cure T. cruzi - infected children, more sensitive parasitological methods should be developed to assure an early T. cruzi congenital diagnosis. PMID:24147166

  6. Management of imported malaria in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this position paper, the European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Study Group on Clinical Parasitology, summarizes main issues regarding the management of imported malaria cases. Malaria is a rare diagnosis in Europe, but it is a medical emergency. A travel history is the key to suspecting malaria and is mandatory in patients with fever. There are no specific clinical signs or symptoms of malaria although fever is seen in almost all non-immune patients. Migrants from malaria endemic areas may have few symptoms. Malaria diagnostics should be performed immediately on suspicion of malaria and the gold- standard is microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick and thin blood films. A Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) may be used as an initial screening tool, but does not replace urgent microscopy which should be done in parallel. Delays in microscopy, however, should not lead to delayed initiation of appropriate treatment. Patients diagnosed with malaria should usually be hospitalized. If outpatient management is preferred, as is the practice in some European centres, patients must usually be followed closely (at least daily) until clinical and parasitological cure. Treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria is either with oral artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) or with the combination atovaquone/proguanil. Two forms of ACT are available in Europe: artemether/lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine. ACT is also effective against Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium knowlesi, but these species can be treated with chloroquine. Treatment of persistent liver forms in P. vivax and P. ovale with primaquine is indicated after excluding glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. There are modified schedules and drug options for the treatment of malaria in special patient groups, such as children and pregnant women. The potential for drug interactions and the role of food in the absorption of anti-malarials are important considerations in the choice of treatment. Complicated malaria is treated with intravenous artesunate resulting in a much more rapid decrease in parasite density compared to quinine. Patients treated with intravenous artesunate should be closely monitored for haemolysis for four weeks after treatment. There is a concern in some countries about the lack of artesunate produced according to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). PMID:22985344

  7. Randomized Clinical Trial on Ivermectin versus Thiabendazole for the Treatment of Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bisoffi, Zeno; Buonfrate, Dora; Angheben, Andrea; Boscolo, Marina; Anselmi, Mariella; Marocco, Stefania; Monteiro, Geraldo; Gobbo, Maria; Bisoffi, Giulia; Gobbi, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis may cause a life-threatening disease in immunosuppressed patients. This can only be prevented by effective cure of chronic infections. Direct parasitologic exams are not sensitive enough to prove cure if negative. We used an indirect immune fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) along with direct methods for patient inclusion and efficacy assessment. Methodology/Principal Findings Prospective, randomized, open label, phase III trial conducted at the Centre for Tropical Diseases (Verona, Italy) to compare efficacy and safety of ivermectin (single dose, 200 µg/kg) and thiabendazole (two daily doses of 25 mg/Kg for two days) to cure strongyloidiasis. The first patient was recruited on 6th December, 2004. Follow-up visit of the last patient was on 11th January, 2007. Consenting patients responding to inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to one of the treatment arms. Primary outcome was: negative direct and indirect (IFAT) tests at follow-up (4 to 6 months after treatment) or subjects with negative direct test and drop of two or more IFAT titers. Considering 198 patients who concluded follow-up, efficacy was 56.6% for ivermectin and 52.2% for thiabendazole (p?=?0.53). If the analysis is restricted to 92 patients with IFAT titer 80 or more before treatment (virtually 100% specific), efficacy would be 68.1% for ivermectin and 68.9% for thiabendazole (p?=?0.93). Considering direct parasitological diagnosis only, efficacy would be 85.7% for ivermectin and 94.6% for thiabendazole (p?=?0.21). In ivermectin arm, mild to moderate side effects were observed in 24/115 patients (20.9%), versus 79/108 (73.1%) in thiabendazole arm (p?=?0.00). Conclusion No significant difference in efficacy was observed, while side effects were far more frequent in thiabendazole arm. Ivermectin is the drug of choice, but efficacy of single dose is suboptimal. Different dose schedules should be assessed by future, larger studies. Trial Registration Portal of Clinical Research with Medicines in Italy 2004–004693–87 PMID:21814588

  8. A comparative study on the efficacy of artesunate plus sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine versus artemether-lumefantrine in eastern Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mukhtar, Ebtihal A; Gadalla, Nahla B; El-zaki, Salah-Eldin G; Mukhtar, Izdihar; Mansour, Fathi A; Babiker, Ahmed; El-Sayed, Badria B

    2007-01-01

    Background A combination of artesunate (AS) plus sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) as first-line and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as second-line treatment are currently recommended against uncomplicated P. falciparum infection in Sudan. However, there is limited information on the efficacy of ACTs in the country and only one report of PCR-corrected results for AS/SP only. Methods The WHO protocol for the assessment of antimalarial drug efficacy for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria was employed. Artesunate plus sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (AS/SP) was compared to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) in a 28-day follow up. Samples that were classified as early treatment failure (ETF), late treatment failure (LCF) or late parasitological failure (LPF) were genotyped for msp-1 and msp-2 genes to differentiate recrudescence from reinfection. Results A total of 178 patients were screened and 160 met the enrolment criteria and were recruited to the study of which 157 (98.1%) completed the follow up and had an analysed treatment outcome. On the AS/SP arm, three (0.038%) patients were lost during the follow-up, two on day 1 and one on day 7, and 77 (96.3) completed the study, while all 80 (100%) patients completed the follow up in the AL arm. In the per protocol analysis for AS/SP the treatment outcome for patients who completed the follow-up were as follows: adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR); 84.4% ETF; 1.3%, LCF; 3.9%, (LPF); 10.4%. For the AL arm the out come was as follows, ACPR; 90%, ETF; 0%, LCF; 6.3% and LPF; 3.8%. However, when PCR-corrected, 6.5% (5/77) of patients treated with AS/SP maintained parasites from their primary infection, while (7/80) in the AL group maintained their initial parasite genotype. Therefore, PCR-corrected efficacy was 93.5% in the AS/SP treated group and for AL it was 91.3%. Conclusion Both AS/SP and AL are highly effective for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan. However, AS/SP appears to have a slightly higher efficacy than AL, this may be due to patient compliance with the repeated dose rather than drug efficacy. PMID:17631681

  9. Impact of 3 years ivermectin treatment on onchocerciasis in Yanomami communities in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Banic, Dalma M; Calvão-Brito, Regina H S; Marchon-Silva, Verônica; Schuertez, Joana C; de Lima Pinheiro, Luís Renerys; da Costa Alves, Marilene; Têva, Antônio; Maia-Herzog, Marilza

    2009-11-01

    In the current study, it was assessed, for the first time, the effect of ivermectin treatment administered twice a year on the prevalence and morbidity of onchocerciasis in the hyperendemic Yanomami communities of the Roraima State (Brazil). Physical and parasitological examinations were carried out every 6 months until six drug rounds of treatment were completed. The coverage during the six rounds of ivermectin treatment ranged from 89% to 92% of the eligible Yanomami population. Overall, comparison of results at pre-treatment with results after six rounds of treatment, the prevalence of infection had declined from 87% to 42% (P<0.0001, CI 95%=0.05-0.22); the community microfilarial load (CMFL) fell from 1.17 to 0.53Mf/mg of skin; and the crude intensity of infection (MFL-Total) decreased from 18.95 to 1.96Mf/mg of skin during the same period (P<0.0001, for both microfilarial loads). Although no significant difference was observed between microfilarial densities in skin snips from iliac crest and scapula after the 6th round of ivermectin treatment it was observed that the prevalence of positive skin snips was significantly higher when skin snips were taken from iliac crest (42%) than from scapula (8%) (P=0.001, CI 95%=3.41-22.67). After six rounds of ivermectin treatments, no significant differences were observed in the prevalences of palpable nodules and of onchodermatitis in relation to pre-treatment prevalences, from 45% to 41% and from 17% to 20% (P>0.05, for both). These findings suggest that mass population treatment should continue without interruption and achieve higher levels of drug coverage in order to alleviate disease manifestations and interrupt infection transmission to hasten the elimination of onchocerciasis in Yanomami communities. In addition, the sensitivity of iliac crest snips for parasitological assessment in epidemiological surveillance of Yanomami communities may increase the acceptance of the population in biopsy sampling and seems to be a good choice for assessing the success of control programs. PMID:19615327

  10. [Cutanous myiasis caused by Sarcophaga spp. larvae in a diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Demirel Kaya, Filiz; Orkun, Omer; Cakmak, Ay?e; Inkaya, Ahmet Ca?kan; Erguven, Sibel

    2014-04-01

    Myiasis is defined as a parasitic infestation of tissues and organs in living vertebrates with dipterous larvae. Infestation with dipterous larvae can occur when flies deposit their eggs or first stage larvae on the host's tissues. Myiasis is seen more frequently in tropical and subtropical countries, especially in rural regions where people are in close contact with animals. Diagnosis of myiasis depends on the demonstration of larvae on the host's tissues or organs. Correct identification of the larvae is important for the initiation of appropriate treatment and establishment of preventive measures. In this report, a case of diabetic wound ulcer complicated with myiasis was presented. A 68 years old male patient with a diabetic wound was admitted to the Hacettepe University Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Ankara in July 2013. The patient had a history of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus over 10 years and hypertension, coronary artery disease and chronic renal failure for several years. His left leg under the knee and his right toe were amputated because of diabetic foot. The infection on his right heel had started as a single, painless ulcer 5 months ago. He had medical advice from a health care provider and used ampicilin-sulbactam for 3 months. However, the wound progressed in spite of the treatment and upon admission to our hospital, he was hospitalized with the diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcer. The C-reactive protein, sedimentation rate, white blood cell count and HbA1c values were found to be high. Piperacillin-tazobactam therapy was started and debridement of necrotic tissue was planned. During the debridement prosedure larvae were observed under the necrotic tissue. Two larvae were collected and delivered to the parasitology laboratory. After morphological examination the larvae washed in distilled water and killed in 70% alcohol and they were taken to the Ankara University Veterinary Faculty, Department of Parasitology for identification. The morphological characteristics of cephalopharyngeal skeleton, anterior spiracles and slits of the posterior spiracles were examined and the larvae were identified as third stage of Sarcophaga spp. Diabetes, coronary artery disease and low socio-economic level as well as the presence of an open, neglected wound were attributed as the most important predisposing factors that led to the development of myiasis in this patient. It should be kept in mind that the diabetic patients with open wounds may develop myiasis especially in the summer months and larvae can cause progressive wound infection. PMID:24819275

  11. Health-Related Quality of Life among School Children with Parasitic Infections: Findings from a National Cross-Sectional Survey in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Eveline; Houngbedji, Clarisse A.; Yapi, Richard B.; Ndri, Prisca B.; Silué, Kigbafori D.; Soro, Gotianwa; Kouamé, Ferdinand N.; Fürst, Thomas; Utzinger, Jürg; N'Goran, Eliézer K.; Raso, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Parasitic infections are still of considerable public health relevance, notably among children in low- and middle-income countries. Measures to assess the magnitude of ill-health in infected individuals, however, are debated and patient-based proxies through generic health-related quality of life (HrQoL) instruments are among the proposed strategies. Disability estimates based on HrQoL are still scarce and conflicting, and hence, there is a need to strengthen the current evidence-base. Methodology Between November 2011 and February 2012, a national school-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in Côte d'Ivoire. Children underwent parasitological and clinical examination to assess infection status with Plasmodium and helminth species and clinical parameters, and responded to a questionnaire interview incorporating sociodemographic characteristics, self-reported morbidity, and HrQoL. Validity analysis of the HrQoL instrument was performed, assessing floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency, and correlation with morbidity scores. Multivariate regression models were applied to identify significant associations between HrQoL and children's parasitic infection and clinical status. Principal Findings Parasitological examination of 4,848 children aged 5–16 years revealed Plasmodium spp., hookworm, Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma mansoni, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Trichuris trichiura prevalences of 75.0%, 17.2%, 5.7%, 3.7%, 1.8%, and 1.3%, respectively. Anemic children showed a significant 1-point reduction in self-rated HrQoL on a scale from 0 to 100, whereas no significant negative association between HrQoL and parasite infection was observed. The 12-item HrQoL questionnaire proofed useful, as floor and ceiling effects were negligible, internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha?=?0.71), and valid, as revealed by significant negative correlations and associations with children's self-reported and clinically assessed morbidity. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that HrQoL tools are not sufficiently sensitive to assess subtle morbidities due to parasitic infection in Ivorian school-aged children. However, more advanced morbid sequelae (e.g., anemia), were measurable by the instrument's health construct. Further investigations on health impacts of parasitic infection among school-aged children and refinement of generic HrQoL questionnaires are warranted. PMID:25474579

  12. Global food security: the impact of veterinary parasites and parasitologists.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J L

    2013-08-01

    Global food security will require the production of more food using resources including land more efficiently, and with less waste. This goal must be achieved within the context of climate change and while ensuring minimal adverse environmental impact from both crop and livestock production. Disease, especially infectious disease, is a main constraint of biologically efficient livestock production and both endemic and exotic disease results in mortality and morbidity and hence less food than should ideally be available in current farming systems. A significant proportion of diseases affect the safety of food supplies, in addition to or instead of, their effect on volume and quality of food products. Parasitological diseases including those caused by nematodes, trematodes, protozoa and ectoparasites, have widely differing effects on meat, milk and fibre production and many new technologies have been developed in order to prevent or treat them. Approaches to developing better control of parasites have included livestock breeding strategies, improved nutrition and management, and the development of new drugs, diagnostic tests and vaccines. Some of the most important examples include both the development of new anthelmintic products, and better means of using existing drugs in order to maximise their effectiveness in the face of rapidly increasing parasite resistance; diagnostic tests which are able to detect low levels of nucleic acids or proteins from infectious agents rapidly; and vaccines derived from either native or recombinant proteins and designed to stimulate the most appropriate protective response from livestock species. Some of the parasitic diseases affect restricted regions around the world, however most affect very large global populations. The development of technologies of suitable and affordable livestock products for use in developing countries where most pressure on increased production for food will occur, provides a particular challenge. Most if not all new technologies form part of integrated management schemes on farms and these vary hugely in differing systems and geographical regions of the world. If the benefit of improved technologies for optimal health, welfare and biological efficiency of livestock is to be realised, then the veterinary, farming, commercial animal health and public service communities need to learn lessons from past successes and failures in the delivery of newly developed technologies to the farmer. The combination of technology and rural development in the veterinary parasitological field has played a key role in current food production and is well placed to continue this trend to help in ensuring future food requirements for the world. PMID:23622818

  13. Comparative tissue pharmacokinetics and efficacy of moxidectin, abamectin and ivermectin in lambs infected with resistant nematodes: Impact of drug treatments on parasite P-glycoprotein expression☆

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Mercedes; Alvarez, Luis; Entrocasso, Carlos; Virkel, Guillermo; Ballent, Mariana; Mate, Laura; Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The high level of resistance to the macrocyclic lactones has encouraged the search for strategies to optimize their potential as antiparasitic agents. There is a need for pharmaco-parasitological studies addressing the kinetic-dynamic differences between various macrocyclic lactones under standardized in vivo conditions. The current work evaluated the relationship among systemic drug exposure, target tissue availabilities and the pattern of drug accumulation within resistant Haemonchus contortus for moxidectin, abamectin and ivermectin. Drug concentrations in plasma, target tissues and parasites were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, the efficacy of the three molecules was evaluated in lambs infected with resistant nematodes by classical parasitological methods. Furthermore, the comparative determination of the level of expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp2) in H. contortus recovered from lambs treated with each drug was performed by real time PCR. A longer persistence of moxidectin (P < 0.05) concentrations in plasma was observed. The concentrations of the three compounds in the mucosal tissue and digestive contents were significant higher than those measured in plasma. Drug concentrations were in a range between 452 ng/g (0.5 day post-treatment) and 32 ng/g (2 days post-treatment) in the gastrointestinal (GI) contents (abomasal and intestinal). Concentrations of the three compounds in H. contortus were in a similar range to those observed in the abomasal contents (positive correlation P = 0.0002). Lower moxidectin concentrations were recovered within adult H. contortus compared to abamectin and ivermectin at day 2 post-treatment. However, the efficacy against H. contortus was 20.1% (ivermectin), 39.7% (abamectin) and 89.6% (moxidectin). Only the ivermectin treatment induced an enhancement on the expression of P-gp2 in the recovered adult H. contortus, reaching higher values at 12 and 24 h post-administration compared to control (untreated) worms. This comparative pharmacological evaluation of three of the most used macrocyclic lactones compounds provides new insights into the action of these drugs. PMID:24533290

  14. Serological and infection statuses of dogs from a visceral leishmaniasis-endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Daniela Farias; da Matta, Vânia Lúcia Ribeiro; Tomokane, Thaíse Yumie; Marcondes, Mary; Corbet, Carlos Eduardo Pereira; Laurenti, Márcia Dalastra

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the serological status of dogs living in a visceral leishmaniasis-endemic area and its correlation with the parasitological condition of the animals. METHODS Canine humoral response was evaluated using the sera of 134 dogs by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry to detect parasites in the skin, lymph node, and spleen of the animals. The specific antibodies investigated were IgG, IgG1, IgG2, and IgE. RESULTS According to the parasitological, laboratory, and clinical findings, the dogs were placed into one of four groups: asymptomatic with (AP+, n = 21) or without (AP-, n = 36) Leishmania tissue parasitism and symptomatic with (SP+, n = 52) or without (SP-, n = 25) parasitism. Higher IgG and IgE levels were positively correlated with the infection condition and parasite load, but not with the clinical status. In all groups, total IgG was the predominant antibody, which occurred at the expense of IgG2 instead of IgG1. Most of the infected dogs tested positive for IgG (SP+, 98.1%; AP+, 95.2%), whereas this was not observed with IgE (SP+, 80.8%; AP+, 71.2%). The most relevant finding was the high positivity of the uninfected dogs for Leishmania-specific IgG (SP-, 60.0%; AP-, 44.4%), IgE (SP-, 44.0%; AP-, 27.8%), IgG1 (SP-, 28.0%; AP-, 22.2%), and IgG2 antibodies (SP-, 56.0%; AP-, 41.7%). CONCLUSIONS The serological status of dogs, as determined by any class or subclass of antibodies, did not accurately distinguish dogs infected with L. (L.) infantum chagasi from uninfected animals. The inaccuracy of the serological result may impair not only the diagnosis, but also epidemiological investigations and strategies for visceral leishmaniasis control. This complex serological scenario occurring in a visceral leishmaniasis-endemic area highlights the challenges associated with canine diagnosis and points out the difficulties experienced by veterinary clinicians and coordinators of control programs. PMID:25210815

  15. Outcome of artemether-lumefantrine treatment for uncomplicated malaria in HIV-infected adult patients on anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria and HIV infections are both highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, with HIV-infected patients being at higher risks of acquiring malaria. The majority of antiretroviral (ART) and anti-malarial drugs are metabolized by the CYP450 system, creating a chance of drug-drug interaction upon co-administration. Limited data are available on the effectiveness of the artemether-lumefantrine combination (AL) when co-administered with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). The aim of this study was to compare anti-malarial treatment responses between HIV-1 infected patients on either nevirapine- or efavirenz-based treatment and those not yet on ART (control-arm) with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, treated with AL. Method This was a prospective, non-randomized, open-label study conducted in Bagamoyo district, with three arms of HIV-infected adults: efavirenz-based treatment arm (EFV-arm) n?=?66, nevirapine-based treatment arm (NVP-arm) n?=?128, and control-arm n?=?75, with uncomplicated malaria. All patients were treated with AL and followed up for 28 days. The primary outcome measure was an adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) after treatment with AL by day 28. Results Day 28 ACPR was 97.6%, 82.5% and 94.5% for the NVP-arm, EFV-arm and control-arm, respectively. No early treatment or late parasitological failure was reported. The cumulative risk of recurrent parasitaemia was >19-fold higher in the EFV-arm than in the control-arm (Hazard ratio [HR], 19.11 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 10.5–34.5]; P?

  16. Seasonality in the proportions of domestic cats shedding Toxoplasma gondii or Hammondia hammondi oocysts is associated with climatic factors.

    PubMed

    Schares, G; Ziller, M; Herrmann, D C; Globokar, M V; Pantchev, N; Conraths, F J

    2016-04-01

    A previous study on domestic cats in Germany and neighbouring countries suggested seasonality in shedding Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether this seasonality in shedding could be explained by climatic effects and whether differences between years in the proportions of cats shedding oocysts could also be explained by climatic factors. To this end, a long-term study over a period of 55months on domestic cats for T. gondii and Hammondia hammondi oocysts was performed and the results compared with climatic data. Using species-specific PCR, T. gondii oocysts were identified in 0.14% (84/61,224) and H. hammondi in 0.10% (61/61,224) of the samples. Toxoplasma gondii oocysts were predominantly observed from summer to autumn, while H. hammondi oocysts were mainly found during autumn and winter. In statistical analyses using climatic data, even differences in parasitological findings between years could be partially modelled using monthly temperature, North Atlantic Oscillation indices and precipitation. Of the three climatic variables analysed, precipitation as an explanatory variable had the lowest impact in the statistical models while those taking only temperature and North Atlantic Oscillation indices into account were sufficiently predictive. Interestingly, time lags between the climatic event and the parasitological findings had to be implemented in all models. For T. gondii, North Atlantic Oscillation indices with a time lag of 7months and temperature with a time lag of 2months had the best predictive value. In contrast, temperature (with a time lag of 6months) and the interaction of precipitation (with a time lag of 5months) and North Atlantic Oscillation indices (with a time lag of 11months) were optimal for predicting the seasonality of H. hammondi. These results suggest prominent differences in the life cycles of the two closely related parasites. Previous findings showed that H. hammondi lack avian hosts, in contrast to T. gondii, and the coincidence in the periods of high abundance of birds and high proportions of cats shedding T. gondii suggest that birds may play an important role in the epidemiology of this infection. The result that North Atlantic Oscillation index is an important variable in modelling variations in the proportion of cats shedding T. gondii and H. hammondi over the year is an indication that global warming may also influence the infection risk of animals and humans with T. gondii and H. hammondi. The findings have important implications for planning epidemiological studies and for estimating the risk of human infection. PMID:26820303

  17. Bionomics of malaria vectors and relationship with malaria transmission and epidemiology in three physiographic zones in the Senegal River Basin.

    PubMed

    Dia, Ibrahima; Konate, Lassana; Samb, Badara; Sarr, Jean-Biram; Diop, Abdoulaye; Rogerie, François; Faye, Malick; Riveau, Gilles; Remoue, Franck; Diallo, Mawlouth; Fontenille, Didier

    2008-02-01

    Following the implementation of two dams in the Senegal River, entomological and parasitological studies were conducted in three different ecological zones in the Senegal River Basin (the low valley of Senegal River, the Guiers Lake area and the low valley of Ferlo) every 3 month in June 2004, September 2004, December 2004 and March 2005. The objective of this work was to study the influence of environmental heterogeneities on vector bionomics and malaria epidemiology. Mosquitoes were collected when landing on human volunteers and by pyrethrum spray catches. In the parasitological survey, blood samples were taken from a cohort of schoolchildren under 9 years during each entomology survey. Seven anopheline species were collected: Anopheles arabiensis, Anopheles gambiae M form, Anopheles funestus, Anopheles pharoensis, Anopheles coustani, Anopheles wellcomei and Anopheles rufipes. A. arabiensis, A. funestus and A. pharoensis were predominant in the low valley of the Senegal River, A. funestus in the Guiers Lake area and A. arabiensis in the low valley of Ferlo. Mosquito populations' dynamics varied temporally depending on the rainy season for each zone. The anthropophilic rates varied between 6 and 76% for A. gambiae s.l. and 23 and 80% for A. funestus. Only 4/396 A. pharoensis and 1/3076 A. funestus tested carried Plasmodium falciparum CS antigen. These results suggest the implication of A. pharoensis in malaria transmission. The related entomological inoculation rates were estimated to 10.44 in Mbilor and 3 infected bites in Gankette Balla and were due, respectively, to A. pharoensis and A. funestus. Overall, 1636 thick blood smears were tested from blood samples taken from schoolchildren with, respectively, a parasite and gametocyte average prevalence of 9 and 0.9%. The parasite prevalence was uniformly low in Mbilor and Gankette Balla whereas; it increased in September (16%) and then remained stable in December and March (22%) in Mboula where malaria transmission was not perceptible. However, significant differences were observed over time for parasite prevalence in Mbilor and Mboula villages whereas; it was only in Gankette Balla village where gametocyte prevalence was significantly different over time. Our study demonstrates the influence of ecological changes resulted from dams implementation in the Senegal River on the composition of vectorial system, malaria transmission and epidemiology. Such changes should be thoroughly surveyed in order to prevent any possible malaria outbreak in the Senegal River Basin. PMID:18068685

  18. In vivo efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine against uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Central Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In vivo efficacy assessments of the first-line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum malaria are essential for ensuring effective case management. In Ethiopia, artemether-lumefantrine (AL) has been the first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria since 2004. Methods Between October and November 2009, we conducted a 42-day, single arm, open label study of AL for P. falciparum in individuals >6 months of age at two sites in Oromia State, Ethiopia. Eligible patients who had documented P. falciparum mono-infection were enrolled and followed according to the standard 2009 World Health Organization in vivo drug efficacy monitoring protocol. The primary and secondary endpoints were PCR uncorrected and corrected cure rates, as measured by adequate clinical and parasitological response on days 28 and 42, respectively. Results Of 4426 patients tested, 120 with confirmed falciparum malaria were enrolled and treated with AL. Follow-up was completed for 112 patients at day 28 and 104 patients at day 42. There was one late parasitological failure, which was classified as undetermined after genotyping. Uncorrected cure rates at both day 28 and 42 for the per protocol analysis were 99.1% (95% CI 95.1-100.0); corrected cure rates at both day 28 and 42 were 100.0%. Uncorrected cure rates at day 28 and 42 for the intention to treat analysis were 93.3% (95% CI 87.2-97.1) and 86.6% (95% CI 79.1-92.1), respectively, while the corrected cure rates at day 28 and 42 were 94.1% (95% CI 88.2-97.6) and 87.3% (95% CI 79.9-92.7), respectively. Using survival analysis, the unadjusted cure rate was 99.1% and 100.0% adjusted by genotyping for day 28 and 42, respectively. Eight P. falciparum patients (6.7%) presented with Plasmodium vivax infection during follow-up and were excluded from the per protocol analysis. Only one patient had persistent parasitaemia at day 3. No serious adverse events were reported, with cough and nausea/vomiting being the most common adverse events. Conclusions AL remains a highly effective and well-tolerated treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the study setting after several years of universal access to AL. A high rate of parasitaemia with P. vivax possibly from relapse or new infection was observed. Trial Registration NCT01052584 PMID:21798054

  19. Visceral leishmaniasis in Iran: Review of the Epidemiological and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Mohebali, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a life-threatening vector-borne parasitic disease is distributed in some parts of the new world and old world. The disease is endemic in different parts of Iran. This review article has been focused on major topics of epidemiological aspects and clinical features of VL in Iran for the period of 2002 through 2012. For the detection of VL in humans as well as animal reservoir hosts, anti-Leishmania antibodies were detected using direct agglutination test (DAT) as a validated serological test. Parasitological examinations were performed on suspected VL patients as well as canines and rodents. Different molecular methods were used for identification of species and genotype/ or strain of Leishmania spp. isolated from infected humans, animal reservoir hosts and vectors. Altogether, 1698 out of 36081 (4.7%) human serum samples collected from 5 distinct geographical zones showed anti-Leishmania antibodies at titers ≥ 1:3200 using DAT. The majority of VL cases in the endemic areas were found among children up to 12 years old. Almost 75% of DAT-positive cases (≥1:3200) in endemic areas showed clinical signs and symptoms. Predominant signs and symptoms in 217 hospitalized patients with DAT positive (≥1:3200) results included paleness (99.5%), fever (96.9%), splenomegaly (91.5%), hepatomegaly (53.6%) and lymphadenopathy (21.1%). Integrated VL surveillance system in primary care using DAT, could decrease mortality and morbidity of the disease in the VL endemic areas of the northwestern Iran. Out of 7204 serum samples collected from domestic dogs in various geographical locations of Iran, 879 (12.2%) were DAT sero-positive at titers ≥ 1:320. L. infantum as the principal causative agent of the disease was isolated from infected humans, domestic and wild canines and rodents. The principal animal reservoir hosts of the infection are domestic and wild canines. Ph. kandelakii, Ph. perfiliewi transcaucasicus, Ph. tobbi in northwestern Iran; Ph. major s.l. (=Ph. neglectus), Ph. keshishiani, and Ph. alexandri in southern parts of Iran were molecularly and/or parasitologically positive for L. infantum infections. The zoonotic form of VL (ZVL) caused by L. infantum occurs sporadically in all geographical zones of Iran but in northwestern and southern parts of the country the disease is endemic. DAT as an appropriate and potential tool has been used for sero-diagnosis and sero-epidemiological of VL among humans as well as domestic and wild canines. PMID:24454426

  20. Mapping B-cell epitopes for the peroxidoxin of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and its potential for the clinical diagnosis of tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Santos, Thaís Teodoro de Oliveira; Silva, Ana Luíza Teixeira; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; de Carvalho, Silvio Fernando Guimarães; Coelho, Eduardo Antônio Ferraz; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The search toward the establishment of novel serological tests for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis and proper differential diagnosis may represent one alternative to the invasive parasitological methods currently used to identify infected individuals. In the present work, we investigated the potential use of recombinant peroxidoxin (rPeroxidoxin) of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis as a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of human tegumentary (TL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). Linear B-cell epitope mapping was performed to identify polymorphic epitopes when comparing orthologous sequences present in Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent for Chagas disease (CD), and the Homo sapiens and Canis familiaris hosts. The serological assay (ELISA) demonstrated that TL, VL and CVL individuals showed high levels of antibodies against rPeroxidoxin, allowing identification of infected ones with considerable sensitivity and great ability to discriminate (specificity) between non-infected and CD individuals (98.46% and 100%; 98.18% and 95.71%; 95.79% and 100%, respectively). An rPeroxidoxin ELISA also showed a greater ability to discriminate between vaccinated and infected animals, which is an important requirement for the public campaign control of CVL. A depletion ELISA assay using soluble peptides of this B-cell epitope confirmed the recognition of these sites only by Leishmania-infected individuals. Moreover, this work identifies two antigenic polymorphic linear B-cell epitopes of L. braziliensis. Specific recognition of TL and VL patients was confirmed by significantly decreased IgG reactivity against rPeroxidoxin after depletion of peptide-1- and peptide-2-specific antibodies (peptide 1: reduced by 32%, 42% and 5% for CL, ML and VL, respectively; peptide-2: reduced by 24%, 22% and 13% for CL, ML and VL, respectively) and only peptide-2 for CVL (reduced 9%). Overall, rPeroxidoxin may be a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of TL, VL or CVL, as it has a higher agreement with parasitological assays and is better than other reference tests that use soluble Leishmania antigens for diagnosing CVL in Brazil (EIE-LVC, Bio-manguinhos, FIOCRUZ). PMID:24921246

  1. Reptile and rodent parasites in raptor pellets in an archaeological context: the case of Epullán Chica (northwestern Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, María Ornela; Fernández, Fernando Julián; Sardella, Norma Haydeé

    2015-07-01

    Paleoparasitology is the study of parasite remains from archaeological and paleontological sites. Raptor pellets can be used as source for paleoparasitological information in archaeological sites. However, this zooarchaeological material has been scarcely studied. Epullán Chica (ECh) is an archaeological site in northwestern Patagonia. This cave yielded remains from more than 2000 years before present. The aim of this paper was to study the parasite remains found in owl pellets from the archaeological site ECh, and to discuss the paleoparasitological findings in an archaeological context. Twenty two raptor pellets were examined for parasites. The pellets were whole processed by rehydration in a 0.5% water solution of trisodium phosphate, followed by homogenization, filtered and processed by spontaneous sedimentation. Eight out of 22 bird pellets examined were positive for parasites from reptiles and rodents. Representatives of 12 parasite taxa were recorded; nine of this parasitic species were reported for the first time from ancient samples from Patagonia. This is the first time that pellets give evidences of ancient reptile parasites from archaeological contexts. It is noteworthy that Late Holocene hunter-gatherers of the upper Limay River basin, could have been exposed to some of these zoonotic parasites. Future paleoparasitological studies on owl pellets may reflect even more the parasitological diversity of all micromammal and reptile species presents in ancient times.

  2. Interruption of Onchocerca volvulus Transmission in the Abu Hamed Focus, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Higazi, Tarig B.; Zarroug, Isam M. A.; Mohamed, Hanan A.; ElMubark, Wigdan A.; Deran, Tong Chor M.; Aziz, Nabil; Katabarwa, Moses; Hassan, Hassan K.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Mackenzie, Charles D.; Richards, Frank; Hashim, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Abu Hamed, Sudan, the northernmost location of onchocerciasis in the world, began community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) in 1998, with annual treatments enhanced to semiannual in 2007. We assessed the status of the parasite transmission in 2011 entomologically, parasitologically, and serologically. O-150 pool screening showed no parasite DNA in 17,537 black flies collected in 2011 (95% confidence interval upper limit [95% CI UL] = 0.023). Skin microfilariae, nodules, and signs of skin disease were absent in 536 individuals in seven local communities. Similarly, no evidence of Onchocerca volvulus Ov16 antibodies was found in 6,756 school children ? 10 years (95% CI UL = 0.03%). Because this assessment of the focus meets the 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for interrupted transmission, treatment was halted in 2012, and a post-treatment surveillance period was initiated in anticipation of declaration of disease elimination in this area. We provide the first evidence in East Africa that long-term CDTI alone can interrupt transmission of onchocerciasis. PMID:23690554

  3. Trichodina nobilis Chen, 1963 and Trichodina reticulata Hirschmann et Partsch, 1955 from ornamental freshwater fishes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martins, M L; Marchiori, N; Roumbedakis, K; Lami, F

    2012-05-01

    In the present work Trichodina reticulata and T. nobilis (Ciliophora: Trichodinidae) are morphologically characterised from ornamental freshwater fish culture in the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The prevalence of infection and a list of comparative measurements are discussed. We examined "southern platyfish" Xiphophorus maculatus (n = 35), "goldfish" Carassius auratus (n = 31), "guppy" Poecilia reticulata (n = 20), "sailfin molly" Poecilia latipinna (n = 6), "beta" Betta splendens (n = 2) and "spotted headstander" Chilodus punctatus (n = 1). After being anesthetised in a benzocaine solution, fishes were examined for parasitological evaluation. A total of 51.57% fishes were parasitised by Trichodina spp. Carassius auratus was the most parasitised species, followed by X. maculatus and P. reticulata. Beta splendens, C. punctatus and P. latipinna were not parasitised by any trichodinid species. Two species of Trichodina were collected from the skin of fish: T. nobilis was found in C. auratus, P. reticulata and X. maculatus and T. reticulata was only observed in C. auratus. The importance of adequate handling in ornamental fish culture are also discussed. PMID:22735135

  4. Quantitative Kinetoplast DNA Assessment During Treatment of Mucosal Leishmaniasis as a Potential Biomarker of Outcome: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jara, Marlene; Valencia, Braulio Mark; Adaui, Vanessa; Alba, Milena; Lau, Rachel; Arevalo, Jorge; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Boggild, Andrea K

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is a disfiguring manifestation of Leishmania (Viannia) infection. We evaluated parasite load (PL) over time as a potential biomarker of treatment outcome in ML. PL was assessed with kinetoplast DNA quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (kDNA-qPCR) at enrollment, days 14 and 21-28 of therapy and 3, 6, 12-18, and 18-24 months after treatment of ML and correlated to demographic, clinical, and parasitologic factors. Forty-four patients were enrolled: 30 men and 14 women. Enrollment PL differed significantly by causative species (P < 0.001), and was higher in patients with severe ML (nasal and laryngeal involvement) compared with those with only isolated nasal involvement (median = 1,285 versus 51.5 parasites/?g tissue DNA; P = 0.005). Two patterns of PL emerged: pattern 1 (N = 23) was characterized by a sequential decline in PL during and after therapy until kDNA was undetectable. Pattern 2 (N = 18) was characterized by clearance of detectable kDNA during treatment, followed by an increased PL thereafter. All patients who failed treatment (N = 4) demonstrated pattern 1. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis was overrepresented among those with pattern 2 (P = 0.019). PL can be quantified by cytology brush qPCR during and after treatment in ML. We demonstrate that treatment failure was associated with undetectable PL, and L. (V.) braziliensis infection was overrepresented in those with rebounding PL. PMID:26483122

  5. Effect of repeated targeted mass treatment with praziquantel on the prevalence, intensity of infection and morbidity due to Schistosoma intercalatum in an urban community in equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Simarro, P P; Sima, F O; Mir, M; Ndong, P

    1991-09-01

    A longitudinal community-based study was carried out in order to evaluate the impact of repeated selective population chemotherapy with praziquantel on the epidemiology of an urban focus of Schistosoma intercalatum in the city of Bata, capital of the Continental Region of Equatorial Guinea. Three surveys were undertaken in January of 1988, 1989 and 1990, determining parasitological prevalence, intensity of infection and morbidity and applying repeated targeted mass treatment. One dose of praziquantel (40 mg/kg body weight) was given one week after treatment with mebendazole (100 mg every 12 hours for 3 days). A reduction of the overall prevalence by S. intercalatum of 69.9% and 79.3% in the first and second year respectively was found. Persons showing high parasite burden suffered a reduction of 95.7%. The cure rate (no more eggs in stool) was between 90% and 98.9%. A significant decrease of signs and symptoms was observed. No important side effects were detected. This study shows the positive action of praziquantel in reducing prevalence, intensity of infection and morbidity due to S. intercalatum, above all in the case of a high human population participation response. Cure rates obtained being similar to the ones observed using the same drug in Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium. PMID:1801138

  6. Molecular epidemiology of human Blastocystis isolates in France.

    PubMed

    Souppart, Laetitia; Sanciu, Giovanna; Cian, Amandine; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Delbac, Frederic; Capron, Monique; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Boorom, Kenneth; Delhaes, Laurence; Viscogliosi, Eric

    2009-08-01

    Blastocystis sp. is the most common eukaryotic parasite in the intestinal tract of humans. Due to its strong impact in public health, in this study, we determined the frequency of different Blastocystis subtypes in patients in France. We hypothesized on the mode of transmission and tested a possible relationship between the subtype and symptomatic status. We obtained a total of 40 stool samples identified as positive for Blastocystis by microscopic examination of smears. Participants consisted of 25 symptomatic and 15 asymptomatic patients, for whom clinical and parasitological data were collected. For nested-polymerase chain reaction and genotyping, DNA was extracted directly from fecal samples or from fecal cultures. Morphological forms observed in fecal cultures were uncorrelated with symptomatic status. Genotyping using partial small subunit rRNA gene analysis identified a total of 43 Blastocystis isolates corresponding to 37 single infections and three mixed infections by two different subtypes. These 43 isolates belonged to five subtypes (1, 2, 3, 4, and 7) with predominance of subtype 3 (53.5%). Patient symptomatic status was uncorrelated with Blastocystis subtype. PMID:19290540

  7. Predicting frequency distribution and influence of sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors of Schistosoma mansoni infection and analysis of co-infection with intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Rollemberg, Carla V V; Silva, Marília M B L; Rollemberg, Karla C; Amorim, Fábio R; Lessa, Nayanna M N; Santos, Marcos D S; Souza, Acácia M B; Melo, Enaldo V; Almeida, Roque P; Silva, Ângela M; Werneck, Guilherme L; Santos, Mario A; Almeida, José A P; Jesus, Amélia R

    2015-01-01

    Geospatial analysis was used to study the epidemiology of Schistosoma mansoni, intestinal parasites and co-infections in an area (Ilha das Flores) in Sergipe, Brazil. We collected individually georeferenced sociodemographic, behavioral and parasitological data from 500 subjects, analyzed them by conventional statistics, and produced risk maps by Kernel estimation. The prevalence rates found were: S. mansoni (24.0%), Trichuris trichiura (54.8%), Ascaris lumbricoides (49.2%), Hookworm (17.6%) and Entamoeba histolytica (7.0%). Only 59/500 (11.8%) individuals did not present any of these infections, whereas 279/500 (55.8%) were simultaneously infected by three or more parasites. We observed associations between S. mansoni infection and various variables such as male gender, being rice farmer or fisherman, low educational level, low income, water contact and drinking untreated water. The Kernel estimator indicated that high-risk areas coincide with the poorest regions of the villages as well as with the part of the villages without an adequate sewage system. We also noted associations between both A. lumbricoides and hookworm infections with low education and low income. A. lumbricoides infection and T. trichiura infection were both associated with drinking untreated water and residential open-air sewage. These findings call for an integrated approach to effectively control multiple parasitic infections. PMID:26054512

  8. Gastrointestinal helminths of pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus/Pipistrellus pygmaeus) (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) of England.

    PubMed

    Lord, Jennifer S; Parker, Steve; Parker, Fiona; Brooks, Darren R

    2012-03-01

    Although bats are one of the most successful and diverse of mammalian orders, studies that focus upon bat endoparasites are limited. To further knowledge of bat parasitology, pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus) were acquired from across the Greater Manchester and Lancashire region of England and examined for gastrointestinal helminths using morphological and molecular analyses. Sixty-eight of 90 adult/juvenile bats (76% prevalence) were infected with at least 1 species of helminth and mean helminth abundance was 48·2 (+/-7·0). All helminths were digenean trematodes and the following species were identified in 51 P. pipistrellus specimens (prevalence in parentheses): Lecithodendrium linstowi (80·4%), L. spathulatum (19·6%), Prosthodendrium sp. (35·3%), Plagiorchis koreanus (29·4%) and Pycnoporus heteroporus (9·8%). Statistical analyses, incorporating multifactorial models, showed that male bats exhibited a significantly more aggregated helminth distribution and lower abundance than females. Positive associations were observed between L. linstowi and L. spathulatum, Prosthodendrium sp. and P. heteroporus and between L. spathulatum and P. koreanus. A revised phylogeny of bat-associated Lecithodendriidae, incorporating novel L. spathulatum and Prosthodendrium sp. 28S rRNA sequences, separated the controversial clade formed by L. linstowi and P. hurkovaae. Further studies are likely to assist the understanding of bat-parasite/pathogen relationships, helminth infracommunity structures and phylogenetics. PMID:22217158

  9. Evaluation of gastrointestinal transit after infection with different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in rats.

    PubMed

    Anjos-Ramos, L; Gama, L A; Mati, V L T; Corá, L A; Fujiwara, R T; Americo, M F

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to correlate the gastrointestinal transit profile in rats, evaluated by a biomagnetic technique, in response to infection with different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis. Eggs per gram, intestinal number of worms and fecundity, and also gastric emptying time, cecum arrival time, small intestinal transit time and stool weight were determined. Assessments occurred at 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days post infection (dpi) with three infective loads (400, 2000, and 10,000L). Gastric emptying was faster (p=0.0001) and the intestinal transit was significantly slower (p=0.001) during the infection time course. Also, linear mixed-effects models showed significantly changes in small intestinal transit after three parasite load over time. Cecum arrival was not influenced by infection time course or parasite load. As indirect effect, stool weight decreased accompanied a strong oviposition peak at 9dpi in 400L and 2000L. In several motor function instances, neuromuscular dysfunction persists after mucosal inflammation has decreased. Our approach could be very helpful to evaluate gastrointestinal motor abnormalities in vivo after parasite infection. Despite parasitological data progressively decreased after 15 dpi, small intestinal transit worse over time and according to burden. PMID:26739657

  10. Hepatosplenomegaly associated with chronic malaria exposure: evidence for a pro-inflammatory mechanism exacerbated by schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S; Jones, F M; Mwatha, J K; Kimani, G; Booth, M; Kariuki, H C; Vennervald, B J; Ouma, J H; Muchiri, E; Dunne, D W

    2009-02-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, chronic hepatosplenomegaly, with palpable firm/hard organ consistency, is common, particularly among school-aged children. This morbidity can be caused by long-term exposure to malaria, or by Schistosoma mansoni, and it is exacerbated when these two occur together. Although immunological mechanisms probably underlie the pathogenic process, these mechanisms have not been identified, nor is it known whether the two parasites augment the same mechanisms or induce unrelated processes that nonetheless have additive or synergistic effects. Kenyan primary schoolchildren, living in a malaria/schistosomiasis co-transmission area, participated in cross-sectional parasitological and clinical studies in which circulating immune modulator levels were also measured. Plasma IL-12p70, sTNF-RII, IL-10 and IL-13 levels correlated with relative exposure to malaria, and with hepatosplenomegaly. Soluble-TNF-RII and IL-10 were higher in children infected with S. mansoni. Hepatosplenomegaly caused by chronic exposure to malaria was clearly associated with increased circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, with higher levels of regulatory modulators, and with tissue repair cytokines, perhaps being required to control the inflammatory response. The higher levels of regulatory modulators amongst S. mansoni infected children, compared to those without detectable S. mansoni and malarial infections, but exposed to malaria, suggest that S. mansoni infection may augment the underlying inflammatory reaction. PMID:19149774

  11. Community diversity reduces Schistosoma mansoni transmission, host pathology and human infection risk.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pieter T J; Lund, Peder J; Hartson, Richard B; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2009-05-01

    Global biodiversity loss and disease emergence are two of the most challenging issues confronting science and society. Recently, observed linkages between species-loss and vector-borne infections suggest that biodiversity may help reduce pathogenic infections in humans and wildlife, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship and its applicability to a broader range of pathogens have remained speculative. Here, we experimentally evaluated the effects of host community structure on transmission of the human pathogen, Schistosoma mansoni, which alternates between snail intermediate hosts and vertebrate definitive hosts. By manipulating parasite exposure and community diversity, we show that heterospecific communities cause a 25-50 per cent reduction in infection among snail hosts (Biomphalaria glabrata). Infected snails raised alongside non-host snails (Lymnaea or Helisoma sp.) also produced 60-80 per cent fewer cercariae, suggesting that diverse communities could reduce human infection risk. Because focal host density was held constant during experiments, decreases in transmission resulted entirely from diversity-mediated pathways. Finally, the decrease in infection in mixed-species communities led to an increase in reproductive output by hosts, representing a novel example of parasite-mediated facilitation. Our results underscore the significance of community structure on transmission of complex life-cycle pathogens, and we emphasize enhanced integration between ecological and parasitological research on the diversity-disease relationship. PMID:19203926

  12. Schistosoma haematobium: effect of non-schistosomicidal drugs (tetracycline and sulphadimidine) on schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Nkya, W M; Shija, D G; Mayala, A P

    1986-01-01

    Pupils attending four secondary boarding schools in Mwanza Municipality, Tanzania, were examined parasitologically for Schistosoma haematobium. Prevalence of infection was highest in the age group 17 to 18 years in both sexes whereas the intensity was highest in the age group 15 to 16 years in girls and 17 to 18 in boys. Absence on grounds of sickness among the pupils studied was not related to the infection and the over-all academic performance was not clearly related to S. haematobium infection in either. Two drugs (tetracycline-HCL and sulphadimidine) commonly used for treatment of many bacterial infections in Tanzania were used. Administration of these drugs to schistosomiasis patients showed that both significantly lowered egg excretion and the degree depended on the dosage. Neither drugs affected the hatching of miracidia. It is speculated that the administration of both drugs might contribute to a higher accumulation of the eggs in the tissues. This effect could lead to more pathogenic effects as well as introducing an element of error in the studies on drug trials and chemotherapy. Treatment using metrifonate (Bilarcil) resulted in cure rates of 76% for girls and 93% for boys. PMID:3088784

  13. The pathogenesis of experimental Schistosoma bovis infections in Sudanese sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Saad, A M; Hussein, M F; Dargie, J D; Taylor, M G

    1984-07-01

    The pathogenic effects of experimental Schistosoma bovis infection in Sudanese sheep and goats were investigated by a variety of clinical, parasitological, physiological and histopathological techniques; uninfected animals of each species were used as controls. Infected animals of both species lost or failed to gain weight and developed a haemorrhagic diarrhoea, inappetence, marked anaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, hyperglobulinaemia, hyperproteinaemia and eosinophilia. These changes first became noticeable around the time of onset of oviposition and their severity was generally related to faecal egg counts. Red cell breakdown and albumin catabolism were much higher in infected than in control animals of the same species, and it was concluded that these changes were due to haemorrhage resulting from the extrusion of large numbers of eggs through the intestinal mucosa. Although all the animals were infected with the same number of cercariae, both the number of worms reaching maturity and the tissue egg counts tended to be higher in sheep than in goats. On the other hand, goats had significantly higher faecal egg counts than sheep and it is suggested that this was the reason for the generally more severe disease in the former species. PMID:6470226

  14. Changing Patterns of Spatial Clustering of Schistosomiasis in Southwest China between 1999–2001 and 2007–2008: Assessing Progress toward Eradication after the World Bank Loan Project

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Xiong, Chenglong; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Can; Cohen, Ted; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Lijuan; Jiang, Qingwu

    2014-01-01

    We compared changes in the spatial clustering of schistosomiasis in Southwest China at the conclusion of and six years following the end of the World Bank Loan Project (WBLP), the control strategy of which was focused on the large-scale use of chemotherapy. Parasitological data were obtained through standardized surveys conducted in 1999–2001 and again in 2007–2008. Two alternate spatial cluster methods were used to identify spatial clusters of cases: Anselin’s Local Moran’s I test and Kulldorff’s spatial scan statistic. Substantial reductions in the burden of schistosomiasis were found after the end of the WBLP, but the spatial extent of schistosomiasis was not reduced across the study area. Spatial clusters continued to occur in three regions: Chengdu Plain, Yangtze River Valley, and Lancang River Valley during the two periods, and regularly involved five counties. These findings suggest that despite impressive reductions in burden, the hilly and mountainous regions of Southwest China remain at risk of schistosome re-emergence. Our results help to highlight specific locations where integrated control programs can focus to speed the elimination of schistosomiasis in China. PMID:24394217

  15. A random forest approach for predicting the presence of Echinococcus multilocularis intermediate host Ochotona spp. presence in relation to landscape characteristics in western China

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Christopher G.; Danson, F. Mark; Armitage, Richard P.; Giraudoux, Patrick; Pleydell, David R.J.; Wang, Qian; Qui, Jiamin; Craig, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding distribution patterns of hosts implicated in the transmission of zoonotic disease remains a key goal of parasitology. Here, random forests are employed to model spatial patterns of the presence of the plateau pika (Ochotona spp.) small mammal intermediate host for the parasitic tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis which is responsible for a significant burden of human zoonoses in western China. Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery and digital elevation model data were utilized to generate quantified measures of environmental characteristics across a study area in Sichuan Province, China. Land cover maps were generated identifying the distribution of specific land cover types, with landscape metrics employed to describe the spatial organisation of land cover patches. Random forests were used to model spatial patterns of Ochotona spp. presence, enabling the relative importance of the environmental characteristics in relation to Ochotona spp. presence to be ranked. An index of habitat aggregation was identified as the most important variable in influencing Ochotona spp. presence, with area of degraded grassland the most important land cover class variable. 71% of the variance in Ochotona spp. presence was explained, with a 90.98% accuracy rate as determined by ‘out-of-bag’ error assessment. Identification of the environmental characteristics influencing Ochotona spp. presence enables us to better understand distribution patterns of hosts implicated in the transmission of Em. The predictive mapping of this Em host enables the identification of human populations at increased risk of infection, enabling preventative strategies to be adopted. PMID:25386042

  16. Shifts in the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Schistosomiasis: A Case Study in Anhui Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Gao, Fenghua; Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Shiqing; Zhang, Zhijie; Jiang, Qingwu

    2015-01-01

    Background The Chinese national surveillance system showed that the risk of Schistosoma japonicum infection fluctuated temporally. This dynamical change might indicate periodicity of the disease, and its understanding could significantly improve targeted interventions to reduce the burden of schistosomiasis. The goal of this study was to investigate how the schistosomiasis risk varied temporally and spatially in recent years. Methodology/Principal Findings Parasitological data were obtained through repeated cross-sectional surveys that were carried out during 1997-2010 in Anhui Province, East China. A multivariate autoregressive model, combined with principal oscillation pattern (POP) analysis, was used to evaluate the spatio-temporal variation of schistosomiasis risk. Results showed that the temporal changes of schistosomiasis risk in the study area could be decomposed into two sustained damped oscillatory modes with estimated period of approximately 2.5 years. The POPs associated with these oscillatory components showed that the pattern near the Yangtze River varied markedly and that the disease risk appeared to evolve in a Southwest/Northeast orientation. The POP coefficients showed decreasing tendency until 2001, then increasing during 2002-2005 and decaying afterwards. Conclusion The POP analysis characterized the variations of schistosomiasis risk over space and time and demonstrated that the disease mainly varied temporally along the Yangtze River. The schistosomiasis risk declined periodically with a temporal fluctuation. Whether it resulted from previous national control strategies on schistosomiasis needs further investigations. PMID:25881189

  17. Selective Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Vivax Malaria: Reduction of Malaria Incidence in an Open Cohort Study in Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Luiz Herman Soares; de Lima, Alzemar Alves; Freitag, Elci Marlei; dos Santos, Tatiana Marcondes; do Nascimento Filha, Maria Teixeira; dos Santos Júnior, Alcides Procópio Justiniano; da Silva, Josiane Mendes; Rodrigues, Aline de Freitas; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Fontes, Cor Jesus Fernandes; Pereira da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando

    2013-01-01

    In children, the Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTc), currently called Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC), was considered effective on malaria control due to the reduction of its incidence in Papua New Guinea and in some areas with seasonal malaria in Africa. However, the IPT has not been indicated because of its association with drug resistance and for hindering natural immunity development. Thus, we evaluated the alternative IPT impact on malaria incidence in three riverside communities on Madeira River, in the municipality of Porto Velho, RO. We denominate this scheme Selective Intermittent Preventive Treatment (SIPT). The SIPT consists in a weekly dose of two 150 mg chloroquine tablets for 12 weeks, for adults, and an equivalent dose for children, after complete supervised treatment for P. vivax infection. This scheme is recommend by Brazilian Health Ministry to avoid frequent relapses. The clinic parasitological and epidemiological surveillance showed a significant reduction on vivax malaria incidence. The results showed a reduction on relapses and recurrence of malaria after SIPT implementation. The SIPT can be effective on vivax malaria control in localities with high transmission risk in the Brazilian Amazon. PMID:23577276

  18. Effects of the initial level of milk production and of the dietary protein intake on the course of natural nematode infection in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Chartier, C; Etter, E; Hoste, H; Pors, I; Mallereau, M P; Broqua, C; Mallet, S; Koch, C; Massé, A

    2000-09-10

    The level of dietary protein is known to alter the establishment and the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep. On the other hand, high-producing dairy goats are less resistant and/or resilient than low-producing ones to experimental nematode infection. During a 2-year study, we have investigated the course of a natural nematode infection (mainly T. colubriformis) in a high-producing dairy goat flock. In year 1, 50 grazing goats divided in high (HP) or low producer (LP) were compared from April to October for parasitological and milk parameters. In year 2, the 25 HP goats were only considered and were allocated to two levels of dietary protein, high level (HPr) with a protein coverage of 125% or normal level (NPr) with a protein coverage of 106%. They were monitored as above. In year 1, HP goats showed a greater nematode egg output (1856 vs. 1000epg) associated with higher values in T. colubriformis IgG in autumn than LP ones whereas the decrease in serum phosphate concentration was similar in both groups. In year 2, HPr goats exhibited lower egg output in autumn (2219 vs. 2817) vs. NPr ones. Moreover, milk yield and fat content were significantly higher in HPr vs. NPr in the 2nd part of the study. HP goats are less resistant to nematode infection in natural conditions. Resistance and resilience of HP goats may partially be improved by a protein supplementation in the diet. PMID:10936541

  19. Digenean metacercariae parasites as natural tags of habitat use by 0-group common sole Solea solea in nearshore coastal areas: A case study in the embayed system of the Pertuis Charentais (Bay of Biscay, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durieux, Eric D. H.; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Pinet, Patrick; Sasal, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    This study focused on the spatio-temporal variation in the host-parasite system, 0-group sole-digenean metacercariae, in nearshore coastal areas at relatively small spatial scale. 0-group soles were sampled using a standard beam trawl in April, May, June, August and October 2005 at nine different sites in the Pertuis Charentais area (Bay of Biscay, France). Sole density, size, Fulton's condition factor K and digenean metacercariae communities were analysed. 0-group sole concentrated in shallow and muddy areas where they accumulated digenean metacercariae. Parasite communities displayed strong spatial patterns tightly linked to the distribution of the first intermediate mollusc hosts. These parasitological data suggest that 0-group sole during their first period of growth are mainly sedentary with limited movements between the different parts of the habitat. Size and density data revealed spatial heterogeneity in terms of habitat quality so that a limited zone (Aiguillon Bay) within the study area could be identified as sensu stricto nursery habitat for 0-group sole. The use of digenean metacercariae as natural tags appears as a novel powerful tool to evaluate habitat use and movements of juvenile flatfish, which could find applications in fisheries and coastal zone management programs.

  20. Parasite fauna of farmed Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Akoll, Peter; Konecny, Robert; Mwanja, Wilson W; Nattabi, Juliet K; Agoe, Catherine; Schiemer, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    An intensive parasite survey was conducted in 2008 to better understand the parasite fauna occurrence, distribution and diversity in the commercial aquaculture fish species in Uganda. A total of 265 fish collected from hatcheries and grow-out systems were examined for parasites using routine parasitological techniques. The survey yielded 17 parasite species: 11 from Oreochromis niloticus and ten from Clarias gariepinus. Four parasites-Amirthalingamia macracantha, Monobothrioides sp., Zoogonoides sp. and a member of the family Amphilinidae-were recorded for the first time in the country. The parasite diversity was similar between hosts; however, O. niloticus was dominated by free-living stage-transmitted parasites in lower numbers, whereas both trophically and free-living stage-transmitted parasites were equally represented in C. gariepinus in relatively high intensities. The patterns in parasite numbers and composition in the two hosts reflect differences in fish habitat use and diet. A shift in parasite composition from monoxenous species-dominated communities in small-sized fish to heteroxenous in large fishes was recorded in both hosts. This was linked to ontogenetic feeding changes and prolonged exposure to parasites. Polyculture systems showed no effect on parasite intensity and composition. The gills were highly parasitized, mainly by protozoans and monogeneans. Generally, the occurrence and diversity of parasites in these fish species highlight the likelihood of disease outbreak in the proposed intensive aquaculture systems. This calls for raising awareness in fish health management among potential farmers, service providers and researchers. PMID:21688067