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Sample records for parathion pc code

  1. Parathion

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Parathion ; CASRN 56 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  2. HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the PC

    SciTech Connect

    Homann, S.G.

    1994-03-01

    The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-PC (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).

  3. Methyl parathion

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl parathion ; CASRN 298 - 00 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  4. VENTURE/PC manual: A multidimensional multigroup neutron diffusion code system. Version 3

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C.; Cho, K.W.

    1991-12-01

    VENTURE/PC is a recompilation of part of the Oak Ridge BOLD VENTURE code system, which will operate on an IBM PC or compatible computer. Neutron diffusion theory solutions are obtained for multidimensional, multigroup problems. This manual contains information associated with operating the code system. The purpose of the various modules used in the code system, and the input for these modules are discussed. The PC code structure is also given. Version 2 included several enhancements not given in the original version of the code. In particular, flux iterations can be done in core rather than by reading and writing to disk, for problems which allow sufficient memory for such in-core iterations. This speeds up the iteration process. Version 3 does not include any of the special processors used in the previous versions. These special processors utilized formatted input for various elements of the code system. All such input data is now entered through the Input Processor, which produces standard interface files for the various modules in the code system. In addition, a Standard Interface File Handbook is included in the documentation which is distributed with the code, to assist in developing the input for the Input Processor.

  5. VENTURE/PC manual: A multidimensional multigroup neutron diffusion code system

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C.; Cho, K.W. )

    1991-12-01

    VENTURE/PC is a recompilation of part of the Oak Ridge BOLD VENTURE code system, which will operate on an IBM PC or compatible computer. Neutron diffusion theory solutions are obtained for multidimensional, multigroup problems. This manual contains information associated with operating the code system. The purpose of the various modules used in the code system, and the input for these modules are discussed. The PC code structure is also given. Version 2 included several enhancements not given in the original version of the code. In particular, flux iterations can be done in core rather than by reading and writing to disk, for problems which allow sufficient memory for such in-core iterations. This speeds up the iteration process. Version 3 does not include any of the special processors used in the previous versions. These special processors utilized formatted input for various elements of the code system. All such input data is now entered through the Input Processor, which produces standard interface files for the various modules in the code system. In addition, a Standard Interface File Handbook is included in the documentation which is distributed with the code, to assist in developing the input for the Input Processor.

  6. PC-based PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) telemetry data reduction system hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Program is using pulse code modulation (PCM) telemetry systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. SERI has developed a low-cost PC-based PCM data acquisition system to facilitate quick PCM data analysis in the field. The SERI PC-PCM system consists of AT-compatible hardware boards for decoding and combining PCM data streams and DOS software for control and management of data acquisition. Up to four boards can be installed in a single PC, providing the capability to combine data from four PCM streams direct to disk or memory. The SERI PC-PCM system hardware is described focusing on the practicality of PC-based PCM data reduction. A related paper highlights the comprehensive PCM data management software program which can be used in conjunction with this hardware to provide full quick-look data processing and display. The PC-PCM hardware boards support a subset of the Inter-Range Instrumentation Group (IRIG) PCM standard, designed to synchronize and decommutate NRZ or Bi-Phase L PCM streams in the range of 1 to 800 Kbits/sec at 8 to 12 bits per word and 2 to 64 words per frame. Multiple PCM streams (at various rates) can be combined and interleaved into a contiguous digital time series. Maximum data throughput depends on characteristics of the PC hardware, such as CPU rate and disk access speed.

  7. Propulsion stability codes for liquid propellant propulsion systems developed for use on a PC computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III; Armstrong, Wilbur C.

    1991-01-01

    Research into component modeling and system synthesis leading to the analysis of the major types of propulsion system instabilities and the characterization of various components characteristics are presented. Last year, several programs designed to run on a PC were developed for Marshall Space Flight Center. These codes covered the low, intermediate, and high frequency modes of oscillation of a liquid rocket propulsion system. No graphics were built into these programs and only simple piping layouts were supported. This year's effort was to add run time graphics to the low and intermediate frequency codes, allow new types of piping elements (accumulators, pumps, and split pipes) in the low frequency code, and develop a new code for the PC to generate Nyquist plots.

  8. Identification and Functional Characterization of G6PC2 Coding Variants Influencing Glycemic Traits Define an Effector Transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A.; Highland, Heather M.; Locke, Adam E.; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Rayner, N. William; Robertson, Neil R.; Beer, Nicola L.; Rundle, Jana K.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S.; Stringham, Heather M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L.; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G.; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Bergman, Richard N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M.; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C.; Morris, Andrew P.; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  9. Identification and functional characterization of G6PC2 coding variants influencing glycemic traits define an effector transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 locus.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A; Highland, Heather M; Locke, Adam E; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J; Teslovich, Tanya M; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Beer, Nicola L; Rundle, Jana K; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P; Groves, Christopher J; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Jackson, Anne U; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S; Stringham, Heather M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Doney, Alex S F; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Bergman, Richard N; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C; Morris, Andrew P; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  10. NUSTART: A PC code for NUclear STructure And Radiative Transition analysis and supplementation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, G.L.; Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    NUSTART is a computer program for the IBM PC/At. It is designed for use with the nuclear reaction cross-section code STAPLUS, which is a STAPRE-based CRAY computer code that is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NUSTART code was developed to handle large sets of discrete nuclear levels and the multipole transitions among these levels; it operates in three modes. The Data File Error Analysis mode analyzes an existing STAPLUS input file containing the levels and their multipole transition branches for a number of physics and/or typographical errors. The Interactive Data File Generation mode allows the user to create input files of discrete levels and their branching fractions in the format required by STAPLUS, even though the user enters the information in the (different) format used by many people in the nuclear structure field. In the Branching Fractions Calculations mode, the discrete nuclear level set is read, and the multipole transitions among the levels are computed under one of two possible assumptions: (1) the levels have no collective character, or (2) the levels are all rotational band heads. Only E1, M1, and E2 transitions are considered, and the respective strength functions may be constants or, in the case of E1 transitions, the strength function may be energy dependent. The first option is used for nuclei closed shells; the bandhead option may be used to vary the E1, M1, and E2 strengths for interband transitions. K-quantum number selection rules may be invoked if desired. 19 refs.

  11. Beta.-glucosidase coding sequences and protein from orpinomyces PC-2

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong; Ximenes, Eduardo A.

    2001-02-06

    Provided is a novel .beta.-glucosidase from Orpinomyces sp. PC2, nucleotide sequences encoding the mature protein and the precursor protein, and methods for recombinant production of this .beta.-glucosidase.

  12. Stability codes for a liquid rocket implemented for use on a PC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Wilbur; Doane, George C., III; Dean, Garvin

    1992-06-01

    The high frequency code has been made an interactive code using FORTRAN 5.0. The option to plot n-tau curves was added using the graphics routines of FORTRAN 5.0 and GRAFMATIC. The user is now able to run with input values non-dimensional (as in the original code) or dimensional. Input data may be modified from the keyboard. The low and intermediate frequency codes have been run through a set of variations. This will help the user to understand how the stability of a configuration will change if any of the input data changes.

  13. Stability codes for a liquid rocket implemented for use on a PC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Wilbur; Doane, George C., III; Dean, Garvin

    1992-01-01

    The high frequency code has been made an interactive code using FORTRAN 5.0. The option to plot n-tau curves was added using the graphics routines of FORTRAN 5.0 and GRAFMATIC. The user is now able to run with input values non-dimensional (as in the original code) or dimensional. Input data may be modified from the keyboard. The low and intermediate frequency codes have been run through a set of variations. This will help the user to understand how the stability of a configuration will change if any of the input data changes.

  14. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PARATHION POISONING FOLLOWING MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased Susceptibility to Parathion Poisoning Following Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection. Fifty to 100 percent mortality occurred in mice treated with ordinarily sublethal doses of parathion 2 to 5 days post infection with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). These mortalities appear...

  15. Chemodynamics of Methyl Parathion and Ethyl Parathion: Adsorption Models for Sustainable Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Rafique, Uzaira; Balkhair, Khaled S.; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of organophosphate insecticides for nontarget organism has been the subject of extensive research for sustainable agriculture. Pakistan has banned the use of methyl/ethyl parathions, but they are still illegally used. The present study is an attempt to estimate the residual concentration and to suggest remedial solution of adsorption by different types of soils collected and characterized for physicochemical parameters. Sorption of pesticides in soil or other porous media is an important process regulating pesticide transport and degradation. The percentage removal of methyl parathion and ethyl parathion was determined through UV-Visible spectrophotometer at 276 nm and 277 nm, respectively. The results indicate that agricultural soil as compared to barren soil is more efficient adsorbent for both insecticides, at optimum batch condition of pH 7. The equilibrium between adsorbate and adsorbent was attained in 12 hours. Methyl parathion is removed more efficiently (by seven orders of magnitude) than ethyl parathion. It may be attributed to more available binding sites and less steric hindrance of methyl parathion. Adsorption kinetics indicates that a good correlation exists between distribution coefficient (Kd) and soil organic carbon. A general increase in Kd is noted with increase in induced concentration due to the formation of bound or aged residue. PMID:24689059

  16. Chemodynamics of methyl parathion and ethyl parathion: adsorption models for sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Noshabah; Rafique, Uzaira; Balkhair, Khaled S; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of organophosphate insecticides for nontarget organism has been the subject of extensive research for sustainable agriculture. Pakistan has banned the use of methyl/ethyl parathions, but they are still illegally used. The present study is an attempt to estimate the residual concentration and to suggest remedial solution of adsorption by different types of soils collected and characterized for physicochemical parameters. Sorption of pesticides in soil or other porous media is an important process regulating pesticide transport and degradation. The percentage removal of methyl parathion and ethyl parathion was determined through UV-Visible spectrophotometer at 276 nm and 277 nm, respectively. The results indicate that agricultural soil as compared to barren soil is more efficient adsorbent for both insecticides, at optimum batch condition of pH 7. The equilibrium between adsorbate and adsorbent was attained in 12 hours. Methyl parathion is removed more efficiently (by seven orders of magnitude) than ethyl parathion. It may be attributed to more available binding sites and less steric hindrance of methyl parathion. Adsorption kinetics indicates that a good correlation exists between distribution coefficient (Kd) and soil organic carbon. A general increase in Kd is noted with increase in induced concentration due to the formation of bound or aged residue. PMID:24689059

  17. Parathion alters incubation behavior of laughing gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Hill, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    One member of each pair of incubating laughing gulls at 9 nests was trapped, orally dosed with either 6 mg/kg parathion in corn oil or corn oil alone, and marked about the neck with red dye. Each nest was marked with a numbered stake and the treatment was recorded. A pilot study with captive laughing gulls had determined the proper dosage of parathion that would significantly inhibit their brain AChE activity (about 50% of normal) without overt signs of poisoning. After dosing, birds were released and the nests were observed for 2 1/2 days from a blind on the nesting island. The activities of the birds at each marked nest were recorded at 10-minute intervals. Results indicated that on the day of treatment there was no difference (P greater than 0.05, Chi-square test) in the proportion of time spent on the nest between treated and control birds. However, birds dosed with 6 mg/kg parathion spent significantly less time incubating on days 2 and 3 than did birds receiving only corn oil. By noon on the third day, sharing of nest duties between pair members in the treated group had approached normal, indicating recovery from parathion intoxication. These findings suggest that sublethal exposure of nesting birds to an organophosphate (OP) insecticide, such as parathion, may result in decreased nest attentiveness, thereby making the clutch more susceptible to predation or egg failure. Behavioral changes caused by sublethal OP exposure could be especially detrimental in avian species where only one pair member incubates or where both members are exposed in species sharing nest duties.

  18. Interactive toxicity of chlorpyrifos and parathion in neonatal rats: Role of esterases in exposure sequence-dependent toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kacham, R.; Karanth, S.; Baireddy, P.; Liu, J.; Pope, C. . E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2006-01-15

    We previously reported that sequence of exposure to chlorpyrifos and parathion in adult rats can markedly influence toxic outcome. In the present study, we evaluated the interactive toxicity of chlorpyrifos (8 mg/kg, po) and parathion (0.5 mg/kg, po) in neonatal (7 days old) rats. Rats were exposed to the insecticides either concurrently or sequentially (separated by 4 h) and sacrificed at 4, 8, and 24 h after the first exposure for biochemical measurements (cholinesterase activity in brain, plasma, and diaphragm and carboxylesterase activity in plasma and liver). The concurrently-exposed group showed more cumulative lethality (15/24) than either of the sequential dosing groups. With sequential dosing, rats treated initially with chlorpyrifos prior to parathion (C/P) exhibited higher lethality (7/23) compared to those treated with parathion before chlorpyrifos (P/C; 1/24). At 8 h after initial dosing, brain cholinesterase inhibition was significantly greater in the C/P group (59%) compared to the P/C group (28%). Diaphragm and plasma cholinesterase activity also followed a relatively similar pattern of inhibition. Carboxylesterase inhibition in plasma and liver was relatively similar among the treatment groups across time-points. Similar sequence-dependent differences in brain cholinesterase inhibition were also noted with lower binary exposures to chlorpyrifos (2 mg/kg) and parathion (0.35 mg/kg). In vitro and ex vivo studies compared relative oxon detoxification of carboxylesterases (calcium-insensitive) and A-esterases (calcium-sensitive) in liver homogenates from untreated and insecticide pretreated rats. Using tissues from untreated rats, carboxylesterases detoxified both chlorpyrifos oxon and paraoxon, while A-esterases only detoxified chlorpyrifos oxon. With parathion pretreatment, A-esterases still detoxified chlorpyrifos oxon while liver from chlorpyrifos pretreated rats had little apparent effect on paraoxon. We conclude that while neonatal rats are less capable than adults at detoxifying many organophosphorus insecticides including chlorpyrifos and parathion, toxicant-selective differences in detoxification play a role in sequence-dependent toxicity in both neonatal and adult rats with these two insecticides.

  19. 40 CFR 180.122 - Parathion; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Parathion; tolerances for residues...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.122 Parathion; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues...

  20. 40 CFR 180.122 - Parathion; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Parathion; tolerances for residues...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.122 Parathion; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues...

  1. 40 CFR 180.121 - Methyl parathion; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methyl parathion; tolerances for residues. 180.121 Section 180.121 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.121 Methyl parathion; tolerances...

  2. 40 CFR 180.121 - Methyl parathion; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl parathion; tolerances for residues. 180.121 Section 180.121 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.121 Methyl parathion; tolerances...

  3. Methyl parathion hydrolase based nanocomposite biosensors for highly sensitive and selective determination of methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhen; Huang, Jing; Du, Dan; Li, Jinlin; Tu, Haiyang; Liu, Deli; Zhang, Aidong

    2011-07-15

    This article reports the fabrication of a nanocomposite biosensor for the sensitive and specific detection of methyl parathion. The nanocomposite sensing film was prepared via the formation of gold nanoparticles on silica particles, mixing with multiwall carbon nanotubes and subsequent covalent immobilization of methyl parathion hydrolase. The composite of the individual materials was finely tuned to offer the sensing film with high specific surface area and high conductivity. A significant synergistic effect of nanocomposites on the biosensor performance was observed in biosensing methyl parathion. The square wave voltammetric responses displayed well defined peaks, linearly proportional to the concentrations of methyl parathion in the range from 0.001 μg mL⁻¹ to 5.0 μg mL⁻¹ with a detection limit of 0.3 ng mL⁻¹. The application of this biosensor in the analysis of spiked garlic samples was also evaluated. The proposed protocol can be used as a platform for the simple and fast construction of biosensors with good performance for the determination of enzyme-specific electroactive species. PMID:21616655

  4. Parathion utilization by bacterial symbionts in a chemostat.

    PubMed Central

    Daughton, C G; Hsieh, D P

    1977-01-01

    A continuous-culture device was used to select and enrich for microorganisms, from sewage and agricultural runoff, that were capable of using the organophosphorus insecticide parathion as a sole growth substrate. Parathion was dissimilated by the highly acclimated symbiotic activities of Pseudomonas stutzeri, which non-oxidatively and cometabolically hydrolyzed the parathion to ionic diethyl thiophosphate and p-nitrophenol, and P. aeruginosa, which utilized the p-nitrophenol as a sole carbon and energy source. Ionic diethyl thiophosphate was found to be inert to any transformations. Methyl parathion was dissimilated in an analogous way. The device functioned as a chemostat with parathion as the growth-limiting nutrient, and extraordinarily high dissimilation rates were attained for parathion (8 g/liter per day) and for p-nitrophenol (7 g/liter per day). This is the first report of parathion utilization by a defined microbial culture and by symbiotic microbial attack and of dissimilation of an organophosphorus pesticide in a chemostat. PMID:410368

  5. EXPOSURE OF PESTICIDE FORMULATING PLANT WORKERS TO PARATHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential hazard to workers exposed to the organophosphorus pesticide, parathion, in formulating plants was studied. Potential dermal and respiratory exposure near certain work stations was determined. Calculations were based on the use of minimum protection (no respirator, s...

  6. Pathways of microbial metabolism of parathion.

    PubMed Central

    Munnecke, D M; Hsieh, D P

    1976-01-01

    A mixed bacterial culture, consisting of a minimum of nine isolates, was adapted to growth on technical parathion (PAR) as a sole carbon and energy source. The primary oxidative pathway for PAR metabolism involved an initial hydrolysis to yield diethylthiophosphoric acid and p-nitrophenol. A secondary oxidative pathway involved the oxidation of PAR to paraoxon and then hydrolysis to yield p-nitrophenol and diethylphosphoric acid. Under low oxgen conditions PAR was reduced via a third pathway to p-aminoparathion and subsequently hydrolyzed to p-aminophenol and diethylthiophosphoric acid. PAR hydrolase, an enzyme produced by an isolate from the mixed culture, rapidly hydrolyzed PAR and paraoxon (6.0 mumol/mg per min). This enzyme was inducible and stable at room temperature and retained 100% of its activity when heated for 55 C for 10 min. PMID:8005

  7. Behavior of parathion in tomatoes processed into juice and ketchup.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, M A; Kawar, N S

    1985-10-01

    Fresh tomatoes were cut, fortified with 25 ppm (micrograms/g) of parathion (0,0-diethyl 0-4-nitrophenylphosphorothioate) and processed into either juice or ketchup. Tomato juice was canned, while ketchup was placed in bottles. All samples were stored at room temperature for analysis at two-monthly intervals. Parathion residues were measured quantitatively by GLC, while the two metabolites, aminoparathion (0,0-diethyl 0-4-aminophenylphosphorothioate) and 4-nitrophenol, were determined colorimetrically. The presence of the three compounds was confirmed qualitatively by TLC. Blanching of tomatoes resulted in about 50% reduction of parathion level. Pulping of fruits caused a further decrease in parathion residues in juice as a result of its sorption and concentration in the semi-solid pulp. About 85% of parathion added to tomatoes was lost during the processing steps. Storage of juice resulted in a gradual decrease in parathion levels, whereby only 1.7% of the original amount was detected after six months of storage. The compound was stable in ketchup for the first four months of storage but decreased thereafter to almost 7% of the original quantity added to fruits. Aminoparathion and 4-nitrophenol were detected in low levels. PMID:4078230

  8. 75 FR 57787 - Methyl Parathion; Notice of Receipt of Request to Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... request would delete methyl parathion use in or on sweet potatoes, walnuts, and yams. The request would... products containing methyl parathion on July 27, 2010 (75 FR 43981). This action on the...

  9. 77 FR 18813 - Rescission of Previously Issued Cancellation Order for Methyl Parathion Product Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Register Notice (76 FR 81496) to the extent it is applicable to one methyl parathion product. On December... FR 43981), in relation to a Memorandum of Agreement where all methyl parathion products were... AGENCY Rescission of Previously Issued Cancellation Order for Methyl Parathion Product...

  10. DDE increased the toxicity of parathion to coturnix quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludke, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    Adult male Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix) were exposed to DDE or chlordane in the diet and subsequently dosed with parathion or paraoxon. Pretreatment with 5 or 50 ppm DDE in the diet for 12 weeks resulted in increased cholinesterase (ChE) activity in plasma, but not in the brain. Dietary concentrations of 5 and 50 ppm DDE caused increased susceptibility of quail that were challenged with parathion or paraoxon. The increased mortality resulting from DDE pretreatment was reflected in brain ChE inhibition. The synergistic action of DDE was apparent after 3 days of exposure to 50 ppm DDE and 1 week of exposure to 5 ppm DDE. Birds exposed for 3 weeks to 5 or 50 ppm DDE retained their DDE-potentiated sensitivity to parathion after 2 weeks on clean diet. Chlordane pretreatment resulted in decreased susceptibility (antagonism) to parathion, but not to paraoxon dosage. Implications of differing responses in ChE and mortality among controls, DDE-, and chlordane-pretreated birds after parathion or paraoxon dosage are discussed.

  11. FATE OF METHYL PARATHION IN AQUATIC CHANNEL MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of methyl parathion and the development of biological communities were examined as a function of inorganic nutrient enrichment, inorganic nutrients plus glycerol and presence of sediments in two eight-compartment, continuous-flow microcosms. First-order degradation rates...

  12. Accumulation, metabolism and toxicity of parathion in tadpoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Earlier work exposing tadpoles to organophosphorus pesticides indicated the great resistance of tadpoles of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) to these chemicals and their surprising ability to accumulate parathion and fenthion from water. These qualities seemed to make them an ideal model with which to test a hypothesis advanced by Burke and Ferguson, who noted that parathion is more toxic to resistant mosquitofish in static water than in flowing water--a reversal of the pattern normally seen. They believed that highly toxic metabolite paraoxon was produced by the fish and that its buildup in static systems resulted in the unexpected mortality. Amphibians have been shown to produce paraoxon and to accumulate the parent compound parathion to levels that are potentially hazardous to other organisms. In the course of examining paraoxon production by tadpoles, it would also be possible to learn more about their patterns of parathion uptake and elimination. Retention of residues is also a matter of concern given the high levels observed in the earlier studies.

  13. ACUTE AND CHRONIC PARATHION TOXICITY TO FISH AND INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute and chronic aquatic bioassays were conducted with a variety of organisms using parathion (0,0-diethyl 0-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphorothioate) as the challenge compound. Acute LC50 values ranged from a low of 0.38 micrograms/l in invertebrates to a high of 2.0 mg/l in freshwater...

  14. NEUROTOXICITY OF PARATHION-INDUCED ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN NEONATAL RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biochemical and morphological neurotoxic effects of postnatal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition were examined in rat pups dosed with parathion, at time points critical to hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis (i.e., D5-20). ippocampal cytopathology as assessed by l...

  15. METHYL PARATHION PERSISTENCE IN SOIL FOLLOWING SIMULATED SPILLAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulated spillage of emulsifiable concentrate (E.C) and microencapsulated formulations of methyl parathion on soil were studied. Persistence of residues from both formulations spilled as concentrates and as simulated drum rinses were followed for up to 45 months. Spillage of enc...

  16. Vitamin K3 (menadione) redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism and inhibits parathion intoxication.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Richardson, Jason R; Baker, Angela A; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2015-10-01

    Parathion, a widely used organophosphate insecticide, is considered a high priority chemical threat. Parathion toxicity is dependent on its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system to paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate), a cytotoxic metabolite. As an effective inhibitor of cholinesterases, paraoxon causes the accumulation of acetylcholine in synapses and overstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, leading to characteristic signs of organophosphate poisoning. Inhibition of parathion metabolism to paraoxon represents a potential approach to counter parathion toxicity. Herein, we demonstrate that menadione (methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, vitamin K3) is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of parathion. Menadione is active in redox cycling, a reaction mediated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase that preferentially uses electrons from NADPH at the expense of their supply to the P450s. Using human recombinant CYP 1A2, 2B6, 3A4 and human liver microsomes, menadione was found to inhibit the formation of paraoxon from parathion. Administration of menadione bisulfite (40mg/kg, ip) to rats also reduced parathion-induced inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity, as well as parathion-induced tremors and the progression of other signs and symptoms of parathion poisoning. These data suggest that redox cycling compounds, such as menadione, have the potential to effectively mitigate the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides including parathion which require cytochrome P450-mediated activation. PMID:26212258

  17. Glucose feeding exacerbates parathion-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Olivier, K; Liu, J; Karanth, S; Zhang, H; Roane, D S; Pope, C N

    2001-06-22

    Excessive dietary intake of sugars could alter various biotransformation processes and the pharmacological and toxicological properties of numerous xenobiotics. In the present study, the effects of glucose supplementation were examined on the neurotoxicity of the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide parathion (PS) and its active metabolite, paraoxon (PO), a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Rats (n = 6-12/treatment group) were given free access to tap water or 15% glucose (w/v) in tap water beginning 7 d prior to OP toxicant exposure. Food, caloric intake, and body weight were measured daily. Animals were challenged with either PS (4.5, 9, or 18 mg/kg, sc) or PO (0.3 0.5, or 0.7 mg/kg, sc) and clinical signs of neurotoxicity (i.e., autonomic dysfunction, involuntary movements) were recorded daily for the following 13 d. Glucose feeding was associated with a dramatic drop (approximately 50%) in feed intake and an increase (approximately 20% in total caloric consumption over the 7 d prior to OP exposure. Functional toxicity associated with PS exposure was increased in glucose-fed (GF) rats, but the glucose diet had no apparent effect on clinical signs of toxicity following PO treatment. Glucose feeding increased the magnitude of AChE inhibition in the frontal cortex and plasma at lower dosages (i.e., 4.5 and 9 mg/kg) 3 d following PS treatment. Time-course studies (3, 7, and 11 d after PS exposure, 18 mg/kg, sc) indicated significantly greater brain and plasma AChE inhibition in glucose-fed animals at later time points. In contrast, glucose feeding had no effect on the degree of AChE inhibition following PO exposure. Neither liver microsomal oxidative desulfuration of PS, nor liver or plasma paraoxonase, nor liver or plasma carboxylesterase activities were measurably affected by glucose feeding. Downregulation of muscarinic receptors 7 d after PS exposure (18 mg/kg, sc) was more extensive in GF rats. It is postulated that excessiveglucose consumption decreases the intake of other dietary components, in particular amino acids, limiting the de novo synthesis of AChE and consequent recovery of synaptic transmission. Due to the shorter duration of inhibition following PO exposure, sponta neous reactivation of AChE may be more important than de novo protein synthesis in recovery of function, and thus with the effects of glucose feeding on its toxicity. Individuals that derive a large proportion of their calories from sugars may be at higher risk of acute toxicity from organophosphorus pesticides such as PS. PMID:11437059

  18. Hormonal responses and tolerance to cold of female quail following parathion ingestion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Scanes, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-week-old female bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus), maintained at 26 + 1?C, were provided diets containing 0,25, or 100 ppm parathion ad libitum. After 10 days, birds were exposed to mild cold (6 + 1?C) for 4,8, 12, 24, or 48 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in birds receiving 25 and 100 ppm parathion. Body weight, egg production, and plasma luteinizing hormone and progesterone concentrations were reduced in birds receiving 100 ppm parathion compared with other groups. Cold exposure did not alter plasma corticosterone levels in the 0- and 25-ppm parathion groups, but a two- to five fold elevation of plasma corticosterone was observed in birds fed 100 ppm parathion. These findings indicate that (i) short-term ingestion of parathion can impair reproduction possibly by altering gonadotropin or steroid secretion, and (ii) tolerance to cold may be reduced following ingestion of this organophosphate.

  19. Poisoning of Canada geese in Texas by parathion sprayed for control of Russian wheat aphid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flickinger, Edward L.; Juenger, Gary; Roffe, Thomas J.; Smith, Milton R.; Irwin, Roy J.

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 200 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) died at a playa lake in the Texas Panhandle shortly after a winter wheat field in the basin adjacent to the lake was treated with parathion to control newly invading Russian wheat aphids (Diuraphis noxia). No evidence of infectious disease was diagnosed during necropsies of geese. Brain ChE activities were depressed up to 77% below normal. Parathion residues in GI tract contents of geese ranged from 4 to 34 ppm. Based on this evidence, parathion was responsible for the goose mortalities. Parathion applications to winter wheat will undoubtedly increase if parathion is applied for control of both Russian wheat aphids and greenbugs (Schizaphis graminum). Geese may potentially be exposed to widespread applications of parathion from fall to spring, essentially their entire wintering period.

  20. Constitutive Androgen Receptor-Null Mice Are Sensitive to the Toxic Effects of Parathion: Association with Reduced Cytochrome P450-Mediated Parathion MetabolismS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Linda C.; Hernandez, Juan P.

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive androgen receptor (CAR) is activated by several chemicals and in turn regulates multiple detoxification genes. Our research demonstrates that parathion is one of the most potent, environmentally relevant CAR activators with an EC50 of 1.43 μM. Therefore, animal studies were conducted to determine whether CAR was activated by parathion in vivo. Surprisingly, CAR-null mice, but not wild-type (WT) mice, showed significant parathion-induced toxicity. However, parathion did not induce Cyp2b expression, suggesting that parathion is not a CAR activator in vivo, presumably because of its short half-life. CAR expression is also associated with the expression of several drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (P450). CAR-null mice demonstrate lower expression of Cyp2b9, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, and Cyp3a11 primarily, but not exclusively in males. Therefore, we incubated microsomes from untreated WT and CAR-null mice with parathion in the presence of esterase inhibitors to determine whether CAR-null mice show perturbed P450-mediated parathion metabolism compared with that in WT mice. The metabolism of parathion to paraoxon and p-nitrophenol (PNP) was reduced in CAR-null mice with male CAR-null mice showing reduced production of both paraoxon and PNP, and female CAR-null mice showing reduced production of only PNP. Overall, the data indicate that CAR-null mice metabolize parathion slower than WT mice. These results provide a potential mechanism for increased sensitivity of individuals with lower CAR activity such as newborns to parathion and potentially other chemicals due to decreased metabolic capacity. PMID:20573718

  1. Photodegradation of fenitrothion and parathion in tomato epicuticular waxes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Masao; Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2006-01-25

    Photodegradation of (14)C-labeled fenitrothion ([O,O-dimethyl O-(3-methyl-4-nitrophenyl) phosphorothioate]) and parathion ([O,O-diethyl O-(4-nitrophenyl) phosphorothioate]) was conducted on a series of solid surfaces including isolated tomato fruit and leaf cuticle waxes. The wax-coated glass plate gave the comparative degradation of fenitrothion observed for the intact plant but both surfaces of octadecyl-capped silica gel and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) enhanced its volatilization. Photoinduced desulfuration and ester cleavage were common to both pesticides in waxes, but formation of the azo derivative was found to be a major degradation pathway characteristic of parathion. The modified electronic states of the nitro group by introduction of m-methyl group accounted for this different photoreactivity based on molecular orbital calculations. PMID:16417307

  2. CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITING INSECTICIDES (PARATHION)—Chemical and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, James H.

    1955-01-01

    Since parathion and other cholinesterase insecticides are being used extensively, safety precautions are important, and the need for prompt and adequate therapy if poisoning does occur must be emphasized. This paper stresses the acute nature of the poisoning and attempts to outline the basic principles of therapy so that practicing physicians may handle cases with more confidence, which should help prevent prolonged periods of functional disturbances due to anxiety following poisoning. PMID:13230922

  3. Sources of parathion exposures for Israeli aerial spray workers, 1977.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B; Richter, E; Weisenberg, E; Schoenberg, J; Luria, M

    1979-12-01

    Exposure of Israeli agricultural spray pilots and ground crews to parathion was studied. Measurements were made with personal samplers contianing wet midget impingers; samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. Cockpit air exposure levels during 11-21-minute sampling periods for 12 flights ranged from nearly 0 to 430 microgram/m3. During sampling periods of 30 minutes to 4 hours the threshold limit value (TLV) of 100 microgram/m3 was exceeded in 2 of 19 instances. In seven measurements of ground crew exposures, TLV was not exceeded. Air washing with parathion resulted in airborne contamination of the ground level area at more than three times the TLV. Skin exposure data suggested that this route of exposure was significant for ground crew workers but not for pilots. Calculations based on the present data and standard absorption formula suggested that total daily intake for ground crew, but not for pilots, exceeded the Accepted Daily Intake (ADI) of 5 microgram/kg body weight. Sources of exposure and contamination for ground crew and pilots were identified. Recommended environmental control measures for parathion exposure should include cockpit air filtration, modification in flight patterns, paving landing areas, installation of hosing and drainage, NaOH neutralization point, and separate loading and unloading sites. Personal control measures were suggested as a supplement. PMID:537865

  4. EFFECT OF METHYL PARATHION ON FOOD DISCRIMINATION IN NORTHERN BOBWHITE (COLINUS VIRGINIANUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of methyl parathion on dietary discrimination ability was assessed in two-week-old northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus). n initial oral dose of methyl parathion(O, 3 or 6 mg/kg: 0, 0-dimethyl 0-(4-nitrophenyl-ester) was given to two subgroups of bobwhite before a 6-...

  5. Abiotic degradation of methyl parathion by manganese dioxide: Kinetics and transformation pathway.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Caixiang; Liu, Yuan; Luo, Yinwen; Wu, Sisi; Yuan, Songhu; Zhu, Zhenli

    2016-05-01

    Methyl parathion, a widely used insecticide around the world, has aroused gradually extensive concern of researchers due to its degradation product such as methyl paraoxon, with higher toxicity for mammals and more recalcitrant. Given the ubiquity of manganese dioxide (MnO2) in soils and aquatic sediments, the abiotic degradation of methyl parathion by α-MnO2 was investigated in batch experiments. It was found that methyl parathion was decomposed up to 90% by α-MnO2 in 30 h and the removal efficiency of methyl parathion depended strongly on the loading of α-MnO2 and pH value in the solution where the reactions followed pseudo-first-order model well. The coexisting metal ions (such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Mn(2+)) weakened markedly the degradation of methyl parathion by α-MnO2. However, the effect of dissolved organic matter (HA-Na) on reaction rates presented two sides: to improve hydrolysis rate but deteriorate oxidation rate of methyl parathion. Based on the degradation products identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometer (LC/HRMS), both hydrolysis and oxidation processes were proposed to be two predominant reaction mechanisms contributing to methyl parathion degradation by α-MnO2. This study provided meaningful information to elucidate the abiotic dissipation of methyl parathion by manganese oxide minerals in the environment. PMID:26891361

  6. Fate of parathion in artificially fortified grape juice processed into wine.

    PubMed

    Kawar, N S; Gunther, F A; Iwata, Y

    1978-01-01

    "Semellon" grape juice fortified with a high level of 25 ppm parathion was fermented using Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus. After 12 days inte parathion levels in the wine and lees were 10.3 and 156 ppm, respectively; the paraoxon, aminoparathion, and p-nitrophenol levels in the wine were 0.16, 0.20, and 4.5 ppm, respectively, and in the lees were 0.04, 3.1 and 10 ppm, respectively. Thus, hydrolysis of parathion to p-nitrophenol and parathion sorption to sedimented particulate matter were important pathways for parathion residue reduction in the wine. The 56-day-old finished wine just prior to bottling contained 8.8 ppm parathion, 0.04 ppm paraoxon, 0.21 ppm aminoparathion, and 3.0 ppm p-nitrophenol. Two months storage at 24 degrees, 12 degrees, 4 degrees, and -20 degrees C had no effect on paraoxon and aminoparathion residue levels in the wine; parathion residues in wine decreased at all storage temperatures. PMID:632538

  7. Burkholderia jiangsuensis sp. nov., a methyl parathion degrading bacterium, isolated from methyl parathion contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-Yun; Li, Chun-Xiu; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Lai, Qi-Liang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-09-01

    A methyl parathion (MP) degrading bacterial strain, designated MP-1(T), was isolated from a waste land where pesticides were formerly manufactured in Jiangsu province, China. Polyphasic taxonomic studies showed that MP-1(T) is a Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and motile bacterium. The bacterium could grow at salinities of 0-1 % (w/v) and temperatures of 15-40 °C. Strain MP-1(T) could reduce nitrate to nitrite, utilize d-glucose and l-arabinose, but not produce indole, or hydrolyse gelatin. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that MP-1(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, showing highest sequence similarity to Burkholderia grimmiae DSM 25160(T) (98.5 %), and similar strains including Burkholderia zhejiangensis OP-1(T) (98.2 %), Burkholderia choica LMG 22940(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia glathei DSM 50014(T) (97.4 %), Burkholderia terrestris LMG 22937(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia telluris LMG 22936(T) (97.0 %). In addition, the gyrB and recA gene segments of strain MP-1(T) exhibited less than 89.0 % and 95.1 % similarities with the most highly-related type strains indicated above. The G+C content of strain MP-1(T) was 62.6 mol%. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone Q-8. The predominant polar lipids comprised phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl glycerol, aminolipid and phospholipid. The principal fatty acids in strain MP-1(T) were C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c (23.3 %), C16 : 0 (16.8 %), cyclo-C17 : 0 (15.0 %), C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6 (8.5 %), cyclo-C19 : 0ω8c (8.1 %), C16 : 1 iso I/C14 : 0 3-OH (5.7 %), C16 : 0 3-OH (5.6 %) and C16 : 02-OH (5.1 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain MP-1(T) and the three type strains (B. grimmiae DSM 25160(T), B. zhejiangensis OP-1(T) and B. glathei DSM 50014(T)) ranged from 24.6 % to 37.4 %. In accordance with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain MP-1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia jiangsuensis sp. nov. is proposed, the type strain is MP-1(T) (LMG 27927(T) = MCCC 1K00250(T)). PMID:24981326

  8. IMPAIRMENT OF ANTIPREDATOR BEHAVIOR IN 'PALAEMONETES PUGIO' BY EXPOSURE TO SUBLETHAL DOSES OF PARATHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, when exposed to sublethal concentrations of methyl or ethyl parathion, become more susceptible to predation by gulf killifish, Fundulus grandis. An increase in spontaneous activity renders them more easily detected by a predator, and they fatigue...

  9. Depression of plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in quail by the anticholinesterase insecticide parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Clarke, R.N.; Ottinger, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    To examine the effects of parathion on basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration, male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were orally intubated with 0, 5 or 10 mg/kg parathion and sacrificed after 4, 8 and 24 hr. At the 5 mg/kg dose, plasma LH levels were reduced at 4 and 8 hr, but returned to control values by 24 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was substantially reduced by 10 mg/kg parathion (52, 75 and 37% inhibition at 4, 8 and 24 hr, respectively) and plasma LH concentration remained depressed through the 24-hr period. These findings suggest that the organophosphorus insecticide parathion may alter plasma LH concentration in a manner which might impair reproductive activity, and provide indirect evidence for a cholinergic component in the regulation of LH secretion in quail.

  10. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF SELECTED HAZARDOUS MATERIALS: PENTACHLOROPHENOL, HEXACHLOROCYCLOPENTADIENE, AND METHYL PARATHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This program evaluated the use of selected pure culture microrganisms for potential in biodegrading the hazardous materials pentachlorophenol (PCP), hexachlorocyclopentadiene (HCCP), and methyl parathion (MP). Each chemical was separately challenged by each of 24 organisms in aqu...

  11. SOME PROBLEMS RELATED TO CLEANUP OF PARATHION-CONTAMINATED SURFACES FOLLOWING SPILLAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to determine the most effective techniques or methods for cleanup and decontamination of various wood, metal, and concrete surfaces following spillage of 45% emulsifiable parathion. This involved certain absorbents and chemicals, some of which are readily a...

  12. GFI - EASY PC GRAPHICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Easy PC Graphics (GFI) is a graphical plot program that permits data to be easily and flexibly plotted. Data is input in a standard format which allows easy data entry and evaluation. Multiple dependent axes are also supported. The program may either be run in a stand alone mode or be embedded in the user's own software. Automatic scaling is built in for several logarithmic and decibel scales. New scales are easily incorporated into the code through the use of object-oriented programming techniques. For the autoscale routines and the actual plotting code, data is not retrieved directly from a file, but a "method" delivers the data, performing scaling as appropriate. Each object (variable) has state information which selects its own scaling. GFI is written in Turbo Pascal version 6.0 for IBM PC compatible computers running MS-DOS. The source code will only compile properly with the Turbo Pascal v. 6.0 or v. 7.0 compilers; however, an executable is provided on the distribution disk. This executable requires at least 64K of RAM and DOS 3.1 or higher, as well as an HP LaserJet printer to print output plots. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. An electronic copy of the documentation is provided on the distribution medium in ASCII format. GFI was developed in 1993.

  13. Graphene modified screen printed immunosensor for highly sensitive detection of parathion.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Jyotsana; Vinayak, Priya; Tuteja, Satish K; Chhabra, Varun A; Bhardwaj, Neha; Paul, A K; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2016-09-15

    Due to indiscriminate use of pesticides, there is a growing need to develop sensors that can sensitively detect the trace amount of pesticides in food and water samples. Parathion, identified as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, had been one of the most widely used pesticides throughout the world. Symptoms of its poisoning are found to be diverse enough to include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle cramping/twitching, and shortness of breath. In this work, a graphene based impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated and employed for highly sensitive and specific detection of parathion. The fabrication proceeded through the modification of the screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPE) with graphene sheets, followed by their functionalization with 2-aminobenzyl amine (2-ABA) via an electrochemical reaction. These amine functionalized graphene electrodes were then bio-interfaced with the anti-parathion antibodies. In the impedimetric mode, this biosensor detected parathion in a broad linear range, i.e. 0.1-1000ng/L with a very low limit of detection (52pg/L). It also showed high selectivity towards parathion in the presence of malathion, paraoxon, and fenitrothion. The viability of this biosensor was demonstrated by detecting parathion in real samples (e.g., tomato and carrot) and through cross-calibration against HPLC. PMID:27135939

  14. Simultaneous detection of imidacloprid and parathion by the dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haiyan; Sheng, Enze; Feng, Lu; Zhou, Liangliang; Hua, Xiude; Wang, Minghua

    2015-10-01

    A highly sensitive direct dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) to detect parathion and imidacloprid simultaneously in food and environmental matrices was developed. Europium (Eu(3+)) and samarium (Sm(3+)) were used as fluorescent labels by coupling separately with L1-Ab and A1P1-Ab. Under optimal assay conditions, the half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) and limit of detection (LOD, IC10) were 10.87 and 0.025 μg/L for parathion and 7.08 and 0.028 μg/L for imidacloprid, respectively. The cross-reactivities (CR) were negligible except for methyl-parathion (42.4 %) and imidaclothiz (103.4 %). The average recoveries of imidacloprid ranged from 78.9 to 104.2 % in water, soil, rice, tomato, and Chinese cabbage with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.4 to 11.6 %, and those of parathion were from 81.5 to 110.9 % with the RSD of 3.2 to 10.5 %. The results of TRFIA for the authentic samples were validated by comparison with gas chromatography (GC) analyses, and satisfactory correlations (parathion: R (2) = 0.9918; imidacloprid: R (2) = 0.9908) were obtained. The results indicate that the dual-labeled TRFIA is convenient and reliable to detect parathion and imidacloprid simultaneously in food and environmental matrices. PMID:25994268

  15. AMPS/PC - AUTOMATIC MANUFACTURING PROGRAMMING SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The AMPS/PC system is a simulation tool designed to aid the user in defining the specifications of a manufacturing environment and then automatically writing code for the target simulation language, GPSS/PC. The domain of problems that AMPS/PC can simulate are manufacturing assembly lines with subassembly lines and manufacturing cells. The user defines the problem domain by responding to the questions from the interface program. Based on the responses, the interface program creates an internal problem specification file. This file includes the manufacturing process network flow and the attributes for all stations, cells, and stock points. AMPS then uses the problem specification file as input for the automatic code generator program to produce a simulation program in the target language GPSS. The output of the generator program is the source code of the corresponding GPSS/PC simulation program. The system runs entirely on an IBM PC running PC DOS Version 2.0 or higher and is written in Turbo Pascal Version 4 requiring 640K memory and one 360K disk drive. To execute the GPSS program, the PC must have resident the GPSS/PC System Version 2.0 from Minuteman Software. The AMPS/PC program was developed in 1988.

  16. INTERACTION BETWEEN GAMMA-HEXACHLOROCYCLOHEXANE AND THE GASTROINTESTINAL MICROFLORA AND THEIR EFFECT ON THE ABSORPTION, BIOTRANSFORMATION, AND EXCRETION OF PARATHION BY THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pretreatment of rats with the organochlorine insecticide lindane reduced the estimated absorption rate of parathion from the gastrointestinal tract. Lindane pretreatment also significantly reduced the metabolism of parathion to p-nitrophenol in vivo. Lindane pretreatment altered ...

  17. Enhancement of parathion toxicity to quail by heat and cold exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Becker, J.M.; Nakatsugawa, T.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of ambient temperature on the acute oral toxicity of parathion were investigated in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) maintained at thermoneutral temperature (26.degree. C) or exposed to elevated (37.degree. C) or reduced (4.degree. C) temperatures commonly encountered by free-ranging wild birds. Based upon estimates of the median lethal dosage, there was up to a two-fold enhancement of parathion toxicity in birds chronically exposed to heat or cold. Twenty-four hours after administration of a low dosage (4 mg/kg body wt, po), there was markedly greater cholinesterase inhibition in surviving heat-exposed quail compared with those reared at 26.degree. C (e.g., brain acetylcholinesterase depression of 42% versus 12%). There were no differences in hepatic activities of parathion oxidase, paraoxonase, or paraoxon deethylase which could account for greater toxicity to chronically heat-exposed birds. In contrast, 4 mg parathion/kg wt elicited less plasma cholinesterase inhibition in cold-exposed quail compared to thermoneutral controls (e.g., < 10% versus 48% depression after 24 hr). Increased liver weight and a doubling of paraoxonase activity may have been associated with greater tolerance to sublethal doses of parathion in chronically cold-exposed quail. These findings, together with limited field observations, indicate that the hazard associated with anticholinesterase exposure of wild birds is substantially influenced by environmental temperature.

  18. Bioconcentration and Acute Intoxication of Brazilian Freshwater Fishes by the Methyl Parathion Organophosphate Pesticide.

    PubMed

    de Salles, João Bosco; Lopes, Renato Matos; de Salles, Cristiane M C; Cassano, Vicente P F; de Oliveira, Manildo Marcião; Bastos, Vera L F Cunha; Bastos, Jayme Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Three species of freshwater Brazilian fishes (pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus; piavussu, Leporinus macrocephalus, and curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus) were exposed to an acute dose of 5 ppm methyl parathion organophosphate pesticide. Three to five individuals per species were exposed, one at a time, to 40 liters tap water spiked with Folidol 600. Pesticide concentrations and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were evaluated in serum, liver, brain, heart, and muscle. The bioconcentration of methyl parathion was similar for all studied fishes. Brain tissue showed the highest pesticide concentration, reaching 80 ppm after exposure for 30 min to methyl parathion. Three to 5 hours of 5 ppm methyl parathion exposure provoked the death of all P. lineatus at 92% brain AChE inhibition, whereas fish from the other two species survived for up to 78 hours with less than 80% brain AChE inhibition. Our results indicate that acute toxic effects of methyl parathion to fish are correlated with brain AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. PMID:26339593

  19. Introduction--the methyl parathion story: a chronicle of misuse and preventable human exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Carol; Esteban, Emilio; Hill, Robert H; Pearce, Ken

    2002-01-01

    In the fall of 1994, Lorain County, Ohio, became the site of the first investigation of several large-scale incidences in which the organophosphate pesticide methyl parathion was illegally applied to private residences. The extent of potential human exposure to this pesticide led the Ohio Department of Health to formally request technical assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This article describes the initial investigation of 64 homes in Ohio and introduces the method of using both biological markers of exposure (p-nitrophenol levels in human urine samples) and environmental markers of contamination in dust and air samples when making public health decisions about the cleanup of homes sprayed with methyl parathion. The results of the CDC rapid investigation led the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to declare the contaminated homes in Lorain County a Superfund cleanup site. Seven years after the Lorain incident, and after subsequent Superfund actions had been implemented in Illinois and Mississippi, researchers participated in an expanded session devoted to methyl parathion at the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Exposure Analysis held in Charleston, South Carolina, in the fall of 2001. The articles included in this monograph are based on presentations at that meeting. They report previously unpublished data that tell the methyl parathion story from different perspectives, each providing in-depth information about separate aspects of this multistate, multiagency, and multimillion dollar chemical exposure. This monograph is the methyl parathion story. PMID:12634136

  20. Effects on wildlife of ethyl and methyl parathion applied to California rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Hill, E.F.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Selected rice fields on the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex were aerially sprayed one time during May or June 1982 with either ethyl (0.11 kg Al/ha) or methyl (0.84 kg AI/ha) parathion for control of tadpole shrimp, Triops longicaudatus. No sick or dead vertebrate wildlife were found or adjacent to the treated rice fields after spraying. Specimens of the following birds and mammals were assayed for brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity to determine exposure to either form of parathion; house mouse, Mus musculus; black-tailed jackrabbit, Lepus californicus; mallard, Anas platyrhynchos; ring-necked pheasant, Phasianus colchicus; American coot, Fulica americana; and red-winged blackbird, Agelaius phoeniceus. Both mice and pheasants from methyl parathion-treated fields had overall mean ChE activities that were significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited compared with controls, and 7, 40, 54 and 57% of individual blackbirds, pheasant, mice, and coots, respectively, had inhibited brain ChE activities (i.e., less than -2 SD of control mean). Although no overall species effect was detected for ethyl parathoid treatment, pheasants (43%), coots (33%), and mice (37%) had significantly inhibited brain ChE activities. Neither of the parathion treatment appeared acutely hazardous to wildlife in or adjacent to rice fields, but sufficient information on potential hazards was obtained to warrant caution in use of these chemicals, especially methyl parathion, in rice fields.

  1. Effects of wildlife of ethyl and methyl parathion applied to California USA rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Hill, E.F.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Selected rice fields on the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex were aerially sprayed one time during May or June 1982 with either ethyl (0.11 kg Al/ha) or methyl (0.84 kg AI/ha) parathion for control of tadpole shrimp, Triops longicaudatus. No sick or dead vertebrate wildlife were found or adjacent to the treated rice fields after spraying. Specimens of the following birds and mammals were assayed for brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity to determine exposure to either form of parathion; house mouse, Mus musculus; black-tailed jackrabbit, Lepus californicus; mallard, Anas platyrhynchos; ring-necked pheasant, Phasianus colchicus; American coot, Fulica americana; and red-winged blackbird, Agelaius phoeniceus. Both mice and pheasants from methyl parathion-treated fields had overall mean ChE activities that were significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited compared with controls, and 7, 40, 54 and 57% of individual blackbirds, pheasant, mice, and coots, respectively, had inhibited brain ChE activities (i.e., less than -2 SD of control mean). Although no overall species effect was detected for ethyl parathoid treatment, pheasants (43%), coots (33%), and mice (37%) had significantly inhibited brain ChE activities. Neither of the parathion treatment appeared acutely hazardous to wildlife in or adjacent to rice fields, but sufficient information on potential hazards was obtained to warrant caution in use of these chemicals, especially methyl parathion, in rice fields.

  2. Bioconcentration and Acute Intoxication of Brazilian Freshwater Fishes by the Methyl Parathion Organophosphate Pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Bosco de Salles, João; Matos Lopes, Renato; de Salles, Cristiane M. C.; Cassano, Vicente P. F.; de Oliveira, Manildo Marcião; Cunha Bastos, Vera L. F.; Bastos, Jayme Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Three species of freshwater Brazilian fishes (pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus; piavussu, Leporinus macrocephalus, and curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus) were exposed to an acute dose of 5 ppm methyl parathion organophosphate pesticide. Three to five individuals per species were exposed, one at a time, to 40 liters tap water spiked with Folidol 600. Pesticide concentrations and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were evaluated in serum, liver, brain, heart, and muscle. The bioconcentration of methyl parathion was similar for all studied fishes. Brain tissue showed the highest pesticide concentration, reaching 80 ppm after exposure for 30 min to methyl parathion. Three to 5 hours of 5 ppm methyl parathion exposure provoked the death of all P. lineatus at 92% brain AChE inhibition, whereas fish from the other two species survived for up to 78 hours with less than 80% brain AChE inhibition. Our results indicate that acute toxic effects of methyl parathion to fish are correlated with brain AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. PMID:26339593

  3. Purification and characterization of a secreted recombinant phosphotriesterase (parathion hydrolase) from Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Rowland, S S; Speedie, M K; Pogell, B M

    1991-02-01

    A heterologous phosphotriesterase (parathion hydrolase), previously cloned from a Flavobacterium species into Streptomyces lividans, was secreted at high levels and purified to homogeneity. N-terminal analysis revealed that it had been processed in the same manner as the native membrane-bound Flavobacterium hydrolase. The enzyme consisted of a single polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 35,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Substrate specificity studies showed Kms of 68 microM for parathion, 46 microM for O-ethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate, 599 microM for methyl parathion, and 357 microM for p-nitrophenyl ethyl(phenyl)phosphinate. Temperature and pH optima were 45 degrees C and 9.0, respectively. The purified enzyme was inhibited by 1 mM dithiothreitol and 1 mM CuSO4. After chelation and inactivation by o-phenanthroline, however, activity could be partially restored by 1 mM CuCl or 1 mM CuSO4. The results showed that the purified recombinant parathion hydrolase has the same characteristics as the native Flavobacterium hydrolase. This system provides a source of milligram quantities of parathion hydrolase for future structural and mechanism studies and has the potential to be used in toxic waste treatment strategies. PMID:1849713

  4. Influence of vegetation in mitigation of methyl parathion runoff.

    PubMed

    Moore, M T; Bennett, E R; Cooper, C M; Smith, S; Farris, J L; Drouillard, K G; Schulz, R

    2006-07-01

    A pesticide runoff event was simulated on two 10 m x 50 m constructed wetlands (one non-vegetated, one vegetated) to evaluate the fate of methyl parathion (MeP) (Penncap-M). Water, sediment, and plant samples were collected at five sites downstream of the inflow for 120 d. Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed at each wetland outflow to determine exiting pesticide load. MeP was detected in water at all locations of the non-vegetated wetland (50 m), 30 min post-exposure. MeP was detected 20 m from the vegetated wetland inflow 30 min post-exposure, while after 10d it was detected only at 10 m. MeP was measured only in SPMDs deployed in non-vegetated wetland cells, suggesting detectable levels were not present near the vegetated wetland outflow. Furthermore, mass balance calculations indicated vegetated wetlands were more effective in reducing aqueous loadings of MeP introduced into the wetland systems. This demonstrates the importance of vegetation as sorption sites for pesticides in constructed wetlands. PMID:16314013

  5. Methyl parathion in residential properties: relocation and decontamination methodology.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J Milton; Bing-Canar, John; Renninger, Steve; Dollhopf, Ralph; El-Zein, Jason; Star, Dave; Zimmerman, Dea; Anisuzzaman, Abul; Boylan, Kathline; Tomaszewski, Terrence; Pearce, Ken; Yacovac, Rebecca; Erlwein, Bobby; Ward, John

    2002-01-01

    In November 1994 methyl parathion (MP), a restricted agricultural pesticide, was discovered to have been illegally sprayed within hundreds of residences in Lorain County, Ohio. Surface levels and air concentrations of MP revealed detectable levels of the pesticide 3 years after spraying. Because of the high toxicity of MP (lethal dose to 50% of rats tested [LD50] = 15 mg/kg) and long half-life indoors, risk-based relocation and decontamination criteria were created. Relocation criteria were derived based on levels of p-nitrophenol in urine, a metabolic byproduct of MP exposure. In Ohio, concentrations of MP on surfaces and in the air were also used to trigger relocations. The criteria applied in Ohio underwent refinement as cases of MP misuse were found in Mississippi and then in several other states. The MP investigation (1994-1997) was the largest pesticide misuse case in the nation, ultimately involving the sampling of 9,000 residences and the decontamination of 1,000 properties. This article describes the methodology used for relocation of residents and decontamination of properties having MP. PMID:12634141

  6. Absence of circannual toxicity of parathion to starlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Grue, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ambient temperature and season have been observed to influence the toxicity of several environmental pollutants in homeotherms. The circannual toxicity of ethyl parathion (EP) was examined in adult European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Groups of birds housed in outdoor pens received oral doses of EP (20-150 mg/kg body weight) in fall, winter, spring and summer (temperature range -3.3 to 36.7?C). The median lethal dosage (LD50), and brain and plasma cholinesterase inhibition, were found to be quite similar among seasons. There was some suggestion that EP may have been more toxic during hot weather (winter versus summer LD50 estimate [95% confidence interval]:160 [114-225] vs. 118 [102-136] mg/kg; P<0.10). In view of previous reports in which ambient temperature extremes and harsh weather have enhanced organophosphorus insecticide toxicity to birds, it is concluded that circannual toxicity studies should include measures of sensitivity (acute oral exposure) and vulnerability (dietary exposure) to better predict responses of free-ranging birds

  7. [Effects of surfactants on adsorption of methyl parathion by neutral alumina].

    PubMed

    Tang, Can; Zeng, Qing-Ru; Li, Guo-Xue; Yang, Cheng-Jian; Liao, Bo-Han

    2007-02-01

    The sorption of methyl parathion by neutral alumina which was modified by ionic surfactants such as SDS, SDBS and CTMAB was studied. It showed that the adsorbability of alumina to methyl parathion were related to the type and concentration of surfactant and pH of the system. The adsorbabilities of alumina on three kinds of surfactants were different. When pH = 7, the adsorbance of SDS was the largest, but the adsorbance of CTMAB was the smallest. When pH = 4, the adsorbance of SDS or SDBS was increased, while the adsorbance of CTMAB was decreased. The adsorbability of alumina was strengthened, not weakened, by the cooperation of pollutant and anionic surfactant, while the sorption of methyl parathion by alumina with cationic surfactant was weakened. These features had the practical value when neutral alumina is used to remove more than one contaminants from wastewater. PMID:17489197

  8. Toxicity of parathion to captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)-absence of seasonal effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Grue, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of season on the toxicity of the prototypic organophosphorus insecticide parathion was evaluated using adult European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) housed in outdoor pens. Groups of birds received oral doses of parathion in the fall, winter, spring and summer. Median lethal dosage, and brain and plasma cholinesterase inhibition, were found to be quite similar among seasons. Parathion may have been more toxic during hot weather (winter vs. summer LD50 estimate: 160 vs. 118 mg/kg; p < 0.1). In view of previous reports in which ambient temperature extremes and harsh weather have enhanced organophosphorus insecticide toxicity to birds, it is concluded that circannual toxicity studies should include measures of sensitivity (acute oral exposure) and vulnerability (dietary exposure) to better predict responses of free-ranging birds.

  9. Parathion accumulation in cricket frogs and its effect on American kestrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; de Chacin, H.; Pattee, O.H.; Lamont, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    Adult cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) were held individually for 96 h in static systems containing initial concentrations of either 0, 0.1, 1.0, or 10 ppm parathion in 10 ml water. Mortality of cricket frogs was directly related to the parathion concentration in the water. Frogs from the 1.0- and 10-ppm groups accumulated 0.08 and 4.6 ppm parathion, respectively. One of four American kestrels (Falco sparverius) fed frogs from the 10-ppm group died from organophosphate poisoning less than 3 h after consuming five frogs. Mortality did not occur in kestrels fed frogs from the other treatment groups, which represented more environmentally realistic levels of exposure.

  10. Detection of parathion and patulin by quartz-crystal microbalance functionalized by the photonics immobilization technique.

    PubMed

    Funari, Riccardo; Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Carrieri, Raffaele; Morra, Luigi; Lahoz, Ernesto; Gesuele, Felice; Altucci, Carlo; Velotta, Raffaele

    2015-05-15

    Oriented antibodies are tethered on the gold surface of a quartz crystal microbalance through the photonics immobilization technique so that limit of detection as low as 50 nM and 140 nM are achieved for parathion and patulin, respectively. To make these small analytes detectable by the microbalance, they have been weighed down through a "sandwich protocol" with a second antibody. The specificity against the parathion has been tested by checking the immunosensor response to a mixture of compounds similar to parathion, whereas the specificity against the patulin has been tested with a real sample from apple puree. In both cases, the results are more than satisfactory suggesting interesting outlook for the proposed device. PMID:25190088

  11. Effects of salinity on the toxicity of parathion to the estuarine crab Chasmagnathus granulata (Decapoda, Grapsidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Monserrat, J.M.; Rodriguez, E.M.; Lombardo, R.J. )

    1991-04-01

    The crab community of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina extends along the coast of Samborombon Bay. Since this is an estuarine environment, there are strong diel and seasonal fluctuations in water salinity which requires special physiological adaptations of the animals that live in this habitat. One of the common species of crabs of this community is Chasmagnathus granulata, which shows euryhaline and osmoregulatory features that render it a good model for the study of parathion toxicity at different salinities. Parathion is a widely used pesticide in Argentina, and it is able to reach Samborombon Bay from neighboring croplands through several rivers and artificial channels flowing into it.

  12. Degradation and Byproduct Formation of Parathion in Aqueous Solutions by UV and UV/H2O2 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Changlong; Linden, Karl G.

    2013-01-01

    The photodegradation of parathion, a US EPA Contaminant Candidate List pesticide, in aqueous solutions by UV and UV/H2O2 processes in batch reactors was evaluated. Direct photolysis of parathion both by LP (low pressure) and MP (medium pressure) lamps at pH 7 were very slow with quantum yields of 6.67 ± 0.33 ×10−4 and 6.00 ± 1.06 ×10−4 mol E−1, respectively. Hydrogen peroxide enhanced the photodegradation of parathion through the reaction between UV generated hydroxyl radical and parathion with a second-order reaction rate constant of 9.70 ± 0.45×109 M−1 s−1. However, addition of hydrogen peroxide did not result in a linear increase in the degradation rate. An optimum molar ratio between hydrogen peroxide and parathion was determined to be between 300 – 400. Photodegradation of parathion yielded several organic byproducts, of which the paraoxon, 4-nitrophenol, O,O,O-triethyl thiophosphate and O,O diethyl-methyl thiophosphate were quantified and their occurrence during UV/H2O2 processes were discussed. NO2−, PO43−, NO3− and SO42− were the major anionic byproducts of parathion photodegradation and their recover ratio were also discussed. A photodegradation mechanism scheme suggesting three simultaneous pathways was proposed in the study. PMID:18834610

  13. Poster session ELIPGRID-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.R.

    1995-02-01

    ELIPGRID-PC, a new personal computer program, has been developed to provide easy access to Singer`s ELIPGRID algorithm for hot-spot detection probabilities. Three features of the program are the ability to determine: (1) the grid size required for specified conditions, (2) the smallest hot spot that can be sampled with a given probability, and (3) the approximate grid size resulting from specified conditions and sampling cost. ELIPGRID-PC also provides probability of detection versus cost data for graphing with spreadsheets or graphics software. The program has been successfully tested using Singer`s published ELIPGRID results. An apparent error in the published ELIPGRID code has been uncovered and an appropriate modification incorporated into the new program.

  14. LABORATORY ECOSYSTEMS FOR STUDYING CHEMICAL FATE: AN EVALUATION USING METHYL PARATHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of complex microcosms as tools for testing mathematical models of pollutant fate was evaluated by determining the transport and transformation of methyl parathion in two-8-compartment, continuous flow microcosms designed to enhance the effects of different degradation pro...

  15. EFFECTS OF DIETARY METHYL PARATHION ON NORTHERN BOBWHITE EGG PRODUCTION AND EGGSHELL QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need to develop avian reproduction tests that reflect more realistic exposure scenarios for short-lived pesticides, like organophosphorus and carbamate compounds. he effect of a short-term ietary methyl parathion exposure on northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) egg ...

  16. EFFECTS OF METHYL PARATHION ON RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD (AGELIUS PHOENICUES) INCUBATION BEHAVIOR AND NESTING SUCCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free-living female red-winged blackbirds were captured on their nests and given oral doses of 0,2.37 or 4.21 mg/kg methyl- parathion in a propylene glycol carrier during incubation. irds were released immediately after dosing and observed for 5 h to document behavioral effects, a...

  17. THE INHIBITION OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN PINK SHRIMP 'PENAEUS DUORARUM' BY METHYL PARATHION AND ITS OXON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, E.C.3.1.1.7, (AChE) activity in the ventral nerve cord of pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum) by methyl parathion (MPT) and methyl paraoxon (MPO) was investigated. When the animals were exposed to these compounds in water (in vivo), AChE activit...

  18. EFFECTS OF THE DURATION AND TIMING OF DIETARY METHYL PARATHION EXPOSURE ON BOBWHITE REPRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two northern bobwhite (colinus virginianus) reproduction tests were conducted concurrently to evaluate how the duration and time of initiation of methyl parathion exposure affeCted dose-response relationships of reproductive parameters. n the long-term exposure test, pairs of adu...

  19. Removal of methyl parathion by cyanobacteria Microcystis novacekii under culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Fioravante, Isabela Arajo; Barbosa, Francisco Antnio Rodrigues; Augusti, Rodinei; Magalhes, Srgia Maria Starling

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the removal of methyl parathion by cyanobacteria Microcystis novacekii in culture conditions and evaluated toxicity in terms of EC(50) of the pesticide for the species. This is the first report on the removal and toxicity of methyl parathion for the species that is abundant and easily accessible in Brazilian lakes. The results have shown that Microcystis novacekii is capable of removing methyl parathion, an organophosphorus pesticide, from the culture medium with an extraction rate higher than 90%. Spontaneous degradation was not significant, which indicates a high efficiency level of biological removal. No metabolites of methyl parathion were detected in the culture medium at the concentration levels evaluated (0.10 to 2.00 mg/dm(3)). The mechanisms proposed to explain pesticide removal are bioaccumulation and mineralization. EC(50) for 72 h was 17.60 mg/dm(3), which is much higher than the usual concentrations in surface waters. This indicates that M. novacekii is highly tolerant of this pesticide and may represent an important bioremediation agent of contaminated environments. PMID:20532383

  20. Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) for degrdation of nerve agent simulant parathion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parathion, a simulant of nerve agent VX, has been studied for degradation on Fe3+, Fe2+ and zerovalent iron supported on chitosan. Chitosan, a naturally occurring biopolymer derivative of chitin, is a very good adsorbent for many chemicals including metals. Chitosan is used as supporting biopolymer ...

  1. RATES OF TRANSFORMATION OF METHYL PARATHION AND DIETHYL PHTHALATE BY AUFWUCHS MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using batch cultures, the authors determined transformation rates for low concentrations of two toxicants--an insectide, methyl parathion, and a plasticizer, diethyl phthalate--by aufwuchs. Aufwuchs samples were collected from field sites, an indoor channel, and a continuous-flow...

  2. EFFECTS OF DIETARY EXPOSURE TO METHYL PARATHION ON EGG LAYING AND INCUBATION IN MALLARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An outdoor pen reproduction study was Conducted with mallards (Anas platyrhychos) to evaluate the effects of an 8-d dietary exposure to methyl parathion (400 ppm) on nesting success when treatment was initiated at different times in the nesting cycle. reatment groups were defined...

  3. ACUTE TOXICITY OF METHYL-PARATHION IN WETLAND MESOCOSMS: INFLUENCE OF AQUATIC PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acute toxicity of methyl-parathion (MeP) introduced into constructed wetlands for the purpose of assessing the importance of emergent vegetation was tested using Hyalella azecta (Crustacea: Amphipoda). A vegetated (90% cover, mainly Juncus effuses) and a non-vegetated wetland (each with a water...

  4. Effects of malathion, diazinon, and parathion on mallard embryo development and cholinesterase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Eastin, W.C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of external exposure of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs to malathion, diazinon, and parathion were examined using formulations and concentrations similar to field applications. Treatment with aqueous emulsion simulated exposure at the rate of 100 gal per acre (153 liters/hectare) with three to six different doses per compound with treatment at 3 and 8 days of embryonic development. Treatment with a nontoxic oil vehicle simulated exposure at the rate of 11 gal per acre (16.8 liters/hectare) with three to six different doses per compound. The order of embryotoxicity on a pounds-per-acre basis was parathion > diazinon > malathion with either vehicle. However, the potential hazard under conditions of up to five times the maximum field level of application was greater for malathion because of the high permissible level of application for malathion on certain crops. Parathion, the most embryotoxic of the three, had the most pronounced effects when an oil vehicle was used, as reflected by an LC50 of about 2 lb of active ingredient per acre, stunted growth, and a high frequency of malformations involving distortion of the axial skeleton, particularly in the cervical region. All three compounds resulted in significant depression of plasma and brain cholinesterase activity, but parathion caused the most depression throughout development, which was still apparent in hatchlings. Treatment with either distilled water or oil vehicle alone did not result in any of these effects seen with organophosphorous insecticides.

  5. Children's exposure to chlorpyrifos and parathion in an agricultural community in central Washington State.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Richard A; Lu, Chensheng; Barr, Dana; Needham, Larry

    2002-01-01

    We measured two diethyl organophosphorus (OP) pesticides--chlorpyrifos and parathion--in residences, and their metabolic by-products, in the urine of children 6 years old or younger in a central Washington State agricultural community. Exposures to two dimethyl OP pesticides (azinphos-methyl and phosmet) in this same population have been reported previously. We categorized children by parental occupation and by household proximity to pesticide-treated farmland. Median chlorpyrifos house dust concentrations were highest for the 49 applicator homes (0.4 microg/g), followed by the 12 farm-worker homes (0.3 microg/g) and the 14 nonagricultural reference homes (0.1 microg/g), and were statistically different (p < 0.001); we observed a similar pattern for parathion in house dust. Chlorpyrifos was measurable in the house dust of all homes, whereas we found parathion in only 41% of the homes. Twenty-four percent of the urine samples from study children had measurable 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) concentrations [limits of quantitation (LOQ) = 8 microg/L], and 7% had measurable 4-nitrophenol concentrations (LOQ = 9 microg/L). Child urinary metabolite concentrations did not differ across parental occupational classifications. Homes in close proximity (200 ft/60 m) to pesticide-treated farmland had higher chlorpyrifos (p = 0.01) and parathion (p = 0.014) house dust concentrations than did homes farther away, but this effect was not reflected in the urinary metabolite data. Use of OP pesticides in the garden was associated with an increase in TCPy concentrations in children's urine. Parathion concentrations in house dust decreased 10-fold from 1992 to 1995, consistent with the discontinued use of this product in the region in the early 1990s. PMID:12003762

  6. Mass spectrometric detection of CYP450 adducts following oxidative desulfuration of methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Patrick B; Smith, Stanley V; Baker, Rodney C; Kramer, Robert E

    2013-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated desulfuration of methyl parathion results in mechanism-based inhibition of the enzyme. Although previous data suggest that reactive sulfur is released and binds to the apoprotein, the identities of neither the adduct(s) nor the affected amino acid(s) have been clearly determined. In this study, nanospray tandem mass spectroscopy was used to analyze peptide digests of CYP resolved by SDS-PAGE from liver microsomes of male rats following incubation in the absence or presence of methyl parathion. Oxidative desulfuration was confirmed by measurement of methyl paraoxon, and inhibition of specific CYP isozymes was determined by measurement of testosterone hydroxylation. Total CYP content was quantified spectrophotometrically. Incubation of microsomes with methyl parathion decreased CYP content by 58%. This effect was not associated with a comparable increase in absorbance at 420 nm, suggesting the displacement of heme from the apoprotein. Rates of testosterone 2β- and 6β-hydroxylation, respectively, were reduced to 8 and 2%, implicating CYP3A and CYP2C11 in the oxidative desulfuration of methyl parathion. Mass spectrometric analysis identified 96 amu adducts to cysteines 64 and 378 of CYP3A1. In addition, a peptide containing cysteine 433 that coordinates with heme was possibly modified as it was detected in control, but not methyl parathion samples. A comparison of rat CYP3A1 with human CYP3A4 suggests that cysteines 64 and 378 reside along the substrate channel, remote from the active site. Alteration of these residues might modulate substrate entry to the binding pocket of the enzyme. PMID:22271348

  7. Oviposition and the plasma concentrations of LH, progesterone, and corticosterone in bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) fed parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Scanes, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Bobwhite quail were fed concentrations of parathion (0,50, 100, 200 or 400 p.p.m.) for 10 days. Food intake, body weight change, brain acetylcholinesterase activity, egg production, and ovary weight were reduced in a dose-dependent manner. In a second experiment, birds were fed 0, 25 or 100 p.p.m. parathion or pair-fed control food to equate consumption in the 100 p.p.m. group. Egg production was not affected in birds fed 25 p.p.m. or in the pair-fed group, but the daily time of oviposition was more variable than in the control group. Cessation of egg production, inhibition of follicular development, and reduced plasma LH concentration were observed in birds fed 100 p.p.m. parathion. These findings indicate that exposure to parathion can impair reproduction, possibly by altering gonadotrophin secretion.

  8. Cellulases and coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  9. Cellulases and coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  10. Blood glucose and insulin concentration in rats subjected to physical exercise in acute poisoning with parathion-methyl.

    PubMed

    Lukaszewicz-Hussain, A; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, J; Pawłowska, D

    1985-01-01

    Unexercised rats or those subjected to single physical exercise were given parathion-methyl (10 mg/kg p.o. - 0.5 DL50) or oil (vehicle). Blood glucose and serum insulin concentration were assayed 1 h after the treatment. Physical exercise depressed the serum insulin concentration without changes in blood glucose level. In acute poisoning with parathion-methyl hyperglycemia occurred concurrently with hypoinsulinemia. Physical exercise abolished the pesticide-induced hypoinsulinemia, but not hyperglycemia. PMID:3913953

  11. User's manual for FERD-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, B.D.

    1989-04-01

    FERD-PC is a modified version of the unfolding code FERD, rewritten in Microsoft FORTRAN and optimized for use on an IBM-PC or compatible computer. It can be used to correct observed pulse-height distributions for the nonideal response of a pulse-height spectrometer and has been successfully applied to the analysis of data from the Tower Shielding Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Modifications to the original code have been incorporated to optimize program execution and run time, while still maintaining most input and output options supported by the original code. In addition, several changes have been made to include an interactive binning code, a flux integration code, and a plotting utility, which supports enhanced color graphics (EGA) and a HP 7475A or equivalent plotter. This manual describes these changes and enhancements, and covers essential information to set up and run FERD-PC. Sample problems are included to illustrate input and output procedures using various options of the code. 4 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Ethyl parathion in wetlands following aerial application to sunflowers in North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tome, M.W.; Grue, C.E.; DeWeese, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    An operational aerial application of parathion to sunflower fields resulted in greater or equal spray deposit in wetlands adjacent to or surrounded by sunflower fields than in the sunflower fields. In another application, when the applicator attempted to avoid contamination of the wetlands, parathion still drifted into wetlands in detectable amounts; in 2 of 4 comparisons, spray deposit in wetlands and sunflower fields did not differ. Weather during both spray operations was ideal for North Dakota, Le., wind speeds <16 km/ hour, excellent visibility, and temperature <24 C. We review how spray droplet size, weather, terrain, and type of application equipment interact to determine the amount of drift from any application of pesticide. With this information, wildlife managers should be able to make decisions pertaining to insecticide applications that will minimize drift and reduce negative impacts to nontarget organisms

  13. Differential acetylcholinesterase inhibition of chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jerry; Donerly, Sue; Levin, Edward D; Linney, Elwood A

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish are increasingly used for developmental neurotoxicity testing because early embryonic events are easy to visualize, exposures are done without affecting the mother and the rapid development of zebrafish allows for high throughput testing. We used zebrafish to examine how exposures to three different organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion) over the first five days of embryonic and larval development of zebrafish affected their survival, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and behavior. We show that at non-lethal, equimolar concentrations, chlorpyrifos (CPF) is more effective at equimolar concentrations than diazinon (DZN) and parathion (PA) in producing AChE inhibition. As concentrations of DZN and PA are raised, lethality occurs before they can produce the degree of AChE inhibition observed with CPF at 300 nM. Because of its availability outside the mother at the time of fertilization, zebrafish provides a complementary model for studying the neurotoxicity of very early developmental exposures. PMID:22036888

  14. Degradation of organophosphorus pesticide parathion methyl on nanostructured titania-iron mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henych, Jiří; Štengl, Václav; Slušná, Michaela; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Janoš, Pavel; Kuráň, Pavel; Štastný, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Titania-iron mixed oxides with various Ti:Fe ratio were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of aqueous solutions of titanium(IV) oxysulphate and iron(III) sulphate with urea as a precipitating agent. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman and infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, XRF analysis, specific surface area (BET) and porosity determination (BJH). These oxides were used for degradation of organophosporus pesticide parathion methyl. The highest degradation efficiency approaching <70% was found for the samples with Ti:Fe ratio 0.25:1 and 1:0.25. Contrary, parathion methyl was not degraded on the surfaces of pure oxides. In general, the highest degradation rate exhibited samples consisted of the iron or titanium oxide containing a moderate amount of the admixture. However, distinct correlations between the degradation rate and the sorbent composition were not identified.

  15. Detection of parathion pesticide by quartz crystal microbalance functionalized with UV-activated antibodies.

    PubMed

    Funari, Riccardo; Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Schiavo, Luigi; Esposito, Rosario; Altucci, Carlo; Velotta, Raffaele

    2013-07-01

    Photonic immobilization technique (PIT) has been used to develop an immunosensor for the detection of parathion. An antibody solution has been activated by breaking the disulfide bridge in the triad Trp/Cys-Cys through absorption of ultrashort UV laser pulses. The free thiol groups so produced interact with gold lamina making the antibody oriented upside, that is, with its variable parts exposed to the environment, thereby greatly increasing the detection efficiency. PIT has been applied to anchor polyclonal antiparathion antibodies to the gold electrode of a Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) giving rise to very high detection sensitivity once the parathion is made heavier by complexion with BSA (bovine serum albumin), this latter step only required by the mass based transducer used in this case. The comparison of the sensor response with irradiated antibodies against different analytes shows that the high degree of antibody specificity is not affected by PIT nor is it by the complexion of parathion with BSA. These results pave the way to important applications in biosensing, since the widespread occurrence of the Trp/Cys-Cys residues triads in proteins make our procedure very general and effective to detect light analytes. PMID:23721081

  16. Methyl parathion and fenvalerate toxicity in American kestrels: Acute physiological responses and effects of cold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Franson, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and toxicological effects of p.o. methyl parathion (0.375-3.0 mg/kg) or fenvalerate (1000-4000 mg/kg) were examined over a 10-h period in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) maintained in thermoneutral (22?C) and cold (-5?C) environments. Methyl parathion was highly toxic (estimated median lethal dose of 3.08 mg/kg, 95% confidence limits of 2.29 -4.14 mg/kg), producing dose-dependent inhibition of brain and plasma cholinesterase activity, hyperglycemia, and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration. Brain and plasma cholinesterase inhibition in excess of 50% was associated with transient but pronounced hypothermia 2 h after intubation, although the magnitude of this response was yariable. Fenvalerate, at doses far exceeding those encountered in the environment, caused mild intoxication and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Cold intensified methyl parathion toxicity, but did not affect that of fenvalerate. Thus, it would appear that organophosphorus insecticides pose far greater hazard than pyrethroids to raptorial birds.

  17. Kinetic studies of heterogeneous reactions of particulate phosmet and parathion with NO3 radicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Yang, Bo; Zeng, Chenghua

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorous pesticides (OPPs) are ubiquitous pollutants in the atmospheric environment with adverse effects on human health. In this study, heterogeneous kinetics of particulate phosmet and parathion with NO3 radicals were investigated with a mixed-phase relative rate method. A vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS) and an atmospheric gas analysis mass spectrometer were used to monitor online the decays of particulate OPPs and reference compound, respectively. Reactive uptake coefficients of NO3 radicals on phosmet and parathion particles were (0.12±0.03) and (0.14±0.04), respectively, calculated according to the measured OPPs loss ratios and the average NO3 concentrations. Additionally, the average effective rate constants for heterogeneous reactions of particulate phosmet and parathion with NO3 radicals measured under experimental conditions were (2.80±0.16)×10(-12) and (2.97±0.13)×10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The experimental results of these heterogeneous reactions in the aerosol state provide supplementary knowledge for kinetic behaviors of airborne OPPs particles. PMID:25460772

  18. Aminoparathion: a highly reactive metabolite of parathion. 1. Reactions with polyphenols and polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Rung, Bruno; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2005-11-16

    Spiking of tomato and apple fruits with parathion at different levels of about 1-4 mg/kg irradiation and under simulated sunlight conditions resulted in nearly complete photodegradation within 13 h, but extractable parathion degradation products could not be found in any case. However, after irradiation of an unrealistically spiked apple (134 mg/kg) different photoproducts including aminoparathion (AP) were detectable by HPLC, proving that the hitherto postulated photochemistry of parathion indeed takes place in the fruit cuticle environment. Besides the photoreduction pathway it was shown for the first time that AP is also easily formed by reduction of the primary photoproduct nitrosoparathion with thiols (cysteine, glutathione), while ascorbic acid only leaves hydroxylaminoparathion. In the presence of polyphenols, AP was effectively bound to quinone intermediates formed by both silver oxide and polyphenol oxidases. For pyrocatechol, a disubstituted o-quinone derivative could be isolated as a dark red addition product and structurally be elucidated. However, in the presence of caffeic acid, catechol, naringin, and quercetin, respectively, insoluble dark colored polymers precipitated within 48 h, while in the supernatants AP was not detectable any more. Polymer-bound and nonextractable AP was proven by transesterification with sodium ethoxide releasing O,O,O-triethyl thiophosphate which was determined by GC. Additionally, AP itself was a substrate for polyphenol oxidases, resulting in a quinone imine intermediate which in turn reacted with excessive AP yielding deep red colored di- and trimerization products. PMID:16277414

  19. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of methyl parathion in water and vegetable samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Neetu; Asthana, Anupama; Upadhyay, Kanchan

    2013-01-01

    A new selective and sensitive kinetic method has been developed for spectrophotometric determination of methyl parathion based on its inhibitory effect on the redox reaction between bromate and hydrochloric acid. The decolorization of neutral red by the reaction product was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 530 nm by measuring the change in absorbance at the fixed time of 5 min after the initiation of the reaction. The variables affecting the rate of the reaction were investigated. Under the selected experimental conditions methyl parathion was determined in the range of 0.025-0.3 μg mL-1. Sandell's sensitivity and molar absorptivity for the system were found to be 0.0004 μg cm-2 and 6.5 × 105 L mol-1 cm-1 respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of methyl parathion in different vegetable and water samples with satisfactory results. The results were compared with those obtained by GC-MS, very similar values were found by the two methods.

  20. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on endocannabinoid and endocannabinoid-like lipid metabolites in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Parsons, Loren; Pope, Carey

    2015-09-01

    Parathion and chlorpyrifos are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) are endogenous neuromodulators that regulate presynaptic neurotransmitter release in neurons throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. While substantial information is known about the eCBs, less is known about a number of endocannabinoid-like metabolites (eCBLs, e.g., N-palmitoylethanolamine, PEA; N-oleoylethanolamine, OEA). We report the comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on AChE and enzymes responsible for inactivation of the eCBs, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), and changes in the eCBs AEA and 2AG and eCBLs PEA and OEA, in rat striatum. Adult, male rats were treated with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), parathion (27 mg/kg) or chlorpyrifos (280 mg/kg) 6-7 days after surgical implantation of microdialysis cannulae into the right striatum, followed by microdialysis two or four days later. Additional rats were similarly treated and sacrificed for evaluation of tissue levels of eCBs and eCBLs. Dialysates and tissue extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. AChE and FAAH were extensively inhibited at both time-points (85-96%), while MAGL activity was significantly but lesser affected (37-62% inhibition) by parathion and chlorpyrifos. Signs of toxicity were noted only in parathion-treated rats. In general, chlorpyrifos increased eCB levels while parathion had no or lesser effects. Early changes in extracellular AEA, 2AG and PEA levels were significantly different between parathion and chlorpyrifos exposures. Differential changes in extracellular and/or tissue levels of eCBs and eCBLs could potentially influence a number of signaling pathways and contribute to selective neurological changes following acute OP intoxications. PMID:26215119

  1. Early Postnatal Parathion Exposure in Rats Causes Sex-Selective Cognitive Impairment and Neurotransmitter Defects Which Emerge in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Edward D.; Timofeeva, Olga A.; Yang, Liwei; Petro, Ann; Ryde, Ian T.; Wrench, Nicola; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2010-01-01

    Developmental exposure of rats to the organophosphate (OP) pesticides leads to altered neurobehavioral function in juvenile and young adult stages. The current study was conducted to determine whether effects of neonatal parathion exposure on cognitive performance persist in older adult and aged rats, and the relationship of behavioral changes to underlying cholinergic and serotonergic mechanisms. We administered parathion to rat pups on postnatal days 1–4, at doses spanning the threshold for the initial signs of systemic toxicity and for barely-detectable cholinesterase inhibition (0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg/day). Beginning at 14 months of age and continuing until 19 months, the rats were trained in the 16-arm radial maze. Controls showed the normal sex difference in this spatial learning and memory task, with the males committing significantly fewer working memory errors than females. Neonatal parathion exposure eliminated the sex difference primarily by causing impairment in males. In association with the effects on cognitive performance, neonatal parathion exposure elicited widespread abnormalities in indices of serotonergic and cholinergic synaptic function, characterized by upregulation of 5HT2 receptors and the 5HT transporter, deficits in choline acetyltransferase activity and nicotinic cholinergic receptors, and increases in hemicholinium-3 binding to the presynaptic choline transporter. Within-animal correlations between behavior and neurochemistry indicated a specific correlation between working memory performance and hippocampal hemicholinium-3 binding; parathion exposure destroyed this relationship. Like the behavioral effects, males showed greater effects of parathion on neurochemical parameters. This study demonstrates the sex-selective, long-term behavioral alterations caused by otherwise nontoxic neonatal exposure to parathion, with effects persisting into the beginning of senescence. PMID:20015457

  2. PC-FACS.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Donna S

    2016-03-01

    PC-FACS(FastArticleCriticalSummaries for Clinicians inPalliativeCare) provides hospice and palliative care clinicians with concise summaries of the most important findings from more than 100 medical and scientific journals. If you have colleagues who would benefit from receiving PC-FACS, please encourage them to join the AAHPM at aahpm.org. Comments from readers are welcomed at https://webmail.chpnet.org/owa/redir.aspx?C=ae2e0d47fa6f479a8024736a8d3c95b1&URL=mailto%3apc-facs%40aahpm.orgpc-facs@aahpm.org. PMID:26854996

  3. Effect of Parathion-Methyl on Amazonian Fish and Freshwater Invertebrates: A Comparison of Sensitivity with Temperate Data

    PubMed Central

    Geber-Corrêa, Rachel; Campos, Paola S.; Garcia, Marcos V. B.; Waichman, Andrea V.; van den Brink, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Parathion-methyl is an organophosphorous insecticide that is widely used in agricultural production sites in the Amazon. The use of this pesticide might pose a potential risk for the biodiversity and abundance of fish and invertebrate species inhabiting aquatic ecosystems adjacent to the agricultural fields. Due to a lack of toxicity data for Amazonian species, safe environmental concentrations used to predict the ecological risks of parathion-methyl in the Amazon are based on tests performed with temperate species, although it is unknown whether the sensitivity of temperate species is representative for those of Amazonian endemic species. To address this issue, the acute toxic effect (LC50–96 h) of parathion-methyl was assessed on seven fish and five freshwater invertebrate species endemic to the Amazon. These data were used to compare their pesticide sensitivity with toxicity data for temperate species collected from the literature. The interspecies sensitivity was compared using the Species Sensitivity Distribution (SSD) concept. The results of this study suggest that Amazonian species are no more, or less, sensitive to parathion-methyl than their temperate counterparts, with LC50 values ranging from 2900 to 7270 μg/L for fish and from 0.3 to 319 μg/L for freshwater arthropods. Consequently, this evaluation supports the initial use of toxicity data of temperate fish and freshwater invertebrate species for assessing the effects of parathion-methyl on Amazonian freshwater ecosystems. PMID:19847472

  4. Covalent Coupling of Organophosphorus Hydrolase Loaded Quantum Dots to Carbon Nanotube/Au Nanocomposite for Enhanced Detection of Methyl Parathion

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dan; Chen, Wenjuan; Zhang, Weiying; Liu, Deli; Li, Haibing; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    An amperometric biosensor for highly selective and sensitive determination of methyl parathion (MP) was developed based on dual signal amplification: (1) a large amount of introduced enzyme on the electrode surface and (2) synergistic effects of nanoparticles towards enzymatic catalysis. The fabrication process includes (1) electrochemical deposition of gold nanoparticles by a multi-potential step technique at multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film pre-cast on a glassy carbon electrode and (2) immobilization of methyl parathion degrading enzyme (MPDE) onto a modified electrode through CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) covalent attachment. The introduced MWCNT and gold nanoparticles significantly increased the surface area and exhibited synergistic effects towards enzymatic catalysis. CdTe QDs are further used as carriers to load a large amount of enzyme. As a result of these two important enhancement factors, the proposed biosensor exhibited extremely sensitive, perfectly selective, and rapid response to methyl parathion in the absence of a mediator.

  5. Easy PC Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffett-Smith, Peter

    1996-11-01

    Easy PC Astronomy is the perfect book for everyone who wants to make easy and accurate astronomical calculations. The author supplies a simple but powerful script language called AstroScript on a disk, ready to use on any IBM PC-type computer. Equipped with this software, readers can compute complex but interesting astronomical results within minutes: from the time of moonrise or moonset anywhere in the world on any date, to the display of a lunar or solar eclipse on the computer screen--all within a few minutes of opening the book! The Sky Graphics feature of the software displays a detailed image of the sky as seen from any point on earth--at any time in the future or past--showing the constellations, planets, and a host of other features. Readers need no expert knowledge of astronomy, math or programming; the author provides full details of the calculations and formulas, which the reader can absorb or ignore as desired, and a comprehensive glossary of astronomical terms. Easy PC Astronomy is of immediate practical use to beginning and advanced amateur astronomers, students at all levels, science teachers, and research astronomers. Peter Duffett-Smith is at the Cavendish Laboratory of the University of Cambridge and is the author of Astronomy with Your Personal Computer (Cambridge University Press, 1990) and Practical Astronomy with Your Calculator (Cambridge University Press, 1989).

  6. Cholinesterase inhibition of birds inhabiting wheat fields treated with methyl parathion and toxaphene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niethammer, K.R.; Baskett, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and dickcissels (Spiza americana) inhabiting wheat fields treated with 0.67 kg AI/ha methyl parathion and 1.35 kg AI/ha toxaphene showed brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition compared with birds inhabiting untreated fields. Maximum inhibition occurred about five days after insecticide application. ChE activities again approached normal 10 days after treatment. ChE inhibition for dickcissels and red-winged blackbirds differed significantly (p<0.05); maximum inhibition for the former species was 74%, and for the latter, 40%. These differences could not be explained by the diets of the two species, as they were similar.

  7. A receptor binding assay applied to monitoring the neurotoxicity of parathion to Peromyscus after oral exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Many naturally occurring toxins, as well as pesticides, metals, and other compounds that occur in our environment from anthropogenic activities, stimulate or antagonize neuro-receptors to produce acute and/or chronic toxicities. Recent advances in laboratory instrumentation and the availability of a variety of radiolabeled ligands and type-specific drugs for numerous receptors make it possible to easily screen large numbers of samples and detect changes in sensitivity and density of receptor types and subtypes. A receptor binding assay for examining the chronic dietary toxicity of parathion will be used as a model to describe the methodology.

  8. Determination of parathion, aldicarb, and thiobencarb in tap water and bottled mineral water in Mashhad, Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Ramin; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad; Mehri, Fereshteh; Khashyarmanesh, Zahra; Moallemzadeh, Hamideh; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2012-04-01

    Water is a necessity for life. Currently, because of different contaminations in tap water, most people prefer using bottled mineral waters. Pesticides (e.g., organophophorous, carbamates, etc.) are among the most dangerous chemicals that may be found in drinking waters, which can cause long- and short-term complications. Because all people consume at least 2 L of water per day, water-quality monitoring is vital. In this study, we determined the concentration of three pesticides (aldicarb, parathion, and thiobencarb) in 13 tap-water samples collected from 13 different urban areas and 10 samples of bottled mineral water in Mashhad, a major city in northeast Iran. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with a pulsed flame photometric detector after solid-phase extraction. Results showed that 2 of 13 tap-water samples and 2 of 10 bottled mineral water trademarks were contaminated either by parathion or by thiobencarb or both, with concentrations ranging between 0.6 and 0.8 ppb. According to the defined guideline values, determined concentrations of pesticides are below the permissible World Health Organization level for these toxic agents, and it is considered that drinking these tap waters and bottled mineral waters are safe for human consumption. PMID:21939365

  9. RATE OF SOIL REDUCTION AS AFFECTED BY LEVELS OF METHYL PARATHION AND 2, 4,-D (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple technique was demonstrated for determining the potential for synthetic organics to stress microbial populations. Oxidized Crowly and Cecil soil materials were amended with varying concentrations of 2,4-D and methyl parathion, flooded, and then analyzed for changes in pH,...

  10. CHANGES IN MALLARD HEN AND BROOD BEHAVIORS IN RESPONSE TO METHYL PARATHION-INDUCED ILLNESS OF DUCKLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Half the young in each of four broods of 5-d-old mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were gavaged orally with 4 mg/kg methyl parathion and released with their mother and untreated siblings in pond enclosures. our control broods received corn oil only. ctivity categories (Swimming, pree...

  11. Isolation of a selected microbial consortium capable of degrading methyl parathion and p-nitrophenol from a contaminated soil site.

    PubMed

    Pino, Nancy J; Dominguez, Maria C; Penuela, Gustavo A

    2011-01-01

    A bacterial consortium with the ability to degrade methyl parathion and p-nitrophenol, using these compounds as the only carbon source, was obtained by selective enrichment in a medium with methyl parathion. Samples were taken from Moravia, Medellin; an area that is highly contaminated, owing to the fact that it was used as a garbage dump from 1974 to 1982. Acinetobacter sp, Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus sp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Citrobacter freundii, Stenotrophomonas sp, Flavobacterium sp, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas sp, Acinetobacter sp, Klebsiella sp and Proteus sp were the microorganisms identified within the consortium. In culture, the consortium was able to degrade 150 mg L⁻¹ of methyl-parathion and p-nitrophenol in 120 h, but after adding glucose or peptone to the culture, the time of degradation decreased to 24 h. In soil, the consortium was also able to degrade 150 mg L⁻¹ of methyl parathion in 120 h at different depths and also managed to decrease the toxicity. PMID:21328125

  12. PARATHION RESIDUES ON APPLE AND PEACH FOLIAGE AS AFFECTED BY THE PRESENCE OF THE FUNGICIDES, MANEB AND ZINEB

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a search for factors that might produce more hazardous conditions for workers exposed to pesticide residues on crops, a study was carried out to determine if the presence of the fungicides, maneb or zineb, on apple and peach foliage where parathion had been applied, affects th...

  13. Isolation of a selected microbial consortium capable of degrading methyl parathion and p-nitrophenol from a contaminated soil site.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Pino NJ; Dominguez MC; Penuela GA

    2011-01-01

    A bacterial consortium with the ability to degrade methyl parathion and p-nitrophenol, using these compounds as the only carbon source, was obtained by selective enrichment in a medium with methyl parathion. Samples were taken from Moravia, Medellin; an area that is highly contaminated, owing to the fact that it was used as a garbage dump from 1974 to 1982. Acinetobacter sp, Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus sp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Citrobacter freundii, Stenotrophomonas sp, Flavobacterium sp, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas sp, Acinetobacter sp, Klebsiella sp and Proteus sp were the microorganisms identified within the consortium. In culture, the consortium was able to degrade 150 mg L⁻¹ of methyl-parathion and p-nitrophenol in 120 h, but after adding glucose or peptone to the culture, the time of degradation decreased to 24 h. In soil, the consortium was also able to degrade 150 mg L⁻¹ of methyl parathion in 120 h at different depths and also managed to decrease the toxicity.

  14. ORPLOT. PC: a graphic utility for ORMGEN. PC and ORVIRT. PC

    SciTech Connect

    Inversini, C.; Bryson, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    ORPLOT.PC is an interactive graphic utility for ORMGEN.PC and ORVIRT.PC. It executes on an IBM PC/XT or PC/AT equipped with hard disk, graphic card, and 512K minimum memory. The program is capable of: (1) displaying finite-element meshes generated by ORMGEN.PC complete with node numbers, element numbers, and boundary conditions; and (2) generating deformed mesh plots, contour plots, line (X-Y) plots, and developed surface plots of ORVIRT.PC output. A zooming feature allows detailed inspection of any subregion. Because simplicity and ease of use were important objectives during program development, all commands are entered interactively using free format. The option of automatic or user-defined scaling for most plots is another convenience. Plot files may be created and written to hard disk for subsequent hardcopy to printer or plotter. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  15. METIER (Modular Ecotoxicity Tests Incorporating Ecological Relevance) for difficult substances--III. Effects of medium renewal and use of a carrier on the bioavailability of parathion.

    PubMed

    Guilhermino, L; Ribeiro, R; Gonçalves, F; Soares, A M

    1996-01-01

    In this work we compared the effects of medium renewal and use of a carrier (ethanol) in the lethal toxicity of parathion to Daphnia magna Straus. Actual concentrations measured in test solutions with and without ethanol were not significantly different, indicating that there is no need for a carrier solution to assist dissolution of parathion, up to a concentration of 5 mg litre(-1). LC50 values at 48 h from bioassays with and without medium renewal were identical, indicating that in our experimental conditions, degradation of parathion was not a significant consideration. Similar 48-h LC50 values were obtained in all tests, with or without ethanol present. Thus, potential interactions between carrier and toxicant had no effect on the lethal toxicity of parathion to D. magna. PMID:15091417

  16. ACEPHATE, ALDICARB, CARBOPHENOTHION, DEF, EPN, ETHOPROP, METHYL PARATHION, AND PHORATE; THEIR ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY, BIOCONCENTRATION POTENTIAL, AND PERSISTENCE AS RELATED TO MARINE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioconcentration, and persistence of the pesticides acephate, aldicarb, carbophenothion, DEF, EPN, ethoprop, methyl parathion, and phorate were determined for estuarine environments. Static acute toxicity tests were conducted to determine the 96-h EC50 values for al...

  17. PC index and magnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander; Sormakov, Dmitry; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    PC index is regarded as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere as distinct from the AL and Dst indices, which are regarded as characteristics of the energy that realize in the magnetosphere in form of substorm and magnetic storms. This conclusion is based on results of analysis of relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-index) and parameters of the solar wind, on the one hand, relationships between changes of PC and development of magnetospheric substorms (AL-index) and magnetic storms (Dst-index), on the other hand. This paper describes in detail the following main results which demonstrate a strong connection between the behavior of PC and development of magnetic disturbances in the auroral zone: (1) magnetic substorms are preceded by the РС index growth (isolated and extended substorms) or long period of stationary PC (postponed substorms), (2) the substorm sudden onsets are definitely related to such PC signatures as leap and reverse, which are indicative of sharp increase of the PC growth rate, (3) substorms generally start to develop when the PC index exceeds the threshold level ~ 1.5±0.5 mV/m, irrespective of the substorm growth phase duration and type of substorm, (4) linear dependency of AL values on PC is typical of all substorm events irrespective of type and intensity of substorm.

  18. Improving the acidic stability of a methyl parathion hydrolase by changing basic residues to acidic residues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Wang, Ping; Tian, Jian; Jiang, Huachen; Wu, Ningfeng; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin; Fan, Yunliu

    2012-06-01

    The acidic stability of a methyl parathion hydrolase (Ochr-MPH) was improved by selectively changing basic amino acids to acidic ones. Mutation sites were selected based on the position-specific amino acid replacement probabilities (more than or equal to 0.2) and the entropy of each site (more than or equal to 0.8). Three mutants (K208E, K277D, and K208E/K277D) were more stable than the wild-type (WT). Their half-lives at pH 5.0 were 64, 68, 65 min, respectively, whereas that of WT was 39 min. The acidic stability of proteins may therefore be improved by changing selected basic amino acid residues to acidic ones. PMID:22350335

  19. Studies on combined effects of organophosphates and heavy metals in birds. I. Plasma and brain cholinesterase in Coturnix quail fed methyl mercury and orally dosed with parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Ludke, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    We found that mercury potentiated the toxicity and biochemical effects of parathion. Male Coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were fed a sublethal concentration of morsodren (4 ppm as methyl mercury) for 18 weeks. This resulted in an accumulation of 21.0 ppm of mercury in the liver and 8.4 ppm in the carcass. Birds fed clean feed and those fed morsodren-treated feed were orally dosed with 2, 4, 6, 8,and 10 mg/kg parathion, and their 48-h survival times compared. The computed LD50 was 5.86mg/kg in birds not fed morsodren and 4.24 in those fed the heavy metal. When challenged with a sublethal, oral dose of parathion (1.0 mg/kg), morsodren-fed birds exhibited significantly greater inhibition of plasma and brain cholinesterase activity than controls dosed with parathion. Brain cholinesterase activity was inhibited 41% in morsodren-fed birds and 26in clean-fed birds dosed with parathion, which suggested that the increase in parathion toxicity in the presence of morsodren was directly related to the inhibitation of brain cholinesterase.

  20. Wanted: A Solid, Reliable PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses PC reliability, one of the most pressing issues regarding computers. Nearly a quarter century after the introduction of the first IBM PC and the outset of the personal computer revolution, PCs have largely become commodities, with little differentiating one brand from another in terms of capability and performance. Most of…

  1. NASA PC software evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Kuan, Julie C.

    1986-01-01

    The USL NASA PC software evaluation project is intended to provide a structured framework for facilitating the development of quality NASA PC software products. The project will assist NASA PC development staff to understand the characteristics and functions of NASA PC software products. Based on the results of the project teams' evaluations and recommendations, users can judge the reliability, usability, acceptability, maintainability and customizability of all the PC software products. The objective here is to provide initial, high-level specifications and guidelines for NASA PC software evaluation. The primary tasks to be addressed in this project are as follows: to gain a strong understanding of what software evaluation entails and how to organize a structured software evaluation process; to define a structured methodology for conducting the software evaluation process; to develop a set of PC software evaluation criteria and evaluation rating scales; and to conduct PC software evaluations in accordance with the identified methodology. Communication Packages, Network System Software, Graphics Support Software, Environment Management Software, General Utilities. This report represents one of the 72 attachment reports to the University of Southwestern Louisiana's Final Report on NASA Grant NGT-19-010-900. Accordingly, appropriate care should be taken in using this report out of context of the full Final Report.

  2. Lichenase and coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  3. Identification of a Marine Bacillus Strain C5 and Parathion-Methyl Degradation Characteristics of the Extracellular Esterase B1

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jianhua; Liu, Junzhong; Sun, Mi

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain C5 that can produce new type of marine esterase was isolated and screened from marine sludge. According to 16S rRNA sequence analysis and physiological and biochemical experiments, the strain was identified as Bacillus subtilis. A single isozyme with a molecular weight of 86 kDa was observed by SDS-PAGE and native-PAGE. On this basis, the mechanism of esterase B1 secreted by strain C5 degrading parathion-methyl was explored, and the effects of temperature and pH on the degradation rate were investigated. From the results, p-nitrophenol was one of the degradation products of B1 degrading parathion-methyl, and the best degradation effect could be achieved at the temperature of 40°C and the neutral pH value. PMID:25580438

  4. A simple and sensitive fluorescent sensor for methyl parathion based on L-tyrosine methyl ester functionalized carbon dots.

    PubMed

    Hou, Juying; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Haishuang; Teng, Xue; Ai, Shiyun; Mang, Minglin

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, a simple and sensitive fluorescent sensor for methyl parathion is developed based on L-tyrosine methyl ester functionalized carbon dots (Tyr-CDs) and tyrosinase system. The carbon dots are obtained by simple hydrothermal reaction using citric acid as carbon resource and L-tyrosine methyl ester as modification reagent. The carbon dots are characterized by transmission electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The carbon dots show strong and stable photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 3.8%. Tyrosinase can catalyze the oxidation of tyrosine methyl ester on the surface of carbon dots to corresponding quinone products, which can quench the fluorescence of carbon dots. When organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are introduced in system, they can decrease the enzyme activity, thus decrease the fluorescence quenching rate. Methyl parathion, as a model of OPs, was detected. Experimental results show that the enzyme inhibition rate is proportional to the logarithm of the methyl parathion concentration in the range 1.0×10(-10)-1.0×10(-4) M with the detection limit (S/N=3) of 4.8×10(-11) M. This determination method shows a low detection limit, wide linear range, good selectivity and high reproducibility. This sensing system has been successfully used for the analysis of cabbage, milk and fruit juice samples. PMID:25558870

  5. Covalent coupling of organophosphorus hydrolase loaded quantum dots to carbon nanotube/Au nanocomposite for enhanced detection of methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Du, Dan; Chen, Wenjuan; Zhang, Weiying; Liu, Deli; Li, Haibing; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    An amperometric biosensor for highly selective and sensitive determination of methyl parathion (MP) was developed based on dual-signal amplification: (1) a large amount of introduced enzyme on the electrode surface and (2) synergistic effects of nanoparticles towards enzymatic catalysis. The fabrication process includes (1) electrochemical deposition of gold nanoparticles by a multi-potential step technique at multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film pre-cast on a glassy carbon electrode and (2) immobilization of methyl parathion degrading enzyme (MPDE) onto a modified electrode through CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) covalent attachment. The introduced MWCNT and gold nanoparticles significantly increased the surface area and exhibited synergistic effects towards enzymatic catalysis. CdTe QDs are further used as carriers to load a large amount of enzyme. As a result of these two important enhancement factors, the proposed biosensor exhibited extremely sensitive, perfectly selective, and rapid response to methyl parathion in the absence of a mediator. The detection limit was 1.0 ng/mL. Moreover, since MPDE hydrolyzes pesticides containing the P-S bond, it showed high selectivity for detecting MP and many interfering compounds, such as carbamate pesticides. Other organophosphorous pesticides and oxygen-containing inorganic ions (SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-)) did not interfere with the determination. The proposed MPDE biosensor presents good reproducibility and stability, and the MPDE is not poisoned by organophosphate pesticides. Unlike cholinesterase-based biosensor, the MPDE biosensor can be potentially reused and is suitable for continuous monitoring. PMID:19926466

  6. Preparation of a magnetic metal organic framework composite and its application for the detection of methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Hu, LiPing; Wu, Nan; Zheng, Jing; Xu, JingLi; Zhang, Min; He, PinGang

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic metal organic framework (MOF) composite was prepared. The composite was fabricated by incorporation of Fe3O4 nanoparticals with MOF. It was characterized and expected to offer a promising template for molecular immobilization and sensor fabrication because of its ordered structure and satisfying large specific surface area. The resulting composite was used to detect methyl parathion. Electrochemical measurements showed that the multifunctional composite of MOF provided an excellent matrix for the co-adsorption of methyl parathion. Owing to the ordered structure, the large surface area, excellent compatibility and magnetic property of the material, methyl parathion could be separated, accumulated and directly detected in the solution with high sensitivity. The differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) response was proportional to the concentration range from 5.00 × 10(-6) to 5.00 × 10(-3) g L(-1) with the detection limit of 3.02 × 10(-6) g L(-1). The experimental results can lead to a widespread use of electrochemical sensors to detect organophosphorous pesticides contaminates and other substances. PMID:24919671

  7. Surface assembly of nano-metal organic framework on amine functionalized indium tin oxide substrate for impedimetric sensing of parathion.

    PubMed

    Deep, Akash; Bhardwaj, Sanjeev Kumar; Paul, A K; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-10-22

    The present paper reports the assembly and pesticide sensing application of a nanometal organic framework [Cd(atc)(H2O)2]n ('atc'=2-aminoterephthalic acid). The assembly of the NMOF film has been achieved by sequential dipping of a 2-aminobenzylamine (2-ABA) modified indium tin oxide (ITO) slide in organic linker 'atc' and metal ion 'Cd(2+)' solutions. The different structural and morphological characteristics of the NMOF thin film have been characterized. The availability of pendent -COOH functional groups on the assembled NMOF film is exploited to synthesize a pesticide immunosensor by conjugating the NMOF film with anti-parathion antibody. This immunosensor has been explored for the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) based analysis of parathion in the concentration range of 0.1-20ng/mL. The proposed detection is specific with respect to other organophosphate compounds, e.g. malathion, paraoxon, fenitrothion, monochrotophos and dichlorovos. The proposed sensor shows the detection limit of 0.1ng/mL and it is applicable for analysis of parathion in a rice sample. The sensor's performance is validated by comparting the obtained results with gas chromatographic data. PMID:25461162

  8. Effect of ionising radiation on polyphenolic content and antioxidant potential of parathion-treated sage (Salvia officinalis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Issam; Fekih, Sana; Sghaier, Haitham; Bousselmi, Mehrez; Saidi, Mouldi; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Fattouch, Sami

    2013-11-15

    The γ-irradiation effects on polyphenolic content and antioxidant capacity of parathion-pretreated leaves of Salvia officinalis plant were investigated. The analysis of phenolic extracts of sage without parathion showed that irradiation decreased polyphenolic content significantly (p<0.05) by 30% and 45% at 2 and 4kGy, respectively, compared to non-irradiated samples. The same trend was observed for the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), as assessed by the anionic DPPH and cationic ABTS radical-scavenging assays. The antioxidant potential decreased significantly (p<0.01) at 2 and 4kGy, by 11-20% and 40-44%, respectively. The results obtained with a pure chlorogenic acid solution confirmed the degradation of phenols; however, its TEAC was significantly (p<0.01) increased following irradiation. Degradation products of parathion formed by irradiation seem to protect against a decline of antioxidant capacity and reduce polyphenolic loss. Ionising radiation was found to be useful in breaking down pesticide residues without inducing significant losses in polyphenols. PMID:23790930

  9. Metabolism of carbaryl, chloropyrifos, DDT, and parathion in the European corn borer: effects of microsporidiosis on toxicity and detoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Tetreault, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the effects of microsporidiosis on an insect's response to insecticide intoxication. Healthy European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, larvae and those heavily infected with the microsporidian pathogen, Nosema pyrausta, were bioassayed with ten insecticides. The compounds used were carbaryl, carbofuran, chlorophrifos, DDT, diazinon, fonofos, methomyl, parathion, permethrin, and terbufos. Third instar larvae were used for topical bioassays. The compounds carbaryl, carbofuran, chlorophrifos, methomyl and terbufos were found to be significantly more toxic to diseased insects than healthy insects at the 0.05 probability level. To examine the effect of Nosema pyrausta infection on the European corn borer's ability to detoxify insecticides, /sup 14/C ring-labeled carbaryl, chlorophrifos, DDT, and parathion were topically applied to fourth instar larvae. Qualitative differences between healthy and diseased insects were found in the metabolic pathways of carbaryl, DDT, and parathion. The degradative fate of chlorophrifos was the same in both groups. Quantitatively, each insecticide penetrated diseased larvae faster. This resulted in larger amounts of the applied dose of parent compound and metabolites being found in the feces from diseased insects. Conversely, healthy insects had more of these materials present in the body and associated with the cuticle.

  10. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Parsons, Loren; Pope, Carey

    2013-11-01

    Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 6–7 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (89–90%) and CPF (78–83%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (88–91%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (35–50%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. • Functional signs were only noted with parathion. • Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. • 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were lesser affected. • The CB1 antagonist AM251 had no effect on chlorpyrifos but reduced parathion toxicity.

  11. Comparison of biosorption and phytoremediation of cadmium and methyl parathion, a case-study with live Lemna gibba and Lemna gibba powder.

    PubMed

    Halaimi, F Z; Kellali, Y; Couderchet, M; Semsari, S

    2014-07-01

    Heavy metals and pesticides can be adsorbed by several biomasses such as living or non-living aquatic plants. In this study adsorption properties of live Lemna gibba and Lemna gibba powder were investigated with regard to cadmium and methyl parathion (MP). Toxicity data (IC50) on live L. gibba indicated that the period of four days was adequate for phytoremediation. Initial adsorption studies showed that both adsorbents were capable of removing cadmium and methyl parathion. Cadmium and methyl parathion adsorption onto L. gibba powder was fast and equilibrium was attained within 120min. The adsorption data could be well interpreted by the Freundlich model. The KF were: 7.8963 (Cd(2+)/ live Lemna); 0.7300 (MP/live Lemna); 11.5813 (Cd(2+)/Lemna powder); 1.1852 (MP/Lemna powder) indicating that Cd(2+) was more efficiently removed by both biosorbents than MP. Adsorption kinetics for cadmium and methyl parathion in both systems and rate constants were determined for each contaminant. It was found that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. Boyd model and external mass-transfer expression were tested. It was concluded that cadmium and methyl parathion sorption onto Lemna powder is governed by film diffusion. PMID:24815048

  12. Pathway Controlled Penetration (PcP)

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Zubelewicz, Aleksander

    2012-08-29

    The technical approach employs advanced computational simulation tools to demonstrate how current assets can destroy RWK-RFI-12-0001's HDBT, a tunnel complex with two portals built into the base of a granite mountain. The granite over layer is assumed to be 60 meters thick over both portals and 80 meters over the facility's mission space. Key S&T is the completed development of a highly innovative viscoplastic fracture material model, 3D parallel gas-fracture capabilities into FDEM, and a stochastic handling of the material properties. Phase I - Develop and validate code simulation tools: (1) develop, incorporate and validate AZ-Frac material model for granite; and (2) Develop and incorporate gas-driven-fracture modeling into LANL's FDEM MUNROU code; (3) Develop and incorporate stochastic features into FDEM modeling. Phase II - Conduct PcP analysis on above HDBT: (1) Acquire HDBT design data, develop simulation model; and (2) Evaluate and select most promising defeat alternative. Phase III - Deliver code, train Service target analysts, and conduct simulations against real world HDBTs. PcP uses advanced computer simulations to enhance HDBT functional defeat efforts. Newly developed material models that account for fractural energy coupled with the finite discrete element methodology (FDEM) will provide targeting packages that will create penetration avenues for current or future lethality options. This novel computational approach requires full 3D geologic and structure characterization as well as significant high performance computing capabilities. The goal is to distinctively alter the targeting paradigm by leveraging critical DoD assets along with insitu geologic strata. In other words, assets will utilize underground rock structure to their benefit by creating rubbilization zones that will allow pathway controlled penetration.

  13. A STUDY OF THE BINDING OF SULFUR TO RAT LIVER MICROSOMES WHICH OCCURS CONCURRENTLY WITH THE METABOLISM OF O,O-DIETHYL O-P-NITROPHENYL PHOSPHOROTHIOATE (PARATHION) TO O,O-DIETHYL O-P-NITROPHENYL PHOSPHATE (PARAOXON)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to investigate the nature of the sulfur that is bound to liver microsomes concurrently with the metabolism of parathion to paraoxon, an isolated rat liver microsomal preparation was labeled with (35S) parathion and the purified product was examined by chemical degradatio...

  14. USL/DBMS NASA/PC R and D project C programming standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Moreau, Dennis R.

    1984-01-01

    A set of programming standards intended to promote reliability, readability, and portability of C programs written for PC research and development projects is established. These standards must be adhered to except where reasons for deviation are clearly identified and approved by the PC team. Any approved deviation from these standards must also be clearly documented in the pertinent source code.

  15. Acute disturbance of calcium homeostasis in PC12 cells as a novel mechanism of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Hamers, Timo; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-07-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) and carbamates are widely used insecticides that exert their neurotoxicity via inhibition of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and subsequent overexcitation. OPs can induce additional neurotoxic effects at concentrations below those for inhibition of AChE, indicating other mechanisms of action are also involved. Since tight regulation of the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) is essential for proper neuronal development and function, effects of one carbamate (carbaryl) and two OPs (chlorpyrifos, parathion-ethyl) as well as their -oxon metabolites on [Ca(2+)]i were investigated. Effects of acute (20min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were measured in fura-2-loaded PC12 cells using single-cell fluorescence microscopy. Acute exposure to chlorpyrifos and its metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i. More importantly, the tested OPs concentration-dependently inhibited depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i. Chlorpyrifos already induced a ∼30% inhibition at 0.1μM and a 100% inhibition at 10μM (IC50=0.43μM), whereas parathion-ethyl inhibited the depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i increase with ∼70% at 10μM. Interestingly, -oxon metabolites were more potent inhibitors of AChE, but were less potent inhibitors of depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i compared to their parent compound (chlorpyrifos-oxon) or were even without effect (paraoxon-ethyl and -methyl). Similarly, acute exposure to carbaryl had no effect on [Ca(2+)]i. Exposure to mixtures of chlorpyrifos with its oxon-analog or with parathion-ethyl did not increase the degree of inhibition, indicating additivity does not apply. These data demonstrate that concentration-dependent inhibition of depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i is a novel mechanism of action of (sub)micromolar concentrations of OPs that could partly underlie OP-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:24495583

  16. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of lindane, carbofuran and methyl parathion on various Indian soils.

    PubMed

    Rama Krishna, K; Philip, Ligy

    2008-12-30

    Adsorption and desorption characteristics of three insecticides on four Indian soils were studied. Insecticides used were representative of organochlorine, organophosphate, and carbomate groups. The order of adsorption of pesticides on soils was: lindane>methyl parathion>carbofuran. Compost soil had shown the maximum adsorption capacity. The order of adsorption capacity of various soils were: compost soil>clayey soil>red soil>sandy soil. Adsorption isotherms were better fitted to Freundlich model and Kf values increased with increase in organic matter content of the soils. Thermodynamic parameters indicated favorable adsorption of all the three pesticides in four different soils. Adsorption was exothermic in nature. Distilled water desorbed 30-60% of adsorbed pesticides whereas; organic solvents were able to affect 50-80% of sorbed pesticides. Clay content and organic matter played a significant role in pesticide adsorption and desorption processes. Hysteresis effect was observed in red, clayey and compost soils. Hysteresis effect increased with increase in organic matter and clay content of the soils. PMID:18455300

  17. Reclassification of a parathione-degrading Flavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551 as Sphingobium fuliginis.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Yoon, Jaewoo; Yokota, Akira

    2010-06-01

    A parathione-degrading bacterium isolated from rice field in the Philippines, Flavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551 (Sethunathan and Yoshida, 1973, Can. J. Microbiol., 19, 873-875), was re-examined chemotaxonomically and phylogenetically. The strain contained 2-hydroxymyristic acid (2-OH 14 : 0), cis-vaccenic acid (18 : 1 omega7c), and palmitic acid (16 : 0) as major cellular fatty acids, two kinds of glycosphingolipids, and ubiquinone-10 as a sole quinone component. The G+C content of genomic DNA of the strain was 65.9 mol%. The phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the strain was included in the family Sphingomonadaceae, and most closely related to Sphingobium fuliginis (98.0% similarity) and Sphingobium herbicidovorans (97.3%). The strain showed similar physiological characteristics and a moderate value of DNA-DNA relatedness to S. fuliginis. These data suggested it reasonable to conclude that strain ATCC 27551 was identified as S. fuliginis. PMID:20647682

  18. Long-term neurobehavioral health effects of methyl parathion exposure in children in Mississippi and Ohio.

    PubMed Central

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Kakolewski, Kirsten; Bove, Frank J; Kaye, Wendy E

    2004-01-01

    Methyl parathion (MP), an organophosphate pesticide licensed only for agricultural uses, was sprayed illegally for pest control in Mississippi and Ohio residences. To evaluate the association between MP exposure and neurobehavioral development, we assessed children 6 years or younger at the time of the spraying and local comparison groups of unexposed children using the Pediatric Environmental Neurobehavioral Test Battery (PENTB). The PENTB is composed of informant-based procedures (parent interview and questionnaires) and performance-based procedures (neurobehavioral tests for children 4 years or older) that evaluate cognitive, motor, sensory, and affect domains essential to neurobehavioral assessment. Children were classified as exposed or unexposed on the basis of urinary para-nitrophenol levels and environmental wipe samples for MP. Exposed children had more difficulties with tasks involving short-term memory and attention. Additionally, parents of exposed children reported that their children had more behavioral and motor skill problems than did parents of unexposed children. However, these effects were not consistently seen at both sites. There were no differences between exposed and unexposed children in tests for general intelligence, the integration of visual and motor skills, and multistep processing. Our findings suggest that MP might be associated with subtle changes to short-term memory and attention and contribute to problems with motor skills and some behaviors, but the results of the study are not conclusive. PMID:14698930

  19. A novel fluorescence probing strategy for the determination of parathion-methyl.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu; Li, Hongxia; Wang, Xinyan; Su, Xingguang

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive fluorescence probing strategy for parathion-methyl (PM) detection was developed based on electron transfer (ET) between p-nitrophenol (the hydrolysate of PM) and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). PM was hydrolyzed by organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) to form p-nitrophenol. P-nitrophenol is a typically electron-deficient compound due to the strong electron-withdrawing effect of the nitro groups. The positive charge of CTAB which make it assemble with electronegative mercaptopropionic acid-capped QDs, could be used as an absorbent for p-nitrophenol due to the strong hydrophobic interaction between the long alkyl chain of CTAB and aromatic ring of p-nitrophenol. Thus, the fluorescence intensity of CdTe QDs/CTAB probe could be quenched by p-nitrophenol due to the ET mechanism. The fluorescence intensity of the QD/CTAB system was proportional to PM concentration in the range of 25-3000 ng mL(-1), with a detection limit of 18 ng mL(-1). Furthermore, the proposed method was simple in design and fast in operation, and has been successfully used for PM detection in environmental and agricultural samples with satisfactory recovery. PMID:25281077

  20. Kinetic analysis of the hydrolysis of methyl parathion using citrate-stabilized 10 nm gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nita, Rafaela; Trammell, Scott A; Ellis, Gregory A; Moore, Martin H; Soto, Carissa M; Leary, Dagmar H; Fontana, Jake; Talebzadeh, Somayeh F; Knight, D Andrew

    2016-02-01

    "Ligand-free" citrate-stabilized 10 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) promote the hydrolysis of the thiophosphate ester methyl parathion (MeP) on the surface of gold as a function of pH and two temperature values. At 50 °C, the active surface gold atoms show catalytic turnover ∼4 times after 8 h and little turnover of gold surface atoms at 25 °C with only 40% of the total atoms being active. From Michaelis-Menten analysis, k(cat) increases between pH 8 and 9 and decreases above pH 9. A global analysis of the spectral changes confirmed the stoichiometric reaction at 25 °C and the catalytic reaction at 50 °C and mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of p-nitrophenolate (PNP) product. Additional decomposition pathways involving oxidation and hydrolysis independent of the formation of PNP were also seen at 50 °C for both catalyzed and un-catalyzed reactions. This work represents the first kinetic analysis of ligand-free AuNP catalyzed hydrolysis of a thiophosphate ester. PMID:26547026

  1. Determination of methyl parathion in water and its removal on zirconia using optical enzyme assay.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Kanchanmala; Mishra, Rupesh K; Bhand, Sunil

    2011-07-01

    A simple, miniaturized microplate chemiluminescence assay for determination of methyl parathion (MP) was developed in 384-microwell plates. Zirconia (ZrO(2)) was added in microwell for adsorption of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The developed assay is based on inhibition of AChE by MP. A good dynamic range 0.008-1,000 ng/mL was obtained for MP with limit of detection 0.008 ng/mL. Intrabatch and interbatch reproducibility for miniaturized assay was obtained with % RSD up to 3.07 and 5.66, respectively. In 384 well plate formats, 70 samples were simultaneously analyzed within 20 min with assay volume of 41.5 μL. The application of developed assay was extended for MP remediation. Column containing ZrO(2) was utilized for remediation where MP was selectively adsorbed. Under optimized condition, adsorption of MP on ZrO(2) was found to be 98-99% with 2-h contact time in real water samples. Adsorption of MP on ZrO(2) column followed by quantification using developed bioassay provides a novel approach to monitor remediation. The applicability of assay was successfully extended for determination of MP in water samples after removal through ZrO(2). PMID:21286943

  2. ICAN - INTEGRATED COMPOSITE ANALYZER (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) is a computer program designed to carry out a comprehensive linear analysis of multilayered fiber composites. The analysis contains the essential features required to effectively design structural components made from fiber composites. ICAN includes the micromechanical design features of the Intraply Hybrid Composite Design (INHYD) program to predict ply level hygral, thermal, and mechanical properties. The laminate analysis features of the Multilayered Filamentary Composite Analysis (MFCA) program are included to account for interply layer effects. ICAN integrates these and additional features to provide a comprehensive analysis capability for composite structures. Additional features unique to ICAN include the following: 1) ply stress-strain influence coefficients, 2) microstresses and microstrain influence coefficients, 3) concentration factors around a circular hole, 4) calculation of probable delamination locations around a circular hole, 5) Poisson's ratio mismatch details near a straight edge, 6) free-edge stresses, 7) material card input for finite element analysis using NASTRAN (available separately from COSMIC) or MARC, 8) failure loads based on maximum stress criterion, and laminate failure stresses based on first-ply failures and fiber breakage criteria, 9) transverse shear stresses, normal and interlaminar stresses, and 10) durability/fatigue type analyses for thermal as well as mechanical cyclic loads. The code can currently assess degradation due to mechanical and thermal cyclic loads with or without a defect. ICAN includes a dedicated data bank of constituent material properties, and allows the user to build a database of material properties of commonly used fibers and matrices so the user need only specify code names for constituents. Input to ICAN includes constituent material properties (or code names), factors reflecting the fabrication process, and composite geometry. ICAN performs micromechanics, macromechanics, and laminate analysis including the hygrothermal response of fiber composites. ICAN output includes the various ply and composite properties, composite structural response, and composite stress analysis results with details of failure. Output can be tailored to specific needs by choosing the appropriate options. Two machine versions of ICAN are available. The IBM 370 series version (LEW-14468) is written in FORTRAN IV for the IBM 370 series computers running OS/TSS. The IBM PC version (LEW-15592) is written in FORTRAN 77 for use on the IBM PC series computers running MS-DOS and Microsoft FORTRAN 5.1. The IBM 370 version requires 3.5Mb of memory for execution. No sample executable is provided. For the IBM PC version, a sample executable, along with sample input and output data, is included on the distribution medium. Although the included executable requires a math coprocessor, the ICAN source can be recompiled into an executable which does not require a math coprocessor. The standard distribution medium for the IBM 370 version of ICAN is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in EBCDIC CARD IMAGE format. The standard distribution medium for the IBM PC version is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. ICAN was developed in 1986 and the IBM PC version was released in 1992.

  3. Characterization of a fenpropathrin-degrading strain and construction of a genetically engineered microorganism for simultaneous degradation of methyl parathion and fenpropathrin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yuanfan; Zhou, Jin; Hong, Qing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Jiandong; Li, Shunpeng

    2010-11-01

    A gram-negative fenpropathrin-degrading bacterial strain Sphingobium sp. JQL4-5 was isolated from the wastewater treatment sludge of an insecticide factory. Strain JQL4-5 showed the ability to degrade other pyrethroid insecticides, but it was not able to degrade methyl parathion. To enhance its degrading range of substrate, a methyl parathion hydrolase gene (mpd) was successfully introduced into the chromosome of strain JQL4-5 with a mini-Tn-transposon system. A genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) named JQL4-5-mpd resulted, which was capable of simultaneously degrading methyl parathion and fenpropathrin. Soil treatment results indicated that JQL4-5-mpd is a promising multifunctional bacterium in the bioremediation of multiple pesticide-contaminated environments. PMID:20624669

  4. Comparative analyses of genotoxicity, oxidative stress and antioxidative defence system under exposure of methyl parathion and hexaconazole in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Dubey, Pragyan; Mishra, Amit Kumar; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the comparative effects of methyl parathion and hexaconazole on genotoxicity, oxidative stress, antioxidative defence system and photosynthetic pigments in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. variety karan-16). The seeds were exposed with three different concentrations, i.e. 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 % for 6 h after three pre-soaking durations 7, 17 and 27 h which represents G1, S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, respectively. Ethyl methane sulphonate, a well-known mutagenic agent and double distilled water, was used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The results indicate significant decrease in mitotic index with increasing concentrations of pesticides, and the extent was higher in methyl parathion. Chromosomal aberrations were found more frequent in methyl parathion than hexaconazole as compared to their respective controls. Treatment with the pesticides induced oxidative stress which was evident with higher contents of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation, and the increase was more prominent in methyl parathion. Contents of total phenolics were increased; however, soluble protein content showed a reverse trend. Among the enzymatic antioxidants, activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were significantly up-regulated, and more increase was noticed in hexaconazole. Increments in total chlorophyll and carotenoid contents were observed up to 0.1 % but decreased at higher concentration (0.5 %), and the reductions were more prominent in methyl parathion than hexaconazole as compared to their respective controls. Methyl parathion treatment caused more damage in the plant cells of barley as compared to hexaconazole, which may be closely related to higher genotoxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:26286802

  5. Stop PC-aids from spreading through your PCAn early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uniyal, Parashu R.; Manglik, A.

    1993-02-01

    A new software system is presented that runs in an IBM PC/DOS environment immediately after the booting up stage, and provides an effective early warning of an infection by a virus. The system identifies all the users of a PC by their names, passwords, and booking codes. An authentication program performs characteristic diagnostic tests for the presence of boot and file viruses in addition to ensuring that access is provided only to authorized users. A record of login-logout times and results of viral diagnostics is appended to a log file. If there was a viral infection during a user session, access is denied at the time of next login with a display of the report on the last session. Thus corrective measures are prompted not only on the infected fixed disk, but also on that unwary user's floppies. The system includes programs that facilitate recovery from infection by viruses that are unknown to existing commercial scanners and therapy programs at an installation. The system has been effective in keeping the size of the virus epidemic under control at an installation with a minimum sacrifice of the comforts that a PC/DOS combination offers.

  6. D2PC sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.P.

    1992-08-01

    The Chemical Hazard Prediction Model (D2PC) developed by the US Army will play a critical role in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program by predicting chemical agent transport and dispersion through the atmosphere after an accidental release. To aid in the analysis of the output calculated by D2PC, this sensitivity analysis was conducted to provide information on model response to a variety of input parameters. The sensitivity analysis focused on six accidental release scenarios involving chemical agents VX, GB, and HD (sulfur mustard). Two categories, corresponding to conservative most likely and worst case meteorological conditions, provided the reference for standard input values. D2PC displayed a wide variety of sensitivity to the various input parameters. The model displayed the greatest overall sensitivity to wind speed, mixing height, and breathing rate. For other input parameters, sensitivity was mixed but generally lower. Sensitivity varied not only with parameter, but also over the range of values input for a single parameter. This information on model response can provide useful data for interpreting D2PC output.

  7. Computer (PC/Network) Coordinator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 22 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer (PC/network) coordinator, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 22 units are as…

  8. A rat mammary tumor model induced by the organophosphorous pesticides parathion and malathion, possibly through acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, G; Valenzuela, M; Vilaxa, A; Durán, V; Rudolph, I; Hrepic, N; Calaf, G

    2001-01-01

    Environmental chemicals may be involved in the etiology of breast cancers. Many studies have addressed the association between cancer in humans and agricultural pesticide exposure. Organophosphorous pesticides have been used extensively to control mosquito plagues. Parathion and malathion are organophosphorous pesticides extensively used to control a wide range of sucking and chewing pests of field crops, fruits, and vegetables. They have many structural similarities with naturally occurring compounds, and their primary target of action in insects is the nervous system; they inhibit the release of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase at the synaptic junction. Eserine, parathion, and malathion are cholinesterase inhibitors responsible for the hydrolysis of body choline esters, including acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses. Atropine, a parasympatholytic alkaloid, is used as an antidote to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. The aim of this study was to examine whether pesticides were able to induce malignant transformation of the rat mammary gland and to determine whether alterations induced by these substances increase the cholinergic activation influencing such transformation. These results showed that eserine, parathion, and malathion increased cell proliferation of terminal end buds of the 44-day-old mammary gland of rats, followed by formation of 8.6, 14.3, and 24.3% of mammary carcinomas, respectively, after about 28 months. At the same time, acetylcholinesterase activity decreased in the serum of these animals from 9.78 +/- 0.78 U/mL in the control animals to 3.05 +/- 0.06 U/mL; 2.57 +/- 0.15 U/mL; and 3.88 +/- 0.44 U/mL in the eserine-, parathion-, and malathion-treated groups, respectively. However, atropine alone induced a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the acetylcholinesterase activity from the control value of 9.78 +/- 0.78 to 4.38 +/- 0.10 for atropine alone, to 1.32 +/- 0.06 for atropine in combination with eserine, and 2.39 +/- 0.29 for atropine with malathion, and there was no mammary tumor formation. These results indicate that organophosphorous pesticides induce changes in the epithelium of mammary gland influencing the process of carcinogenesis, and such alterations occur at the level of nervous system by increasing the cholinergic stimulation. PMID:11401758

  9. Methyl-parathion decreases sperm function and fertilization capacity after targeting spermatocytes and maturing spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-Guzman, Belem; Sanchez-Gutierrez, M.; Marchetti, Francesco; Hernandez-Ochoa, I.; Solis-Heredia, M.J .; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

    2009-05-03

    Paternal germline exposure to organophosphorous pesticides (OP) has been associated with reproductive failures and adverse effects in the offspring. Methyl parathion (Me-Pa), a worldwide-used OP, has reproductive adverse effects and is genotoxic to sperm. Oxidative damage has been involved in the genotoxic and reproductive effects of OP. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Me-Pa on spermatozoa function and ability to fertilize. Male mice were exposed to Me-Pa (20 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and spermatozoa from epididymis-vas deferens were collected at 7 or 28 days post-treatment (dpt) to assess the effects on maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes, respectively. DNA damage was evaluated by nick translation (NT-positive cells) and SCSA (percentDFI); lipoperoxidation (LPO) by malondialdehyde production; sperm function by spontaneous- and induced-acrosome reactions (AR); mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by using the JC-1 flurochrome; and, fertilization ability by an in vitro assay and in vivo mating. Results showed alterations in DNA integrity (percentDFI and NT-positive cells) at 7 and 28 dpt, in addition to decreased sperm quality and a decrease in induced-AR; reduced MMP and LPO was observed only at 7 dpt. We found negative correlations between LPO and all sperm alterations. Altered sperm functional parameters were associated with reduced fertilization rates at both times, evaluated either in vitro or in vivo. These results show that Me-Pa exposure of maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes affects many sperm functional parameters that result in a decreased fertilizing capacity. Oxidative stress seems to be a likely mechanism ofthe detrimental effects of Me-Pa in male germ cells.

  10. Genetic damage caused by methyl-parathion in mouse spermatozoa is related to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-Guzman, B.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Rojas-Garcia, A.E.; Uriostegui-Acosta, M.; Quintanilla-Vega, B. . E-mail: mquintan@cinvestav.mx

    2006-10-15

    Organophosphorous (OP) pesticides are considered genotoxic mainly to somatic cells, but results are not conclusive. Few studies have reported OP alterations on sperm chromatin and DNA, and oxidative stress has been related to their toxicity. Sperm cells are very sensitive to oxidative damage which has been associated with reproductive dysfunctions. We evaluated the effects of methyl-parathion (Me-Pa; a widely used OP) on sperm DNA, exploring the sensitive stage(s) of spermatogenesis and the relationship with oxidative stress. Male mice (10-12-weeks old) were administered Me-Pa (3-20 mg/kg bw/i.p.) and euthanized at 7- or 28-days post-treatment. Mature spermatozoa were obtained and evaluated for chromatin structure through SCSA (Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay; DNA Fragmentation Index parameters: Mean DFI and DFI%) and chromomycin-A{sub 3} (CMA{sub 3})-staining, for DNA damage through in situ-nick translation (NT-positive) and for oxidative stress through lipid peroxidation (LPO; malondialdehyde production). At 7-days post-treatment (mature spermatozoa when Me-Pa exposure), dose-dependent alterations in chromatin structure (Mean DFI and CMA{sub 3}-staining) were observed, as well as increased DNA damage, from 2-5-fold in DFI% and NT-positive cells. Chromatin alterations and DNA damage were also observed at 28-days post-treatment (cells at meiosis at the time of exposure); suggesting that the damage induced in spermatocytes was not repaired. Positive correlations were observed between LPO and sperm DNA-related parameters. These data suggest that oxidative stress is related to Me-Pa alterations on sperm DNA integrity and cells at meiosis (28-days post-treatment) and epididymal maturation (7-days post-treatment) are Me-Pa targets. These findings suggest a potential risk of Me-Pa to the offspring after transmission.

  11. Urinary p-nitrophenol as a biomarker of household exposure to methyl parathion.

    PubMed Central

    Hryhorczuk, Daniel O; Moomey, Mike; Burton, Ann; Runkle, Ken; Chen, Edwin; Saxer, Tiffanie; Slightom, Jennifer; Dimos, John; McCann, Ken; Barr, Dana

    2002-01-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is an organophosphate pesticide illegally applied to the interiors of many hundreds of homes throughout the United States by unlicensed pesticide applicators. Public health authorities developed a protocol for investigating contaminated homes and classifying their need for public health interventions. This protocol included environmental screening for MP contamination and 1-day biomonitoring (a.m. and p.m. spot urine samples) of household members for p-nitrophenol (PNP), a metabolite of MP. The variability of urinary PNP excretion under these exposure conditions was unknown. We collected a.m. and p.m. spot urine samples for 7 consecutive days from 75 individuals, who were members of 20 MP-contaminated households in the greater Chicago, Illinois, area, and analyzed them for PNP. We also assessed the ability of the 1-day sampling protocol to correctly classify exposed individuals and households according to their need for public health interventions, assuming that 1 week of sampling (14 urinary PNPs) represented their true exposure condition. The coefficient of variation of log urinary PNPs for individuals over the course of 7 days of a.m. and p.m. sampling averaged about 15%. Adjusting for urinary excretion of creatinine improved reproducibility of urinary PNPs among children but not among adults. The 1-day protocol correctly classified true risk category in 92% of individuals and 85% of households. The data contained in this study can be used to refine what is already a reasonable and effective approach to identifying MP-exposed households and determining the appropriate public health intervention. PMID:12634137

  12. Phenomenology of Pc(4380)+, Pc(4450)+ and related states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, T. J.

    2015-11-01

    The Pc(4380)+ and Pc(4450)+ states recently discovered at LHCb have masses close to several relevant thresholds, which suggests they can be described in terms of meson-baryon degrees of freedom. This article explores the phenomenology of these states, and their possible partners, from this point of view. Competing models can be distinguished by the masses of the neutral partners which have yet to be observed, and the existence or otherwise of further partners with different isospin, spin, and parity. Future experimental studies in different decay channels can also discriminate among models, using selection rules and algebraic relations among decays. Among the several possible meson-baryon pairs which could be important, one implies that the states are mixtures of isospins 1/2 and 3/2, with characteristic signatures in production and decay. A previous experimental study of a Cabibbo-suppressed decay showed no evidence for the states, and further analysis is required to establish the significance of this non-observation. Several intriguing similarities suggest that Pc(4450)+ is related to the X(3872) meson.

  13. PC-based PCM telemetry data reduction system software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, D. A.

    1990-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Program is using pulse code modulation (PCM) telemetry systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. SERI has developed a low-cost PC-based PCM data-acquisition system to facilitate quick PCM data analysis in the field. The SERI PC-PCM system consists of AT-compatible hardware boards for decoding and combining PCM data streams and DOS software for control and management of data acquisition. Up to four boards can be installed in a single PC, providing the capability to combine data from four PCM streams direct to disk or memory. This paper describes the SERI Quick-Look Data Management Program, which is a comprehensive software package used to organize, acquire, process, and display information from PCM data streams. The software was designed for use in conjunction with SERI's PC-PCM hardware described in a related paper. Features of the Quick-Look program are highlighted, including those which make it useful in an experiment test environment to quickly examine and verify incoming data. Also discussed are problems and techniques associated with PC-based PCM data acquisition, processing, and real-time display.

  14. Effects of the organophosphate insecticides diazinon and parathion on bobwhite quail embryos: skeletal defects and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Meneely, G A; Wyttenbach, C R

    1989-10-01

    Bobwhite quail eggs were injected at 48 or 72 hr of incubation with various doses of the organophosphate (OP) insecticides diazinon or parathion and the embryos were examined after an additional 48 hr of incubation by both histological and cartilage-staining methods. Bobwhite embryos did not display the notochordal folding or vascular enlargement reported for OP-injected chicken embryos. Cartilage staining of embryos injected with insecticide at 72 hr of incubation and recovered at day 12 of incubation revealed severe shortening and contortion of the vertebral axis, as well as tibiotarsal, rib, and sternum defects. Parathion was more potent in causing skeletal defects than diazinon. No type I defects (micromelia, parrot beak) were detected. Radiometric acetylcholinesterase (AChE) assays of whole embryo homogenates were performed for day 6, 9, and 12 diazinon-injected and control embryos. Diazinon effected drastic reductions in AChE activity. Although the AChE and axial skeletal responses of bobwhite embryos to OP injection are similar to those reported in the literature for other species, some major differences in the bobwhite response were noted: namely, the absence of notochordal folding in the young bobwhite embryo and the absence of type I defects at day 12. These differences suggest that further studies with the bobwhite quail would be useful in clarifying the mechanisms involved in OP-induced teratogenesis. PMID:2809535

  15. Genetically modified microorganism Spingomonas paucimobilis UT26 for simultaneously degradation of methyl-parathion and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen S; Lu, Ti K; Qin, Zhi F; Shi, Xiu J; Wang, Jin J; Hu, Yun F; Chen, Bin; Zhu, Yi H; Liu, Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Bioremediation of pesticide residues by bacteria is an efficient and environmentally friendly method to deal with environmental pollution. In this study, a genetically modified microorganism (GMM) named UT26XEGM was constructed by introducing a parathion hydrolase gene into an initially γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) degrading bacterium Spingomonas paucimobilis UT26. In order to reduce its potential risk of gene escaping into the environment for the public concern on biosafety, a suicide system was also designed that did not interfere with the performance of the GMM until its physiological function was activated by specific signal. The system was designed with circuiting suicide cassettes consisting of killing genes gef and ecoRIR from Escherichia coli controlled by Pm promoter and the xylS gene. The cell viability and original degradation characteristics were not affected by the insertion of exogenous genes. The novel GMM was capable of degrading methyl-parathion and γ-HCH simultaneously. In laboratory scale testing, the recombinant bacteria were successfully applied to the bioremediation of mixed pesticide residues with the activity of self-destruction after 3-methylbenzoate induction. PMID:24648032

  16. Environmentally-friendly in situ plated bismuth-film electrode for the quantification of the endocrine disruptor parathion in skimmed milk.

    PubMed

    Gerent, Giles G; Spinelli, Almir

    2016-05-01

    An in situ bismuth-film electrode (BiFE) together with square-wave cathodic voltammetry (SWCV) was used to determine the concentration of the endocrine disruptor parathion in skimmed milk. The experimental conditions (deposition time, deposition potential and Bi (III) concentration) were optimized for the preparation of the BiFE. A glassy carbon electrode was used as the substrate. The selection of the chemical composition of the supporting electrolyte and the solution pH was aimed at improving the reduction of parathion at the BiFE surface. In addition, the parameters of the square-wave cathodic voltammetry were adjusted to improve the sensor performance. A cathodic current identified at -0.523V increased linearly with the parathion concentration in the range of 0.2-2.0μmolL(-1) (R=0.999). The sensitivity of the calibration curve obtained was 4.09μALμmol(-1), and the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 55.7nmolL(-1) and 169.0 nmolL(-1), respectively. The performance of the sensor was tested using a sample of skimmed milk with parathion added. The same determination was carried out by UV-vis spectroscopy and the results obtained were used for the statistical evaluation of the data obtained. PMID:26812083

  17. Analysis of trifluralin, methyl paraoxon, methyl parathion, fenvalerate and 2,4-D dimethylamine in pond water using solid-phase extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swineford, D.M.; Belisle, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous extraction of trifluralin, methyl paraoxon, methyl parathion, fenvalerate, and 2,4-D dimethylamine salt in pond water using a solid-phase C18 column. After elution from the C18 column, the eluate was analyzed on a capillary gas chromatograph equipped with an electron-capture or flame photometric detector.

  18. METCAN-PC - METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites offer great potential for use in advanced aerospace structural applications. The realization of this potential however, requires concurrent developments in (1) a technology base for fabricating high temperature metal matrix composite structural components, (2) experimental techniques for measuring their thermal and mechanical characteristics, and (3) computational methods to predict their behavior. METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is a computer program developed to predict this behavior. METCAN can be used to computationally simulate the non-linear behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC), thus allowing the potential payoff for the specific application to be assessed. It provides a comprehensive analysis of composite thermal and mechanical performance. METCAN treats material nonlinearity at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level, where the behavior of each constituent is modeled accounting for time-temperature-stress dependence. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by making use of composite micromechanics and macromechanics. Factors which affect the behavior of the composite properties include the fabrication process variables, the fiber and matrix properties, the bonding between the fiber and matrix and/or the properties of the interphase between the fiber and matrix. The METCAN simulation is performed as point-wise analysis and produces composite properties which are readily incorporated into a finite element code to perform a global structural analysis. After the global structural analysis is performed, METCAN decomposes the composite properties back into the localized response at the various levels of the simulation. At this point the constituent properties are updated and the next iteration in the analysis is initiated. This cyclic procedure is referred to as the integrated approach to metal matrix composite analysis. METCAN-PC is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. An 80286 machine with an 80287 math co-processor is required for execution. The executable requires at least 640K of RAM and DOS 3.1 or higher. The package includes sample executables which were compiled under Microsoft FORTRAN v. 5.1. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. METCAN-PC was developed in 1992.

  19. PC-based Astronomical Image Processing with pcIPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, O. M.; Piskunov, N. E.

    Modern 486-based PCs are fast enough for many serious image processing applications, and inexpensive enough even for amateur astronomers. Our pcIPS image processing system runs on these platforms and satisfies a broad range of data analysis needs, while providing maximum expandability. It supports large format 1D and 2D images in any numeric type, from 8-bit integer to 64-bit floating point. pcIPS includes a set of visualization tools as part of an intuitive graphical user interface that employs buttons, pop-up menus, and a mouse. It is extremely expandable, because all of the image processing functionality is provided by external modules ( applications ), with new ones constantly being developed. The basic application package includes ones for elementary arithmetics and statistics, geometric transformations, and import/export of various data formats (FITS, plain ASCII, Photometrics, binary, GIF, etc.); specialized astronomy-oriented packages will be demonstrated. An API lets the user create his own applications in C and FORTRAN. The demo will show the latest version of the system, as well as some of its recently-created applications. The newest of them is a port of the DAOPHOTII stellar photometry program, and a Fourier analysis package. A CCD/Echelle processing package (location of echelle orders, geometric correction and extraction of orders, flat field correction, etc.) and a Spectral package (generation of dispersion curve, continuum fitting, wavelength calibration, multiple simultaneous line profile fits) will also be shown.

  20. Construction and Analysis of a Novel 2-D Optical Orthogonal Codes Based on Modified One-coincidence Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jianhua; Wang, Yanfen; Wang, Ke; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Zhipeng; Yang, Shuwen

    2013-09-01

    A new two-dimensional OOC (optical orthogonal codes) named PC/MOCS is constructed, using PC (prime code) for time spreading and MOCS (modified one-coincidence sequence) for wavelength hopping. Compared with PC/PC, the number of wavelengths for PC/MOCS is not limited to a prime number. Compared with PC/OCS, the length of MOCS need not be expanded to the same length of PC. PC/MOCS can be constructed flexibly, and also can use available wavelengths effectively. Theoretical analysis shows that PC/MOCS can reduce the bit error rate (BER) of OCDMA system, and can support more users than PC/PC and PC/OCS.

  1. PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

    2009-10-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

  2. PC Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-03-09

    PC-BLAS is a highly optimized version of the Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS), a standardized set of thirty-eight routines that perform low-level operations on vectors of numbers in single and double-precision real and complex arithmetic. Routines are included to find the index of the largest component of a vector, apply a Givens or modified Givens rotation, multiply a vector by a constant, determine the Euclidean length, perform a dot product, swap and copy vectors, andmore » find the norm of a vector. The BLAS have been carefully written to minimize numerical problems such as loss of precision and underflow and are designed so that the computation is independent of the interface with the calling program. This independence is achieved through judicious use of Assembly language macros. Interfaces are provided for Lahey Fortran 77, Microsoft Fortran 77, and Ryan-McFarland IBM Professional Fortran.« less

  3. Conversion from 8800 to 8800PC -- Evaluation and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Miner, A.E.; Lawson, B.J.

    1998-03-20

    Though a final version of the software is pending the 8800PC operating system host computer is a welcomed change from the old Digital (DEC) host computer. The 8800PC host computer uses the Windows NT operating system and has proven to be very user friendly. Descriptive window messages replace the cryptic coding of the DEC host. Though numerous electrical components were replaced, system calibration remained constant. Calibrated Thermoluminescent (TL) output from a randomly selected 8815 field card was measured before and after the upgrade. The % difference, when comparing calibrated output from an upgraded reader to the non upgraded reader, ranged from 0.2 to 3%. The most disappointing aspect of the upgrade experience was the lag time between hardware installation and software completion.

  4. Rotordynamics on the PC: Further Capabilities of ARDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Rotordynamics codes for personal computers are now becoming available. One of the most capable codes is Analysis of RotorDynamic Systems (ARDS) which uses the component mode synthesis method to analyze a system of up to 5 rotating shafts. ARDS was originally written for a mainframe computer but has been successfully ported to a PC; its basic capabilities for steady-state and transient analysis were reported in an earlier paper. Additional functions have now been added to the PC version of ARDS. These functions include: 1) Estimation of the peak response following blade loss without resorting to a full transient analysis; 2) Calculation of response sensitivity to input parameters; 3) Formulation of optimum rotor and damper designs to place critical speeds in desirable ranges or minimize bearing loads; 4) Production of Poincard plots so the presence of chaotic motion can be ascertained. ARDS produces printed and plotted output. The executable code uses the full array sizes of the mainframe version and fits on a high density floppy disc. Examples of all program capabilities are presented and discussed.

  5. PC-based fault finder

    SciTech Connect

    Bengiamin, N.N. ); Jensen, C.A. . Electrical Engineering Dept. Otter Tail Power Co., Fergus Falls, MN . System Protection Group); McMahon, H. )

    1993-07-01

    Electric utilities are continually pressed to stay competitive while meeting the increasing demand of today's sophisticated customer. Advances in electron equipment and the improved array of electric driven devices are setting new standards for improved reliability and quality of service. Besides the specifications on voltage and frequency regulation and the permitted harmonic content, to name a few, the number and duration of service interruptions have a dramatic direct effect on the customer. Accurate fault locating reduces transmission line patrolling and is of particular significance in repairing long lines in rough terrain. Shortened outage times, reduced equipment degrading and stress on the system, fast restored service, and improved revenue are immediate outcomes of fast fault locating which insure minimum loss of system security. This article focuses on a PC-based (DOS) computer program that has unique features for identifying the type of fault and its location on overhead transmission/distribution lines. Balanced and unbalanced faults are identified and located accurately while accounting for changes in conductor sizes and network configuration. The presented concepts and methodologies have been spurred by Otter Tail Power's need for an accurate fault locating scheme to accommodate multiple feeders with mixed lone configurations. A case study based on a section of the Otter Tail network is presented to illustrate the features and capabilities of the developed software.

  6. The Vital Function of Fe3O4@Au nanocomposites for Hydrolase Biosensor Design and Its Application in Detection of Methyl Parathion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yuting; Zhang, Weiying; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

    2013-02-04

    A nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorating a magnetic Fe3O4 core was synthesized using cysteamine (SH–NH2) as linker, and characterized by TEM, XPS, UV and electrochemistry. Then a hydrolase biosensor, based on self-assembly of methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) on the Fe3O4@Au nanocomposite, was developed for sensitive and selective detection of the organophosphorus pesticide (OP) methyl parathion. The magnetic nanocomposite provides an easy way to construct the enzyme biosensor by simply exerting an external magnetic field, and also provides a simple way to renew the electrode surface by removing the magnet. Unlike inhibition-based enzyme biosensors, the hydrolase is not poisoned by OPs and thus is reusable for continuous measurement. AuNPs not only provide a large surface area, high loading efficiency and fast electron transfer, but also stabilize the enzyme through electrostatic interactions. The MPH biosensor shows rapid response and high selectivity for detection of methyl parathion, with a linear range from 0.5 to 1000 ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL. It also shows acceptable reproducibility and stability. The simplicity and ease of operation of the proposed method has great potential for on-site detection of P–S containing pesticides and provides a promising strategy to construct a robust biosensor.

  7. Environmental pollutants parathion, paraquat and bisphenol A show distinct effects towards nuclear receptors-mediated induction of xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450 in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vrzal, Radim; Zenata, Ondrej; Doricakova, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2015-10-01

    Environmental pollutants parathion, bisphenol A and paraquat were not systematically studied towards the effects on the expression of phase I xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (CYPs). We monitored their effects on the expression of selected CYPs in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Moreover, we investigated their effects on the receptors regulating these CYPs, particularly arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by gene reporter assays. We found that parathion and bisphenol A are the activators of AhR. Moreover, they are the inducers of CYP1A1 mRNA in hepatoma cells HepG2 as well as in human hepatocytes by AhR-dependent mechanism via formation of AhR-DNA-binding complex, as revealed by gel shift assay. All three compounds possessed anti-glucocorticoid action as revealed by GR-dependent gene reporter assay and a decline in tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene expression in human hepatocytes. Moreover, parathion and bisphenol A are the activators of PXR and inducers of CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in the primary cultures of human hepatocytes. In conclusion, the studied compounds displayed distinct activities towards nuclear receptors involved in many biological processes and these findings may help us to better understand their adverse actions in pathological states followed after their exposure. PMID:26196221

  8. Fabrication of polymerized crystalline colloidal array thin film modified β-cyclodextrin polymer for paraoxon-ethyl and parathion-ethyl detection.

    PubMed

    Bui, Minh-Phuong N; Seo, Seong S

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an optical chemical sensor for the detection of organophosphate (OP) compounds using a polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) thin film composed of a close-packed colloidal array of polystyrene particles. The PCCA thin film was modified with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) polymer as a capping cavity for the selective detection of paraoxon-ethyl and parathion-ethyl chemical agents. The fabrication of the modified PCCA thin film was optimized and the structure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The arrangement of polystyrene particles in the PCCA follows a pattern of the fcc (111) planes with strong diffraction peak in the visible spectral region and pH dependence. The diffraction peak of the β-CD modified PCCA thin film showed a red shift according to the change of paraoxon-ethyl and parathion-ethyl concentrations at a fast response time (10 s) and high sensitivity with detection limits of 2.0 and 3.4 ppb, respectively. Furthermore, the proposed interaction mechanism of β-CD with paraoxon-ethyl and parathion-ethyl in the β-CD modified PCCA thin film were discussed. PMID:24813957

  9. Hydrogen bonds in PC61BM solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chun-Qi; Li, Wen-Jie; Du, Ying-Ying; Chen, Guang-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the hydrogen bonds in PC61BM solids. Inter-molecular interaction is analyzed theoretically for the well-defined monoclinic (P21/n) structure. The results indicate that PC61BM combines into C-H⋯Od bonded molecular chains, where Od denotes the doubly-bonded O atom of PC61BM. The molecular chains are linked together by C-H⋯Os bonds, where Os denotes the singly-bonded O atom of PC61BM. To reveal the consequences of hydrogen bond formation on the structural properties of PC61BM solids (not limited to the monoclinic structure), we design and perform some experiments for annealed samples with the monoclinic (P21/n) PC61BM as starting material. The experiments include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption measurements. Structural phase transitions are observed below the melting point. The C-H⋯Od bonds seem persisting in the altered structures. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonds can help to understand the phase separation in polymer/PC61BM blends and may be responsible for the existence of liquid PC61BM.

  10. Theoretical and experimental comparison of SnPc, PbPc, and CoPc adsorption on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, J. D.; Larsson, J. A.; Woolley, R. A. J.; Cong, Yan; Moriarty, P. J.; Cafolla, A. A.; Schulte, K.; Dhanak, V. R.

    2010-02-01

    A combination of normal-incidence x-ray standing-wave (NIXSW) spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density-functional theory (DFT) has been used to investigate the interaction of a number of phthalocyanine molecules (specifically, SnPc, PbPc, and CoPc) with the Ag(111) surface. The metal-surface distances predicted by the DFT calculations for SnPc/Ag(111) (2.48Å) and CoPc/Ag(111) (2.88Å) are in good agreement with our NIXSW experimental results for these systems ( 2.31±0.09 and 2.90±0.05Å , respectively). Good agreement is also found between calculated partial density-of-states plots and STM images of CoPc on Ag(111). Although the DFT and Pb4f NIXSW results for the Pb-Ag(111) distance are similarly in apparently good agreement, the Pb4f core-level data suggest that a chemical reaction between PbPc and Ag(111) occurs due to the annealing procedure used in our experiments and that the similarity of the DFT and Pb4f NIXSW values for the Pb-Ag(111) distance is likely to be fortuitous. We interpret the Pb4f XPS data as indicating that the Pb atom can detach from the PbPc molecule when it is adsorbed in the “Pb-down” position, leading to the formation of a Pb-Ag alloy and the concomitant reduction in Pb from a Pb2+ state (in bulklike films of PbPc) to Pb0 . In contrast to SnPc, neither PbPc nor CoPc forms a well-ordered monolayer on Ag(111) via the deposition and annealing procedures we have used. Our DFT calculations show that each of the phthalocyanine molecules donate charge to the silver surface, and that back donation from Ag to the metal atom (Co, Sn, or Pb) is only significant for CoPc.

  11. Down-regulation of muscarinic receptors and the m3 subtype in white-footed mice by dietary exposure to parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.; Hill, E.F.; Fernando, J.C.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of ad libitum dietary exposure (as occurs in the field) to parathion for 14 d was investigated on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in brains and submaxillary glands of adults of a field species, the white-footed mouse Peromyscus leucopus. Immunoprecipitation using subtype selective antibodies revealed that the relative ratios of the m1-m5 mAChR subtypes in Peromyscus brain were similar to those in rat brain. There was little variability in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in control mice brains but large variability in 39 exposed mice, resulting from differences in food ingestion and parathion metabolism. Accordingly, data on radioligand binding to mAChRs in each mouse brain were correlated with brain AChE activity in the same mouse, and AChE inhibition served as a biomarker of exposure reflecting in situ paraoxon concentrations. Exposure to parathion for 14 d reduced maximal binding (Bmax) of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB), [3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS), and [3H]-4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide ([3H]-4-DAMP) by up to approximately 58% without affecting receptor affinities for these ligands. Maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]QNB and [3H]-4-DAMP binding occurred in mice with highest AChE inhibition, while equivalent maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]NMS occurred in mice with only approximately 10% AChE inhibition, without further change at higher parathion doses. This is believed to be due to the hydrophilicity of [3H]NMS, which limits its accessibility to internalized desensitized receptors. In submaxillary glands (mAChRs are predominantly m3 subtype), there were significant dose-dependent reductions in [3H]QNB binding and m3 mRNA levels in exposed mice, revealed by Northern blot analyses. The reduction in m3 receptors is suggested to result mostly from reduced synthesis at the transcription level, rather than from translational or posttranslational events. The data suggest that down-regulation of mAChRs occurs after dietary exposure for 14 d to sublethal concentrations of parathion in a field rodent species, and that significant though incomplete recovery in AChE and mAChRs occurs in 7 d following termination of exposure.

  12. Comparison of the metabolism of parathion by a rat liver reconstituted mixed-function oxidase enzyme system and by a system containing cumene hydroperoxide and purified rat liver cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, S; Neal, R A

    1977-01-01

    The metabolism of parathion by a reconstituted mixed-function oxidase enzyme system (rat liver cytochrome P-450, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine, deoxycholate, and NADPH) or a cumene hydroperoxide system (cytochrome P-450, dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine, and cumene hydroperoxide) have been compared. The products formed on incubation of parathion with both systems were paraoxon, diethyl phosphorothioic acid, diethyl phosphoric acid, p-nitrophenol, and atomic sulfur. The apparent KM values for parathion for formation of paraoxon and diethyl phosphorothioic acid with the cumene hydroperoxide system were 55 and 39 X 10(-6) M, respectively. These KM values are not significantly different. When the reconstituted system was used, apparent KM values of 2.8 x 10(-6) M for formation of paraoxon and 3.9 x 10(-6) M for The formation of diethyl phosphorothioic acid and diethyl phosphoric acid were determined. These KM values are also not significantly different. covalent binding of the sulfur atom, released in the metabolism of parathion to paraoxon, to the proteins of the reconstituted system and to cytochrome P-450 of the cumene hydroperoxide system was also examined. With both the reconstituted system and the cumene hydroperoxide system approximately 65% of the sulfur released became bound to the proteins of these enzyme systems. The binding of the sulfur atome resulted in a progressive inhibition of the metabolism of parathion by these two systems. PMID:15813

  13. Screening for Developmental Neurotoxicity Using PC12 Cells: Comparisons of Organophosphates with a Carbamate, an Organochlorine, and Divalent Nickel

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; MacKillop, Emiko A.; Ryde, Ian T.; Tate, Charlotte A.; Seidler, Frederic J.

    2007-01-01

    Background In light of the large number of chemicals that are potential developmental neurotoxicants, there is a need to develop rapid screening techniques. Objectives We exposed undifferentiated and differentiating neuronotypic PC12 cells to different organophosphates (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, parathion), a carbamate (physostigmine), an organochlorine (dieldrin), and a metal (divalent nickel; Ni2+) and examined indices of cell replication and differentiation for both short- and long-term exposures. Results In undifferentiated cells, all the agents inhibited DNA synthesis, with the greatest effect for diazinon, but physostigmine eventually produced the largest deficits in the total number of cells after prolonged exposure. The onset of differentiation intensified the adverse effects on DNA synthesis and changed the rank order in keeping with a shift away from noncholinergic mechanisms and toward cholinergic mechanisms. Differentiation also worsened the effects of each agent on cell number after prolonged exposure, whereas cell growth was not suppressed, nor were there any effects on viability as assessed with trypan blue. Nevertheless, differentiating cells displayed signs of oxidative stress from all of the test compounds except Ni2+, as evidenced by measurements of lipid peroxidation. Finally, all of the toxicants shifted the transmitter fate of the cells away from the cholinergic phenotype and toward the catecholaminergic phenotype. Conclusions These studies point out the feasibility of developing cell-based screening methods that enable the detection of multiple end points that may relate to mechanisms associated with developmental neurotoxicity, revealing some common targets for disparate agents. PMID:17366826

  14. Regeneration of ethyl parathion antibodies for repeated use in immunosensor: a study on dissociation of antigens from antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kandimalla, V B; Neeta, N S; Karanth, N G; Thakur, M S; Roshini, K R; Rani, B E A; Pasha, A; Karanth, N G K

    2004-11-01

    Reliable analysis using an immunosensor strongly depends on the specificity, activity, and sensitivity of the antibody. Immobilization of antibody on the solid matrix enables its repeated use, for which it is required to dissociate the antigens and antigen-enzyme conjugate from the immobilized antibody matrix after each use and while doing so, a maximum retention of activity and specificity are crucial requirements. In the present investigation, on the development of an immunosensor for the organophosphorus pesticide ethyl parathion (EP) using EP antibodies, different dissociating agents such as organic solvents, detergents and acidic buffers, that is, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), Tween-20, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), methanol, chloroform, guanidium chloride (GdmCl), glycine-HCl (Gly-HCl) buffer in the pH range of 1.5-3.0, pierce buffer and combination of DMSO and methanol in phosphate buffer and Gly-HCl buffer and salts like NaCl and MgCl2 were used. Generally about 50-60% dissociation was obtained with some degree of denaturation of the antibody immobilized on the sepharose matrix. However, 1% DMSO in combination with 0.2 M Gly-HCl buffer at a pH of 2.3 showed 97% dissociation and the immobilized antibody retained sufficient activity to carry out 14 reproducible assays for EP. PMID:15522608

  15. Metabolic Engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for Complete Mineralization of Methyl Parathion and γ-Hexachlorocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Liu, Ruihua; Zuo, Zhenqiang; Che, You; Yu, Huilei; Song, Cunjiang; Yang, Chao

    2016-05-20

    Agricultural soils are often cocontaminated with multiple pesticides. Unfortunately, microorganisms isolated from natural environments do not possess the ability to simultaneously degrade different classes of pesticides. Currently, we can use the approaches of synthetic biology to create a strain endowed with various catabolic pathways that do not exist in a natural microorganism. Here, we describe the metabolic engineering of a biosafety Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 for complete mineralization of methyl parathion (MP) and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) by functional assembly of the MP and γ-HCH mineralization pathways. The engineered strain was genetically stable, and no growth inhibition was observed. Such a strain not only would reduce the toxicity of MP and γ-HCH but also would prevent the accumulation of potentially toxic intermediates in the environment. Furthermore, expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin improved the ability of the engineered strain to sequester O2. The inoculation of the engineered strain to soils treated with MP and γ-HCH resulted in a higher degradation rate than in noninoculated soils. Moreover, introduced GFP may be used to monitor the activity of the engineered strain during bioremediation. The engineered strain may be a promising candidate for in situ bioremediation of soil cocontaminated with MP and γ-HCH. PMID:26854500

  16. Methyl parathion imprinted polymer nanoshell coated on the magnetic nanocore for selective recognition and fast adsorption and separation in soils.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shiying; Guo, Changjuan; Li, Yongxian; Yu, Zerong; Wei, Chaohai; Tang, Youwen

    2014-01-15

    Core-shell magnetic methyl parathion (MP) imprinted polymers (Fe3O4@MPIPs) were fabricated by a layer-by-layer self-assembly process. In order to take full advantage of the synergistic effect of hydrogen-binding interactions and π-π accumulation between host and guest for molecular recognition, methacrylic acid and 4-vinyl pyridine were chosen as co-functional monomers and their optimal proportion were investigated. The core-shell and crystalline structure, morphology and magnetic properties of Fe3O4@MPIPs were characterized. The MP-imprinted nanoshell was almost uniform and about 100nm thick. Binding experiments demonstrated that Fe3O4@MPIPs possessed excellent binding properties, including high adsorption capacity and specific recognition, as well as fast adsorption kinetics and a fast phase separation rate. The equilibration adsorption capacity reached up to 9.1mg/g, which was 12 times higher than that of magnetic non-imprinted polymers, while adsorption reached equilibrium within 5min at a concentration of 0.2mmol/L. Furthermore, Fe3O4@MPIPs successfully provided selective separation and removal of MP in soils with a recovery and detection limit of 81.1-87.0% and 5.2ng/g, respectively. PMID:24275470

  17. Alteration of the kidney membrane proteome of Mizuhopecten yessoensis induced by low-level methyl parathion exposure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Huang, He-Qing

    2012-06-15

    Methyl parathion (MP) is a widely used organophosphorus pesticide that causes severe health and environmental effects. We investigated the alteration of the proteomic profile in the membrane enriched fraction of the kidneys of the scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis exposed to low-level MP. Gas chromatography analysis showed that MP residues were significantly accumulated in the kidneys and the digestive glands of the scallops. According to two-dimensional electrophoresis, 17 proteins were differentially modulated under MP exposure. The mRNA expressions of 12 differential proteins were analyzed using quantitative PCR, and 10 showed consistent alteration of mRNA level with that of protein expression level. Altered expressions of two proteins (mitochondrial processing peptidase and α-tubulin) were also examined using Western blotting, showing that the mitochondrial processing peptidase was down-regulated but α-tubulin remained unchanged in response to MP exposure. Subcellular locations of all the identified proteins that were predicted using bioinformatics tools indicate that few of them are permanently located in the membrane. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in several critical biological processes, and their relevance to human health has been illuminated. These data taken together have provided some novel insights into the chronic toxicity mechanism of MP and have suggested mitochondrial processing peptidase as a potential biomarker for human health and environmental monitoring. PMID:22446831

  18. Oxidative Stress, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity Induced by Methyl Parathion in Human Gingival Fibroblasts: Protective Role of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate.

    PubMed

    Argentin, Gabriella; Divizia, Maurizio; Cicchetti, Rosadele

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) compounds are pesticides frequently released into the environment because of extensive use in agriculture. Among these, methyl parathion (mPT) recently received attention as a consequence of illegal use. The predominant route of human exposure to mPT is via inhalation, but inadvertent consumption of contaminated foods and water may also occur. The goal of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of mPT on cells in the oral cavity and evaluate the potential protective role of epigallocathechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on these effects. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were exposed to 10, 50, or 100 μ g/ml mPT for 24 h and assessed for oxidative stress, as evidenced by reactive generation of oxygen species (ROS), induction of apoptotic cell death, DNA damage (comet assay and cytochinesis-block micronucleus test), and nitric oxide (NO) production. The results showed that mPT produced significant oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity and increased NO levels through stimulation of inducible NO synthase expression. Finally, data demonstrated that EGCG (10, 25, or 50 μ M) was able to inhibit the pesticide-induced effects on all parameters studied. Data indicate that cytotoxic and genotoxic effects may be associated with oxidative stress induced by mPT observed in HGF cultures and that EGCG plays a protective role via antioxidant activities. PMID:26479333

  19. A PC based computer program to aid the preparation of solvent systems for the HPLC.

    PubMed

    Rao, G N

    1991-01-01

    An interactive computer program, SOLCOMP, is developed which calculates the volumes of the components that are to be added to obtain either a fresh solvent mixture or a new solvent system from the old one of required composition. The code is implemented in MicroSoft FORTRAN and GWBASIC which runs on any IBM compatible PC under MSDOS environment. PMID:1914445

  20. A PC-based telemetry system for acquiring and reducing data from multiple PCM streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, D. A.; Butterfield, C. P.

    1991-07-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Program is using Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) Telemetry Data-Acquisition Systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. Many PCM systems are combined for use in test installations that require accurate measurements from a variety of different locations. SERI has found them ideal for data-acquisition from multiple wind turbines and meteorological towers in wind parks. A major problem has been in providing the capability to quickly combine and examine incoming data from multiple PCM sources in the field. To solve this problem, SERI has developed a low-cost PC-based PCM Telemetry Data-Reduction System (PC-PCM System) to facilitate quick, in-the-field multiple-channel data analysis. The PC-PCM System consists of two basic components. First, PC-compatible hardware boards are used to decode and combine multiple PCM data streams. Up to four hardware boards can be installed in a single PC, which provides the capability to combine data from four PCM streams directly to PC disk or memory. Each stream can have up to 62 data channels. Second, a software package written for use under DOS was developed to simplify data-acquisition control and management. The software, called the Quick-Look Data Management Program, provides a quick, easy-to-use interface between the PC and multiple PCM data streams. The Quick-Look Data Management Program is a comprehensive menu-driven package used to organize, acquire, process, and display information from incoming PCM data streams. The paper describes both hardware and software aspects of the SERI PC-PCM system, concentrating on features that make it useful in an experiment test environment to quickly examine and verify incoming data from multiple PCM streams. Also discussed are problems and techniques associated with PC-based telemetry data-acquisition, processing, and real-time display.

  1. [Functions of prion protein PrPc].

    PubMed

    Cazaubon, Sylvie; Viegas, Pedro; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier

    2007-01-01

    It is now well established that both normal and pathological (or scrapie) isoforms of prion protein, PrPc and PrPsc respectively, are involved in the development and progression of various forms of neurodegenerative diseases, including scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or "mad cow disease") and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in human, collectively known as prion diseases. The protein PrPc is highly expressed in the central nervous system in neurons and glial cells, and also present in non-brain cells, such as immune cells or epithelial and endothelial cells. Identification of the physiological functions of PrPc in these different cell types thus appears crucial for understanding the progression of prion diseases. Recent studies highlighted several major roles for PrPc that may be considered in two major domains : (1) cell survival (protection against oxidative stress and apoptosis) and (2) cell adhesion. In association with cell adhesion, distinct functions of PrPc were observed, depending on cell types : neuronal differentiation, epithelial and endothelial barrier integrity, transendothelial migration of monocytes, T cell activation. These observations suggest that PrPc functions may be particularly relevant to cellular stress, as well as inflammatory or infectious situations. PMID:17875293

  2. Management and transmission of DICOM files using PC to PC multicasting methodology.

    PubMed

    Kim, I K; Kwon, G B; Choi, W K; Cho, H; Kwak, Y S

    2001-01-01

    The PACS system built and used in hospitals nowadays has quite significant overload on its central server because of both treatment of very large data and full management of medical images. We suggest a distributed communication and management methodology using PC to PC multicasting strategy for efficient management of medical images produced by DICOM modalities. It is absolutely necessary for reducing strict degradation of PACS system due to large size of medical images and its very high transport rates. DICOM PC to PC component is composed a service manager to execute requested queries, a communication manager to take charge of file transmission, and a DICOM manager to manage stored data and system behavior. Each manager itself is a component to search for requested file by interaction or transmit the file to other PCs. Distributed management and transformation of medical information based on PC to PC multicasting methodology will enhance performance of central server and network capacity reducing overload on them. PMID:11604865

  3. Methyl parathion inhibits the nuclear maturation, decreases the cytoplasmic quality in oocytes and alters the developmental potential of embryos of Swiss albino mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Ramya; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Sneha Guruprasad; D'Souza, Antony Sylvan; Shetty, Pallavi K.; Mutalik, Srinivas; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2014-09-15

    Methyl parathion (MP) is one of the most commonly used and extremely toxic organophosphorous group of pesticide. A large number of studies in the literature suggest that it has adverse effects on the male reproductive system. However, there is limited information about its toxicity to the female reproductive system. In the present study we report the toxic effects of methyl parathion on the female reproductive system using Swiss albino mice as the experimental model. The female mice were administered orally with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of MP. One week later, the mice were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to study the quality of the oocytes, spindle organization, developmental potential of early embryos and the DNA integrity in blastocysts. MP exposure resulted in a non-significant decrease in the number of primordial follicles and increased DNA damage in granulosa cells. Though MP did not have any effect on the ovulation it had a significant inhibitory effect on the nuclear maturity of oocytes which was associated with spindle deformity. In addition, the oocytes had higher cytoplasmic abnormalities with depleted glutathione level. Even though it did not have any effect on the fertilization and blastocyst rate at lower doses, at 20 mg/kg MP it resulted in a significant decrease in blastocyst hatching, decrease in cell number and high DNA damage. While low body weight gain was observed in F1 generation from 5 mg/kg group, at higher dose, the body weight in F1 generation was marginally higher than control. Post-natal death in F1 generation was observed only in mice treated with 20 mg/kg MP. In conclusion, we report that MP has adverse effects on the oocyte quality, developmental potential of the embryo and reproductive outcome. - Highlights: • Methyl parathion induces severe cytoplasmic abnormalities in oocytes. • Inhibits nuclear maturation and spindle damage • Poor blastocyst quality and high DNA damage.

  4. Adapting PC104Plus for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Larry; Cox, Gary; Nguyen, Hai

    2000-01-01

    This article addresses the issues associated with adapting the commercial PC104Plus standard and its associated architecture to the requirements of space applications. In general, space applications exhibit extreme constraints on power, weight, and volume. EMI and EMC are also issues of significant concern. Additionally, space applications have to survive high radiation environment. Finally, NASA is always concerned about achieving cost effective solutions that are compatible with safety and launch constraints. Weight and volume constraints are directly related to high launch cost. Power on the other hand is not only related to the high launch costs, but are related to the problem of dissipating the resulting heat once in space. The article addresses why PC104Plus is an appropriate solution for the weight and volume issues. The article also addresses what NASA did electrically to reduce power consumption and mechanically dissipate the associated heat in a microgravity and vacuum environment, and how these solutions allow NASA to integrate various sizes of ruggedized custom PC104 boards with COTS, PC104 complaint boards for space applications. In addition to the mechanical changes to deal with thermal dissipation NASA also made changes to minimize EMI. Finally, radiation issues are addressed as well as the architectural and testing solutions and the implications for use of COTS PC104Plus boards.

  5. Evaluation of geno-toxicity of methyl parathion and chlorpyrifos to human liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2).

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Rajashree; Padhy, Rabindra Nath

    2016-05-01

    Insecticides and their residues are known to cause several types of ailments in human body. An attempt had been made to assess digitally the geno-toxicity of methyl parathion (MP) and chlorpyrifos (CP) to in vitro-grown HepG2 cell line, with Hoechst 33342 staining, comet, and micronucleus assays. Additionally, "acridine orange/ethidium bromide" (AO/EB) staining was done for the determination of insecticide-induced cytotoxicity, in corollary. Hoechst 33342 staining of cells revealed a decrease in live cell counts at 8-40 mg/L MP and 15-70 mg/L CP. Moreover, nuclear fragmentations in ranges 8 to 40 mg/L MP and 15 to 70 mg/L CP were recorded dependant on individual doses, increasingly with concomitant increases in comet tail length values. DNA fragmentation index measured in comet assays was 94.3 ± 0.57 at 40 mg/L MP and 93.3 ± 2.08 at 70 mg/L CP. Average micronuclei number was 59.0 ± 2.00 at 40 mg/L MP and 62.6 ± 1.52 at 70 mg/L CP, per 1000 cell nuclei, in micronucleus assay. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values with AO/EB staining for monitoring cytotoxicity were 4 and 10 mg/L for MP and CP, respectively. Lethal concentration50 (LC50) values were 20.89 mg/L MP and 79.43 mg/L CP in AO/EB staining, for cytotoxicity with probit analyses. It was concluded that MP was comparatively more geno-toxic than CP to HepG2 cell. It was discernible that at lower levels of each insecticide, geno-toxicity was recorded in comparison to cytotoxicity. PMID:26782680

  6. Alteration of neurotrophins in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of young rats exposed to chlorpyrifos and methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Angela M; Filipov, Nikolay M; Carr, Russell L

    2007-12-01

    Exposure to either chlorpyrifos (CPS) or methyl parathion (MPS) results in the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and leads to altered neuronal activity which normally regulates critical genes such as the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The effects of postnatal exposure to CPS and MPS on the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels for NGF and BDNF were investigated in the frontal cerebral cortex (cortex) and hippocampus of rats. Oral administration of CPS (4.0 or 6.0 mg/kg), MPS (0.6 or 0.9 mg/kg), or the safflower oil vehicle was performed daily from postnatal day 10 (PND10) through PND20. Exposure induced significant effects on growth and cholinesterase activity. Increased NGF protein levels were observed in the hippocampus but not the cortex on PND20 with some reduction occurring on PND28 in both regions. These changes did not correlate with the changes in NGF mRNA. BDNF mRNA was increased in both regions on PND20 and PND28, whereas BDNF protein levels were increased on PND20. On PND12, c-fos mRNA, a marker of neuronal activation, was increased in both regions. Total BDNF protein was increased in the hippocampus but decreased in the cortex. No changes in NGF protein were observed. These results indicate that repeated developmental OP exposure during the postnatal period alters NGF and BDNF in the cortex and the hippocampus and the patterns of these alterations differ between regions. PMID:17893397

  7. Emissions tracking system (ETS-PC) software

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherbee, J. Jr.; Kress, T.

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. EPA Acid Rain Division developed and is maintaining the Emissions Tracking System (ETS) to receive, store and analyze data from continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) submitted by utilities affected by the 1990 Clean Air Act. This paper will describe ETS-PC, a PC application developed by EPA to assist utilities in analyzing and submitting emission data files each quarter. ETS-PC includes quality assurance software which helps utilities identify possible errors in their quarterly data files (QDFs) prior to submission. It also includes communications software which allows utilities to transfer QDFs via modem directly to the EPA mainframe computer located in Research Triangle Park, NC. After a file is transferred, users are provided with immediate feedback from the mainframe in the form of a file transfer receipt and summary.

  8. The IBM PC at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peredo, James P.

    1988-01-01

    Like many large companies, Ames relies very much on its computing power to get work done. And, like many other large companies, finding the IBM PC a reliable tool, Ames uses it for many of the same types of functions as other companies. Presentation and clarification needs demand much of graphics packages. Programming and text editing needs require simpler, more-powerful packages. The storage space needed by NASA's scientists and users for the monumental amounts of data that Ames needs to keep demand the best database packages that are large and easy to use. Availability to the Micom Switching Network combines the powers of the IBM PC with the capabilities of other computers and mainframes and allows users to communicate electronically. These four primary capabilities of the PC are vital to the needs of NASA's users and help to continue and support the vast amounts of work done by the NASA employees.

  9. Peak Pc Prediction in Conjunction Analysis: Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis. Pc Behavior Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallejo, J.J.; Hejduk, M.D.; Stamey, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite conjunction risk typically evaluated through the probability of collision (Pc). Considers both conjunction geometry and uncertainties in both state estimates. Conjunction events initially discovered through Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) screenings, usually seven days before Time of Closest Approach (TCA). However, JSpOC continues to track objects and issue conjunction updates. Changes in state estimate and reduced propagation time cause Pc to change as event develops. These changes a combination of potentially predictable development and unpredictable changes in state estimate covariance. Operationally useful datum: the peak Pc. If it can reasonably be inferred that the peak Pc value has passed, then risk assessment can be conducted against this peak value. If this value is below remediation level, then event intensity can be relaxed. Can the peak Pc location be reasonably predicted?

  10. A PC based FASTBUS development system

    SciTech Connect

    Blanar, G.J.; Farr, W.D.; Yost, B.T.

    1987-02-01

    A general purpose FASTBUS development system and test station based on the IBM PC is described. Designed to facilitate the development, testing and monitoring of the latest generation of high energy physics detectors, this system provides the user with the flexibility, performance, and speed of FASTBUS in a compact transportable package. The commercially available key components are: 1) a FASTBUS mini-crate, (2) a programmable FASTBUS Master, (3) a DMA interface and (4) a PC-type personal computer. In addition, a gateway to VME exists.

  11. CAP88-PC Version 4, an updated radionuclide NESHAPS model.

    PubMed

    Wood, Raymond; Stuenkel, David; Rosnick, Reid

    2013-08-01

    The latest version of the CAP88-PC computer model, Version 4, has many changes and improvements from previous versions. The most significant of these changes from a user perspective are the incorporation of age-dependent radionuclide dose and risk factors for ingestion and inhalation, the increase in the number of included radionuclides, and a change in the file management system used by the program. Other changes less visible to the user include new code architecture, incorporation of numerical solvers for the calculation of radioactive decay chains, including the ingrowth of decay products during air transport and ground surface deposition, enhanced error messages, updated on-line help, and a utility for migrating Version 3 datasets, wind files, and population files to Version 4. The modifications have produced a significant improvement in speed and stability for Version 4 relative to Version 3 and eliminated the solution approximations used in Version 3. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has implemented an extensive testing and documentation program for CAP88-PC Version 4 to address user concerns with past versions, resulting in enhanced documentation supporting compatibility with user software quality assurance programs. PMID:23803671

  12. The white dwarf population within 40 pc of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Santiago; García-Berro, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Context. The white dwarf luminosity function is an important tool to understand the properties of the solar neighborhood, like its star formation history, and its age. Aims: Here we present a population synthesis study of the white dwarf population within 40 pc from the Sun, and compare the results of this study with the properties of the observed sample. Methods: We use a state-of-the-art population synthesis code based on Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporates the most recent and reliable white dwarf cooling sequences, an accurate description of the Galactic neighborhood, and a realistic treatment of all the known observational biases and selection procedures. Results: We find a good agreement between our theoretical models and the observed data. In particular, our simulations reproduce a previously unexplained feature of the bright branch of the white dwarf luminosity function, which we argue is due to a recent episode of star formation. We also derive the age of the solar neighborhood employing the position of the observed cut-off of the white dwarf luminosity function, to obtain ~8.9 ± 0.2 Gyr. Conclusions: We conclude that a detailed description of the ensemble properties of the population of white dwarfs within 40 pc of the Sun allows us to obtain interesting constraints on the history of the Solar neighborhood.

  13. Coding and transformations in the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoshige; Poo, Cindy; Haddad, Rafi

    2014-01-01

    How is sensory information represented in the brain? A long-standing debate in neural coding is whether and how timing of spikes conveys information to downstream neurons. Although we know that neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) exhibit rich temporal dynamics, the functional relevance of temporal coding remains hotly debated. Recent recording experiments in awake behaving animals have elucidated highly organized temporal structures of activity in the OB. In addition, the analysis of neural circuits in the piriform cortex (PC) demonstrated the importance of not only OB afferent inputs but also intrinsic PC neural circuits in shaping odor responses. Furthermore, new experiments involving stimulation of the OB with specific temporal patterns allowed for testing the relevance of temporal codes. Together, these studies suggest that the relative timing of neuronal activity in the OB conveys odor information and that neural circuits in the PC possess various mechanisms to decode temporal patterns of OB input. PMID:24905594

  14. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  15. Audit trails and PC control on Novell networks

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, A.

    1991-01-01

    Although Novell Netware 286 provides excellent access control at both the server and the directory level, the record they make available through the accounting function leaves much to be desired. This paper presents two programs; the first is a BASIC program that converts the output of Novell's PAUDIT command into single line audit trails, providing an auditable record of server access. The second program, written in dBase III+, can be used to insure that all PC's accessing the LAN are recorded in an inventory data base. The subject network consists of six file servers connecting approximately 500 users at the main office of WSRC's Engineering and Projects Division. Hard copy and diskettes of the source code will be available.

  16. Audit trails and PC control on Novell networks

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, A.

    1991-12-31

    Although Novell Netware 286 provides excellent access control at both the server and the directory level, the record they make available through the accounting function leaves much to be desired. This paper presents two programs; the first is a BASIC program that converts the output of Novell`s PAUDIT command into single line audit trails, providing an auditable record of server access. The second program, written in dBase III+, can be used to insure that all PC`s accessing the LAN are recorded in an inventory data base. The subject network consists of six file servers connecting approximately 500 users at the main office of WSRC`s Engineering and Projects Division. Hard copy and diskettes of the source code will be available.

  17. Continuous biodegradation of parathion by immobilized Sphingomonas sp. in magnetically fixed-bed bioreactors and evaluation of the enzyme stability of immobilized bacteria.

    PubMed

    Robatjazi, Seyed Mortaza; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Khalilzadeh, Rassoul; Farahani, Ebrahim Vasheghani; Zeinoddini, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Magnetically-modified Sphingomonas sp. was prepared using covalent binding of magnetic nanoparticles on to the cell surface. The magnetic modified bacteria were immobilized in the fixed-bed bioreactors (FBR) by internal and external magnetic fields for the biodetoxification of a model organophosphate, parathion: 93 % of substrate (50 mg parathion/l) was hydrolyzed at 0.5 ml/min in internal magnetic field fixed-bed bioreactor. The deactivation rate constants (at 1 ml/min) were 0.97 × 10(-3), 1.24 × 10(-3) and 4.17 × 10(-3) h(-1) for immobilized bacteria in external and internal magnetic field fixed-bed bioreactor and FBR, respectively. The deactivation rate constant for immobilized magnetically modified bacteria in external magnetic field fixed-bed bioreactor (EMFFBR) was 77 % lower than that of immobilized cells by entrapping method on porous basalt beads in FBR at 1 ml/min. Immobilized magnetic modified bacteria exhibited maximum enzyme stability in EMFFBR. PMID:22996642

  18. Experience in setting up a PC cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ganghua; Zhang, Mei

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we summary and present our thinking and experience in setting up a PC cluster, with a consideration that the described thinking and experience may be relevant to or useful for those who intend to buy a similar cluster in the near future.

  19. Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN/PC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Mital, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Composites Analyzer (ICAN/PC) computer program designed to carry out comprehensive linear analysis of multilayered continuous-fiber polymer matrix composites. Performs micromechanics, macromechanics, and laminate analyses, taking account of hygrothermal responses of fiber composites. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  20. Mathematics Instruction and the Tablet PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, K. Renee; McCarthy, Maeve L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of tablet PCs in teaching is a relatively new phenomenon. A cross between a notebook computer and a personal digital assistant (PDA), the tablet PC has all of the features of a notebook with the additional capability that the screen can also be used for input. Tablet PCs are usually equipped with a stylus that allows the user to write on…

  1. Combating adverse selection in secondary PC markets.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Stewart W; Fitzpatrick, Colin

    2008-04-15

    Adverse selection is a significant contributor to market failure in secondary personal computer (PC) markets. Signaling can act as a potential solution to adverse selection and facilitate superior remarketing of second-hand PCs. Signaling is a means whereby usage information can be utilized to enhance consumer perception of both value and utility of used PCs and, therefore, promote lifetime extension for these systems. This can help mitigate a large portion of the environmental impact associated with PC system manufacture. In this paper, the computer buying and selling behavior of consumers is characterized via a survey of 270 Irish residential users. Results confirm the existence of adverse selection in the Irish market with 76% of potential buyers being unwilling to purchase and 45% of potential vendors being unwilling to sell a used PC. The so-called "closet affect" is also apparent with 78% of users storing their PC after use has ceased. Results also indicate that consumers place a higher emphasis on specifications when considering a second-hand purchase. This contradicts their application needs which are predominantly Internet and word-processing/spreadsheet/presentation applications, 88% and 60% respectively. Finally, a market solution utilizing self monitoring and reporting technology (SMART) sensors for the purpose of real time usage monitoring is proposed, that can change consumer attitudes with regard to second-hand computer equipment. PMID:18497164

  2. PC Games and the Teaching of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMichael, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Although the use of PC games in the history classroom might be relatively new, the ideas for these assignments and the theory behind their use borrows heavily from a number of areas and combines different pedagogical techniques. Using computer games allows teachers to recombine disparate teaching threads into something novel that will serve…

  3. PC Kiosk Trends in Rural India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyama, Kentaro; Kiri, Karishma; Menon, Deepak; Sethi, Suneet; Pal, Joyojeet; Srinivasan, Janaki

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a series of preliminary, quantitative results on rural PC kiosks in India. An analysis of the data confirms many expected trends and correlations and shows that kiosks still face the challenge of sustainability as a business. This study is based on questionnaires presented to kiosk operators and customers of kiosks operated…

  4. Jargon that Computes: Today's PC Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1997-01-01

    Discusses PC (personal computer) and telecommunications terminology in context: Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN); Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL); cable modems; satellite downloads; T1 and T3 lines; magnitudes ("giga-,""nano-"); Central Processing Unit (CPU); Random Access Memory (RAM); Universal Serial Bus (USB); "Firewire,"…

  5. Stretch Your PC Dollars--Buy Clones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    True, John

    1986-01-01

    Relates how the story of how San Francisco State University evaluated IBM PC look-alikes, considered some of the risks involved, and decided to purchase over 100 of them. Questions of compatibility, vendor longevity, support, and other risk management issues are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  6. COMPPAP - COMPOSITE PLATE BUCKLING ANALYSIS PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Composite Plate Buckling Analysis Program (COMPPAP) was written to help engineers determine buckling loads of orthotropic (or isotropic) irregularly shaped plates without requiring hand calculations from design curves or extensive finite element modeling. COMPPAP is a one element finite element program that utilizes high-order displacement functions. The high order of the displacement functions enables the user to produce results more accurate than traditional h-finite elements. This program uses these high-order displacement functions to perform a plane stress analysis of a general plate followed by a buckling calculation based on the stresses found in the plane stress solution. The current version assumes a flat plate (constant thickness) subject to a constant edge load (normal or shear) on one or more edges. COMPPAP uses the power method to find the eigenvalues of the buckling problem. The power method provides an efficient solution when only one eigenvalue is desired. Once the eigenvalue is found, the eigenvector, which corresponds to the plate buckling mode shape, results as a by-product. A positive feature of the power method is that the dominant eigenvalue is the first found, which is this case is the plate buckling load. The reported eigenvalue expresses a load factor to induce plate buckling. COMPPAP is written in ANSI FORTRAN 77. Two machine versions are available from COSMIC: a PC version (MSC-22428), which is for IBM PC 386 series and higher computers and compatibles running MS-DOS; and a UNIX version (MSC-22286). The distribution medium for both machine versions includes source code for both single and double precision versions of COMPPAP. The PC version includes source code which has been optimized for implementation within DOS memory constraints as well as sample executables for both the single and double precision versions of COMPPAP. The double precision versions of COMPPAP have been successfully implemented on an IBM PC 386 compatible running MS-DOS, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS, an HP-9000 series computer running HP-UX, and a CRAY X-MP series computer running UNICOS. COMPPAP requires 1Mb of RAM and the BLAS and LINPACK math libraries, which are included on the distribution medium. The COMPPAP documentation provides instructions for using the commercial post-processing package PATRAN for graphical interpretation of COMPPAP output. The UNIX version includes two electronic versions of the documentation: one in LaTex format and one in PostScript format. The standard distribution medium for the PC version (MSC-22428) is a 5.25 inch 1.2Mb MS-DOS format diskette. The standard distribution medium for the UNIX version (MSC-22286) is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24) in UNIX tar format. For the UNIX version, alternate distribution media and formats are available upon request. COMPPAP was developed in 1992.

  7. CLIPS - C LANGUAGE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, G.

    1994-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System, CLIPS, is a shell for developing expert systems. It is designed to allow artificial intelligence research, development, and delivery on conventional computers. The primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. For these reasons, the program is written in C. CLIPS meets or outperforms most micro- and minicomputer based artificial intelligence tools. CLIPS is a forward chaining rule-based language. The program contains an inference engine and a language syntax that provide a framework for the construction of an expert system. It also includes tools for debugging an application. CLIPS is based on the Rete algorithm, which enables very efficient pattern matching. The collection of conditions and actions to be taken if the conditions are met is constructed into a rule network. As facts are asserted either prior to or during a session, CLIPS pattern-matches the number of fields. Wildcards and variables are supported for both single and multiple fields. CLIPS syntax allows the inclusion of externally defined functions (outside functions which are written in a language other than CLIPS). CLIPS itself can be embedded in a program such that the expert system is available as a simple subroutine call. Advanced features found in CLIPS version 4.3 include an integrated microEMACS editor, the ability to generate C source code from a CLIPS rule base to produce a dedicated executable, binary load and save capabilities for CLIPS rule bases, and the utility program CRSV (Cross-Reference, Style, and Verification) designed to facilitate the development and maintenance of large rule bases. Five machine versions are available. Each machine version includes the source and the executable for that machine. The UNIX version includes the source and binaries for IBM RS/6000, Sun3 series, and Sun4 series computers. The UNIX, DEC VAX, and DEC RISC Workstation versions are line oriented. The PC version and the Macintosh version each contain a windowing variant of CLIPS as well as the standard line oriented version. The mouse/window interface version for the PC works with a Microsoft compatible mouse or without a mouse. This window version uses the proprietary CURSES library for the PC, but a working executable of the window version is provided. The window oriented version for the Macintosh includes a version which uses a full Macintosh-style interface, including an integrated editor. This version allows the user to observe the changing fact base and rule activations in separate windows while a CLIPS program is executing. The IBM PC version is available bundled with CLIPSITS, The CLIPS Intelligent Tutoring System for a special combined price (COS-10025). The goal of CLIPSITS is to provide the student with a tool to practice the syntax and concepts covered in the CLIPS User's Guide. It attempts to provide expert diagnosis and advice during problem solving which is typically not available without an instructor. CLIPSITS is divided into 10 lessons which mirror the first 10 chapters of the CLIPS User's Guide. The program was developed for the IBM PC series with a hard disk. CLIPSITS is also available separately as MSC-21679. The CLIPS program is written in C for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC computer operating under DOS, a Macintosh and DEC VAX series computers operating under VMS or ULTRIX. The line oriented version should run on any computer system which supports a full (Kernighan and Ritchie) C compiler or the ANSI standard C language. CLIPS was developed in 1986 and Version 4.2 was released in July of 1988. Version 4.3 was released in June of 1989.

  8. IBM PC enhances the world's future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Jozelle

    1988-01-01

    Although the purpose of this research is to illustrate the importance of computers to the public, particularly the IBM PC, present examinations will include computers developed before the IBM PC was brought into use. IBM, as well as other computing facilities, began serving the public years ago, and is continuing to find ways to enhance the existence of man. With new developments in supercomputers like the Cray-2, and the recent advances in artificial intelligence programming, the human race is gaining knowledge at a rapid pace. All have benefited from the development of computers in the world; not only have they brought new assets to life, but have made life more and more of a challenge everyday.

  9. A PC based fault diagnosis expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Christopher A.

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Status Assessment (ISA) prototype expert system performs system level fault diagnosis using rules and models created by the user. The ISA evolved from concepts to a stand-alone demonstration prototype using OPS5 on a LISP Machine. The LISP based prototype was rewritten in C and the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) to run on a Personal Computer (PC) and a graphics workstation. The ISA prototype has been used to demonstrate fault diagnosis functions of Space Station Freedom's Operation Management System (OMS). This paper describes the development of the ISA prototype from early concepts to the current PC/workstation version used today and describes future areas of development for the prototype.

  10. Virtual Reality at the PC Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, John

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of my research has been to incorporate virtual reality at the desktop level; i.e., create virtual reality software that can be run fairly inexpensively on standard PC's. The standard language used for virtual reality on PC's is VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). It is a new language so it is still undergoing a lot of changes. VRML 1.0 came out only a couple years ago and VRML 2.0 came out around last September. VRML is an interpreted language that is run by a web browser plug-in. It is fairly flexible in terms of allowing you to create different shapes and animations. Before this summer, I knew very little about virtual reality and I did not know VRML at all. I learned the VRML language by reading two books and experimenting on a PC. The following topics are presented: CAD to VRML, VRML 1.0 to VRML 2.0, VRML authoring tools, VRML browsers, finding virtual reality applications, the AXAF project, the VRML generator program, web communities and future plans.

  11. Parallel computing on a PC Linux Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travnicek, Pavel; Dytrych, T.; Hellinger, P.; Jasensky, V.; Soucek, J.

    2001-06-01

    For numeric calculations we have used since 1999 a homogeneous parallel PC Linux cluster. We have build a system of eight dual Pentium III (600 MHz) nodes with Intel N 440BX motherboards. (total of 16 CPU-s and 4 GB of SDRAM on a homogeneous PC cluster). Each node has 9GB IBM Ultra Wide SCSI disk. The whole parallel system (including its private network) is protected against power failure by an APC Matrix UPS system providing backup energy for up to 60 minutes. The computers are stored in a grounded metal skelet. Nodes of the system are networked by a private 1-Gbit Ethernet network based on a 12 port 1-Gbit 3Com switch. We run several distributed applications on this supercomputer like the computation of the nuclear symplectic model, simulation of space plasmas and reconstruction of geologic profiles by inverse scattering method. We have seen enhanced performance when the calculation is distributed between as many as eight procesessors. However, for more than eight processors the performance saturates and there is little further gain. We build a new PC cluster based on four processor motherboards.

  12. Speech coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersho, Allen

    1990-05-01

    Recent advances in algorithms and techniques for speech coding now permit high quality voice reproduction at remarkably low bit rates. The advent of powerful single-ship signal processors has made it cost effective to implement these new and sophisticated speech coding algorithms for many important applications in voice communication and storage. Some of the main ideas underlying the algorithms of major interest today are reviewed. The concept of removing redundancy by linear prediction is reviewed, first in the context of predictive quantization or DPCM. Then linear predictive coding, adaptive predictive coding, and vector quantization are discussed. The concepts of excitation coding via analysis-by-synthesis, vector sum excitation codebooks, and adaptive postfiltering are explained. The main idea of vector excitation coding (VXC) or code excited linear prediction (CELP) are presented. Finally low-delay VXC coding and phonetic segmentation for VXC are described.

  13. Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, Fabrizio; Hamkins, Jon; Dolinar, Sam; Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews uplink coding. The purpose and goals of the briefing are (1) Show a plan for using uplink coding and describe benefits (2) Define possible solutions and their applicability to different types of uplink, including emergency uplink (3) Concur with our conclusions so we can embark on a plan to use proposed uplink system (4) Identify the need for the development of appropriate technology and infusion in the DSN (5) Gain advocacy to implement uplink coding in flight projects Action Item EMB04-1-14 -- Show a plan for using uplink coding, including showing where it is useful or not (include discussion of emergency uplink coding).

  14. The USL NASA PC R and D development environment standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Moreau, Dennis R.

    1984-01-01

    The development environment standards which have been established in order to control usage of the IBM PC/XT development systems and to prevent interference between projects being currently developed on the PC's are discussed. The standards address the following areas: scheduling PC resources; login/logout procedures; training; file naming conventions; hard disk organization; diskette care; backup procedures; and copying policies.

  15. 41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (PC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Property custodian (PC... Personal Property Management § 128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (PC). An individual responsible for the... required on all actions affecting the personal property within his jurisdiction. The designation as PC...

  16. 41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (PC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Property custodian (PC... Personal Property Management § 128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (PC). An individual responsible for the... required on all actions affecting the personal property within his jurisdiction. The designation as PC...

  17. 41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (PC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Property custodian (PC... Personal Property Management § 128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (PC). An individual responsible for the... required on all actions affecting the personal property within his jurisdiction. The designation as PC...

  18. 41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (PC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Property custodian (PC... Personal Property Management § 128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (PC). An individual responsible for the... required on all actions affecting the personal property within his jurisdiction. The designation as PC...

  19. 41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (PC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Property custodian (PC... Personal Property Management § 128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (PC). An individual responsible for the... required on all actions affecting the personal property within his jurisdiction. The designation as PC...

  20. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) biosynthesis in pancreatic islets of Langerhans

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.M.; Laychock, S.G.

    1986-03-01

    Islets of Langerhans isolated from rat pancreata were incubated with (/sup 14/C)choline to determine the biosynthesis of PC by the CDP choline to determine the biosynthesis of PC by the CDPcholine pathway. Recovery of (/sup 14/C)PC in islet membranes was time-related, and stimulated by glucose (17mM) during 60 min. The rate of PC synthesis was constant during 60 min with glucose stimulation. In contrast, the sulfonylurea tolbutamide (2 mM) reduced the recovery of (/sup 14/C)choline in PC, and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (5 mM) did not significantly affect (/sup 14/C)PC recovery. Incubation of islets in Ca/sup 2 +/-free medium enhanced glucose-stimulated recovery of (/sup 14/C)choline-labeled PC due to the inhibition of phospholipase and phospholipid hydrolysis. Inhibition of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase with 5-deoxy-5'-isobutylthioadenosine (SIBA) reduced (/sup 14/C)PC levels and insulin release in a concentration dependent manner. Treatment with SIBA also reduced Mg/sup 2 +/-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity in islet microsomes. Quantitation of membrane PC showed that glucose stimulation did not alter islet P levels. Thus, islet PC biosynthesis is linked to glucose stimulation and contributes to the maintenance of PC levels in membranes undergoing exocytosis and phospholipid hydrolysis. Adequate PC levels support Ca/sup 2 +/ pump activity and secretory mechanisms.

  1. Microsomal biotransformation of chlorpyrifos, parathion and fenthion in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch): mechanistic insights into interspecific differences in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lavado, Ramon; Schlenk, Daniel

    2011-01-17

    Rainbow trout often serve as a surrogate species evaluating xenobiotic toxicity in cold-water species including other salmonids of the same genus, which are listed as threatened or endangered. Biotransformation tends to show species-specific patterns that influence susceptibility to xenobiotic toxicity, particularly organophosphate insecticides (OPs). To evaluate the contribution of biotransformation in the mechanism of toxicity of three organophosphate (phosphorothionate) insecticides, (chlorpyrifos, parathion and fenthion), microsomal bioactivation and detoxification pathways were measured in gills, liver and olfactory tissues in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and compared to juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Consistent with species differences in acute toxicity, significantly higher chlorpyrifos bioactivation was found in liver microsomes of rainbow trout (up to 2-fold) when compared with coho salmon. Although bioactivation to the oxon was observed, the catalytic efficiency towards chlorpyrifos dearylation (detoxification) was significantly higher in liver for both species (1.82 and 0.79 for trout and salmon, respectively) when compared to desulfuration (bioactivation). Bioactivation of parathion to paraoxon was significantly higher (up to 2.2-fold) than detoxification to p-nitrophenol in all tissues of both species with rates of conversion in rainbow trout, again significantly higher than coho salmon. Production of fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxides from fenthion was detected only in liver and gills of both species with activities in rainbow trout significantly higher than coho salmon. NADPH-dependent cleavage of fenthion was observed in all tissues, and was the only activity detected in olfactory tissues. These results indicate rainbow trout are more sensitive than coho salmon to the acute toxicity of OP pesticides because trout have higher catalytic rates of oxon formation. Thus, rainbow trout may serve as a conservative surrogate species for the evaluation of OP pesticides in coho salmon. PMID:20947181

  2. Halloysite nanotubes-titanium dioxide as a solid-phase microextraction coating combined with negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of parathion.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Jafari, Mohammad Taghi; Mossaddegh, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Halloysite nanotubes-titanium dioxide (HNTs-TiO2) as a biocompatible environmentally friendly solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coating was prepared. HNTs-TiO2 was chemically coated on the surface of a fused-silica fiber using a sol-gel process. Parathion as an organophosphorus pesticide was selected as a model compound to investigate the extraction efficiency of the fiber. The extracted analyte was detected by negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometer (NCD-IMS). The effective parameters on the extraction efficiency, such as salt effect, extraction temperature and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The extraction efficiency of HNTs-TiO2 fiber was compared with bare-silica (sol-gel based coating without HNTs-TiO2), HNTs, carbon nanotubes and commercial SPME fibers (PA, PDMS, and PDMS-DVB). The HNTs-TiO2 fiber showed highest extraction efficiency among the studied fibers. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were found to be 4.3 and 6.3%, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification values were 0.03 and 0.1 μg L(-1), respectively. The dynamic range of the method was in the range of 0.1-25 μg L(-1). The spiking recoveries were between 85 (±9) and 97 (±6). The SPME-HNTs-TiO2 combined with NCD-IMS was successfully applied for the determination of parathion in apple, strawberry, celery and water samples. PMID:27216393

  3. EXPRESSION OF AN AT-RICH XYLANASE GENE FROM THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS ORPINOMYCES SP. STRAIN PC-2 IN AND SECRETION OF THE HETEROLOGOUS ENZYME BY HYPOCREA JECORINA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AT-rich xylanase A gene (xynA) of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 codes for a polypeptide comprising a glycoside hydrolase family 11 catalytic domain linked by a hinge to two docking domains. The catalytic domain-coding region was used for the heterologous production of a xylan...

  4. PC Software for Artificial Intelligence Applications.

    PubMed

    Epp, H; Kalin, M; Miller, D

    1988-05-01

    Our review has emphasized that AI tools are programming languages inspired by some problem-solving paradigm. We want to underscore their status as programming languages; even if an AI tool seems to fit a problem perfectly, its proficient use still requires the training and practice associated with any programming language. The programming manuals for PC-Plus, Smalltalk/ V, and Nexpert Object are all tutorial in nature, and the corresponding software packages come with sample applications. We find the manuals to be uniformly good introductions that try to anticipate the problems of a user who is new to the technology. All three vendors offer free technical support by telephone to licensed users. AI tools are sometimes oversold as a way to make programming easy or to avoid it altogether. The truth is that AI tools demand programming-but programming that allows you to concentrate on the essentials of the problem. If we had to implement a diagnostic system, we would look first to a product such as PC-Plus rather than BASIC or C, because PC-Plus is designed specifically for such a problem, whereas these conventional languages are not. If we had to implement a system that required graphical interfaces and could benefit from inheritance, we would look first to an object-oriented system such as Smalltalk/V that provides built-in mechanisms for both. If we had to implement an expert system that called for some mix of AI and conventional techniques, we would look first to a product such as Nexpert Object that integrates various problem-solving technologies. Finally, we might use FORTRAN if we were concerned primarily with programming a well-defined numerical algorithm. AI tools are a valuable complement to traditional languages. PMID:17741465

  5. A PC-interactive stereonet plotting program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilant, Walter L.

    The computer program here described allows the structural geologist to rotate and revolve structural data interactively (strike dip: trend plunge). These actions can remove the effects of dip and plunge. Once a final screen plot is obtained, it may be printed on an associated graphics printer. This program requires an IBM PC/XT AT or compatible equipped with the color graphics (CGA) card. It also works satisfactorily on compatible PCs such as the COMPAQ or AT&T 6300 (which use a combination mono CGA screen). The addition of a math coprocessor (8087 or 80287) greatly speeds up the response time but is not required.

  6. PC-based car license plate reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chung-Mu; Shu, Shyh-Yeong; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chen, Yie-Wern; Wen, Kuang-Pu

    1992-11-01

    A car license plate reader (CLPR) using fuzzy inference and neural network algorithm has been developed in Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) and installed in highway toll stations to identify stolen cars. It takes an average of 0.7 seconds to recognize a car license plate by using a PC with 80486-50 CPU. The recognition rate of the system is about 97%. The techniques of CLPR include vehicle sensing, image grab control, optic pre- processing, lighting, and optic character recognition (OCR). The CLPR can be used in vehicle flow statistics, the checking of stolen vehicles, automatic charging systems in parking lots or garage management, and so on.

  7. Securing your PC and protecting your privacy.

    PubMed

    Schloman, Barbara F

    2005-01-01

    Working in a networked information environment brings new opportunities for getting and sharing information. Regrettably, these benefits of the Internet are challenged by forces that would interfere to satisfy their own profit or malevolent motives. Your networked computer can be infected by viruses, worms, or Trojan horses or infiltrated by spyware, adware, or pop-ups. Without being aware of the dangers and taking precautionary steps, your PC is susceptible to being compromised and your privacy invaded. This column will highlight some of the dangers and offer basic steps for securing your computer and protecting your privacy. PMID:15727543

  8. PC based attitude determination for Navstar GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, Darrell

    The feasibility of 486-microprocessor-based PC processing of large quantities of satellite observation data in real time, in order to solve for space vehicle attitude and sensor biases, is presently demonstrated for the case of Navstar GPS data. The data system modernization (DSM) software program used requires a sun-Z observation in every data set. DSM processing can be improved by obtaining data over the greatest time-period possible, preferably over a full orbit. Using the Independent Attitude Determination program, and solving for sensor biases, it should be possible to ascertain spacecraft attitude prior to apogee kick motor burn within 0.1-0.2 deg.

  9. Palliative care coding practices in Canada since the introduction of guidelines and the HSMR indicator

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Omid; Amuah, Joseph Emmanuel; Herasimovich, Viachaslau; Chaudhary, Zeerak; Leeb, Kira; Gurevich, Yana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examines palliative care (PC) coding practices since the introduction of a national coding standard and assesses a potential association with hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) results. Setting Acute-care hospitals in Canada. Participants ∼16 million hospital discharges recorded in Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)'s Discharge Abstract Database from April 2006 to March 2013. Primary and secondary outcome measures In-hospital mortality, patient characteristics and service utilisation among all hospitalisations, HSMR cases and palliative patients. Methods We assessed all separations in the Discharge Abstract Database between fiscal years 2006–2007 and 2012–2013 for PC cases at national, provincial and facility levels. In-hospital mortality was measured among all hospitalisations (including HSMR cases) and palliative patients. We calculated a variant HSMR-PC that included PC cases. Results There was an increase in the frequency of PC coding over the study period (from 0.78% to 1.12% of all separations), and year-over-year improvement in adherence to PC coding guidelines. Characteristics and resource utilisation of PC patients remained stable within provinces. Crude mortality among HSMR cases declined from 8.7% to 7.3%. National HSMR declined by 22% during the study period, compared with a 17% decline in HSMR-PC. Provincial results for HSMR-PC are not significantly different from regular HSMR calculation. Conclusions The introduction of a national coding standard resulted in increased identification of palliative patients and services. Aside from PC coding practices, we note numerous independent drivers of improving HSMR results, notably, a significant reduction of in-hospital mortality, and increase in admissions accompanied by a greater number of coded comorbidities. While PC impacts the HSMR indicator, its influence remains modest. PMID:26597865

  10. A low-cost PC-based telemetry data-reduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, D. A.; Butterfield, C. P.

    1990-04-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Branch is using Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) telemetry data-acquisition systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. PCM telemetry systems are used in test installations that require accurate multiple-channel measurements taken from a variety of different locations. SERI has found them ideal for use in tests requiring concurrent acquisition of data-reduction system to facilitate quick, in-the-field multiple-channel data analysis. Called the PC-PCM System, it consists of two basic components. First, AT-compatible hardware boards are used for decoding and combining PCM data streams. Up to four hardware boards can be installed in a single PC, which provides the capability to combine data from four PCM streams directly to PC disk or memory. Each stream can have up to 62 data channels. Second, a software package written for the DOS operating system was developed to simplify data-acquisition control and management. The software provides a quick, easy-to-use interface between the PC and PCM data streams. Called the Quick-Look Data Management Program, it is a comprehensive menu-driven package used to organize, acquire, process, and display information from incoming PCM data streams. This paper describes both hardware and software aspects of the SERI PC-PCM system, concentrating on features that make it useful in an experiment test environment to quickly examine and verify incoming data. Also discussed are problems and techniques associated with PC-based telemetry data acquisition, processing, and real-time display.

  11. IBM PC/IX operating system evaluation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Granier, Martin; Hall, Philip P.; Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation plan for the IBM PC/IX Operating System designed for IBM PC/XT computers is discussed. The evaluation plan covers the areas of performance measurement and evaluation, software facilities available, man-machine interface considerations, networking, and the suitability of PC/IX as a development environment within the University of Southwestern Louisiana NASA PC Research and Development project. In order to compare and evaluate the PC/IX system, comparisons with other available UNIX-based systems are also included.

  12. Comparative biosynthesis, covalent post-translational modifications and efficiency of prosegment cleavage of the prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2: glycosylation, sulphation and identification of the intracellular site of prosegment cleavage of PC1 and PC2.

    PubMed

    Benjannet, S; Rondeau, N; Paquet, L; Boudreault, A; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Seidah, N G

    1993-09-15

    We present herein the pulse-chase analysis of the biosynthesis of the prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 in the endocrine GH4C1 cells infected with vaccinia virus recombinants expressing these convertases. Characterization of the pulse-labelled enzymes demonstrated that pro-PC1 (88 kDa) is cleaved into PC1 (83 kDa) and pro-PC2 (75 kDa) into PC2 (68 kDa). Secretion of glycosylated and sulphated PC1 (84 kDa) occurs about 30 min after the onset of biosynthesis, whereas glycosylated and sulphated PC2 (68 kDa) is detected in the medium after between 1 and 2 h. Furthermore, in the case of pro-PC2 only, we observed that a fraction of this precursor escapes glycosylation. A small proportion (about 5%) of the intracellular glycosylated pro-PC2 (75 kDa) is sulphated, and it is this glycosylated and sulphated precursor that is cleaved into the secretable 68 kDa form of PC2. Major differences in the carbohydrate structures of PC1 and PC2 are demonstrated by the resistance of the secreted PC1 to endoglycosidase H digestion and sensitivity of the secreted PC2 to this enzyme. Inhibition of N-glycosylation with tunicamycin caused a dramatic intracellular degradation of these convertases within the endoplasmic reticulum, with the net effect of a reduction in the available activity of PC1 and PC2. These results emphasize the importance of N-glycosylation in the folding and stability of PC1 and PC2. Pulse-labelling experiments in uninfected mouse beta TC3 and rat Rin m5F insulinoma cells, which endogenously synthesize PC2, showed that, as in infected GH4C1 cells, pro-PC2 predominates intracellularly. In order to define the site of prosegment cleavage, pulse-chase analysis was performed at low temperature (15 degrees C) or after treatment of GH4C1 cells with either brefeldin A or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. These results demonstrated that the onset of the conversions of pro-PC1 into PC1 and non-glycosylated pro-PC2 into PC2 (65 kDa) occur in a pre-Golgi compartment, presumably within the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, pulse labelling in the presence of Na(2)35SO4 demonstrated that the processing of glycosylated and sulphated pro-PC2 occurs within the Golgi apparatus. In order to test the possibility that zymogen processing is performed by furin, we co-expressed this convertase with either pro-PC1 or pro-PC2. The data demonstrated the inability of furin to cleave either proenzyme. PMID:8397508

  13. Comparative biosynthesis, covalent post-translational modifications and efficiency of prosegment cleavage of the prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2: glycosylation, sulphation and identification of the intracellular site of prosegment cleavage of PC1 and PC2.

    PubMed Central

    Benjannet, S; Rondeau, N; Paquet, L; Boudreault, A; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Seidah, N G

    1993-01-01

    We present herein the pulse-chase analysis of the biosynthesis of the prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 in the endocrine GH4C1 cells infected with vaccinia virus recombinants expressing these convertases. Characterization of the pulse-labelled enzymes demonstrated that pro-PC1 (88 kDa) is cleaved into PC1 (83 kDa) and pro-PC2 (75 kDa) into PC2 (68 kDa). Secretion of glycosylated and sulphated PC1 (84 kDa) occurs about 30 min after the onset of biosynthesis, whereas glycosylated and sulphated PC2 (68 kDa) is detected in the medium after between 1 and 2 h. Furthermore, in the case of pro-PC2 only, we observed that a fraction of this precursor escapes glycosylation. A small proportion (about 5%) of the intracellular glycosylated pro-PC2 (75 kDa) is sulphated, and it is this glycosylated and sulphated precursor that is cleaved into the secretable 68 kDa form of PC2. Major differences in the carbohydrate structures of PC1 and PC2 are demonstrated by the resistance of the secreted PC1 to endoglycosidase H digestion and sensitivity of the secreted PC2 to this enzyme. Inhibition of N-glycosylation with tunicamycin caused a dramatic intracellular degradation of these convertases within the endoplasmic reticulum, with the net effect of a reduction in the available activity of PC1 and PC2. These results emphasize the importance of N-glycosylation in the folding and stability of PC1 and PC2. Pulse-labelling experiments in uninfected mouse beta TC3 and rat Rin m5F insulinoma cells, which endogenously synthesize PC2, showed that, as in infected GH4C1 cells, pro-PC2 predominates intracellularly. In order to define the site of prosegment cleavage, pulse-chase analysis was performed at low temperature (15 degrees C) or after treatment of GH4C1 cells with either brefeldin A or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. These results demonstrated that the onset of the conversions of pro-PC1 into PC1 and non-glycosylated pro-PC2 into PC2 (65 kDa) occur in a pre-Golgi compartment, presumably within the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, pulse labelling in the presence of Na(2)35SO4 demonstrated that the processing of glycosylated and sulphated pro-PC2 occurs within the Golgi apparatus. In order to test the possibility that zymogen processing is performed by furin, we co-expressed this convertase with either pro-PC1 or pro-PC2. The data demonstrated the inability of furin to cleave either proenzyme. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8397508

  14. Evaluating security systems using SNAP-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, C.D.; Gregg, M.L.; Erdbruegger, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    SNAP-PC (Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure for the Personal Computer) is a user-friendly version of SNAP designed for IBM XT or AT compatible microcomputers. SNAP is a simulation-based analysis technique supporting the evaluation of fixed-site security systems to prevent theft or sabotage of a specified target. Through SNAP the user is able to define the facility, the sensor system, the guard operating policies and response tactics, and the adversary's attack plan. SNAP uses the system definition to analyze its effectiveness in defending against specific threats. The system performance statistics measured by SNAP include: Adversary mission success probability, guard and adversary casualties, duration of engagements, outcome of engagements, duration of scenario by outcome (adversary success/fail), and adversary duration by facility location. The SNAP-PC package provides a compact analysis tool that can be used to analyze a wide variety of security systems. It places SNAP, a proven evaluation technique, in the hands of on-site personnel, not just computer analysts. The support programs eliminate the labor intensive tedious task of organizing and sorting through reams of output reports and greatly reduce the time previously required to analyze a security system.

  15. PC Based Pulsed Field Hysteresis Loop Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhite, S. D.; Likhite, Prachi; Radha, S.

    2011-07-01

    The present paper describes the design and setting up of a PC based hysteresis loop tracer that enables quick characterization of magnetic materials at room temperature. A high magnetic field is generated in a solenoid by passing a pulse current of sinusoidal shape at an interval slow enough to produce minimum heating in the solenoid. A pickup coil system is kept in the solenoid to detect field and magnetization signal of a sample placed in the pickup coil. These transitory analog signals are converted into digital signals by a micro-controller integrated circuit. These digital signals are sent to a computer through a serial port. A software has been developed to interface the system to the PC and processing the data to calculate hysteresis parameters like saturation magnetization Ms, coercivity Hc and remanence Mr followed by plotting of the hysteresis loop. The data and graphs can be printed or stored as files. The sample holder is designed for samples in powder or pellet form. The data acquired for some standard magnetic samples are presented.

  16. Simulation code of high power discharge for iPhones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsugai, Takuro; Sugimoto, Takuya; Taniwaki, Manabu; Sato, Shunichi; Iyoda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-02-01

    The new simulation code of high power discharge has successfully developed. The code is not executed by mainframe computer, PC, nor Macintosh, but by iPhones. The details, such as development environment and process are described in this paper below.

  17. THE ORIGIN OF OB CLUSTERS: FROM 10 pc TO 0.1 pc

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Wang Ke; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou; Quintana-Lacaci, Guillermo; Li Zhiyun; Zhang Zhiyu E-mail: kwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: quintana@iram.es E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu

    2012-01-20

    We observe the 1.2 mm continuum emission around the OB cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4, using the MAMBO-2 bolometer array of the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Comparison of the Spitzer 24 {mu}m and 8 {mu}m images with our 1.2 mm continuum maps reveal an ionization front of an H II region, the photon-dominated layer, and several 5 pc scale filaments that follow the outer edge of the photon-dominated layer. The filaments, which are resolved in the MAMBO-2 observations, show regularly spaced parsec-scale molecular clumps, embedded with a cluster of dense molecular cores as shown in the SMA 0.87 mm observations. Toward the center of the G10.6-0.4 region, the combined SMA+IRAM 30 m continuum image reveals several parsec-scale protrusions. They may continue down to within 0.1 pc of the geometric center of a dense 3 pc scale structure, where a 200 M{sub Sun} OB cluster resides. The observed filaments may facilitate mass accretion onto the central cluster-forming region in the presence of strong radiative and mechanical stellar feedback. Their filamentary geometry may also facilitate fragmentation. We did not detect any significant polarized emission at 0.87 mm in the inner 1 pc region with SMA.

  18. PC-based Multiple Information System Interface (PC/MISI) detailed design and implementation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Hall, Philip P.

    1985-01-01

    The design plan for the personal computer multiple information system interface (PC/MISI) project is discussed. The document is intended to be used as a blueprint for the implementation of the system. Each component is described in the detail necessary to allow programmers to implement the system. A description of the system data flow and system file structures is given.

  19. Remote estimation of phycocyanin (PC) for inland waters coupled with YSI PC fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaishan; Li, Lin; Tedesco, Lenore; Clercin, Nicole; Hall, Bob; Li, Shuai; Shi, Kun; Liu, Dawei; Sun, Ying

    2013-08-01

    Nuisance cyanobacterial blooms degrade water resources through accelerated eutrophication, odor generation, and production of toxins that cause adverse effects on human health. Quick and effective methods for detecting cyanobacterial abundance in drinking water supplies are urgently needed to compliment conventional laboratory methods, which are costly and time consuming. Hyperspectral remote sensing can be an effective approach for rapid assessment of cyanobacterial blooms. Samples (n=250) were collected from five drinking water sources in central Indiana (CIN), USA, and South Australia (SA), which experience nuisance cyanobacterial blooms. In situ hyperspectral data were used to develop models by relating spectral signal with handheld fluorescence probe (YSI 6600 XLM-SV) measured phycocyanin (PC in cell/ml), a proxy pigment unique for indicating the presence of cyanobacteria. Three-band model (TBM), which is effective for chlorophyll-a estimates, was tuned to quantify cyanobacteria coupled with the PC probe measured cyanobacteria. As a comparison, two band model proposed by Simis et al. (Limnol Oceanogr, 50(11): 237-245, 2005; denoted as SM05) was paralleled to evaluate TBM model performance. Our observation revealed a high correlation between measured and estimated PC for SA dataset (R (2) =0.96; range: 534-20,200 cell/ml) and CIN dataset (R (2) =0.88; range: 1,300-44,500 cell/ml). The potential of this modeling approach for imagery data were assessed by simulated ESA/Centinel3/OLCI spectra, which also resulted in satisfactory performance with the TBM for both SA dataset (RMSE % =26.12) and CIN dataset (RMSE % =34.49). Close relationship between probe-measured PC and laboratory measured cyanobacteria biovolume was observed (R (2) =0.93, p<0.0001) for the CIN dataset, indicating a stable performance for PC probe. Based on our observation, field spectroscopic measurement coupled with PC probe measurements can provide quantitative cyanobacterial bloom information from both relatively static and flowing inland waters. Hence, it has promising implications for water resource managers to obtain information for early warning detection of cyanobacterial blooms through the close association between probe measured PC values and cyanobacterial biovolume via remote sensing modeling. PMID:23397212

  20. Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunez, E.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1994-01-01

    TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport, was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large three dimensional (3-D) geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally nonsymmetric and nonpositive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000+ grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PC's provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.

  1. User's guide and documentation manual for BOAST-VHS for the PC''

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ming-Ming; Sarathi, P.; Heemstra, R.J.; Cheng, A.M.; Pautz, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The recent advancement of computer technology makes reservoir simulations feasible in a personal computer (PC) environment. This manual provides a guide for running BOAST-VHS, a black oil reservoir simulator for vertical/horizontal/slant wells, using a PC. In addition to detailed explanations of input data file preparation for simulation runs, special features of BOAST-VHS are described and three sample problems are presented. BOAST-VHS is a cost-effective and easy-to-use reservoir simulation tool for the study of oil production from primary depletion and waterflooding in a black oil reservoir. The well model in BOAST-VHS permits specification of any combination of horizontal, slanted, and vertical wells in the reservoir. BOAST-VHS was designed for an IBM PC/AT, PS-2, or compatible computer with 640 K bytes of memory. BOAST-VHS can be used to model a three-dimensional reservoir of up to 810 grid blocks with any combination of rows, columns, and layers, depending on the input data supplied. This dynamic redimensioning feature facilitates simulation work by avoiding the need to recompiling the simulator for different reservoir models. Therefore the program is only supplied as executable code without any source code.

  2. User`s guide and documentation manual for ``BOAST-VHS for the PC``

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ming-Ming; Sarathi, P.; Heemstra, R.J.; Cheng, A.M.; Pautz, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The recent advancement of computer technology makes reservoir simulations feasible in a personal computer (PC) environment. This manual provides a guide for running BOAST-VHS, a black oil reservoir simulator for vertical/horizontal/slant wells, using a PC. In addition to detailed explanations of input data file preparation for simulation runs, special features of BOAST-VHS are described and three sample problems are presented. BOAST-VHS is a cost-effective and easy-to-use reservoir simulation tool for the study of oil production from primary depletion and waterflooding in a black oil reservoir. The well model in BOAST-VHS permits specification of any combination of horizontal, slanted, and vertical wells in the reservoir. BOAST-VHS was designed for an IBM PC/AT, PS-2, or compatible computer with 640 K bytes of memory. BOAST-VHS can be used to model a three-dimensional reservoir of up to 810 grid blocks with any combination of rows, columns, and layers, depending on the input data supplied. This dynamic redimensioning feature facilitates simulation work by avoiding the need to recompiling the simulator for different reservoir models. Therefore the program is only supplied as executable code without any source code.

  3. AKPLOT- A PLOTTER ROUTINE FOR THE IBM PC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The AKPLOT routine was designed for engineers and scientists who use graphs as an integral part of their documentation. AKPLOT allows the user to generate a graph and edit its appearance on a CRT. This graph may undergo many interactive alterations before it is finally screen dumped to a printer for a hard copy plot. The finished AKPLOT graph may be stored in a file for future use. Features available in AKPLOT include: multiple curves on a single plot; combinations of linear and logarithmic scale axes; Lagrange interpolation of selected curves; shrink, expand, zoom, and tilt; ten different symbols and four different colors for curves; and three different grid types. AKPLOT enables the user to perform least squares fitting of all or selected curves with polynomials of up to 99 degrees and examine the least squares coefficients. The user must provide the data points to be plotted by one of two methods: 1) supplying an external file of X-Y values for all curves, or 2) computing the X-Y vectors by either placing BASIC code describing the relation in a designated section of the AKPLOT code or dynamically entering a one line function. Using either technique, the X-Y values are input to the computer only once, as the iterative graph edit loop bypasses the data input step for faster execution. AKPLOT is written in BASIC for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under DOS. AKPLOT requires a graphics board and a color monitor. This program was originally developed in 1986 and later revised in 1987.

  4. [Report on the VDÄPC Fellowship].

    PubMed

    Sarantopoulos, E

    2016-04-01

    "Orandum est ut sit mens sana in corpore sano" ("You should pray for a healthy mind in a healthy body"). This phrase is a shortened citation from the satirical work of the Roman poet Juvenal. It highlights the significant role of physical as well as mental health. Aesthetic ideals have existed since the Archaic age, but they are not necessarily the same in different continents. Being familiar with aesthetic ideals in different cultures might help to accommodate patients' needs and wishes in today's globalised world. Therefore, fellowship programs such as the program organised by the Association of German Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons ("VDÄPC") are very important for young plastic surgeons who are interested in improving their surgical skills and experience. After all, aesthetic surgery is a dynamic specialty, which requires aesthetic plastic surgeons to undergo continued medical education. PMID:27096212

  5. Data integration and mapping with a PC

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J.; Freeman, D.M.; Stewart, H.E. )

    1987-02-01

    One of the major problems facing today's explorationist is integrating more data into the exploration process. Most data are either in map form or on scout tickets, and must be transferred onto composite maps. Traditional methods have relied heavily on photography and drafting to accomplish this task. This has led to several problems, including (1) often too much information is put on one map making it difficult to extract specific information, and (2) users are reluctant to make changes or updates because of the effort required to redraft the map. To solve these problems and integrate more data into the exploration process, they developed a geologic data base and mapping system on an IBM PC AT. Rather than develop their own data-base system and graphics routines, they used two off-the-shelf packages, dBASE III and AutoCAD. They concentrated on their area of expertise: designing the needed output products.

  6. COBRA-IV PC: A personal computer version of COBRA-IV-I for thermal-hydraulic analysis of rod bundle nuclear fuel elements and cores

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    COBRA-IV PC is a modified version of COBRA-IV-I, adapted for use with most IBM PC and PC-compatible desktop computers. Like COBRA-IV-I, COBRA-IV PC uses the subchannel analysis approach to determine the enthalpy and flow distribution in rod bundles for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state and transient solution schemes used in COBRA-IIIC are still available in COBRA-IV PC as the implicit solution scheme option. An explicit solution scheme is also available, allowing the calculation of severe transients involving flow reversals, recirculations, expulsions, and reentry flows, with a pressure or flow boundary condition specified. In addition, several modifications have been incorporated into COBRA-IV PC to allow the code to run on the PC. These include a reduction in the array dimensions, the removal of the dump and restart options, and the inclusion of several code modifications by Oregon State University, most notably, a critical heat flux correlation for boiling water reactor fuel and a new solution scheme for cross-flow distribution calculations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Image coding.

    PubMed

    Kunt, M

    1988-01-01

    The digital representation of an image requires a very large number of bits. The goal of image coding is to reduce this number, as much as possible, and reconstruct a faithful duplicate of the original picture. Early efforts in image coding, solely guided by information theory, led to a plethora of methods. The compression ratio reached a saturation level around 10:1 a couple of years ago. Recent progress in the study of the brain mechanism of vision and scene analysis has opened new vistas in picture coding. Directional sensitivity of the neurones in the visual pathway combined with the separate processing of contours and textures has led to a new class of coding methods capable of achieving compression ratios as high as 100:1. PMID:3072645

  8. User`s guide and documentation manual for ``PC-Gel`` simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ming-Ming; Gao, Hong W.

    1993-10-01

    PC-GEL is a three-dimensional, three-phase (oil, water, and gas) permeability modification simulator developed by incorporating an in-situ gelation model into a black oil simulator (BOAST) for personal computer application. The features included in the simulator are: transport of each chemical species of the polymer/crosslinker system in porous media, gelation reaction kinetics of the polymer with crosslinking agents, rheology of the polymer and gel, inaccessible pore volume to macromolecules, adsorption of chemical species on rock surfaces, retention of gel on the rock matrix, and permeability reduction caused by the adsorption of polymer and gel. The in-situ gelation model and simulator were validated against data reported in the literature. The simulator PC-GEL is useful for simulating and optimizing any combination of primary production, waterflooding, polymer flooding, and permeability modification treatments. A general background of permeability modification using crosslinked polymer gels is given in Section I and the governing equations, mechanisms, and numerical solutions of PC-GEL are given in Section II. Steps for preparing an input data file with reservoir and gel-chemical transport data, and recurrent data are described in Sections III and IV, respectively. Example data inputs are enclosed after explanations of each input line to help the user prepare data files. Major items of the output files are reviewed in Section V. Finally, three sample problems for running PC-GEL are described in Section VI, and input files and part of the output files of these problems are listed in the appendices. For the user`s reference a copy of the source code of PC-GEL computer program is attached in Appendix A.

  9. Investigation of interaction between Pc 1 and 2 and Pc 5 micropulsations at the synchronous orbit during magnetic storms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barfield, J. N.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Coincident Pc 5 and Pc 1 and 2 micropulsations were observed at the synchronous equatorial satellite ATS 1 during the main phase of 11 geomagnetic storms that occurred in 1967. The Pc 1 and 2 oscillations were quasi sinusoidal, with periods of 5-20 sec and amplitudes of 1-2 gammas. Their average polarization was transverse to the ambient magnetic field. The oscillations were elliptical and rotation was to the left in relation to the main field. The observed characteristics suggest that the Pc 1 and 2 activity was due to ion cyclotron resonance of Alfven waves with energetic protons.

  10. Low cost PC based scanning Kelvin probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikie, I. D.; Estrup, P. J.

    1998-11-01

    We have developed a novel, low cost, scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) system that can measure work function (wf) and surface potential (sp) topographies to within 1 meV energy resolution. The control and measurement subcomponents are PC based and incorporate a flexible user interface, permitting software control of major parameters and allowing easy user implementation via automatic setup and scanning procedures. We review the mode of operation and design features of the SKP including the digital oscillator, the compact ambient voice-coil head-stage, and signal processing techniques. This system offers unique tip-to-sample spacing control (to within 40 nm) which provides a method of simultaneously imaging sample height topographies and is essential to avoid spurious or "apparent" wf changes due to scanning-induced spacing changes. We illustrate SKP operation in generating high resolution wf/sp profiles of metal interfaces (as a tip characterization procedure) and operational electronic devices. The SKP potentially has a very wide range of applications ranging from semiconductor quality control thin film and surface analyses to corrosion and biopotential imaging.

  11. Interstation Pc3 coherence at cusp latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuberla, C. A. L.; Olson, J. V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Fraser, B. J.; Ables, S.; Hughes, W. J.

    Magnetic fluctuations in the 22-100 millihertz (Pc3) band are a consistent indicator of the presence of the cusp in the overhead ionosphere at high latitudes. Correlation of the signals from a variety of instruments have shown that the sources of these pulsations are local (ionospheric) rather than distant (magnetospheric) [Engebretson et al., 1990]. Modulated electron precipitation is presumed to be the source of the fluctuations through the modulations in ionospheric conductivity that they produce. Olson and Szuberla [1997] used data from a pair of cusp stations to deduce the scale size of the precipitating beams using a simple model in which the beams were assumed to have circular cross section. They obtained an upper bound for the coherence length of the order of 200 km. In this paper we extend the analysis of Olson and Szuberla by incorporating data from the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS) magnetometer array and the Australian ANARE antarctic sites to give a broader range of station separations. Using a statistical approach we computed the cumulative distribution function of the interstation coherence and from that distribution we established a measure of coherence, CL. The result of this analysis is a coherence that diminishes with inter-station distance as CL ≈ 1.4 exp(-S/250) where S is the station separation in km. When this result is interpreted in the context of the simple model mentioned above we find a coherence length of 140-180km.

  12. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the coding techniques are equally applicable to any voice signal whether or not it carries any intelligible information, as the term speech implies. Other terms that are commonly used are speech compression and voice compression since the fundamental idea behind speech coding is to reduce (compress) the transmission rate (or equivalently the bandwidth) And/or reduce storage requirements In this document the terms speech and voice shall be used interchangeably.

  13. Pulsating proton aurora caused by rising tone Pc1 waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Omura, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    We found rising tone emissions with a dispersion of ˜1 Hz per several tens of seconds in the dynamic spectrum of a Pc1 geomagnetic pulsation (Pc1) observed on the ground. These Pc1 rising tones were successively observed over ˜30 min from 0250 UT on 14 October 2006 by an induction magnetometer at Athabasca, Canada (54.7°N, 246.7°E, magnetic latitude 61.7°N). Simultaneously, a Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms panchromatic (THEMIS) all-sky camera detected pulsations of an isolated proton aurora with a period of several tens of seconds, ˜10% variations in intensity, and fine structures of 3° in magnetic longitudes. The pulsations of the proton aurora close to the zenith of ATH have one-to-one correspondences with the Pc1 rising tones. This suggests that these rising tones scatter magnetospheric protons intermittently at the equatorial region. The radial motion of the magnetospheric source, of which the isolated proton aurora is a projection, can explain the central frequency increase of Pc1, but not the shorter period (tens of seconds) frequency increase of ˜1 Hz in Pc1 rising tones. We suggest that EMIC-triggered emissions generate the frequency increase of Pc1 rising tones on the ground and that they also cause the Pc1 pearl structure, which has a similar characteristic time.

  14. 39 CFR 501.16 - PC postage payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... refunds provided to customers by the provider. (f) Security and revenue protection. To receive Postal... examination of its PC Postage system and any other applications and technology infrastructure that may have a... controls related to the PC Postage system and any other applications and technology...

  15. 39 CFR 501.16 - PC postage payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... refunds provided to customers by the provider. (f) Security and Revenue Protection. To receive Postal... examination of its PC Postage system and any other applications and technology infrastructure that may have a... controls related to the PC Postage system, and any other applications and technology...

  16. 39 CFR 501.16 - PC postage payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... refunds provided to customers by the provider. (f) Security and revenue protection. To receive Postal... examination of its PC Postage system and any other applications and technology infrastructure that may have a... controls related to the PC Postage system and any other applications and technology...

  17. Transforming PC Power Supplies into Smart Car Battery Conditioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Ascariz, J. M.; Boquete-Vazquez, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory project consisting of a PC power supply modification into an intelligent car-battery conditioner with both wireless and wired networking capabilities. Adding a microcontroller to an average PC power supply transforms it into a flexible, intelligent device that can be configured and that is suitable to keep car

  18. PrPC from stem cells to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Hirsch, Théo Z.; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Halliez, Sophie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Launay, Jean-Marie; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The cellular prion protein PrPC was initially discovered as the normal counterpart of the pathological scrapie prion protein PrPSc, the main component of the infectious agent of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. While clues as to the physiological function of this ubiquitous protein were greatly anticipated from the development of knockout animals, PrP-null mice turned out to be viable and to develop without major phenotypic abnormalities. Notwithstanding, the discovery that hematopoietic stem cells from PrP-null mice have impaired long-term repopulating potential has set the stage for investigating into the role of PrPC in stem cell biology. A wealth of data have now exemplified that PrPC is expressed in distinct types of stem cells and regulates their self-renewal as well as their differentiation potential. A role for PrPC in the fate restriction of embryonic stem cells has further been proposed. Paralleling these observations, an overexpression of PrPC has been documented in various types of tumors. In line with the contribution of PrPC to stemness and to the proliferation of cancer cells, PrPC was recently found to be enriched in subpopulations of tumor-initiating cells. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by PrPC in stem cell biology and discuss how the subversion of its function may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:25364760

  19. Mouse vision: PC mouse control using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, David; Silva, E.; Patino, A.

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a system to control the PC's Mouse using the ocular movement. This system allows incapacitated people use the PC for many purposes; on the other hand, this system is ideal to play virtual games due to its interactivity with the user.

  20. 39 CFR 501.16 - PC postage payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.16 PC postage payment methodology. (a) The PC Postage customer is... issues a refund to a customer for any unused postage in a Postage Evidencing System. After verification... of its system, to be conducted by an independent systems auditor, the frequency and scope of...

  1. Transforming PC Power Supplies into Smart Car Battery Conditioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Ascariz, J. M.; Boquete-Vazquez, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory project consisting of a PC power supply modification into an intelligent car-battery conditioner with both wireless and wired networking capabilities. Adding a microcontroller to an average PC power supply transforms it into a flexible, intelligent device that can be configured and that is suitable to keep car…

  2. Extrapolating laboratory avian toxicity data to free-living birds: Comparison of the toxicity of parathion to captive and free-living European starlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grue, C.E.; Rattner, B.A.; Bunck, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    In 1985 and 1986, we captured nesting wild female European starlings with young 8-10 days of age. Birds were weighted, banded, and given one of four dosages of the OP insecticide parathion (50, 72, 104 or 150 mg/kg dissolved in corn oil) or pure corn-oil (control). and their young weighed. Nest boxes (7- 12/treatment) were observed and young re-weighed 2-3 days postdose to determine presence/absence of the females. If necessary, males were captured and fate of young used to confirm female response. Brain ChE inhibition in dosed birds (based on a pilot study) was 55-74%. EC50's (failure to return to nest box) for the females was 74 mg/kg in 1985 and 92 mg/kg in 1986. Confidence limit (95%) for these estimates overlapped LD50's for captive female starlings dosed with the OP in spring and early summer 1987 (136, 128 mg/kg, respectively). Results suggest that responses of captive and free-living birds to potentially lethal concentrations of OP's are similar, despite the additional stresses in the wild.

  3. Genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida X3 strain and its potential ability to bioremediate soil microcosms contaminated with methyl parathion and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Xu, Xingjian; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-02-01

    A multifunctional Pseudomonas putida X3 strain was successfully engineered by introducing methyl parathion (MP)-degrading gene and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in P. putida X4 (CCTCC: 209319). In liquid cultures, the engineered X3 strain utilized MP as sole carbon source for growth and degraded 100 mg L(-1) of MP within 24 h; however, this strain did not further metabolize p-nitrophenol (PNP), an intermediate metabolite of MP. No discrepancy in minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cobalt (Co) was observed between the engineered X3 strain and its host strain. The inoculated X3 strain accelerated MP degradation in different polluted soil microcosms with 100 mg MP kg(-1) dry soil and/or 5 mg Cd kg(-1) dry soil; MP was completely eliminated within 40 h. However, the presence of Cd in the early stage of remediation slightly delayed MP degradation. The application of X3 strain in Cd-contaminated soil strongly affected the distribution of Cd fractions and immobilized Cd by reducing bioavailable Cd concentrations with lower soluble/exchangeable Cd and organic-bound Cd. The inoculated X3 strain also colonized and proliferated in various contaminated microcosms. Our results suggested that the engineered X3 strain is a potential bioremediation agent showing competitive advantage in complex contaminated environments. PMID:26521245

  4. PC viruses: How do they do that

    SciTech Connect

    Pichnarczyk, K.

    1992-07-01

    The topic of PC Viruses has been an issue for a number of years now. They've been reported in every major newspaper, tabloids, television and radio. People from all fields get viruses: government, private sector businesses, home computers, schools, computer software suppliers. A definition is proposed to introduce the virus phenomenon. Virus authors come from a variety of communities. Motives and ideologies of authors are discussed, and examples of viruses are offered. Also mentioned is the growing number of viruses developed, isolated, and never distributed to the public at large, but kept within the antivirus research community. Virus examples are offered as well. Viruses are distributed not only through bulletin boards and shareware, but also from areas previously assumed to be safe, including the threat of receiving a virus through a standard in-house function, such as an in-house hardware maintenance shop. Three categories of viruses are presented: File Infecter viruses, Boot Sector Infecters, and the new category of Directory Entry Infecter virus. Also discussed are crossover viruses, that is, viruses which utilize a variety of techniques to ensure survival. An explanation of what is occurring within every stage of various viruses is given. Replication strategies common to all three types is noted, mainly the two different replication strategies of memory resident infecters and active selection infecters. A detailed definition, description and application of a stealth virus is presented. Detection strategies are discussed as each topic in this section is completed; a high level schemata of the operation of various virus detection programs ispresented. Since most eradication today is done using virus detection/eradication software, this paper attempts to reveal the techniques used by these packages.Included in the paper is the topic of manual eradication.

  5. PC viruses: How do they do that?

    SciTech Connect

    Pichnarczyk, K.

    1992-07-01

    The topic of PC Viruses has been an issue for a number of years now. They`ve been reported in every major newspaper, tabloids, television and radio. People from all fields get viruses: government, private sector businesses, home computers, schools, computer software suppliers. A definition is proposed to introduce the virus phenomenon. Virus authors come from a variety of communities. Motives and ideologies of authors are discussed, and examples of viruses are offered. Also mentioned is the growing number of viruses developed, isolated, and never distributed to the public at large, but kept within the antivirus research community. Virus examples are offered as well. Viruses are distributed not only through bulletin boards and shareware, but also from areas previously assumed to be safe, including the threat of receiving a virus through a standard in-house function, such as an in-house hardware maintenance shop. Three categories of viruses are presented: File Infecter viruses, Boot Sector Infecters, and the new category of Directory Entry Infecter virus. Also discussed are crossover viruses, that is, viruses which utilize a variety of techniques to ensure survival. An explanation of what is occurring within every stage of various viruses is given. Replication strategies common to all three types is noted, mainly the two different replication strategies of memory resident infecters and active selection infecters. A detailed definition, description and application of a stealth virus is presented. Detection strategies are discussed as each topic in this section is completed; a high level schemata of the operation of various virus detection programs ispresented. Since most eradication today is done using virus detection/eradication software, this paper attempts to reveal the techniques used by these packages.Included in the paper is the topic of manual eradication.

  6. Run-09 pC polarimeter analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoyan, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Lee, S.; Li, X.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nakagawa, I.; Svirida, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2010-08-01

    Analysis of PC polarimeter data at {radical}s = 200 and 500 GeV from Run9 is presented. Final polarization results, fill-by-fill, for blue and yellow beams, as to be used by RHIC experiments (in collisions) are released and collected in http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/cnipol/pubdocs/Run09Offline/. Global relative systematic uncertainties {delta}P/P (to be considered as correlated from fill to fill) are 4.7% for 100 GeV beams, and 8.3% (12.1%) for blue (yellow) 250 GeV beams. For a product of two beam polarizations P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y} (used in double spin asymmetry measurements) the relative uncertainty {delta}(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y})/(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y}) 8.8% for 100 GeV beams and 18.5% for 250 GeV beams. For the average between two beam polarization (P{sub B} + P{sub Y})/2 (used in single spin asymmetry measurements, when data from two polarized beams are combined) the relative uncertainty is 4.4% for 100 GeV beams and 9.2% for 250 GeV beams. Larger uncertainties for 250 GeV beams relate to significant rate related systematic effects experienced in the first part of Run9 (due to thicker targets used and smaller trans. beam size at higher beam energy).

  7. PC/FRAM, Version 3.2 User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, T.A.; Sampson, T.E.

    1999-02-23

    This manual describes the use of version 3.2 of the PC/FRAM plutonium isotopic analysis software developed in the Safeguards Science and Technology Group, NE-5, Nonproliferation and International Security Division Los Alamos National Laboratory. The software analyzes the gamma ray spectrum from plutonium-bearing items and determines the isotopic distribution of the plutonium 241Am content and concentration of other isotopes in the item. The software can also determine the isotopic distribution of uranium isotopes in items containing only uranium. The body of this manual descnies the generic version of the code. Special facility-specific enhancements, if they apply, will be described in the appendices. The information in this manual applies equally well to version 3.3, which has been licensed to ORTEC. The software can analyze data that is stored in a file on disk. It understands several storage formats including Canberra's S1OO format, ORTEC'S `chn' and `SPC' formats, and several ASCII text formats. The software can also control data acquisition using an MCA and then store the results in a file on disk for later analysis or analyze the spectrum directly after the acquisition. The software currently only supports the control of ORTEC MCB'S. Support for Canbema's Genie-2000 Spectroscopy Systems will be added in the future. Support for reading and writing CAM files will also be forthcoming. A versatile parameter fde database structure governs all facets of the data analysis. User editing of the parameter sets allows great flexibility in handling data with different isotopic distributions, interfering isotopes, and different acquisition parameters such as energy calibration, and detector type. This manual is intended for the system supervisor or the local user who is to be the resident expert. Excerpts from this manual may also be appropriate for the system operator who will routinely use the instrument.

  8. QR Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  9. Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the objectives, meeting goals and overall NASA goals for the NASA Data Standards Working Group. The presentation includes information on the technical progress surrounding the objective, short LDPC codes, and the general results on the Pu-Pw tradeoff.

  10. ISTUM PC: industrial sector technology use model for the IBM-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Roop, J.M.; Kaplan, D.T.

    1984-09-01

    A project to improve and enhance the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) was originated in the summer of 1983. The project had dix identifiable objectives: update the data base; improve run-time efficiency; revise the reference base case; conduct case studies; provide technical and promotional seminars; and organize a service bureau. This interim report describes which of these objectives have been met and which tasks remain to be completed. The most dramatic achievement has been in the area of run-time efficiency. From a model that required a large proportion of the total resources of a mainframe computer and a great deal of effort to operate, the current version of the model (ISTUM-PC) runs on an IBM Personal Computer. The reorganization required for the model to run on a PC has additional advantages: the modular programs are somewhat easier to understand and the data base is more accessible and easier to use. A simple description of the logic of the model is given in this report. To generate the necessary funds for completion of the model, a multiclient project is proposed. This project will extend the industry coverage to all the industrial sectors, including the construction of process flow models for chemicals and petroleum refining. The project will also calibrate this model to historical data and construct a base case and alternative scenarios. The model will be delivered to clients and training provided. 2 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Method of mounting a PC board to a hybrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Coin, James R. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A system for mounting a hybrid electronic component to a PC board is disclosed. The system includes a set of brackets for mutually engaging a first surface of the PC board and a cover surface of the hybrid electronic component, wherein the cover surface has an arcuate shape when in a vacuum environment. The brackets are designed with legs having lengths and thicknesses for providing clearance between the cover surface of the hybrid and the first surface of the PC board for use when the hybrid electronic component is in a vacuum environment.

  12. PC Farms for Offline Event Reconstruction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Beretvas, A.

    1997-03-01

    Fermilab is investigating the use of PC`s for HEP computing. As a first step we have built a full offline environment under Linux on a set of Pentium (P5) and Pentium Pro (P6) machines (the ``PC Farm``). The Pythia simulation has been ported to run serially and in parallel (using CPS) on the PC Farm. Fermilab software products and CDF offline packages have also been ported to Linux. Run 1 CDF data has been analyzed on both Linux and SGI (Irix) with essentially identical results. The performance of the system is compared to results with commercial UNIX systems.

  13. VeryVote: A Voter Verifiable Code Voting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joaquim, Rui; Ribeiro, Carlos; Ferreira, Paulo

    Code voting is a technique used to address the secure platform problem of remote voting. A code voting system consists in secretly sending, e.g. by mail, code sheets to voters that map their choices to entry codes in their ballot. While voting, the voter uses the code sheet to know what code to enter in order to vote for a particular candidate. In effect, the voter does the vote encryption and, since no malicious software on the PC has access to the code sheet it is not able to change the voters intention. However, without compromising the voters privacy, the vote codes are not enough to prove that the vote is recorded and counted as cast by the election server.

  14. PC-SEAPAK - ANALYSIS OF COASTAL ZONE COLOR SCANNER AND ADVANCED VERY HIGH RESOLUTION RADIOMETER DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    PC-SEAPAK is a user-interactive satellite data analysis software package specifically developed for oceanographic research. The program is used to process and interpret data obtained from the Nimbus-7/Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). PC-SEAPAK is a set of independent microcomputer-based image analysis programs that provide the user with a flexible, user-friendly, standardized interface, and facilitates relatively low-cost analysis of oceanographic satellite data. Version 4.0 includes 114 programs. PC-SEAPAK programs are organized into categories which include CZCS and AVHRR level-1 ingest, level-2 analyses, statistical analyses, data extraction, remapping to standard projections, graphics manipulation, image board memory manipulation, hardcopy output support and general utilities. Most programs allow user interaction through menu and command modes and also by the use of a mouse. Most programs also provide for ASCII file generation for further analysis in spreadsheets, graphics packages, etc. The CZCS scanning radiometer aboard the NIMBUS-7 satellite was designed to measure the concentration of photosynthetic pigments and their degradation products in the ocean. AVHRR data is used to compute sea surface temperatures and is supported for the NOAA 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 satellites. The CZCS operated from November 1978 to June 1986. CZCS data may be obtained free of charge from the CZCS archive at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. AVHRR data may be purchased through NOAA's Satellite Data Service Division. Ordering information is included in the PC-SEAPAK documentation. Although PC-SEAPAK was developed on a COMPAQ Deskpro 386/20, it can be run on most 386-compatible computers with an AT bus, EGA controller, Intel 80387 coprocessor, and MS-DOS 3.3 or higher. A Matrox MVP-AT image board with appropriate monitor and cables is also required. Note that the authors have received some reports of incompatibilities between the MVP-AT image board and ZENITH computers. Also, the MVP-AT image board is not necessarily compatible with 486-based systems; users of 486-based systems should consult with Matrox about compatibility concerns. Other PC-SEAPAK requirements include a Microsoft mouse (serial version), 2Mb RAM, and 100Mb hard disk space. For data ingest and backup, 9-track tape, 8mm tape and optical disks are supported and recommended. PC-SEAPAK has been under development since 1988. Version 4.0 was updated in 1992, and is distributed without source code. It is available only as a set of 36 1.2Mb 5.25 inch IBM MS-DOS format diskettes. PC-SEAPAK is a copyrighted product with all copyright vested in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Phar Lap's DOS_Extender run-time version is integrated into several of the programs; therefore, the PC-SEAPAK programs may not be duplicated. Three of the distribution diskettes contain DOS_Extender files. One of the distribution diskettes contains Media Cybernetics' HALO88 font files, also licensed by NASA for dissemination but not duplication. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. HALO88 is a registered trademark of Media Cybernetics, but the product was discontinued in 1991.

  15. [Study on fluorescence labeling and determination of polypeptide (PC2~PC6) by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-xi; Gao, Li-jie; Cao, Wei; Zheng, Li; Chen, Jun-hui; Xu, Xiu-li; Wang, Xiao-ru

    2014-12-01

    This study was based on the thiol groups (-SH) of PC2~PC6, which could be reacted with the Monobromobimane (mBBr), in order to get polypeptide derivatives with fluorescent signal. A new method was developed for measuring the Polypeptides by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector, then the chromatographic conditions of HPLC was optimized; meawhile the reaction proportion of PCs and mBBr was identified by Trap-MS. The results showed that, the reaction proportion of PCs and mBBr was 1:1, the polypeptide derivatives had good stability; the five compounds separation was better, and the peak time focused on the 16.6~22.0 min; the linear correlation coefficient of PC2, PC3, PC4, PC5 and PC6 was >0.9991, and the limits of quantification were 0.3, 0.05, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 mg · L(-1) respectively, the recovery rate was 83.0%-102.0%; the method was reproducible, RSD<2%, this method for measuring the peptide compounds was rapid and accurate. PMID:25881428

  16. OCEAN-PC and a distributed network for ocean data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, Douglas R.

    1992-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) wishes to develop an integrated software package for oceanographic data entry and access in developing countries. The software, called 'OCEAN-PC', would run on low cost PC microcomputers and would encourage and standardize: (1) entry of local ocean observations; (2) quality control of the local data; (3) merging local data with historical data; (4) improved display and analysis of the merged data; and (5) international data exchange. OCEAN-PC will link existing MS-DOS oceanographic programs and data sets with table-driven format conversions. Since many ocean data sets are now being distributed on optical discs (Compact Discs - Read Only Memory, CD-ROM, Mass et al. 1987), OCEAN-PC will emphasize access to CD-ROMs.

  17. PC-SPES (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of PC-SPES as a treatment for prostate cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  18. PC BEEPOP - A PERSONAL COMPUTER HONEY BEE POPULATION DYNAMICS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    PC BEEPOP is a computer model that simulates honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colony population dynamics. he model consists of a system of interdependent elements, including colony condition, environmental variability, colony energetics, and contaminant exposure. t includes a mortal...

  19. PC BEEPOP - AN ECTOXICOLOGICAL SIMULATION MODEL FOR HONEY BEE POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PC BEEPOP is a computer model that simulates honey bee colony population dynamics. he model consists of a feedback system of interdependent elements, including colony condition, environmental variability, and contaminant exposures. t includes a mortality module (BEEKILL) and a ch...

  20. PC-SPES (PDQ)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of PC-SPES as a treatment for prostate cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  1. Software Reviews. PC Software for Artificial Intelligence Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Helmut; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Contrasts artificial intelligence and conventional programming languages. Reviews Personal Consultant Plus, Smalltalk/V, and Nexpert Object, which are PC-based products inspired by problem-solving paradigms. Provides information on background and operation of each. (RT)

  2. PC-SPES (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of PC-SPES as a treatment for prostate cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  3. Strong decay patterns of the hidden-charm pentaquark states Pc(4380 ) and Pc(4450 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-Juan; Ma, Li; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-02-01

    With the heavy quark symmetry and spin rearrangement scheme, we study the strong decay behavior of the hidden-charm pentaquark states with JP=3/2± , 5/2± assuming they are molecular candidates composed of D¯ (*) and Σc(*) . We obtain several typical ratios of the partial decay widths of the hidden-charm pentaquarks. For the three S-wave (D ¯ Σc* ), (D¯ *Σc ), and (D¯ *Σc* ) molecular pentaquarks with JP=3/2 - , we have obtained the ratio of their J /ψ N decay widths: Γ [(D ¯ Σc*)] :Γ [(D¯ *Σc)] :Γ [(D¯ *Σc*)] =2.7 :1.0 :5.4 , which may be useful to further test the possible molecular assignment of the Pc states.

  4. Wf/pc Cycle 1 Calibration: Rapid Internal Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1990-12-01

    This test is to take repeated internal flats to test for contamination buildup on the optical surfaces or the reappearance of QEH. Part 1: INTFLATS in F555W are obtained every 4 days in both WFC and PC to check for measles or daisies and to monitor scattered light. Part 2: Sequential INTFLATS in F439W with PC are obtained every 7 days to check for QEH.

  5. Wf/pc Cycle 2 Calibration: Rapid Internal Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1991-07-01

    This test is to take repeated internal flats to test for contamination buildup on the optical surfaces or the reappearance of QEH. Part 1: INTFLATS in F555W are obtained every 4 days in both WFC and PC to check for measles or daisies and to monitor scattered light. Part 2: Sequential INTFLATS in F439W with PC are obtained every 7 days to check for QEH.

  6. Wf/pc Cycle 3 Calibration: Rapid Internal Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1992-06-01

    This test is to take repeated internal flats to test for contamination buildup on the optical surfaces or the reappearance of QEH. Part 1: INTFLATS in F555W are obtained every 4 days in both WFC and PC to check for measles or daisies and to monitor scattered light. Part 2: Sequential INTFLATS in F439W with PC are obtained every 7 days to check for QEH.

  7. Narrative compression coding for a channel with errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Data compression codes offer the possibility of improving the thruput of existing communication systems in the near term. This study was undertaken to determine if data compression codes could be utilized to provide message compression in a channel with up to a 0.10 bit error rate. The data compression capabilities of codes were investigated by estimating the average number of bits-per-character required to transmit narrative files. The performance of the codes in a channel with errors (a noisy channel) was investigated in terms of the average numbers of characters-decoded-in-error and of characters-printed-in-error-per-bit-error. Results were obtained by encoding four narrative files, which were resident on an IBM-PC and use a 58 character set. The study focused on Huffman codes and suffix/prefix comma-free codes. Other data compression codes, in particular, block codes and some simple variants of block codes, are briefly discussed to place the study results in context. Comma-free codes were found to have the most promising data compression because error propagation due to bit errors are limited to a few characters for these codes. A technique was found to identify a suffix/prefix comma-free code giving nearly the same data compressions as a Huffman code with much less error propagation than the Huffman codes. Greater data compression can be achieved through the use of this comma-free code word assignments based on conditioned probabilities of character occurrence.

  8. Mapping of the oat crown rust resistance gene Pc91.

    PubMed

    McCartney, C A; Stonehouse, R G; Rossnagel, B G; Eckstein, P E; Scoles, G J; Zatorski, T; Beattie, A D; Chong, J

    2011-02-01

    Crown rust is an important disease of oat caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks. Crown rust is efficiently and effectively managed through the development of resistant oat varieties. Pc91 is a seedling crown rust resistance gene that is highly effective against the current P. coronata population in North America. The primary objective of this study was to develop DNA markers linked to Pc91 for purposes of marker-assisted selection in oat breeding programs. The Pc91 locus was mapped using a population of F7-derived recombinant inbred lines developed from the cross 'CDC Sol-Fi'/'HiFi' made at the Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan. The population was evaluated for reaction to P. coronata in field nurseries in 2008 and 2009. Pc91 mapped to a linkage group consisting of 44 Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers. DArTs were successfully converted to sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. Five robust SCARs were developed from three non-redundant DArTs that co-segregated with Pc91. SCAR markers were developed for different assay systems, such that SCARs are available for agarose gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and Taqman single nucleotide polymorphism detection. The SCAR markers accurately postulated the Pc91 status of 23 North American oat breeding lines. PMID:20862449

  9. Endoproteolytic processing of integrin pro-alpha subunits involves the redundant function of furin and proprotein convertase (PC) 5A, but not paired basic amino acid converting enzyme (PACE) 4, PC5B or PC7.

    PubMed Central

    Lissitzky, J C; Luis, J; Munzer, J S; Benjannet, S; Parat, F; Chrétien, M; Marvaldi, J; Seidah, N G

    2000-01-01

    Several integrin alpha subunits undergo post-translational endoproteolytic processing at pairs of basic amino acids that is mediated by the proprotein convertase furin. Here we ask whether other convertase family members can participate in these processing events. We therefore examined the endoproteolysis rate of the integrin subunits pro-alpha5, alpha6 and alphav by recombinant furin, proprotein convertase (PC)5A, paired basic amino acid converting enzyme (PACE)4, PC1, PC2 and PC7 in vitro and/or ex vivo after overexpression in LoVo cells that were deficient in furin activity. We found that 60-fold more PC1 than furin was needed to produce 50% cleavage of pro-alpha subunit substrates in vitro; the defective pro-alpha chain endoproteolysis in LoVo cells was not rescued by overexpression of PC1 or PC2. No endoproteolysis occurred with PC7 either in vitro or ex vivo, although similar primary sequences of the cleavage site are found in integrins and in proteins efficiently processed by PC7, which suggests that a particular conformation of the cleavage site is required for optimal convertase-substrate interactions. In vitro, 50% cleavage of pro-alpha subunits was obtained with one-third of the amount of PC5A and PACE4 than of furin. In LoVo cells, PC5A remained more active than furin, PACE4 activity was quite low, and PC5B, which differs from PC5A by a C-terminal extension containing a transmembrane domain, was very inefficient in processing integrin alpha-subunit precursors. In conclusion, these results indicate that integrin alpha-subunit endoproteolytic processing involves the redundant function of furin and PC5A and to a smaller extent PACE4, but not of PC1, PC2, PC5B or PC7. PMID:10657249

  10. Algebraic solution of the synthesis problem for coded sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Leukhin, Anatolii N

    2005-08-31

    The algebraic solution of a 'complex' problem of synthesis of phase-coded (PC) sequences with the zero level of side lobes of the cyclic autocorrelation function (ACF) is proposed. It is shown that the solution of the synthesis problem is connected with the existence of difference sets for a given code dimension. The problem of estimating the number of possible code combinations for a given code dimension is solved. It is pointed out that the problem of synthesis of PC sequences is related to the fundamental problems of discrete mathematics and, first of all, to a number of combinatorial problems, which can be solved, as the number factorisation problem, by algebraic methods by using the theory of Galois fields and groups. (fourth seminar to the memory of d.n. klyshko)

  11. Crack propagation analysis of WECS (Wind Energy Conversion System) components using the LIFE2 computer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Herbert J.; Schluter, Larry L.

    1988-06-01

    The LIFE2 code is a fatigue/fracture analysis code that is specialized to the analysis of wind energy conversion system components. It is a PC-compatible FORTRAN code that is written in a top-down, modular format. This paper discusses the additions to the code that permit WECS components to be analyzed using linear fracture mechanics. To illustrate the capabilities of the numerical techniques employed here, two example problems are presented.

  12. Epitaxial growth and electronic properties of well ordered phthalocyanine heterojunctions MnPc/F{sub 16}CoPc

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Susi; Mahns, Benjamin; Treske, Uwe; Knupfer, Martin; Vilkov, Oleg; Haidu, Francisc; Fronk, Michael; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2014-09-07

    We have prepared phthalocyanine heterojunctions out of MnPc and F{sub 16}CoPc, which were studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This heterojunction is characterized by a charge transfer at the interface, resulting in charged MnPc{sup δ} {sup +} and F{sub 16}CoPc{sup δ} {sup −} species. Our data reveal that the molecules are well ordered and oriented parallel to the substrate surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate the filling of the Co 3d{sub z{sup 2}} orbital due to the charge transfer, which supports the explanation of the density functional theory, that the charge transfer is local and affects the metal centers only.

  13. CoPc and CoPcF16 on gold: Site-specific charge-transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Petraki, Fotini; Uihlein, Johannes; Aygül, Umut; Chassé, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Interface properties of cobalt(II) phthalocyanine (CoPc) and cobalt(II) hexadecafluoro-phthalocyanine (CoPcF16) to gold are investigated by photo-excited electron spectroscopies (X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES)). It is shown that a bidirectional charge transfer determines the interface energetics for CoPc and CoPcF16 on Au. Combined XPS and XAES measurements allow for the separation of chemical shifts based on different local charges at the considered atom caused by polarization effects. This facilitates a detailed discussion of energetic shifts of core level spectra. The data allow the discussion of site-specific charge-transfer processes. PMID:24991487

  14. A finite element code for electric motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1994-01-01

    FEMOT is a finite element program for solving the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. This version uses nonlinear, Newton first order elements. The code can be used for electric motor design and analysis. FEMOT can be embedded within an optimization code that will vary nodal coordinates to optimize the motor design. The output from FEMOT can be used to determine motor back EMF, torque, cogging, and magnet saturation. It will run on a PC and will be available to anyone who wants to use it.

  15. PC Tutor. Bericht uber ein PC-gestutzes Tutorensystem = PC Tutor. Report on a Tutoring System with Personal Computer. ZIFF Papiere 75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritsch, Helmut

    A project was conducted to increase as well as to professionalize communication between tutors and learners in a West German university's distance education program by the use of personal computers. Two tutors worked on the systematic development of a PC-based correcting system. The goal, apart from developing general language skills in English,…

  16. Morphine treatment selectively regulates expression of rat pituitary POMC and the prohormone convertases PC1/3 and PC2

    PubMed Central

    Anghel, Adrian; Paez Espinosa, Enma V.; Stuart, Ronald C.; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Nillni, Eduardo A.; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2013-01-01

    The prohormone convertases, PC1/3 and PC2 are thought to be responsible for the activation of many prohormones through processing including the endogenous opioid peptides. We propose that maintenance of hormonal homeostasis can be achieved, in part, via alterations in levels of these enzymes that control the ratio of active hormone to prohormone. In order to test the hypothesis that exogenous opioids regulate the endogenous opioid system and the enzymes responsible for their biosynthesis, we studied the effect of short-term morphine or naltrexone treatment on pituitary PC1/3 and PC2 as well as on the level of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor gene for the biosynthesis of the endogenous opioid peptide, beta-endorphin. Using ribonuclease protection assays, we observed that morphine down-regulated and naltrexone up-regulated rat pituitary PC1/3 and PC2 mRNA. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis confirmed that the protein levels changed in parallel with the changes in mRNA levels and were accompanied by changes in the levels of phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response element binding protein. We propose that the alterations of the prohormone processing system may be a compensatory mechanism in response to an exogenous opioid ligand whereby the organism tries to restore its homeostatic hormonal milieu following exposure to the opioid, possibly by regulating the levels of multiple endogenous opioid peptides and other neuropeptides in concert. PMID:23891651

  17. Autophagy Regulates Colistin-Induced Apoptosis in PC-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Yonghao; Ding, Wenjian; Jiang, Guozheng; Lu, Ziyin; Li, Li; Wang, Jinli

    2015-01-01

    Colistin is a cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic with activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Our recent study demonstrated that colistin induces apoptosis in primary chick cortex neurons and PC-12 cells. Although apoptosis and autophagy have different impacts on cell fate, there is a complex interaction between them. Autophagy plays an important role as a homeostasis regulator by removing excessive or unnecessary proteins and damaged organelles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of autophagy and apoptosis regulation in PC-12 cells in response to colistin treatment. PC-12 cells were exposed to colistin (125 to 250 μg/ml), and autophagy was detected by visualization of monodansylcadaverine (MDC)-labeled vacuoles, LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) immunofluorescence microscopic examination, and Western blotting. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining, and Western blotting. Autophagosomes were observed after treatment with colistin for 12 h, and the levels of LC3-II gene expression were determined; observation and protein levels both indicated that colistin induced a high level of autophagy. Colistin treatment also led to apoptosis in PC-12 cells, and the level of caspase-3 expression increased over the 24-h period. Pretreatment of cells with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) increased colistin toxicity in PC-12 cells remarkably. However, rapamycin treatment significantly increased the expression levels of LC3-II and beclin 1 and decreased the rate of apoptosis of PC-12 cells. Our results demonstrate that colistin induced autophagy and apoptosis in PC-12 cells and that the latter was affected by the regulation of autophagy. It is very likely that autophagy plays a protective role in the reduction of colistin-induced cytotoxicity in neurons. PMID:25645826

  18. Los Alamos radiation transport code system on desktop computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Briesmeister, J.F.; Brinkley, F.W.; Clark, B.A.; West, J.T. )

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. These codes were originally developed many years ago and have undergone continual improvement. With a large initial effort and continued vigilance, the codes are easily portable from one type of hardware to another. The performance of scientific work-stations (SWS) has evolved to the point that such platforms can be used routinely to perform sophisticated radiation transport calculations. As the personal computer (PC) performance approaches that of the SWS, the hardware options for desk-top radiation transport calculations expands considerably. The current status of the radiation transport codes within the LARTCS is described: MCNP, SABRINA, LAHET, ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, and ONELD. Specifically, the authors discuss hardware systems on which the codes run and present code performance comparisons for various machines.

  19. Initial experiences with grid-based volume visualization of fluid flow simulations on PC clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Iyer, Anusha

    2005-03-01

    Over the last 18 months, our team at the Laboratory for Computational Science & Engineering (LCSE) at the University of Minnesota has been moving our data analysis and visualization applications from small clusters of PCs within our lab to a Grid-based approach using multiple PC clusters with dynamically varying availability. Under support from an NSF CISE Research Resources grant, we have outfitted 52 Dell PCs in a student lab in our building that is operated by the University's Academic and Distributed Computing Services (ADCS) organization. This PC cluster supplements another PC cluster of 10 machines in our lab. As the students gradually leave this ADCS lab after 10 PM, the PCs are rebooted into an operating system image that sees the 400 GB disk subsystems we have installed on them and communicates with a central, 32-processor Unisys ES-7000 machine in our lab. The ES-7000 hosts databases that coordinate the work of these 52 PCs along with that of 10 additional Dell PCs in our lab that drive our PowerWall display. This equipment forms a local Grid that we coordinate to analyze and visualize data generated on remote clusters at NCSA. The PCs of the student lab offer a 20 TB pool of disk storage for our simulation data as well as a large movie rendering capability with their Nvidia graphics engines. However, these machines do not become available to us in force until after about 1 AM. This fact has forced us to automate our visualization process to an unusual degree. It has also forced us to address problems of security and run error diagnosis that we could easily avoid in a more standard environment. In this paper we report our methods of addressing these challenges and describe the software tools that we have developed and made available for this purpose on our Web site, www.lcse.umn.edu. We also report our experience in using this system to visualize 1.4 TB of vorticity volumetric data from a recent simulation of homogeneous, compressible turbulence with our PPM code. This code was run on the NSF TeraGrid cluster at NCSA, and the data was transported to our lab at 8 MB/sec over the Internet using the same ipRIO software that we developed to move this data around within our own environment. The move visualizations generated on the ADCS PCs overnight are viewed on the LCSE 10-panel, 13 Mpixel PowerWall the next day. Smaller trial movies can be generated on the small PC cluster in our lab before submitting an overnight large movie request.

  20. Narrative compression coding for a channel with errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, James W.

    1988-12-01

    Data compression codes offer the possibility of improving the throughput of existing communication systems in the near term. This study was undertaken to determine if data compression codes could be utilized to provide message compression in a channel with up to a .10 bit error rate. The data compression capabilities of codes were investigated by estimating the average number of bits-per-character required to transmit narrative files. The performance of the codes in a channel with errors (a noisy channel) was investigated in terms of the average numbers of characters decoded in error per bit error and of characters printed in error per bit error. Results were obtained by encoding four narrative files, which were resident on an IBM PC and use a 58 character set. The study focused on Huffman codes and suffix/prefix comma-free codes. Other data compression codes, in particular, block codes and some simple variants of block codes, are briefly discussed to place the study results in context. Comma-free codes were found to have the most promising data compression because error propagation due to bit errors are limited to a few characters for these codes. A technique was found to identify a suffix/prefix comma-free code giving nearly the same data compression as a Huffman code with much less error propagation than the Huffman codes.

  1. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is necessary only to add an identification record and the namelist data that are to be changed from the previous run. This code was originally developed in 1989 in FORTRAN V on a CDC 6000 computer system, and was later ported to an MS-DOS environment. Both versions are available from COSMIC. There are only a few differences between the PC version (LAR-14458) and CDC version (LAR-14178) of AERO2S distributed by COSMIC. The CDC version has one main source code file while the PC version has two files which are easier to edit and compile on a PC. The PC version does not require a FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST because a special INPUT subroutine has been added. The CDC version includes two MODIFY decks which can be used to improve the code and prevent the possibility of some infrequently occurring errors while PC-version users will have to make these code changes manually. The PC version includes an executable which was generated with the Ryan McFarland/FORTRAN compiler and requires 253K RAM and an 80x87 math co-processor. Using this executable, the sample case requires about four hours to execute on an 8MHz AT-class microcomputer with a co-processor. The source code conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard except that it uses variables longer than six characters. With two minor modifications, the PC version should be portable to any computer with a FORTRAN compiler and sufficient memory. The CDC version of AERO2S is available in CDC NOS Internal format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape. The PC version is available on a set of two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes. IBM AT is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. CDC is a registered trademark of Control Data Corporation. NOS is a trademark of Control Data Corporation.

  2. Pc1-Pc2 waves and energetic particle precipitation during and after magnetic storms: Superposed epoch analysis and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Lessard, M. R.; Bortnik, J.; Green, J. C.; Horne, R. B.; Detrick, D. L.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Manninen, J.; Petit, N. J.; Posch, J. L.; Rose, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic pulsations in the Pc1-Pc2 frequency range (0.1-5 Hz) are often observed on the ground and in the Earth's magnetosphere during the aftermath of geomagnetic storms. Numerous studies have suggested that they may play a role in reducing the fluxes of energetic ions in the ring current; more recent studies suggest they may interact parasitically with radiation belt electrons as well. We report here on observations during 2005 from search coil magnetometers and riometers installed at three Antarctic stations, Halley (-61.84° magnetic latitude, MLAT), South Pole (-74.18° MLAT), and McMurdo (-79.96° MLAT), and from energetic ion detectors on the NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environment Satellites (POES). A superposed epoch analysis based on 13 magnetic storms between April and September 2005 as well as case studies confirm several earlier studies that show that narrowband Pc1-Pc2 waves are rarely if ever observed on the ground during the main and early recovery phases of magnetic storms. However, intense broadband Pi1-Pi2 ULF noise, accompanied by strong riometer absorption signatures, does occur during these times. As storm recovery progresses, the occurrence of Pc1-Pc2 waves increases, at first in the daytime and especially afternoon sectors but at essentially all local times later in the recovery phase (typically by days 3 or 4). During the early storm recovery phase the propagation of Pc1-Pc2 waves through the ionospheric waveguide to higher latitudes was more severely attenuated. These observations are consistent with suggestions that Pc1-Pc2 waves occurring during the early recovery phase of magnetic storms are generated in association with plasmaspheric plumes in the noon-to-dusk sector, and these observations provide additional evidence that the propagation of waves to ground stations is inhibited during the early phases of such storms. Analysis of 30- to 250-keV proton data from four POES satellites during the 24-27 August and 18-19 July 2005 storm intervals showed that the location of the inner edge of the ring current matched well with the plasmapause model of O'Brien and Moldwin (2003). However, the POES data showed no evidence of the consequences of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (localized proton precipitation) during main and early recovery phase. During later stages of the recovery phase, when such precipitation was observed, it was coincident with intense wave events at Halley, and it occurred at L shells near or up to 1 RE outside the modeled plasmapause but well equatorward of the isotropy boundary.

  3. PC-based analysis of alpha-particle spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Terry C.

    1990-12-01

    Recently developed personal-computer (PC) software performs analysis of alpha-particle spectra. The spectra are collected using a commercially available multichannel analyzer board in the PC, interfaced with up to eight alpha-particle detectors. The PC is an IBM PC-AT computer with a 20 Mbyte Bernoulli-Box removable cartridge disk, a math coprocessor and a printer. Once saved on disk, the spectra are analyzed using the software described here. The PC analysis software performs automatic peak-area determination with operator override. Sample analysis can use measured detector efficiencies or chemical yields obtained from a radionuclide spike or both. Background contribution corrections for all peaks are included. Upper limit values are calculated for nuclides specified by the operator and not found in the sample. Nuclide identification uses a master table of up to 64 nuclides with up to 8 alpha lines for each nuclide. Any one of 32 available subtables can be selected for use in an analysis. Analysis time is short and is limited by interaction with the operator, not by calculation time. Both detailed and summary versions of final results are printed for ease of data reporting. Utilities included with the software provide nuclide table editing, subset table editing, energy calibration, efficiency calibration and background analysis with background correction file update.

  4. Top Ten Inpatient Palliative Medicine Billing and Coding Mistakes (and How to Fix Them This Week)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A.; Bull, Janet; Acevedo, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Palliative care (PC) has undergone incredible growth in the last 10 years, having gained subspecialty status and penetration into 85% of hospitals over 300 beds. The comprehensive services provided by multiple members of the PC team combined with low reimbursement for nonprocedural medical care challenges all PC teams to operate with financial sustainability. Accurately and compliantly documenting and coding services provided to patients can help to maximize PC programs' revenues and limit operating subsidies received from health care systems or hospice programs. In this article we share common billing and coding mistakes made by our programs and colleagues while providing inpatient, consultative palliative care. Each mistake is explained and paired with a straightforward fix to enable compliant, efficient practice. This will allow clinicians to more accurately communicate to payers the complex care provided to inpatients by the PC team. This fuller picture of the complexity of care provided can increase reimbursements received by your PC program from payers. Understanding how to accurately document, code, and receive appropriate reimbursement will allow our field to continue to grow, broadening the reach of PC nationally to improve quality of life for all patients and families in need. PMID:25671789

  5. Codes with special correlation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumert, L. D.

    1964-01-01

    Uniform binary codes with special correlation including transorthogonality and simplex code, Hadamard matrices and difference sets uniform binary codes with special correlation including transorthogonality and simplex code, Hadamard matrices and difference sets

  6. Error-correction coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, Erold W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made towards the completion of a specific task on error-correcting coding. The proposed research consisted of investigating the use of modulation block codes as the inner code of a concatenated coding system in order to improve the overall space link communications performance. The study proposed to identify and analyze candidate codes that will complement the performance of the overall coding system which uses the interleaved RS (255,223) code as the outer code.

  7. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2003-04-01

    During the current quarter, pilot scale testing was continued with the modified combustor and modified channel burner using the new PRB coal delivered in late December. Testing included benchmark testing to determine whether the system performance was comparable to that with the previous batch of PRB coal, baseline testing to characterize performance of the PC Burner without coal preheating, and parametric testing to evaluate the effect of various preheat combustor and PC burner operating variables, including reduced gas usage in the preheat combustor. A second version of the PC burner in which the secondary air channels were closed and replaced with six air nozzles was then tested with PRB coal. Plans were developed with RPI for the next phase of testing at the 100 million Btu/h scale using RPI's Coal Burner Test Facility (CBTF). A cost estimate for preparation of the CBTF and preheat burner system design, installation and testing was then prepared by RPI.

  8. Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Trocciola; Thomas N. Pompa; Linda S. Boyd

    2004-09-01

    This project involved the installation of a 200kW PC25C{trademark} phosphoric-acid fuel cell power plant at Orgenergogaz, a Gazprom industrial site in Russia. In April 1997, a PC25C{trademark} was sold by ONSI Corporation to Orgenergogaz, a subsidiary of the Russian company ''Gazprom''. Due to instabilities in the Russian financial markets, at that time, the unit was never installed and started by Orgenergogaz. In October of 2001 International Fuel Cells (IFC), now known as UTC Fuel Cells (UTCFC), received a financial assistance award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entitled ''Demonstration of PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia''. Three major tasks were part of this award: the inspection of the proposed site and system, start-up assistance, and installation and operation of the powerplant.

  9. PC-1D installation manual and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, P.A.

    1991-05-01

    PC-1D is a software package for personal computers that uses finite-element analysis to solve the fully-coupled two-carrier semiconductor transport equations in one dimension. This program is particularly useful for analyzing the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, but can be applied to any bipolar device whose carrier flows are primarily one-dimensional. This User's Guide provides the information necessary to install PC-1D, define a problem for solution, solve the problem, and examine the results. Example problems are presented which illustrate these steps. The physical models and numerical methods utilized are presented in detail. This document supports version 3.1 of PC-1D, which incorporates faster numerical algorithms with better convergence properties than previous versions of the program. 51 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Horio, Yukari; Sun, Yongkun; Liu, Chuang; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetner added to many low-calorie foods. The safety of aspartame remains controversial even though there are many studies on its risks. In this study, to understand the physiological effects of trace amounts of artificial sweetners on cells, the effects of aspartame on apoptosis were investigated using a PC12 cell system. In addition, the mechanism of apoptosis induced by aspartame in PC12 cells and effects on apoptotic factors such as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and caspase family proteins were studied by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspartame exposure increased the expressions of caspases 8 and 9, and cytochrome c. These results indicate that aspartame induces apoptosis mainly via mitochondrial pathway involved in apoptosis due to oxigen toxicity. PMID:24355796

  11. Tablet PC as a mobil PACS terminal using wireless LAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Bo-Shen; Ching, Yu-Tai; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Chen, Shyh-Jye; Chang, Chia-Hung; Chen, Chien-Jung; Yen, York; Lee, Yuan-Ten

    2003-05-01

    A PACS mobile terminal has applications in ward round, emergency room and remote teleradiology consultation. Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) have the highest mobility and are used for many medical applications. However, their roles are limited in the field of radiology due to small screen size. In this study, we built a wireless PACS terminal using a hand-held tablet-PC. A tablet PC (X-pilot, LEO systems, Taiwan) running the WinCE operating systems was used as our mobile PACS terminal. This device is equipped with 800×600 resolution 10.4 inch TFT monitor. The network connection between the tablet PC and the server was linked via wireless LAN (IEEE 802.11b).

  12. Regulation of the differentiation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, K; Lazarovici, P; Guroff, G

    1989-01-01

    The PC12 clone, developed from a pheochromocytoma tumor of the rat adrenal medulla, has become a premiere model for the study of neuronal differentiation. When treated in culture with nanomolar concentrations of nerve growth factor, PC12 cells stop dividing, elaborate processes, become electrically excitable, and will make synapses with appropriate muscle cells in culture. The changes induced by nerve growth factor lead to cells that, by any number of criteria, resemble mature sympathetic neurons. These changes are accompanied by a series of biochemical alterations occurring in the membrane, the cytoplasm, and the nucleus of the cell. Some of these events are independent of changes in transcription, while others clearly involve changes in gene expression. A number of the alterations seen in the cells involve increases or decreases in the phosphorylation of key cellular proteins. The information available thus far allows the construction of a hypothesis regarding the biochemical basis of PC12 differentiation. PMID:2647474

  13. Thermal Conductivity behavior of MWCNT based PMMA and PC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Girija; Jindal, Prashant; Bhandari, Rajiv; Dhiman, Neha; Bajaj, Chetan; Jindal, Vijay

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and Polycarbonate (PC) are low cost polymer materials which can be easily transformed into desired shapes for various applications. However they have poor mechanical, thermal and electrical properties which are required to be enhanced to widen their scope of applications specifically where along with high strength, rapid heat transfer is essential. Multi Walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are excellent new materials having extraordinary mechanical and transport properties. We will report results of fabricating composites of varying compositions of MWCNTs with PMMA and PC and their thermal conductivity behaviour using simple transient heat flow methods. The samples in disk shapes of around 2 cm diameters and 0.2 cm thickness with MWCNT compositions varying up to 10 wt% were fabricated. We found that both PMMA and PC measured high thermal conductivity with increase in the composition of CNTs. The thermal conductivity of 10wt% MWCNT/PMMA composite increased by nearly two times in comparison to pure PMMA.

  14. BioCode: Two biologically compatible Algorithms for embedding data in non-coding and coding regions of DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent times, the application of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has diversified with the emergence of fields such as DNA computing and DNA data embedding. DNA data embedding, also known as DNA watermarking or DNA steganography, aims to develop robust algorithms for encoding non-genetic information in DNA. Inherently DNA is a digital medium whereby the nucleotide bases act as digital symbols, a fact which underpins all bioinformatics techniques, and which also makes trivial information encoding using DNA straightforward. However, the situation is more complex in methods which aim at embedding information in the genomes of living organisms. DNA is susceptible to mutations, which act as a noisy channel from the point of view of information encoded using DNA. This means that the DNA data embedding field is closely related to digital communications. Moreover it is a particularly unique digital communications area, because important biological constraints must be observed by all methods. Many DNA data embedding algorithms have been presented to date, all of which operate in one of two regions: non-coding DNA (ncDNA) or protein-coding DNA (pcDNA). Results This paper proposes two novel DNA data embedding algorithms jointly called BioCode, which operate in ncDNA and pcDNA, respectively, and which comply fully with stricter biological restrictions. Existing methods comply with some elementary biological constraints, such as preserving protein translation in pcDNA. However there exist further biological restrictions which no DNA data embedding methods to date account for. Observing these constraints is key to increasing the biocompatibility and in turn, the robustness of information encoded in DNA. Conclusion The algorithms encode information in near optimal ways from a coding point of view, as we demonstrate by means of theoretical and empirical (in silico) analyses. Also, they are shown to encode information in a robust way, such that mutations have isolated effects. Furthermore, the preservation of codon statistics, while achieving a near-optimum embedding rate, implies that BioCode pcDNA is also a near-optimum first-order steganographic method. PMID:23570444

  15. Neural nets for radio Morse code recognizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hsin-Chia; Lin, Y. Y.; Pao, Hsiao-Tien

    1993-09-01

    This paper proposes a neural network recognition system for hand keying Radio Morse codes. The system has been trained and tested on real world data recorded from amateur radio Morse codes. The overall recognizing process can be partitioned into 3 major parts, the preprocessing, the feature extracting, and the character decoding. The whole operation is able to be performed in real-time on a PC/486 system. Self-Organizing Maps are used intensively in the recognition system to adaptively learn the variation of the Morse code signal. The average performance of the recognition system has been achieved about 96.4% with a rejection rate of 6.5%. It is hoped that many of the techniques would be applicable to a wide range of DSP and recognition tasks.

  16. Effect of morphine on PC12 cells with molecular radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chen; Yu, Xiaoli; Lu, Jiuyi; Zhang, Chunyang; Jin, Lei; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Dacheng; Chen, Die Yan

    2000-10-01

    Molecular Radar (MR) is a new method to detect biological processes in living cells at the level of molecular, it is also the newest means to get intracellular information. In this paper we study the effect of morphine on PC12 cells using MR. The results show that the effect of morphine on PC12 cells is time- and concentration-dependent. Morphine treating for short time induces the increase and fluctuation of intracellular (CA2+), while morphine treating for long time induces chromatin condensation, loss of mitochondria membrane potential apoptosis.

  17. Run-08 pC polarization analysis - October 16, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmawardane,V.; Bazilevsky,A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Nakagawa, I.; Morozov, B.; Okada, H.; Sivertz, M.; Zelenski, A.; Alekseev, I.; Svirida, D.

    2009-03-01

    In this note we will discuss the analysis of RHIC run 08 pC data that were collected during February 14 - March 10, 2008. An analysis method that is similar to Run 05 and Run 06 was adopted for Run 08 analysis (except few minor changes, which are described below). A detailed analysis note and a NIM article that describe the pC analysis procedure (for run 05 and run 06) can be found elsewhere. In brief, the analysis consists of calibrating the detectors, determining energy corrections ('dead layers'), determining good runs and extracting the polarization from data.

  18. Online medical symbol recognition using a Tablet PC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Amlan; Hu, Qian; Boykin, Stanley; Clark, Cheryl; Fish, Randy; Jones, Stephen; Moore, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a scheme to enhance the usability of a Tablet PC's handwriting recognition system by including medical symbols that are not a part of the Tablet PC's symbol library. The goal of this work is to make handwriting recognition more useful for medical professionals accustomed to using medical symbols in medical records. To demonstrate that this new symbol recognition module is robust and expandable, we report results on both a medical symbol set and an expanded symbol test set which includes selected mathematical symbols.

  19. [A PC-based 3D stereoscopic medical visualization system].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Tang, Hui; Lin, Yi-xing; Bao, Xu-dong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a low-cost PC-based, high-quality and interactive 3D stereoscopic medical visualization system is presented, which can be clinically used for diagnosis and surgical planning. The algorithms of direct volume rendering have been improved for realization with the programmable graphics hardware under PC environment. Local illumination, classification and non-polygonal iso-surface rendering are also incorporated into the system in appropriate consideration of both high-quality rendering and real-time interaction. The medical visualization system has been applied to the neurosurgical and orthopedic planning and the effectiveness has been clinically proved. PMID:17432117

  20. [A skin cell segregating control system based on PC].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-zhong; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Hong-bing

    2005-11-01

    A skin cell segregating control system based on PC (personal computer) is presented in this paper. Its front controller is a single-chip microcomputer which enables the manipulation for 6 patients simultaneously, and thus provides a great convenience for clinical treatments for vitiligo. With the use of serial port communication technology, it's possible to monitor and control the front controller in a PC terminal. And the application of computer image acquisition technology realizes the synchronous acquisition of pathologic shin cell images pre/after the operation and a case history. Clinical tests prove its conformity with national standards and the pre-set technological requirements. PMID:16494054

  1. PC Windows finite element modeling of landfill gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mull, S.R.; Lang, R.J.; Vigil, S.A.; Cota, H.

    1996-09-01

    A two dimensional demonstration program, GAS, has been developed for the solution of landfill gas (LFG) flow problems on a personal computer (PC). The program combines a Windows{trademark} graphical user interface, object oriented programming (OOP) techniques, and finite element modeling (FEM) to demonstrate the practicality of performing LFG flow modeling on the PC. GAS is demonstrated on a sample LFG problem consisting of a landfill, one gas extraction well, the landfill liner, cap, and surrounding soil. Analyses of the program results are performed for successively finer grid resolutions. Element flux imbalance, execution time, and required memory are characterized as a function of grid resolution.

  2. Photogrammetric processing of large images on a PC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skryabin, Sergei V.; Zheltov, Sergey Y.; Visilter, Yury V.

    1995-12-01

    A digital stereophotogrammetric system based on PC is being developed. The system uses standard IBM PC-AT/386-/486 as a processing unit. The system is capable to fulfill processes of stereo model's building and terrain reconstruction using aero and space photographs. The peculiarity of this system is its possibility to process the large digital images exceeding disk memory capacities. Initial images must be previously decomposed on the fragments by use of the Workstation computer. The fragments are accompanied by some extra information. The survey image is created using pyramid image processing.

  3. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-06-30

    Large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal has stopped. This stoppage has come about due to limitations in current funding available to continue large scale research and development activities at Riley's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) of the PC Preheat technology. The CBTF was secured and decommissioned in the previous quarter; work this quarter has focused on disposition of PC Preheat experimental equipment at the CBTF as well as methods for disposal of about 100 tons of residual PRB test coal in storage. GTI was granted a no-cost time extension through September 2005; a final report is due in December 2005.

  4. Expression of the neurosecretory process in PC12 cells is governed by REST.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Klajn, Andrijana; Stucchi, Laura; Podini, Paola; Malosio, Maria Luisa; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2008-05-01

    The neurosecretory process is acquired during differentiation and can be lost en block by differentiated cells. To investigate the role of REST/NRSF, a transcription repressor, in the maintenance of the process we studied two PC12 clones, one wt and one defective, expressing low and high levels of endogenous RE-1 silencing transcription (factor) (REST), respectively. Stable transfection of constructs demonstrated that REST represses 10 genes coding for proteins of neurosecretory vesicles and their exocytosis, eight including and two lacking the REST-binding sequence, RE-1. Of these genes, those of chromogranins were strongly repressed by fewfold increases of REST, those of VAMP2 and syntaxin1a required much higher levels. Moreover, in wt cells transfected with an active construct the dense-core vesicles, still competent for regulated exocytosis, were much smaller, with lighter cores; in defective cells, the dominant-negative construct induced the rescue of many vesicle/exocytosis genes but not of those of chromogranins. Small dense-core vesicles, exocytized upon stimulation, were rescued when the construct-transfected defective cells were transfected also with chromograninA or treated with trichostatinA, a blocker of histone deacetylases. Our results identify REST, working by direct and indirect mechanisms, as the factor governing the maintenance of the neurosecretory process and the properties of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells. PMID:18298477

  5. Characterization of the Pneumocystis carinii Histone Acetyltransferase Chaperone Proteins PcAsf1 and PcVps75

    PubMed Central

    Pupaibool, Jakrapun; Kottom, Theodore J.; Bouchonville, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Rtt109 is a lysine acetyltransferase that acetylates histone H3 at lysine 56 (H3K56) in fungi. This acetylation event is important for proper DNA replication and repair to occur. Efficient Rtt109 acetyltransferase activity also requires a histone chaperone, vacuolar protein sorting 75 (Vps75), as well as the major chaperone of the H3-H4 dimer, anti-silencing factor 1 (Asf1). Little is known about the role of these proteins in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis carinii. To investigate the functions of Asf1 and Vps75 in Pneumocystis carinii, we cloned and characterized both of these genes. Here, we demonstrate that both genes, P. carinii asf1 (Pcasf1) and Pcvps75, function in a fashion analogous to their Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterparts. We demonstrate that both P. carinii Asf1 (PcAsf1) and PcVps75 can bind histones. Furthermore, when Pcasf1 is expressed heterologously in S. cerevisiae asf1Δ cells, PcAsf1 can restore full H3 lysine acetylation. We further demonstrated that the Pcasf1 cDNA expressed in asf1Δ S. cerevisiae cells can restore growth to wild-type levels in the presence of genotoxic agents that block DNA replication. Lastly, we observed that purified PcAsf1 and PcVps75 proteins enhance the ability of PcRtt109 to acetylate histone H3-H4 tetramers. Together, our results indicate that the functions of the Rtt109-Asf1-Vps75 complex in the acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 and in DNA damage response are present in P. carinii DNA and cell cycle progression. PMID:23569117

  6. Dynamic Analysis of Spur Gear Transmissions (DANST). PC Version 3.00 User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Delgado, Irebert R.

    1996-01-01

    DANST is a FORTRAN computer program for static and dynamic analysis of spur gear systems. The program can be used for parametric studies to predict the static transmission error, dynamic load, tooth bending stress and other properties of spur gears as they are influenced by operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile. DANST performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. DANST can simulate gear systems with contact ratios ranging from one to three. It was designed to be easy to use and it is extensively documented in several previous reports and by comments in the source code. This report describes installing and using a new PC version of DANST, covers input data requirements and presents examples.

  7. Measure of 1/f noise using the sound card of a PC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlà, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    An experimental setup is described to measure 1/f noise (pink noise) in conductors using a PC equipped with a sound card functioning as a spectrum analyzer. A simple auxiliary analog electronic circuit with three operational amplifiers has been assembled to yield the required amplification, to match the sound card signal levels, and to implement a bridge configuration to improve dynamical range. Test experiments and data analysis have been conducted using commonly available software, together with some custom scripts and C code. The whole setup is technically accessible and economical for both the high school and undergraduate levels. Results are reported for pink noise of vintage carbon resistors spanning seven frequency decades, from 1 mHz to 10 kHz.

  8. PC vs. Mac--Which Way Should You Go?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the factors in hardware, software, and administration to consider in developing specifications for choosing a computer operating system. Compares Microsoft Windows 95/NT that runs on PC/Intel-based systems and System 7.5 that runs on the Apple-based systems. Lists reasons why the Microsoft platform clearly stands above the Apple platform.…

  9. Falling PC Solitaire Cards: An Open-Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2012-01-01

    Many of us have played the PC Solitaire game that comes as standard software in many computers. Although I am not a great player, occasionally I win a game or two. The game celebrates my accomplishment by pushing the cards forward, one at a time, falling gracefully in what appears to look like a parabolic path in a drag-free environment. One day,

  10. 36. View of preset counter (PC) console and tracking console ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. View of preset counter (PC) console and tracking console on right, located in MWOC facility in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. A PC-based Workstation for Robotic Discectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casadei, C.; Fiorini, P.; Martelli, S.; Montanari, M.; Morri, A.

    1998-01-01

    Ths paper describes a PC-based controller for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. The development is motivated by the need of reducing the exposure of operating room personnel to X-rays during surgical procedures such as percutanrous discectomy.

  12. Desktop Publishing in a PC-Based Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Harold A.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies, considers, and interrelates the functionality of hardware, firmware, and software types; discusses the relationship of input and output devices in the PC-based desktop publishing environment; and reports some of what has been experienced in three years of working intensively in/with desktop publishing devices and solutions. (MES)

  13. SEF.ASSISTANT: Shell for Authoring Language SEF.PC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masturzi, Elio R.

    This paper describes SEF.ASSISTANT, a special software shell for authoring languages to be used in the development of courseware serving computer based education (CBE). The capabilities of SEF.ASSISTANT are identified: (1) it will generate programs written in the IBM SEF.PC authoring language; (2) it is compatible with external standard software…

  14. Wf/pc Cycle 1 Calib: 4-CHIP UV Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1990-12-01

    THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (F194W, F230W, AND F284W). This calibration is done for each CCD detector using exposures of a UV flux standard star. This program is intended for use only during a UV campaign.

  15. Wf/pc Cycle 2 Calib: Single Chip UV Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1991-07-01

    THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (F194W, F230W, AND F284W). This calibration is done using exposures of a UV flux standard star. This program is intended for use only following a UV decontamination.

  16. PC-CUBE, a personal computer based hypercube

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, A.; Fox, G.; Walker, D.; Snyder, S.; Chang, D.; Chen, S.; Breaden, M.; Cole, T.

    1988-01-01

    PC-CUBE is an ensemble of IBM PCs or close compatibles connected in the hypercube topology with ordinary computer cables. Communication occurs at the rate of 115.2 K-baud via the RS-232 serial links. Available for PC-CUBE is the Crystalline Operating System III (CrOS III), Mercury Operating System, CUBIX and PLOTIX which are parallel I/O and graphics libraries. A CrOS performance monitor was developed to facilitate the measurement of communication and computation time of a program and their effects on performance. Also available are CXLISP, a parallel version of the XLISP interpreter; GRAFIX, some graphics routines for the EGA and CGA; and a general execution profiler for determining execution time spent by program subroutines. PC-CUBE provides a programming environment similar to all hypercube systems running CrOS III, Mercury and Cubix. In addition, every node (personal computer) has its own graphics display monitor and storage devices. These allow data to be displayed or stored at every processor, which has much instructional value and enables easier debugging of applications. Some application programs which are taken from the book Solving Problems on Concurrent Processors (Fox 88) were implemented with graphics enhancement on PC-CUBE. The applications range from solving the Mandelbrot set, Laplace equation, wave equation, long range force interaction, to WaTor, an ecological simulation.

  17. PC-CUBE: A personal computer based hypercube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Alex; Fox, Geoffrey; Walker, David; Snyder, Scott; Chang, Douglas; Chen, Stanley; Breaden, Matt; Cole, Terry

    1988-01-01

    PC-CUBE is an ensemble of IBM PCs or close compatibles connected in the hypercube topology with ordinary computer cables. Communication occurs at the rate of 115.2 K-band via the RS-232 serial links. Available for PC-CUBE is the Crystalline Operating System III (CrOS III), Mercury Operating System, CUBIX and PLOTIX which are parallel I/O and graphics libraries. A CrOS performance monitor was developed to facilitate the measurement of communication and computation time of a program and their effects on performance. Also available are CXLISP, a parallel version of the XLISP interpreter; GRAFIX, some graphics routines for the EGA and CGA; and a general execution profiler for determining execution time spent by program subroutines. PC-CUBE provides a programming environment similar to all hypercube systems running CrOS III, Mercury and CUBIX. In addition, every node (personal computer) has its own graphics display monitor and storage devices. These allow data to be displayed or stored at every processor, which has much instructional value and enables easier debugging of applications. Some application programs which are taken from the book Solving Problems on Concurrent Processors (Fox 88) were implemented with graphics enhancement on PC-CUBE. The applications range from solving the Mandelbrot set, Laplace equation, wave equation, long range force interaction, to WaTor, an ecological simulation.

  18. Audio Podcasting in a Tablet PC-Enhanced Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyles, Heather; Robertson, Brian; Mangino, Michael; Cox, James R.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the effects of making audio podcasts of all lectures in a large, basic biochemistry course promptly available to students. The audio podcasts complement a previously described approach in which a tablet PC is used to annotate PowerPoint slides with digital ink to produce electronic notes that can be archived. The fundamentals…

  19. Data Acquisition and Display for Electrophysiology: PC Oscilloscopes.

    PubMed

    George, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The PC oscilloscope, an external data acquisition unit connected to a laptop computer, is an option worth considering for neuroscience teaching labs that include electrophysiology. This article describes the available technology and reviews products on the market as of mid-2006. PMID:23493990

  20. Deciding when It's Time to Buy a New PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    How to best decide when it's time to replace your PC, whether at home or at work, is always tricky. Spending on computers can make you more productive, but it's money you otherwise cannot spend, invest or save, and faster systems always await you in the future. What is clear is that the computer industry really wants you to buy, and the computer…

  1. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  2. Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiwen; Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009; Bijie Pilot Area Research Institute of Bijie University, Bijie 551700 ; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Zhang, Kangbao; Jiang, Chenyang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 ; Liu, Zongping; Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. •Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. •Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. •Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity.

  3. IPEG- IMPROVED PRICE ESTIMATION GUIDELINES (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aster, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Improved Price Estimation Guidelines, IPEG, program provides a simple yet accurate estimate of the price of a manufactured product. IPEG facilitates sensitivity studies of price estimates at considerably less expense than would be incurred by using the Standard Assembly-line Manufacturing Industry Simulation, SAMIS, program (COSMIC program NPO-16032). A difference of less than one percent between the IPEG and SAMIS price estimates has been observed with realistic test cases. However, the IPEG simplification of SAMIS allows the analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform a greater number of sensitivity studies than with SAMIS. Although IPEG was developed for the photovoltaics industry, it is readily adaptable to any standard assembly line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG estimates the annual production price per unit. The input data includes cost of equipment, space, labor, materials, supplies, and utilities. Production on an industry wide basis or a process wide basis can be simulated. Once the IPEG input file is prepared, the original price is estimated and sensitivity studies may be performed. The IPEG user selects a sensitivity variable and a set of values. IPEG will compute a price estimate and a variety of other cost parameters for every specified value of the sensitivity variable. IPEG is designed as an interactive system and prompts the user for all required information and offers a variety of output options. The IPEG/PC program is written in TURBO PASCAL for interactive execution on an IBM PC computer under DOS 2.0 or above with at least 64K of memory. The IBM PC color display and color graphics adapter are needed to use the plotting capabilities in IPEG/PC. IPEG/PC was developed in 1984. The original IPEG program is written in SIMSCRIPT II.5 for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 300K of 8 bit bytes. The original IPEG was developed in 1980.

  4. Chromosomal assignment of the genes for proprotein convertases PC4, PC5, and PACE 4 in mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Mbikay, M.; Seidah, N.G.; Chretien, M.

    1995-03-01

    The genes for three subtilisin/kexin-like proprotein convertases, PC4, PC5, and PACE4, were mapped in the mouse by RFLP analysis of a DNA panel from a (C57BL/6JEi x SPRET/Ei) F{sub 1} x SPRET/Ei backcross. The chromosomal locations of the human homologs were determined by Southern blot analysis of a DNA panel from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, most of which contained a single human chromosome each. The gene for PC4 (Pcsk4 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 10, close to the Adn (adipsin, a serine protease) locus and near the Amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) locus; in a human, the gene was localized to chromosome 19. The gene for PC5 (Pcsk5 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 19 close to the Lpc1 (lipoacortin-1) locus and, in human, was localized to chromosome 9. The gene for PACE4 (Pcsk6 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 7, at a distance of 13 cM from the Pcsk3 locus, which specifies furin, another member of this family of enzymes previoulsy mapped to this chromosome. This is in concordance with the known close proximity of these two loci in the homologous region on human chromosome 15q25-qter. Pcsk3 and Pcsk6 mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 7 that has been associated cytogenetically with postnatal lethality in maternal disomy, suggesting that these genes might be candidates for imprinting. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Surface-type nonvolatile electric memory elements based on organic-on-organic CuPc-H2Pc heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasan, S. Karimov; Zubair, Ahmad; Farid, Touati; Mahroof-Tahir, M.; M. Muqeet, Rehman; S. Zameer, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    A novel surface-type nonvolatile electric memory elements based on organic semiconductors CuPc and H2Pc are fabricated by vacuum deposition of the CuPc and H2Pc films on preliminary deposited metallic (Ag and Cu) electrodes. The gap between Ag and Cu electrodes is 30-40 μm. For the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics the memory effect, switching effect, and negative differential resistance regions are observed. The switching mechanism is attributed to the electric-field-induced charge transfer. As a result the device switches from a low to a high-conductivity state and then back to a low conductivity state if the opposite polarity voltage is applied. The ratio of resistance at the high resistance state to that at the low resistance state is equal to 120-150. Under the switching condition, the electric current increases ˜ 80-100 times. A comparison between the forward and reverse I-V characteristics shows the presence of rectifying behavior. Project supported by the GIK Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Pakistan and Physical Technical Institute of Academy of Sciences of Tajikistan.

  6. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal antenna required to establish a link with the satellite, the statistical parameters that characterize the rainrate process at the terminal site, the length of the propagation path within the potential rain region, and its projected length onto the local horizontal. The IBM PC version of LeRC-SLAM (LEW-14979) is written in Microsoft QuickBASIC for an IBM PC compatible computer with a monitor and printer capable of supporting an 80-column format. The IBM PC version is available on a 5.25 inch MS-DOS format diskette. The program requires about 30K RAM. The source code and executable are included. The Macintosh version of LeRC-SLAM (LEW-14977) is written in Microsoft Basic, Binary (b) v2.00 for Macintosh II series computers running MacOS. This version requires 400K RAM and is available on a 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette, which includes source code only. The Macintosh version was developed in 1987 and the IBM PC version was developed in 1989. IBM PC is a trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. Macintosh is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.

  7. GABAA receptor-mediated feedforward and feedback inhibition differentially modulate the gain and the neural code transformation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Jae; Park, Kyerl; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Han, Kyu Hun; Kwag, Jeehyun

    2015-12-01

    Diverse variety of hippocampal interneurons exists in the CA1 area, which provides either feedforward (FF) or feedback (FB) inhibition to CA1 pyramidal cell (PC). However, how the two different inhibitory network architectures modulate the computational mode of CA1 PC is unknown. By investigating the CA3 PC rate-driven input-output function of CA1 PC using in vitro electrophysiology, in vitro-simulation of inhibitory network, and in silico computational modeling, we demonstrated for the first time that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibition differentially modulate the gain, the spike precision, the neural code transformation and the information capacity of CA1 PC. Recruitment of FF inhibition buffered the CA1 PC spikes to theta-frequency regardless of the input frequency, abolishing the gain and making CA1 PC insensitive to its inputs. Instead, temporal variability of the CA1 PC spikes was increased, promoting the rate-to-temporal code transformation to enhance the information capacity of CA1 PC. In contrast, the recruitment of FB inhibition sub-linearly transformed the input rate to spike output rate with high gain and low spike temporal variability, promoting the rate-to-rate code transformation. These results suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibitory circuits could serve as network mechanisms for differentially modulating the gain of CA1 PC, allowing CA1 PC to switch between different computational modes using rate and temporal codes ad hoc. Such switch will allow CA1 PC to efficiently respond to spatio-temporally dynamic inputs and expand its computational capacity during different behavioral and neuromodulatory states in vivo. PMID:26123028

  8. CLIPS - C LANGUAGE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEM (IBM PC VERSION WITH CLIPSITS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, , .

    1994-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System, CLIPS, is a shell for developing expert systems. It is designed to allow artificial intelligence research, development, and delivery on conventional computers. The primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. For these reasons, the program is written in C. CLIPS meets or outperforms most micro- and minicomputer based artificial intelligence tools. CLIPS is a forward chaining rule-based language. The program contains an inference engine and a language syntax that provide a framework for the construction of an expert system. It also includes tools for debugging an application. CLIPS is based on the Rete algorithm, which enables very efficient pattern matching. The collection of conditions and actions to be taken if the conditions are met is constructed into a rule network. As facts are asserted either prior to or during a session, CLIPS pattern-matches the number of fields. Wildcards and variables are supported for both single and multiple fields. CLIPS syntax allows the inclusion of externally defined functions (outside functions which are written in a language other than CLIPS). CLIPS itself can be embedded in a program such that the expert system is available as a simple subroutine call. Advanced features found in CLIPS version 4.3 include an integrated microEMACS editor, the ability to generate C source code from a CLIPS rule base to produce a dedicated executable, binary load and save capabilities for CLIPS rule bases, and the utility program CRSV (Cross-Reference, Style, and Verification) designed to facilitate the development and maintenance of large rule bases. Five machine versions are available. Each machine version includes the source and the executable for that machine. The UNIX version includes the source and binaries for IBM RS/6000, Sun3 series, and Sun4 series computers. The UNIX, DEC VAX, and DEC RISC Workstation versions are line oriented. The PC version and the Macintosh version each contain a windowing variant of CLIPS as well as the standard line oriented version. The mouse/window interface version for the PC works with a Microsoft compatible mouse or without a mouse. This window version uses the proprietary CURSES library for the PC, but a working executable of the window version is provided. The window oriented version for the Macintosh includes a version which uses a full Macintosh-style interface, including an integrated editor. This version allows the user to observe the changing fact base and rule activations in separate windows while a CLIPS program is executing. The IBM PC version is available bundled with CLIPSITS, The CLIPS Intelligent Tutoring System for a special combined price (COS-10025). The goal of CLIPSITS is to provide the student with a tool to practice the syntax and concepts covered in the CLIPS User's Guide. It attempts to provide expert diagnosis and advice during problem solving which is typically not available without an instructor. CLIPSITS is divided into 10 lessons which mirror the first 10 chapters of the CLIPS User's Guide. The program was developed for the IBM PC series with a hard disk. CLIPSITS is also available separately as MSC-21679. The CLIPS program is written in C for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC computer operating under DOS, a Macintosh and DEC VAX series computers operating under VMS or ULTRIX. The line oriented version should run on any computer system which supports a full (Kernighan and Ritchie) C compiler or the ANSI standard C language. CLIPS was developed in 1986 and Version 4.2 was released in July of 1988. Version 4.3 was released in June of 1989.

  9. CARES/PC - CERAMICS ANALYSIS AND RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatmary, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The beneficial properties of structural ceramics include their high-temperature strength, light weight, hardness, and corrosion and oxidation resistance. For advanced heat engines, ceramics have demonstrated functional abilities at temperatures well beyond the operational limits of metals. This is offset by the fact that ceramic materials tend to be brittle. When a load is applied, their lack of significant plastic deformation causes the material to crack at microscopic flaws, destroying the component. CARES/PC performs statistical analysis of data obtained from the fracture of simple, uniaxial tensile or flexural specimens and estimates the Weibull and Batdorf material parameters from this data. CARES/PC is a subset of the program CARES (COSMIC program number LEW-15168) which calculates the fast-fracture reliability or failure probability of ceramic components utilizing the Batdorf and Weibull models to describe the effects of multi-axial stress states on material strength. CARES additionally requires that the ceramic structure be modeled by a finite element program such as MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS. The more limited CARES/PC does not perform fast-fracture reliability estimation of components. CARES/PC estimates ceramic material properties from uniaxial tensile or from three- and four-point bend bar data. In general, the parameters are obtained from the fracture stresses of many specimens (30 or more are recommended) whose geometry and loading configurations are held constant. Parameter estimation can be performed for single or multiple failure modes by using the least-squares analysis or the maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit tests measure the accuracy of the hypothesis that the fracture data comes from a population with a distribution specified by the estimated Weibull parameters. Ninety-percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters and the unbiased value of the shape parameter for complete samples are provided when the maximum likelihood technique is used. CARES/PC is written and compiled with the Microsoft FORTRAN v5.0 compiler using the VAX FORTRAN extensions and dynamic array allocation supported by this compiler for the IBM/MS-DOS or OS/2 operating systems. The dynamic array allocation routines allow the user to match the number of fracture sets and test specimens to the memory available. Machine requirements include IBM PC compatibles with optional math coprocessor. Program output is designed to fit 80-column format printers. Executables for both DOS and OS/2 are provided. CARES/PC is distributed on one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette in compressed format. The expansion tool PKUNZIP.EXE is supplied on the diskette. CARES/PC was developed in 1990. IBM PC and OS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines. MS-DOS and MS OS/2 are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. VAX is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation.

  10. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Joseph Rabovitser; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-09-30

    The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (PC) boilers. This NO{sub x} reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to ready technology for full-scale commercial deployment to meet the market demand for NO{sub x} reduction technologies. Over half of the electric power generated in the U.S. is produced by coal combustion, and more than 80% of these units utilize PC combustion technology. Conventional measures for NOx reduction in PC combustion processes rely on combustion and post-combustion modifications. A variety of combustion-based NO{sub x} reduction technologies are in use today, including low-NO{sub x} burners (LNBs), flue gas recirculation (FGR), air staging, and natural gas or other fuel reburning. Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are post-combustion techniques. NO{sub x} reduction effectiveness from these technologies ranges from 30 to 60% and up to 90-93% for SCR. Typically, older wall-fired PC burner units produce NO{sub x} emissions in the range of 0.8-1.6 lb/million Btu. Low-NO{sub x} burner systems, using combinations of fuel staging within the burner and air staging by introduction of overfire air in the boiler, can reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 50-60%. This approach alone is not sufficient to meet the desired 0.15 lb/million Btu NO{sub x} standard with a range of coals and boiler loads. Furthermore, the heavy reliance on overfire air can lead to increased slagging and corrosion in furnaces, particularly with higher-sulfur coals, when LNBs are operated at sub-stoichiometric conditions to reduce fuel-derived NOx in the flame. Therefore, it is desirable to minimize the need for overfire air by maximizing NO{sub x} reduction in the burner. The proposed combustion concept aims to greatly reduce NO{sub x} emissions by incorporating a novel modification to conventional or low-NO{sub x} PC burners using gas-fired coal preheating to destroy NO{sub x} precursors and prevent NO{sub x} formation. A concentrated PC stream enters the burner, where flue gas from natural gas combustion is used to heat the PC up to about 1500 F prior to coal combustion. Secondary fuel consumption for preheating is estimated to be 3 to 5% of the boiler heat input. This thermal pretreatment releases coal volatiles, including fuel-bound nitrogen compounds into oxygen-deficient atmosphere, which converts the coal-derived nitrogen compounds to molecular N{sub 2} rather than NO. Design, installation, shakedown, and testing on Powder River Basin (PRB) coal at a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at RPI's (Riley Power, Inc.) pilot-scale combustion facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA demonstrated that the PC PREHEAT process has a significant effect on final O{sub x} formation in the coal burner. Modifications to both the pilot system gas-fired combustor and the PC burner led to NO{sub x} reduction with PRB coal to levels below 0.15 lb/million Btu with CO in the range of 35-112 ppmv without any furnace air staging.

  11. The secretory proprotein convertases furin, PC5, and PC7 activate VEGF-C to induce tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Siegfried, Geraldine; Basak, Ajoy; Cromlish, James A.; Benjannet, Suzanne; Marcinkiewicz, Jadwiga; Chrtien, Michel; Seidah, Nabil G.; Khatib, Abdel-Majid

    2003-01-01

    The secretory factor VEGF-C has been directly implicated in various physiological processes during embryogenesis and human cancers. However, the importance of the conversion of its precursor proVEGF-C to mature VEGF-C in tumorigenesis, and vessel formation and the identity of the protease(s) that regulate these processes is/are not known. The intracellular processing of proVEGF-C that occurs within the dibasic motif HSIIRR227SL suggests the involvement of the proprotein convertases (PCs) in this process. In addition, furin and VEGF-C were found to be coordinately expressed in adult mouse tissues. Cotransfection of the furin-deficient colon carcinoma cell line LoVo with proVEGF-C and different PC members revealed that furin, PC5, and PC7 are candidate VEGF-C convertases. This finding is consistent with the in vitro digestions of an internally quenched synthetic fluorogenic peptide mimicking the cleavage site of proVEGF-C (220Q-VHSIIRR?SLP230). The processing of proVEGF-C is blocked by the inhibitory prosegments of furin, PC5, and PACE4, as well as by furin-motif variants of ?2-macroglobulin and ?1-antitrypsin. Subcutaneous injection of CHO cells stably expressing VEGF-C into nude mice enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, but not tumor growth. In contrast, expression of proVEGF-C obtained following mutation of the cleavage site (HSIIRR227SL to HSIISS227SL) inhibits angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis as well as tumor growth. Our findings demonstrate the processing of proVEGF-C by PCs and highlight the potential use of PC inhibitors as agents for inhibiting malignancies induced by VEGF-C. PMID:12782675

  12. The secretory proprotein convertases furin, PC5, and PC7 activate VEGF-C to induce tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Siegfried, Geraldine; Basak, Ajoy; Cromlish, James A; Benjannet, Suzanne; Marcinkiewicz, Jadwiga; Chrétien, Michel; Seidah, Nabil G; Khatib, Abdel-Majid

    2003-06-01

    The secretory factor VEGF-C has been directly implicated in various physiological processes during embryogenesis and human cancers. However, the importance of the conversion of its precursor proVEGF-C to mature VEGF-C in tumorigenesis, and vessel formation and the identity of the protease(s) that regulate these processes is/are not known. The intracellular processing of proVEGF-C that occurs within the dibasic motif HSIIRR(227)SL suggests the involvement of the proprotein convertases (PCs) in this process. In addition, furin and VEGF-C were found to be coordinately expressed in adult mouse tissues. Cotransfection of the furin-deficient colon carcinoma cell line LoVo with proVEGF-C and different PC members revealed that furin, PC5, and PC7 are candidate VEGF-C convertases. This finding is consistent with the in vitro digestions of an internally quenched synthetic fluorogenic peptide mimicking the cleavage site of proVEGF-C ((220)Q-VHSIIRR downward arrow SLP(230)). The processing of proVEGF-C is blocked by the inhibitory prosegments of furin, PC5, and PACE4, as well as by furin-motif variants of alpha2-macroglobulin and alpha1-antitrypsin. Subcutaneous injection of CHO cells stably expressing VEGF-C into nude mice enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, but not tumor growth. In contrast, expression of proVEGF-C obtained following mutation of the cleavage site (HSIIRR(227)SL to HSIISS(227)SL) inhibits angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis as well as tumor growth. Our findings demonstrate the processing of proVEGF-C by PCs and highlight the potential use of PC inhibitors as agents for inhibiting malignancies induced by VEGF-C. PMID:12782675

  13. Rapid multi-residue method for the determination of azinphos methyl, bromopropylate, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, parathion methyl and phosalone in apricots and peaches by using negative chemical ionization ion trap technology.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Konstantinos S; Aplada-Sarlis, Pipina; Kyriakidis, Nikolaos V

    2003-05-01

    A rapid, selective and sensitive multi-residue method for the determination of six common pesticides in stone fruit samples is described. The proposed method involves the extraction of the pesticides with the use of acetone solvent followed by liquid-liquid partition with a mixture of dichloromethane and light petroleum (40-60 degrees C) and subsequent determination by a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry system using ion trap technology in negative ion chemical ionization mode. The average percent recoveries of bromopropylate and phosalone in the concentration range 0.2-2.0 mg/kg were 97.3 +/- 6.7 to 120 +/- 1.0%, while the recoveries of chlorpyrifos and parathion methyl examined in the concentration range 0.02-0.2 mg/kg were 95.5 +/- 7.5 to 145 +/- 3.6%, the recoveries of azinphos methyl in the range 0.05-0.5 mg/kg were 74.8 +/- 29.6 to 96.5 +/- 13% and those of dimethoate in the range 0.1-1.0 mg/kg were 73.1 +/- 5.7 to 92.8 +/- 2.8% for n = 3 for all the above pesticides. The high mean recovery (145%) for chlorpyrifos is attributed to a matrix enhancement effect. The limits of quantitation in apricots were 0.01 mg/kg for chlorpyrifos, 0.02 mg/kg for dimethoate and parathion methyl, 0.05 mg/kg for azinphos methyl and phosalone and 0.1 mg/kg for bromopropylate. The usefulness of tandem mass spectrometry for confirmation purposes was also examined. The method was applied successfully to the determination of the target pesticides in 32 samples of stone fruits (apricots and peaches). PMID:12830919

  14. Melt crystallization of bisphenol A polycarbonate in PC/zinc sulfonated polystyrene ionomer blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang

    The effects of zinc sulfonated polystyrene ionomer (ZnSPS) on the melt crystallization of bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC) were investigated. Melt crystallization of pure PC is extremely slow due to its rigid chain. In the blend of PC and ZnSPS (PC-ZnSPS), the melt crystallization rate of PC can be enhanced. DSC was used to study the crystallization kinetics of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. The crystallization of PC at 190°C increased in both partially miscible and miscible blends with ZnSPS. For PC-ZnSPS blend with same PC composition as 80%, the crystallization rate was affected by the sulfonation level of ZnSPS. The induction time of crystallization for a partially miscible blend PC-ZnSPS9.98 (80/20) was 40 minutes, and the crystallization reaches 27% crystallinity within 14 hrs. The induction time for pure PC with the same thermal history was more than 24 hrs. The crystal structure of PC crystal formed in PC-ZnSPS blend was studied by WAXD, which showed no difference from the reported WAXD pattern for pure PC. Molecular weight change of PC was found during the thermal annealing of PC-ZnSPS blend at 190°C, but molecular weight alone cannot explain the change of crystallization rate of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. Discussion was made to address the mechanisms that are responsible for the crystallization rate enhancement of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. In order to understand and elucidate the reason for the molecular weight change of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend and its effect on the crystallization of PC, TG, GPC and GC-MS were used to investigate the stability of PC-ZnSPS blend and mixtures of PC with sodium tosylate (NaTS), zinc tosylate (ZnTS) and sodium benzoate (NaBZ). ZnSPS, NaTS and ZnTS undergo desulfonation of the sulfonate group at temperatures above 350°C. The desulfonation process can destabilize PC and lower the maximum mass loss rate temperature of PC for more than 70°C. NaTS, ZnTS and NaBZ have quite different effect on the thermal stability of PC at temperatures below 250°C. NaBZ can significantly degrade PC both at 190°C and 250°C. PC does not show any molecular weight (M w) change in the presence of NaTS at 250°C and 190°C for up to 1hr and 16 hrs respectively. ZnTS can also cause Mw change of PC at 250°C and 190°C, but the changing of Mw of PC in the presence of ZnTS is less than that in the presence of NaBZ. The reason for the molecular weight change of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend can be explained based on Davis's ionic ester exchange reaction mechanism.

  15. Magnetospheric filter effect for Pc 3 Alfven mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of Pc 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of a magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. Pc 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observations at high latitudes.

  16. Magnetospheric filter effect for Pc 3 Alfven mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of Pc 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. Pc 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observation at high altitudes.

  17. Tablet PC Enabled Body Sensor System for Rural Telehealth Applications

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Nitha V.; Kumar, A. Sukesh

    2016-01-01

    Telehealth systems benefit from the rapid growth of mobile communication technology for measuring physiological signals. Development and validation of a tablet PC enabled noninvasive body sensor system for rural telehealth application are discussed in this paper. This system includes real time continuous collection of physiological parameters (blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature) and fall detection of a patient with the help of a body sensor unit and wireless transmission of the acquired information to a tablet PC handled by the medical staff in a Primary Health Center (PHC). Abnormal conditions are automatically identified and alert messages are given to the medical officer in real time. Clinical validation is performed in a real environment and found to be successful. Bland-Altman analysis is carried out to validate the wrist blood pressure sensor used. The system works well for all measurements. PMID:26884757

  18. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-09-30

    Large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal has stopped. This stoppage has come about due to limitations in current funding available to continue large scale research and development activities at Riley Power's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) of the PC Preheat technology. The CBTF was secured and decommissioned in the previous quarter; work this quarter work completed the securing the proper disposition of all PC Preheat experimental equipment at the PSCF and CBTF and completing negotiations with AES Westover (a power plant in Johnson City, New York) to accept 130 tons of residual PRB test coal in storage. The coal transport to Westover occurred at the end of August. GTI was granted a no-cost time extension through September 2005; immediate efforts are focused on completing a draft final report, which is due in October 31, 2005 and the final report in December.

  19. Tablet PC Enabled Body Sensor System for Rural Telehealth Applications.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Nitha V; Kumar, A Sukesh

    2016-01-01

    Telehealth systems benefit from the rapid growth of mobile communication technology for measuring physiological signals. Development and validation of a tablet PC enabled noninvasive body sensor system for rural telehealth application are discussed in this paper. This system includes real time continuous collection of physiological parameters (blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature) and fall detection of a patient with the help of a body sensor unit and wireless transmission of the acquired information to a tablet PC handled by the medical staff in a Primary Health Center (PHC). Abnormal conditions are automatically identified and alert messages are given to the medical officer in real time. Clinical validation is performed in a real environment and found to be successful. Bland-Altman analysis is carried out to validate the wrist blood pressure sensor used. The system works well for all measurements. PMID:26884757

  20. Flexible missile autopilot design studies with PC-MATLAB/386

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a responsive, high-bandwidth missile autopilot for airframes which have structural modes of unusually low frequency presents a challenging design task. Such systems are viable candidates for modern, state-space control design methods. The PC-MATLAB interactive software package provides an environment well-suited to the development of candidate linear control laws for flexible missile autopilots. The strengths of MATLAB include: (1) exceptionally high speed (MATLAB's version for 80386-based PC's offers benchmarks approaching minicomputer and mainframe performance); (2) ability to handle large design models of several hundred degrees of freedom, if necessary; and (3) broad extensibility through user-defined functions. To characterize MATLAB capabilities, a simplified design example is presented. This involves interactive definition of an observer-based state-space compensator for a flexible missile autopilot design task. MATLAB capabilities and limitations, in the context of this design task, are then summarized.

  1. Large-Scale PC Management and Configuration for SNS Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Darryl J.; Purcell, J. David

    2004-11-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project's diagnostics group has begun its implementation of more than 300 PC-based Network Attached Devices (NADs). An implementation of this size creates many challenges, such as distribution of patches and software upgrades; virus/worm potentials; and the configuration management, including interaction with the SNS relational database. As part of the initial solution, a base operating system (OS) configuration has been determined and computer management software has been implemented. Each PC requires a unique configuration, but all are based on a common OS and supporting applications. The diagnostics group has started with an implementation of an XP Embedded (XPe) OS and uses Altiris registered eXpress Deployment Solution{sup TM}. The use of XPe and Altiris gives the diagnostics group the ability to easily configure, distribute, and manage software on a large scale. This paper describes the initial experience and discusses plans for the future.

  2. Calculation of Weibull strength parameters, Batdorf flaw density constants and related statistical quantities using PC-CARES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatmary, Steven A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1990-01-01

    This manual describes the operation and theory of the PC-CARES (Personal Computer-Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program for the IBM PC and compatibles running PC-DOS/MS-DOR OR IBM/MS-OS/2 (version 1.1 or higher) operating systems. The primary purpose of this code is to estimate Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities. Included in the manual is the description of the calculation of shape and scale parameters of the two-parameter Weibull distribution using the least-squares analysis and maximum likelihood methods for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics with complete and censored samples. The methods for detecting outliers and for calculating the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit statistics and 90 percent confidence bands about the Weibull line, as well as the techniques for calculating the Batdorf flaw-density constants are also described.

  3. Cloning and expression of bacteriophage SP02 DNAZ polymerase gene L in Bacillus subtilis, using the Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pC194.

    PubMed Central

    Rutberg, L; Rådén, B; Flock, J I

    1981-01-01

    HindIII restriction endonuclease fragments of DNA from temperate Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage SP02 were cloned in B. subtilis by using the plasmid pC194. Three hybrid plasmids which permit growth of the mutant SP02 susL244 in suppressor-negative bacteria were isolated. SP02 gene L is thought to code for a DNA polymerase essential for autonomous replication of SP02 DNA. Extracts of bacteria carrying one of these hybrid plasmids, pC194-96, had 10- to 30-fold increased DNA polymerase activity. The plasmid-induced DNA polymerase activity differed from that of the known B. subtilis DNA polymerases in several respects. The results of the experiments support the idea that phage SP02 codes for a new DNA polymerase. Images PMID:6268832

  4. The Photodynamic Antibacterial Effects of Silicon Phthalocyanine (Pc) 4

    PubMed Central

    Dimaano, Matthew L.; Rozario, Chantal; Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Donskey, Curtis J.; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma D.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains in facultative anaerobic Gram-positive coccal bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is a global health issue. Typically, MRSA strains are found associated with institutions like hospitals but recent data suggest that they are becoming more prevalent in community-acquired infections. It is thought that the incidence and prevalence of bacterial infections will continue to increase as (a) more frequent use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and immunosuppressive medications; (b) increased number of invasive medical procedures; and (c) higher incidence of neutropenia and HIV infections. Therefore, more optimal treatments, such as photodynamic therapy (PDT), are warranted. PDT requires the interaction of light, a photosensitizing agent, and molecular oxygen to induce cytotoxic effects. In this study, we investigated the efficacy and characterized the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by photodynamic therapy sensitized by silicon phthalocyanine (Pc) 4 on (a) methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (ATCC 25923); (b) community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) (ATCC 43300); and (c) hospital acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) (PFGE type 300). Our data include confocal image analysis, which confirmed that Pc 4 is taken up by all S. aureus strains, and viable cell recovery assay, which showed that concentrations as low as 1.0 μM Pc 4 incubated for 3 h at 37 °C followed by light at 2.0 J/cm2 can reduce cell survival by 2–5 logs. These results are encouraging, but before PDT can be utilized as an alternative treatment for eradicating resistant strains, we must first characterize the mechanism of cell death that Pc 4-based PDT employs in eliminating these pathogens. PMID:25856680

  5. Falling PC Solitaire Cards: An Open-Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2012-01-01

    Many of us have played the PC Solitaire game that comes as standard software in many computers. Although I am not a great player, occasionally I win a game or two. The game celebrates my accomplishment by pushing the cards forward, one at a time, falling gracefully in what appears to look like a parabolic path in a drag-free environment. One day,…

  6. Implications of a J{sup PC} exotic

    SciTech Connect

    P.R. Page

    1997-09-01

    Recent experimental data from BNL on the isovector J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic at 1.6 GeV indicate the existence of a non-quarkonium state consistent with lattice gauge theory predictions. The authors discuss how further experiments can strengthen this conclusion. They show that the {rho}{pi}, {eta}{prime}{pi} and {eta}{pi} couplings of this state qualitatively support the hypothesis that it is a hybrid meson, although other interpretations cannot be eliminated.

  7. GPS TEC response to Pc4 "giant pulsations"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Chris; Jayachandran, P. T.; Singer, Howard J.; Redmon, Robert J.; Danskin, Donald

    2016-02-01

    Variations in ionospheric total electron content (TEC) associated with ultralow frequency (ULF) magnetic field variations in the Pc4 (6.7-22.0 mHz) frequency band were observed in the early morning sector. TEC variations were observed by the Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver in Sanikiluaq, Nunavut (56.54°N, 280.77°E), which is located near the equatorward edge of the auroral region. Small-amplitude Pc4 ULF waves were observed by the Sanikiluaq ground magnetometer and by the geosynchronous GOES 13 satellite. TEC and magnetic field both exhibited narrowband, highly regular, quasi-sinusoidal waveforms, with high correlation and coherence indicating a clear link between TEC variations and Pc4 ULF activity. Variations in TEC and 30-50 keV electron flux observed by GOES 13 were also highly correlated and coherent. TEC variations observed directly above Sanikiluaq were in antiphase with eastward magnetic field variations on the ground, while TEC variations observed at the footprint of the GOES 13 satellite were in phase with GOES radial magnetic field and 30-50 keV electron flux. Intermittent occurrence of TEC variations observed by multiple GPS satellites indicated a localized ionospheric response to the Pc4 activity. This is the first clear evidence of a TEC response to these so called "giant pulsations (Pgs)." By applying a multisatellite triangulation technique, the phase velocity, group velocity, and azimuthal wave number of TEC variations were also calculated for an interval of highly coherent measurements. The phase and group propagation velocities were 2-7 km/s and 1-3 km/s north and westward, respectively, while the azimuthal wave number ranged from -35 to -310.

  8. A PC-Based Controller for Dextrous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Seraji, Homayoun; Long, Mark

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture and performance of a PC-based controller for 7-DOF dextrous manipulators. The computing platform is a 486-based personal computer equipped with a bus extender to access the robot Multibus controller, together with a single board computer as the graphical engine, and with a parallel I/O board to interface with a force-torque sensor mounted on the manipulator wrist.

  9. Stereo viewing on the PC/AT with EGA graphics.

    PubMed

    Chelvanayagam, G; McKeaig, L

    1991-06-01

    Tachystoscopic stereo can be used to greatly enhance the performance and usability of low-cost molecular graphics systems. Here, a simple way to connect and control three-dimensional liquid-crystal glasses from a PC/AT with EGA graphics capabilities is described. The method makes elegant use of the screen's vertical retrace for synchronization purposes, allowing left and right views to be alternated every refresh cycle. PMID:1768640

  10. Practical Pocket PC Application w/Biometric Security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Julian

    2004-01-01

    I work in the Flight Software Engineering Branch, where we provide design and development of embedded real-time software applications for flight and supporting ground systems to support the NASA Aeronautics and Space Programs. In addition, this branch evaluates, develops and implements new technologies for embedded real-time systems, and maintains a laboratory for applications of embedded technology. The majority of microchips that are used in modern society have been programmed using embedded technology. These small chips can be found in microwaves, calculators, home security systems, cell phones and more. My assignment this summer entails working with an iPAQ HP 5500 Pocket PC. This top-of-the-line hand-held device is one of the first mobile PC's to introduce biometric security capabilities. Biometric security, in this case a fingerprint authentication system, is on the edge of technology as far as securing information. The benefits of fingerprint authentication are enormous. The most significant of them are that it is extremely difficult to reproduce someone else's fingerprint, and it is equally difficult to lose or forget your own fingerprint as opposed to a password or pin number. One of my goals for this summer is to integrate this technology with another Pocket PC application. The second task for the summer is to develop a simple application that provides an Astronaut EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Log Book capability. The Astronaut EVA Log Book is what an astronaut would use to report the status of field missions, crew physical health, successes, future plans, etc. My goal is to develop a user interface into which these data fields can be entered and stored. The applications that I am developing are created using eMbedded Visual C++ 4.0 with the Pocket PC 2003 Software Development Kit provided by Microsoft.

  11. Ionic regulation of endonuclease activity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, M; Ferrari, D; Bozza, A; Del Senno, L; Di Virgilio, F

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the Ca2+ dependency of DNA degradation into nucleosome-sized fragments in intact chromaffin-like PC12 cells and PC12 nuclear fractions. In intact cells we were unable to trigger DNA fragmentation by inducing either transient or sustained elevations of cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin. On the contrary, DNA fragmentation was induced in intact cells by the intracellular Zn2+ chelator NNN'N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). To characterize further PC12 cell endonuclease activity, we then investigated digestion by purified PC12 cell fractions of exogenously added plasmids. In nuclear fractions two endonuclease activities were identified: an acidic (pH 5.0) endonuclease activity that was fully Ca2+- and Mg(2+)-independent; and a neutral (pH 7.6) endonuclease activity that was Ca(2+)-independent but Mg(2+)-dependent. Both endonuclease activities were inhibited by Zn2+. Nuclear membrane permeabilization greatly enhanced plasmid digestion at pH 7.6, but not at pH 5.0. This suggests that neutral endonuclease was located in a membrane-bound compartment, whereas acidic endonuclease was freely accessible to the substrate even in the presence of an intact nuclear membrane. In intact nuclei, digestion of genomic DNA could not be triggered by increasing the bivalent cation composition of the medium. On the contrary, in hypotonic medium we observed a large spontaneous nucleolytic DNA degradation that was increased by Zn2+ chelation. However, an acidic pH shift was a potent stimulus for DNA fragmentation in isotonic as well as hypotonic medium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:7487921

  12. PC-Based Interface Circuit For Communication Of Telemetric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatley, Thomas P.

    1993-01-01

    PCIO card in input/output interface-circuit card enabling computer based on ISA bus to transmit and receive high-speed, synchronous serial data and clock signals. Designed specifically to plug into IBM PC-AT or compatible computer and to handle input and output of data in packet formats like those of telemetric data streams used throughout NASA and aerospace industry. Reduces amount of auxiliary equipment needed.

  13. CLIPS 6.0 - C LANGUAGE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEM, VERSION 6.0 (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnell, B.

    1994-01-01

    CLIPS, the C Language Integrated Production System, is a complete environment for developing expert systems -- programs which are specifically intended to model human expertise or knowledge. It is designed to allow artificial intelligence research, development, and delivery on conventional computers. CLIPS 6.0 provides a cohesive tool for handling a wide variety of knowledge with support for three different programming paradigms: rule-based, object-oriented, and procedural. Rule-based programming allows knowledge to be represented as heuristics, or "rules-of-thumb" which specify a set of actions to be performed for a given situation. Object-oriented programming allows complex systems to be modeled as modular components (which can be easily reused to model other systems or create new components). The procedural programming capabilities provided by CLIPS 6.0 allow CLIPS to represent knowledge in ways similar to those allowed in languages such as C, Pascal, Ada, and LISP. Using CLIPS 6.0, one can develop expert system software using only rule-based programming, only object-oriented programming, only procedural programming, or combinations of the three. CLIPS provides extensive features to support the rule-based programming paradigm including seven conflict resolution strategies, dynamic rule priorities, and truth maintenance. CLIPS 6.0 supports more complex nesting of conditional elements in the if portion of a rule ("and", "or", and "not" conditional elements can be placed within a "not" conditional element). In addition, there is no longer a limitation on the number of multifield slots that a deftemplate can contain. The CLIPS Object-Oriented Language (COOL) provides object-oriented programming capabilities. Features supported by COOL include classes with multiple inheritance, abstraction, encapsulation, polymorphism, dynamic binding, and message passing with message-handlers. CLIPS 6.0 supports tight integration of the rule-based programming features of CLIPS with COOL (that is, a rule can pattern match on objects created using COOL). CLIPS 6.0 provides the capability to define functions, overloaded functions, and global variables interactively. In addition, CLIPS can be embedded within procedural code, called as a subroutine, and integrated with languages such as C, FORTRAN and Ada. CLIPS can be easily extended by a user through the use of several well-defined protocols. CLIPS provides several delivery options for programs including the ability to generate stand alone executables or to load programs from text or binary files. CLIPS 6.0 provides support for the modular development and execution of knowledge bases with the defmodule construct. CLIPS modules allow a set of constructs to be grouped together such that explicit control can be maintained over restricting the access of the constructs by other modules. This type of control is similar to global and local scoping used in languages such as C or Ada. By restricting access to deftemplate and defclass constructs, modules can function as blackboards, permitting only certain facts and instances to be seen by other modules. Modules are also used by rules to provide execution control. The CRSV (Cross-Reference, Style, and Verification) utility included with previous version of CLIPS is no longer supported. The capabilities provided by this tool are now available directly within CLIPS 6.0 to aid in the development, debugging, and verification of large rule bases. COSMIC offers four distribution versions of CLIPS 6.0: UNIX (MSC-22433), VMS (MSC-22434), MACINTOSH (MSC-22429), and IBM PC (MSC-22430). Executable files, source code, utilities, documentation, and examples are included on the program media. All distribution versions include identical source code for the command line version of CLIPS 6.0. This source code should compile on any platform with an ANSI C compiler. Each distribution version of CLIPS 6.0, except that for the Macintosh platform, includes an executable for the command line version. For the UNIX version of CLIPS 6.0, the command line interface has been successfully implemented on a Sun4 running SunOS, a DECstation running DEC RISC ULTRIX, an SGI Indigo Elan running IRIX, a DEC Alpha AXP running OSF/1, and an IBM RS/6000 running AIX. Command line interface executables are included for Sun4 computers running SunOS 4.1.1 or later and for the DEC RISC ULTRIX platform. The makefiles may have to be modified slightly to be used on other UNIX platforms. The UNIX, Macintosh, and IBM PC versions of CLIPS 6.0 each have a platform specific interface. Source code, a makefile, and an executable for the Windows 3.1 interface version of CLIPS 6.0 are provided only on the IBM PC distribution diskettes. Source code, a makefile, and an executable for the Macintosh interface version of CLIPS 6.0 are provided only on the Macintosh distribution diskettes. Likewise, for the UNIX version of CLIPS 6.0, only source code and a makefile for an X-Windows interface are provided. The X-Windows interface requires MIT's X Window System, Version 11, Release 4 (X11R4), the Athena Widget Set, and the Xmu library. The source code for the Athena Widget Set is provided on the distribution medium. The X-Windows interface has been successfully implemented on a Sun4 running SunOS 4.1.2 with the MIT distribution of X11R4 (not OpenWindows), an SGI Indigo Elan running IRIX 4.0.5, and a DEC Alpha AXP running OSF/1 1.2. The VAX version of CLIPS 6.0 comes only with the generic command line interface. ASCII makefiles for the command line version of CLIPS are provided on all the distribution media for UNIX, VMS, and DOS. Four executables are provided with the IBM PC version: a windowed interface executable for Windows 3.1 built using Borland C++ v3.1, an editor for use with the windowed interface, a command line version of CLIPS for Windows 3.1, and a 386 command line executable for DOS built using Zortech C++ v3.1. All four executables are capable of utilizing extended memory and require an 80386 CPU or better. Users needing an 8086/8088 or 80286 executable must recompile the CLIPS source code themselves. Users who wish to recompile the DOS executable using Borland C++ or MicroSoft C must use a DOS extender program to produce an executable capable of using extended memory. The version of CLIPS 6.0 for IBM PC compatibles requires DOS v3.3 or later and/or Windows 3.1 or later. It is distributed on a set of three 1.4Mb 3.5 inch diskettes. A hard disk is required. The Macintosh version is distributed in compressed form on two 3.5 inch 1.4Mb Macintosh format diskettes, and requires System 6.0.5, or higher, and 1Mb RAM. The version for DEC VAX/VMS is available in VAX BACKUP format on a 1600 BPI 9-track magnetic tape (standard distribution medium) or a TK50 tape cartridge. The UNIX version is distributed in UNIX tar format on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24). For the UNIX version, alternate distribution media and formats are available upon request. The CLIPS 6.0 documentation includes a User's Guide and a three volume Reference Manual consisting of Basic and Advanced Programming Guides and an Interfaces Guide. An electronic version of the documentation is provided on the distribution medium for each version: in MicroSoft Word format for the Macintosh and PC versions of CLIPS, and in both PostScript format and MicroSoft Word for Macintosh format for the UNIX and DEC VAX versions of CLIPS. CLIPS was developed in 1986 and Version 6.0 was released in 1993.

  14. Kinetics of alpha-PcCu --> beta-PcCu isothermal conversion in air and thermal behavior of beta-PcCu from in situ real-time laboratory parallel-beam X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ballirano, Paolo; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-07-01

    The kinetics of the alpha-PcCu --> beta-PcCu conversion in air has been followed, under isothermal conditions, in situ real-time in the 423-443 K temperature range. Data have been fitted following the JMAK model. The reaction order of the kinetics at 423 K is consistent with a diffusion controlled, deceleratory nucleation rate process for 2D laminar particles, whereas at higher temperatures it is consistent with a phase boundary controlled, deceleratory nucleation rate process for 2D laminar particles. At 423 K, the overall transformation mechanism implies three steps: growth of the alpha-PcCu phase, disordering of adjacent columns of molecules of phthalocyanine, and nucleation and growth of the beta-PcCu phase. The calculated empirical activation energy is of 187 kJ/mol significantly greater than that for the alpha-PcCo --> beta-PcCo conversion. This fact seems to support the reported different structures of alpha-PcCo and alpha-PcCu. Investigation of the thermal behavior of beta-PcCu indicates a strongly anisotropic thermal expansion that follows the alpha(c) > alpha(a) approximately = alpha(b) trend. Moreover, the beta angle decreases with increasing temperature. Such anisotropy is consistent with the geometry of the very weak N3...H3 hydrogen bond which acts mainly along the c axis. PMID:19534476

  15. Endoplasmic oleoyl-PC desaturase references the second double bond.

    PubMed

    Schwartzbeck, J L; Jung, S; Abbott, A G; Mosley, E; Lewis, S; Pries, G L; Powell, G L

    2001-07-01

    The regiospecificity for the gene product of fad2,(1) the microsomal oleoyl-PC desaturase from higher plants, differs from some previous suggestions. Rather than only referencing the carboxyl group (a Delta(12) desaturase) or the methyl terminus (an omega-6 desaturase), this desaturase locates the second double bond in its substrates by first referencing the existing double bond. This specificity was demonstrated for the oleoyl-PC desaturase cDNA from the developing seeds of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L) expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisae). The expressed enzyme was capable of desaturating monounsaturated fatty acyl groups in membrane lipids. Endogenous palmitoleate was desaturated to cis, cis 9,12 hexadecadienoate (9(Z)12(Z)C16:2), endogenous oleate to linoleate (9(Z)12(Z) octadecadienoate), and cis 10-nonadecenoate (provided as a supplement in the growth medium) to 10(Z)13(Z)C19:2. The rule, Delta(x+3) where x=9 is the double bond location in the substrate, best describes the consistent placement of the second double bond in the above monounsaturated substrates for the oleoyl-PC desaturase of higher plants. PMID:11397429

  16. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in PC12 cells through ER stress

    PubMed Central

    KRIZANOVA, OLGA; STELIAROVA, IVETA; CSADEROVA, LUCIA; PASTOREK, MICHAL; HUDECOVA, SONA

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent agent in chili peppers, has been shown to act as a tumor-suppressor in cancer. In our previous study, capsaicin was shown to induce apoptosis in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12 cells). Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the potential mechanism by which capsaicin induces apoptosis. We treated PC12 cells with 50, 100 and 500 ?M capsaicin and measured the reticular calcium content and expression of the reticular calcium transport systems. These results were correlated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers CHOP, ATF4 and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), as well as with apoptosis induction. We observed that capsaicin decreased reticular calcium in a concentration-dependent manner. Simultaneously, expression levels of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum pump and ryanodin receptor of type 2 were modified. These changes were accompanied by increased ER stress, as documented by increased stress markers. Thus, from these results we propose that in PC12 cells capsaicin induces apoptosis through increased ER stress. PMID:24337105

  17. Modulation of total electron content by ULF Pc5 waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Belakhovsky, V.; Murr, D.; Fedorov, E.; Engebretson, M.

    2014-06-01

    An intriguing effect was found while analyzing the small-scale variations of total electron content (TEC) derived from global positioning system (GPS) signals. We found a response in TEC variations to intense global Pc5 pulsations with periods of a few millihertz covering the corrected geomagnetic latitudes ~58°-75° during the recovery phase of the strong magnetic storms on 31 October 2003. Earlier studies demonstrated that the GPS-TEC technique is a powerful method to study the propagation pattern of transient disturbances in the ionosphere, generated by seismic or internal gravity waves. This technique has turned out to be sensitive enough to ULF waves as well. During periods with intense Pc5 geomagnetic wave activity, distinct pulsations with the same periodicity were found in the TEC data from high-latitude GPS receiving stations in Scandinavia. Wavelet and cross-spectral analysis showed a high coherence (~0.9) between the periodic geomagnetic and TEC variations. Moreover, the relative amplitude of TEC periodic fluctuations ΔTEC/TEC was about or even larger than the relative amplitude of geomagnetic variations ΔB/B. So far, the effect of TEC modulation by Pc5 waves is not well understood and is still a challenge for the MHD wave theory. Various possible modulation mechanisms have been estimated, but no mechanism has been firmly identified.

  18. High-resolution CCD camera family with a PC host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raanes, Chris A.; Bottenberg, Les

    1993-05-01

    EG&G Reticon and Adaptive Optics Associates have developed a family of high resolution CCD cameras with a PC/AT host to fulfill imaging applications from medical science to industrial inspection. The MC4000 family of CCD cameras encompasses resolutions of 512 X 512, 1024 X 1024, and 2048 X 2048 pixels. All three of these high performance cameras interface to the SB4000, PC/AT controller, which serves as a frame buffer with up to 64 MBytes of storage, as well as providing all the required control, and setup parameters while the camera head is remotely located at distances of up to 100 ft. All of the MC4000 high resolution cameras employ MPP clocking to achieve high dynamic range without cooling the CCD sensor. The use of this low power clocking technique, surface mount components, electronic shutter and clever packaging have allowed Reticon to deliver the MC4000 cameras in convenient, rugged small housings. The MC4000 family provides users with a total imaging solution from leading edge sensors and electronics in ruggedized housings, to cables, power supplies, and a PC/AT frame buffer and controller card. All the components are designed to function together as a turn-key, self-contained system, or individual components can become part of a user's larger system. The MC4000 CCD camera family makes high resolution, electronic imaging an accessible tool for a wide range of applications.

  19. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in PC12 cells through ER stress.

    PubMed

    Krizanova, Olga; Steliarova, Iveta; Csaderova, Lucia; Pastorek, Michal; Hudecova, Sona

    2014-02-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent agent in chili peppers, has been shown to act as a tumor-suppressor in cancer. In our previous study, capsaicin was shown to induce apoptosis in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12 cells). Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the potential mechanism by which capsaicin induces apoptosis. We treated PC12 cells with 50, 100 and 500 µM capsaicin and measured the reticular calcium content and expression of the reticular calcium transport systems. These results were correlated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers CHOP, ATF4 and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), as well as with apoptosis induction. We observed that capsaicin decreased reticular calcium in a concentration-dependent manner. Simultaneously, expression levels of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum pump and ryanodin receptor of type 2 were modified. These changes were accompanied by increased ER stress, as documented by increased stress markers. Thus, from these results we propose that in PC12 cells capsaicin induces apoptosis through increased ER stress. PMID:24337105

  20. Electronic transitions and band offsets in C60:SubPc and C60:MgPc on MoO3 studied by modulated surface photovoltage spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengler, S.; Dittrich, Th.; Rusu, M.

    2015-07-01

    Electronic transitions at interfaces between MoO3 layers and organic layers of C60, SubPc, MgPc, and nano-composite layers of SubPc:C60 and MgPc:C60 have been studied by modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) spectroscopy. For all systems, time dependent and modulated SPV signals pointed to dissociation of excitons at the MoO3/organic layer interfaces with a separation of holes towards MoO3. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps (EHL) of C60, SubPc, and MgPc and the effective EHL of SubPc:C60 and MgPc:C60 were measured. The offsets between the LUMO (ΔEL) or HOMO (ΔEH) bands were obtained with high precision and amounted to 0.33 or 0.73 eV for SubPc:C60, respectively, and to -0.33 or 0.67 eV for MgPc:C60, respectively. Exponential tails below EHL and most pronounced sub-bandgap transitions were characterized and ascribed to disorder and transitions from HOMO bands to unoccupied defect states.

  1. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  2. Concatenated Coding Using Trellis-Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Michael W.

    1997-01-01

    In the late seventies and early eighties a technique known as Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM) was developed for providing spectrally efficient error correction coding. Instead of adding redundant information in the form of parity bits, redundancy is added at the modulation stage thereby increasing bandwidth efficiency. A digital communications system can be designed to use bandwidth-efficient multilevel/phase modulation such as Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK), Phase Shift Keying (PSK), Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK) or Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM). Performance gain can be achieved by increasing the number of signals over the corresponding uncoded system to compensate for the redundancy introduced by the code. A considerable amount of research and development has been devoted toward developing good TCM codes for severely bandlimited applications. More recently, the use of TCM for satellite and deep space communications applications has received increased attention. This report describes the general approach of using a concatenated coding scheme that features TCM and RS coding. Results have indicated that substantial (6-10 dB) performance gains can be achieved with this approach with comparatively little bandwidth expansion. Since all of the bandwidth expansion is due to the RS code we see that TCM based concatenated coding results in roughly 10-50% bandwidth expansion compared to 70-150% expansion for similar concatenated scheme which use convolution code. We stress that combined coding and modulation optimization is important for achieving performance gains while maintaining spectral efficiency.

  3. Coset Codes Viewed as Terminated Convolutional Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossorier, Marc P. C.; Lin, Shu

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, coset codes are considered as terminated convolutional codes. Based on this approach, three new general results are presented. First, it is shown that the iterative squaring construction can equivalently be defined from a convolutional code whose trellis terminates. This convolutional code determines a simple encoder for the coset code considered, and the state and branch labelings of the associated trellis diagram become straightforward. Also, from the generator matrix of the code in its convolutional code form, much information about the trade-off between the state connectivity and complexity at each section, and the parallel structure of the trellis, is directly available. Based on this generator matrix, it is shown that the parallel branches in the trellis diagram of the convolutional code represent the same coset code C(sub 1), of smaller dimension and shorter length. Utilizing this fact, a two-stage optimum trellis decoding method is devised. The first stage decodes C(sub 1), while the second stage decodes the associated convolutional code, using the branch metrics delivered by stage 1. Finally, a bidirectional decoding of each received block starting at both ends is presented. If about the same number of computations is required, this approach remains very attractive from a practical point of view as it roughly doubles the decoding speed. This fact is particularly interesting whenever the second half of the trellis is the mirror image of the first half, since the same decoder can be implemented for both parts.

  4. Static and Dynamic Energetic Disorders in the C60, PC61BM, C70, and PC71BM Fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Zheng, Zilong; Aziz, Saadullah G; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-17

    We use a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations to investigate the energetic disorder in fullerene systems. We show that the energetic disorder evaluated from an ensemble average contains contributions of both static origin (time-independent, due to loose packing) and dynamic origin (time-dependent, due to electron-vibration interactions). In order to differentiate between these two contributions, we compare the results obtained from an ensemble average approach with those derived from a time average approach. It is found that in both amorphous C60 and C70 bulk systems, the degrees of static and dynamic disorder are comparable, while in the amorphous PC61BM and PC71BM systems, static disorder is about twice as large as dynamic disorder. PMID:26722738

  5. Discussion on LDPC Codes and Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the progress that the workgroup on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) for space link coding. The workgroup is tasked with developing and recommending new error correcting codes for near-Earth, Lunar, and deep space applications. Included in the presentation is a summary of the technical progress of the workgroup. Charts that show the LDPC decoder sensitivity to symbol scaling errors are reviewed, as well as a chart showing the performance of several frame synchronizer algorithms compared to that of some good codes and LDPC decoder tests at ESTL. Also reviewed is a study on Coding, Modulation, and Link Protocol (CMLP), and the recommended codes. A design for the Pseudo-Randomizer with LDPC Decoder and CRC is also reviewed. A chart that summarizes the three proposed coding systems is also presented.

  6. An overview of the evaluation plan for PC/MISI: PC-based Multiple Information System Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Lim, Bee Lee; Hall, Philip P.

    1985-01-01

    An initial evaluation plan for the personal computer multiple information system interface (PC/MISI) project is discussed. The document is intend to be used as a blueprint for the evaluation of this system. Each objective of the design project is discussed along with the evaluation parameters and methodology to be used in the evaluation of the implementation's achievement of those objectives. The potential of the system for research activities related to more general aspects of information retrieval is also discussed.

  7. pRNAm-PC: Predicting N(6)-methyladenosine sites in RNA sequences via physical-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi; Xiao, Xuan; Yu, Dong-Jun; Jia, Jianhua; Qiu, Wang-Ren; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-03-15

    Just like PTM or PTLM (post-translational modification) in proteins, PTCM (post-transcriptional modification) in RNA plays very important roles in biological processes. Occurring at adenine (A) with the genetic code motif (GAC), N(6)-methyldenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most common and abundant PTCMs in RNA found in viruses and most eukaryotes. Given an uncharacterized RNA sequence containing many GAC motifs, which of them can be methylated, and which cannot? It is important for both basic research and drug development to address this problem. Particularly with the avalanche of RNA sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly demanded to develop computational methods for timely identifying the N(6)-methyldenosine sites in RNA. Here we propose a new predictor called pRNAm-PC, in which RNA sequence samples are expressed by a novel mode of pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC) whose components were derived from a physical-chemical matrix via a series of auto-covariance and cross covariance transformations. It was observed via a rigorous jackknife test that, in comparison with the existing predictor for the same purpose, pRNAm-PC achieved remarkably higher success rates in both overall accuracy and stability, indicating that the new predictor will become a useful high-throughput tool for identifying methylation sites in RNA, and that the novel approach can also be used to study many other RNA-related problems and conduct genome analysis. A user-friendly Web server for pRNAm-PC has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/pRNAm-PC, by which users can easily get their desired results without needing to go through the mathematical details. PMID:26748145

  8. Investigating the IMF Cone Angle Control of Pc 3-4 Pulsations Observed on the Ground, 1: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu, N.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Lessard, M.

    2013-05-01

    ULF waves with periods in the 15-60 s range, denoted Pc 3-4 pulsations, are generated in Earth's ion foreshock upstream from the bow shock. These waves, whose frequency is directly proportional to the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), are most often observed in the dayside magnetosphere and on the ground when the angle between the IMF and the Earth-Sun line (the IMF cone angle) is < 45°. In this study we compared the occurrence and frequency of band-limited Pc 3-4 pulsations observed by search coil magnetometers at four near-cusp stations on Svalbard (Ny-Ålesund, Longyearbyen, Isfjord Radio, and Hornsund) from June 1, 2010 to December 31, 2011. IMF orientation and magnitude data provided by the OMNI database were used to calculate the IMF cone angle and the empirically expected Pc 3-4 frequency (f in Hz = 0.006 BIMF). This frequency was overplotted on 0-100 mHz daily Fourier spectrograms from these stations, and its trace was color-coded to represent 3 cone angle ranges: 0° - 40°, 40° - 50°, and 50° to 90°. These spectrograms then provided a quick visual test of the expected IMF control of the observed waves. Waves observed within 2 hours of local noon showed good agreement on nearly all days between the observed and expected wave frequency. On most days wave occurrence also coincided with intervals of low cone angle, but a number of days showed band-limited Pc3-4 waves simultaneous with cone angles considerably larger than 50°. Examination of solar wind plasma parameters in the OMNI data base suggests that slightly enhanced values of solar wind pressure (above ~1.5 nPa) are associated with these anomalous cases.

  9. Binary primitive alternant codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helgert, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    In this note we investigate the properties of two classes of binary primitive alternant codes that are generalizations of the primitive BCH codes. For these codes we establish certain equivalence and invariance relations and obtain values of d and d*, the minimum distances of the prime and dual codes.

  10. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  11. Strong decay mode J /ψ p of hidden charm pentaquark states Pc+(4380 ) and Pc+(4450 ) in ΣcD¯* molecular scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Qi-Fang; Dong, Yu-Bing

    2016-04-01

    We study the strong decay channels Pc+(4380 )→J /ψ p and Pc+(4450 )→J /ψ p under a ΣcD¯* molecular state ansatz. With various spin-parity assignments, the partial decay widths of the J /ψ p final state are calculated. Our results show that all the P wave ΣcD¯* assignments are excluded, while S wave ΣcD¯* pictures for Pc(4380 ) and Pc(4450 ) are both allowed by present experimental data. The JP=3 /2- Σc*D ¯ and Σc*D¯* molecules are also discussed in the heavy quark limit, and we find that the Σc*D ¯ system for Pc(4380 ) is possible. More experimental information on spin parities and partial decay widths and theoretical investigations on other decay modes are needed to clarify the nature of the two Pc states.

  12. QR Codes 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; LaFrance, Jason; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional scannable code, similar in function to a traditional bar code that one might find on a product at the supermarket. The main difference between the two is that, while a traditional bar code can hold a maximum of only 20 digits, a QR code can hold up to 7,089 characters, so it can contain much more…

  13. ARA type protograph codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus and method for encoding low-density parity check codes. Together with a repeater, an interleaver and an accumulator, the apparatus comprises a precoder, thus forming accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA codes). Protographs representing various types of ARA codes, including AR3A, AR4A and ARJA codes, are described. High performance is obtained when compared to the performance of current repeat-accumulate (RA) or irregular-repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes.

  14. Multi-satellite study of the excitation of Pc3 and Pc4-5 ULF waves and their penetration across the plasmapause during the 2003 Halloween superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, G.; Daglis, I. A.; Mann, I. R.; Papadimitriou, C.; Zesta, E.; Georgiou, M.; Haagmans, R.; Tsinganos, K.

    2015-10-01

    We use multi-satellite and ground-based magnetic data to investigate the concurrent characteristics of Pc3 (22-100 mHz) and Pc4-5 (1-22 mHz) ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves on the 31 October 2003 during the Halloween magnetic superstorm. ULF waves are seen in the Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere, and Earth's surface, enabling an examination of their propagation characteristics. We employ a time-frequency analysis technique and examine data from when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT) conjunction near the dayside noon-midnight meridian. We find clear evidence of the excitation of both Pc3 and Pc4-5 waves, but more significantly we find a clear separation in the L shell of occurrence of the Pc4-5 and Pc3 waves in the equatorial inner magnetosphere, separated by the density gradients at the plasmapause boundary layer. A key finding of the wavelet spectral analysis of data collected from the Geotail, Cluster, and CHAMP spacecraft and the CARISMA and GIMA magnetometer networks was a remarkably clear transition of the waves' frequency into dominance in a higher-frequency regime within the Pc3 range. Analysis of the local field line resonance frequency suggests that the separation of the Pc4-5 and Pc3 emissions across the plasmapause is consistent with the structure of the inhomogeneous field line resonance Alfvén continuum. The Pc4-5 waves are consistent with direct excitation by the solar wind in the plasma trough, as well as Pc3 wave absorption in the plasmasphere following excitation by upstream waves originating at the bow shock in the local noon sector. However, despite good solar wind coverage, our study was not able to unambiguously identify a clear explanation for the sharp universal time (UT) onset of the discrete frequency and large-amplitude Pc3 wave power.

  15. 75 FR 66655 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-7 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Ltd. Model PC-7 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation.... Affected ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-7 airplanes... of the airplane. Do this check following paragraph 3.A. of Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. PC-7...

  16. The USL NASA PC R and D project: General specifications of objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Given here are the general specifications of the objectives of the University of Southwestern Louisiana Data Base Management System (USL/DBMS) NASA PC R and D Project, a project initiated to address future R and D issues related to PC-based processing environments acquired pursuant to the NASA contract work; namely, the IBM PC/XT systems.

  17. 76 FR 39473 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1120-PC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1120-PC AGENCY: Internal Revenue...(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Form 1120-PC, U.S. Property and...: 1545-1027. Form Number: Form 1120-PC. Abstract: Property and casualty insurance companies are...

  18. TOUGH+ v1.5 Core Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-27

    TOUGH+ v1.5 is a numerical code for the simulation of multi-phase, multi-component flow and transport of mass and heat through porous and fractured media, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. TOUGH+ is a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRANmore » 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstations, PC, Macintosh). TOUGH+ v1.5 employs dynamic memory allocation, thus minimizing storage requirements. It has a completely modular structure, follows the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), and involves the advanced features of FORTRAN 95/2003, i.e., modules, derived data types, the use of pointers, lists and trees, data encapsulation, defined operators and assignments, operator extension and overloading, use of generic procedures, and maximum use of the powerful intrinsic vector and matrix processing operations. TOUGH+ v1.5 is the core code for its family of applications, i.e., the part of the code that is common to all its applications. It provides a description of the underlying physics and thermodynamics of non-isothermal flow, of the mathematical and numerical approaches, as well as a detailed explanation of the general (common to all applications) input requirements, options, capabilities and output specifications. The core code cannot run by itself: it needs to be coupled with the code for the specific TOUGH+ application option that describes a particular type of problem. The additional input requirements specific to a particular TOUGH+ application options and related illustrative examples can be found in the corresponding User’s Manual.« less

  19. TOUGH+ v1.5 Core Code

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.

    2015-08-27

    TOUGH+ v1.5 is a numerical code for the simulation of multi-phase, multi-component flow and transport of mass and heat through porous and fractured media, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. TOUGH+ is a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstations, PC, Macintosh). TOUGH+ v1.5 employs dynamic memory allocation, thus minimizing storage requirements. It has a completely modular structure, follows the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), and involves the advanced features of FORTRAN 95/2003, i.e., modules, derived data types, the use of pointers, lists and trees, data encapsulation, defined operators and assignments, operator extension and overloading, use of generic procedures, and maximum use of the powerful intrinsic vector and matrix processing operations. TOUGH+ v1.5 is the core code for its family of applications, i.e., the part of the code that is common to all its applications. It provides a description of the underlying physics and thermodynamics of non-isothermal flow, of the mathematical and numerical approaches, as well as a detailed explanation of the general (common to all applications) input requirements, options, capabilities and output specifications. The core code cannot run by itself: it needs to be coupled with the code for the specific TOUGH+ application option that describes a particular type of problem. The additional input requirements specific to a particular TOUGH+ application options and related illustrative examples can be found in the corresponding User’s Manual.

  20. Development Of A PC-Based Radiological Imaging Workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Fahy, J. B.; DeSoto, L. A.; Haynor, D. R.; Loop, J. W.

    1988-06-01

    Low-cost image processing systems which can provide convenient access to image processing and analysis techniques hold great potential as diagnostic and research tools in medical imaging. At the University of Washington, we have developed a PC-based medium performance image processing system for use as an experimental radiological workstation. The workstation uses a standard IBM PC/AT personal computer augmented with a custom designed image processor implemented on two IBM PC/AT prototyping boards. Features of the system include up to 52 512 x 512 x 8 bit frame buffers (4 on the image processor board and up to 48 in the host computer memory) and a 512 x 512 x 4 bit graphics overlay memory, hardware zoom, pan and scroll, pseudo coloring, and a 60 Hz noninterlaced display. Many image processing and analysis functions are provided in this workstation, and all user requests are supported in an interactive fashion. For example, arithmetic and logical point operations between two 512 x 512 frame buffers require approximately 170 ms, while computationally intensive functions such as an 11 x 11 convolution or a full screen geometric transformation (warping) can be completed in less than 10 seconds. A full screen 2-D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Inverse FFT (IFFT) based on the row-column method can be completed in less than 20 seconds. The developed system can easily be configured into a DIN/PACS workstation or a biological imaging system. Hardware and software details of this workstation as well as user interface functions implemented will be discussed in the paper.

  1. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  2. Ionospheric signatures of cusp latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretson, M.J.; Anderson, B.J. ); Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Arnoldy, R.L. ); Rosenberg, T.J. ); Carpenter, D.L. ); Gail, W.B. ); Eather, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors have compared search coil magnetometer, riometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver data obtained at South Pole Station and McMurdo, Antarctica, during selected days in March and April 1986. Narrow-band magnetic pulsations in the Pc 3 period range are observed simultaneously at both stations in the dayside sector during times of low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle, but are considerably stronger at South Pole, which is located at a latitude near the nominal foot point of the daysie cusp/cleft region. Pulsations in auroral light a 427.8 nm wavelength are often observed with magnetic pulsations at South Pole, but such optical pulsations are not observed at McMurdo. When Pc 3 pulsations are present, they exhibit nearly identical frequencies, proportional to the magnitude of the IMF, in magnetometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver signals at South Pole Station and in magnetometer signals at McMurdo. Singals from the 30-MHz riometer at South Pole are modulated in concert with the magnetic and optical variations during periods of broadband pulsation activity, but no riometer variations are noted during periods of narrow-band activity. Because riometers are sensitive to electrons of auroral energies (several keV and above), while the 427.8-nm photometer is sensitive to precipitation with much lower energies, they interpret these observatons as showing that precipitating magnetosheathlike electrons (with energies {le} 1 keV) at nominal dayside cleft latitudes are at times modulated with frequencies similar to those of upstream waves. They suggest that these particles may play an important role, via modification of ionospheric currents and conductivities, in the transmission of upstream wave signals into the magnetosphere and in the generation of dayside high-latitude Pc 3 pulsations.

  3. AKPLOT: A plotter routine for IBM PC, XT and AT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil

    1987-01-01

    The AKPLOT software for the IBM PC, XT, and AT is an efficient and versatile tool that allows X-Y plotting of quantitative information. Features include IBM four-color graphics, which combined with 10 different symbols allows 40 different curves on the same grid, shrink or expansion of the graph size, any combination of log and linear X and Y axes, selective plotting from multiple curves of a previous run, interpolation and polynomial least-squares fit with any degree polynomial, and a 90-degree tilt of the entire graph. These options are independent, and can be invoked individually.

  4. Wf/pc Cycle 2 Calib: Measles Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1991-07-01

    This program takes "uniform illuminated" pictures of the earth to monitor the measles effect observed in WFPC observations. The goals of this program are: 1. Look for changes in measle numbers/characteristics 2. Have before/after images in place for decontaminations. This program will also build up a high quality flat field. The observations are done only with PC with a frequency of once every two weeks. The sequence (during a single earth occultation) is: F517N+OPEN, F517N+F122M, F517N+OPEN

  5. Isobaric PVT Behavior of Poly(Carbonate) (PC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    The scaling law for relaxation times, τ(V,T) = ℑ(TVγ), recently proposed by Casalini and Roland, is utilized in the framework of KAHR (Kovacs Aklonis Hutchinson and Ramos) phenomenological theory. With this approach it is shown that the Pressure, Volume, Temperature (PVT) data obtained on Poly(carbonate)(PC) can be reliably predicted, in the region of the alpha relaxation, by using only two fitting parameters, namely: the relaxation time in the reference condition, τg, and the fractional exponent, β that describes the dispersion of the alpha relaxation.

  6. AUTOPLAN: A PC-based automated mission planning tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterra, Frank C.; Allen, Marc S.; Lawrence, George F.

    1987-01-01

    A PC-based automated mission and resource planning tool, AUTOPLAN, is described, with application to small-scale planning and scheduling systems in the Space Station program. The input is a proposed mission profile, including mission duration, number of allowable slip periods, and requirement profiles for one or more resources as a function of time. A corresponding availability profile is also entered for each resource over the whole time interval under study. AUTOPLAN determines all integrated schedules which do not require more than the available resources.

  7. PC analysis of an acousto-ultrasonic signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiernan, M. T.; Duke, J. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An introduction is given to PC software developed to analyze a digitized signal. The specific way in which the software was implemented and the relative ease with which the same software can be implemented in different systems for various applications are discussed. The basic equations and related theory used in the software are furnished. Specifically, mention is made of signal digitization, dc biasing, Fourier analysis, moment analysis, digital filtering, and transfer functions. Examples of calculations are given to indicate the physical significance of variables calculated from the frequency domain via moment equations.

  8. AUTOPLAN - A PC-based automated mission planning tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterra, Frank C.; Allen, Marc S.; Lawrence, George F.

    1987-01-01

    A PC-based automated mission and resource planning tool, AUTOPLAN, is described, with application to small-scale planning and scheduling systems in the Space Station program. The input is a proposed mission profile, including mission duration, number of allowable slip periods, and requirement profiles for one or more resources as a function of time. A corresponding availability profile is also entered for each resource over the whole time interval under study. AUTOPLAN determines all integrated schedules which do not require more than the available resources.

  9. Evidence for a T suppressor cell-inducing antigenic determinant shared by ADJ-PC-5 plasmacytoma and syngeneic BALB/c spleen cells.

    PubMed

    Kloke, O; Haubeck, H D; Kölsch, E

    1986-06-01

    The BALB/c plasmacytoma ADJ-PC-5 induces in early stages of tumorigenesis specific T suppressor (Ts) cells apparently as the first reaction of the immune system towards the growing tumor. In attempts to apply the concept of early induction of Ts cells in neoplasia for the induction of tolerance to allografts we have tried to induce Ts cells against alloantigens by injecting allogeneic spleen cells in doses increasing exponentially from 10 to 10(5) cells/mouse. Experiments using various strain combinations failed to demonstrate induction of specific Ts cells by this procedure. To explain the apparent discrepancy between these and the tumor data the capacity of the ADJ-PC-5 tumor cells to induce Ts cells in allogeneic combinations was analyzed. ADJ-PC-5 cells are capable of inducing specific Ts cells in CBA/J mice. These Ts cells specifically suppress the induction of a primary cytotoxic T cell response of CBA/J spleen cells against BALB/c, BALB.B and (BALB/c X C57BL/6)F1 cells but not one against B10.D2 or C57BL/10 target cells. The ADJ-PC-5-induced CBA/J Ts cells have been further analyzed using a panel of different target or responder cells. From these experiments the following conclusions can be drawn: the CBA/J Ts cells are specific for an antigen which is shared by ADJ-PC-5 and normal BALB/c spleen cells. The antigen in question is not coded for by the H-2d major histocompatibility complex. The data suggest that the Ts cell-inducing antigen on ADJ-PC-5 tumor cells is not a tumor associated neoantigen but a self antigen also present on normal BALB/c lymphoid cells. PMID:2424769

  10. Asymmetric quantum convolutional codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Guardia, Giuliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we construct the first families of asymmetric quantum convolutional codes (AQCCs). These new AQCCs are constructed by means of the CSS-type construction applied to suitable families of classical convolutional codes, which are also constructed here. The new codes have non-catastrophic generator matrices, and they have great asymmetry. Since our constructions are performed algebraically, i.e. we develop general algebraic methods and properties to perform the constructions, it is possible to derive several families of such codes and not only codes with specific parameters. Additionally, several different types of such codes are obtained.

  11. Comparison of CAP88 PC Ver. 3.0 and MAXDOSE dose assessment models involving co-located stack releases at the Savannah River site.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo; Jannik, G Timothy; Lee, Patricia; Powell, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's Environmental Dosimetry Group performs dosimetry assessments for Savannah River Site (SRS) radionuclide air emissions utilizing the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) code (CAP88 PC Ver. 3.0) and the MAXDOSE-SR Ver. 2011 code, which is an SRS-specific version of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's MAXIGASP code. CAP88 PC and MAXDOSE-SR are used at SRS for demonstrating compliance with Environmental Protection Agency dose standards for radionuclide emissions to the atmosphere and Department of Energy Order 458.1 dose standards, respectively. During a routine comparison of these two assessment models, it was discovered that CAP88 PC Ver. 3.0 was not producing the expected results when using multiple co-located stacks in a single run. Specifically, if the stack heights are considered separately, the results for several radionuclides (but not all) differ from the combined run [i.e., 1 + 2 does not equal (1+2)]. Additionally, when two or more stack heights are considered in a run, the results depend on the order of the selected stack heights. For example, for a two stack-height run of 0 meter and 61 m input produces different results from a 61 m and 0 m input run. This study presents a comparison of CAP88 PC Ver. 3.0 and MAXDOSE-SR Ver. 2011 based on SRS input data and on two-stack release scenarios. The selected radionuclides for this study included gases/vapors (H, C, Kr, and I) and particulates (Sr, Cs, Pu, and Am) commonly encountered at SRS. PMID:23803669

  12. Unfolding the color code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubica, Aleksander; Yoshida, Beni; Pastawski, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    The topological color code and the toric code are two leading candidates for realizing fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here we show that the color code on a d-dimensional closed manifold is equivalent to multiple decoupled copies of the d-dimensional toric code up to local unitary transformations and adding or removing ancilla qubits. Our result not only generalizes the proven equivalence for d = 2, but also provides an explicit recipe of how to decouple independent components of the color code, highlighting the importance of colorability in the construction of the code. Moreover, for the d-dimensional color code with d+1 boundaries of d+1 distinct colors, we find that the code is equivalent to multiple copies of the d-dimensional toric code which are attached along a (d-1)-dimensional boundary. In particular, for d = 2, we show that the (triangular) color code with boundaries is equivalent to the (folded) toric code with boundaries. We also find that the d-dimensional toric code admits logical non-Pauli gates from the dth level of the Clifford hierarchy, and thus saturates the bound by Bravyi and Knig. In particular, we show that the logical d-qubit control-Z gate can be fault-tolerantly implemented on the stack of d copies of the toric code by a local unitary transformation.

  13. Polycomb Group (PcG) Proteins and Human Cancers: Multifaceted Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Voruganti, Sukesh; Nag, Subhasree; Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors that regulate several crucial developmental and physiological processes in the cell. More recently, they have been found to play important roles in human carcinogenesis and cancer development and progression. The deregulation and dysfunction of PcG proteins often lead to blocking or inappropriate activation of developmental pathways, enhancing cellular proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, and increasing the cancer stem cell population. Genetic and molecular investigations of PcG proteins have long been focused on their PcG functions. However, PcG proteins have recently been shown to exert non-polycomb functions, contributing to the regulation of diverse cellular functions. We and others have demonstrated that PcG proteins regulate the expression and function of several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a PcG-independent manner, and PcG proteins are associated with the survival of patients with cancer. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the research on PcG proteins, including both the polycomb-repressive and non-polycomb functions. We specifically focus on the mechanisms by which PcG proteins play roles in cancer initiation, development, and progression. Finally, we discuss the potential value of PcG proteins as molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer, and as molecular targets for cancer therapy. PMID:26227500

  14. Binding to and photo-oxidation of cardiolipin by the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Myriam E.; Kim, Junhwan; Delos Santos, Grace B.; Azizuddin, Kashif; Berlin, Jeffrey; Anderson, Vernon E.; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2010-09-01

    Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Its peroxidation correlates with release of cytochrome c and induction of apoptosis. The phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 binds preferentially to the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Earlier Förster resonance energy transfer studies showed colocalization of Pc 4 and cardiolipin, which suggests cardiolipin as a target of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with Pc 4. Using liposomes as membrane models, we find that Pc 4 binds to cardiolipin-containing liposomes similarly to those that do not contain cardiolipin. Pc 4 binding is also studied in MCF-7c3 cells and those whose cardiolipin content was reduced by treatment with palmitate. Decreased levels of cardiolipin are quantified by thin-layer chromatography. The similar level of binding of Pc 4 to cells, irrespective of palmitate treatment, supports the lack of specificity of Pc 4 binding. Thus, factors other than cardiolipin are likely responsible for the preferential localization of Pc 4 in mitochondria. Nonetheless, cardiolipin within liposomes is readily oxidized by Pc 4 and light, yielding apparently mono- and dihydroperoxidized cardiolipin. If similar products result from exposure of cells to Pc 4-PDT, they could be part of the early events leading to apoptosis following Pc 4-PDT.

  15. [PC-1 enhances c-myc gene expression in prostate cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Shi, Qing-Guo; Qian, Xiao-Long; Li, Shan-Hu; Wang, Hong-Tao; Wang, Le-Le; Zhou, Jian-Guang

    2010-04-01

    PC-1(Prostate and colon gene 1) gene belongs to TPD52 (Tumor Protein D52) gene family. The expression of PC-1 is found to promote androgen-independent progression. This study was conducted to assess the mechnism of promotion of androgen-independent progression in PC-1 gene. The c-myc gene expression was tested by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses in the LNCaP-pc-1 and LNCaP-zero cell line. After separation of cytoplasm and nulear proteins of the LNCaP-pc-1 and LNCaP-zero cell line, the beta-catenin protein was detected by Western blotting. C4-2 cell line was used to examine the effects of 10058-F4 on the PC-1 gene expression. The results of RT-PCR and Western blotting indicated that PC-1 enhanced c-myc gene expression in prostate cancer cells, PC-1 was also found to enhance beta-catenin expression in nuclear. Furthermore, a small-molecule c-Myc inhibitor, 10058-F4 represses PC-1 gene expression in C4-2 cell line. Our findings suggest that PC-1 enhances c-myc gene expression in prostate cancer cells through the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Meanwhile, c-myc plays a feed-forward role in enhancing PC-1 driven c-myc gene expression, and promotes prostate an-drogen-independent progression. PMID:20423888

  16. Ionospheric signatures of cusp latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    Search coil magnetometer, riometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver data obtained at South Pole Station and McMurdo, Antarctica during selected days in March and April 1986 are compared. Narrow-band magnetic pulsations in the Pc 3 period range are observed simultaneously at both stations in the dayside sector during times of low IMF cone angle, but are considerably stronger at South Pole, which is located at a latitude near the nominal foot point of the dayside cusp/cleft region. Pulsations in auroral light at 427.8 nm wavelength are often observed with magnetic pulsations at South Pole, but such optical pulsations are not observed at McMurdo. The observations suggest that precipitating magnetosheathlike electrons at nominal dayside cleft latitudes are at times modulated with frequencies similar to those of upstream waves. These particles may play an important role, via modification of ionospheric currents and conductivities, in the transmission of upstream wave signals into the magnetosphere and in the generation of dayside high-latitude Pc 3 pulsations.

  17. Paleomap PC: Plate tectonic reconstructions on IBM compatible computers

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.B.; Scotese, C.R. . Dept. Geology)

    1993-02-01

    PALEOMAP-PC (PMAPPC) allows users to interactively view Phanerozoic plate reconstructions on IBM compatible personal computers. This software compliments Macintosh and Unix software developed to conjunction with the PALEOMAP Project at the University of Texas at Arlington. The past positions of the continents can be viewed on the PC monitor in a variety of map projections including the spherical projection which gives a 3-D perspective of the Earth. Once a reconstruction time has been entered, the total finite rotations for over 150 independently moving plates are calculated and the plates are rotated back through time and drawn in reconstructed coordinates. The user can zoom in and out focusing on particular areas of interest. Hard copy output is available to a variety of output devices, both as a screen dump utility and as a selected option within the program. Although visualizing continental configurations through time is the core of the program, its primary strength is that user-defined data, such as stratigraphic or structural data, can be incorporated and plotted on reconstructed basemaps. This allows the time aspect of all geological data to be united with other user-supplied data within the plate tectonic framework.

  18. Commodity clusters: Performance comparison between PC`s and workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.; Laroco, J.; Armstrong, R.

    1996-03-01

    Workstation clusters were originally developed as a way to leverage the better cost basis of UNIX workstations to perform computations previously handled only by relatively more expensive supercomputers. Commodity workstation clusters take this evolutionary process one step further by replacing equivalent proprietary workstation functionality with less expensive PC technology. As PC technology encroaches on proprietary UNIX workstation vendor markets, these vendors will see a declining share of the overall market. As technology advances continue, the ability to upgrade a workstations performance plays a large role in cost analysis. For example, a major upgrade to a typical UNIX workstation means replacing the whole machine. As major revisions to the UNIX vendor`s product line come out, brand new systems are introduced. IBM compatibles, however, are modular by design, and nothing need to be replaced except the components that are truly improved. The DAISy cluster, for example, is about to undergo a major upgrade from 90MHz Pentiums to 200MHz Pentium Pros. All of the memory -- the system`s largest expense -- and disks, power supply, etc., can be reused. As a result, commodity workstation clusters ought to gain an increasingly large share of the distributed computing market.

  19. A DMC study on FePc electronic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichibha, Tom; Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo

    We performed fixed-node DMC calculations on an isolated FePc [Iron(II) Phthalocyanine] using CASSCF nodal surfaces, getting its ground state, 3A2 g [dz22dxz, yz 2dxy2 ]. Virial ratios for each state are achieved to be within 0.042% around 2.0. Recent studies are proposing a mixed state with 3Eg (b) and 3B2 g as the ground state, while past ab-initio calculations are predicting 3A2 g or 3Eg (a) , giving still controversial arguments even within isolated/no-LS coupling model. Under D4 h ligand field parameter space, (10Dq , Dt, Ds), the state, 3A2 g , is reported to be possible as a ground state, while it is not when we restrict the space into 2-dim sub-space corresponding to more specified symmetry as in FePc with plane square alignment of neighboring N to Fe ('superposition model'). Our optimized geometry also satisfies the same symmetry, and hence appears to be contradicting to the ligand theory.

  20. Nuclear data retrieval for PC applications, PCNuDat

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, R.R.

    1996-11-01

    The PCNuDat program for IBM-PC compatibles is similar to the NuDat program available through the NNDC Online Nuclear Data Service. They provide a user with access to nuclear data in a convenient and menu driven system. This data is useful in both basic and applied research. The nuclear base used by NuDat is extracted from several data bases maintained at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). The program is an extended DOS program which uses 32 bit addressing. It can run in a DOS window on all the current Windows operating systems. The program and its data base are currently available on both a CD-ROM or electronically over the Internet. Electronic access can be made through the NNDC`s Web home page. The files may also be FTP`d from the public area under the [pc{_}prog] directory on bnlnd2.dne.bnl.gov. The CD-ROM version also contains the Nuclear Science References (NSR) data base and its retrieval program, Papyrus NSR.

  1. PC-based closed-circuit television system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, Daniel; Clark, Carl

    The PC-based closed-circuit television (CCTV) system is a low-cost, highly functional alternative to conventional video system equipment. The system provides routing switching, character generation, video presence detection, and solid-state video recording and replay by using four uniquely designed boards that fit into the backplane slots of an IBM PC-XT-compatible personal computer. Each board controls 16 separate channels, and the boards can be daisy-chained together to build larger, more powerful systems. The system can be configured to handle as many as 240 input signals or up to 48 output channels, and uses a redundant video bus loop. The video bus can be tapped into throughout the loop to provide localized routing switching within several buildings, and video termination at multiple locations, such as security operators' stations. This approach reduces cabling costs and allows additional routing switchers to be added easily with little impact on existing equipment. The system is capable of communicating with several control interfaces, and control software is currently in place for communicating via an RS-232 link and the Intel BitBus network. The hardware drivers are Microsoft C modules that can be linked with a user developed control program.

  2. On the PC Interface for Hearing-Impaired

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Mitsuhiro; Akiyama, Kouichi; Hama, Hiromitsu

    2002-12-01

    A human being takes in the outer world information by using the five senses, and lives. So he is forced very inconvenient life even when one sense is missing. Among others, it is said that the sense of hearing has importance next to the sight, but it is one of the organs which surely become weak with aging, and "hearing defect" is particularly the problem which all people face someday. But, technically and socially, the system which the person whose physical function is poor can entry into and contribute to the society is very important. In this research, the way of making up for a lost function by the medium change to the sense of touch information from the auditory information is examined, as a help that hearing-impaired gets "safety", "independence", "the tranquility of the heart" from the technical side. In this paper, as a concrete system, it paid attention to the mouse of the PC interface, and a vibration mouse was used under the environment which a PC was being used for, and thought about building of the system which can acquire the sound information of the life environment in real time.

  3. PC-SEAPAK user's guide, version 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Charles R.; Fu, Gary; Darzi, Michael; Firestone, James K.

    1992-01-01

    PC-SEAPAK is designed to provide a complete and affordable capability for processing and analysis of NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Nimbus-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) data. Since the release of version 3.0 over a year ago, significant revisions were made to the AVHRR and CZCS programs and to the statistical data analysis module, and a number of new programs were added. This new version has 114 procedures listed in its menus. The package continues to emphasize user-friendliness and interactive data analysis. Additionally, because the scientific goals of the ocean color research being conducted have shifted to larger space and time scales, batch processing capabilities were enhanced, allowing large quantities of data to be easily ingested and analyzed. The development of PC-SEAPAK was paralled by two other activities that were influential and assistive: the global CZCS processing effort at GSFC and the continued development of VAX-SEAPAK. SEAPAK incorporates the instrument calibration and support all levels of data available from the CZCS archive.

  4. A code for calculating intrabeam scattering and beam lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1997-05-01

    Beam emittances in a circular accelerator with a high beam intensity are strongly affected by the small angle intrabeam Coulomb scattering. In the computer simulation model the authors present here they used three coupled nonlinear differential equations to describe the evolution of the emittances in the transverse and the longitudinal planes. These equations include terms which take into account the intra-beam scattering, adiabatic damping, microwave instabilities, synchrotron damping, and quantum excitations. A code is generated to solve the equations numerically and incorporated into a FORTRAN code library. Circular high intensity physics routines are included in the library such as intrabeam scattering, Touschek scattering, and the bunch lengthening effect of higher harmonic cavities. The code runs presently in the PC environment. Description of the code and some examples are presented.

  5. NASA Lewis Steady-State Heat Pipe Code Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mi, Ye; Tower, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed the LERCHP code. The PC-based LERCHP code can be used to predict the steady-state performance of heat pipes, including the determination of operating temperature and operating limits which might be encountered under specified conditions. The code contains a vapor flow algorithm which incorporates vapor compressibility and axially varying heat input. For the liquid flow in the wick, Darcy s formula is employed. Thermal boundary conditions and geometric structures can be defined through an interactive input interface. A variety of fluid and material options as well as user defined options can be chosen for the working fluid, wick, and pipe materials. This report documents the current effort at GRC to update the LERCHP code for operating in a Microsoft Windows (Microsoft Corporation) environment. A detailed analysis of the model is presented. The programming architecture for the numerical calculations is explained and flowcharts of the key subroutines are given

  6. QR Code Mania!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumack, Kellie A.; Reilly, Erin; Chamberlain, Nik

    2013-01-01

    space, has error-correction capacity, and can be read from any direction. These codes are used in manufacturing, shipping, and marketing, as well as in education. QR codes can be created to produce…

  7. DIANE multiparticle transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillaud, M.; Lemaire, S.; Ménard, S.; Rathouit, P.; Ribes, J. C.; Riz, D.

    2014-06-01

    DIANE is the general Monte Carlo code developed at CEA-DAM. DIANE is a 3D multiparticle multigroup code. DIANE includes automated biasing techniques and is optimized for massive parallel calculations.

  8. Enhanced photodynamic efficacy towards melanoma cells by encapsulation of Pc4 in silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Baozhong; Yin Junjie; Bilski, Piotr J.; Chignell, Colin F.; Roberts, Joan E.; He Yuying

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticles have been explored recently as an efficient means of delivering photosensitizers for cancer diagnosis and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc4) is currently being clinically tested as a photosensitizer for PDT. Unfortunately, Pc4 aggregates in aqueous solutions, which dramatically reduces its PDT efficacy and therefore limits its clinical application. We have encapsulated Pc4 using silica nanoparticles (Pc4SNP), which not only improved the aqueous solubility, stability, and delivery of the photodynamic drug but also increased its photodynamic efficacy compared to free Pc4 molecules. Pc4SNP generated photo-induced singlet oxygen more efficiently than free Pc4 as measured by chemical probe and EPR trapping techniques. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements showed that the size of the particles is in the range of 25-30 nm. Cell viability measurements demonstrated that Pc4SNP was more phototoxic to A375 or B16-F10 melanoma cells than free Pc4. Pc4SNP photodamaged melanoma cells primarily through apoptosis. Irradiation of A375 cells in the presence of Pc4SNP resulted in a significant increase in intracellular protein-derived peroxides, suggesting a Type II (singlet oxygen) mechanism for phototoxicity. More Pc4SNP than free Pc4 was localized in the mitochondria and lysosomes. Our results show that these stable, monodispersed silica nanoparticles may be an effective new formulation for Pc4 in its preclinical and clinical studies. We expect that modifying the surface of silicon nanoparticles encapsulating the photosensitizers with antibodies specific to melanoma cells will lead to even better early diagnosis and targeted treatment of melanoma in the future.

  9. The laser linewidth effect on the image quality of phase coded synthetic aperture ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guangyu; Hou, Peipei; Ma, Xiaoping; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ning; Li, Guangyuan; Zhang, Guo; Liu, Liren

    2015-12-01

    The phase coded (PC) waveform in synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) outperforms linear frequency modulated (LFM) signal in lower side lobe, shorter pulse duration and making the rigid control of the chirp starting point in every pulse unnecessary. Inherited from radar PC waveform and strip map SAL, the backscattered signal of a point target in PC SAL was listed and the two dimensional match filtering algorithm was introduced to focus a point image. As an inherent property of laser, linewidth is always detrimental to coherent ladar imaging. With the widely adopted laser linewidth model, the effect of laser linewidth on SAL image quality was theoretically analyzed and examined via Monte Carlo simulation. The research gives us a clear view of how to select linewidth parameters in the future PC SAL systems.

  10. STEEP32 computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goerke, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    A manual is presented as an aid in using the STEEP32 code. The code is the EXEC 8 version of the STEEP code (STEEP is an acronym for shock two-dimensional Eulerian elastic plastic). The major steps in a STEEP32 run are illustrated in a sample problem. There is a detailed discussion of the internal organization of the code, including a description of each subroutine.

  11. Morse Code Activity Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Janeen S.

    This activity packet offers simple directions for setting up a Morse Code system appropriate to interfacing with any of several personal computer systems. Worksheets are also included to facilitate teaching Morse Code to persons with visual or other disabilities including blindness, as it is argued that the code is best learned auditorily. (PB)

  12. Longitudinal frequency variation of long-lasting EMIC Pc1-Pc2 waves localized in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-H.; Shiokawa, K.; Mann, I. R.; Park, J.-S.; Kwon, H.-J.; Hyun, K.; Jin, H.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    Long-lasting (> 20 h) electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) Pc1-Pc2 waves were observed by the Athabasca (L =˜ 4.6) induction magnetometer and Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity (L =˜ 4-6) fluxgate magnetometers on 5 April 2007. These waves showed a systematic frequency change with local time, the minimum frequency near dusk, and the maximum frequency near dawn. Assuming the plasmapause as a potential source region of the waves, we estimated the plasmapause location from localized proton enhancement (LPE) events observed at NOAA-Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites and METOP-2 satellites. We found that the longitudinal frequency variation of EMIC waves has a clear correlation with the estimated plasmapause location and that the waves are in the frequency band between the equatorial helium and oxygen gyrofrequencies at the estimated plasmapause. With our analysis results we suggest that the LPE events are caused by wave-particle interaction with the helium band EMIC waves generated near the plasmapause.

  13. CWG - MUTUAL COUPLING PROGRAM FOR CIRCULAR WAVEGUIDE-FED APERTURE ARRAY (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    Mutual Coupling Program for Circular Waveguide-fed Aperture Array (CWG) was developed to calculate the electromagnetic interaction between elements of an antenna array of circular apertures with specified aperture field distributions. The field distributions were assumed to be a superposition of the modes which could exist in a circular waveguide. Various external media were included to provide flexibility of use, for example, the flexibility to determine the effects of dielectric covers (i.e., thermal protection system tiles) upon the impedance of aperture type antennas. The impedance and radiation characteristics of planar array antennas depend upon the mutual interaction between all the elements of the array. These interactions are influenced by several parameters (e.g., the array grid geometry, the geometry and excitation of each array element, the medium outside the array, and the internal network feeding the array.) For the class of array antenna whose radiating elements consist of small holes in a flat conducting plate, the electromagnetic problem can be divided into two parts, the internal and the external. In solving the external problem for an array of circular apertures, CWG will compute the mutual interaction between various combinations of circular modal distributions and apertures. CWG computes the mutual coupling between various modes assumed to exist in circular apertures that are located in a flat conducting plane of infinite dimensions. The apertures can radiate into free space, a homogeneous medium, a multilayered region or a reflecting surface. These apertures are assumed to be excited by one or more modes corresponding to the modal distributions in circular waveguides of the same cross sections as the apertures. The apertures may be of different sizes and also of different polarizations. However, the program assumes that each aperture field contains the same modal distributions, and calculates the complex scattering matrix between all mode and aperture combinations. The scattering matrix can then be used to determine the complex modal field amplitudes for each aperture with a specified array excitation. CWG is written in VAX FORTRAN for DEC VAX series computers running VMS (LAR-15236) and IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS (LAR-15226). It requires 360K of RAM for execution. To compile the source code for the PC version, the NDP Fortran compiler and linker will be required; however, the distribution medium for the PC version of CWG includes a sample MS-DOS executable which was created using NDP Fortran with the -vms compiler option. The standard distribution medium for the PC version of CWG is a 3.5 inch 1.44Mb MS-DOS format diskette. The standard distribution medium for the VAX version of CWG is a 1600 BPI 9track magnetic tape in DEC VAX BACKUP format. The VAX version is also available on a TK50 tape cartridge in DEC VAX BACKUP format. Both machine versions of CWG include an electronic version of the documentation in Microsoft Word for Windows format. CWG was developed in 1993 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA.

  14. Software Certification - Coding, Code, and Coders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a certification approach for software development that has been adopted at our organization. JPL develops robotic spacecraft for the exploration of the solar system. The flight software that controls these spacecraft is considered to be mission critical. We argue that the goal of a software certification process cannot be the development of "perfect" software, i.e., software that can be formally proven to be correct under all imaginable and unimaginable circumstances. More realistically, the goal is to guarantee a software development process that is conducted by knowledgeable engineers, who follow generally accepted procedures to control known risks, while meeting agreed upon standards of workmanship. We target three specific issues that must be addressed in such a certification procedure: the coding process, the code that is developed, and the skills of the coders. The coding process is driven by standards (e.g., a coding standard) and tools. The code is mechanically checked against the standard with the help of state-of-the-art static source code analyzers. The coders, finally, are certified in on-site training courses that include formal exams.

  15. To code, or not to code?

    PubMed

    Parman, Cindy C

    2003-01-01

    In summary, it is also important to remember the hidden rules: 1) Just because there is a code in the manual, it doesn't mean it can be billed to insurance, or that once billed, it will be reimbursed. 2) Just because a code was paid once, doesn't mean it will ever be paid again--or that you get to keep the money! 3) The healthcare provider is responsible for knowing all the rules, but then it is impossible to know all the rules! And not knowing all the rules can lead to fines, penalties or worse! New codes are added annually (quarterly for OPPS), definitions of existing codes are changed, and it is the responsibility of healthcare providers to keep abreast of all coding updates and changes. In addition, the federal regulations are constantly updated and changed, making compliant billing a moving target. All healthcare entities should focus on complete documentation, the adherence to authoritative coding guidance and the provision of detailed explanations and specialty education to the payor, as necessary. PMID:14619987

  16. Coding for Electronic Mail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Lee, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Scheme for coding facsimile messages promises to reduce data transmission requirements to one-tenth current level. Coding scheme paves way for true electronic mail in which handwritten, typed, or printed messages or diagrams sent virtually instantaneously - between buildings or between continents. Scheme, called Universal System for Efficient Electronic Mail (USEEM), uses unsupervised character recognition and adaptive noiseless coding of text. Image quality of resulting delivered messages improved over messages transmitted by conventional coding. Coding scheme compatible with direct-entry electronic mail as well as facsimile reproduction. Text transmitted in this scheme automatically translated to word-processor form.

  17. Noninvasive assessment of tissue distribution and tumor pharmacokinetics of Pc 181, a silicon phthalocyanine analogue, in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lihua; Guo, Jianxia; Clausen, Dana M.; Eiseman, Julie L.

    2010-02-01

    Objective: In in vitro photodynamic therapy, the LD50 of Pc 181 has been reported to be 7 to 8 times less than that of silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4). The Optical Pharmacokinetic System (OPS) can measure photosensitizer concentrations in accessible tissues non-invasively. We used OPS to evaluate the tumor pharmacokinetics of Pc 181 and Pc 4 and the tissue drug distribution in SCID mice bearing either human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 or human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma SCC-15 xenografts. Methods: Following iv administration of 2.5 mg/kg Pc 181 or 2 mg/kg Pc 4 to SCID mice, OPS measurements were taken on tumor and normal tissues between 5 and 4320 min in vivo or in situ. Results: Large variations in tumor Pc 181 concentrations were observed among mice. In MDA-MB-231 tumors, the Pc 181 concentration peaked at 240 min, and was retained in the tumor. Tumor Pc 181 concentrations were much less than the tumor Pc 4 concentrations at an equimolar dose. Pc 181 concentrations were the highest in liver, followed by spleen, and kidney. In mice bearing SCC-15 xenografts, skin and underlying tissue Pc 181 concentrations were higher than tumor concentrations at all time points examined. Conclusions: This first Pc 181 pharmacokinetics study described a tissue Pc 181 distribution similar to that of Pc 4. However, tumor Pc 181 concentrations were lower than those of Pc 4 at equimolar doses.

  18. XSOR codes users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, Hong-Nian; Murfin, W.B.; Johnson, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the source term estimation codes, XSORs. The codes are written for three pressurized water reactors (Surry, Sequoyah, and Zion) and two boiling water reactors (Peach Bottom and Grand Gulf). The ensemble of codes has been named ``XSOR``. The purpose of XSOR codes is to estimate the source terms which would be released to the atmosphere in severe accidents. A source term includes the release fractions of several radionuclide groups, the timing and duration of releases, the rates of energy release, and the elevation of releases. The codes have been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in support of the NUREG-1150 program. The XSOR codes are fast running parametric codes and are used as surrogates for detailed mechanistic codes. The XSOR codes also provide the capability to explore the phenomena and their uncertainty which are not currently modeled by the mechanistic codes. The uncertainty distributions of input parameters may be used by an. XSOR code to estimate the uncertainty of source terms.

  19. Code to generate random identifiers and select QA/QC samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehnert, Edward

    1992-01-01

    SAMPLID is a PC-based, FORTRAN-77 code which generates unique numbers for identification of samples, selection of QA/QC samples, and generation of labels. These procedures are tedious, but using a computer code such as SAMPLID can increase efficiency and reduce or eliminate errors and bias. The algorithm, used in SAMPLID, for generation of pseudorandom numbers is free of statistical flaws present in commonly available algorithms.

  20. Permutation codes for sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T.; Jelinek, F.; Wolf, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    Source encoding techniques based on permutation codes are investigated. For a broad class of distortion measures it is shown that optimum encoding of a source permutation code is easy to instrument even for very long block lengths. Also, the nonparametric nature of permutation encoding is well suited to situations involving unknown source statistics. For the squared-error distortion measure a procedure for generating good permutation codes of a given rate and block length is described. The performance of such codes for a memoryless Gaussian source is compared both with the rate-distortion function bound and with the performance of various quantization schemes. The comparison reveals that permutation codes are asymptotically ideal for small rates and perform as well as the best entropy-coded quantizers presently known for intermediate rates. They can be made to compare favorably at high rates, too, provided the coding delay associated with extremely long block lengths is tolerable.

  1. DLLExternalCode

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2014-05-14

    DLLExternalCode is the a general dynamic-link library (DLL) interface for linking GoldSim (www.goldsim.com) with external codes. The overall concept is to use GoldSim as top level modeling software with interfaces to external codes for specific calculations. The DLLExternalCode DLL that performs the linking function is designed to take a list of code inputs from GoldSim, create an input file for the external application, run the external code, and return a list of outputs, read from files created by the external application, back to GoldSim. Instructions for creating the input file, running the external code, and reading the output are contained in an instructions file that is read and interpreted by the DLL.

  2. DLLExternalCode

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-05-14

    DLLExternalCode is the a general dynamic-link library (DLL) interface for linking GoldSim (www.goldsim.com) with external codes. The overall concept is to use GoldSim as top level modeling software with interfaces to external codes for specific calculations. The DLLExternalCode DLL that performs the linking function is designed to take a list of code inputs from GoldSim, create an input file for the external application, run the external code, and return a list of outputs, read frommore » files created by the external application, back to GoldSim. Instructions for creating the input file, running the external code, and reading the output are contained in an instructions file that is read and interpreted by the DLL.« less

  3. A PC-Based Free Text DSS for Health Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Ralph R.; Buchanan, Paul; Massey, James K.; Jin, Ming

    1987-01-01

    A free Decision Support System(DST) has been constructed for health care professional that allows the analysis of complex medical cases and the creation of diagnostic list of potential diseases for clinical evaluation.The system uses a PC-based text management system specifically designed for desktop operation. The texts employed in the decision support package include the Merck Manual (published by Merck Sharpe & Dohme) and Control of Communicable Diseas in Man (published by the American Public Health Association). The background and design of the database are discussed along with a structured analysis procedure for handling free text DSS system. A case study is presented to show the application of this technology and conclusions are drawn in the summary that point to expanded areas of professional intention and new frontiers yet to be explored in this rapidly progressing field.

  4. PC reporting system for radiologists: practical use under PACS environment.

    PubMed

    Nakata, N; Yoshihiro, S; Miida, K; Tashima, M; Sunakawa, Y; Harada, J; Tada, S; Fukuda, K

    2001-07-01

    To evaluate the practical usefulness of several types of the reporting system especially for radiologists, we have developed and employed several reporting systems. We categorized those reporting systems as follows (1) stand alone PC reporting system; (2) linked reporting system with PACS environment; (3) integrated three-dimensional (3D) imaging workstation (WS) with the intranet. We have evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of those three systems, and compared between the reporting system without PACS and network reporting system with PACS. Using linked reporting system with PACS, radiologists could easily reference both previous reports and archived diagnostic images, and also make their teaching files quickly. In conclusion, the reporting system under PACS environment is found to be practical and helpful for Japanese radiologists. PMID:11378217

  5. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  6. Audio podcasting in a tablet PC-enhanced biochemistry course.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Heather; Robertson, Brian; Mangino, Michael; Cox, James R

    2007-11-01

    This report describes the effects of making audio podcasts of all lectures in a large, basic biochemistry course promptly available to students. The audio podcasts complement a previously described approach in which a tablet PC is used to annotate PowerPoint slides with digital ink to produce electronic notes that can be archived. The fundamentals of this approach are described, and data from student attitudinal and informational surveys are presented. The survey data suggest that the students have a positive attitude toward the combination of tablet-based instruction and audio podcasting. In addition, three students provide testimonials on how these technological tools allowed them to utilize their preferred learning styles to succeed in the course. Possible negative consequences of this approach, in terms of class attendance and note taking, are also analyzed and discussed. PMID:21591146

  7. PC-based Digital Acoustic Control System (DACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Kamlesh C.

    1991-01-01

    The PC-based Digital Acoustic Control System (DACS), which is a closed-loop system capable of precisely controlling the spectrum in real-time mode, is discussed. The system is based on integrated facility hardware including control microphones, signal conditioners, a real-time analyzer (RTA), a shaper, high capacity power amplifiers, and acoustic horns and generators. The DACS provides both an improved spectrum simulation and realtime information of pertinent test parameters that are stored in five separate files. These files can be hard copied and/or transferred to other programs to obtain a specific format of the test data. It is demonstrated that the computer interface with digital RTA and programmable filters are most effective and efficient. This facility runs independently under the control of a computer with an IEEE-488 interface to the facility hardware.

  8. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2000-07-05

    The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (PC) boilers. This NO{sub x} reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to make this technology ready for full-scale commercial deployment by 2002-2003 in order to meet an anticipated market demand for NO{sub x} reduction technologies resulting from the EPA's NO{sub x} SIP call.

  9. Power-cable-carrier control (PC/sup 3/) system

    SciTech Connect

    Alvis, R.L.; Wally, K.; Rosborough, J.R.

    1981-04-01

    A control system has been developed that uses a carrier signal imposed on an existing ac power circuit to transmit commands. This system was specifically developed to control an entire solar collector field by sending sun-tracking information to the trough collectors or by commanding them to assume safe positions (STOW) if out-of-limit conditions were encountered. Objectives were to develop a control system that operates reliably and has enough functions to control an entire collector field, yet do it at less cost than for conventional approaches. Development, design, operating characteristics, and field testing and results of the new system, the Power Cable Carrier Control (PC/sup 3/) System are described.

  10. Neurosecretory Habituation in PC12 Cells: Modulation During Parallel Habituation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Paul T.; Koshland, Daniel E., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    PC12 cells habituate during repetitive stimulation with acetylcholine, bradykinin, or high potassium. Interspersing these stimulants did not affect the rate of habituation of the others, but it could modulate the amplitude of the norepinephrine secretion each could achieve. Stimulation with acetylcholine inhibited norepinephrine secretion caused by high potassium and bradykinin stimulation, while high potassium had no effect on acetylcholine or bradykinin, and bradykinin increased secretion caused by acetylcholine. Changes in norepinephrine secretion resulting from any of these stimulants correlated with changes in internal calcium levels. Cyclic AMP-, protein kinase C-, and calmodulin-dependent second messenger pathways all modulated norepinephrine secretion caused by acetylcholine and high potassium and showed a distinct hierarchy in their effectiveness. These data demonstrate that different receptor pathways can change the norepinephrine response of one another while not changing the levels of the molecules responsible for habituation.

  11. Development of PC Games for Use in Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Yuuta; Miyakawa, Michio; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    We have developed a rehabilitation tool used for treatment of patients suffering from hemiplegia and evaluation of the paralysis-stage. The tool consists of a PC and button switches for a computer game so that it is not expensive, available in anywhere, and possible to get a change of air in the patients. In this study, we have evaluated behavior indices such as an operation time to play with the games both in healthy young students and patients with paralysis. From experimental results, it was shown that the recorded behavioral indices showed the strong dependence on the motion control function of a subject. Preceding evaluation of effectiveness in rehabilitation of the developed tool, possible application of the tool in evaluation of the motion control function of the patients with hemiplegia was discussed in this paper.

  12. Falling PC Solitaire Cards: An Open-Inquiry Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Espada, Wilson J.

    2012-09-01

    Many of us have played the PC Solitaire game that comes as standard software in many computers. Although I am not a great player, occasionally I win a game or two. The game celebrates my accomplishment by pushing the cards forward, one at a time, falling gracefully in what appears to look like a parabolic path in a drag-free environment. One day, as I was watching this progression, I asked myself what is the downward acceleration of the playing cards. Could the game programmer have used a realistic value of Earth's acceleration due to gravity? It occurred to me that this could be an excellent open-inquiry activity for high school or introductory college physics students!

  13. Neurosecretory habituation in PC12 cells: modulation during parallel habituation.

    PubMed

    Martin, P T; Koshland, D E

    1995-05-23

    PC12 cells habituate during repetitive stimulation with acetylcholine, bradykinin, or high potassium. Interspersing these stimulants did not affect the rate of habituation of the others, but it could modulate the amplitude of the norepinephrine secretion each could achieve. Stimulation with acetylcholine inhibited norepinephrine secretion caused by high potassium and bradykinin stimulation, while high potassium had no effect on acetylcholine or bradykinin, and bradykinin increased secretion caused by acetylcholine. Changes in norepinephrine secretion resulting from any of these stimulants correlated with changes in internal calcium levels. Cyclic AMP-, protein kinase C-, and calmodulin-dependent second messenger pathways all modulated norepinephrine secretion caused by acetylcholine and high potassium and showed a distinct hierarchy in their effectiveness. These data demonstrate that different receptor pathways can change the norepinephrine response of one another while not changing the levels of the molecules responsible for habituation. PMID:7761447

  14. WINDOW 4. 0: Program description. A PC program for analyzing the thermal performance of fenestration products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    WINDOW 4.0 is a publicly available IBM PC compatible computer program developed by the Windows and Daylighting Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for calculating total window thermal performance indices (e.g. U-values, solar heat gain coefficients, shading coefficients, and visible transmittances). WINDOW 4.0 provides a versatile heat transfer analysis method consistent with the rating procedure developed by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC). The program can be used to design and develop new products, to rate and compare performance characteristics of all types of window products, to assist educators in teaching heat transfer through windows, and to help public officials in developing building energy codes. WINDOW 4.0 is a major revision to WINDOW 3.1 and we strongly urge all users to read this manual before using the program. Users who need professional assistance with the WINDOW 4.0 program or other window performance simulation issues are encouraged to contact one or more of the NFRC-accredited Simulation Laboratories. A list of these accredited simulation professionals is available from the NFRC.

  15. How to Build and Use Special Purpose PC Clusters in Stellar Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurzem, R.

    2006-08-01

    The advent of special purpose GRAPE (GRAvity PipE) chips and boards by astronomers in Tokyo has given a boost to the field of gravothermal stellar dynamics, dense stellar systems in which two-body relaxation effects cannot be neglected. Recently, GRAPE boards are used in parallel PC clusters world wide. An overview will be given from a users viewpoint of how to build and operate such a GRAPE cluster (with a focus on experiences with the Heidelberg and Rochester clusters); it is discussed what kinds of software we have suitable for such clusters and how its performance scales, with a focus on direct high-accuracy N-body codes. Typical astrophysical applications like dynamical simulations of globular clusters and galactic nuclei with massive black holes will be shown as examples what can be achieved with present hardware and software. Finally, new perspectives to use reconfigurable hardware (FPGA, MPRACE) used in addition to (in the future possibly instead of) the GRAPE, are presented, together with first benchmarks obtained from the Heidelberg GRACE cluster (GRAPE + MPRACE). This paper partly presents results obtained within the collaborations GRACE http://www.ari.uni-heidelberg.de/grace (Heidelberg), grapecluster http://www.cs.rit.edu/~grapecluster/ (Rochester), RSDN http://www.ari.uni-heidelberg.de/rsdn/ (Rhine Stell. Dyn. Network)

  16. METHANE DE-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2003-07-30

    During the current quarter, pilot-scale testing with the modified air nozzle version of the PC burner was completed with PRB coal at the Riley Power Inc. (RPI) test facility. A total of 8 different burner configurations were tested utilizing various burner air nozzle arrangements in place of the burner air channels. It was found that with the arrangements tested, a stable flame could not be maintained at coal feed rates above 100 lb/h. While it is felt that the air nozzle approach can ultimately be used effectively, in the interest of holding to the current project schedule it was decided to proceed with the balance of the project using the air channel design. The pilot-scale PC burner was therefore restored to the air-channel configuration and benchmark testing with PRB coal to confirmed previous operating results. A series of tests was then conducted with PRB and West Virginia caking coal to evaluate modifications to the gas combustor configuration and operation for improved performance with caking coal. Continuous operation was achieved with caking coal up to 50 lb/h vs. the full load target of 150 lb/h. Impingement and deposition of partially devolatilized coal occurred at various points within the combustor when the caking coal feed was increased above 50 lb/h. The 100 MMBtu/h commercial-scale prototype design was started with coal burner design input from both RPI and VTI. Based on typical burner installation layout considerations, it was that the preheat combustor should be oriented horizontally on the axial centerline of the coal burner. Accordingly, work was begun to relocate the pilot gas combustor to this orientation so that the pilot results with caking coal will be directly applicable to the preferred 100 MMBtu design. Inspection and repair of the 100 MMBtu/h Coal Burner Test Facility (CBTF) was initiated by RPI and as of 6/30, this activity was 70% complete.

  17. How to reveal the exotic nature of the Pc(4450 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng-Kun; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhi

    2015-10-01

    The LHCb Collaboration announced two pentaquark-like structures in the J /ψ p invariant mass distribution. We show that the current information on the narrow structure at 4.45 GeV is compatible with kinematical effects of the rescattering from χc 1p to J /ψ p : First, it is located exactly at the χc 1p threshold. Second, the mass of the four-star well-established Λ (1890 ) is such that a leading Landau singularity from a triangle diagram can coincidentally appear at the χc 1p threshold, and third, there is a narrow structure at the χc 1p threshold but not at the χc 0p and χc 2p thresholds. In order to check whether that structure corresponds to a real exotic resonance, one can measure the process Λb0→K-χc 1p . If the Pc(4450 ) structure exists in the χc 1p invariant mass distribution as well, then the structure cannot be just a kinematical effect but is a real resonance; otherwise, one cannot conclude that Pc(4450 ) is another exotic hadron. In addition, it is also worthwhile to measure the decay ϒ (1 S )→J /ψ p p ¯ : a narrow structure at 4.45 GeV but not at the χc 0p and χc 2p thresholds would exclude the possibility of a pure kinematical effect.

  18. Disk-based k-mer counting on a PC

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The k-mer counting problem, which is to build the histogram of occurrences of every k-symbol long substring in a given text, is important for many bioinformatics applications. They include developing de Bruijn graph genome assemblers, fast multiple sequence alignment and repeat detection. Results We propose a simple, yet efficient, parallel disk-based algorithm for counting k-mers. Experiments show that it usually offers the fastest solution to the considered problem, while demanding a relatively small amount of memory. In particular, it is capable of counting the statistics for short-read human genome data, in input gzipped FASTQ file, in less than 40 minutes on a PC with 16 GB of RAM and 6 CPU cores, and for long-read human genome data in less than 70 minutes. On a more powerful machine, using 32 GB of RAM and 32 CPU cores, the tasks are accomplished in less than half the time. No other algorithm for most tested settings of this problem and mammalian-size data can accomplish this task in comparable time. Our solution also belongs to memory-frugal ones; most competitive algorithms cannot efficiently work on a PC with 16 GB of memory for such massive data. Conclusions By making use of cheap disk space and exploiting CPU and I/O parallelism we propose a very competitive k-mer counting procedure, called KMC. Our results suggest that judicious resource management may allow to solve at least some bioinformatics problems with massive data on a commodity personal computer. PMID:23679007

  19. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  20. Nucleotide sequence and functional map of pC194, a plasmid that specifies inducible chloramphenicol resistance.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, S; Weisblum, B

    1982-05-01

    The nucleotide sequence of pC194, a small plasmid from Staphylococcus aureus which is capable of replication in Bacillus subtilis, has been determined. The genetic determinant of chloramphenicol (CAM) resistance, which includes the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) structural gene, the putative promoter and controlling element of this determinant, have been mapped functionally by subcloning a 1,035-nucleotide fragment which specifies the resistance phenotype using plasmid pBR322 as vector. Expression of CAM resistance is autogenously regulated since the 1,035-nucleotide fragment containing the CAT gene sequence and its promoter cloned into pBR322 expresses resistance inducibly in the Escherichia coli host. A presumed controlling element of CAT expression consists of a 37-nucleotide inverted complementary repeat sequence that is located between the -10 and ribosome-loading sequences of the CAT structural gene. Whereas the composite plasmid containing the minimal CAT determinant cloned in pBR322 could not replicate in B. subtilis, ability to replicate in B. subtilis was seen if the fragment cloned included an extension consisting of an additional 300 nucleotides beyond the 5' end of the single pC194 MspI site associated with replication. This 5' extension contained a 120-nucleotide inverted complementary repeat sequence similar to that found in pE194 TaqI fragment B which contains replication sequences of that plasmid. pC194 was found to contain four opening reading frames theoretically capable of coding for proteins with maximum molecular masses, as follows: A, 27,800 daltons; B, 26,200 daltons; C, 15,000 daltons; and D, 9,600 daltons. Interruption or deletion of either frame A or D does not entail loss of ability to replicate or to express CAM resistance, whereas frame B contains the CAT structural gene and frame C contains sequences associated with plasmid replication. PMID:6950931

  1. Electrochemical fabrication and optoelectronic properties of hybrid heterostructure of CuPc/porous GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fei; Qin, Shuang-Jiao; Hu, Li-Feng; Wang, Juan-Ye; Yang, Jia-Mei; Chen, Xue-Qing; Pan, Ge-Bo

    2016-05-01

    A new hybrid heterostructure of p-type copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and n-type porous GaN (PGaN) has been fabricated by electrophoretic deposition. The influence of CuPc concentration, electric field intensity, and deposition time on the growth of CuPc film has been explored. The as-prepared CuPc films are made of numerous nanorods. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra revealed that the CuPc films are the β phase and amorphous type on pristine and porous GaN, respectively. Moreover, the prototype devices were fabricated on the basis of the CuPc/PGaN heterostructures. The devices exhibited excellent photodetector performance under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination.

  2. Early Clinical Diagnosis of PC1/3 Deficiency in a Patient With a Novel Homozygous PCSK1 Splice-Site Mutation.

    PubMed

    Härter, Bettina; Fuchs, Irene; Müller, Thomas; Akbulut, Ulas Emre; Cakir, Murat; Janecke, Andreas R

    2016-04-01

    Autosomal recessive proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) deficiency, caused by mutations in the PCSK1 gene, is characterized by severe congenital malabsorptive diarrhea, early-onset obesity, and certain endocrine abnormalities. We suspected PC1/3 deficiency in a 4-month-old girl based on the presence of congenital diarrhea and polyuria. Sequencing the whole coding region and splice sites detected a novel homozygous PCSK1 splice-site mutation, c.544-2A>G, in the patient. The mutation resulted in the skipping of exon 5, the generation of a premature termination codon, and nonsense-mediated PCSK1 messenger ribonucleic acid decay, which was demonstrated in complementary DNA derived from fibroblasts. PMID:26488123

  3. Adaptive entropy coded subband coding of images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Modestino, J W

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe a design approach, called 2-D entropy-constrained subband coding (ECSBC), based upon recently developed 2-D entropy-constrained vector quantization (ECVQ) schemes. The output indexes of the embedded quantizers are further compressed by use of noiseless entropy coding schemes, such as Huffman or arithmetic codes, resulting in variable-rate outputs. Depending upon the specific configurations of the ECVQ and the ECPVQ over the subbands, many different types of SBC schemes can be derived within the generic 2-D ECSBC framework. Among these, the authors concentrate on three representative types of 2-D ECSBC schemes and provide relative performance evaluations. They also describe an adaptive buffer instrumented version of 2-D ECSBC, called 2-D ECSBC/AEC, for use with fixed-rate channels which completely eliminates buffer overflow/underflow problems. This adaptive scheme achieves performance quite close to the corresponding ideal 2-D ECSBC system. PMID:18296138

  4. Intracellular EP2 prostanoid receptor promotes cancer-related phenotypes in PC3 cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana Belén; Lucio-Cazaña, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) affect many mechanisms that have been involved in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PC). HIF-1α, which is up-regulated by PGE2 in LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, has been shown to contribute to metastasis and chemo-resistance of castrate-resistant PC (a lethal form of PC) and to promote in PC cells migration, invasion, angiogenesis and chemoresistance. The selective blockade of PGE2-EP2 signaling pathway in PC3 cells results in inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and invasion. PGE2 affects many mechanisms that have been shown to play a role in carcinogenesis such as proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Recently, we have found in PC3 cells that most of these PGE2-induced cancer-related features are due to intracellular PGE2 (iPGE2). Here, we aimed to study in PC3 cells the role of iPGE2-intracellular EP2 (iEP2)-HIF-1α signaling in several events linked to PC progression using an experimental approach involving pharmacological inhibition of the prostaglandin uptake transporter and EGFR and pharmacological and genetic modulation of EP2 receptor and HIF-1α. We found that iPGE2 increases HIF-1α expression through iEP2-dependent EGFR transactivation and that inhibition of any of the axis iEP2-EGFR-HIF-1α in cells treated with PGE2 or EP2 agonist results in prevention of the increase in PC3 cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Of note, PGE2 induced EP2 antagonist-sensitive DNA synthesis in nuclei isolated from PC3 cells, which indicates that they have functional EP2 receptors. These results suggest that PGE2-EP2 dependent intracrine mechanisms involving EGFR and HIF-1α play a role in PC. PMID:25828575

  5. Release of Full-Length PrPC from Cultured Neurons Following Neurotoxic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Zoltewicz, J. Susie; Chiu, Allen; Zhang, Zhiqun; Rubenstein, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The susceptibility of the normal cellular prion protein isoform, cellular prion protein (PrPC), to proteolytic digestion has been well documented. In addition, a link between PrPC and the cytosolic protease, calpain, has been reported although the specifics of the interaction remain unclear. We performed in vitro and in cell-based studies to examine this relationship. We observed that human recombinant PrP (HrPrP) was readily cleaved by calpain-1 and -2, and we have identified and defined the targeted cleavage sites. In contrast, HrPrP was resistant to caspase-3 digestion. Unexpectedly, when brain lysates from PrPC-expressing mice were treated with calpain, no appreciable loss of the intact PrPC, nor the appearance of PrPC breakdown products (BDPs) were observed, even though alpha II-spectrin was converted to its signature calpain-induced BDPs. In addition, when rat cerebrocortical neuronal cultures (RtCNC) were subjected to the two neurotoxins at subacute levels, maitotoxin (MTX) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), PrPC-BDPs were also not detectable. However, a novel finding from these cell-based studies is that apparently full-length, mature PrPC is released into culture media from RtCNC challenged with subacute doses of MTX and NMDA. Calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 and caspase inhibitor IDN-6556 did not attenuate the release of PrPC. Similarly, the lysosomal protease inhibitor, NH4Cl, and the proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, did not significantly alter the integrity of PrPC or its release from the RtCNC. In conclusion, rat neuronal PrPC is not a significant target for proteolytic modifications during MTX and NMDA neurotoxic challenges. However, the robust neurotoxin-mediated release of full-length PrPC into the cell culture media suggests an unidentified neuroprotective mechanism for PrPC. PMID:23093947

  6. Orpinomyces cellulase celf protein and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Chen, Huizhong; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2000-09-05

    A cDNA (1,520 bp), designated celF, consisting of an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide (CelF) of 432 amino acids was isolated from a cDNA library of the anaerobic rumen fungus Orpinomyces PC-2 constructed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed that starting from the N-terminus, CelF consists of a signal peptide, a cellulose binding domain (CBD) followed by an extremely Asn-rich linker region which separate the CBD and the catalytic domains. The latter is located at the C-terminus. The catalytic domain of CelF is highly homologous to CelA and CelC of Orpinomyces PC-2, to CelA of Neocallimastix patriciarum and also to cellobiohydrolase IIs (CBHIIs) from aerobic fungi. However, Like CelA of Neocallimastix patriciarum, CelF does not have the noncatalytic repeated peptide domain (NCRPD) found in CelA and CelC from the same organism. The recombinant protein CelF hydrolyzes cellooligosaccharides in the pattern of CBHII, yielding only cellobiose as product with cellotetraose as the substrate. The genomic celF is interrupted by a 111 bp intron, located within the region coding for the CBD. The intron of the celF has features in common with genes from aerobic filamentous fungi.

  7. Overview of Code Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The verified code for the SIFT Executive is not the code that executes on the SIFT system as delivered. The running versions of the SIFT Executive contain optimizations and special code relating to the messy interface to the hardware broadcast interface and to packing of data to conserve space in the store of the BDX930 processors. The running code was in fact developed prior to and without consideration of any mechanical verification. This was regarded as necessary experimentation with the SIFT hardware and special purpose Pascal compiler. The Pascal code sections cover: the selection of a schedule from the global executive broadcast, scheduling, dispatching, three way voting, and error reporting actions of the SIFT Executive. Not included in these sections of Pascal code are: the global executive, five way voting, clock synchronization, interactive consistency, low level broadcasting, and program loading, initialization, and schedule construction.

  8. Mechanical code comparator

    DOEpatents

    Peter, Frank J.; Dalton, Larry J.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of mechanical code comparators is described which have broad potential for application in safety, surety, and security applications. These devices can be implemented as micro-scale electromechanical systems that isolate a secure or otherwise controlled device until an access code is entered. This access code is converted into a series of mechanical inputs to the mechanical code comparator, which compares the access code to a pre-input combination, entered previously into the mechanical code comparator by an operator at the system security control point. These devices provide extremely high levels of robust security. Being totally mechanical in operation, an access control system properly based on such devices cannot be circumvented by software attack alone.

  9. Industrial Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1991-01-01

    The industrial codes will consist of modules of 2-D and simplified 2-D or 1-D codes, intended for expeditious parametric studies, analysis, and design of a wide variety of seals. Integration into a unified system is accomplished by the industrial Knowledge Based System (KBS), which will also provide user friendly interaction, contact sensitive and hypertext help, design guidance, and an expandable database. The types of analysis to be included with the industrial codes are interfacial performance (leakage, load, stiffness, friction losses, etc.), thermoelastic distortions, and dynamic response to rotor excursions. The first three codes to be completed and which are presently being incorporated into the KBS are the incompressible cylindrical code, ICYL, and the compressible cylindrical code, GCYL.

  10. Generating code adapted for interlinking legacy scalar code and extended vector code

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-06-04

    Mechanisms for intermixing code are provided. Source code is received for compilation using an extended Application Binary Interface (ABI) that extends a legacy ABI and uses a different register configuration than the legacy ABI. First compiled code is generated based on the source code, the first compiled code comprising code for accommodating the difference in register configurations used by the extended ABI and the legacy ABI. The first compiled code and second compiled code are intermixed to generate intermixed code, the second compiled code being compiled code that uses the legacy ABI. The intermixed code comprises at least one call instruction that is one of a call from the first compiled code to the second compiled code or a call from the second compiled code to the first compiled code. The code for accommodating the difference in register configurations is associated with the at least one call instruction.

  11. Improving efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells with pentacene-doped CuPc layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Bing; Xiang, Hai-Feng; Xu, Zong-Xiang; Yan, Bei-Ping; Roy, V. A. L.; Che, Chi-Ming; Lai, Pui-To

    2007-11-01

    We have fabricated efficient heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells based on pentacene-doped copper(II) phthalocyanine (CuPc) layer as donor and fullerene (C60) layer as acceptor. The power conversion efficiency of 4% pentacene-doped CuPc /C60 OPV cell (3.06%) is increased by 77% compared with that of the standard CuPc /C60 OPV cell (1.73%). The efficiency improvement can be attributed to the higher carrier mobility instead of the stronger photon absorption of the pentacene-doped CuPc layer.

  12. Cooperation between SMYD3 and PC4 drives a distinct transcriptional program in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Kyunghwan; Schmidt, Thomas; Punj, Vasu; Tucker, Haley; Rice, Judd C.; Ulmer, Tobias S.; An, Woojin

    2015-01-01

    SET and MYND domain containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a histone methyltransferase, which has been implicated in cell growth and cancer pathogenesis. Increasing evidence suggests that SMYD3 can influence distinct oncogenic processes by acting as a gene-specific transcriptional regulator. However, the mechanistic aspects of SMYD3 transactivation and whether SMYD3 acts in concert with other transcription modulators remain unclear. Here, we show that SMYD3 interacts with the human positive coactivator 4 (PC4) and that such interaction potentiates a group of genes whose expression is linked to cell proliferation and invasion. SMYD3 cooperates functionally with PC4, because PC4 depletion results in the loss of SMYD3-mediated H3K4me3 and target gene expression. Individual depletion of SMYD3 and PC4 diminishes the recruitment of both SMYD3 and PC4, indicating that SMYD3 and PC4 localize at target genes in a mutually dependent manner. Artificial tethering of a SMYD3 mutant incapable of binding to its cognate elements and interacting with PC4 to target genes is sufficient for achieving an active transcriptional state in SMYD3-deficient cells. These observations suggest that PC4 contributes to SMYD3-mediated transactivation primarily by stabilizing SMYD3 occupancy at target genes. Together, these studies define expanded roles for SMYD3 and PC4 in gene regulation and provide an unprecedented documentation of their cooperative functions in stimulating oncogenic transcription. PMID:26350217

  13. Cellular prion protein (PrPC) and its role in stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liang; Zou, Wenquan; Wang, Gongxian

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the physiological function of cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been developed by the generation of transgenic mice, however, the pathological mechanisms related to PrPC in prion diseases such as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are still abstruse. Regardless of some differences, most studies describe the neuroprotective role of PrPC in environmental stresses. In this review, we will update the current knowledge on the responses of PrPC to various stresses, especially those correlated with cell signaling and neural degeneration, including ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation and autophagy. PMID:26221369

  14. Doubled Color Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey

    Combining protection from noise and computational universality is one of the biggest challenges in the fault-tolerant quantum computing. Topological stabilizer codes such as the 2D surface code can tolerate a high level of noise but implementing logical gates, especially non-Clifford ones, requires a prohibitively large overhead due to the need of state distillation. In this talk I will describe a new family of 2D quantum error correcting codes that enable a transversal implementation of all logical gates required for the universal quantum computing. Transversal logical gates (TLG) are encoded operations that can be realized by applying some single-qubit rotation to each physical qubit. TLG are highly desirable since they introduce no overhead and do not spread errors. It has been known before that a quantum code can have only a finite number of TLGs which rules out computational universality. Our scheme circumvents this no-go result by combining TLGs of two different quantum codes using the gauge-fixing method pioneered by Paetznick and Reichardt. The first code, closely related to the 2D color code, enables a transversal implementation of all single-qubit Clifford gates such as the Hadamard gate and the π / 2 phase shift. The second code that we call a doubled color code provides a transversal T-gate, where T is the π / 4 phase shift. The Clifford+T gate set is known to be computationally universal. The two codes can be laid out on the honeycomb lattice with two qubits per site such that the code conversion requires parity measurements for six-qubit Pauli operators supported on faces of the lattice. I will also describe numerical simulations of logical Clifford+T circuits encoded by the distance-3 doubled color code. Based on a joint work with Andrew Cross.

  15. Phonological coding during reading

    PubMed Central

    Leinenger, Mallorie

    2014-01-01

    The exact role that phonological coding (the recoding of written, orthographic information into a sound based code) plays during silent reading has been extensively studied for more than a century. Despite the large body of research surrounding the topic, varying theories as to the time course and function of this recoding still exist. The present review synthesizes this body of research, addressing the topics of time course and function in tandem. The varying theories surrounding the function of phonological coding (e.g., that phonological codes aid lexical access, that phonological codes aid comprehension and bolster short-term memory, or that phonological codes are largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers) are first outlined, and the time courses that each maps onto (e.g., that phonological codes come online early (pre-lexical) or that phonological codes come online late (post-lexical)) are discussed. Next the research relevant to each of these proposed functions is reviewed, discussing the varying methodologies that have been used to investigate phonological coding (e.g., response time methods, reading while eyetracking or recording EEG and MEG, concurrent articulation) and highlighting the advantages and limitations of each with respect to the study of phonological coding. In response to the view that phonological coding is largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers, research on the use of phonological codes in prelingually, profoundly deaf readers is reviewed. Finally, implications for current models of word identification (activation-verification model (Van Order, 1987), dual-route model (e.g., Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001), parallel distributed processing model (Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989)) are discussed. PMID:25150679

  16. Phonological coding during reading.

    PubMed

    Leinenger, Mallorie

    2014-11-01

    The exact role that phonological coding (the recoding of written, orthographic information into a sound based code) plays during silent reading has been extensively studied for more than a century. Despite the large body of research surrounding the topic, varying theories as to the time course and function of this recoding still exist. The present review synthesizes this body of research, addressing the topics of time course and function in tandem. The varying theories surrounding the function of phonological coding (e.g., that phonological codes aid lexical access, that phonological codes aid comprehension and bolster short-term memory, or that phonological codes are largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers) are first outlined, and the time courses that each maps onto (e.g., that phonological codes come online early [prelexical] or that phonological codes come online late [postlexical]) are discussed. Next the research relevant to each of these proposed functions is reviewed, discussing the varying methodologies that have been used to investigate phonological coding (e.g., response time methods, reading while eye-tracking or recording EEG and MEG, concurrent articulation) and highlighting the advantages and limitations of each with respect to the study of phonological coding. In response to the view that phonological coding is largely epiphenomenal in skilled readers, research on the use of phonological codes in prelingually, profoundly deaf readers is reviewed. Finally, implications for current models of word identification (activation-verification model, Van Orden, 1987; dual-route model, e.g., M. Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001; parallel distributed processing model, Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989) are discussed. PMID:25150679

  17. Industrial Computer Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1996-01-01

    This is an overview of new and updated industrial codes for seal design and testing. GCYLT (gas cylindrical seals -- turbulent), SPIRALI (spiral-groove seals -- incompressible), KTK (knife to knife) Labyrinth Seal Code, and DYSEAL (dynamic seal analysis) are covered. CGYLT uses G-factors for Poiseuille and Couette turbulence coefficients. SPIRALI is updated to include turbulence and inertia, but maintains the narrow groove theory. KTK labyrinth seal code handles straight or stepped seals. And DYSEAL provides dynamics for the seal geometry.

  18. Tokamak Systems Code

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  19. Topological subsystem codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bombin, H.

    2010-03-15

    We introduce a family of two-dimensional (2D) topological subsystem quantum error-correcting codes. The gauge group is generated by two-local Pauli operators, so that two-local measurements are enough to recover the error syndrome. We study the computational power of code deformation in these codes and show that boundaries cannot be introduced in the usual way. In addition, we give a general mapping connecting suitable classical statistical mechanical models to optimal error correction in subsystem stabilizer codes that suffer from depolarizing noise.

  20. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described.

  1. Expander chunked codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Yang, Shenghao; Ye, Baoliu; Yin, Yitong; Lu, Sanglu

    2015-12-01

    Chunked codes are efficient random linear network coding (RLNC) schemes with low computational cost, where the input packets are encoded into small chunks (i.e., subsets of the coded packets). During the network transmission, RLNC is performed within each chunk. In this paper, we first introduce a simple transfer matrix model to characterize the transmission of chunks and derive some basic properties of the model to facilitate the performance analysis. We then focus on the design of overlapped chunked codes, a class of chunked codes whose chunks are non-disjoint subsets of input packets, which are of special interest since they can be encoded with negligible computational cost and in a causal fashion. We propose expander chunked (EC) codes, the first class of overlapped chunked codes that have an analyzable performance, where the construction of the chunks makes use of regular graphs. Numerical and simulation results show that in some practical settings, EC codes can achieve rates within 91 to 97 % of the optimum and outperform the state-of-the-art overlapped chunked codes significantly.

  2. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a code obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.

  3. A PC-based hardware implementation of the maximum-likelihood classifier for the Shuttle Ice Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggi, S.

    1991-01-01

    A PC-based near-real time implementation of a two-channel maximum-likelihood classifier is described. The statistical distribution of the reflectance characteristics of ice, frost, and water formation on spray-on-foam-insulation, which covers the External Tank surface of the Space Shuttle, is acquired. The classification technique is based on these statistics. The computer, set in either a training or a classifying mode, learns the statistics of the various classes, or produces a color-coded image denoting the respective categories of classification. The classified results are memory-mapped for efficiency. The speed of the classification process is only limited by the speed of the digital frame grabber and the software that interfaces the frame grabber to the monitor. The process took 4 seconds for a 512 x 480 pixel image.

  4. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2003-09-30

    During the current quarter, pilot-scale testing with the modified air nozzle version of the PC burner was completed with PRB coal at the Riley Power Inc. (RPI) test facility. A total of 8 different burner configurations were tested utilizing various burner air nozzle arrangements in place of the burner air channels. It was found that with the arrangements tested, a stable flame could not be maintained at coal feed rates above 100 lb/h. While it is felt that the air nozzle approach can ultimately be used effectively, in the interest of holding to the current project schedule it was decided to proceed with the balance of the project using the air channel design. The pilot-scale PC burner was therefore restored to the air-channel configuration and benchmark testing with PRB coal to confirmed previous operating results. A series of tests was then conducted with PRB and West Virginia caking coal to evaluate modifications to the gas combustor configuration and operation for improved performance with caking coal. Continuous operation was achieved with caking coal up to 50 lb/h vs. the full load target of 150 lb/h. Impingement and deposition of partially devolatilized coal occurred at various points within the combustor when the caking coal feed was increased above 50 lb/h. The 100 MMBtu/h commercial-scale prototype design was continued with coal burner design input from both RPI and VTI. Based on typical burner installation layout considerations, it was decided that the preheat combustor should be oriented horizontally on the axial centerline of the coal burner. Accordingly, the pilot gas combustor was changed to this orientation so that the pilot results with caking coal will be directly applicable to the preferred 100 MMBtu design. Testing with caking coal in the horizontal pilot combustor achieved feed rates up to 126 lb/h, although some deposition and LOI issues remain. Several promising approaches to further improve operation with caking coal were identified. NOx results with caking coal are promising, with NOx as low as 150 ppmv at exit oxygen levels of 4% and higher. The 100 MMBtu/h commercial-scale prototype design is nearing completion. Design of the caking coal version of the unit continues with additional pilot testing in support of this design expected. GTI and RPI are expediting the fabrication of the 100 MMBtu/h PRB unit in order to start testing in early- to mid-December. Inspection and repair of the 100 MMBtu/h Coal Burner Test Facility (CBTF) is nearing completion. As of mid-September, this activity was 95% complete.

  5. Code-Switching or Code-Mixing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelander, Mats

    1976-01-01

    An attempt to apply Blom's and Gumperz' model of code-switching to a small Swedish community in northern Sweden, Burtrask. The informants spoke standard Swedish, the Burtrask dialect, and a third variety which was a combination of the two. (CFM)

  6. Antitumor therapeutic efficacy of photoactivated phthalocyanines ZnS4PC and AlS2PC in tumor-bearing mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canti, Gianfranco L.; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola; Valentini, Gianluca

    1993-03-01

    The photosensitizer of choice in photodynamic therapy (PDT) is the hematoporphyrin derivative (Hpd). However, Hpd has many characteristics which make it less than an ideal photosensitizer. The sulfonated phthalocyanines represent a new group of interesting compounds that have a strong absorption in the red part of the spectrum at 675 nm. In our laboratory we compare the efficacy of two phthalocyanines, the zincum tetrasulfonated (ZnS4Pc) and the aluminum disulfonated (AlS2Pc), on a murine tumor. Mice bearing MS-2 fibrosarcoma were treated with 5 or 25 mg/kg of ZnS4Pc or AlS2Pc and then the tumor mass was exposed to a laser light (100 mW for 10'). The results show that the treatment with AlS2Pc is significantly more therapeutically active in respect to the treatment with the same dose of ZnS4Pc. Moreover, resistance to rechallenge with the MS-2 tumor was evidenced by surviving animals. Studies are in progress with other murine tumors with different biological properties.

  7. Fast Coding Unit Encoding Mechanism for Low Complexity Video Coding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yueying; Jia, Kebin; Gao, Guandong

    2016-01-01

    In high efficiency video coding (HEVC), coding tree contributes to excellent compression performance. However, coding tree brings extremely high computational complexity. Innovative works for improving coding tree to further reduce encoding time are stated in this paper. A novel low complexity coding tree mechanism is proposed for HEVC fast coding unit (CU) encoding. Firstly, this paper makes an in-depth study of the relationship among CU distribution, quantization parameter (QP) and content change (CC). Secondly, a CU coding tree probability model is proposed for modeling and predicting CU distribution. Eventually, a CU coding tree probability update is proposed, aiming to address probabilistic model distortion problems caused by CC. Experimental results show that the proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism significantly reduces encoding time by 27% for lossy coding and 42% for visually lossless coding and lossless coding. The proposed low complexity CU coding tree mechanism devotes to improving coding performance under various application conditions. PMID:26999741

  8. SABRE observations of a sequence of Pc 5 micropulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldock, J. A.; Thomas, E. C.; Stewart, C. P.; Jones, T. B.; Nielsen, E.

    1983-12-01

    Observations of a Pc 5 micropulsation event, using the Wick half of the new SABRE auroral radar, are presented. During a 3-hour period in the early morning of September 18, 1981, a train of pulsations were recorded. Analysis revealed that there were three main events, rather than one continuous disturbance. The first event appeared as a perturbation of only one or two cycles, extending throughout the latitude of the viewing area. It was also visible in the STARE region, but the perturbation drift velocity was in the north-south direction as opposed to the east-west perturbation drift of a more conventional toroidal mode field line resonance. The second disturbance was an isolated, one-cycle perturbation, also visible throughout both SABRE and STARE viewing areas and also having a dominant north-south velocity component. Finally, a very localized monochromatic event, lasting five cycles or more, with a period of about 5 min, was recorded. The characteristics of the third event were found to be consistent with those predicted by field line resonance theory.

  9. Indexes of Large Genome Collections on a PC

    PubMed Central

    Danek, Agnieszka; Deorowicz, Sebastian; Grabowski, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    The availability of thousands of individual genomes of one species should boost rapid progress in personalized medicine or understanding of the interaction between genotype and phenotype, to name a few applications. A key operation useful in such analyses is aligning sequencing reads against a collection of genomes, which is costly with the use of existing algorithms due to their large memory requirements. We present MuGI, Multiple Genome Index, which reports all occurrences of a given pattern, in exact and approximate matching model, against a collection of thousand(s) genomes. Its unique feature is the small index size, which is customisable. It fits in a standard computer with 16–32 GB, or even 8 GB, of RAM, for the 1000GP collection of 1092 diploid human genomes. The solution is also fast. For example, the exact matching queries (of average length 150 bp) are handled in average time of 39 µs and with up to 3 mismatches in 373 µs on the test PC with the index size of 13.4 GB. For a smaller index, occupying 7.4 GB in memory, the respective times grow to 76 µs and 917 µs. Software is available at http://sun.aei.polsl.pl/mugi under a free license. Data S1 is available at PLOS One online. PMID:25289699

  10. Chlorpyrifos developmental neurotoxicity: interaction with glucocorticoids in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Card, Jennifer; Seidler, Frederic J

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal coexposures to glucocorticoids and organophosphate pesticides are widespread. Glucocorticoids are elevated by maternal stress and are commonly given in preterm labor; organophosphate exposures are virtually ubiquitous. We used PC12 cells undergoing neurodifferentiation in order to assess whether dexamethasone enhances the developmental neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos, focusing on models relevant to human exposures. By themselves, each agent reduced the number of cells and the combined exposure elicited a correspondingly greater effect than with either agent alone. There was no general cytotoxicity, as cell growth was actually enhanced, and again, the combined treatment evoked greater cellular hypertrophy than with the individual compounds. The effects on neurodifferentiation were more complex. Chlorpyrifos alone had a promotional effect on neuritogenesis whereas dexamethasone impaired it; combined treatment showed an overall impairment greater than that seen with dexamethasone alone. The effect of chlorpyrifos on differentiation into specific neurotransmitter phenotypes was shifted by dexamethasone. Either agent alone promoted differentiation into the dopaminergic phenotype at the expense of the cholinergic phenotype. However, in dexamethasone-primed cells, chlorpyrifos actually enhanced cholinergic neurodifferentiation instead of suppressing this phenotype. Our results indicate that developmental exposure to glucocorticoids, either in the context of stress or the therapy of preterm labor, could enhance the developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphates and potentially of other neurotoxicants, as well as producing neurobehavioral outcomes distinct from those seen with either individual agent. PMID:22796634

  11. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2004-12-31

    Preparations for conducting large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal continued during the start of this quarter. Major project accomplishments related to bituminous coal testing included: a CFD preheat model and evaluation, an update of the process flow diagram and a detailed preheat burner mechanical design (suitable for construction) for firing bituminous coal. Installation and testing of the 85 MMBtu/h bituminous coal preheating system was planned to take place before the end of December. Based on the inability to conduct testing in Riley's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) during freezing weather, a schedule review indicated required site work for testing bituminous coal at the CBTF could not be completed before freezing weather set in at the site. Further bituminous preheat modification work was put on hold and efforts turned to securing the test facility over the winter season. Bituminous coal tests are therefore delayed; April-May 2005 is earliest estimate of when testing can resume. A request for a time extension was submitted to DOE to extend the project through September 2005 to allow time to secure additional funding and complete the bituminous coal testing. Removal of the PRB PC Preheater from the CBTF burner deck was completed. Decommissioning of the CBTF for the winter was also completed.

  12. Statistics of Pc 5 pulsation events observed by SABRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, M.; Yeoman, T. K.; Lester, M.; Jones, T. B.

    1991-09-01

    A statistical analysis is presented of Pc 5 pulsations observed by the Wick component of the SABRE auroral radar during the 1985-1989 time period. Results of the analysis indicate that the occurrence of poleward-propagating events peaks near midnight whereas for equatorward-propagating events the occurrence peaks at about 18:00 U.T. A further class of event is observed, where the phase propagation changes direction during the event. Each event is characterized by the estimated position of the plasmapause, based upon an empirical relationship between plasmapause L-shell and both local time and Kp. Poleward-propagating events are found to occur mostly for low plasmapause L-shells, and equatorward propagating events occur mostly at higher L-shells. It is concluded that the equatorward-propagating pulsations correspond to resonant structures at the plasmapause, whereas the majority of the poleward propagating pulsations observed by SABRE correspond to field line resonances within the plasma trough.

  13. Image Registration Algorithm For A PC-Based System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, Brian S.; Mitra, Sunanda; Krile, Thomas F.

    1988-01-01

    Image registration algorithms are essential for subtractive analysis of sequential images. Discrepancies in lighting, image orientation, and scale must be minimized before effective subtraction of two images can occur. We have successfully implemented computationally intensive algorithms for registration, which include illuminance normalization and magnification correction, in a PC-based image processing system. A homomorphic filter in the spatial domain is used to reduce the illumination variations in the images. A modified sequential similarity detection technique is used to derive the minimum error factor associated with each combination of translation, magnification, and rotation variations. Each variation of the test image is masked with one of three masks, and the squares of the pixel intensity differences are summed for every test image. An adaptive threshold is used to decrease the time required for a misfit by aborting the test image under consideration when its summation exceeds the value of the previous best fit summation. After the best fit parameters are obtained, they are used to register the images so that the images can be subtracted. The difference image is subjected to further image enhancement operations. The execution time of the image registration algorithm has been reduced through use of a hybrid program written in C and Assembly languages. Applications of the registration algorithms in analysis of fundus images will be presented.

  14. Dress Codes for Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Million, June

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses an e-mail survey of principals from across the country regarding whether or not their school had a formal staff dress code. The results indicate that most did not have a formal dress code, but agreed that professional dress for teachers was not only necessary, but showed respect for the school and had a…

  15. Synthesizing Certified Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Michael; Schumann, Johann; Fischer, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Code certification is a lightweight approach to demonstrate software quality on a formal level. Its basic idea is to require producers to provide formal proofs that their code satisfies certain quality properties. These proofs serve as certificates which can be checked independently. Since code certification uses the same underlying technology as program verification, it also requires many detailed annotations (e.g., loop invariants) to make the proofs possible. However, manually adding theses annotations to the code is time-consuming and error-prone. We address this problem by combining code certification with automatic program synthesis. We propose an approach to generate simultaneously, from a high-level specification, code and all annotations required to certify generated code. Here, we describe a certification extension of AUTOBAYES, a synthesis tool which automatically generates complex data analysis programs from compact specifications. AUTOBAYES contains sufficient high-level domain knowledge to generate detailed annotations. This allows us to use a general-purpose verification condition generator to produce a set of proof obligations in first-order logic. The obligations are then discharged using the automated theorem E-SETHEO. We demonstrate our approach by certifying operator safety for a generated iterative data classification program without manual annotation of the code.

  16. Legacy Code Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, Michelle R.; Frumkin, Michael; Jin, Haoqiang; Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computing has evolved rapidly; systems based on commodity microprocessors have been introduced in quick succession from at least seven vendors/families. Porting codes to every new architecture is a difficult problem; in particular, here at NASA, there are many large CFD applications that are very costly to port to new machines by hand. The LCM ("Legacy Code Modernization") Project is the development of an integrated parallelization environment (IPE) which performs the automated mapping of legacy CFD (Fortran) applications to state-of-the-art high performance computers. While most projects to port codes focus on the parallelization of the code, we consider porting to be an iterative process consisting of several steps: 1) code cleanup, 2) serial optimization,3) parallelization, 4) performance monitoring and visualization, 5) intelligent tools for automated tuning using performance prediction and 6) machine specific optimization. The approach for building this parallelization environment is to build the components for each of the steps simultaneously and then integrate them together. The demonstration will exhibit our latest research in building this environment: 1. Parallelizing tools and compiler evaluation. 2. Code cleanup and serial optimization using automated scripts 3. Development of a code generator for performance prediction 4. Automated partitioning 5. Automated insertion of directives. These demonstrations will exhibit the effectiveness of an automated approach for all the steps involved with porting and tuning a legacy code application for a new architecture.

  17. Insurance billing and coding.

    PubMed

    Napier, Rebecca H; Bruelheide, Lori S; Demann, Eric T K; Haug, Richard H

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of understanding various numeric and alpha-numeric codes for accurately billing dental and medically related services to private pay or third-party insurance carriers. In the United States, common dental terminology (CDT) codes are most commonly used by dentists to submit claims, whereas current procedural terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD.9.CM) codes are more commonly used by physicians to bill for their services. The CPT and ICD.9.CM coding systems complement each other in that CPT codes provide the procedure and service information and ICD.9.CM codes provide the reason or rationale for a particular procedure or service. These codes are more commonly used for "medical necessity" determinations, and general dentists and specialists who routinely perform care, including trauma-related care, biopsies, and dental treatment as a result of or in anticipation of a cancer-related treatment, are likely to use these codes. Claim submissions for care provided can be completed electronically or by means of paper forms. PMID:18501731

  18. Vision-based reading system for color-coded bar codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Erhard; Schroeder, Axel

    1996-02-01

    Barcode systems are used to mark commodities, articles and products with price and article numbers. The advantage of the barcode systems is the safe and rapid availability of the information about the product. The size of the barcode depends on the used barcode system and the resolution of the barcode scanner. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the information content and the length of the barcode. To increase the information content, new 2D-barcode systems like CodaBlock or PDF-417 are introduced. In this paper we present a different way to increase the information content of a barcode and we would like to introduce the color coded barcode. The new color coded barcode is created by offset printing of the three colored barcodes, each barcode with different information. Therefore, three times more information content can be accommodated in the area of a black printed barcode. This kind of color coding is usable in case of the standard 1D- and 2D-barcodes. We developed two reading devices for the color coded barcodes. First, there is a vision based system, consisting of a standard color camera and a PC-based color frame grabber. Omnidirectional barcode decoding is possible with this reading device. Second, a bi-directional handscanner was developed. Both systems use a color separation process to separate the color image of the barcodes into three independent grayscale images. In the case of the handscanner the image consists of one line only. After the color separation the three grayscale barcodes can be decoded with standard image processing methods. In principle, the color coded barcode can be used everywhere instead of the standard barcode. Typical applications with the color coded barcodes are found in the medicine technique, stock running and identification of electronic modules.

  19. Code blue: seizures.

    PubMed

    Hoerth, Matthew T; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Noe, Katherine H; Sirven, Joseph I

    2011-06-01

    Eyewitnesses frequently perceive seizures as life threatening. If an event occurs on the hospital premises, a "code blue" can be called which consumes considerable resources. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and characteristics of code blue calls for seizures and seizure mimickers. A retrospective review of a code blue log from 2001 through 2008 identified 50 seizure-like events, representing 5.3% of all codes. Twenty-eight (54%) occurred in inpatients; the other 22 (44%) events involved visitors or employees on the hospital premises. Eighty-six percent of the events were epileptic seizures. Seizure mimickers, particularly psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, were more common in the nonhospitalized group. Only five (17.9%) inpatients had a known diagnosis of epilepsy, compared with 17 (77.3%) of the nonhospitalized patients. This retrospective survey provides insights into how code blues are called on hospitalized versus nonhospitalized patients for seizure-like events. PMID:21546315

  20. Combustion chamber analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.