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Sample records for parental marker alleles

  1. Allelic association between marker loci

    PubMed Central

    Lonjou, C.; Collins, A.; Morton, N. E.

    1999-01-01

    Allelic association has proven useful to refine the location of major genes prior to positional cloning, but it is of uncertain value for genome scans in complex inheritance. We have extended kinship theory to give information content for linkage and allelic association. Application to pairs of closely linked markers as a surrogate for marker × oligogene pairs indicates that association is largely determined by regional founders, with little effect of subsequent demography. Sub-Saharan Africa has the least allelic association, consistent with settlement of other regions by small numbers of founders. Recent speculation about substantial advantages of isolates over large populations, of constant size over expansion, and of F1 hybrids over incrosses is not supported by theory or data. On the contrary, fewer affected cases, less opportunity for replication, and more stochastic variation tend to make isolates less informative for allelic association, as they are for linkage. PMID:9990074

  2. Allelic association between marker loci.

    PubMed

    Lonjou, C; Collins, A; Morton, N E

    1999-02-16

    Allelic association has proven useful to refine the location of major genes prior to positional cloning, but it is of uncertain value for genome scans in complex inheritance. We have extended kinship theory to give information content for linkage and allelic association. Application to pairs of closely linked markers as a surrogate for marker x oligogene pairs indicates that association is largely determined by regional founders, with little effect of subsequent demography. Sub-Saharan Africa has the least allelic association, consistent with settlement of other regions by small numbers of founders. Recent speculation about substantial advantages of isolates over large populations, of constant size over expansion, and of F1 hybrids over incrosses is not supported by theory or data. On the contrary, fewer affected cases, less opportunity for replication, and more stochastic variation tend to make isolates less informative for allelic association, as they are for linkage. PMID:9990074

  3. Marker assisted accelerated introgression of null allele of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vineet; Rani, Anita; Rawal, Reena; Mourya, Vaishali

    2015-12-01

    Development of kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI)-free soybean is crucial for soy-food industry as the heat inactivation employed to inactivate the anti-nutritional factor in regular soybean incurs extra cost and affects protein solubility. In the presented work, a null allele of KTI from PI542044 was introgressed into cultivar 'JS97-52' (recurrent parent) through marker assisted backcrossing. Foreground selection in BC1F2, BC2F2 and BC3F2 was carried out using the null allele-specific marker in tandem with SSR marker Satt228, tightly linked with a trypsin inhibitor Ti locus. Background selection in null allele-carrying plants through 106 polymorphic SSR markers across the genome led to the identification of 9 KTI-free lines exhibiting 98.6% average recurrent parent genome content (RPGC) after three backcrosses, which otherwise had required 5-6 backcrosses through conventional method. Introgressed lines (ILs) were free from KTI and yielded at par with recurrent parent. Reduction of 68.8-83.5% in trypsin inhibitor content (TIC) in ILs compared to the recurrent parent ('JS97-52') was attributed to the elimination of KTI. PMID:26719748

  4. Marker assisted accelerated introgression of null allele of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Rani, Anita; Rawal, Reena; Mourya, Vaishali

    2015-01-01

    Development of kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI)-free soybean is crucial for soy-food industry as the heat inactivation employed to inactivate the anti-nutritional factor in regular soybean incurs extra cost and affects protein solubility. In the presented work, a null allele of KTI from PI542044 was introgressed into cultivar ‘JS97-52’ (recurrent parent) through marker assisted backcrossing. Foreground selection in BC1F2, BC2F2 and BC3F2 was carried out using the null allele-specific marker in tandem with SSR marker Satt228, tightly linked with a trypsin inhibitor Ti locus. Background selection in null allele-carrying plants through 106 polymorphic SSR markers across the genome led to the identification of 9 KTI-free lines exhibiting 98.6% average recurrent parent genome content (RPGC) after three backcrosses, which otherwise had required 5–6 backcrosses through conventional method. Introgressed lines (ILs) were free from KTI and yielded at par with recurrent parent. Reduction of 68.8–83.5% in trypsin inhibitor content (TIC) in ILs compared to the recurrent parent (‘JS97-52’) was attributed to the elimination of KTI. PMID:26719748

  5. Incorrect specification of marker allele frequencies: Effects on linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Freimer, N.B. ); Sandkuijl, L.A. ); Blower, S.M. )

    1993-06-01

    Most current linkage analyses make use of highly polymorphic DNA markers. Assigning correct allele frequencies for these markers may be extremely difficult in particular study populations. Designation of erroneous frequencies may result in false-positive evidence for linkage, as well as in failure to correctly exclude linkage. These effects are most pronounced in small pedigrees with key individuals unavailable for typing. The power to correctly detect true linkage does not appear to be greatly affected by inaccurate allele frequencies. Before linkage analyses are performed for specific pedigrees, it is recommended that simulation analyses be performed, followed by uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-01-01

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population. PMID:25966202

  7. Study on the application of parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guisen; Yang, Qingen; Huang, Daixin; Yu, Chunying; Yang, Rongzhi; Chen, Hui; Mei, Kun

    2005-11-25

    In paternity test, especially in motherless cases, the allele inherited from father (obligatory gene, OG) often cannot be determined. The paternity exclusion probability (PE) of a genetic marker is reduced considerably. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new technique, by which the parental origin of alleles can be determined without genealogical analysis. In this paper, we explored the possibility of using parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to determine the parental origin of alleles, choosing the imprinted single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) locus rs220028 (A/G) as a model system. We typed the SNP by mutagenically separated PCR (MS-PCR). The frequencies of alleles were A = 0.5085, G = 0.4915; the unbiased heterozygosity was 0.5020. In order to discriminate between the maternal allele and paternal allele, post-digestion MS-PCR, a novel PCR based methylation analysis and SNP typing technique was developed and performed on 18 heterozygous children, and the methylated maternal allele was detected specifically. As a pilot study on the use of epigenetic markers in forensic genetics, our results demonstrated the feasibility of using parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to determine the parental origin of alleles. PMID:16182958

  8. Nonrandom segregation of parental alleles in reovirus reassortants.

    PubMed

    Nibert, M L; Margraf, R L; Coombs, K M

    1996-10-01

    To test for nonrandom segregations among their 10 genomic RNA segments, we examined a set of 83 reassortants derived from mammalian reovirus type 1 Lang and type 3 Dearing. After confirming the genotypes of the reassortants, we performed statistical analyses on the distributions of parental alleles for each of the 10 gene segments, as well as for the 45 possible pairings of the 10 segments. The analyses revealed nonrandom associations of parental alleles in the L1-L2, L1-M1, L1-S1, and L3-S1 segment pairs, at levels indicating high statistical significance (P < 0.005). Such associations may reflect specific interactions between viral components (protein-protein, protein-RNA, or RNA-RNA) and may influence both the evolution of reoviruses in nature and their genetic analysis in the laboratory. The data may also support an hypothesis that reovirus reassortants commonly contain mutations that improve their fitness for independent replication. PMID:8794386

  9. Allelic Associations between 100 DNA Markers and High versus Low IQ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; And Others

    1995-01-01

    For DNA markers in or near genes of neurological relevance, allelic frequencies were compared for groups of high- and low-IQ children (total sample of 86). This study adds 40 markers to the 60 already studied. Only one showed a significant association with IQ in original and replication samples. (SLD)

  10. Parental allelic variation at COL6A1 and congenital heart defects in trisomy 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kessling, A.M.; Howard, C.M.; Farrer, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Overt congenital heart defects (CHD) affect over 40% of newborns with Down syndrome. On the hypothesis that genetic variation on chromosome 21 determines this clinical variability, we studied a CHD candidate locus (COL6A1) on 21q22.3. We studied three RFLP loci in COL6A1 in 37 families of known British/Irish population of ancestral origin, and in population-matched controls. Each family had a child with trisomy 21 with or without accompanying congenital heart defect (CHD). Parental and meiotic origin of nondisjunction were determined using peri-centromeric markers. For the analysis, we considered groups of families with trisomic children with and without CHD, and subsets of nondisjoining and disjoining parents. Parental genotypes at nine control RFLP loci on chromosome 21 showed no association with CHD in the trisomic child. By contrast, parental genotypes at all three individual RFLP loci within COL6A1 showed statistically significant association with the trisomic child`s CHD status. Pairwise consideration of these loci in groups of families of trisomic children with and without CHD showed subsets of nondisjoining and disjoining parents to have different linkage disequilibrium patterns at these loci than population-matched controls. This suggests that the COL6A1 alleles of the parents are not representative of the population as a whole. Consideration of all three loci together as haplotypes supports this conclusion. Four results suggest that a functional mutation within, or in linkage disequilibrium with COL6A1 influences CHD outcome in trisomy 21.

  11. [The inadequacy of using the autosomal STR markers for the establishment of the kinship in the parent-child pairs].

    PubMed

    Kovtun, P A; Kuklev, M Iu; Lapenkov, M I; Plakhina, N V

    2013-01-01

    This article is concerned with the management of the disputable situations arising in the course of establishment of the kinship based on the analysis of autosomal STR loci. It is proposed to enhance the accuracy of determining thekinsip relations in the parent-child pairs (in the absence of one of the parents) by using additional sets of genetic markers localized for example on sex chromosomes, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and bi-allele markers. PMID:25474915

  12. Foundation characteristics of edible Musa triploids revealed from allelic distribution of SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Hippolyte, I.; Jenny, C.; Gardes, L.; Bakry, F.; Rivallan, R.; Pomies, V.; Cubry, P.; Tomekpe, K.; Risterucci, A. M.; Roux, N.; Rouard, M.; Arnaud, E.; Kolesnikova-Allen, M.; Perrier, X.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The production of triploid banana and plantain (Musa spp.) cultivars with improved characteristics (e.g. greater disease resistance or higher yield), while still preserving the main features of current popular cultivars (e.g. taste and cooking quality), remains a major challenge for Musa breeders. In this regard, breeders require a sound knowledge of the lineage of the current sterile triploid cultivars, to select diploid parents that are able to transmit desirable traits, together with a breeding strategy ensuring final triploidization and sterility. Highly polymorphic single sequence repeats (SSRs) are valuable markers for investigating phylogenetic relationships. Methods Here, the allelic distribution of each of 22 SSR loci across 561 Musa accessions is analysed. Key Results and Conclusions We determine the closest diploid progenitors of the triploid ‘Cavendish’ and ‘Gros Michel’ subgroups, valuable information for breeding programmes. Nevertheless, in establishing the likely monoclonal origin of the main edible triploid banana subgroups (i.e. ‘Cavendish’, ‘Plantain’ and ‘Mutika-Lujugira’), we postulated that the huge phenotypic diversity observed within these subgroups did not result from gamete recombination, but rather from epigenetic regulations. This emphasizes the need to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of genome expression on a unique model in the plant kingdom. We also propose experimental standards to compare additional and independent genotyping data for reference. PMID:22323428

  13. Development of β-Carotene Rich Maize Hybrids through Marker-Assisted Introgression of β-carotene hydroxylase Allele

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Vignesh; Hossain, Firoz; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Choudhary, Mukesh; Saha, Supradip; Bhat, Jayant S.; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Gupta, Hari S.

    2014-01-01

    Development of vitamin A-rich cereals can help in alleviating the widespread problem of vitamin A deficiency. We report here significant enhancement of kernel β-carotene in elite maize genotypes through accelerated marker-assisted backcross breeding. A favourable allele (543 bp) of the β-carotene hydroxylase (crtRB1) gene was introgressed in the seven elite inbred parents, which were low (1.4 µg/g) in kernel β-carotene, by using a crtRB1-specific DNA marker for foreground selection. About 90% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in the selected progenies within two backcross generations. Concentration of β-carotene among the crtRB1-introgressed inbreds varied from 8.6 to 17.5 µg/g - a maximum increase up to 12.6-fold over recurrent parent. The reconstituted hybrids developed from improved parental inbreds also showed enhanced kernel β-carotene as high as 21.7 µg/g, compared to 2.6 µg/g in the original hybrid. The reconstituted hybrids evaluated at two locations possessed similar grain yield to that of original hybrids. These β-carotene enriched high yielding hybrids can be effectively utilized in the maize biofortification programs across the globe. PMID:25486271

  14. Allele-specific parental imprinting of dzr1, a posttranscriptional regulator of zein accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, S; Messing, J

    1994-01-01

    Parental imprinting describes the phenomenon of unequivalent gene function based on transmission from the female or male parent. We have discovered parental imprinting of an allele of the dzr1 locus that posttranscriptionally regulates the accumulation of 10-kDa zein in the maize endosperm. The imprinted allele of MO17 inbred origin, dzr1 + MO17, conditions low accumulation of the 10-kDa zein and is dominant when transmitted through the female but recessive when transmitted through the male. Analyzing endosperms with equal parental contributions of dzr1 + MO17 ruled out the possibility that the unequivalent phenotype of dzr1 + MO17 was due to parental dosage imbalance in the triploid endosperm. Second-generation studies show that the dominant or recessive phenotype of dzr1 + MO17 is determined at every generation based on immediate parental origin with no grandparental effect. Images PMID:8197149

  15. A combined analysis of D22S278 marker alleles in affected sib-pairs: Support for a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at chromosome 22q12

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Vallada, H.; Collier, D.

    1996-02-16

    Several groups have reported weak evidence for linkage between schizophrenia and genetic markers located on chromosome 22q using the lod score method of analysis. However these findings involved different genetic markers and methods of analysis, and so were not directly comparable. To resolve this issue we have performed a combined analysis of genotypic data from the marker D22S278 in multiply affected schizophrenic families derived from 11 independent research groups worldwide. This marker was chosen because it showed maximum evidence for linkage in three independent datasets. Using the affected sib-pair method as implemented by the program ESPA, the combined dataset showed 252 alleles shared compared with 188 alleles not shared (chi-square 9.31, 1df, P = 0.001) where parental genotype data was completely known. When sib-pairs for whom parental data was assigned according to probability were included the number of alleles shared was 514.1 compared with 437.8 not shared (chi-square 6.12, 1df, P = 0.006). Similar results were obtained when a likelihood ratio method for sib-pair analysis was used. These results indicate that there may be a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at 22q12. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Regulatory Divergence between Parental Alleles Determines Gene Expression Patterns in Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Hueber, Yann; Dereeper, Alexis; Rialle, Stéphanie; Herrera, Juan-Carlos; Lashermes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Both hybridization and allopolyploidization generate novel phenotypes by conciliating divergent genomes and regulatory networks in the same cellular context. To understand the rewiring of gene expression in hybrids, the total expression of 21,025 genes and the allele-specific expression of over 11,000 genes were quantified in interspecific hybrids and their parental species, Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides using RNA-seq technology. Between parental species, cis- and trans-regulatory divergences affected around 32% and 35% of analyzed genes, respectively, with nearly 17% of them showing both. The relative importance of trans-regulatory divergences between both species could be related to their low genetic divergence and perennial habit. In hybrids, among divergently expressed genes between parental species and hybrids, 77% was expressed like one parent (expression level dominance), including 65% like C. eugenioides. Gene expression was shown to result from the expression of both alleles affected by intertwined parental trans-regulatory factors. A strong impact of C. eugenioides trans-regulatory factors on the upregulation of C. canephora alleles was revealed. The gene expression patterns appeared determined by complex combinations of cis- and trans-regulatory divergences. In particular, the observed biased expression level dominance seemed to be derived from the asymmetric effects of trans-regulatory parental factors on regulation of alleles. More generally, this study illustrates the effects of divergent trans-regulatory parental factors on the gene expression pattern in hybrids. The characteristics of the transcriptional response to hybridization appear to be determined by the compatibility of gene regulatory networks and therefore depend on genetic divergences between the parental species and their evolutionary history. PMID:25819221

  17. Allelic imbalance study of 16q in human primary breast carcinomas using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Dorion-Bonnet, F; Mautalen, S; Hostein, I; Longy, M

    1995-11-01

    The high incidence of allelic imbalance on the long arm of chromosome 16 in breast cancer suggests its involvement in the development and progression of the tumor. Several loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies have led to the assignment of commonly deleted regions on 16q where tumor suppressor genes may be located. The most recurrent LOH regions have been 16q22.1 and 16q22.4-qter. The aim of this study was to gain further insight into the occurrence of one or multiple "smallest regions of overlap" on 16q in a new series of breast carcinomas. Hence, a detailed allelic imbalance map was constructed for 46 sporadic breast carcinomas, using 11 polymorphic microsatellite markers located on chromosome 16. Allelic imbalance of one or more markers on 16q was shown by 30 of the 46 tumors (65%). Among these 30 carcinomas, LOH on the long arm of chromosome 16 was detected at all informative loci in 19 (41%); 13 of them showed allelic imbalance on the long but not on the short arm, with the occurrence of variable "breakpoints" in the pericentromeric region. The partial allelic imbalance in 11 tumors involved either the 16q22.1-qter LOH region or interstitial LOH regions. A commonly deleted region was found between D16S421 and D16S289 on 16q22.1 in 29 of the 30 tumors. The present data argue in favor of an important involvement of a tumor suppressor gene mapping to 16q22.1 in the genesis or progression of breast cancer. PMID:8589033

  18. Improvements in allelic discrimination of microsatellite markers using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Symons, R C; Marshall, V M; Foote, S J

    2000-08-01

    Poor resolution, retarded progress of DNA through gels, and variable sizing of DNA fragments between and within gels hinder accurate genotyping of some simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) markers with the Perkin Elmer Applied Biosystems 377 Sequenator. These problems are similar to renaturation related problems observed in DNA sequencing gels. PCR products especially susceptible to these problems are shown to have higher melting temperatures (T(m)) than others. Gels containing increased concentrations of denaturants allow greater accuracy in allelic discrimination. This is especially beneficial where quantification is necessary. PMID:10920238

  19. Allelic divergence and cultivar-specific SSR alleles revealed by capillary electrophoresis using fluorescence-labeled SSR markers in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneu-polyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible due to capillary electrophoregrams (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR primer pairs. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 each...

  20. Inbreeding of bottlenecked butterfly populations. Estimation using the likelihood of changes in marker allele frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Saccheri, I J; Wilson, I J; Nichols, R A; Bruford, M W; Brakefield, P M

    1999-01-01

    Polymorphic enzyme and minisatellite loci were used to estimate the degree of inbreeding in experimentally bottlenecked populations of the butterfly, Bicyclus anynana (Satyridae), three generations after founding events of 2, 6, 20, or 300 individuals, each bottleneck size being replicated at least four times. Heterozygosity fell more than expected, though not significantly so, but this traditional measure of the degree of inbreeding did not make full use of the information from genetic markers. It proved more informative to estimate directly the probability distribution of a measure of inbreeding, sigma2, the variance in the number of descendants left per gene. In all bottlenecked lines, sigma2 was significantly larger than in control lines (300 founders). We demonstrate that this excess inbreeding was brought about both by an increase in the variance of reproductive success of individuals, but also by another process. We argue that in bottlenecked lines linkage disequilibrium generated by the small number of haplotypes passing through the bottleneck resulted in hitchhiking of particular marker alleles with those haplotypes favored by selection. In control lines, linkage disequilibrium was minimal. Our result, indicating more inbreeding than expected from demographic parameters, contrasts with the findings of previous (Drosophila) experiments in which the decline in observed heterozygosity was slower than expected and attributed to associative overdominance. The different outcomes may both be explained as a consequence of linkage disequilibrium under different regimes of inbreeding. The likelihood-based method to estimate inbreeding should be of wide applicability. It was, for example, able to resolve small differences in sigma2 among replicate lines within bottleneck-size treatments, which could be related to the observed variation in reproductive viability. PMID:10049922

  1. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Sugarcane Parents in Chinese Breeding Programmes Using gSSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    You, Qian; Xu, Liping; Zheng, Yifeng; Que, Youxiong

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane is the most important sugar and bioenergy crop in the world. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 115 sugarcane genotypes used for parental crossing were genotyped based on five genomic simple sequence repeat marker (gSSR) loci and 88 polymorphic alleles of loci (100%) as detected by capillary electrophoresis. The values of genetic diversity parameters across the populations indicate that the genetic variation intrapopulation (90.5%) was much larger than that of interpopulation (9.5%). Cluster analysis revealed that there were three groups termed as groups I, II, and III within the 115 genotypes. The genotypes released by each breeding programme showed closer genetic relationships, except the YC series released by Hainan sugarcane breeding station. Using principle component analysis (PCA), the first and second principal components accounted for a cumulative 76% of the total variances, in which 43% were for common parents and 33% were for new parents, respectively. The knowledge obtained in this study should be useful to future breeding programs for increasing genetic diversity of sugarcane varieties and cultivars to meet the demand of sugarcane cultivation for sugar and bioenergy use. PMID:23990759

  2. Using molecular markers for pedigree reconstruction of the greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili) in the absence of parental information.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Barreto, D; Consuegra, S; Jerez, S; Cejas, J R; Martín, V; Lorenzo, A

    2013-08-01

    Ensuring appropriate levels of genetic diversity in captive populations is essential to avoid inbreeding and loss of rare alleles by genetic drift. Pedigree reconstruction and parentage analysis in the absence of parental genotypes can be a challenging task that relies in the assignment of sibship relationships among the offspring. Here, we used eight highly variable microsatellite markers and three different assignment methods to reconstruct the most likely genotypes of a parental group of wild Seriola dumerili fish based on the genotypes of six cohorts of their offspring, to assess their relative contributions to the offspring. We found that a combination of the four most variable microsatellites was enough to identify the number of parents and their contribution to the offspring, suggesting that the variability of the markers can be more critical than the number of markers. Estimated effective population sizes were lower than the number of breeders and variable among years. The results suggest unequal parental contribution that should be accounted for breeding programs in the future. PMID:23506386

  3. Genetic mapping, marker assisted selection and allelic relationships for the Pu6 gene conferring rust resistance in sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Bulos, Mariano; Vergani, Pablo Nicolas; Altieri, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Rust resistance in the sunflower line P386 is controlled by Pu6, a gene which was reported to segregate independently from other rust resistant genes, such as R4. The objectives of this work were to map Pu6, to provide and validate molecular tools for its identification, and to determine the linkage relationship of Pu6 and R4. Genetic mapping of Pu6 with six markers covered 24.8 cM of genetic distance on the lower end of linkage Group 13 of the sunflower consensus map. The marker most closely linked to Pu6 was ORS316 at 2.5 cM in the distal position. ORS316 presented five alleles when was assayed with a representative set of resistant and susceptible lines. Allelism test between Pu6 and R4 indicated that both genes are linked at a genetic distance of 6.25 cM. This is the first confirmation based on an allelism test that at least two members of the Radv/R4/R11/ R13a/R13b/Pu6 cluster of genes are at different loci. A fine elucidation of the architecture of this complex locus will allow designing and constructing completely new genomic regions combining genes from different resistant sources and the elimination of the linkage drag around each resistant gene. PMID:25320555

  4. Marker-assisted selection for recognizing wheat mutant genotypes carrying HMW glutenin alleles related to baking quality.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Mohammad Javad; Bihamta, Mohammad Reza; Naserian Khiabani, Behnam; Tahernezhad, Zahra; Hallajian, Mohammad Taher; Shamsi, Marzieh Varasteh

    2014-01-01

    Allelic diversity of HMW glutenin loci in several studies revealed that allelic combinations affect dough quality. Dx5 + Dy10 subunits are related to good baking quality and Dx2 + Dy12 are related to undesirable baking quality. One of the most regular methods to evaluate the baking quality is SDS-PAGE which is used to improve baking quality labs. Marker-assisted selection is the method which can recognize the alleles related to baking quality and this method is based on polymerase chain reaction. 10 pairs of specific primers related to Dx2, Dx2.1, Dx5, Dy10, and Dy12 subunits were used for recognizing baking quality of some wheat varieties and some mutant genotypes. Only 5 pairs of them could show the specific bands. All subunits were recognized by the primers except Dx2.1. Some of the primers were extracted from previous studies and the others were designed based on D genome subunits of wheat. SDS-PAGE method accomplished having confidence in these marker's results. To realize the effect of mutation, seed storage proteins were measured. It showed that mutation had effect on the amount of seed storage protein on the mutant seeds (which showed polymorphism). PMID:24883389

  5. Marker-Assisted Selection for Recognizing Wheat Mutant Genotypes Carrying HMW Glutenin Alleles Related to Baking Quality

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Mohammad Javad; Bihamta, Mohammad Reza; Naserian Khiabani, Behnam; Tahernezhad, Zahra; Hallajian, Mohammad Taher; Shamsi, Marzieh Varasteh

    2014-01-01

    Allelic diversity of HMW glutenin loci in several studies revealed that allelic combinations affect dough quality. Dx5 + Dy10 subunits are related to good baking quality and Dx2 + Dy12 are related to undesirable baking quality. One of the most regular methods to evaluate the baking quality is SDS-PAGE which is used to improve baking quality labs. Marker-assisted selection is the method which can recognize the alleles related to baking quality and this method is based on polymerase chain reaction. 10 pairs of specific primers related to Dx2, Dx2.1, Dx5, Dy10, and Dy12 subunits were used for recognizing baking quality of some wheat varieties and some mutant genotypes. Only 5 pairs of them could show the specific bands. All subunits were recognized by the primers except Dx2.1. Some of the primers were extracted from previous studies and the others were designed based on D genome subunits of wheat. SDS-PAGE method accomplished having confidence in these marker's results. To realize the effect of mutation, seed storage proteins were measured. It showed that mutation had effect on the amount of seed storage protein on the mutant seeds (which showed polymorphism). PMID:24883389

  6. HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles as putative susceptibility markers in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Paulo Tadashi; Targa, Lília Spaleta; Yamamoto, Lidia; Rodrigues, Jonatas Cristian; Kanunfre, Kelly Aparecida; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2016-05-18

    Host and parasite genotypes are among the factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis pathogenesis. As HLA class II molecules play a key role in the immune system regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles are associated with susceptibility or protection to congenital toxoplasmosis. One hundred and twenty-two fetuses with and 103 without toxoplasmosis were studied. The two study groups were comparable according to a number of socio-demographic and genetic variables. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP. In the HLA-DQA1 region, the allele frequencies showed that *01:03 and *03:02 alleles could confer susceptibility (OR= 3.06, p = 0.0002 and OR= 9.60, p= 0.0001, respectively) as they were more frequent among infected fetuses. Regarding the HLA-DQB1 region, the *05:04 allele could confer susceptibility (OR = 6.95, p < 0.0001). Of the 122 infected fetuses, 10 presented susceptibility haplotypes contrasting with only one in the non-infected group. This difference was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparison (OR = 9.37, p=0.011). In the casuistic, there were two severely damaged fetuses with high parasite loads determined in amniotic fluid samples and HLA-DQA1 susceptibility alleles. In the present study, a discriminatory potential of HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles to identify susceptibility to congenital toxoplasmosis and the most severe cases has been shown. PMID:26856406

  7. Improvement of marker-based predictability of Apparent Amylose Content in japonica rice through GBSSI allele mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apparent Amylose Content (AAC), regulated by the Waxy gene, represents the key determinant of rice cooking properties. In occidental countries high AAC rice represents the most requested market class but the availability of molecular markers allowing specific selection of high AAC varieties is limited. Results In this study, the effectiveness of available molecular markers in predicting AAC was evaluated in a collection of 127 rice accessions (125 japonica ssp. and 2 indica ssp.) characterized by AAC values from glutinous to 26%. The analyses highlighted the presence of several different allelic patterns identifiable by a few molecular markers, and two of them, i.e., the SNPs at intron1 and exon 6, were able to explain a maximum of 79.5% of AAC variation. However, the available molecular markers haplotypes did not provide tools for predicting accessions with AAC higher than 24.5%. To identify additional polymorphisms, the re-sequencing of the Waxy gene and 1kbp of the putative upstream regulatory region was performed in 21 genotypes representing all the AAC classes identified. Several previously un-characterized SNPs were identified and four of them were used to develop dCAPS markers. Conclusions The addition of the SNPs newly identified slightly increased the AAC explained variation and allowed the identification of a haplotype almost unequivocally associated to AAC higher than 24.5%. Haplotypes at the waxy locus were also associated to grain length and length/width (L/W) ratio. In particular, the SNP at the first intron, which identifies the Wx a and Wx b alleles, was associated with differences in the width of the grain, the L/W ratio and the length of the kernel, most likely as a result of human selection. PMID:24383761

  8. Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J. Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coveillo, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D’adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco EJ; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul DP; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth JF; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild IA; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  9. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Perry, John R B; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davey Smith, George; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco E J; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth J F; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K

    2014-10-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  10. New Markers from Sugar Metabolism ESTs: Tagging Positive Alleles from Saccharum spontaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited genetic gains, obtained from breeding for sugar content in different breeding programs worldwide suggest that a plateau has been reached for this trait. One way to overcome this obstacle would be to identify and introduce into commercial germplasm alternative alleles controlling sugar metab...

  11. Allelic divergence in sugarcane cultivars revealed through capillary electrophoregrams of fluorescence-labeled microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneu-polyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible due to capillary electerophoregrams (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR primer pairs. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 eac...

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND ALLELE DIVERSITY OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS LINKED TO THE BARLEY ALUMINUM TOLERANCE GENE ALP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utilization of barley cultivars tolerant to aluminum (Al) is one of the most economical strategies for expanding barley production on acidic soils. A gene conferring Al tolerance in the barley cultivar "Dayton", Alp, has previously been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 4H with RFLP markers. ...

  13. Global analysis of Plasmodium falciparum Na+/H+ exchanger (pfnhe-1) allele polymorphism and its usefulness as a marker of in vitro resistance to quinine

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Didier; Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Khim, Nimol; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Witkowski, Benoit; Benedet, Christophe; Canier, Lydie; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Durand, Rémy

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive analysis of the worldwide genetic polymorphism of ms4760 alleles of the pfnhe-1 gene and to discuss their usefulness as molecular marker of quinine resistance (QNR). A new numbering of ms4760 allele, classification grouping ms4760 alleles according to the number of DNNND and DDNHNDNHNND repeat motifs in blocks II and V was also proposed. A total of 1508 ms4760 sequences from isolates, culture-adapted parasites or reference strains from various geographical regions were retrieved from GenBank (last update on 15th June 2012) or from publications and were used for genetic analyses. The association of different alleles of pfnhe-1 with resistance to quinoline antimalarial drugs showed marked geographic disparities. The validity and reliability of candidate polymorphisms in pfnhe-1 gene as molecular markers of QNR appeared restricted to endemic areas from South Asia or possibly East African countries and needs to be confirmed. PMID:24533289

  14. Global analysis of Plasmodium falciparum Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (pfnhe-1) allele polymorphism and its usefulness as a marker of in vitro resistance to quinine.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Didier; Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Khim, Nimol; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Witkowski, Benoit; Benedet, Christophe; Canier, Lydie; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Durand, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive analysis of the worldwide genetic polymorphism of ms4760 alleles of the pfnhe-1 gene and to discuss their usefulness as molecular marker of quinine resistance (QNR). A new numbering of ms4760 allele, classification grouping ms4760 alleles according to the number of DNNND and DDNHNDNHNND repeat motifs in blocks II and V was also proposed. A total of 1508 ms4760 sequences from isolates, culture-adapted parasites or reference strains from various geographical regions were retrieved from GenBank (last update on 15th June 2012) or from publications and were used for genetic analyses. The association of different alleles of pfnhe-1 with resistance to quinoline antimalarial drugs showed marked geographic disparities. The validity and reliability of candidate polymorphisms in pfnhe-1 gene as molecular markers of QNR appeared restricted to endemic areas from South Asia or possibly East African countries and needs to be confirmed. PMID:24533289

  15. Construction of a BALB/c congenic mouse, C.C3H-Lpsd, that expresses the Lpsd allele: analysis of chromosome 4 markers surrounding the Lps gene.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, S N; Wax, J S; Perera, P Y; Padlan, C; Potter, M; Mock, B A

    1994-01-01

    Development of a congenic BALB/c mouse strain that contains a segment of chromosome 4 including the Lpsd allele of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-hyporesponsive C3H/HeJ strain is presented. On the basis of LPS-induced spleen cell mitogenesis, macrophage tumor necrosis factor secretion, and tyrosine phosphorylation in vitro and lethality in galactosamine-sensitized mice in vivo, the C.C3H-Lpsd strain provides a model of LPS hyporesponsiveness that is comparable to that of the parental C3H/HeJ strain. Analysis of markers in this region indicates that length of the donor fragment is approximately 5.5 centimorgans. Thus, the C.C3H-Lpsd strain provides an important genetic tool for analysis of markers in this region and for examining functional effects of Lpsd expression on the BALB/c background. Images PMID:7927709

  16. Allele-specific marker development and selection efficiencies for both flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase genes in soybean subgenus soja.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Color is one of the phenotypic markers mostly used to study soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) genetic, molecular and biochemical processes. Two P450-dependent mono-oxygenases, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H; EC1.14.3.21) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H, EC1.14.13.88), both catalyzing the hydroxylation of the B-ring in flavonoids, play an important role in coloration. Previous studies showed that the T locus was a gene encoding F3'H and the W1 locus co-segregated with a gene encoding F3'5'H in soybean. These two genetic loci have identified to control seed coat, flower and pubescence colors. However, the allelic distributions of both F3'H and F3'5'H genes in soybean were unknown. In this study, three novel alleles were identified (two of four alleles for GmF3'H and one of three alleles for GmF3'5'H). A set of gene-tagged markers was developed and verified based on the sequence diversity of all seven alleles. Furthermore, the markers were used to analyze soybean accessions including 170 cultivated soybeans (G. max) from a mini core collection and 102 wild soybeans (G. soja). For both F3'H and F3'5'H, the marker selection efficiencies for pubescence color and flower color were determined. The results showed that one GmF3'H allele explained 92.2 % of the variation in tawny and two gmf3'h alleles explained 63.8 % of the variation in gray pubescence colors. In addition, two GmF3'5'H alleles and one gmF3'5'h allele explained 94.0 % of the variation in purple and 75.3 % in white flowers, respectively. By the combination of the two loci, seed coat color was determined. In total, 90.9 % of accessions possessing both the gmf3'h-b and gmf3'5'h alleles had yellow seed coats. Therefore, seed coat colors are controlled by more than two loci. PMID:23463490

  17. Functional study of a genetic marker allele associated with resistance to Ascaris suum in pigs.

    PubMed

    Skallerup, Per; Thamsborg, Stig M; Jrgensen, Claus B; Enemark, Heidi L; Yoshida, Ayako; Gring, Harald H H; Fredholm, Merete; Nejsum, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP TXNIP and SNP ARNT), both on chromosome 4, have been reported to be associated with roundworm (Ascaris suum) burden in pigs. In the present study, we selected pigs with two SNP TXNIP genotypes (AA; n = 24 and AB; n = 24), trickle-infected them with A. suum from 8 weeks of age until necropsy 8 weeks later, and tested the hypothesis that pigs with the AA genotype would have higher levels of resistance than pigs of AB genotype. We used different indicators of resistance (worm burden, fecal egg counts (FEC), number of liver white spots and A. suum-specific serum IgG antibody levels). Pigs of the AA genotype had lower mean macroscopic worm burden (2.4 vs 19.3; P = 0.06), lower mean total worm burden (26.5 vs 70.1; P = 0.09) and excreted fewer A. suum eggs at week 8 PI (mean number of eggs/g feces: 238 vs 1259; P = 0.14) than pigs of the AB genotype, as expected based on prior associations. The pigs were also genotyped at another locus (SNP ARNT) which showed a similar trend. This study provides suggestive evidence that resistant pigs may be selected using a genetic marker, TXNIP, and provides further support to the quantitative trait locus on chromosome 4. PMID:24709292

  18. Influence of sex of the transmitting parent as well as of parental allele site on the CTG expansion in myotonic dystrophy (DM)

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, H. G.; Brüggenwirth, H. T.; Nillesen, W.; Jansen, G.; Hamel, B. C. J.; Hoppe, R. L. E.; de Die, C. E. M.; Höweler, C. J.; van Oost, B. A.; Wieringa, B.; Ropers, H. H.; Smeets, H. J. M.

    1993-01-01

    In patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM), the severity of clinical signs is correlated with the length of a (CTG)n trinucleotide repeat sequence. This sequence tends to expand in subsequent generations. In order to examine the kinetics of this process and, in particular, the influence of the mutant-allele size and the sex of the transmitting parent, we have studied (CTG)n repeat lengths in the offspring of 38 healthy carriers with small mutations (less than 100 CTG trinucleotides, mean length [CTG]67). In these studies, we found a weakly positive correlation between the size of the mutation in the carrier parents and that in their offspring. Furthermore, we observed that, in the offspring of male transmitters, repeat lengths exceeding 100 CTG trinucleotides were much more frequent than in the offspring of carrier females (48 [92%] of 52 vs. 7 [44%] of 16, P = .0002). Similarly, in genealogical studies performed in 38 Dutch DM kindreds, an excess of nonmanifesting male transmitters was noted, which was most conspicuous in the generation immediately preceding that with phenotypic expression of DM. Thus, two separate lines of evidence suggest that the sex of the transmitting parent is an important factor that determines DM allele size in the offspring. On the basis of our data, we estimate that when both parents are asymptomatic, the odds are approximately 2:1 that the father carries the DM mutation. Because expansion of the CTG repeat is more rapid with male transmission, negative selection during spermatogenesis may be required to explain the exclusive maternal inheritance of severe congenital onset DM. PMID:8213829

  19. Rapid detection of allelic losses in brain tumours using microsatellite repeat markers and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chernova, O B; Barnett, G H; Cowell, J K

    2003-06-16

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a recently introduced high-capacity automated method for detecting unknown mutations (denaturing HPLC) or for sizing DNA fragments under nondenaturing conditions. We have adapted the HPLC method for detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and used glial tumours as a model to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity in comparison to conventional denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 20 oligodendrogliomas (grades II and III), and five astrocytic tumours (grades III and IV) were analysed using 14 polymorphic microsatellite markers mapping to regions on chromosomes 1p, 19q, and 10q using both DNA-HPLC and denaturing gel electrophoresis. This study demonstrated complete concordance between both methods. However, unlike gel electrophoresis, HPLC is automated, does not require post-PCR processing, and does not require hazardous radioactive or expensive fluorescent labelling. Our data suggest that HPLC is a reliable and sensitive method for detection of allelic losses in tumour samples and it is a favourable alternative for high-sensitivity LOH detection in both research and diagnostic environments. PMID:12799632

  20. QTL Analysis of High Thermotolerance with Superior and Downgraded Parental Yeast Strains Reveals New Minor QTLs and Converges on Novel Causative Alleles Involved in RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yudi; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Clement, Lieven; Erdei, Éva; Tanghe, An; Schaerlaekens, Kristien; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    Revealing QTLs with a minor effect in complex traits remains difficult. Initial strategies had limited success because of interference by major QTLs and epistasis. New strategies focused on eliminating major QTLs in subsequent mapping experiments. Since genetic analysis of superior segregants from natural diploid strains usually also reveals QTLs linked to the inferior parent, we have extended this strategy for minor QTL identification by eliminating QTLs in both parent strains and repeating the QTL mapping with pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis. We first mapped multiple QTLs responsible for high thermotolerance in a natural yeast strain, MUCL28177, compared to the laboratory strain, BY4742. Using single and bulk reciprocal hemizygosity analysis we identified MKT1 and PRP42 as causative genes in QTLs linked to the superior and inferior parent, respectively. We subsequently downgraded both parents by replacing their superior allele with the inferior allele of the other parent. QTL mapping using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis with the segregants from the cross of the downgraded parents, revealed several new QTLs. We validated the two most-strongly linked new QTLs by identifying NCS2 and SMD2 as causative genes linked to the superior downgraded parent and we found an allele-specific epistatic interaction between PRP42 and SMD2. Interestingly, the related function of PRP42 and SMD2 suggests an important role for RNA processing in high thermotolerance and underscores the relevance of analyzing minor QTLs. Our results show that identification of minor QTLs involved in complex traits can be successfully accomplished by crossing parent strains that have both been downgraded for a single QTL. This novel approach has the advantage of maintaining all relevant genetic diversity as well as enough phenotypic difference between the parent strains for the trait-of-interest and thus maximizes the chances of successfully identifying additional minor QTLs that are relevant for the phenotypic difference between the original parents. PMID:23966873

  1. QTL analysis of high thermotolerance with superior and downgraded parental yeast strains reveals new minor QTLs and converges on novel causative alleles involved in RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yudi; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R; Clement, Lieven; Erdei, Eva; Tanghe, An; Schaerlaekens, Kristien; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M

    2013-01-01

    Revealing QTLs with a minor effect in complex traits remains difficult. Initial strategies had limited success because of interference by major QTLs and epistasis. New strategies focused on eliminating major QTLs in subsequent mapping experiments. Since genetic analysis of superior segregants from natural diploid strains usually also reveals QTLs linked to the inferior parent, we have extended this strategy for minor QTL identification by eliminating QTLs in both parent strains and repeating the QTL mapping with pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis. We first mapped multiple QTLs responsible for high thermotolerance in a natural yeast strain, MUCL28177, compared to the laboratory strain, BY4742. Using single and bulk reciprocal hemizygosity analysis we identified MKT1 and PRP42 as causative genes in QTLs linked to the superior and inferior parent, respectively. We subsequently downgraded both parents by replacing their superior allele with the inferior allele of the other parent. QTL mapping using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis with the segregants from the cross of the downgraded parents, revealed several new QTLs. We validated the two most-strongly linked new QTLs by identifying NCS2 and SMD2 as causative genes linked to the superior downgraded parent and we found an allele-specific epistatic interaction between PRP42 and SMD2. Interestingly, the related function of PRP42 and SMD2 suggests an important role for RNA processing in high thermotolerance and underscores the relevance of analyzing minor QTLs. Our results show that identification of minor QTLs involved in complex traits can be successfully accomplished by crossing parent strains that have both been downgraded for a single QTL. This novel approach has the advantage of maintaining all relevant genetic diversity as well as enough phenotypic difference between the parent strains for the trait-of-interest and thus maximizes the chances of successfully identifying additional minor QTLs that are relevant for the phenotypic difference between the original parents. PMID:23966873

  2. Early Markers of Language and Attention: Mutual Contributions and the Impact of Parent-Infant Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartstein, Maria A.; Crawford, Jennifer; Robertson, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the contribution of attentional skills to early language, and the influence of early language markers on the development of attention, simultaneously examining the impact of parent-child interaction factors (reciprocity/synchrony and sensitivity/responsivity), including their potential moderator effects. All…

  3. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a) the parental species don’t share alleles, and b) one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis), then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus) and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica) by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management. PMID:23006678

  4. Personality traits as potential susceptibility markers: differential susceptibility to support among parents.

    PubMed

    Slagt, Meike; Dubas, Judith Semon; Denissen, Jaap J A; Deković, Maja; van Aken, Marcel A G

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we examined whether parents are differentially susceptible to support from their spouse and adolescent child depending on their personality traits, and whether differences in susceptibility to support among parents, in turn, are linked to the quality of support parents give to their children. Participants in this three-wave longitudinal study were 288 two-parent Dutch families with an adolescent child. Fathers were on average 43.9 years old (SD = 3.7 years), mothers were 41.7 years old (SD = 3.3 years), and adolescents (50% girls) were 14.5 years old (SD = 0.8 years). We found that the association between support from children toward their parents and subsequent support from parents toward their children was more pronounced for parents high on Openness, for better and for worse. Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Emotional Stability did not emerge as markers of differences in susceptibility. Also, parents did not differ in their susceptibility to support from their spouse, nor were differences in susceptibility found a year later when using data from a third wave. We found very modest support for differential susceptibility, only for Openness, and depending on the source of perceived support and on the timing of measurement. PMID:24471708

  5. The Dopamine Receptor D4 Gene 7-Repeat Allele Interacts with Parenting Quality to Predict Effortful Control in Four-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Sheese, Brad E; Rothbart, Mary K; Voelker, Pascale M; Posner, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) 7-repeat allele has been found to interact with environmental factors such as parenting in children and peer attitudes in adults to influence aspects of behavior such as risk taking. We previously found that in toddlers, lower-quality parenting in combination with the 7-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene was associated with greater parent-reported Sensation Seeking (SS), but was unrelated to Effortful Control (EC). We now report findings from a followup assessment with the same sample of children showing that parenting quality interacts with the presence of the 7-repeat allele to predict EC in 3-to 4-year-old children. The change in these patterns of results may reflect the increased role of the executive attention network in older children and adults. However, due to the small sample size (N = 52) and the novelty of the results, these findings should be treated with caution and considered preliminary until they are replicated in an independent sample. PMID:23869253

  6. Distribution of mating-type alleles and M13 PCR markers in the black leaf spot fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis of bananas in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, C B; Miranda, E C; Hanada, R E; Sousa, N R; Gasparotto, L; Soares, M A; Silva, G F

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the causative agent of black sigatoka, which is one of the most destructive diseases of banana plants. Infection with this pathogen results in underdeveloped fruit, with no commercial value. We analyzed the distribution of the M. fijiensis mating-type system and its genetic variability using M13 phage DNA markers. We found a 1:1 distribution of mating-type alleles, indicating MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 idiomorphs. A polymorphism analysis using three different primers for M13 markers showed that only the M13 minisatellite primers generated polymorphic products. We then utilized this polymorphism to characterize 40 isolates from various Brazilian states. The largest genetic distances were found between isolates from the same location and between isolates from different parts of the country. Therefore, there was no correlation between the genetic similarity and the geographic origin of the isolates. The M13 marker was used to generate genetic fingerprints for five isolates; these fingerprints were compared with the band profiles obtained from inter-simple sequence repeat (UBC861) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism analyses. We found that the M13 marker was more effective than the other two markers for differentiating these isolates. PMID:23420369

  7. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding. PMID:24926299

  8. Maladaptive family dysfunction and parental death as risk markers of childhood abuse in women.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Anna; Torres, Anna; Ascaso, Carlos; Navarro, Purificacin; Gelabert, Estel; Imaz, Maria Luisa; Martn-Santos, Roco; Valds, Manuel; Garca-Esteve, Llusa

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine the prevalence and characteristics of physical, emotional and sexual childhood abuse. It also examines whether other non-abuse types of childhood adversities related to maladaptive family functioning and separations during childhood can be used as markers for the presence of childhood abuse. Participants (N = 237) were women at 2-3 days after delivery that completed the Spanish-validated version of the Early Trauma Inventory Self Report (ETI-SR; Bremner, Bolus, & Mayer, 2007; Plaza et al., 2011), designed to assess the presence of childhood adversities. Results show that 29% of the women had experienced some type of childhood abuse, and 10% more than one type. Logistic regression analyses indicate that childhood parental death is a risk marker for childhood emotional abuse (OR: 3.77; 95% CI: 1.327-10.755; p <.013), childhood parental substance abuse is a risk marker for childhood sexual (OR: 3.72; 95% CI: 1.480-9.303; p < .005) and physical abuse (OR: 2.610; 95% CI: 1.000-6.812; p < .05) and that childhood family mental illness is a risk marker for childhood emotional (OR: 2.95; 95% CI: 1.175-7.441; p < .021) and sexual abuse (OR: 2.55; 95% CI: 1.168-5.580; p < .019). The high prevalence of childhood abuse indicates a need for assessment during the perinatal period. Screening for childhood family mental illness, parental substance abuse, and parental death - all identified risk factors for reporting childhood abuse - can help to identify women that should be assessed specifically regarding abuse. PMID:26054253

  9. Enrichment of an intraspecific genetic map of upland cotton by developing markers using parental RAD sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hantao; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Beibei; Shen, Chao; Lin, Zhongxu

    2015-04-01

    RAD sequencing was performed using DH962 and Jimian5 as upland cotton mapping parents. Sequencing data for DH962 and Jimian5 were assembled into the genome sequences of ≈55.27 and ≈57.06 Mb, respectively. Analysing genome sequences of the two parents, 1,323 SSR, 3,838 insertion/deletion (InDel), and 9,366 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) primer pairs were developed. All of the SSRs, 121 InDels, 441 SNPs, and other 6,747 primer pairs were screened in the two parents, and a total of 535 new polymorphic loci were identified. A genetic map including 1,013 loci was constructed using these results and 506 loci previously published for this population. Twenty-seven new QTLs for yield and fibre quality were identified, indicating that the efficiency of QTL detection was greatly improved by the increase in map density. Comparative genomics showed there to be considerable homology and collinearity between the AT and A2 genomes and between the DT and D5 genomes, although there were a few exchanges and introgressions among the chromosomes of the A2 genome. Here, the development of markers using parental RAD sequencing was effective, and a high-density intraspecific genetic map was constructed. This map can be used for molecular marker-assisted selection in cotton. PMID:25656006

  10. Sibs with atopy and asthma share marker alleles at 11q13, but not at 7q31 or 14q32

    SciTech Connect

    Kate, L.P. ten; Collee, J.M.; Vries, H.G. de

    1994-09-01

    We studied allele sharing in 26 sib-pairs affected with atopy and asthma, recruited through a pediatric pulmonology department. Inclusion criteria were a positive score (2 symptoms or more) on a modified Dutch version of the MRC/ECCS questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and positive IgE tests (specific IgE 0.35 PRU/ml or more; total serum IgE for children under 10 years as described by Kjellmann et al., 1976; for older children 100 U/ml or over). Twenty-six sibpairs fulfilled these criteria. The microsatellites and polymorphic markers used in the analysis were 17bTA (an intragenic marker in the cystic fibrosis gene on 7q31); D11S534, D11S527, D11S97, PYGM, D11S480, Fc{epsilon}RI (all on 11q13, ordered from telomere to centromere) and D14S51 (a CA repeat close to the {alpha}-1-antitrypsin gene). We observed no sharing with the markers on 7q31 and 14q32, but significant sharing with markers on chromosome 11q13, especially D11S97, PYGM and D11S480. Sharing patterns were consistent with the existence of a dominant gene involved in the pathogenesis of atopic asthma on chromosome 11.

  11. Detection and molecular characterization of two FAD3 genes controlling linolenic acid content and development of allele-specific markers in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba).

    PubMed

    Tian, Entang; Zeng, Fangqin; MacKay, Kimberly; Roslinsky, Vicky; Cheng, Bifang

    2014-01-01

    Development of yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.) with superior quality traits (low erucic and linolenic acid contents, and low glucosinolate content) can make this species as a potential oilseed crop. We have recently isolated three inbred lines Y1127, Y514 and Y1035 with low (3.8%), medium (12.3%) and high (20.8%) linolenic acid (C18∶3) content, respectively, in this species. Inheritance studies detected two fatty acid desaturase 3 (FAD3) gene loci controlling the variation of C18∶3 content. QTL mapping revealed that the two FAD3 gene loci responsible for 73.0% and 23.4% of the total variation and were located on the linkage groups Sal02 and Sal10, respectively. The FAD3 gene on Sal02 was referred to as SalFAD3.LA1 and that on Sal10 as SalFAD3.LA2. The dominant and recessive alleles were designated as LA1 and la1 for SalFAD3.LA1, and LA2 and la2 for SalFAD3.LA2. Cloning and alignment of the coding and genomic DNA sequences revealed that the SalFAD3.LA1 and SalFAD3.LA2 genes each contained 8 exons and 7 introns. LA1 had a coding DNA sequence (CDS) of 1143 bp encoding a polypeptide of 380 amino acids, whereas la1 was a loss-of-function allele due to an insertion of 584 bp in exon 3. Both LA2 and la2 had a CDS of 1152 bp encoding a polypeptide of 383 amino acids. Allele-specific markers for LA1, la1, LA2 and la2 co-segregated with the C18∶3 content in the F2 populations and will be useful for improving fatty acid composition through marker assisted selection in yellow mustard breeding. PMID:24823372

  12. Dissemination of the highly expressed Bx7 glutenin subunit (Glu-B1al allele) in wheat as revealed by novel PCR markers and RP-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Butow, B J; Gale, K R; Ikea, J; Juhász, A; Bedö, Z; Tamás, L; Gianibelli, M C

    2004-11-01

    Increased expression of the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Bx7 is associated with improved dough strength of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flour. Several cultivars and landraces of widely different genetic backgrounds from around the world have now been found to contain this so-called 'over-expressing' allelic form of the Bx7 subunit encoded by Glu-B1al. Using three methods of identification, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC and PCR marker analysis, as well as pedigree information, we have traced the distribution and source of this allele from a Uruguayan landrace, Americano 44D, in the mid-nineteenth century. Results are supported by knowledge of the movement of wheat lines with migrants. All cultivars possessing the Glu-B1al allele can be identified by the following attributes: (1) the elution of the By sub-unit peak before the Dx sub-unit peak by RP-HPLC, (2) high expression levels of Bx7 (>39% Mol% Bx), (3) a 43 bp insertion in the matrix-attachment region (MAR) upstream of the gene promoter relative to Bx7 and an 18 bp nucleotide duplication in the coding region of the gene. Evidence is presented indicating that these 18 and 43 bp sequence insertions are not causal for the high expression levels of Bx7 as they were also found to be present in a small number of hexaploid species, including Chinese Spring, and species expressing Glu-B1ak and Glu-B1a alleles. In addition, these sequence inserts were found in different isolates of the tetraploid wheat, T. turgidum, indicating that these insertion/deletion events occurred prior to hexaploidization. PMID:15340686

  13. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, Erin L.; Gedy, Bradley C.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Garey, Andrew L.; Emel, Sarah L.; Mumma, Matthew; Wagner, Helene H.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Cushman, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals.

  14. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, E.L.; Fedy, B.C.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.; Garey, A.L.; Emel, S.L.; Mumma, M.; Wagner, H.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Cushman, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Chromosome Instability and Oxidative Stress Markers in Patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Bitelo Ludwig, Luciane; Valiati, Victor Hugo; Palazzo, Roberta Passos; Jardim, Laura Bannach; da Rosa, Darlan Pase; Bona, Silvia; Rodrigues, Graziela; Marroni, Norma Possa; Prá, Daniel; Maluf, Sharbel Weidner

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder, inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Total blood samples were collected from 20 patients with AT, 13 parents of patients, and 17 healthy volunteers. This study aimed at evaluating the frequency of chromosomal breaks in spontaneous cultures, induced by bleomycin and ionizing radiation, and further evaluated the rates of oxidative stress in AT patients and in their parents, compared to a control group. Three cell cultures were performed to each individual: the first culture did not receive induction to chromosomal instability, the second was exposed to bleomycin, and the last culture was exposed to ionizing radiation. To evaluate the rates of oxidative stress, the markers superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and thiobarbituric acid (TBARS) were utilized. Significant differences were observed between the three kinds of culture treatments (spontaneous, bleomycin, and radiation induced) and the breaks and chromosomal aberrations in the different groups. The oxidative stress showed no significant differences between the markers. This study showed that techniques of chromosomal instability after the induction of ionizing radiation and bleomycin are efficient in the identification of syndrome patients, with the ionizing radiation being the most effective. PMID:23936845

  16. Methods for precise sizing, automated binning of alleles, and reduction of error rates in large-scale genotyping using fluorescently labeled dinucleotide markers. FUSION (Finland-U.S. Investigation of NIDDM Genetics) Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Karanjawala, Z E; Hauser, E R; Ally, D; Knapp, J I; Rayman, J B; Musick, A; Tannenbaum, J; Te, C; Shapiro, S; Eldridge, W; Musick, T; Martin, C; Smith, J R; Carpten, J D; Brownstein, M J; Powell, J I; Whiten, R; Chines, P; Nylund, S J; Magnuson, V L; Boehnke, M; Collins, F S

    1997-02-01

    Large-scale genotyping is required to generate dense identity-by-descent maps to map genes for human complex disease. In some studies the number of genotypes needed can approach or even exceed 1 million. Generally, linkage and linkage disequilibrium analyses depend on clear allele identification and subsequent allele frequency estimation. Accurate grouping or categorization of each allele in the sample (allele calling or binning) is therefore an absolute requirement. Hence, a genotyping system that can reliably achieve this is necessary. In the case of affected sib-pair analysis without parents, the need for accurate allele calling is even more critical. We describe methods that permit precise sizing of alleles across multiple gels using the fluorescence-based, Applied Biosystems (ABI) genotyping technology and discuss ways to reduce genotyping error rates. Using database utilities, we show how to minimize intergel allele size variation, to combine data effectively from different models of ABI sequencing machines, and automatically bin alleles. The final data can then be converted into a format ready for analysis by statistical genetic packages such as MENDEL. PMID:9049634

  17. Recurrent parent genome recovery analysis in a marker-assisted backcrossing program of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-02-01

    Backcross breeding is the most commonly used method for incorporating a blast resistance gene into a rice cultivar. Linkage between the resistance gene and undesirable units can persist for many generations of backcrossing. Marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) along with marker-assisted selection (MAS) contributes immensely to overcome the main limitation of the conventional breeding and accelerates recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. The MABC approach was employed to incorporate (a) blast resistance gene(s) from the donor parent Pongsu Seribu 1, the blast-resistant local variety in Malaysia, into the genetic background of MR219, a popular high-yielding rice variety that is blast susceptible, to develop a blast-resistant MR219 improved variety. In this perspective, the recurrent parent genome recovery was analyzed in early generations of backcrossing using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Out of 375 SSR markers, 70 markers were found polymorphic between the parents, and these markers were used to evaluate the plants in subsequent generations. Background analysis revealed that the extent of RPG recovery ranged from 75.40% to 91.3% and from 80.40% to 96.70% in BC1F1 and BC2F1 generations, respectively. In this study, the recurrent parent genome content in the selected BC2F2 lines ranged from 92.7% to 97.7%. The average proportion of the recurrent parent in the selected improved line was 95.98%. MAS allowed identification of the plants that are more similar to the recurrent parent for the loci evaluated in backcross generations. The application of MAS with the MABC breeding program accelerated the recovery of the RP genome, reducing the number of generations and the time for incorporating resistance against rice blast. PMID:25553855

  18. Analysis of case-parent trios at a locus with a deletion allele: association of GSTM1 with autism

    PubMed Central

    Buyske, Steven; Williams, Tanishia A; Mars, Audrey E; Stenroos, Edward S; Ming, Sue X; Wang, Rong; Sreenath, Madhura; Factura, Marivic F; Reddy, Chitra; Lambert, George H; Johnson, William G

    2006-01-01

    Background Certain loci on the human genome, such as glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), do not permit heterozygotes to be reliably determined by commonly used methods. Association of such a locus with a disease is therefore generally tested with a case-control design. When subjects have already been ascertained in a case-parent design however, the question arises as to whether the data can still be used to test disease association at such a locus. Results A likelihood ratio test was constructed that can be used with a case-parents design but has somewhat less power than a Pearson's chi-squared test that uses a case-control design. The test is illustrated on a novel dataset showing a genotype relative risk near 2 for the homozygous GSTM1 deletion genotype and autism. Conclusion Although the case-control design will remain the mainstay for a locus with a deletion, the likelihood ratio test will be useful for such a locus analyzed as part of a larger case-parent study design. The likelihood ratio test has the advantage that it can incorporate complete and incomplete case-parent trios as well as independent cases and controls. Both analyses support (p = 0.046 for the proposed test, p = 0.028 for the case-control analysis) an association of the homozygous GSTM1 deletion genotype with autism. PMID:16472391

  19. A new Xist allele driven by a constitutively active promoter is dominated by Xist locus environment and exhibits the parent-of-origin effects.

    PubMed

    Amakawa, Yuko; Sakata, Yuka; Hoki, Yuko; Arata, Satoru; Shioda, Seiji; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Sado, Takashi

    2015-12-15

    The dosage difference of X-linked genes between the sexes in mammals is compensated for by genetic inactivation of one of the X chromosomes in XX females. A noncoding RNA transcribed from the Xist gene at the onset of X chromosome inactivation coats the X chromosome in cis and induces chromosome-wide heterochromatinization. Here, we report a new Xist allele (Xist(CAG)) driven by a CAG promoter, which is known to be constitutively active in many types of cells. The paternal transmission of Xist(CAG) resulted in the preferential inactivation of the targeted paternal X (Xp) not only in the extra-embryonic but also the embryonic lineage, whereas maternal transmission ended with embryonic lethality at the early postimplantation stage with a phenotype that resembled mutant embryos carrying a maternal deficiency in Tsix, an antisense negative regulator of Xist, in both sexes. Interestingly, we found that the upregulation of Xist(CAG) in preimplantation embryos temporally differed depending on its parental origin: its expression started at the 4- to 8-cell stages when paternally inherited, and Xist(CAG) was upregulated at the blastocyst stage when maternally inherited. This might indicate that the Xist locus on Xp is permissive to transcription, but the Xist locus on the maternal X (Xm) is not. We extrapolated from these findings that the maternal Xist allele might manifest a chromatin structure inaccessible by transcription factors relative to the paternal allele. This might underlie the mechanism for the maternal repression of Xist at the early cleavage stage when Tsix expression has not yet occurred on Xm. PMID:26511926

  20. Utility testing of an apple skin color MdMYB1 marker in two progenies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reported allele-specific dCAP PCR marker associated with apple fruit red skin color was tested in 18 elite breeding parents and two apple cross populations. Among all tested cultivars except one, a consistent relationship was observed between red fruit color and the presence of allele. In both pop...

  1. Using microsatellite DNA markers to determine the genetic identity of parental clones used in the Louisiana sugarcane breeding program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane propagates asexually through vegetative cuttings. To validate the genetic identity of sugarcane clones during shipping and handling, we produced molecular fingerprints based on 21 microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers for 116 Louisiana parental clones that were included in the crossing program...

  2. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  3. Identification of Coupling and Repulsion Phase DNA Marker Associated With an Allele of a Gene Conferring Host Plant Resistance to Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV) in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp.)

    PubMed Central

    Daspute, Abhijit; Fakrudin, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigeonpea Sterility Mosaic Disease (PSMD) is an important foliar disease caused by Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV) which is transmitted by eriophyid mites (Aceria cajani Channabasavanna). In present study, a F2 mapping population comprising 325 individuals was developed by crossing PSMD susceptible genotype (Gullyal white) and PSMD resistant genotype (BSMR 736). We identified a set of 32 out of 300 short decamer random DNA markers that showed polymorphism between Gullyal white and BSMR 736 parents. Among them, eleven DNA markers showed polymorphism including coupling and repulsion phase type of polymorphism across the parents. Bulked Segregant Analysis (BSA), revealed that the DNA marker, IABTPPN7, produced a single coupling phase marker (IABTPPN7414) and a repulsion phase marker (IABTPPN7983) co-segregating with PSMD reaction. Screening of 325 F2 population using IABTPPN7 revealed that the repulsion phase marker, IABTPPN7983, was co-segregating with the PSMD responsive SV1 at a distance of 23.9 cM for Bidar PPSMV isolate. On the other hand, the coupling phase marker IABTPPN7414 did not show any linkage with PSMD resistance. Additionally, single marker analysis both IABTPPN7983 (P<0.0001) and IABTPPN 7414 (P<0.0001) recorded a significant association with the PSMD resistance and explained a phenotypic variance of 31 and 36% respectively in F2 population. The repulsion phase marker, IABTPPN7983, could be of use in Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS) in the PPSMV resistance breeding programmes of pigeonpea. PMID:25774108

  4. A Critical Proton MR Spectroscopy Marker of Alzheimer's Disease Early Neurodegenerative Change: Low Hippocampal NAA/Cr Ratio Impacts APOE ɛ4 Mexico City Children and Their Parents.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Melo-Sánchez, Gastón; Rodríguez-Díaz, Joel; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Styner, Martin; Mukherjee, Partha S; Lin, Weili; Jewells, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Severe air pollution exposures produce systemic, respiratory, myocardial, and brain inflammation and Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmarks in clinically healthy children. We tested whether hippocampal metabolite ratios are associated with contrasting levels of air pollution, APOE, and body mass index (BMI) in paired healthy children and one parent sharing the same APOE alleles. We used 1H-MRS to interrogate bilateral hippocampal single-voxel in 57 children (12.45 ± 3.4 years) and their 48 parents (37.5 ± 6.78 years) from a low pollution city versus Mexico City (MC). NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr metabolite ratios were analyzed. The right hippocampus NAA/Cr ratio was significantly different between cohorts (p = 0.007). The NAA/Cr ratio in right hippocampus in controls versus APOE ɛ4 MC children and in left hippocampus in MC APOE ɛ4 parents versus their children was significantly different after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI (p = 0.027 and 0.01, respectively). The NAA/Cr ratio is considered reflective of neuronal density/functional integrity/loss of synapses/higher pTau burden, thus a significant decrease in hippocampal NAA/Cr ratios may constitute a spectral marker of early neurodegeneration in young urbanites. Decreases in NAA/Cr correlate well with cognitive function, behavioral symptoms, and dementia severity; thus, since the progression of AD starts decades before clinical diagnosis, our findings support the hypothesis that under chronic exposures to fine particulate matter and ozone above the standards, neurodegenerative processes start in childhood and APOE ɛ4 carriers are at higher risk. Gene and environmental factors are critical in the development of AD and the identification and neuroprotection of young urbanites at high risk must become a public health priority. PMID:26402110

  5. Segregation analysis of microsatellite (SSR) markers in sugarcane polyploids.

    PubMed

    Lu, X; Zhou, H; Pan, Y-B; Chen, C Y; Zhu, J R; Chen, P H; Li, Y-R; Cai, Q; Chen, R K

    2015-01-01

    No information is available on segregation analysis of DNA markers involving both pollen and self-progeny. Therefore, we used capillary electrophoresis- and fluorescence-based DNA fingerprinting together with single pollen collection and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to investigate simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker segregation among 964 single pollens and 288 self-progenies (S1) of sugarcane cultivar LCP 85-384. Twenty SSR DNA fragments (alleles) were amplified by five polymorphic SSR markers. Only one non-parental SSR allele was observed in 2392 PCRs. SSR allele inheritance was in accordance with Mendelian laws of segregation and independent assortment. Highly significant correlation coefficients were found between frequencies of observed and expected genotypes in pollen and S1 populations. Within the S1 population, the most frequent genotype of each SSR marker was the parental genotype of the same marker. The number of genotypes was higher in pollen than S1 population. PIC values of the five SSR markers were greater in pollen than S1 populations. Eleven of 20 SSR alleles (55%) were segregated in accordance with Mendelian segregation ratios expected from pollen and S1 populations of a 2n = 10x polyploid. Six of 20 SSR alleles were segregated in a 3:1 (presence:absence) ratio and were simplex markers. Four and one alleles were segregated in 77:4 and 143:1 ratios and considered duplex and triplex markers, respectively. Segregation ratios of remaining alleles were unexplainable. The results provide information about selection of crossing parents, estimation of seedling population optimal size, and promotion of efficient selection, which may be valuable for sugarcane breeders. PMID:26782486

  6. Psychosocial and Biological Markers of Daily Lives of Midlife Parents of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Almeida, David M.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Savla, Jyoti; Stawski, Robert S.; Hong, Jinkuk; Taylor, Julie Lounds

    2009-01-01

    Using daily telephone interviews, 82 midlife parents (mean age = 57.4) of children with disabilities (mean age = 29.9) were compared with a closely matched sample of unaffected parents (N = 82) to elucidate the daily experience of non-normative parenting. In addition, salivary cortisol samples were obtained to examine whether parents of children

  7. Paternity identification in sugarcane polycrosses by using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xavier, M A; Pinto, L R; Fávero, T M; Perecin, D; Carlini-Garcia, L A; Landell, M G A

    2014-01-01

    Although polycrosses have been used to test the potential of cross-combination of a large number of sugarcane parents, the male parent of the half-sib progenies produced is unknown. The present study aimed to integrate the molecular marker technology to the sugarcane polycross approach by the application of microsatellite markers to identify the male parent of 41 elite clones derived from polycross families. Ten microsatellite [single sequence repeats (SSRs)] primer pairs were used to identify the most likely male parent considering markers present in the selected clone but absent in the female parent. The number of alleles generated by the 10 microsatellite primer pairs ranged from 102 (cross-pollination lantern 4) to 120 (cross-pollination lantern 2) with an average of 113.25 alleles per SSR. The average genetic similarity among the involved parents in the polycrosses was 45.9%. The results of the analysis of the SSR markers absent in the female parent and present only in the selected clone as well as the genetic similarity values allowed the identification of the most likely male parent in 73% of the total clones evaluated and also to detect probable contaminations. The obtained results highlight the importance of using molecular marker technology in the identification and confirmation of the male parent of high-performance clones derived from polycrosses in the sugarcane breeding programs. PMID:24737475

  8. Childhood trauma and parental style: Relationship with markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and aggression in healthy and personality disordered subjects.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Jennifer R; Lee, Royce; Gozal, David; Coussons-Read, Mary; Coccaro, Emil F

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that early life trauma is associated with elevations in circulating markers of inflammation in human subjects. History of aggression as a behavior, or aggression as a personality trait, is also associated with elevations of these inflammatory markers. Since early life trauma is associated with the development and maintenance of aggression in later life we examined the relationship of early life adversity, plasma inflammation markers (IL-6 and CRP) and oxidative stress markers (8-OH-DG and 8-ISO), and aggression in adult subjects with (n=79) and without (n=55) personality disorder. We used a series of mediated and moderated path models to test whether the effects of early adversity on later aggression may be mediated through markers of inflammation. Childhood abuse and parental control were associated with basal IL-6 and CRP concentrations. Path modeling suggested that childhood abuse was associated with aggression indirectly through CRP while parental control influenced aggression indirectly through IL-6 and CRP. Furthermore, these effects were independent of the effect of current depression. The results suggest that disruption of inflammatory processes represent one pathway by which early adversity influences aggression. PMID:26423894

  9. ZmGrp3: identification of a novel marker for root initiation in maize and development of a robust assay to quantify allele-specific contribution to gene expression in hybrids.

    PubMed

    Woll, Katrin; Dressel, Angela; Sakai, Hajime; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2006-11-01

    This study comprises a comprehensive gene expression analysis of the root tip specific maize gene ZmGrp3. In the first part of this paper expression of ZmGrp3 was studied in maize inbred lines. First, RNA in situ hybridization experiments confined the expression of ZmGrp3 to the columella and the epidermis of all embryonic and postembryonic root types. Second, Northern-blot analyses of the maize root initiation mutants rtcs and lrt1 revealed that the ZmGrp3 gene is not expressed prior to root initiation, thus providing a novel marker for this developmental process. Finally, a comprehensive expression profiling in 42 tissues via the Lynx MPSS system revealed almost exclusive expression of ZmGrp3 in maize roots. In the second part of this survey, ZmGrp3 expression was assayed in maize hybrids. In this context, a novel approach to quantify allele-specific contribution to gene expression in maize hybrids was developed. This assay combines RT-PCR amplification of polymorphisms between two alleles and subsequent quantification of allele-specific gene expression via a combination of didesoxyterminator assays and capillary electrophoresis. Allelic expression of the ZmGrp3 gene in six reciprocal hybrids generated from three ZmGrp3 alleles was analyzed via a new statistical mixed model approach. PMID:16937154

  10. Parenting

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents, people are always ready to offer advice. Parenting tips, parents' survival guides, dos, don'ts, shoulds ... right" way to be a good parent. Good parenting includes Keeping your child safe Showing affection and ...

  11. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele associations in an Albanian patient population with rheumatoid arthritis: correlations with the specific autoantibody markers and inter-population DRB1 allele frequency variability.

    PubMed

    Prifti-Kurti, Margarita; Nunes, José Manuel; Shyti, Erkena; Ylli, Zamira; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Sulcebe, Genc

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis and its specific autoantibodies varies in different populations. This variability depends on the genetic polymorphism of the immune response genes among which the HLA system plays a major role. In this context, we studied the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 first-level allele frequencies in 100 Albanian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and taking into account their rheumatoid factor (RF) and anticitrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) serologic subgroups, we compared them with the respective frequencies in a population of 191 Albanian individuals without known pathology. No differences were found between the controls and the RA patient group as a whole, but three statistically significant differences were found: an increase in DRB1*04 among ACPA+, RF+ and ACPA+/RF+ patients, a significant decrease in DRB1*11 among ACPA+/RF+ and also a decrease in DRB1*13 among RF+ patient subgroups. Comparing allele frequencies of putatively associated RA alleles in different European populations revealed a significant negative correlation between the RA predisposing DRB1*04 and protective DRB1*11 allele frequencies. A statistically significant correlation was also found between RA prevalence rates and DRB1*04 as well as DRB1*11 frequencies. The relatively low frequencies of DRB1*04 and high DRB1*11 in the Albanian population might explain the rather low positivity rate of ACPA and RF antibodies among the Albanian RA patients. These specific association patterns suggest that this first study of RA in an Albanian population should be followed up to include second level or higher definition of HLA alleles and to compare RA patterns among European populations. PMID:24381092

  12. Usage of Conventional PCR Technology for the Detection of HLA-B27 Allele: A Significant Molecular Marker of Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Narotam; Sharma, Veena; Masood, Tariq; Nautiyal, Satish Chandra; Sailwal, Shivani; Singh, Rajesh K; Kushwaha, Rajeev K; Singh, R K

    2013-04-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that has been linked to the human leukocyte antigen class I allele HLA-B27. More than 90 % of patients with ankylosing spondylitis possess the HLA-B27 allele, but only 1 % of people with HLA-B27 develop the disease. Ankylosing spondylitis predominately affects young males. The present study was planned to find out the involvement of HLA-B27 specific allele in relation to age and sex in symptomatic suspected patients of ankylosing spondylitis using conventional PCR technology. Forty symptomatic patients of ankylosing spondylitis were included in the present study. SSP-PCR technique was used to detect the HLA-B27 specific allele. This study showed (out of 40 symptomatic suspected cases of ankylosing spondylitis only 12 patients were detected positive with HLA-B27 allele, while remaining 28 were negative) that the positivity rate for ankylosing spondylitis with HLA-B27 allele is low. Furthermore, it was observed that the males above 50 years are more prone to develop AS with HLA-B27 specific allele. It could be concluded that the conventional PCR technology is a rapid, sensitive, and confirmatory method for the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:24426208

  13. The normal huntington disease (HD) allele, or a closely linked gene, influences age at onset of HD

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, L.A. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Cupples, L.A. ); Conneally, P.M. ); Gusella, J.F. ); Myers, R.H. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors evaluated the hypothesis that Huntington disease (HD) is influenced by the normal HD allele by comparing transmission patterns of genetically linked markers at the D4S10 locus in the normal parent against age at onset in the affected offspring. Analysis of information from 21 sibships in 14 kindreds showed a significant tendency for sibs who have similar onset ages to share the same D4S10 allele from the normal parent. Affected sibs who inherited different D4S10 alleles from the normal parent tended to have more variable ages at onset. These findings suggest that the expression of HD is modulated by the normal HD allele or by a closely linked locus. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Psychosocial and Biological Markers of Daily Lives of Midlife Parents of Children with Disabilities*

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Almeida, David M.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Savla, Jyoti; Stawski, Robert S.; Hong, Jinkuk; Taylor, Julie Lounds

    2009-01-01

    Using daily telephone interviews, 82 midlife parents (mean age = 57.4) of children with disabilities (mean age = 29.9) were compared with a closely matched sample of unaffected parents (n = 82) to elucidate the daily experience of nonnormative parenting. In addition, salivary cortisol samples were obtained to examine whether parents of children with disabilities had dysregulated diurnal rhythms and the extent to which the amount of time spent with children was associated with divergent patterns of cortisol expression. We found that parents of children with disabilities had similar patterns of daily time use and similar likelihood of positive daily events as the comparison group, but they had elevated levels of stress, negative affect, and physical symptoms, all reported on a daily basis. In addition, their diurnal rhythm of cortisol expression differed significantly from the comparison group, a pattern that was strongest for parents of children with disabilities on days when they spent more time with their children. PMID:19413131

  15. The CYP4502D6 *4 and *6 alleles are the molecular genetic markers for drug response: implications in colchicine non-responder FMF patients.

    PubMed

    Yalcıntepe, Sinem; Ozdemır, Ozturk; Sılan, Coskun; Ozen, Filiz; Uludag, Ahmet; Candan, Ferhan; Sılan, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    The cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the oxidative biotransformation of the xenobiotics, carcinogens and various clinically important drugs. Patients are evaluated in three sub-groups of extensive (EM), intermediate (IM) and poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes due to their drug-metabolising ability for the target CYP2D6 gene. Colchicine non-responsive FMF patients were prospectively genotyped for the major CYP2D6 alleles in the current study. Major CYP2D6 alleles of *1, *3, *4, *5, and *6 were genotyped for 30 responsive and 60 non-responsive FMF patients by multiplex PCR-based reverse-hybridization StripAssay and real-time PCR methods. DNA banks isolated from blood-EDTA were retrospectively used in the current patients and results were compared statistically. Increased CYP2D6 *4 and *6 allele frequencies were highly detected in the colchicine non-responsive FMF patients when compared to the responsive group. Results showed the frequencies of major CYP2D6 *1(wild), *3(2637A > delA), *4(G1934A), *5(total gene deletion) and *6(1707T del) alleles in 0.550, 0.042, 0.158, 0.025 and 0.225 for non-responder and 0.880 and 0.120 (CYP2D6*1 and *4) for the responder groups, respectively. Despite small sample size, this study suggests that there is an association between CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*6 alleles and drug intoxicants in colchicine non-responder FMF patients. PMID:25645282

  16. Allelic variation of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes located on chromosomes 2A and 2D and development of functional markers for the PPO genes in common wheat.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity is highly related to the undesirable browning of wheat-based end products, especially Asian noodles. Characterization of PPO genes and the development of their functional markers are of great importance for marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding. In the prese...

  17. Bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers identify hybridization between rainbow trout and cutthroat trout subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Eight polymerase chain reaction primer sets amplifying bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers were developed that differentiate between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and various cutthroat trout (O. clarki) subspecies. The primers were tested within known F1 and first generation hybrid backcrosses and were shown to amplify codominantly within hybrids. Heterozygous individuals also amplified a slower migrating band that was a heteroduplex, caused by the annealing of polymerase chain reaction products from both species. These primer sets have numerous advantages for native cutthroat trout conservation including statistical genetic analyses of known crosses and simple hybrid identification.

  18. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR −129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that −129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with −129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than −129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo. PMID:26370050

  19. Microsatellite (simple sequence repeat) marker-based paternity analysis of a seven-parent sugarcane polycross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not feasible to make all possible cross combinations among elite parents used in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeding programs, particularly within a single year. Hence, the polycross approach has been used to maximize the number of cross combinations that can be represented among progeny. Th...

  20. Clinic-Referred Mothers' Autobiographical Narratives as Markers of Their Parenting Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowinski, Katherine S.; Wahler, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Forty clinic-referred mothers completed questionnaires describing their children's problems and the mothers' parenting styles. In addition, each mother told three stories about their personal experiences in child care and one story about being cared for in their families of origin. Each story was transcribed and rated for coherence on six…

  1. Clinic-Referred Mothers' Autobiographical Narratives as Markers of Their Parenting Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowinski, Katherine S.; Wahler, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Forty clinic-referred mothers completed questionnaires describing their children's problems and the mothers' parenting styles. In addition, each mother told three stories about their personal experiences in child care and one story about being cared for in their families of origin. Each story was transcribed and rated for coherence on six

  2. Allelic Exchange.

    PubMed

    Lehman, McKenzie K; Bose, Jeffrey L; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2016-01-01

    Methods used to understand the function of a gene/protein are one of the hallmarks of modern molecular genetics. The ability to genetically manipulate bacteria has become a fundamental tool in studying these organisms and while basic cloning has become a routine task in molecular biology laboratories, generating directed mutations can be a daunting task. This chapter describes the method of allelic exchange in Staphylococcus aureus using temperature-sensitive plasmids that have successfully produced a variety of chromosomal mutations, including in-frame deletions, insertion of antibiotic-resistance cassettes, and even single-nucleotide point mutations. PMID:25646609

  3. Generation and characterization of a novel neural crest marker allele, Inka1-LacZ, reveals a role for Inka1 in mouse neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Bethany S.; Sargent, Thomas D.; Williams, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies identified Inka1 as a gene regulated by AP-2α in the neural crest required for craniofacial morphogenesis in fish and frog. Here, we extend the analysis of Inka1 function and regulation to the mouse by generating a LacZ knock-in allele. Inka1-LacZ allele expression occurs in the cephalic mesenchyme, heart, and paraxial mesoderm prior to E8.5. Subsequently, expression is observed in the migratory neural crest cells and their derivatives. Consistent with expression of Inka1 in tissues of the developing head during neurulation, a low percentage of Inka1−/− mice show exencephaly while the remainder are viable and fertile. Further studies indicate that AP-2α is not required for Inka1 expression in the mouse, and suggest that there is no significant genetic interaction between these two factors during embryogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that while the expression domain of Inka1 is conserved among vertebrates, its function and regulation are not. PMID:20175189

  4. Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lao Parents and Teachers Association, Minneapolis, MN.

    This collection presents advice to help parents help their children succeed in school. Information sheets are included from many sources, in English and translated into Lao by the Lao Parents and Teachers Association. The emphasis is on the elementary grades, although some of the materials are useful for parents of high school students. The…

  5. Susceptibility effects of GABA receptor subunit alpha-2 (GABRA2) variants and parental monitoring on externalizing behavior trajectories: Risk and protection conveyed by the minor allele.

    PubMed

    Trucco, Elisa M; Villafuerte, Sandra; Heitzeg, Mary M; Burmeister, Margit; Zucker, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Understanding factors increasing susceptibility to social contexts and predicting psychopathology can help identify targets for prevention. Persistently high externalizing behavior in adolescence is predictive of psychopathology in adulthood. Parental monitoring predicts low externalizing behavior, yet youth likely vary in the degree to which they are affected by parents. Genetic variants of GABA receptor subunit alpha-2 (GABRA2) may increase susceptibility to parental monitoring, thus impacting externalizing trajectories. We had several objectives: (a) to determine whether GABRA2 (rs279827, rs279826, rs279858) moderates the relationship between a component of parental monitoring, parental knowledge, and externalizing trajectories; (b) to test the form of this interaction to assess whether GABRA2 variants reflect risk (diathesis-stress) or susceptibility (differential susceptibility) factors; and (c) to clarify GABRA2 associations on the development of problem behavior. This prospective study (N = 504) identified three externalizing trajectory classes (i.e., low, decreasing, and high) across adolescence. A GABRA2 × Parental Monitoring effect on class membership was observed, such that A-carriers were largely unaffected by parental monitoring, whereas class membership for those with the GG genotype was affected by parental monitoring. Findings support differential susceptibility in GABRA2. PMID:25797587

  6. Parental somatic and germ-line mosaicism for a multiexon deletion with unusual endpoints in a type III collagen (COL3Al) allele produces ehlers-danlos syndrome type IV in the heterozygous offspring

    SciTech Connect

    McGookey Milewicz, D.; Witz, A.M.; Byers, P.H. ); Smith, A.C.M.; Manchester, D.K.; Waldstein, G. )

    1993-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a dominantly inherited disorder that results from mutation in the type III collagen gene (COL3A1). The authors studied the structure of the COL3A1 gene of an individual with EDS type IV and that of her phenotypically normal parents. The proband was heterozygous for a 2-kb deletion in COL3A1, while her father was mosaic for the same deletion in somatic and germ cells. In fibroblasts from the father, approximately two-fifths of the COL3A1 alleles carried the deletion, but only 10% of the COL3A1 alleles in white blood cells were of the mutant species. The deletion in the mutant allele extended from intron 7 into intron 11. There was a 12-bp direct repeat in intron 7 and intron 11, the latter about 60 bp 5' to the junction. At the breakpoint there was a duplication of 10 bp from intron 11 separated by an insertion of 4 bp contained within the duplicated sequence. The father was mosaic for the deletion so that the gene rearrangement occurred during his early embryonic development prior to lineage allocation. These findings suggest that at least some of the deletions seen in human genes may occur during replication, rather than as a consequence of meiotic crossing-over, and that they thus have a risk for recurrence when observed de novo. 71 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Higher protein diets consumed ad libitum improve cardiovascular risk markers in children of overweight parents from eight European countries.

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Camilla T; Papadaki, Angeliki; Jensen, Signe M; Ritz, Christian; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Hlavaty, Petr; Saris, Wim H M; Martinez, J Alfredo; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Andersen, Malene R; Stender, Steen; Larsen, Thomas M; Astrup, Arne; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2013-06-01

    Dietary strategies to improve early cardiovascular markers in overweight children are needed. We investigated the effect of dietary protein and glycemic index (GI) on cardiovascular markers and metabolic syndrome (MetS) scores in 5- to 18-y-old children of overweight/obese parents from 8 European centers. Families were randomized to 1 of 5 diets consumed ad libitum: high protein (HP) or low protein (LP) combined with high GI (HGI) or low GI (LGI), or a control diet. At 6 centers, families received dietary instruction (instruction centers); at 2 centers, free foods were also provided (supermarket centers). Diet, anthropometry, blood pressure, and serum cardiovascular markers (lipid profile, glucose regulation, and inflammation) were measured in 253 children at baseline, 1 mo, and/or 6 mo. Protein intake was higher in the HP groups (19.9 ± 1.3% energy) than in the LP groups at 6 mo (16.8 ± 1.2% energy) (P = 0.001). The GI was 4.0 points lower (95% CI: 2.1, 6.1) in the LGI compared with the HGI groups (P < 0.001). In the supermarket centers, the HP and LP groups differed more in protein intake than did the groups in the instruction centers (P = 0.009), indicating better compliance. The HP diets evoked a 2.7-cm (95% CI: 0.9, 5.1) smaller waist circumference and a 0.25-mmol/L (95% CI: 0.09, 0.41) lower serum LDL cholesterol compared with the LP diets at 6 mo (P < 0.007). In a separate supermarket center analysis, the HP compared with LP diets reduced waist circumference (P = 0.004), blood pressure (P < 0.01), serum insulin (P = 0.013), and homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (P = 0.016). In the instruction centers, the HP compared with the LP diets reduced LDL cholesterol (P = 0.004). No consistent effect of GI was seen and the MetS scores were not affected. In conclusion, increased protein intake improved cardiovascular markers in high-risk children, particularly in those undergoing most intensive intervention. PMID:23596158

  8. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziff, Barry, Ed.; Hostettler, Karen, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    The newsletter of the California Association for the Gifted includes the following brief articles on parenting: "Your Challenge, Their Lives" (Barry Ziff); "Courage to Be Who I Am, Unafraid" (Elizabeth Meckstroth); "Attribution: A Key to Encouraging More Responsible Behavior in the Gifted" (Saundra Sparling); "A Parent's Perspective" (Carolyn…

  9. Complete sequence of HLA-B27 cDNA identified through the characterization of structural markers unique to the HLA-A, -B, and -C allelic series

    SciTech Connect

    Szoets, H.; Reithmueller, G.; Weiss, E.; Meo, T.

    1986-03-01

    Antigen HLA-B27 is a high-risk genetic factor with respect to a group of rheumatoid disorders, especially ankylosing spondylitis. A cDNA library was constructed from an autozygous B-cell line expressing HLA-B27, HLA-Cw1, and the previously cloned HLA-A2 antigen. Clones detected with an HLA probe were isolated and sorted into homology groups by differential hybridization and restriction maps. Nucleotide sequencing allowed the unambiguous assignment of cDNAs to HLA-A, -B, and -C loci. The HLA-B27 mRNA has the structure features and the codon variability typical of an HLA class I transcript but it specifies two uncommon amino acid replacements: a cysteine in position 67 and a serine in position 131. The latter substitution may have functional consequences, because it occurs in a conserved region and at a position invariably occupied by a species-specific arginine in humans and lysine in mice. The availability of the complete sequence of HLA-B27 and of the partial sequence of HLA-Cw1 allows the recognition of locus-specific sequence markers, particularly, but not exclusively, in the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains.

  10. Association between AgI-CA alleles and severity of autosomal recessive proximal spina lmuscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    DiDonato, C.J.; Carpten, J.D.; Fuerst, P.; Ingraham, S.E.; Mendell, J.R.; Burghes, A.H.M.; Morgan, K.; Prescott, G.; Simard, L.R.; McPherson, J.D.

    1994-12-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been mapped to an 850-kb interval on 5q11.2-q13.3, between the centromeric D5S823 and telomeric D5S557 markers. We report a new complex marker, Ag1-CA, that lies in this interval, whose primers produce one, two, or rarely three amplification-fragment-length variants (AFLVs) per allele. Class I chromosomes are those which amplify a single AFLV allele, and class II chromosomes are those which amplify an allele with two or three AFLVs. Ag1-CA shows highly significant allelic association with type I SMA in both the French Canadian (Hopital Sainte-Justine (HSJ)) and American (Ohio State University (OSU)) populations (P < .0001). Significant association between the Ag1-CA genotype and disease severity was also observed. Type I patients were predominantly homozygous for class I chromosomes (P = .0003 OSU; P = 0.0012 HSJ), whereas the majority of type II patients were heterozygous for class I and II chromosomes (P = .0014 OSU; P = .001 HSJ). There was no significant difference in Ag1-CA genotype frequencies between type III patients (P = .5 OSU; P = .25 HSJ) and the paired normal chromosomes from both carrier parents. Our results indicate that Ag1-CA is the most closely linked marker to SMA and defines the critical candidate-gene region. Finally, we have proposed a model that should be taken into consideration when screening candidates SMA genes.

  11. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  12. The inheritance of genetic markers in microspore-derived plants of barley Hordeum vulgare L.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D M; Chalmers, K; Waugh, R; Forster, B P; Thomas, W T; Caligari, P D; Powell, W

    1991-04-01

    Biochemical, molecular and morphological markers have been used to monitor the segregation of alleles at major gene loci in microspore-derived lines of four spring barley crosses and their parents. Significant deviations from the expected Mendelian ratios were observed for four of the ten markers studied in the cross. Distorted ratios were associated with loci located on chromosomes 4H and 6H. The differential transmission of alleles was in favour of the responsive parent (Blenheim) used in the anther culture studies. For the α-Amy-1 locus on chromosome 6H, the preferential transmission of Blenheim alleles was most pronounced in the haploid regenerants that were colchicine treated. These results are discussed in relation to the genetic control of androgenetic response in barley and with respect to the exploitation of another culture in barley improvement. PMID:24221313

  13. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochim, Lisa; Mueller, Andrea

    This guide contains 15 learning activities that can be used in parenting classes, especially for adults with limited literacy skills. Activities include quotations for discussion and suggestions for conducting group discussions and writing lessons. The following activities are included: interpreting quotations about raising children; positive…

  14. Rapid pyramiding major resistance genes into parental lines in tomato hybrid breeding employing marker-assisted backcrossing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The success of marker-assisted pyramiding major resistance genes depends upon several factors, including the closeness between the markers and the target gene, the number of target genes to be pyramided, the kind of molecular markers to be used, and available technical facilities. This talk will dis...

  15. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele-workbench. Additionally, all software is ready for immediate use from an Atmosphere Virtual Machine Image available from the iPlant Collaborative (www.iplantcollaborative.org). PMID:25541944

  16. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele-workbench. Additionally, all software is ready for immediate use from an Atmosphere Virtual Machine Image available from the iPlant Collaborative (www.iplantcollaborative.org). PMID:25541944

  17. Mining the human phenome using allelic scores that index biological intermediates.

    PubMed

    Evans, David M; Brion, Marie Jo A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Munafò, Marcus; Whitfield, John B; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Timpson, Nicholas J; St Pourcain, Beate; Lawlor, Debbie A; Martin, Nicholas G; Dehghan, Abbas; Hirschhorn, Joel; Smith, George Davey

    2013-10-01

    It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We compared the explanatory ability of allelic scores in terms of their capacity to proxy for the intermediate of interest, and the extent to which they associated with disease. We found that allelic scores derived from known variants and allelic scores derived from hundreds of thousands of genetic markers explained significant portions of the variance in biological intermediates of interest, and many of these scores showed expected correlations with disease. Genome-wide allelic scores however tended to lack specificity suggesting that they should be used with caution and perhaps only to proxy biological intermediates for which there are no known individual variants. Power calculations confirm the feasibility of extending our strategy to the analysis of tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes in large genome-wide meta-analyses. We conclude that our method represents a simple way in which potentially tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes could be screened for causal relationships with disease without having to expensively measure these variables in individual disease collections. PMID:24204319

  18. Imputation of microsatellite alleles from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification across multiple Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Matthew C.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Wiggans, George R.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Weber, Kristina L.; Penedo, Cecilia T.; Berry, Donagh P.; Flynn, John; Garcia, Jose F.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Albuquerque, Milla; Silva, Marcos V. G. B.; Machado, Marco A.; Coffey, Mike; Moore, Kirsty; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Genestout, Lucie; Mazza, Raffaele; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Simpson, Barry; Marques, Elisa; McEwan, John C.; Cromie, Andrew; Coutinho, Luiz L.; Kuehn, Larry A.; Keele, John W.; Piper, Emily K.; Cook, Jim; Williams, Robert; Van Tassell, Curtis P.

    2013-01-01

    To assist cattle producers transition from microsatellite (MS) to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for parental verification we previously devised an effective and inexpensive method to impute MS alleles from SNP haplotypes. While the reported method was verified with only a limited data set (N = 479) from Brown Swiss, Guernsey, Holstein, and Jersey cattle, some of the MS-SNP haplotype associations were concordant across these phylogenetically diverse breeds. This implied that some haplotypes predate modern breed formation and remain in strong linkage disequilibrium. To expand the utility of MS allele imputation across breeds, MS and SNP data from more than 8000 animals representing 39 breeds (Bos taurus and B. indicus) were used to predict 9410 SNP haplotypes, incorporating an average of 73 SNPs per haplotype, for which alleles from 12 MS markers could be accurately be imputed. Approximately 25% of the MS-SNP haplotypes were present in multiple breeds (N = 2 to 36 breeds). These shared haplotypes allowed for MS imputation in breeds that were not represented in the reference population with only a small increase in Mendelian inheritance inconsistancies. Our reported reference haplotypes can be used for any cattle breed and the reported methods can be applied to any species to aid the transition from MS to SNP genetic markers. While ~91% of the animals with imputed alleles for 12 MS markers had ≤1 Mendelian inheritance conflicts with their parents' reported MS genotypes, this figure was 96% for our reference animals, indicating potential errors in the reported MS genotypes. The workflow we suggest autocorrects for genotyping errors and rare haplotypes, by MS genotyping animals whose imputed MS alleles fail parentage verification, and then incorporating those animals into the reference dataset. PMID:24065982

  19. Combined use of maternal, paternal and bi-parental genetic markers for the identification of wolf-dog hybrids.

    PubMed

    Vilà, C; Walker, C; Sundqvist, A-K; Flagstad, Ø; Andersone, Z; Casulli, A; Kojola, I; Valdmann, H; Halverson, J; Ellegren, H

    2003-01-01

    The identification of hybrids is often a subject of primary concern for the development of conservation and management strategies, but can be difficult when the hybridizing species are closely related and do not possess diagnostic genetic markers. However, the combined use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), autosomal and Y chromosome genetic markers may allow the identification of hybrids and of the direction of hybridization. We used these three types of markers to genetically characterize one possible wolf-dog hybrid in the endangered Scandinavian wolf population. We first characterized the variability of mtDNA and Y chromosome markers in Scandinavian wolves as well as in neighboring wolf populations and in dogs. While the mtDNA data suggested that the target sample could correspond to a wolf, its Y chromosome type had not been observed before in Scandinavian wolves. We compared the genotype of the target sample at 18 autosomal microsatellite markers with those expected in pure specimens and in hybrids using assignment tests. The combined results led to the conclusion that the animal was a hybrid between a Scandinavian female wolf and a male dog. This finding confirms that inter-specific hybridization between wolves and dogs can occur in natural wolf populations. A possible correlation between hybridization and wolf population density and disturbance deserves further research. PMID:12522421

  20. Genetic association mapping based on discordant sib pairs: the discordant-alleles test.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, M; Langefeld, C D

    1998-04-01

    Family-based tests of association provide the opportunity to test for an association between a disease and a genetic marker. Such tests avoid false-positive results produced by population stratification, so that evidence for association may be interpreted as evidence for linkage or causation. Several methods that use family-based controls have been proposed, including the haplotype relative risk, the transmission-disequilibrium test, and affected family-based controls. However, because these methods require genotypes on affected individuals and their parents, they are not ideally suited to the study of late-onset diseases. In this paper, we develop several family-based tests of association that use discordant sib pairs (DSPs) in which one sib is affected with a disease and the other sib is not. These tests are based on statistics that compare counts of alleles or genotypes or that test for symmetry in tables of alleles or genotypes. We describe the use of a permutation framework to assess the significance of these statistics. These DSP-based tests provide the same general advantages as parent-offspring trio-based tests, while being applicable to essentially any disease; they may also be tailored to particular hypotheses regarding the genetic model. We compare the statistical properties of our DSP-based tests by computer simulation and illustrate their use with an application to Alzheimer disease and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Our results suggest that the discordant-alleles test, which compares the numbers of nonmatching alleles in DSPs, is the most powerful of the tests we considered, for a wide class of disease models and marker types. Finally, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of the DSP design for genetic association mapping. PMID:9529345

  1. Analysis of rice blast resistance in rice breeding parents from USA using molecular markers and pathogenicity assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease is caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. The Pi-ta gene in rice is effective in preventing infections by strains of M. oryzae that carry AVR-Pita1 in a gene for gene specificity. In the present study, two dominant markers YL153/YL154 and YL155/YL87 derived from diffe...

  2. Opportunities of marker-assisted selection for rice fragrance through marker-trait association analysis of microsatellites and gene-based markers.

    PubMed

    Golestan Hashemi, F S; Rafii, M Y; Razi Ismail, M; Mohamed, M T M; Rahim, H A; Latif, M A; Aslani, F

    2015-09-01

    Developing fragrant rice through marker-assisted/aided selection (MAS) is an economical and profitable approach worldwide for the enrichment of an elite genetic background with a pleasant aroma. The PCR-based DNA markers that distinguish the alleles of major fragrance genes in rice have been synthesised to develop rice scent biofortification through MAS. Thus, the present study examined the aroma biofortification potential of these co-dominant markers in a germplasm panel of 189 F2 progeny developed from crosses between a non-aromatic variety (MR84) and a highly aromatic but low-yielding variety (MRQ74) to determine the most influential diagnostic markers for fragrance biofortification. The SSRs and functional DNA markers RM5633 (on chromosome 4), RM515, RM223, L06, NKSbad2, FMbadh2-E7, BADEX7-5, Aro7 and SCU015RM (on chromosome 8) were highly associated with the 2AP (2-acetyl-1-pyrroline) content across the population. The alleles traced via these markers were also in high linkage disequilibrium (R(2) > 0.70) and explained approximately 12.1, 27.05, 27.05, 27.05, 25.42, 25.42, 20.53, 20.43 and 20.18% of the total phenotypic variation observed for these biomarkers, respectively. F2 plants harbouring the favourable alleles of these effective markers produced higher levels of fragrance. Hence, these rice plants can be used as donor parents to increase the development of fragrance-biofortified tropical rice varieties adapted to growing conditions and consumer preferences, thus contributing to the global rice market. PMID:25865409

  3. Development and validation of a PCR-based marker assay for negative selection of the HMW glutenin allele Glu-B1-1d (Bx-6) in wheat.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, G; Felsenstein, F G; Wenzel, G

    2004-09-01

    Polymorphisms between the coding sequences of high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin x-type genes at the Glu-1 locus were used to amplify Glu-1B x-type-specific PCR fragments. PCR analysis in a wheat cultivar subset carrying different Glu-1B x-type alleles resulted in PCR fragments that differed in size for Glu-B1-1d (B-x6) and non -Glu-B1-1d (B-x6) genotypes. Subsequent sequencing analysis revealed a 15-bp in-frame insertion in the coding regions of all Glu-B1-1d (B-x6) genotypes which allowed the development of a B-x6-specific PCR assay for high-throughput allele sizing by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The assay was validated in a set of 86 German wheat cultivars, and genotyping data unequivocally verified the presence of HMW glutenin subunits GLU-B1-1D (Bx-6) + GLU-B1-2A (By-8) by means of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results demonstrate that the PCR assay can be applied for the detection and negative selection of the 'poor breadmaking quality' Glu-B1-1d (B-x6) alleles in wheat breeding programs. PMID:15175854

  4. Increasing long-term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  5. Characterization of a likelihood based method and effects of markers informativeness in evaluation of admixture and population group assignment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bao-Zhu; Zhao, Hongyu; Kranzler, Henry R; Gelernter, Joel

    2005-01-01

    Background Detection and evaluation of population stratification are crucial issues in the conduct of genetic association studies. Statistical approaches useful for understanding these issues have been proposed; these methods rely on information gained from genotyping sets of markers that reflect population ancestry. Before using these methods, a set of markers informative for differentiating population genetic substructure (PGS) is necessary. We have previously evaluated the performance of a Bayesian clustering method implemented in the software STRUCTURE in detecting PGS with a particular informative marker set. In this study, we implemented a likelihood based method (LBM) in evaluating the informativeness of the same selected marker panel, with respect to assessing potential for stratification in samples of European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs), that are known to be admixed. LBM calculates the probability of a set of genotypes based on observations in a reference population with known specific allele frequencies for each marker, assuming Hardy Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) for each marker and linkage equilibrium among markers. Results In EAs, the assignment accuracy by LBM exceeded 99% using the most efficient marker FY, and reached perfect assignment accuracy using the 10 most efficient markers excluding FY. In AAs, the assignment accuracy reached 96.4% using FY, and >95% when using at least the 9 most efficient markers. The comparison of the observed and reference allele frequencies (which were derived from previous publications and public databases) shows that allele frequencies observed in EAs matched the reference group more accurately than allele frequencies observed in AAs. As a result, the LBM performed better in EAs than AAs, as might be expected given the dependence of LBMs on prior knowledge of allele frequencies. Performance was not dependent on sample size. Conclusion The performance of the LBM depends on the efficiency and number of markers, and depends greatly on how representative the available reference allele frequencies are for those of the population being assigned. This method is of value when the parental population is known and relevant allele frequencies are available. PMID:16225681

  6. DRD2 A1 allele and P300 abnormalities in obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, K. |; Wood, R.; Sheridan, L.P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous and prevalent disorder having both inheritable and environmental components. The role of the dopamine system in P300 has been implicated. We genotyped 193 neuropsychiatrically ill patients with and without comorbid drug and alcohol/abuse/dependence and obesity for the prevalence of the A1 allele of the DRD2 gene. We found a significant linear trend ({chi}{sup 2} = 40.4, df=1, p<0.00001) where the percent prevalence of the A1 increased with increasing polysubstance abuse. Where the A1 allele was found in 44% of 40 obese subjects, the A1 allele prevalence was found in as much as 91% of 11 obese subjects with comorbid polysubstance abuse. 53 obese subjects having a mean body weight (BMI) of 34.6{+-}8.2 were mapped for brain electrical activity and compared with 15 controls with a BMI of 22.3{+-}3.0 (P<.001). The P3 amplitude was significantly different (two tailed; t=3.24, df=16.2, P = 0.005), whereas P3 latency was not significant. Preliminarily, we found a significant decreased P3 amplitude correlated with parental polysubstance abuse (p=0.4) with prolongation of P3 latency correlated with the three risk factors of parental substance abuse, chemical dependency and carbohydrate bingeing (P<0.02). Finally, in a small sample, the A1 allele was present in 25% of probands having 0 risk compared to 66% in those obese subjects with any risk. This work represents the first electrophysiological data to implicate P3 abnormalities in a subset of obesity and further confirms an association of the DRD2 gene and a electrophysiological marker previously indicated to have predictive value in vulnerability to addictive behaviors.

  7. Nonreciprocal recombination between alleles of the chloroplast 23S rRNA gene in interspecific Chlamydomonas crosses

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Claude; Lee, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    The inheritance of six polymorphic loci mapping in the rRNA-encoding (rDNA) region of the inverted repeat sequence of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was scored in hybrid subclones derived from reciprocal interspecific crosses between the green algae Chlamydomonas eugametos and Chlamydomonas moewusii. In order to enhance the detection of cells that had undergone recombination between parental cpDNAs, hybrids were selected that inherited a chloroplast antibiotic-resistance marker contributed by the mating-type-minus(mt-) parent, the parent that normally contributes fewer cpDNA molecules. The major findings of this study can be summarized as follows. (i) The majority of the hybrids (14/17) were recombinant for cpDNA markers in the 10-kilobase-pair rDNA region under study. (ii) Only one allele of each polymorphic cpDNA locus was ever detected in the hybrids, thus suggesting that newly recombined rDNA sequences in one copy of the inverted repeat are rapidly spread to the other by a copy-correction mechanism. (iii) Chloroplast streptomycin-resistance (sr-2) and erythromycin-resistance (er-nM1) loci, although showing little or no genetic linkage, were mapped to the 16S and 23S rRNA gene regions of the cpDNA, respectively, by virtue of their perfect coinheritance with polymorphic markers within these genes. (iv) cpDNA markers associated with a putative intron of the C. eugametos 23S rRNA gene were inherited by all 17 hybrids. Such a result is similar to that observed for certain alleles of the large rRNA gene of yeast mitochondria in crosses between ω+ and ω- strains. Images PMID:16593855

  8. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, Emily J.; Stovold, Grahame T.; Li, Yongjun; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B.; Grattapaglia, Dario G.; Dungey, Heidi S.

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K). The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi-species SNP resource available with the EuCHIP60k, opens a whole new array of opportunities for high-throughput, genome-wide or targeted genotyping in species of Eucalyptus. PMID:26158446

  9. The Maintenance of Single-Locus Polymorphism. IV. Models with Mutation from Existing Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, H. G.; Marks, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of viability selection to maintain allelic polymorphism is investigated using a constructionist approach. In extensions to the models we have previously proposed, a population is bombarded with a series of mutations whose fitnesses in conjunction with other alleles are functions of the corresponding fitnesses with a particular allele, the parent allele, already in the population. Allele frequencies are iterated simultaneously, thus allowing alleles to be driven to extinction by selection. Such models allow very high levels of polymorphism to evolve: up to 38 alleles in one case. Alleles that are lethal as homozygotes can evolve to surprisingly high frequencies. The joint evolution of allele frequencies and viabilities highlights the necessity to consider more than the current morphology of a population. Comparisons are made with the neutral theory of evolution and it is suggested that failure to reject neutrality using the Ewens-Watterson test cannot be regarded as evidence for the neutral theory. PMID:1732162

  10. Microsatellite marker diversity in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, M W; Giraldo, M C; Buendía, H F; Tovar, E; Duque, M C; Beebe, S E

    2006-06-01

    A diversity survey was used to estimate allelic diversity and heterozygosity of 129 microsatellite markers in a panel of 44 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes that have been used as parents of mapping populations. Two types of microsatellites were evaluated, based respectively on gene coding and genomic sequences. Genetic diversity was evaluated by estimating the polymorphism information content (PIC), as well as the distribution and range of alleles sizes. Gene-based microsatellites proved to be less polymorphic than genomic microsatellites in terms of both number of alleles (6.0 vs. 9.2) and PIC values (0.446 vs. 0.594) while greater size differences between the largest and the smallest allele were observed for the genomic microsatellites than for the gene-based microsatellites (31.4 vs. 19.1 bp). Markers that showed a high number of alleles were identified with a maximum of 28 alleles for the marker BMd1. The microsatellites were useful for distinguishing Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes, for uncovering the races within each genepool and for separating wild accessions from cultivars. Greater polymorphism and race structure was found within the Andean gene pool than within the Mesoamerican gene pool and polymorphism rate between genotypes was consistent with genepool and race identity. Comparisons between Andean genotypes had higher polymorphism (53.0%) on average than comparisons among Mesoamerican genotypes (33.4%). Within the Mesoamerican parental combinations, the intra-racial combinations between Mesoamerica and Durango or Jalisco race genotypes showed higher average rates of polymorphism (37.5%) than the within-race combinations between Mesoamerica race genotypes (31.7%). In multiple correspondance analysis we found two principal clusters of genotypes corresponding to the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools and subgroups representing specific races especially for the Nueva Granada and Peru races of the Andean gene pool. Intra population diversity was higher within the Andean genepool than within the Mesoamerican genepool and this pattern was observed for both gene-based and genomic microsatellites. Furthermore, intra-population diversity within the Andean races (0.356 on average) was higher than within the Mesoamerican races (0.302). Within the Andean gene pool, race Peru had higher diversity compared to race Nueva Granada, while within the Mesoamerican gene pool, the races Durango, Guatemala and Jalisco had comparable levels of diversity which were below that of race Mesoamerica. PMID:16614831

  11. Systematic search for markers linked to insulin-dependent diabetes on chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.R.; Shephard, J.M.; Berger, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    We tested 19 microsatellite markers on chromosome 17 for linkage with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Nuclear families (N = 235) with at least two affected offspring were provided by the British Diabetic Association, Human Biological Data Interchange, and our own lab. The mean interval ({plus_minus}sd) between markers was 8 {plus_minus} 3 cM. For each parent heterozygous at the marker locus being studied, we determined whether the same or different alleles were transmitted to the two affected sibs. The {open_quotes}degree of sharing{close_quotes} for each marker is the frequency with which the same parental allele is transmitted to both affected sibs. Linkage with IDDM susceptibility leads to values higher than 0.50 for degree of sharing. Unlike lods, this approach makes no assumption about mode of inheritance. Mean sharing for the 19 markers was 0.51 (range 0.460 to 0.557; sd = .03). Three markers on 17q (all mutually unlinked) showed sharing of {approximately}0.55. The degree of sharing was 228/414 = 0.551 for D17A807 ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.26, p = .04), 172/309 = 0.557 for D17S784 ({chi}{sup 2} = 3.96, p = .04), and 218/398 = 0.548 for D17S798 ({chi}{sup 2} = 3.63, p =.06). We also looked for evidence of linkage disequilibrium between IDDM and alleles of each of these markers, by means of the transmission/disequilibrium test of Spielman. No significant linkage disequilibrium was found for D17S784 or D17S798. However, allele 6 of D17S807 was transmitted from heterozygous parents to IDDM offspring with frequency 131/230 = 0.57 ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.45, p = .035), supporting linkage with IDDM. We are currently investigating other markers and candidate genes in the region of D17S807.

  12. Leaf margin phenotype-specific restriction-site-associated DNA-derived markers for pineapple (Ananas comosus L.).

    PubMed

    Urasaki, Naoya; Goeku, Satoko; Kaneshima, Risa; Takamine, Tomonori; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Moromizato, Chie; Yonamine, Kaname; Hosaka, Fumiko; Terakami, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Shoda, Moriyuki

    2015-06-01

    To explore genome-wide DNA polymorphisms and identify DNA markers for leaf margin phenotypes, a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing analysis was employed to analyze three bulked DNAs of F1 progeny from a cross between a 'piping-leaf-type' cultivar, 'Yugafu', and a 'spiny-tip-leaf-type' variety, 'Yonekura'. The parents were both Ananas comosus var. comosus. From the analysis, piping-leaf and spiny-tip-leaf gene-specific restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing tags were obtained and designated as PLSTs and STLSTs, respectively. The five PLSTs and two STSLTs were successfully converted to cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using the sequence differences between alleles. Based on the genotyping of the F1 with two SSR and three CAPS markers, the five PLST markers were mapped in the vicinity of the P locus, with the closest marker, PLST1_SSR, being located 1.5 cM from the P locus. The two CAPS markers from STLST1 and STLST3 perfectly assessed the 'spiny-leaf type' as homozygotes of the recessive s allele of the S gene. The recombination value between the S locus and STLST loci was 2.4, and STLSTs were located 2.2 cM from the S locus. SSR and CAPS markers are applicable to marker-assisted selection of leaf margin phenotypes in pineapple breeding. PMID:26175625

  13. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E.

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  14. How many markers are enough? Factors influencing parentage testing in different livestock populations.

    PubMed

    Strucken, E M; Lee, S H; Lee, H K; Song, K D; Gibson, J P; Gondro, C

    2016-02-01

    Reliability of parentage test panels is usually based on its power to exclude wrong parentage assignments based on allele frequencies. We evaluated the rates of false exclusions and inclusions in parentage assignments, and how these results are affected by allele frequencies, panel sizes and the number of allowed mismatches. We also evaluated the reliability of parentage testing by comparing populations with distinct genetic backgrounds using pure and composite families of cattle and sheep. Allowing for 1% genotype mismatches in true parent-offspring relations provided the best compromise between false-positive and false-negative assignments. Pure breeds needed at least 200-210 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to correctly assign relations, but between 700 and 890 markers to avoid assigning incorrect relationships. Composite breeds needed between 220 (sheep) and 500 (cattle) markers for correct assignment; 680 (cattle) to 4400 (sheep) SNPs were needed to eliminate false-positive assignments. Allowing 0% genotype mismatches decreased false-positive but increased false-negative assignments, whilst a higher threshold of 2% showed the opposite effects. Panels with high minor allele frequencies (0.35-0.45) provided the best chance for correct parentage resolutions requiring fewer markers. Further, we propose that a dynamic threshold would allow adapting to population specific error rates. A comparison to the performance of the official International Society for Animal Genetics SNP panel for cattle and a recently published SNP panel for sheep showed that randomly selected markers performed only slightly worse for the applied parentage test based on opposing homozygotes. This suggests that even with carefully selected panels, only marginal assignment improvements are obtainable for a particular number of SNPs. The main point for improvement is the number of markers used. We recommend using at least 200 SNP markers for parentage testing if the aim is to reduce false-negative results. To fully exclude false positives at least 700 markers are required. PMID:26234440

  15. A genetic linkage map for hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) based on RAPD and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Mehlenbacher, Shawn A; Brown, Rebecca N; Nouhra, Eduardo R; Gökirmak, Tufan; Bassil, Nahla V; Kubisiak, Thomas L

    2006-02-01

    A linkage map for European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) was constructed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and the 2-way pseudotestcross approach. A full-sib population of 144 seedlings from the cross OSU 252.146 x OSU 414.062 was used. RAPD markers in testcross configuration, segregating 1:1, were used to construct separate maps for each parent. Fifty additional RAPD loci were assigned to linkage groups as accessory markers whose exact location could not be determined. Markers in intercross configuration, segregating 3:1, were used to pair groups in one parent with their homologues in the other. Eleven groups were identified for each parent, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of hazelnut (n = x = 11). Thirty of the 31 SSR loci were able to be assigned to a linkage group. The maternal map included 249 RAPD and 20 SSR markers and spanned a distance of 661 cM. The paternal map included 271 RAPD and 28 SSR markers and spanned a distance of 812 cM. The maps are quite dense, with an average of 2.6 cM between adjacent markers. The S-locus, which controls pollen-stigma incompatibility, was placed on chromosome 5S where 6 markers linked within a distance of 10 cM were identified. A locus for resistance to eastern filbert blight, caused by Anisogramma anomala, was placed on chromosome 6R for which two additional markers tightly linked to the dominant allele were identified and sequenced. These maps will serve as a starting point for future studies of the hazelnut genome, including map-based cloning of important genes. The inclusion of SSR loci on the map will make it useful in other populations. PMID:16498462

  16. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. PMID:25549886

  17. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 15 STR loci in a population of the Goiás State.

    PubMed

    Vieira, T C; Silva, D M; Gigonzac, M A D; Ferreira, V L; Gonçalves, M W; da Cruz, A D

    2013-01-01

    Due to the miscegenation of the Brazilian population, the central region of Brazil was colonized by internal migration of individuals from different origins, who contributed to the genetic diversity existing in this population. The purpose of this study was to estimate population parameters based on the allele frequencies for 15 polymorphic autosomal short-tandem repeat (STR) loci present in the population of the State of Goiás in the central region of Brazil, and to compare the results with those of others from different Brazilian populations. DNA was obtained from a sample of 986 unrelated individuals by a commercial reagent kit and was quantified by spectrometry for later amplification in the thermocycler. These loci, commonly used in forensics and paternity testing, reflected Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in this population. The D18S51 and Penta E loci had the highest number of alleles, while the observed heterozygosity reached the highest rates in FGA (0.920), D7S820 (0.870), and vWA (0.867) markers. Genetic diversity reached the highest levels in Penta E (0.906), Penta D (0.873), and D18S51 (0.860) markers, and the investigated forensic parameters showed high average values, with 93% power of discrimination, polymorphism information content of 78%, gene diversity of 79%, and observed heterozygosity of 79%. Similar to the other populations of Brazil, the population of the Midwest is derived from the admixture of 3 main parental groups: Amerindian, European, particularly Portuguese, and Africans from sub-Saharan Africa. In this context, the overall distribution of allele frequencies in the STR markers of various Brazilian populations is quite similar to the data obtained in this study. PMID:23359020

  18. Identification of RAPD markers linked to a Rhynchosporium secalis resistance locus in barley using near-isogenic lines and bulked segregant analysis.

    PubMed

    Barua, U M; Chalmers, K J; Hackett, C A; Thomas, W T; Powell, W; Waugh, R

    1993-08-01

    Three hundred random sequence 10-mer primers were used to screen a pair of near-isogenic lines of barley and their donor parent for markers linked to genes conferring resistance to Rhynchosporium secalis. One primer was identified which reproducibly generated a product, SC10-65-H400, from the donor parent and the Rhynchosporium-resistant near-isogenic line but not from the recurrent parent. Segregation analysis on a barley doubled haploid population and examination of a further three near-isogenic lines, their donor and recurrent parents confirmed that this marker was linked to the Rhynchosporium resistance locus (Rh) on chromosome 3L. The presence or absence of SC10-65-H400 was subsequently used along with the resistance phenotype to identify two groups of individuals in the doubled haploid population which possessed alternative alleles at both loci and defined a genetic interval between these two markers. Based on that information two bulked DNA samples were constructed by combining equal amounts of DNA from five individuals from each group. The two bulks and doubled haploid parental lines were screened with 700 10-mer primers. Seven products were identified which were present in the 'resistant' bulk and parent and were absent in the susceptible samples. Segregation analysis established their association with Rh. In addition co-segregation of the linked markers with a set of chromosome arm specific RFLPs confirmed the location of the Rh locus on the long arm of barley chromosome 3. PMID:8376177

  19. SSR Marker Analysis of Genetic Relationships within Hydrangea Macrophylla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity studies using 39 SSR markers were carried out with 114 taxa of H. macrophylla. The SSR loci were highly variable among the taxa, producing a mean of 8.26 alleles per locus. Overall allelic richness was relatively high at 5.12 alleles per locus. Subspecies serrata contained nearly t...

  20. Highly variable SSR markers in Douglas-fir: Mendelian inheritance and map locations.

    PubMed

    Slavov, G T; Howe, G T; Yakovlev, I; Edwards, K J; Krutovskii, K V; Tuskan, G A; Carlson, J E; Strauss, S H; Adams, W T

    2004-03-01

    Twenty-two highly variable SSR markers were developed in Douglas-fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] from five SSR-enriched genomic libraries. Fifteen PCR primer pairs amplified a single codominant locus, while seven primer pairs occasionally amplified two loci. The Mendelian inheritance of all 22 SSRs was confirmed via segregation analyses in several Douglas-fir families. The mean observed heterozygosity and the mean number of alleles per locus were 0.855 (SE=0.020) and 23 (SE=1.6), respectively. Twenty markers were used in genetic linkage analysis and mapped to ten known linkage groups. Because of their high polymorphism and unambiguous phenotypes, 15 single-locus markers were selected as the most suitable for DNA fingerprinting and parentage analysis. Only three SSRs were sufficient to achieve an average probability of exclusion from paternity of 0.998 in a Douglas-fir seed orchard block consisting of 59 parents. PMID:14625671

  1. RNA-Seq Identifies SNP Markers for Growth Traits in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed; Vallejo, Roger L.; Leeds, Timothy D.; Palti, Yniv; Liu, Sixin; Sabbagh, Annas; Rexroad, Caird E.; Yao, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    Fast growth is an important and highly desired trait, which affects the profitability of food animal production, with feed costs accounting for the largest proportion of production costs. Traditional phenotype-based selection is typically used to select for growth traits; however, genetic improvement is slow over generations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) explain 90% of the genetic differences between individuals; therefore, they are most suitable for genetic evaluation and strategies that employ molecular genetics for selective breeding. SNPs found within or near a coding sequence are of particular interest because they are more likely to alter the biological function of a protein. We aimed to use SNPs to identify markers and genes associated with genetic variation in growth. RNA-Seq whole-transcriptome analysis of pooled cDNA samples from a population of rainbow trout selected for improved growth versus unselected genetic cohorts (10 fish from 1 full-sib family each) identified SNP markers associated with growth-rate. The allelic imbalances (the ratio between the allele frequencies of the fast growing sample and that of the slow growing sample) were considered at scores >5.0 as an amplification and <0.2 as loss of heterozygosity. A subset of SNPs (n = 54) were validated and evaluated for association with growth traits in 778 individuals of a three-generation parent/offspring panel representing 40 families. Twenty-two SNP markers and one mitochondrial haplotype were significantly associated with growth traits. Polymorphism of 48 of the markers was confirmed in other commercially important aquaculture stocks. Many markers were clustered into genes of metabolic energy production pathways and are suitable candidates for genetic selection. The study demonstrates that RNA-Seq at low sequence coverage of divergent populations is a fast and effective means of identifying SNPs, with allelic imbalances between phenotypes. This technique is suitable for marker development in non-model species lacking complete and well-annotated genome reference sequences. PMID:22574143

  2. Development of polysomic microsatellite markers for characterization of population structuring and phylogeography in the shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, Anne P.; King, Tim L.

    2012-01-01

    Shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum is an endangered polyploid fish species for which no nuclear DNA markers previously existed. To address this need, 86 polysomic loci were developed and characterized in 20 A. brevirostrum from five river systems and eight members (parents and six progeny) of a captive-bred family. All markers proved to be polymorphic, polysomic, and demonstrated direct inheritance when tested in a captive family. Eleven loci were included in a range-wide survey of 561 fish sampled from 17 geographic collections. Allelic diversity at these markers ranged from 7 to 24 alleles/locus and averaged 16.5 alleles/locus; sufficient diversity to produce unique multilocus genotypes. In the range-wide survey, a Mantel comparison of an ecological (1-Jaccard’s) and genetic (ΦPT; an analog to FST) distance metrics, identified a strong positive correlation (r = 0.98, P PT represents a viable metric for assessing genetic relatedness using this class of marker.

  3. Analyses of Allele-Specific Gene Expression in Highly Divergent Mouse Crosses Identifies Pervasive Allelic Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, James J; Zhabotynsky, Vasyl; Sun, Wei; Huang, Shunping; Pakatci, Isa Kemal; Kim, Yunjung; Wang, Jeremy R; Morgan, Andrew P; Calaway, John D; Aylor, David L; Yun, Zaining; Bell, Timothy A; Buus, Ryan J; Calaway, Mark E; Didion, John P; Gooch, Terry J; Hansen, Stephanie D; Robinson, Nashiya N; Shaw, Ginger D; Spence, Jason S; Quackenbush, Corey R; Barrick, Cordelia J; Nonneman, Randal J.; Kim, Kyungsu; Xenakis, James; Xie, Yuying; Valdar, William; Lenarcic, Alan B; Wang, Wei; Welsh, Catherine E; Fu, Chen-Ping; Zhang, Zhaojun; Holt, James; Guo, Zhishan; Threadgill, David W; Tarantino, Lisa M; Miller, Darla R; Zou, Fei; McMillan, Leonard; Sullivan, Patrick F; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex human traits are influenced by variation in regulatory DNA through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Since regulatory elements are conserved between humans and mice, a thorough annotation of cis regulatory variants in mice could aid in this process. Here we provide a detailed portrait of mouse gene expression across multiple tissues in a three-way diallel. Greater than 80% of mouse genes have cis regulatory variation. These effects influence complex traits and usually extend to the human ortholog. Further, we estimate that at least one in every thousand SNPs creates a cis regulatory effect. We also observe two types of parent-of-origin effects, including classical imprinting and a novel, global allelic imbalance in favor of the paternal allele. We conclude that, as with humans, pervasive regulatory variation influences complex genetic traits in mice and provide a new resource toward understanding the genetic control of transcription in mammals. PMID:25730764

  4. Characterisation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) varieties using microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sugar beet is an obligate outcrossing species. Varieties consist of mixtures of plants from various parental combinations. As the number of informative morphological characteristics is limited, this leads to some problems in variety registration research. Results We have developed 25 new microsatellite markers for sugar beet. A selection of 12 markers with high quality patterns was used to characterise 40 diploid and triploid varieties. For each variety 30 individual plants were genotyped. The markers amplified 3-21 different alleles. Varieties had up to 7 different alleles at one marker locus. All varieties could be distinguished. For the diploid varieties, the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.458 to 0.744. The average inbreeding coefficient Fis was 0.282 ± 0.124, but it varied widely among marker loci, from Fis = +0.876 (heterozygote deficiency) to Fis = -0.350 (excess of heterozygotes). The genetic differentiation among diploid varieties was relatively constant among markers (Fst = 0.232 ± 0.027). Among triploid varieties the genetic differentiation was much lower (Fst = 0.100 ± 0.010). The overall genetic differentiation between diploid and triploid varieties was Fst = 0.133 across all loci. Part of this differentiation may coincide with the differentiation among breeders' gene pools, which was Fst = 0.063. Conclusions Based on a combination of scores for individual plants all varieties can be distinguished using the 12 markers developed here. The markers may also be used for mapping and in molecular breeding. In addition, they may be employed in studying gene flow from crop to wild populations. PMID:20482800

  5. Assessment of biodiversity in Chilean cattle using the distribution of major histocompatibility complex class II BoLA-DRB3 allele.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, S-N; Miyasaka, T; Matsumoto, Y; Xue, G; Diaz, V de la Barra; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Giovambattista, G; Ortiz, M; Oltra, J; Kanemaki, M; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2015-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLAs) are used extensively as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. In this study, we estimated BoLA-DRB3 allele frequencies using 888 cattle from 10 groups, including seven cattle breeds and three crossbreeds: 99 Red Angus, 100 Black Angus, 81 Chilean Wagyu, 49 Hereford, 95 Hereford × Angus, 71 Hereford × Jersey, 20 Hereford × Overo Colorado, 113 Holstein, 136 Overo Colorado, and 124 Overo Negro cattle. Forty-six BoLA-DRB3 alleles were identified, and each group had between 12 and 29 different BoLA-DRB3 alleles. Overo Negro had the highest number of alleles (29); this breed is considered in Chile to be an 'Old type' European Holstein Friesian descendant. By contrast, we detected 21 alleles in Holstein cattle, which are considered to be a 'Present type' Holstein Friesian cattle. Chilean cattle groups and four Japanese breeds were compared by neighbor-joining trees and a principal component analysis (PCA). The phylogenetic tree showed that Red Angus and Black Angus cattle were in the same clade, crossbreeds were closely related to their parent breeds, and Holstein cattle from Chile were closely related to Holstein cattle in Japan. Overall, the tree provided a thorough description of breed history. It also showed that the Overo Negro breed was closely related to the Holstein breed, consistent with historical data indicating that Overo Negro is an 'Old type' Holstein Friesian cattle. This allelic information will be important for investigating the relationship between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and disease. PMID:25430590

  6. Undetected Genotyping Errors Cause Apparent Overtransmission of Common Alleles in the Transmission/Disequilibrium Test

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adele A.; Cutler, David J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2003-01-01

    The transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT), a family-based test of linkage and association, is a popular and intuitive statistical test for studies of complex inheritance, as it is nonparametric and robust to population stratification. We carried out a literature search and located 79 significant TDT-derived associations between a microsatellite marker allele and a disease. Among these, there were 31 (39%) in which the most common allele was found to exhibit distorted transmission to affected offspring, implying that the allele may be associated with either susceptibility to or protection from a disease. In 27 of these 31 studies (87%), the most common allele appeared to be overtransmitted to affected offspring (a risk factor), and, in the remaining 4 studies, the most common allele appeared to be undertransmitted (a protective factor). In a second literature search, we identified 92 case-control studies in which a microsatellite marker allele was found to have significantly different frequencies in case and control groups. Of these, there were 37 instances (40%) in which the most common allele was involved. In 12 of these 37 studies (32%), the most common allele was enriched in cases relative to controls (a risk factor), and, in the remaining 25 studies, the most common allele was enriched in controls (a protective factor). Thus, the most common allele appears to be a risk factor when identified through the TDT, and it appears to be protective when identified through case-control analysis. To understand this phenomenon, we incorporated an error model into the calculation of the TDT statistic. We show that undetected genotyping error can cause apparent transmission distortion at markers with alleles of unequal frequency. We demonstrate that this distortion is in the direction of overtransmission for common alleles. Therefore, we conclude that undetected genotyping errors may be contributing to an inflated false-positive rate among reported TDT-derived associations and that genotyping fidelity must be increased. PMID:12587097

  7. Simultaneous inference of haplotypes and alleles at a causal gene

    PubMed Central

    Larribe, Fabrice; Dupont, Mathieu J.; Boucher, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    We present a methodology which jointly infers haplotypes and the causal alleles at a gene influencing a given trait. Often in human genetic studies, the available data consists of genotypes (series of genetic markers along the chromosomes) and a phenotype. However, for many genetic analyses, one needs haplotypes instead of genotypes. Our methodology is not only able to estimate haplotypes conditionally on the disease status, but is also able to infer the alleles at the unknown disease locus. Some applications of our methodology are in genetic mapping and in genetic counseling. PMID:26500677

  8. Development of 11 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the blackberry rust fungus Phragmidium violaceum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Uredinales fungus Phragmidium violaceum, which causes leaf rust on European blackberry (Rubus fruticosus L. aggregate). Allele frequency ranged between two and seventeen alleles per locus with no evidence of linkage disequilibrium amon...

  9. Homoeologous GSL-ELONG gene replacement for manipulation of aliphatic glucosinolates in Brassica rapa L. by marker assisted selection

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Arvind H.; Zelmer, Carla D.; McVetty, Peter B. E.; Daayf, Fouad; Li, Genyi

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic glucosinolates are the predominant sulfur-rich plant secondary metabolites in economically important Brassica crops. Glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products are involved in plant–microbe, plant–insect, plant–animal, and plant–human interactions. It is, therefore, important to manipulate glucosinolate profiles and contents in Brassica species. In this study, aliphatic glucosinolates were genetically manipulated through homoeologous recombination in backcross lines followed by marker assisted selection in B. rapa. A resynthesized B. napus line, from a cross between B. rapa and B. oleracea, was backcrossed with Chinese cabbage doubled haploid line, RI16. Marker assisted selection for non-functional gene was performed in each backcross generations. Advanced backcross progenies (BC3F2) were developed to identify homoeologous gene replacement and/or introgression. Reduction in 5C aliphatic glucosinolates (gluconapoleiferin, glucoalyssin, and glucobrassicanapin) was observed in BC3F2 progenies of the recurrent parent that carried the GSL-ELONG- gene. The GSL-ELONG- positive backcross progenies were also screened by the A-genome and BraGSL-ELONG gene specific marker, which linked with 5C aliphatic glucosinolates. The A-genome specific marker was absent in the plants of advanced backcross progenies which showed reduction in 5C aliphatic glucosinolates. The results suggest that the functional allele had been replaced by the non-functional GSL-ELONG- allele from B. oleracea. Some advanced backcross progenies (BC3F2) positive for the GSL-ELONG- allele and the A-genome specific SCAR marker BraMAM1-1 did not show reduction in 5C aliphatic glucosinolates, suggesting that GSL-ELONG- allele is recessive. Replacement of the functional locus in the A-genome by non-functional counterpart in the C-genome reduced the content of 5C aliphatic glucosinolates in B. rapa seeds with 20 μmol/g. PMID:23532458

  10. DNA profiling of pineapple cultivars in Japan discriminated by SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Moriyuki; Urasaki, Naoya; Sakiyama, Sumisu; Terakami, Shingo; Hosaka, Fumiko; Shigeta, Narumi; Nishitani, Chikako; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2012-01-01

    We developed 18 polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in pineapple (Ananas comosus) by using genomic libraries enriched for GA and CA motifs. The markers were used to genotype 31 pineapple accessions, including seven cultivars and 11 breeding lines from Okinawa Prefecture, 12 foreign accessions and one from a related species. These SSR loci were highly polymorphic: the 31 accessions contained three to seven alleles per locus, with an average of 4.1. The values of expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.76, with an average of 0.52. All 31 accessions could be successfully differentiated by the 18 SSR markers, with the exception of ‘N67-10’ and ‘Hawaiian Smooth Cayenne’. A single combination of three markers TsuAC004, TsuAC010 and TsuAC041, was enough to distinguish all accessions with one exception. A phenogram based on the SSR genotypes did not show any distinct groups, but it suggested that pineapples bred in Japan are genetically diversed. We reconfirmed the parentage of 14 pineapple accessions by comparing the SSR alleles at 17 SSR loci in each accession and its reported parents. The obtained information will contribute substantially to protecting plant breeders’ rights. PMID:23341750

  11. Cultivar identification and genetic relationship of pineapple (Ananas comosus) cultivars using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Kuan, C S; Weng, I S; Tsai, C C

    2015-01-01

    The genetic relationships among 27 pineapple [Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.] cultivars and lines were examined using 16 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The number of alleles per locus of the SSR markers ranged from 2 to 6 (average 3.19), for a total of 51 alleles. Similarity coefficients were calculated on the basis of 51 amplified bands. A dendrogram was created according to the 16 SSR markers by the unweighted pair-group method. The banding patterns obtained from the SSR primers allowed most of the cultivars and lines to be distinguished, with the exception of vegetative clones. According to the dendrogram, the 27 pineapple cultivars and lines were clustered into three main clusters and four individual clusters. As expected, the dendrogram showed that derived cultivars and lines are closely related to their parental cultivars; the genetic relationships between pineapple cultivars agree with the genealogy of their breeding history. In addition, the analysis showed that there is no obvious correlation between SSR markers and morphological characters. In conclusion, SSR analysis is an efficient method for pineapple cultivar identification and can offer valuable informative characters to identify pineapple cultivars in Taiwan. PMID:26634465

  12. Paternal or Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 16 Resulting in Homozygosity of a Mutant Allele Causes Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Frank X; Kimble, Danielle C; Kim, Yonghwan; Lach, Francis P; Harper, Ursula; Kamat, Aparna; Jones, MaryPat; Sanborn, Erica M; Tryon, Rebecca; Wagner, John E; MacMillan, Margaret L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Auerbach, Arleen D; Smogorzewska, Agata; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C

    2016-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited disorder caused by pathogenic variants in one of 19 FANC genes. FA patients display congenital abnormalities, and develop bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. We identified homozygous mutations in four FA patients and, in each case, only one parent carried the obligate mutant allele. FANCA and FANCP/SLX4 genes, both located on chromosome 16, were the affected recessive FA genes in three and one family respectively. Genotyping with short tandem repeat markers and SNP arrays revealed uniparental disomy (UPD) of the entire mutation-carrying chromosome 16 in all four patients. One FANCA patient had paternal UPD, whereas FA in the other three patients resulted from maternal UPD. These are the first reported cases of UPD as a cause of FA. UPD indicates a reduced risk of having another child with FA in the family and has implications in prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26841305

  13. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Yan; Ardisson, Morgane; Ranwez, Vincent; Besnard, Alban; Leroy, Philippe; Poux, Gérard; Roumet, Pierre; Viader, Véronique; Santoni, Sylvain; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2) and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur). Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays. PMID:27171472

  14. A homozygous mutation in keratin 5 is a fully dominant allele responsible for epidermolysis bullosa simplex

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, K.; Smith, L.; Ehrlich, P.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular, ultrastructural, and clinical analysis of a large family with epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) and multiple consanguineous marriages has identified one affected individual who inherited defective keratin 5 genes from both of her affected parents. EBS are skin blistering disorders caused by abnormal keratin filament assembly or function due to a mutation in either of the two structural proteins keratin 5 or keratin 14. Linkage analysis with DNA markers near each keratin gene demonstrated that the defect in this family mapped near keratin 5 (K5) with a LOD score of 7.60, {theta}=0.0 for the proximal marker D12S14. Sequencing of the K5 gene identified an Asn substitution of a highly conserved Lys at codon 173 in the 5{prime} end of the central rod domain. The mutation was found in 33 affected family members but not in 5 unaffected members or 25 unrelated, unaffected individuals. Both linkage and sequence analysis verified that one affected individual was homozygous for the K5 mutation. In this family, clinical examination and analysis of epidermal ultrastructure by electron microscopy were consistent with the Koebner subtype of EBS. Despite the absence of any normal K5 protein in the skin, the clinical and ultrastructural phenotypes of the homozygous individual did not differ significantly from those of affected heteozygous relatives. This K5 mutation is a fully dominant allele.

  15. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  16. Evidence for linkage of bipolar disorder to chromosome 18 with a parent-of-origin effect

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, O.C.; Xu, Jianfeng; McMahon, F.J.

    1995-12-01

    A susceptibility gene on chromosome18 and a parent-of-origin effect have been suggested for bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). We have studied 28 nuclear families selected for apparent unilineal transmission of the BPAD phenotype, by using 31 polymorphic markers spanning chromosome 18. Evidence for linkage was tested with affected-sib-pair and LOD score methods under two definitions of the affected phenotype. The affected-sib-pair analyses indicated excess allele sharing for markers on 18p within the region reported previously. The greatest sharing was at D18S37: 64% in bipolar and recurrent unipolar (RUP) sib pairs (P = .0006). In addition, excess sharing of the paternally, but not maternally, transmitted alleles was observed at three markers on 18q: at D18S41, 51 bipolar and RUP sib pairs were concordant for paternally transmitted alleles, and 21 pairs were discordant (P = .0004). The evidence for linkage to loci on both 18p and 18q was strongest in the 11 paternal pedigrees, i.e., those in which the father or one of the father`s sibs is affected. In these pedigrees, the greatest allele sharing (81%; P = .00002) and the highest LOD score (3.51; {theta} = 0.0) were observed at D18S41. Our results provide further support for linkage of BPAD to chromosome 18 and the first molecular evidence for a parent-of-origin effect operating in this disorder. The number of loci involved, and their precise location, require further study. 49 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Development and characterization of genomic SSR markers in Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chengcheng; Wu, Yanqi; Taliaferro, Charles M; Bell, Greg E; Martin, Dennis L; Smith, Mike W

    2014-08-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are a major molecular tool for genetic and genomic research that have been extensively developed and used in major crops. However, few are available in African bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy), an economically important warm-season turfgrass species. African bermudagrass is mainly used for hybridizations with common bermudagrass [C. dactylon var. dactylon (L.) Pers.] in the development of superior interspecific hybrid turfgrass cultivars. Accordingly, the major objective of this study was to develop and characterize a large set of SSR markers. Genomic DNA of C. transvaalensis '4200TN 24-2' from an Oklahoma State University (OSU) turf nursery was extracted for construction of four SSR genomic libraries enriched with [CA](n), [GA](n), [AAG](n), and [AAT](n) as core repeat motifs. A total of 3,064 clones were sequenced at the OSU core facility. The sequences were categorized into singletons and contiguous sequences to exclude redundancy. From the two sequence categories, 1,795 SSR loci were identified. After excluding duplicate SSRs by comparison with previously developed SSR markers using a nucleotide basic local alignment tool, 1,426 unique primer pairs (PPs) were designed. Out of the 1,426 designed PPs, 981 (68.8 %) amplified alleles of the expected size in the donor DNA. Polymorphisms of the SSR PPs tested in eight C. transvaalensis plants were 93 % polymorphic with 544 markers effective in all genotypes. Inheritance of the SSRs was examined in six F(1) progeny of African parents 'T577' × 'Uganda', indicating 917 markers amplified heritable alleles. The SSR markers developed in the study are the first large set of co-dominant markers in African bermudagrass and should be highly valuable for molecular and traditional breeding research. PMID:24585252

  18. Effects of allele frequency estimation on genomic predictions and inbreeding coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic calculations often require estimating allele frequencies, which differ across time due to selection and drift. Data were 50,000 simulated markers and 39,985 actual markers for 2391 genotyped Holstein bulls. Gene content of relatives and gene frequencies in the base (founder) population were ...

  19. Genetic diversity analysis in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) using AFLP and transferable microsatellite markers from azuki bean (Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi).

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Gopalakrishna, T

    2009-02-01

    Genetic diversity in 20 elite blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) genotypes was studied using microsatellite and AFLP markers. Thirty-six microsatellite markers from azuki bean (Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi) were successfully amplified across the 20 blackgram genotypes and 33 microsatellite markers showed polymorphism. A total of 137 microsatellite alleles were generated with an average of 4.1 alleles per locus. The number of alleles ranged from two to nine and the polymorphic information content value for the microsatellite markers varied from 0.10 to 0.87 with an average of 0.49. Microsatellite markers were highly informative and a combination of only three microsatellite markers (CEDG264, CEDG173, and CEDG044) was sufficient to discriminate all 20 blackgram genotypes. In the case of AFLP, 11 primer pairs generated 324 polymorphic marker fragments. The polymorphic information content values for AFLP primer combinations ranged from 0.21 to 0.34 with an average of 0.29. Similarity measures and clustering analyses were made using microsatellite and AFLP data separately. The resulting dendrograms distributed the 20 blackgram genotypes into five main clusters. The dendrograms were comparable with each other with the Mantel test between the cophenetic matrices of microsatellite data and AFLP data showing moderate correlation (r = 0.64). The results of the principal components analysis were well congruent with the dendrograms. In the dendrograms as well as in the principal components analyses, genotype Trombay wild (Vigna mungo var. silvestris) was placed separately from rest of the genotypes. This study demonstrated that the azuki bean microsatellite markers are highly polymorphic and informative and can be successfully used for genome analysis in blackgram. Results indicate that sufficient variability is present in the blackgram genotypes and would be helpful in the selection of suitable parents for breeding purposes and gene mapping studies. PMID:19234560

  20. Parent-of-origin dependent gene-specific knock down in mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Khursheed; Kues, Wilfried A.; Niemann, Heiner . E-mail: niemann@tzv.fal.de

    2007-07-06

    In mice hemizygous for the Oct4-GFP transgene, the F1 embryos show parent-of-origin dependent expression of the marker gene. F1 embryos with a maternally derived OG2 allele (OG2{sup mat}/-) express GFP in the oocyte and during preimplantation development until the blastocyst stage indicating a maternal and embryonic expression pattern. F1-embryos with a paternally inherited OG2 allele (OG2{sup pat}/-) express GFP from the 4- to 8-cell stage onwards showing only embryonic expression. This allows to study allele specific knock down of GFP expression. RNA interference (RNAi) was highly efficient in embryos with the paternally inherited GFP allele, whereas embryos with the maternally inherited GFP allele showed a delayed and less stringent suppression, indicating that the initial levels of the target transcript and the half life of the protein affect RNAi efficacy. RT-PCR analysis revealed only minimum of GFP mRNA. These results have implications for studies of gene silencing in mammalian embryos.

  1. Multiple mating and reproductive skew in parental and introgressed females of the live-bearing fish Xiphophorus birchmanni.

    PubMed

    Paczolt, Kimberly A; Passow, Courtney N; Delclos, Pablo J; Kindsvater, Holly K; Jones, Adam G; Rosenthal, Gil G

    2015-01-01

    Just as mating patterns can promote speciation or hybridization, the presence of hybridization can shape mating patterns within a population. In this study, we characterized patterns of multiple mating and reproductive skew in a naturally hybridizing swordtail fish species, Xiphophorus birchmanni. We quantified multiple mating using microsatellite markers to genotype embryos from 43 females collected from 2 wild populations. We also used a suite of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers to categorize females and their inferred mates as either parental X. birchmanni or as introgressed individuals, which carried alleles from a sister species, X. malinche. We found that parental and introgressed X. birchmanni females mated multiply with both parental and introgressed males. We found no difference in mating patterns or reproductive skew between parental and introgressed X. birchmanni females. However, nonintrogressed X. birchmanni males mated more often with large, fecund females. These females also had the greatest levels of skew in fertilization success of males. Thus, our results show that X. birchmanni has a polygynandrous mating system and that introgression of X. malinche alleles has only subtle effects on mating patterns in this species. PMID:25433083

  2. Multiple Mating and Reproductive Skew in Parental and Introgressed Females of the Live-Bearing Fish Xiphophorus Birchmanni

    PubMed Central

    Passow, Courtney N.; Delclos, Pablo J.; Kindsvater, Holly K.; Jones, Adam G.; Rosenthal, Gil G.

    2015-01-01

    Just as mating patterns can promote speciation or hybridization, the presence of hybridization can shape mating patterns within a population. In this study, we characterized patterns of multiple mating and reproductive skew in a naturally hybridizing swordtail fish species, Xiphophorus birchmanni. We quantified multiple mating using microsatellite markers to genotype embryos from 43 females collected from 2 wild populations. We also used a suite of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers to categorize females and their inferred mates as either parental X. birchmanni or as introgressed individuals, which carried alleles from a sister species, X. malinche. We found that parental and introgressed X. birchmanni females mated multiply with both parental and introgressed males. We found no difference in mating patterns or reproductive skew between parental and introgressed X. birchmanni females. However, nonintrogressed X. birchmanni males mated more often with large, fecund females. These females also had the greatest levels of skew in fertilization success of males. Thus, our results show that X. birchmanni has a polygynandrous mating system and that introgression of X. malinche alleles has only subtle effects on mating patterns in this species. PMID:25433083

  3. Bridging the genotyping gap: using genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to add high-density SNP markers and new value to traditional bi-parental mapping and breeding populations.

    PubMed

    Spindel, Jennifer; Wright, Mark; Chen, Charles; Cobb, Joshua; Gage, Joseph; Harrington, Sandra; Lorieux, Mathias; Ahmadi, Nourollah; McCouch, Susan

    2013-11-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) is the latest application of next-generation sequencing protocols for the purposes of discovering and genotyping SNPs in a variety of crop species and populations. Unlike other high-density genotyping technologies which have mainly been applied to general interest "reference" genomes, the low cost of GBS makes it an attractive means of saturating mapping and breeding populations with a high density of SNP markers. One barrier to the widespread use of GBS has been the difficulty of the bioinformatics analysis as the approach is accompanied by a high number of erroneous SNP calls which are not easily diagnosed or corrected. In this study, we use a 384-plex GBS protocol to add 30,984 markers to an indica (IR64) × japonica (Azucena) mapping population consisting of 176 recombinant inbred lines of rice (Oryza sativa) and we release our imputation and error correction pipeline to address initial GBS data sparsity and error, and streamline the process of adding SNPs to RIL populations. Using the final imputed and corrected dataset of 30,984 markers, we were able to map recombination hot and cold spots and regions of segregation distortion across the genome with a high degree of accuracy, thus identifying regions of the genome containing putative sterility loci. We mapped QTL for leaf width and aluminum tolerance, and were able to identify additional QTL for both phenotypes when using the full set of 30,984 SNPs that were not identified using a subset of only 1,464 SNPs, including a previously unreported QTL for aluminum tolerance located directly within a recombination hotspot on chromosome 1. These results suggest that adding a high density of SNP markers to a mapping or breeding population through GBS has a great value for numerous applications in rice breeding and genetics research. PMID:23918062

  4. Marker development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  5. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold, in our population. These data circumscribe the influence of these polymorphisms in the clinical outcome of 5-FU and question their use for establishing 5-FU dosage, above all when additional genetic factors are not considered. PMID:26166093

  6. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients.Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3'-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5'-UTR polymorphisms).For neither the 3'- nor the 5'-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance.The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold, in our population. These data circumscribe the influence of these polymorphisms in the clinical outcome of 5-FU and question their use for establishing 5-FU dosage, above all when additional genetic factors are not considered. PMID:26166093

  7. Molecular breeding for introgression of fatty acid desaturase mutant alleles (ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B) enhances oil quality in high and low oil containing peanut genotypes.

    PubMed

    Janila, Pasupuleti; Pandey, Manish K; Shasidhar, Yaduru; Variath, Murali T; Sriswathi, Manda; Khera, Pawan; Manohar, Surendra S; Nagesh, Patne; Vishwakarma, Manish K; Mishra, Gyan P; Radhakrishnan, T; Manivannan, N; Dobariya, K L; Vasanthi, R P; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    High oleate peanuts have two marketable benefits, health benefits to consumers and extended shelf life of peanut products. Two mutant alleles present on linkage group a09 (ahFAD2A) and b09 (ahFAD2B) control composition of three major fatty acids, oleic, linoleic and palmitic acids which together determine peanut oil quality. In conventional breeding, selection for fatty acid composition is delayed to advanced generations. However by using DNA markers, breeders can reject large number of plants in early generations and therefore can optimize time and resources. Here, two approaches of molecular breeding namely marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) and marker-assisted selection (MAS) were employed to transfer two FAD2 mutant alleles from SunOleic 95R into the genetic background of ICGV 06110, ICGV 06142 and ICGV 06420. In summary, 82 MABC and 387 MAS derived introgression lines (ILs) were developed using DNA markers with elevated oleic acid varying from 62 to 83%. Oleic acid increased by 0.5-1.1 folds, with concomitant reduction of linoleic acid by 0.4-1.0 folds and palmitic acid by 0.1-0.6 folds among ILs compared to recurrent parents. Finally, high oleate ILs, 27 with high oil (53-58%), and 28 ILs with low oil content (42-50%) were selected that may be released for cultivation upon further evaluation. PMID:26566838

  8. A novel linkage map of sugarcane with evidence for clustering of retrotransposon-based markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of sugarcane as a sustainable crop has unlimited applications. The crop is one of the most economically viable for renewable energy production, and CO2 balance. Linkage maps are valuable tools for understanding genetic and genomic organization, particularly in sugarcane due to its complex polyploid genome of multispecific origins. The overall objective of our study was to construct a novel sugarcane linkage map, compiling AFLP and EST-SSR markers, and to generate data on the distribution of markers anchored to sequences of scIvana_1, a complete sugarcane transposable element, and member of the Copia superfamily. Results The mapping population parents (‘IAC66-6’ and ‘TUC71-7’) contributed equally to polymorphisms, independent of marker type, and generated markers that were distributed into nearly the same number of co-segregation groups (or CGs). Bi-parentally inherited alleles provided the integration of 19 CGs. The marker number per CG ranged from two to 39. The total map length was 4,843.19 cM, with a marker density of 8.87 cM. Markers were assembled into 92 CGs that ranged in length from 1.14 to 404.72 cM, with an estimated average length of 52.64 cM. The greatest distance between two adjacent markers was 48.25 cM. The scIvana_1-based markers (56) were positioned on 21 CGs, but were not regularly distributed. Interestingly, the distance between adjacent scIvana_1-based markers was less than 5 cM, and was observed on five CGs, suggesting a clustered organization. Conclusions Results indicated the use of a NBS-profiling technique was efficient to develop retrotransposon-based markers in sugarcane. The simultaneous maximum-likelihood estimates of linkage and linkage phase based strategies confirmed the suitability of its approach to estimate linkage, and construct the linkage map. Interestingly, using our genetic data it was possible to calculate the number of retrotransposon scIvana_1 (~60) copies in the sugarcane genome, confirming previously reported molecular results. In addition, this research possibly will have indirect implications in crop economics e.g., productivity enhancement via QTL studies, as the mapping population parents differ in response to an important fungal disease. PMID:22742069

  9. Molecular mapping of stripe rust resistance gene YrCH42 in Chinese wheat cultivar Chuanmai 42 and its allelism with Yr24 and Yr26.

    PubMed

    Li, G Q; Li, Z F; Yang, W Y; Zhang, Y; He, Z H; Xu, S C; Singh, R P; Qu, Y Y; Xia, X C

    2006-05-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (PST), is one of the most devastating diseases in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. The objectives of this study were to map a stripe rust resistance gene in Chinese wheat cultivar Chuanmai 42 using molecular markers and to investigate its allelism with Yr24 and Yr26. A total of 787 F2 plants and 186 F3 lines derived from a cross between resistant cultivar Chuanmai 42 and susceptible line Taichung 29 were used for resistance gene tagging. Also 197 F2 plants from the cross Chuanmai 42xYr24/3*Avocet S and 726 F2 plants from Chuanmai 42xYr26/3*Avocet S were employed for allelic test of the resistance genes. In all, 819 pairs of wheat SSR primers were used to test the two parents, as well as resistant and susceptible bulks. Subsequently, nine polymorphic markers were employed for genotyping the F2 and F3 populations. Results indicated that the stripe rust resistance in Chuanmai 42 was conferred by a single dominant gene, temporarily designated YrCH42, located close to the centromere of chromosome 1B and flanked by nine SSR markers Xwmc626, Xgwm273, Xgwm11, Xgwm18, Xbarc137, Xbarc187, Xgwm498, Xbarc240 and Xwmc216. The resistance gene was closely linked to Xgwm498 and Xbarc187 with genetic distances of 1.6 and 2.3 cM, respectively. The seedling tests with 26 PST isolates and allelic tests indicated that YrCH42, Yr24 and Yr26 are likely to be the same gene. PMID:16525837

  10. Prediction of liability to orofacial clefting using genetic and craniofacial data from parents.

    PubMed Central

    Mossey, P A; Arngrimsson, R; McColl, J; Vintiner, G M; Connor, J M

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P)) and isolated cleft palate (CP) are separate clinical entities and for both polygenic multifactorial aetiology has been proposed. Parents of children with orofacial clefting have been shown to have distinctive differences in their facial shape when compared to matched controls. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that genetic and morphometric factors predispose to orofacial clefting and that these markers differ for CL(P) and CP. Methods-Polymorphisms at the transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) locus in 83 parents of children with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts were analysed, and their craniofacial morphology was assessed using lateral cephalometry. RESULTS: Parents of children with CL(P) and CP showed an increased frequency of the TGFalpha/TaqI C2 allele (RR=4.10, p=0.009) relative to the comparison group. Also the TGFalpha/BamHI A1 allele was more prevalent in the CP parents. MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Using stepwise logistic regression analysis the TGFalpha/TaqI C2 polymorphism provides the best model for liability to orofacial clefting. To determine the type of clefting a model involving interaction between the parental TGFalpha/BamHI and TGFalpha/RsaI genotypes showed the best fit. Using genotype only to predict the clefting defect in the children according to parental genotype, 68.3% could be correctly classified. By adding information on craniofacial measurements in the parents, 76% of CP and 94% of CL(P) parents could be correctly classified. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a model for prediction of liability to orofacial clefting. These findings suggest that different molecular aberrations at the TGFalpha locus may modify the risk for CP and CL(P). Images PMID:9610799

  11. Identification of flanking SSR markers for a major rice gall midge resistance gene Gm1 and their validation.

    PubMed

    Biradar, S K; Sundaram, R M; Thirumurugan, T; Bentur, J S; Amudhan, S; Shenoy, V V; Mishra, B; Bennett, J; Sarma, N P

    2004-11-01

    Host-plant resistance is the preferred strategy for management of Asian rice gall midge (Orseolia oryzae), a serious pest in many rice-growing countries. The deployment of molecular markers linked to gall midge resistance genes in breeding programmes can accelerate the development of resistant cultivars. In the present study, we have tagged and mapped a dominant gall midge resistance gene, Gm1, from the Oryza sativa cv. W1263 on chromosome 9, using SSR markers. A progeny-tested F2 mapping population derived from the cross W1263/TN1 was used for analysis. To map the gene locus, initially a subset of the F2 mapping population consisting of 20 homozygous resistant and susceptible lines each was screened with 63 parental polymorphic SSR markers. The SSR markers RM316, RM444 and RM219, located on chromosome 9, are linked to Gm1 at genetic distances of 8.0, 4.9 and 5.9 cM, respectively, and flank the gene locus. Further, gene/marker order was also determined. The utility of the co-segregating SSR markers was tested in a backcross population derived from the cross Swarna/W1263//Swarna, and allelic profiles of these markers were analysed in a set of donor rice genotypes possessing Gm1 and in a few gall midge-susceptible, elite rice varieties. PMID:15278284

  12. Functionally Relevant Microsatellite Markers From Chickpea Transcription Factor Genes for Efficient Genotyping Applications and Trait Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Alice; Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Gowda, C.L.L.; Singh, Sube; Jain, Mukesh; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2013-01-01

    We developed 1108 transcription factor gene-derived microsatellite (TFGMS) and 161 transcription factor functional domain-associated microsatellite (TFFDMS) markers from 707 TFs of chickpea. The robust amplification efficiency (96.5%) and high intra-specific polymorphic potential (34%) detected by markers suggest their immense utilities in efficient large-scale genotyping applications, including construction of both physical and functional transcript maps and understanding population structure. Candidate gene-based association analysis revealed strong genetic association of TFFDMS markers with three major seed and pod traits. Further, TFGMS markers in the 5? untranslated regions of TF genes showing differential expression during seed development had higher trait association potential. The significance of TFFDMS markers was demonstrated by correlating their allelic variation with amino acid sequence expansion/contraction in the functional domain and alteration of secondary protein structure encoded by genes. The seed weight-associated markers were validated through traditional bi-parental genetic mapping. The determination of gene-specific linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in desi and kabuli based on single nucleotide polymorphism-microsatellite marker haplotypes revealed extended LD decay, enhanced LD resolution and trait association potential of genes. The evolutionary history of a strong seed-size/weight-associated TF based on natural variation and haplotype sharing among desi, kabuli and wild unravelled useful information having implication for seed-size trait evolution during chickpea domestication. PMID:23633531

  13. Segmental allotetraploidy and allelic interactions in buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link syn. Cenchrus ciliaris L.) as revealed by genome mapping.

    PubMed

    Jessup, R W; Burson, B L; Burow, O; Wang, Y W; Chang, C; Li, Z; Paterson, A H; Hussey, M A

    2003-04-01

    Linkage analyses increasingly complement cytological and traditional plant breeding techniques by providing valuable information regarding genome organization and transmission genetics of complex polyploid species. This study reports a genome map of buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link syn. Cenchrus ciliaris L.). Maternal and paternal maps were constructed with restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) segregating in 87 F1 progeny from an intraspecific cross between two heterozygous genotypes. A survey of 862 heterologous cDNAs and gDNAs from across the Poaceae, as well as 443 buffelgrass cDNAs, yielded 100 and 360 polymorphic probes, respectively. The maternal map included 322 RFLPs, 47 linkage groups, and 3464 cM, whereas the paternal map contained 245 RFLPs, 42 linkage groups, and 2757 cM. Approximately 70 to 80% of the buffelgrass genome was covered, and the average marker spacing was 10.8 and 11.3 cM on the respective maps. Preferential pairing was indicated between many linkage groups, which supports cytological reports that buffelgrass is a segmental allotetraploid. More preferential pairing (disomy) was found in the maternal than paternal parent across linkage groups (55 vs. 38%) and loci (48 vs. 15%). Comparison of interval lengths in 15 allelic bridges indicated significantly less meiotic recombination in paternal gametes. Allelic interactions were detected in four regions of the maternal map and were absent in the paternal map. PMID:12723046

  14. Wheat gene bank accessions as a source of new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3: a large scale allele mining project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last hundred years, the development of improved wheat cultivars has led to the replacement of landraces and traditional varieties by modern cultivars. This has resulted in a decline in the genetic diversity of agriculturally used wheat. However, the diversity lost in the elite material is somewhat preserved in crop gene banks. Therefore, the gene bank accessions provide the basis for genetic improvement of crops for specific traits and and represent rich sources of novel allelic variation. Results We have undertaken large scale molecular allele mining to isolate new alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 from wheat gene bank accessions. The search for new Pm3 alleles was carried out on a geographically diverse set of 733 wheat accessions originating from 20 countries. Pm3 specific molecular tools as well as classical pathogenicity tests were used to characterize the accessions. Two new functional Pm3 alleles were identified out of the eight newly cloned Pm3 sequences. These new resistance alleles were isolated from accessions from China and Nepal. Thus, the repertoire of functional Pm3 alleles now includes 17 genes, making it one of the largest allelic series of plant resistance genes. The combined information on resistant and susceptible Pm3 sequences will allow to study molecular function and specificity of functional Pm3 alleles. Conclusions This study demonstrates that molecular allele mining on geographically defined accessions is a useful strategy to rapidly characterize the diversity of gene bank accessions at a specific genetic locus of agronomical importance. The identified wheat accessions with new resistance specificities can be used for marker-assisted transfer of the Pm3 alleles to modern wheat lines. PMID:20470444

  15. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  17. Estimation of genetic marker effects for CAPN1, CAST, and GHR on carcass quality traits in Angus cattle selected to increase minor marker frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and interactions cannot be accurately estimated when minor marker allele frequencies (MAF) are low. To increase the accuracy of estimation for three marker systems in commercial use, an Angus population at USMARC was subjected to marker assisted-selection for multiple years t...

  18. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  19. Allelic losses at genomic instability-associated loci in villous adenomas and adjacent colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bruce M; Stoler, Daniel L; Rodriguez, Luz; Karpenko, Matthew J; Swede, Helen; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Anderson, Garth R

    2007-04-01

    Allelic imbalances in premalignant villous adenomas were compared with those in adjacent microdissected colorectal carcinoma that had arisen directly from the adenomas. Carcinoma-adenoma pairs were examined from 17 patients who underwent resections for colorectal cancer. In all, 28 microsatellite markers were examined, from regions of the genome where individual allelic losses have been associated with overall genomic instability in colorectal carcinomas. Microsatellite instability (MSI) was also evaluated for each marker in each tissue type. Loss of heterozygosity for multiple markers was found in 35% of adenomas and 65% of carcinomas; the average fractional allelic loss rate was 2.5 times higher in carcinomas than in adenomas. Of the 17 patients, 4 had MSI for >30% of markers in both adenoma and carcinoma, with no significant differences between the two tissues. Markers with particularly high imbalance rates in adenomas were seen on chromosomes 11, 14, and 15. These findings provide further evidence that genomic instability is an ongoing process during carcinogenesis, with a markedly increased frequency of allelic losses seen in carcinomas, compared with adjacent adenomas. Markers on chromosomes 11, 14, and 15 may become valuable tools in the identification of patients destined to progress to colorectal carcinomas. PMID:17350461

  20. Origin and dissemination of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum with mutant pfcrt alleles in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nanhua; Wilson, Danny W; Pasay, Cielo; Bell, David; Martin, Laura B; Kyle, Dennis; Cheng, Qin

    2005-05-01

    The pfcrt allelic type and adjacent microsatellite marker type were determined for 82 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from the Philippines. Mutant pfcrt allelic types P1a and P2a/P2b were dominant in different locations. Microsatellite analysis revealed that P2a/P2b evolved independently in the Philippines, while P1a shared common ancestry with Papua New Guinea chloroquine-resistant parasites. PMID:15855538

  1. Large-Scale Development of Cost-Effective Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Marker Assays for Genetic Mapping in Pigeonpea and Comparative Mapping in Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Rachit K.; Varma Penmetsa, R.; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Kumar, Ashish; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Schlueter, Jessica A.; Farmer, Andrew; Whaley, Adam M.; Sarma, Birinchi K.; May, Gregory D.; Cook, Douglas R.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2012-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, >2000) were discovered by using RNA-seq and allele-specific sequencing approaches in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan). For making the SNP genotyping cost-effective, successful competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (KASPar) assays were developed for 1616 SNPs and referred to as PKAMs (pigeonpea KASPar assay markers). Screening of PKAMs on 24 genotypes [23 from cultivated species and 1 wild species (Cajanus scarabaeoides)] defined a set of 1154 polymorphic markers (77.4%) with a polymorphism information content (PIC) value from 0.04 to 0.38. One thousand and ninety-four PKAMs showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the reference mapping population (C. cajan ICP 28 × C. scarabaeoides ICPW 94). By using high-quality marker genotyping data on 167 F2 lines from the population, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 875 PKAMs with an average inter-marker distance of 1.11 cM was developed. Previously mapped 35 simple sequence repeat markers were integrated into the PKAM map and an integrated genetic map of 996.21 cM was constructed. Mapped PKAMs showed a higher degree of synteny with the genome of Glycine max followed by Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus and least with Vigna unguiculata. These PKAMs will be useful for genetics research and breeding applications in pigeonpea and for utilizing genome information from other legume species. PMID:23103470

  2. Large-scale development of cost-effective single-nucleotide polymorphism marker assays for genetic mapping in pigeonpea and comparative mapping in legumes.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rachit K; Penmetsa, R Varma; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Kumar, Ashish; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Schlueter, Jessica A; Farmer, Andrew; Whaley, Adam M; Sarma, Birinchi K; May, Gregory D; Cook, Douglas R; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2012-12-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, >2000) were discovered by using RNA-seq and allele-specific sequencing approaches in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan). For making the SNP genotyping cost-effective, successful competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (KASPar) assays were developed for 1616 SNPs and referred to as PKAMs (pigeonpea KASPar assay markers). Screening of PKAMs on 24 genotypes [23 from cultivated species and 1 wild species (Cajanus scarabaeoides)] defined a set of 1154 polymorphic markers (77.4%) with a polymorphism information content (PIC) value from 0.04 to 0.38. One thousand and ninety-four PKAMs showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the reference mapping population (C. cajan ICP 28 C. scarabaeoides ICPW 94). By using high-quality marker genotyping data on 167 F(2) lines from the population, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 875 PKAMs with an average inter-marker distance of 1.11 cM was developed. Previously mapped 35 simple sequence repeat markers were integrated into the PKAM map and an integrated genetic map of 996.21 cM was constructed. Mapped PKAMs showed a higher degree of synteny with the genome of Glycine max followed by Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus and least with Vigna unguiculata. These PKAMs will be useful for genetics research and breeding applications in pigeonpea and for utilizing genome information from other legume species. PMID:23103470

  3. Global Analysis of Allele-Specific Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Borevitz, Justin O.

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression is a complex trait determined by various genetic and nongenetic factors. Among the genetic factors, allelic difference may play a critical role in gene regulation. In this study we globally dissected cis (allelic) and trans sources of genetic variation in F1 hybrids between two Arabidopsis thaliana wild accessions, Columbia (Col) and Vancouver (Van), using a new high-density SNP-tiling array. This array tiles the whole genome with 35-bp resolution and interrogates 250,000 SNPs identified from resequencing of 20 diverse A. thaliana strains. Quantitative assessment of 12,311 genes identified 3811 genes differentially expressed between parents, 1665 genes with allele-specific expression, and 1688 genes controlled by composite trans-regulatory variation. Loci with cis- or trans-regulatory variation were mapped onto sequence polymorphisms, epigenetic modifications, and transcriptional specificity. Genes regulated in cis tend to be located in polymorphic chromosomal regions, are preferentially associated with repressive epigenetic marks, and exhibit high tissue expression specificity. Genes that vary due to trans regulation reside in relatively conserved chromosome regions, show activating epigenetic marks and generally constitutive gene expression. Our findings demonstrate a method of global functional characterization of allele-specific expression and highlight that chromatin structure is intertwined with evolution of cis- and trans-regulatory variation. PMID:19474198

  4. Null allele, allelic dropouts or rare sex detection in clonal organisms: simulations and application to real data sets of pathogenic microbes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogens and their vectors are organisms whose ecology is often only accessible through population genetics tools based on spatio-temporal variability of molecular markers. However, molecular tools may present technical difficulties due to the masking of some alleles (allelic dropouts and/or null alleles), which tends to bias the estimation of heterozygosity and thus the inferences concerning the breeding system of the organism under study. This is especially critical in clonal organisms in which deviation from panmixia, as measured by Wright’s FIS, can, in principle, be used to infer both the extent of clonality and structure in a given population. In particular, null alleles and allelic dropouts are locus specific and likely produce high variance of Wright’s FIS across loci, as rare sex is expected to do. In this paper we propose a tool enabling to discriminate between consequences of these technical problems and those of rare sex. Methods We have performed various simulations of clonal and partially clonal populations. We introduce allelic dropouts and null alleles in clonal data sets and compare the results with those that exhibit increasing rates of sexual recombination. We use the narrow relationship that links Wright’s FIS to genetic diversity in purely clonal populations as assessment criterion, since this relationship disappears faster with sexual recombination than with amplification problems of certain alleles. Results We show that the relevance of our criterion for detecting poorly amplified alleles depends partly on the population structure, the level of homoplasy and/or mutation rate. However, the interpretation of data becomes difficult when the number of poorly amplified alleles is above 50%. The application of this method to reinterpret published data sets of pathogenic clonal microbes (yeast and trypanosomes) confirms its usefulness and allows refining previous estimates concerning important pathogenic agents. Conclusion Our criterion of superimposing between the FIS expected under clonality and the observed FIS, is effective when amplification difficulties occur in low to moderate frequencies (20-30%). PMID:25027508

  5. Variations and Transmission of QTL Alleles for Yield and Fiber Qualities in Upland Cotton Cultivars Developed in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianzhen; Qian, Neng; Zhu, Xiefei; Chen, Hong; Wang, Sen; Mei, Hongxian; Zhang, Yuanming

    2013-01-01

    Cotton is the world’s leading cash crop, and genetic improvement of fiber yield and quality is the primary objective of cotton breeding program. In this study, we used various approaches to identify QTLs related to fiber yield and quality. Firstly, we constructed a four-way cross (4WC) mapping population with four base core cultivars, Stoneville 2B, Foster 6, Deltapine 15 and Zhongmiansuo No.7 (CRI 7), as parents in Chinese cotton breeding history and identified 83 QTLs for 11 agronomic and fiber quality traits. Secondly, association mapping of agronomical and fiber quality traits was based on 121 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using a general linear model (GLM). For this, 81 Gossypium hirsutum L. accessions including the four core parents and their derived cultivars were grown in seven diverse environments. Using these approaches, we successfully identified 180 QTLs significantly associated with agronomic and fiber quality traits. Among them were 66 QTLs that were identified via linkage disequilibrium (LD) and 4WC family-based linkage (FBL) mapping and by previously published family-based linkage (FBL) mapping in modern Chinese cotton cultivars. Twenty eight and 44 consistent QTLs were identified by 4WC and LD mapping, and by FBL and LD mapping methods, respectively. Furthermore, transmission and variation of QTL-alleles mapped by LD association in the three breeding periods revealed that some could be detected in almost all Chinese cotton cultivars, suggesting their stable transmission and some identified only in the four base cultivars and not in the modern cultivars, suggesting they were missed in conventional breeding. These results will be useful to conduct genomics-assisted breeding effectively using these existing and novel QTL alleles to improve yield and fiber qualities in cotton. PMID:23468939

  6. GENOPROB: COMPUTATION OF GENOTYPE AND GRANDPARENTAL ORIGIN PROBABILITIES IN COMPLEX PEDIGREES WITH MISSING MARKER DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GenoProb analyzes genetic marker data in complex pedigrees with missing marker data using an iterative allelic peeling algorithm. Its output has been used for QTL detection, marker assisted selection, and identification and correction of errors in marker data and pedigrees. It computes the approxima...

  7. Genetic diversity and relatedness of sweet cherry (prunus avium L.) cultivars based on single nucleotide polymorphic markers.

    PubMed

    Fernandez I Marti, Angel; Athanson, Blessing; Koepke, Tyson; Font I Forcada, Carolina; Dhingra, Amit; Oraguzie, Nnadozie

    2012-01-01

    Most previous studies on genetic fingerprinting and cultivar relatedness in sweet cherry were based on isoenzyme, RAPD, and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. This study was carried out to assess the utility of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers generated from 3' untranslated regions (UTR) for genetic fingerprinting in sweet cherry. A total of 114 sweet cherry germplasm representing advanced selections, commercial cultivars, and old cultivars imported from different parts of the world were screened with seven SSR markers developed from other Prunus species and with 40 SNPs obtained from 3' UTR sequences of Rainier and Bing sweet cherry cultivars. Both types of marker study had 99 accessions in common. The SSR data was used to validate the SNP results. Results showed that the average number of alleles per locus, mean observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and polymorphic information content values were higher in SSRs than in SNPs although both set of markers were similar in their grouping of the sweet cherry accessions as shown in the dendrogram. SNPs were able to distinguish sport mutants from their wild type germplasm. For example, "Stella" was separated from "Compact Stella." This demonstrates the greater power of SNPs for discriminating mutants from their original parents than SSRs. In addition, SNP markers confirmed parentage and also determined relationships of the accessions in a manner consistent with their pedigree relationships. We would recommend the use of 3' UTR SNPs for genetic fingerprinting, parentage verification, gene mapping, and study of genetic diversity in sweet cherry. PMID:22737155

  8. No Evidence for Enrichment in Schizophrenia for Common Allelic Associations at Imprinted Loci

    PubMed Central

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Kirov, George; Rees, Elliott; Isles, Anthony R.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Most genetic studies assume that the function of a genetic variant is independent of the parent from which it is inherited, but this is not always true. The best known example of parent-of-origin effects arises with respect to alleles at imprinted loci. In classical imprinting, characteristically, either the maternal or paternal copy is expressed, but not both. Only alleles present in one of the parental copies of the gene, the expressed copy, is likely to contribute to disease. It has been postulated that imprinting is important in central nervous system development, and that consequently, imprinted loci may be involved in schizophrenia. If this is true, allowing for parent-of-origin effects might be important in genetic studies of schizophrenia. Here, we use genome-wide association data from one of the world’s largest samples (N = 695) of parent schizophrenia-offspring trios to test for parent-of-origin effects. To maximise power, we restricted our analyses to test two main hypotheses. If imprinting plays a disproportionate role in schizophrenia susceptibility, we postulated a) that alleles showing robust evidence for association to schizophrenia from previous genome-wide association studies should be enriched for parent-of-origin effects and b) that genes at loci imprinted in humans or mice should be enriched both for genome-wide significant associations, and in our sample, for parent-of-origin effects. Neither prediction was supported in the present study. We have shown, that it is unlikely that parent-of-origin effects or imprinting play particularly important roles in schizophrenia, although our findings do not exclude such effects at specific loci nor do they exclude such effects among rare alleles. PMID:26633303

  9. Microevolution of S-allele frequencies in wild cherry populations: respective impacts of negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Stoeckel, Solenn; Klein, Etienne K; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Musch, Brigitte; Mariette, Stphanie

    2012-02-01

    Negative frequency dependent selection (NFDS) is supposed to be the main force controlling allele evolution at the gametophytic self-incompatibility locus (S-locus) in strictly outcrossing species. Genetic drift also influences S-allele evolution. In perennial sessile organisms, evolution of allelic frequencies over two generations is mainly shaped by individual fecundities and spatial processes. Using wild cherry populations between two successive generations, we tested whether S-alleles evolved following NFDS qualitative and quantitative predictions. We showed that allelic variation was negatively correlated with parental allelic frequency as expected under NFDS. However, NFDS predictions in finite population failed to predict more than half S-allele quantitative evolution. We developed a spatially explicit mating model that included the S-locus. We studied the effects of self-incompatibility and local drift within populations due to pollen dispersal in spatially distributed individuals, and variation in male fecundity on male mating success and allelic frequency evolution. Male mating success was negatively related to male allelic frequency as expected under NFDS. Spatial genetic structure combined with self-incompatibility resulted in higher effective pollen dispersal. Limited pollen dispersal in structured distributions of individuals and genotypes and unequal pollen production significantly contributed to S-allele frequency evolution by creating local drift effects strong enough to counteract the NFDS effect on some alleles. PMID:22276543

  10. Novel complex disease allele mutations in cleidocranial dysplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Anthonappa, Robert P; Yan-Hui, Fan; King, Nigel M; Rabie, Abu Bakr M; You-Qiang, Song

    2014-11-01

    This study reports a novel identical complex disease allele harboring two non-synonymous mutations that were identified in two southern Chinese individuals of the same family with cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD). Blood samples were obtained from the proband, his parents, plus 100 matched control subjects. Exons 0 to 7 of the RUNX2 gene were amplified using specific primers and sequenced. Multiple sequence alignment and protein structure modeling was performed using ClustalW2 and MODBASE software while PolyPhen-2 and MutationTaster applications were employed to predict the disease-causing potential of the identified mutations. A complex disease allele in two affected individuals harboring two non-synonymous mutations in a cis-position on exons 4 (D273N) and 5 (P299L) were identified. The identified mutations were in the conserved region and changed the protein structure. PMID:24935264

  11. Allelic Variation in Paralogs of GDP-l-Galactose Phosphorylase Is a Major Determinant of Vitamin C Concentrations in Apple Fruit1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Chagné, David; Laing, William A.; Keulemans, Johan; Davey, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genetic factors underlying the regulation of fruit vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid [AsA]) concentrations, quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies were carried out in an F1 progeny derived from a cross between the apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars Telamon and Braeburn over three years. QTL were identified for AsA, glutathione, total antioxidant activity in both flesh and skin tissues, and various quality traits, including flesh browning. Four regions on chromosomes 10, 11, 16, and 17 contained stable fruit AsA-QTL clusters. Mapping of AsA metabolic genes identified colocations between orthologs of GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and nucleobase-ascorbate transporter within these QTL clusters. Of particular interest are the three paralogs of MdGGP, which all colocated within AsA-QTL clusters. Allelic variants of MdGGP1 and MdGGP3 derived from the cultivar Braeburn parent were also consistently associated with higher fruit total AsA concentrations both within the mapping population (up to 10-fold) and across a range of commercial apple germplasm (up to 6-fold). Striking differences in the expression of the cv Braeburn MdGGP1 allele between fruit from high- and low-AsA genotypes clearly indicate a key role for MdGGP1 in the regulation of fruit AsA concentrations, and this MdGGP allele-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism marker represents an excellent candidate for directed breeding for enhanced fruit AsA concentrations. Interestingly, colocations were also found between MdDHAR3-3 and a stable QTL for browning in the cv Telamon parent, highlighting links between the redox status of the AsA pool and susceptibility to flesh browning. PMID:23001142

  12. Allelic loss in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang-Feng, T L; Han, H; Chen, K C; Li, S B; Claus, E B; Carcangiu, M L; Chambers, S K; Chambers, J T; Schwartz, P E

    1993-06-19

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was examined at 86 loci distributed on every chromosomal arm in 50 human ovarian tumors. Frequent allele losses were observed on chromosomes 13q (42%), 17p (42%), 17q (45%), and Xp (41%). Deletion mapping on chromosome 17 revealed a candidate gene on the long arm distal to D17S41/S74 for ovarian cancer which is distant from the locus for early onset breast cancer. LOH on chromosome 17q was found to be concordant with LOH on chromosomes 3p, 13q, 17p and Xp suggesting that it may be an early event in neoplastic development. These findings indicate that multiple tumor-suppressor genes for ovarian cancer possibly exist on chromosomes 13q, 17, and/or Xp and provide the basis for the identification of candidate gene(s) associated with ovarian cancer. The chromosomal mechanisms resulting in allele losses in ovarian cancer include deletion, deletion/duplication, mitotic recombination and monosomy, in concordance with the developed genetic model. PMID:8099899

  13. Mixtures with relatives and linked markers.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Guro; Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Egeland, Thore

    2016-05-01

    Mixture DNA profiles commonly appear in forensic genetics, and a large number of statistical methods and software are available for such cases. However, most of the literature concerns mixtures where the contributors are assumed unrelated and the genetic markers are unlinked. In this paper, we consider mixtures of linked markers and related contributors. If no relationships are involved, linkage can be ignored. While unlinked markers can be treated independently, linkage introduces dependencies. The use of linked markers presents statistical and computational challenges, but may also lead to a considerable increase in power since the number of markers available is much larger if we do not require the markers to be unlinked. In addition, some cases that cannot be solved with an unlimited number of unlinked autosomal markers can be solved with linked markers. We focus on two special cases of linked markers: pairs of linked autosomal markers and X-chromosomal markers. A framework is presented for calculation of likelihood ratios for mixtures with general relationships and with linkage between any number of markers. Finally, we explore the effect of linkage disequilibrium, also called allelic association, on the likelihood ratio. PMID:26614310

  14. CAPN1, CAST, and DGAT1 genetic effects on preweaning performance, carcass quality traits, and residual variance of tenderness in a beef cattle population selected for haplotype and allele equalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC III) was subjected to marker assisted selection for multiple years to equalize specific marker frequencies to 1) estimate effect size an...

  15. Evidence for Mito-Nuclear and Sex-Linked Reproductive Barriers between the Hybrid Italian Sparrow and Its Parent Species

    PubMed Central

    Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Bailey, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of reproductive isolation between homoploid hybrid species and their parent species have rarely been carried out. Here we investigate reproductive barriers between a recently recognized hybrid bird species, the Italian sparrow Passer italiae and its parent species, the house sparrow P. domesticus and Spanish sparrow P. hispaniolensis. Reproductive barriers can be difficult to study in hybrid species due to lack of geographical contact between taxa. However, the Italian sparrow lives parapatrically with the house sparrow and both sympatrically and parapatrically with the Spanish sparrow. Through whole-transcriptome sequencing of six individuals of each of the two parent species we identified a set of putatively parent species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. After filtering for coverage, genotyping success (>97%) and multiple SNPs per gene, we retained 86 species-informative, genic, nuclear and mitochondrial SNP markers from 84 genes for analysis of 612 male individuals. We show that a disproportionately large number of sex-linked genes, as well as the mitochondria and nuclear genes with mitochondrial function, exhibit sharp clines at the boundaries between the hybrid and the parent species, suggesting a role for mito-nuclear and sex-linked incompatibilities in forming reproductive barriers. We suggest that genomic conflict via interactions between mitochondria and sex-linked genes with mitochondrial function (“mother's curse”) at one boundary and centromeric drive at the other may best explain our findings. Hybrid speciation in the Italian sparrow may therefore be influenced by mechanisms similar to those involved in non-hybrid speciation, but with the formation of two geographically separated species boundaries instead of one. Spanish sparrow alleles at some loci have spread north to form reproductive barriers with house sparrows, while house sparrow alleles at different loci, including some on the same chromosome, have spread in the opposite direction to form barriers against Spanish sparrows. PMID:24415954

  16. Always look on both sides: Phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily,...

  17. Molecular mapping of the mutant fap4(A24) allele for elevated palmitate concentration in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.] oil with an elevated palmitate concentration is useful for some food and industrial applications. The objective of this study was to map the genetic location of the fap4(A24) allele that controls an increase in palmitate concentration and to identify molecular marker...

  18. Genomic analysis of hybrid rice varieties reveals numerous superior alleles that contribute to heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuehui; Yang, Shihua; Gong, Junyi; Zhao, Yan; Feng, Qi; Gong, Hao; Li, Wenjun; Zhan, Qilin; Cheng, Benyi; Xia, Junhui; Chen, Neng; Hao, Zhongna; Liu, Kunyan; Zhu, Chuanrang; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Danlin; Zhou, Congcong; Lu, Yiqi; Weng, Qijun; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Li, Jiayang; Han, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of heterosis is one of the most important applications of genetics in agriculture. However, the genetic mechanisms of heterosis are only partly understood, and a global view of heterosis from a representative number of hybrid combinations is lacking. Here we develop an integrated genomic approach to construct a genome map for 1,495 elite hybrid rice varieties and their inbred parental lines. We investigate 38 agronomic traits and identify 130 associated loci. In-depth analyses of the effects of heterozygous genotypes reveal that there are only a few loci with strong overdominance effects in hybrids, but a strong correlation is observed between the yield and the number of superior alleles. While most parental inbred lines have only a small number of superior alleles, high-yielding hybrid varieties have several. We conclude that the accumulation of numerous rare superior alleles with positive dominance is an important contributor to the heterotic phenomena. PMID:25651972

  19. Transgene- and locus-dependent imprinting reveals allele-specific chromosome conformations.

    PubMed

    Lonfat, Nicolas; Montavon, Thomas; Jebb, David; Tschopp, Patrick; Nguyen Huynh, Thi Hanh; Zakany, Jozsef; Duboule, Denis

    2013-07-16

    When positioned into the integrin α-6 gene, an Hoxd9lacZ reporter transgene displayed parental imprinting in mouse embryos. While the expression from the paternal allele was comparable with patterns seen for the same transgene when present at the neighboring HoxD locus, almost no signal was scored at this integration site when the transgene was inherited from the mother, although the Itga6 locus itself is not imprinted. The transgene exhibited maternal allele-specific DNA hypermethylation acquired during oogenesis, and its expression silencing was reversible on passage through the male germ line. Histone modifications also corresponded to profiles described at known imprinted loci. Chromosome conformation analyses revealed distinct chromatin microarchitectures, with a more compact structure characterizing the maternally inherited repressed allele. Such genetic analyses of well-characterized transgene insertions associated with a de novo-induced parental imprint may help us understand the molecular determinants of imprinting. PMID:23818637

  20. Evidence of Allelic Suppression for Transcripts Expressed in Day 30 Pig Embryos by SNP Genotyping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic imprinting results in alleles being differentially expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Parthenogenetic and biparental pig embryo gene expression profiles were compared using three cDNA microarray platforms. Comparison of the profiles of the two tissue types indicated different...

  1. A marker-assisted backcross approach for developing submergence-tolerant rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Neeraja, C N; Maghirang-Rodriguez, R; Pamplona, A; Heuer, S; Collard, B C Y; Septiningsih, E M; Vergara, G; Sanchez, D; Xu, K; Ismail, A M; Mackill, D J

    2007-10-01

    Submergence stress regularly affects 15 million hectares or more of rainfed lowland rice areas in South and Southeast Asia. A major QTL on chromosome 9, Sub1, has provided the opportunity to apply marker assisted backcrossing (MAB) to develop submergence tolerant versions of rice cultivars that are widely grown in the region. In the present study, molecular markers that were tightly linked with Sub1, flanking Sub1, and unlinked to Sub1 were used to apply foreground, recombinant, and background selection, respectively, in backcrosses between a submergence-tolerant donor and the widely grown recurrent parent Swarna. By the BC(2)F(2) generation a submergence tolerant plant was identified that possessed Swarna type simple sequence repeat (SSR) alleles on all fragments analyzed except the tip segment of rice chromosome 9 that possessed the Sub1 locus. A BC(3)F(2) double recombinant plant was identified that was homozygous for all Swarna type alleles except for an approximately 2.3-3.4 Mb region surrounding the Sub1 locus. The results showed that the mega variety Swarna could be efficiently converted to a submergence tolerant variety in three backcross generations, involving a time of two to three years. Polymorphic markers for foreground and recombinant selection were identified for four other mega varieties to develop a wider range of submergence tolerant varieties to meet the needs of farmers in the flood-prone regions. This approach demonstrates the effective use of marker assisted selection for a major QTL in a molecular breeding program. PMID:17657470

  2. Considerations for Marker-assisted selection in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) offers considerable promise but requires careful planning. Among the first DNA markers used for peanut improvement were wild species-derived alleles for nematode resistance, now being combined with the high-oleic trait. These are screened as qualitative traits. These ...

  3. Considerations for marker-assisted selection in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) offers considerable promise but requires careful planning. Among the first DNA markers used for peanut improvement were wild species-derived alleles for nematode resistance, now being combined with the high-oleic trait. These are screened as qualitative traits. Thes...

  4. Allelic imbalance within the E-cadherin gene is an infrequent event in prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murant, S J; Rolley, N; Phillips, S M; Stower, M; Maitland, N J

    2000-01-01

    By exploiting two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within the E-cadherin gene, at 16q22, we have determined the frequency of allelic imbalance at this proposed tumor suppressor locus in a series of human prostatic carcinoma DNA samples. Whereas results with seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers flanking the E-cadherin locus confirmed the existence of three separate loci on chromosome 16, at which allelic imbalance increased with increasing loss of tumor cell differentiation, no allelic imbalance within the E-cadherin gene was detected either by single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis or by direct sequencing. We conclude that the loss of E-cadherin function observed in prostate cancer is not a result of allelic deletion. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 27:104-109, 2000. PMID:10564592

  5. Allelic Analysis of Sheath Blight Resistance with Association Mapping in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A.; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r = −0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice. PMID:22427867

  6. Development of genic-SSR markers by deep transcriptome sequencing in pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh], one of the most important food legumes of semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, has limited genomic resources, particularly expressed sequence based (genic) markers. We report a comprehensive set of validated genic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using deep transcriptome sequencing, and its application in genetic diversity analysis and mapping. Results In this study, 43,324 transcriptome shotgun assembly unigene contigs were assembled from 1.696 million 454 GS-FLX sequence reads of separate pooled cDNA libraries prepared from leaf, root, stem and immature seed of two pigeonpea varieties, Asha and UPAS 120. A total of 3,771 genic-SSR loci, excluding homopolymeric and compound repeats, were identified; of which 2,877 PCR primer pairs were designed for marker development. Dinucleotide was the most common repeat motif with a frequency of 60.41%, followed by tri- (34.52%), hexa- (2.62%), tetra- (1.67%) and pentanucleotide (0.76%) repeat motifs. Primers were synthesized and tested for 772 of these loci with repeat lengths of ≥18 bp. Of these, 550 markers were validated for consistent amplification in eight diverse pigeonpea varieties; 71 were found to be polymorphic on agarose gel electrophoresis. Genetic diversity analysis was done on 22 pigeonpea varieties and eight wild species using 20 highly polymorphic genic-SSR markers. The number of alleles at these loci ranged from 4-10 and the polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.46 to 0.72. Neighbor-joining dendrogram showed distinct separation of the different groups of pigeonpea cultivars and wild species. Deep transcriptome sequencing of the two parental lines helped in silico identification of polymorphic genic-SSR loci to facilitate the rapid development of an intra-species reference genetic map, a subset of which was validated for expected allelic segregation in the reference mapping population. Conclusion We developed 550 validated genic-SSR markers in pigeonpea using deep transcriptome sequencing. From these, 20 highly polymorphic markers were used to evaluate the genetic relationship among species of the genus Cajanus. A comprehensive set of genic-SSR markers was developed as an important genomic resource for diversity analysis and genetic mapping in pigeonpea. PMID:21251263

  7. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Noble, E P; Blum, K; Khalsa, M E; Ritchie, T; Montgomery, A; Wood, R C; Fitch, R J; Ozkaragoz, T; Sheridan, P J; Anglin, M D

    1993-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine allelic prevalence of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene in male cocaine-dependent (CD) Caucasian (non-Hispanic) subjects and to determine the relationship of DRD2 alleles to family history and selected behavioral measures. The prevalence of the A1 allele in CD subjects (n = 53) was 50.9%. It was significantly higher than either the 16.0% prevalence (P < 10(-4)) in non-substance abusing controls (n = 100) or the 30.9% prevalence (P < 10(-2)) in population controls (n = 265) wherein substance abusers were not excluded. Similarly, a significantly higher prevalence (P < 10(-2)) of the B1 allele was found in CD subjects (n = 52) compared with non-substance abusing controls (n = 53); 38.5% vs. 13.2%. Logistic regression analysis of CD subjects identified potent routes of cocaine use and the interaction of early deviant behaviors and parental alcoholism as significant risk factors associated with the A1 allele. The cumulative number of these three risk factors in CD subjects was positively and significantly (P < 10(-3)) related to A1 allelic prevalence. The data showing a strong association of the minor alleles (A1 and B1) of the DRD2 with cocaine dependence suggest that a gene, located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11, confers susceptibility to this drug disorder. PMID:8261891

  8. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae).

    PubMed

    Quan, Zhiwu; Pan, Lei; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and identified in the aquatic plant Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae). This species, which belongs to basal Magnoliophyta, reproduces sexually. All of these 11 microsatellite markers yielded 25 alleles in a survey of a wild population of 34 individuals. Two or three alleles per locus were detected, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.056 to 0.634 and observed heterozygosity from 0.000 to 0.088. These simple sequence repeat markers will be useful for evaluating the genetic structure of the E. ferox population in the future. PMID:21564641

  9. Combination of Eight Alleles at Four Quantitative Trait Loci Determines Grain Length in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuxiang; Ji, Zhijuan; Wen, Zhihua; Liang, Yan; Yang, Changdeng

    2016-01-01

    Grain length is an important quantitative trait in rice (Oryza sativa L.) that influences both grain yield and exterior quality. Although many quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for grain length have been identified, it is still unclear how different alleles from different QTLs regulate grain length coordinately. To explore the mechanisms of QTL combination in the determination of grain length, five mapping populations, including two F2 populations, an F3 population, an F7 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, and an F8 RIL population, were developed from the cross between the U.S. tropical japonica variety ‘Lemont’ and the Chinese indica variety ‘Yangdao 4’ and grown under different environmental conditions. Four QTLs (qGL-3-1, qGL-3-2, qGL-4, and qGL-7) for grain length were detected using both composite interval mapping and multiple interval mapping methods in the mapping populations. In each locus, there was an allele from one parent that increased grain length and another allele from another parent that decreased it. The eight alleles in the four QTLs were analyzed to determine whether these alleles act additively across loci, and lead to a linear relationship between the predicted breeding value of QTLs and phenotype. Linear regression analysis suggested that the combination of eight alleles determined grain length. Plants carrying more grain length-increasing alleles had longer grain length than those carrying more grain length-decreasing alleles. This trend was consistent in all five mapping populations and demonstrated the regulation of grain length by the four QTLs. Thus, these QTLs are ideal resources for modifying grain length in rice. PMID:26942914

  10. Multiplexed microsatellite markers for seven Metarhizium species.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Johanna; Lutz, Andy; Widmer, Franco; Rehner, Stephen A; Leuchtmann, Adrian; Enkerli, Jürg

    2015-11-01

    Cross-species transferability of 41 previously published simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers was assessed for 11 species of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium. A collection of 65 Metarhizium strains including all 54 used in a recent phylogenetic revision of the genus were characterized. Between 15 and 34 polymorphic SSR markers produced scorable PCR amplicons in seven species, including M. anisopliae, M. brunneum, M. guizhouense, M. lepidiotae, M. majus, M. pingshaense, and M. robertsii. To provide genotyping tools for concurrent analysis of these seven species fifteen markers grouped in five multiplex pools were selected based on high allelic diversity and easy scorability of SSR chromatograms. PMID:26407949

  11. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources. PMID:26606925

  12. Allelic differences within and among sister spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatum suggest segregation at sporulation.

    PubMed

    Boon, Eva; Zimmerman, Erin; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are root-inhabiting fungi that form mutualistic symbioses with their host plants. AMF are made up of coenocytic networks of hyphae through which nuclei and organelles can freely migrate. In this study, we investigated the possibility of a genetic bottleneck and segregation of allelic variation at sporulation for a low-copy Polymerase1-like gene, PLS. Specifically, our objectives were (1) to estimate what allelic diversity is passed on to a single spore (2) to determine whether this diversity is less than the total amount of variation found in all spores (3) to investigate whether there is any differential segregation of allelic variation. We inoculated three tomato plants with a single spore of Glomus etunicatum each and after six months sampled between two and three daughter spores per tomato plant. Pyrosequencing PLS amplicons in eight spores revealed high levels of allelic diversity; between 43 and 152 alleles per spore. We corroborated the spore pyrosequencing results with Sanger- and pyrosequenced allele distributions from the original parent isolate. Both sequencing methods retrieved the most abundant alleles from the offspring spore allele distributions. Our results indicate that individual spores contain only a subset of the total allelic variation from the pooled spores and parent isolate. Patterns of allele diversity between spores suggest the possibility for segregation of PLS alleles among spores. We conclude that a genetic bottleneck could potentially occur during sporulation in AMF, with resulting differences in genetic variation among sister spores. We suggest that the effects of this bottleneck may be countered by anastomosis (hyphal fusion) between related hyphae. PMID:24386173

  13. Allelic Differences within and among Sister Spores of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus etunicatum Suggest Segregation at Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are root-inhabiting fungi that form mutualistic symbioses with their host plants. AMF are made up of coenocytic networks of hyphae through which nuclei and organelles can freely migrate. In this study, we investigated the possibility of a genetic bottleneck and segregation of allelic variation at sporulation for a low-copy Polymerase1-like gene, PLS. Specifically, our objectives were (1) to estimate what allelic diversity is passed on to a single spore (2) to determine whether this diversity is less than the total amount of variation found in all spores (3) to investigate whether there is any differential segregation of allelic variation. We inoculated three tomato plants with a single spore of Glomus etunicatum each and after six months sampled between two and three daughter spores per tomato plant. Pyrosequencing PLS amplicons in eight spores revealed high levels of allelic diversity; between 43 and 152 alleles per spore. We corroborated the spore pyrosequencing results with Sanger- and pyrosequenced allele distributions from the original parent isolate. Both sequencing methods retrieved the most abundant alleles from the offspring spore allele distributions. Our results indicate that individual spores contain only a subset of the total allelic variation from the pooled spores and parent isolate. Patterns of allele diversity between spores suggest the possibility for segregation of PLS alleles among spores. We conclude that a genetic bottleneck could potentially occur during sporulation in AMF, with resulting differences in genetic variation among sister spores. We suggest that the effects of this bottleneck may be countered by anastomosis (hyphal fusion) between related hyphae. PMID:24386173

  14. Characterization of a New Pm2 Allele Conferring Powdery Mildew Resistance in the Wheat Germplasm Line FG-1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pengtao; Xu, Hongxng; Li, Lihui; Zhang, Hongxia; Han, Guohao; Xu, Yunfeng; Fu, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Xiaotian; An, Diaoguo

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew has a negative impact on wheat production. Novel host resistance increases the diversity of resistance genes and helps to control the disease. In this study, wheat line FG-1 imported from France showed a high level of powdery mildew resistance at both the seedling and adult stages. An F2 population and F2:3 families from the cross FG-1 × Mingxian 169 both fit Mendelian ratios for a single dominant resistance gene when tested against multiple avirulent Blumeria tritici f. sp. tritici (Bgt) races. This gene was temporarily designated PmFG. PmFG was mapped on the multi-allelic Pm2 locus of chromosome 5DS using seven SSR, 10 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-derived and two SCAR markers with the flanking markers Xbwm21/Xcfd81/Xscar112 (distal) and Xbwm25 (proximal) at 0.3 and 0.5 cM being the closest. Marker SCAR203 co-segregated with PmFG. Allelism tests between PmFG and documented Pm2 alleles confirmed that PmFG was allelic with Pm2. Line FG-1 produced a significantly different reaction pattern compared to other lines with genes at or near Pm2 when tested against 49 Bgt isolates. The PmFG-linked marker alleles detected by the SNP-derived markers revealed significant variation between FG-1 and other lines with genes at or near Pm2. It was concluded that PmFG is a new allele at the Pm2 locus. Data from seven closely linked markers tested on 31 wheat cultivars indicated opportunities for marker-assisted pyramiding of this gene with other genes for powdery mildew resistance and additional traits. PMID:27200022

  15. Correlation-based inference for linkage disequilibrium with multiple alleles.

    PubMed

    Zaykin, Dmitri V; Pudovkin, Alexander; Weir, Bruce S

    2008-09-01

    The correlation between alleles at a pair of genetic loci is a measure of linkage disequilibrium. The square of the sample correlation multiplied by sample size provides the usual test statistic for the hypothesis of no disequilibrium for loci with two alleles and this relation has proved useful for study design and marker selection. Nevertheless, this relation holds only in a diallelic case, and an extension to multiple alleles has not been made. Here we introduce a similar statistic, R2, which leads to a correlation-based test for loci with multiple alleles: for a pair of loci with k and m alleles, and a sample of n individuals, the approximate distribution of n(k - 1)(m - 1)/(km)R2 under independence between loci is chi2(k-1(m-1). One advantage of this statistic is that it can be interpreted as the total correlation between a pair of loci. When the phase of two-locus genotypes is known, the approach is equivalent to a test for the overall correlation between rows and columns in a contingency table. In the phase-known case, R2 is the sum of the squared sample correlations for all km 2 x 2 subtables formed by collapsing to one allele vs. the rest at each locus. We examine the approximate distribution under the null of independence for R2 and report its close agreement with the exact distribution obtained by permutation. The test for independence using R2 is a strong competitor to approaches such as Pearson's chi square, Fisher's exact test, and a test based on Cressie and Read's power divergence statistic. We combine this approach with our previous composite-disequilibrium measures to address the case when the genotypic phase is unknown. Calculation of the new multiallele test statistic and its P-value is very simple and utilizes the approximate distribution of R2. We provide a computer program that evaluates approximate as well as "exact" permutational P-values. PMID:18757931

  16. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  17. Identification of repeat sequence heterogeneity at the polymorphic short tandem repeat locus HUMTH01[AATG]n and reassignment of alleles in population analysis by using a locus-specific allelic ladder.

    PubMed Central

    Puers, C; Hammond, H A; Jin, L; Caskey, C T; Schumm, J W

    1993-01-01

    An allelic ladder containing amplified sequences of seven alleles of the polymorphic human tyrosine hydroxylase locus, HUMTH01, was constructed and employed as a standard marker. Sequence analysis of each ladder component indicates that fragments differ by integral multiples of the AATG core repeat sequence characteristic of this locus. Individual alleles are designated "5" through "11," according to the number of complete reiterations of the core repeat contained within them. Comparison of the HUMTH01 allelic ladder with DNA samples amplified at this locus revealed core repeat length heterogeneity (i.e., deletions or insertions shorter than one core repeat) within the human population. In particular, a common allele was identified which migrates more quickly than allele 10, but more slowly than allele 9, on electrophoresis through a denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Sequence analysis of this allele, designated "10-1," reveals lack of a single adenine normally present in the seventh copy of the AATG. The allelic ladder was used to reevaluate previously published population data. Results of testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population substructure were not altered significantly by these modifications. Images Figure 1 PMID:8105685

  18. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of Chinese sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cultivars using Insertion-Deletion (InDel) and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sesame is an important and ancient oil crop in tropical and subtropical areas. China is one of the most important sesame producing countries with many germplasm accessions and excellent cultivars. Domestication and modern plant breeding have presumably narrowed the genetic basis of cultivated sesame. Several modern sesame cultivars were bred with a limited number of landrace cultivars in their pedigree. The genetic variation was subsequently reduced by genetic drift and selection. Characterization of genetic diversity of these cultivars by molecular markers is of great value to assist parental line selection and breeding strategy design. Results Three hundred and forty nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 79 insertion-deletion (InDel) markers were developed from cDNA library and reduced-representation sequencing of a sesame cultivar Zhongzhi 14, respectively. Combined with previously published SSR markers, 88 polymorphic markers were used to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, population structure, and allele distribution among 130 Chinese sesame accessions including 82 cultivars, 44 landraces and 4 wild germplasm accessions. A total of 325 alleles were detected, with the average gene diversity of 0.432. Model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of five subgroups belonging to two main groups, which were consistent with the results from principal coordinate analysis (PCA), phylogenetic clustering and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Several missing or unique alleles were identified from particular types, subgroups or families, even though they share one or both parental/progenitor lines. Conclusions This report presented a by far most comprehensive characterization of the molecular and genetic diversity of sesame cultivars in China. InDels are more polymorphic than SSRs, but their ability for deciphering genetic diversity compared to the later. Improved sesame cultivars have narrower genetic basis than landraces, reflecting the effect of genetic drift or selection during breeding processes. Comparative analysis of allele distribution revealed genetic divergence between improved cultivars and landraces, as well as between cultivars released in different years. These results will be useful for assessing cultivars and for marker-assisted breeding in sesame. PMID:24641723

  19. Functional analysis of human ornithine decarboxylase alleles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Harris, R B; Rosson, D; Boorman, D; O'Brien, T G

    2000-11-15

    It has been known for > 10 years that there are two alleles of the human ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene, defined by a polymorphic PstI RFLP in intron 1. We have sequenced a large portion of each of the two alleles, including some of the 5' promoter region, exon 1, intron 1, and exon 2, and determined that a single nucleotide polymorphism at base +317 (relative to transcription start site) is responsible for the presence or absence of the PstI restriction site. We have developed two genotyping assays, a PCR-RFLP assay and a high-throughput TaqMan-based method, and determined the ODC genotype distribution in >900 North American DNA samples. On the basis of its location between two closely spaced Myc/Max binding sites (E-boxes), we speculated that the single nucleotide polymorphism at base +317 could have functional significance. Results of transfection assays with allele-specific reporter constructs support this hypothesis. The promoter/regulatory region derived from the minor ODC allele (A allele) was more effective in driving luciferase expression in these assays than the identical region from the major allele (G allele). Our results suggest that individuals homozygous for the A allele may be capable of greater ODC expression after environmental exposures, especially those that up-regulate c-MYC expression. PMID:11103791

  20. Genetic Variability and Geographic Diversity of the Common Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Populations from the Midwest Using Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Narain, Ralph B; Lalithambika, Sreedevi; Kamble, Shripat T

    2015-07-01

    With the recent global resurgence of the bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.), there is a need to better understand its biology, ecology, and ability to establish populations. Bed bugs are domestic pests that feed mainly on mammalian blood. Although bed bugs have not been implicated as vectors of pathogens, their biting activity inflicts severe insomnia and allergic reactions. Moreover, they have recently developed resistance to various insecticides, which requires further molecular research to determine genetic variation and appropriate interventions. Population dynamics, including genetic differentiation and genetic distance of 10 populations from the Midwest were analyzed in this study. The bed bug samples collected by pest control companies were genotyped using eight species-specific microsatellite markers. Results showed all eight markers were polymorphic, with 8-16 alleles per locus, suggesting high genetic diversity. The FST values were >0.25, signifying pronounced genetic differentiation. The G-test results also indicated high genetic differentiation among populations. The frequency of the most common allele across all eight loci was 0.42. The coefficient of relatedness between each of the populations was >0.5, indicative of sibling or parent-offspring relationships, while the FIS and its confidence interval values were statistically insignificant within the populations tested. The populations departed from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, possibly because of high heterozygosity. The genetic distance analysis using a neighbor-joining tree showed that the populations from Kansas City, MO, were genetically separate from most of those from Nebraska, indicating a geographic pattern of genetic structure. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of using microsatellite markers to study bed bugs population structure, thereby improving our understanding of bed bug population dynamics in the Midwest. Overall, this study showed a high genetic diversity and identified several new alleles in the bed bug populations in the Midwest. PMID:26335463

  1. Dynamics of molecular markers linked to the resistance loci in a mosquito-Plasmodium system.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guiyun; Severson, David W

    2003-01-01

    Models on the evolution of resistance to parasitism generally assume fitness tradeoffs between the costs of being parasitized and the costs associated with resistance. This study tested this assumption using the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti and malaria parasite Plasmodium gallinaceum system. Experimental mosquito populations were created by mixing susceptible and resistant strains in equal proportions, and then the dynamics of markers linked to loci for Plasmodium resistance and other unlinked neutral markers were determined over 12 generations. We found that when the mixed population was maintained under parasite-free conditions, the frequencies of alleles specific to the susceptible strain at markers closely linked to the loci for resistance (QTL markers) as well as other unlinked markers increased significantly in the first generation and then fluctuated around equilibrium frequencies for all six markers. However, when the mixed population was exposed to an infected blood meal every generation, allele frequencies at the QTL markers for resistance were not significantly changed. Small population size caused significant random fluctuations of allele frequencies at all marker loci. Consistent allele frequency changes in the QTL markers and other unlinked markers suggest that the reduced fitness in the resistant population has a genome-wide effect on the genetic makeup of the mixed population. Continuous exposure to parasites promoted the maintenance of alleles from the resistant Moyo-R strain in the mixed population. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed malaria control strategy through genetic disruption of vector competence. PMID:12807772

  2. Concordance between parental origin of chromosome 13q loss and chromosome 6p duplication in sporadic retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, A.; Sapienza, C. ); Hansen, M.; Strong, L. ); Jones, P.A. ); Hadjistilianou, D.; Mastrangelo, D. ); Griegel, S.; Rajewsky, M.F. ); Shields, J. )

    1994-02-01

    Two hypotheses are capable of explaining nonrandom loss of one parent's alleles at tumor suppressor loci in sporadic cases of several pediatric cancers, including retinoblastoma - namely, preferential germ-line mutation or chromosome imprinting. The authors have examined 74 cases of sporadic retinoblastoma for tumors in which at least two genetic events - loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 13q markers and formation of an isochromosome 6p - have occurred. Sixteen cases were found to contain both events. In 13 of 16 such tumors, the chromosomes 13q that were lost and chromosomes 6p that were duplicated are derived from the same parent. These data may be explained within the framework of the genome imprinting model but are not predicted by preferential germ-line mutation. 39 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Novel Method for Analysis of Allele Specific Expression in Triploid Oryzias latipes Reveals Consistent Pattern of Allele Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Tzintzuni I.; Matos, Isa; Shen, Yingjia; Pabuwal, Vagmita; Coelho, Maria Manuela; Wakamatsu, Yuko; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE) on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types) and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues). In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82%) shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18%) displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78%) displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression. PMID:24945156

  4. Phenotypic and QTL allelic associations among embryonic developmental rate, body size, and precocious maturation in male rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Colin J; Bernier, Nicholas J; Danzmann, Roy G; Ferguson, Moira M

    2014-12-01

    We examined associations among embryonic developmental rate (EDR) as measured by hatching time, juvenile body weight (BW) and propensity for precocial sexual maturation (PM) at two years in two sets of diallel crosses of rainbow trout produced in two spawning seasons (September and December) at both the phenotypic and genotypic levels. Dams and sires had highly significant effects on the body weight of their male juvenile progeny on three measurement dates where parental effects remained consistent through time. Dams spawning earlier in the season produced a greater number of mature male progeny (56.7%) than did later spawning females (25.6%). The families from the December lot showed the expected associations among traits in that earlier hatching fish were significantly heavier on all three measurement dates than later hatching fish and were more likely to mature earlier when families were combined. Moreover, earlier maturing fish were significantly heavier on the third measurement date than those that did not mature. In the September lot, mature fish were significantly heavier as juveniles on all three measurement dates than immature fish as predicted but no significant associations were detected between EDR and BW or between PM and EDR. Significant QTL were detected for all three traits but the linkage group location varied depending on the trait and half-sib group analyzed (across dams and sires in each lot). A strong QTL for EDR with genome-wide effects was detected on linkage group RT-8 in all four half-sib analyses. None of the four linkage groups analyzed had QTL for all three traits. However, the phenotypic association between EDR and BW observed in the December lot was supported by the co-localization of QTL to linkage group RT-8 and a positive coupling of allelic effects. RT-8 marker alleles significantly associated with faster EDR were also associated with larger BW and this was observed in numerous families on all three measurement dates. Linkage group RT-24 had weaker QTL for all three traits in the September lot but these were not detected in the same half-sib group simultaneously. At the allelic level, marker alleles for faster EDR were also associated with BW but only at the third measurement date and the progeny of one male. Similarly, RT-30 had weaker QTL for EDR and PM in the December paternal half-sib analysis but no associations were evident at the allelic level. The detection of associations between life history traits and growth at both the phenotypic and genotypic levels has significant implications to aquaculture breeding programs where selection for a desirable trait may lead to unwanted alterations of other traits. Furthermore, the differences between spawning season lots emphasize the complex interaction between environment and genotype on economically important traits and the resulting challenges for aquaculture. PMID:25023604

  5. Eleven novel polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers from the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Ong, C C; Teh, C H; Tan, S G; Yusoff, K; Yap, C K

    2008-04-01

    We report on the characterization of 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci in P. viridis, the first set of such markers developed and characterized for this species. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 7, whereas the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.0447 to 0.4837. These markers should prove useful as powerful genetic markers for this species. PMID:18666563

  6. Allelic Variation in a Willow Warbler Genomic Region Is Associated with Climate Clines

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Keith W.; Liedvogel, Miriam; Addison, BriAnne; Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Lifjeld, Jan T.; Lundberg, Max; Åkesson, Susanne; Bensch, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1) that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1) allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2) these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3) the northern-allele or “altitude variant” of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios. PMID:24788148

  7. Genetic characterization of pea (Pisum sativum) germplasm from Turkey using morphological and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Sarikamiş, G; Yanmaz, R; Ermiş, S; Bakir, M; Yüksel, C

    2010-01-01

    The need for the conservation of plant genetic resources has been widely accepted. Germplasm characterization and evaluation yield information for more efficient utilization of these valuable resources. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pea germplasm conserved at the Aegean Agricultural Research Institute of Turkey using morphological and simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based molecular approaches. Genetic characterization of 30 pea genotypes collected from different regions of Turkey and 10 commercial pea cultivars was performed using the criteria of the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) (TG 7/9 Pisum sativum), and with 10 SSR markers. We originally tested 15 SSR markers; 10 of these markers were selected on the basis of high polymorphism information content in the molecular assays. Sixty-one alleles were detected at the 10 loci. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from 3 (PVSBE2) to 12 (AB53), with a mean of 6.1 alleles. The most informative loci were AB53 (12 alleles), AA355 (9 alleles), AD270 (8 alleles), A9 (7 alleles), AD61 (7 alleles), and AB25 (6 alleles). The UPGMA dendrogram defined by SSR markers revealed genetic relatedness of the pea genotypes. These findings can be used to guide future breeding studies and germplasm management of these pea genotypes. PMID:20391343

  8. Always look on both sides: phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences.

    PubMed

    Barthe, Stphanie; Gugerli, Felix; Barkley, Noelle A; Maggia, Laurent; Cardi, Cline; Scotti, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily, mutations in the target sequences follow the stepwise mutation model (SMM). Generally speaking, PCR amplicon sizes are used as direct indicators of the number of SSR repeats composing an allele with the data analysis either ignoring the extent of allele size differences or assuming that there is a direct correlation between differences in amplicon size and evolutionary distance. However, without precisely knowing the kind and distribution of polymorphism within an allele (SSR and the associated flanking region (FR) sequences), it is hard to say what kind of evolutionary message is conveyed by such a synthetic descriptor of polymorphism as DNA amplicon size. In this study, we sequenced several SSR alleles in multiple populations of three divergent tree genera and disentangled the types of polymorphisms contained in each portion of the DNA amplicon containing an SSR. The patterns of diversity provided by amplicon size variation, SSR variation itself, insertions/deletions (indels), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) observed in the FRs were compared. Amplicon size variation largely reflected SSR repeat number. The amount of variation was as large in FRs as in the SSR itself. The former contributed significantly to the phylogenetic information and sometimes was the main source of differentiation among individuals and populations contained by FR and SSR regions of SSR markers. The presence of mutations occurring at different rates within a marker's sequence offers the opportunity to analyse evolutionary events occurring on various timescales, but at the same time calls for caution in the interpretation of SSR marker data when the distribution of within-locus polymorphism is not known. PMID:22808236

  9. Allele-specific deletion in exon I of the HRAS1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kasperczyk, A; Mermer, B A; Parkinson, D R; Lonergan, J A; Krontiris, T G

    1989-01-01

    We have detected a 6-bp deletion in the untranslated first exon of a unique HRAS1 gene cloned from lymphocyte DNA of a familial melanoma patient. The deletion is without apparent functional consequence. Using an RNase protection assay, we have demonstrated the deletion in leukocyte DNAs of individuals unrelated to the patient. In these cases, the deletion marker is specifically associated with one class of common HRAS1 allele, thereby establishing the origin of the unique allele. We discuss the means by which DNA sequence heterogeneity at other loci may be rapidly analyzed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2573274

  10. Allele frequency distribution of the STR loci HUMTPOX, HUMTH01 and HUMVWA in Asturias (north Spain).

    PubMed

    Nievas Marco, P; Martínez-Jarreta, B; Abecia Martínez, E; Prades Sanchis, A; Hinojal Fonseca, R

    1999-03-01

    In order to use genetic loci in forensic identity testing, some population data are needed. This paper presents a report of allele frequency data for the loci HUMTH01, HUMTPOX and HUMVWA in a population sample from Northern Spain. No deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was detected in any of the three markers investigated and there was no evidence of association between the alleles of these loci. Statistical analysis was also carried out to obtain some parameters of medicolegal interest and comparative studies were carried out with other populations studied to date for these five loci. The Asturian sample does not differ substantially from other Caucasian and Spanish populations. PMID:10097368

  11. Identity-by-descent matrix decomposition using latent ancestral allele models.

    PubMed

    ter Braak, Cajo J F; Boer, Martin P; Totir, L Radu; Winkler, Christopher R; Smith, Oscar S; Bink, Marco C A M

    2010-07-01

    Genetic linkage and association studies are empowered by proper modeling of relatedness among individuals. Such relatedness can be inferred from marker and/or pedigree information. In this study, the genetic relatedness among n inbred individuals at a particular locus is expressed as an n x n square matrix Q. The elements of Q are identity-by-descent probabilities, that is, probabilities that two individuals share an allele descended from a common ancestor. In this representation the definition of the ancestral alleles and their number remains implicit. For human inspection and further analysis, an explicit representation in terms of the ancestral allele origin and the number of alleles is desirable. To this purpose, we decompose the matrix Q by a latent class model with K classes (latent ancestral alleles). Let P be an n x K matrix with assignment probabilities of n individuals to K classes constrained such that every element is nonnegative and each row sums to 1. The problem then amounts to approximating Q by PP(T), while disregarding the diagonal elements. This is not an eigenvalue problem because of the constraints on P. An efficient algorithm for calculating P is provided. We indicate the potential utility of the latent ancestral allele model. For representative locus-specific Q matrices constructed for a set of maize inbreds, the proposed model recovered the known ancestry. PMID:20407127

  12. S-genotype identification based on allele-specific PCR in Japanese pear

    PubMed Central

    Nashima, Kenji; Terakami, Shingo; Nishio, Sogo; Kunihisa, Miyuki; Nishitani, Chikako; Saito, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2015-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) is controlled by the single, multi-allelic S-locus. Information about the S-genotypes is important for breeding and the selection of pollen donors for fruit production. Rapid and reliable S-genotype identification system is necessary for efficient breeding of new cultivars in Japanese pear. We designed S allele-specific PCR primer pairs for ten previously reported S-RNase alleles (S1S9 and Sk) as simple and reliable method. Specific nucleotide sequences were chosen to design the primers to amplify fragments of only the corresponding S alleles. The developed primer pairs were evaluated by using homozygous S-genotypes (S1/S1S9/S9 and S4sm/S4sm) and 14 major Japanese pear cultivars, and found that S allele-specific primer pairs can identify S-genotypes effectively. The S allele-specific primer pairs developed in this study will be useful for efficient S-genotyping and for marker-assisted selection in Japanese pear breeding programs. PMID:26175617

  13. Imprinting control regions (ICRs) are marked by mono-allelic bivalent chromatin when transcriptionally inactive.

    PubMed

    Maupetit-Mhouas, Stphanie; Montibus, Bertille; Nury, David; Tayama, Chiharu; Wassef, Michel; Kota, Satya K; Fogli, Anne; Cerqueira Campos, Fabiana; Hata, Kenichiro; Feil, Robert; Margueron, Raphael; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-01-29

    Parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes is mediated by imprinting control regions (ICRs) that are constitutively marked by DNA methylation imprints on the maternal or paternal allele. Mono-allelic DNA methylation is strictly required for the process of imprinting and has to be faithfully maintained during the entire life-span. While the regulation of DNA methylation itself is well understood, the mechanisms whereby the opposite allele remains unmethylated are unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse, at maternally methylated ICRs, the paternal allele, which is constitutively associated with H3K4me2/3, is marked by default by H3K27me3 when these ICRs are transcriptionally inactive, leading to the formation of a bivalent chromatin signature. Our data suggest that at ICRs, chromatin bivalency has a protective role by ensuring that DNA on the paternal allele remains unmethylated and protected against spurious and unscheduled gene expression. Moreover, they provide the proof of concept that, beside pluripotent cells, chromatin bivalency is the default state of transcriptionally inactive CpG island promoters, regardless of the developmental stage, thereby contributing to protect cell identity. PMID:26400168

  14. Functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles reveals distinct carrier phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Rory L.; Cidado, Justin; Kim, Minsoo; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Wong, Hong Yuen; Beaver, Julia A.; Cravero, Karen; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Meeker, Alan K.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is commonly performed to identify specific individuals at risk for breast and ovarian cancers who may benefit from prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Unfortunately, it is evident that deleterious BRCA1 alleles demonstrate variable penetrance and that many BRCA1 variants of unknown significance (VUS) exist. In order to further refine hereditary risks that may be associated with specific BRCA1 alleles, we performed gene targeting to establish an isogenic panel of immortalized human breast epithelial cells harboring eight clinically relevant BRCA1 alleles. Interestingly, BRCA1 mutations and VUS had distinct, quantifiable phenotypes relative to isogenic parental BRCA1 wild type cells and controls. Heterozygous cells with known deleterious BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, C61G and R71G) demonstrated consistent phenotypes in radiation sensitivity and genomic instability assays, but showed variability in other assays. Heterozygous BRCA1 VUS cells also demonstrated assay variability, with some VUS demonstrating phenotypes more consistent with deleterious alleles. Taken together, our data suggest that BRCA1 deleterious mutations and VUS can differ in their range of tested phenotypes, suggesting they might impart varying degrees of risk. These results demonstrate that functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles could aid in classifying BRCA1 mutations and VUS, and determining BRCA allele cancer risk. PMID:26246475

  15. Imprinting control regions (ICRs) are marked by mono-allelic bivalent chromatin when transcriptionally inactive

    PubMed Central

    Maupetit-Méhouas, Stéphanie; Montibus, Bertille; Nury, David; Tayama, Chiharu; Wassef, Michel; Kota, Satya K.; Fogli, Anne; Cerqueira Campos, Fabiana; Hata, Kenichiro; Feil, Robert; Margueron, Raphael; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes is mediated by imprinting control regions (ICRs) that are constitutively marked by DNA methylation imprints on the maternal or paternal allele. Mono-allelic DNA methylation is strictly required for the process of imprinting and has to be faithfully maintained during the entire life-span. While the regulation of DNA methylation itself is well understood, the mechanisms whereby the opposite allele remains unmethylated are unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse, at maternally methylated ICRs, the paternal allele, which is constitutively associated with H3K4me2/3, is marked by default by H3K27me3 when these ICRs are transcriptionally inactive, leading to the formation of a bivalent chromatin signature. Our data suggest that at ICRs, chromatin bivalency has a protective role by ensuring that DNA on the paternal allele remains unmethylated and protected against spurious and unscheduled gene expression. Moreover, they provide the proof of concept that, beside pluripotent cells, chromatin bivalency is the default state of transcriptionally inactive CpG island promoters, regardless of the developmental stage, thereby contributing to protect cell identity. PMID:26400168

  16. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  17. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. High interpopulation homogeneity in Central Argentina as assessed by Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs)

    PubMed Central

    García, Angelina; Dermarchi, Darío A.; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Pauro, Maia; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2015-01-01

    The population of Argentina has already been studied with regard to several genetic markers, but much more data are needed for the appropriate definition of its genetic profile. This study aimed at investigating the admixture patterns and genetic structure in Central Argentina, using biparental markers and comparing the results with those previously obtained by us with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the same samples. A total of 521 healthy unrelated individuals living in 13 villages of the Córdoba and San Luis provinces were tested. The individuals were genotyped for ten autosomal ancestry informative markers (AIMs). Allele frequencies were compared with those of African, European and Native American populations, chosen to represent parental contributions. The AIM estimates indicated a greater influence of the Native American ancestry as compared to previous studies in the same or other Argentinean regions, but smaller than that observed with the mtDNA tests. These differences can be explained, respectively, by different genetic contributions between rural and urban areas, and asymmetric gene flow occurred in the past. But a most unexpected finding was the marked interpopulation genetic homogeneity found in villages located in diverse geographic environments across a wide territory, suggesting considerable gene flow. PMID:26500436

  19. DNA Marker Transmission and Linkage Analysis in Populations Derived from a Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) x Erianthus arundinaceus Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-wen; Deng, Hai-hua; Liu, Rui; He, Hui-yi; Fu, Cheng; Chen, Yong-sheng; Liu, Fu-ye; Li, Qi-wei; Jackson, Phillip; Aitken, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Introgression of Erianthus arundinaceus has been the focus of several sugarcane breeding programs in the world, because the species has desirable traits such as high biomass production, vigour, ratooning ability and good resistance to environmental stresses and disease. In this study four genetic maps were constructed for two intergeneric populations. The first population (BC1) was generated from a cross between an Erianthus/Saccharum hybrid YC96-40 and a commercial sugarcane variety CP84-1198. The second population (BC2) was generated from a cross between YCE01-116, a progeny of the BC1 cross and NJ57-416, a commercial sugarcane cultivar. Markers across both populations were generated using 35 AFLP and 23 SSR primer pairs. A total of 756 and 728 polymorphic markers were scored in the BC1 and BC2 populations, respectively. In the BC1 population, a higher proportion of markers was derived from the Erianthus ancestor than those from the Saccharum ancestor Badila. In the BC2 population, both the number and proportion of markers derived from Erianthus were approximately half of those in the BC1 population. Linkage analysis led to the construction of 38, 57, 36 and 47 linkage groups (LGs) for YC96-40, CP84-1198, YCE01-116, and NJ57-416, encompassing 116, 174, 97 and 159 markers (including single dose, double dose and bi-parental markers), respectively. These LGs could be further placed into four, five, five and six homology groups (HGs), respectively, based on information from multi-allelic SSR markers and repulsion phase linkages detected between LGs. Analysis of repulsion phase linkage indicated that Erianthus behaved like a true autopolyploid. PMID:26053338

  20. Genomic-assisted haplotype analysis and the development of high-throughput SNP markers for salinity tolerance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Patil, Gunvant; Do, Tuyen; Vuong, Tri D; Valliyodan, Babu; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Chaudhary, Juhi; Shannon, J Grover; Nguyen, Henry T

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a limiting factor of crop yield. The soybean is sensitive to soil salinity, and a dominant gene, Glyma03g32900 is primarily responsible for salt-tolerance. The identification of high throughput and robust markers as well as the deployment of salt-tolerant cultivars are effective approaches to minimize yield loss under saline conditions. We utilized high quality (15x) whole-genome resequencing (WGRS) on 106 diverse soybean lines and identified three major structural variants and allelic variation in the promoter and genic regions of the GmCHX1 gene. The discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with structural variants facilitated the design of six KASPar assays. Additionally, haplotype analysis and pedigree tracking of 93 U.S. ancestral lines were performed using publically available WGRS datasets. Identified SNP markers were validated, and a strong correlation was observed between the genotype and salt treatment phenotype (leaf scorch, chlorophyll content and Na(+) accumulation) using a panel of 104 soybean lines and, an interspecific bi-parental population (F8) from PI483463 x Hutcheson. These markers precisely identified salt-tolerant/sensitive genotypes (>91%), and different structural-variants (>98%). These SNP assays, supported by accurate phenotyping, haplotype analyses and pedigree tracking information, will accelerate marker-assisted selection programs to enhance the development of salt-tolerant soybean cultivars. PMID:26781337

  1. Genomic-assisted haplotype analysis and the development of high-throughput SNP markers for salinity tolerance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Gunvant; Do, Tuyen; Vuong, Tri D.; Valliyodan, Babu; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Chaudhary, Juhi; Shannon, J. Grover; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a limiting factor of crop yield. The soybean is sensitive to soil salinity, and a dominant gene, Glyma03g32900 is primarily responsible for salt-tolerance. The identification of high throughput and robust markers as well as the deployment of salt-tolerant cultivars are effective approaches to minimize yield loss under saline conditions. We utilized high quality (15x) whole-genome resequencing (WGRS) on 106 diverse soybean lines and identified three major structural variants and allelic variation in the promoter and genic regions of the GmCHX1 gene. The discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with structural variants facilitated the design of six KASPar assays. Additionally, haplotype analysis and pedigree tracking of 93 U.S. ancestral lines were performed using publically available WGRS datasets. Identified SNP markers were validated, and a strong correlation was observed between the genotype and salt treatment phenotype (leaf scorch, chlorophyll content and Na+ accumulation) using a panel of 104 soybean lines and, an interspecific bi-parental population (F8) from PI483463 x Hutcheson. These markers precisely identified salt-tolerant/sensitive genotypes (>91%), and different structural-variants (>98%). These SNP assays, supported by accurate phenotyping, haplotype analyses and pedigree tracking information, will accelerate marker-assisted selection programs to enhance the development of salt-tolerant soybean cultivars. PMID:26781337

  2. Loss of heterozygosity and allelic imbalance in apocrine adenosis of the breast.

    PubMed

    Selim, A G; Ryan, A; El-Ayat, G A; Wells, C A

    2001-01-01

    Recently, there have been studies suggesting that apocrine adenosis of the breast is a putative precancerous lesion, despite the generally held view that apocrine adenosis is benign. Because apocrine adenosis is almost always present as a small area or areas, it cannot be easily studied by conventional methods. In this study, areas of apocrine adenosis were microdissected from archival paraffin-embedded tissue to examine loss of heterozygosity and allelic imbalance compared with normal breast tissue epithelium from the same patients. Seventeen cases of apocrine adenosis, four associated with carcinoma, were analyzed using polymorphic microsatellite markers and polymerase chain reaction for loss of heterozygosity/allelic imbalance at eight loci that were reported to show allele loss or imbalance in invasive and in situ breast cancer. Loss of heterozygosity/allelic imbalance was detected in six of 17 cases of apocrine adenosis; three of 12 (25%) informative cases at 1p (MYCL1), two of seven (28.6%) at 11q (INT2), one of three (33.3%) at 13q (D13S267), two of 12 (16.7%) at 16q (D16S539), and two of 10 (20%) at 17q (D17S250). Neither loss of heterozygosity nor allelic imbalance has been identified at 1p (D1S252), 17p (TP53), or 17p (D17S513). In two of the four cases associated with carcinoma, loss of heterozygosity/allelic imbalance was seen in the same allele as in the synchronous carcinoma. These results suggest that molecular alterations, such as loss of heterozygosity and allelic imbalance, identified in apocrine adenosis may constitute an early event in the pathogenesis of breast cancer; reinforcing the possibility of apocrine adenosis being a putative precancerous lesion. PMID:11425268

  3. Pyrosequencing for Accurate Imprinted Allele Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Damaschke, Nathan; Yao, Tianyu; McCormick, Johnathon; Wagner, Jennifer; Jarrard, David

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restricts gene expression to one inherited allele. Improper maintenance of imprinting has been implicated in a number of human diseases and developmental syndromes. Assays are needed that can quantify the contribution of each paternal allele to a gene expression profile. We have developed a rapid, sensitive quantitative assay for the measurement of individual allelic ratios termed Pyrosequencing for Imprinted Expression (PIE). Advantages of PIE over other approaches include shorter experimental time, decreased labor, avoiding the need for restriction endonuclease enzymes at polymorphic sites, and prevent heteroduplex formation which is problematic in quantitative PCR-based methods. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of PIE including the ability to detect differences in allelic expression down to 1%. The assay is capable of measuring genomic heterozygosity as well as imprinting in a single run. PIE is applied to determine the status of Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF2) imprinting in human and mouse tissues. PMID:25581900

  4. Examining Two Sets of Introgression Lines in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Reveals Favorable Alleles that Improve Grain Zn and Fe Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Zheng, Tian-Qing; Hu, Xia; Cheng, Li-Rui; Xu, Jian-Long; Shi, Yu-Min; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    In the modern world, the grain mineral concentration (GMC) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) not only includes important micronutrient elements such as iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), but it also includes toxic heavy metal elements, especially cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). To date, the genetic mechanisms underlying the regulation of GMC, especially the genetic background and G × E effects of GMC, remain largely unknown. In this study, we adopted two sets of backcross introgression lines (BILs) derived from IR75862 (a Zn-dense rice variety) as the donor parent and two elite indica varieties, Ce258 and Zhongguangxiang1, as recurrent parents to detect QTL affecting GMC traits including Fe, Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations in two environments. We detected a total of 22 loci responsible for GMC traits, which are distributed on all 12 rice chromosomes except 5, 9 and 10. Six genetic overlap (GO) regions affecting multiple elements were found, in which most donor alleles had synergistic effects on GMC. Some toxic heavy metal-independent loci (such as qFe1, qFe2 and qZn12) and some regions that have opposite genetic effects on micronutrient (Fe and Zn) and heavy metal element (Pb) concentrations (such as GO-IV) may be useful for marker-assisted biofortification breeding in rice. We discuss three important points affecting biofortification breeding efforts in rice, including correlations between different GMC traits, the genetic background effect and the G × E effect. PMID:26161553

  5. Examining Two Sets of Introgression Lines in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Reveals Favorable Alleles that Improve Grain Zn and Fe Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xia; Cheng, Li-Rui; Xu, Jian-Long; Shi, Yu-Min; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    In the modern world, the grain mineral concentration (GMC) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) not only includes important micronutrient elements such as iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), but it also includes toxic heavy metal elements, especially cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). To date, the genetic mechanisms underlying the regulation of GMC, especially the genetic background and G × E effects of GMC, remain largely unknown. In this study, we adopted two sets of backcross introgression lines (BILs) derived from IR75862 (a Zn-dense rice variety) as the donor parent and two elite indica varieties, Ce258 and Zhongguangxiang1, as recurrent parents to detect QTL affecting GMC traits including Fe, Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations in two environments. We detected a total of 22 loci responsible for GMC traits, which are distributed on all 12 rice chromosomes except 5, 9 and 10. Six genetic overlap (GO) regions affecting multiple elements were found, in which most donor alleles had synergistic effects on GMC. Some toxic heavy metal-independent loci (such as qFe1, qFe2 and qZn12) and some regions that have opposite genetic effects on micronutrient (Fe and Zn) and heavy metal element (Pb) concentrations (such as GO-IV) may be useful for marker-assisted biofortification breeding in rice. We discuss three important points affecting biofortification breeding efforts in rice, including correlations between different GMC traits, the genetic background effect and the G × E effect. PMID:26161553

  6. Prospective identification of high-risk polycythemia vera patients based on JAK2(V617F) allele burden.

    PubMed

    Vannucchi, A M; Antonioli, E; Guglielmelli, P; Longo, G; Pancrazzi, A; Ponziani, V; Bogani, C; Ferrini, P R; Rambaldi, A; Guerini, V; Bosi, A; Barbui, T

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the burden of JAK2(V617F) allele correlated with major clinical outcomes in patients with polycythemia vera (PV). To this end, we determined JAK2 mutant allele levels in granulocytes of 173 PV patients at diagnosis. The mean (+/-s.d.) mutant allele burden was 52% (+/-29); 32 patients (18%) had greater than 75% mutant allele. The burden of JAK2(V617F) allele correlated with measurements of stimulated erythropoiesis (higher hematocrit, lower mean cell volume, serum ferritin and erythropoietin levels) and myelopoiesis (higher white cell count, neutrophil count and serum lactate dehydrogenase) and with markers of neutrophil activation (elevated leukocyte alkaline phosphatase and PRV-1 expression). As compared to those with less than 25% mutant allele, patients harboring greater than 75% JAK2(V617F) allele were at higher relative risk (RR) of presenting larger spleen (RR 4.7; P<0.001) or suffering from pruritus (RR 3.1; P<0.001). In these patients, the risk of requiring chemotherapy (RR 1.8; P=0.001) or developing major cardiovascular events (RR 7.1; P=0.003) during follow up were significantly increased. We conclude that a burden of JAK2(V617F) allele greater than 75% at diagnosis points to PV patients with high-risk disease. PMID:17625606

  7. Stable microsatellite length but frequent allele loss in SV40-immortalized Werner syndrome and control cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Brokks-Wilson, A.R.; Monnat, R.J. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    We have determined the mitotic stability of microsatellite alleles and allele lengths in SV40-immortalized Werner syndrome (WS) and control cell lines. The impetus for this work was presence of a mutator phenotype in WS cells and cell lines and the association between a DNA mismatch repair deficit and microsatellite length instability in a heritable human tumor syndrome. Thus the identification of microsatellite length instability in WS cells might provide a clue to the primary biochemical defect in WS and a partial explanation for the mutator phenotype and the elevated cancer risk of WS patients. Five microsatellite loci (D2S123, D10S197, D10S141, D8S255, and D8S87) were PCR genotyped in 88 independent clones derived from four SV40-immortalized fibroblast cell lines (two WS lines: WV1 and PSV811; and two control lines: GM637 and GM639). Stable allele lengths were transmitted from cell line to clones in every case. WS cell line WV1 contained a preexisting faint third D2S123 allele which was transmitted with the other two D2S123 alleles to a majority of WV1 clones. In contrast, microsatellite allele loss was common: complete absence of one of two alleles was seen in 30% of control and in 3% of WS clones. Complete allele loss likely results from a clonal population being derived from a cell lacking a microsatellite allele. Altered relative band intensities in clones compared to parental lines were very common in both WS and control backgrounds (40% of all clones). This suggests that allele loss is common and continues upon post-cloning cell culture. These allele losses are likely to be a consequence of the genetic instability that accompanies SV40 immortalization. These results indicate that SV40-immortalized cell lines are genetically heterogeneous, and that the genotypes of individual clones may incompletely represent the genomes of the primary cells from which they were derived.

  8. Improvements to a Markerless Allelic Exchange System for Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Plaut, Roger D.; Stibitz, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A system was previously developed for conducting I-SceI-mediated allelic exchange in Bacillus anthracis. In this system, recombinational loss of a chromosomally-integrated allelic exchange vector is stimulated by creation of a double-stranded break within the vector by the homing endonuclease I-SceI. Although this system is reasonably efficient and represents an improvement in the tools available for allelic exchange in B. anthracis, researchers are nonetheless required to “pick and patch” colonies in order to identify candidate "exchangeants." In the present study, a number of improvements have been made to this system: 1) an improved I-SceI-producing plasmid includes oriT so that both plasmids can now be introduced by conjugation, thus avoiding the need for preparing electro-competent cells of each integration intermediate; 2) antibiotic markers have been changed to allow the use of the system in select agent strains; and 3) both plasmids have been marked with fluorescent proteins, allowing the visualization of plasmid segregation on a plate and obviating the need for “picking and patching.” These modifications have made the process easier, faster, and more efficient, allowing for parallel construction of larger numbers of mutant strains. Using this improved system, the genes encoding the tripartite anthrax toxin were deleted singly and in combination from plasmid pXO1 of Sterne strain 34F2. In the course of this study, we determined that DNA transfer to B. anthracis could be accomplished by conjugation directly from a methylation-competent E. coli strain. PMID:26624016

  9. Independent Emergence of the Plasmodium falciparum Kelch Propeller Domain Mutant Allele C580Y in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Chenet, Stella M; Akinyi Okoth, Sheila; Huber, Curtis S; Chandrabose, Javin; Lucchi, Naomi W; Talundzic, Eldin; Krishnalall, Karanchand; Ceron, Nicolas; Musset, Lise; Macedo de Oliveira, Alexandre; Venkatesan, Meera; Rahman, Reyaud; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-05-01

    Suspected artemisinin resistance inPlasmodium falciparumcan be explored by examining polymorphisms in the Kelch (PfK13) propeller domain. Sequencing ofPfK13and other gene resistance markers was performed on 98 samples from Guyana. Five of these samples carried the C580Y allele in thePfK13propeller domain, with flanking microsatellite profiles different from those observed in Southeast Asia. These molecular data demonstrate independent emergence of the C580Y K13 mutant allele in Guyana, where resistance alleles to previously used drugs are fixed. Therefore, in Guyana and neighboring countries, continued molecular surveillance and periodic assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy are warranted. PMID:26690347

  10. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Rare alleles, MHC and captive breeding.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, P W; Miller, P S

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, more detailed genetic information has become available for individuals of endangered species in captive breeding programs. There have been suggestions that this information be used to identify rare alleles, particularly those at the MHC, that can be subsequently selected for captive breeding programs. First, we summarize the current information on the MHC relevant to conservation genetics, so that such a possible breeding program is seen in a proper perspective. For example, very few specific alleles at the MHC have been identified as selectively advantageous, even though there has been substantial effort to find such alleles in humans and a few other organisms. Further, many of the balancing selection models suggested for MHC variation are based on heterozygotes in general having a higher fitness than homozygotes and not on specific selectively advantageous alleles. Because there is no detailed data on MHC variability in captive populations, we used transferrin data in Przewalski's horses to evaluate a breeding program to select for rare alleles. In this species, one individual, 1060, has been identified to have the transferrin allele J. We determine the effect on founder contribution of multiply mating 1060 to increase the number of copies of this allele. Since there were 485 individuals in the population at this time, this extra mating had little detrimental effect on the distribution of founder contributions and the number of founder equivalents. We then selected 65, an ancestor of 1060, which had a high likelihood of being the individual that passed on the J allele in the lineage of 1060. We examined the effect of increasing the number of copies of alleles of 65 at a time when the population had only 22 other individuals. In this case, even though the founder contributions were changed more, there was also little effect on the founder contributions and the number of founder equivalents. Overall, it appears that selection that results in a limited change in the number of copies of rare alleles may not always have an overall detrimental effect. However, because other pedigrees may have very different properties, it is essential to perform a detailed pedigree analysis of any such selective breeding program to determine its effect before such a selection program is implemented. PMID:8032133

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT MARKERS FOR THE PLANT PATHOGENIC RUST FUNGUS, PUCCINIA TRITICINA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighteen polymorphic di- and trinucleotide simple sequence repeat markers were developed for the phytopathogenic rust fungus, Puccinia triticina. The allelic diversity varied from 2 to 9 alleles per locus. Levels of observed heterozygosity (HO) ranged from 0.095 to 0.952. Seven of the loci deviated ...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT MARKERS FOR THE PLANT PATHOGENIC RUST FUNGUS, PUCCINIA GRAMINIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-four dinucleotide simple sequence repeat markers were developed for the phytopathogenic fungus, Puccinia graminis. The identified loci were polymorphic, with allelic diversity ranging from 2 to 11 alleles. Levels of heterozygosity ranged from 0.000 to 0.960 and 0.113 to 0.846 for observed and...

  14. Development of simple sequence repeat markers for the soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed 24 simple sequence repeat markers for Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungal pathogen of soybean (Glycine max) and other legumes. All 24 of the loci were evaluated on 28 isolates of P. pachyrhizi. Twenty-one loci were polymorphic, with allelic diversity ranging from two to eight alleles, and...

  15. Interrogation of allelic chromatin states in human cells by high-density ChIP-genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Light, Nicholas; Adoue, Véronique; Ge, Bing; Chen, Shu-Huang; Kwan, Tony; Pastinen, Tomi

    2014-01-01

    Allele-specific (AS) assessment of chromatin has the potential to elucidate specific cis-regulatory mechanisms, which are predicted to underlie the majority of the known genetic associations to complex disease. However, development of chromatin landscapes at allelic resolution has been challenging since sites of variable signal strength require substantial read depths not commonly applied in sequencing based approaches. In this study, we addressed this by performing parallel analyses of input DNA and chromatin immunoprecipitates (ChIP) on high-density Illumina genotyping arrays. Allele-specificity for the histone modifications H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K27ac, H3K27me3, and H3K36me3 was assessed using ChIP samples generated from 14 lymphoblast and 6 fibroblast cell lines. AS-ChIP SNPs were combined into domains and validated using high-confidence ChIP-seq sites. We observed characteristic patterns of allelic-imbalance for each histone-modification around allele-specifically expressed transcripts. Notably, we found H3K4me1 to be significantly anti-correlated with allelic expression (AE) at transcription start sites, indicating H3K4me1 allelic imbalance as a marker of AE. We also found that allelic chromatin domains exhibit population and cell-type specificity as well as heritability within trios. Finally, we observed that a subset of allelic chromatin domains is regulated by DNase I-sensitive quantitative trait loci and that these domains are significantly enriched for genome-wide association studies hits, with autoimmune disease associated SNPs specifically enriched in lymphoblasts. This study provides the first genome-wide maps of allelic-imbalance for five histone marks. Our results provide new insights into the role of chromatin in cis-regulation and highlight the need for high-depth sequencing in ChIP-seq studies along with the need to improve allele-specificity of ChIP-enrichment. PMID:25055051

  16. Always Look on Both Sides: Phylogenetic Information Conveyed by Simple Sequence Repeat Allele Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, Stéphanie; Gugerli, Felix; Barkley, Noelle A.; Maggia, Laurent; Cardi, Céline; Scotti, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily, mutations in the target sequences follow the stepwise mutation model (SMM). Generally speaking, PCR amplicon sizes are used as direct indicators of the number of SSR repeats composing an allele with the data analysis either ignoring the extent of allele size differences or assuming that there is a direct correlation between differences in amplicon size and evolutionary distance. However, without precisely knowing the kind and distribution of polymorphism within an allele (SSR and the associated flanking region (FR) sequences), it is hard to say what kind of evolutionary message is conveyed by such a synthetic descriptor of polymorphism as DNA amplicon size. In this study, we sequenced several SSR alleles in multiple populations of three divergent tree genera and disentangled the types of polymorphisms contained in each portion of the DNA amplicon containing an SSR. The patterns of diversity provided by amplicon size variation, SSR variation itself, insertions/deletions (indels), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) observed in the FRs were compared. Amplicon size variation largely reflected SSR repeat number. The amount of variation was as large in FRs as in the SSR itself. The former contributed significantly to the phylogenetic information and sometimes was the main source of differentiation among individuals and populations contained by FR and SSR regions of SSR markers. The presence of mutations occurring at different rates within a marker’s sequence offers the opportunity to analyse evolutionary events occurring on various timescales, but at the same time calls for caution in the interpretation of SSR marker data when the distribution of within-locus polymorphism is not known. PMID:22808236

  17. High-Efficiency Genome Editing and Allele Replacement in Prototrophic and Wild Strains of Saccharomyces

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, William G.; Doering, Drew T.; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2014-01-01

    Current genome editing techniques available for Saccharomyces yeast species rely on auxotrophic markers, limiting their use in wild and industrial strains and species. Taking advantage of the ancient loss of thymidine kinase in the fungal kingdom, we have developed the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene as a selectable and counterselectable marker that forms the core of novel genome engineering tools called the Haploid Engineering and Replacement Protocol (HERP) cassettes. Here we show that these cassettes allow a researcher to rapidly generate heterogeneous populations of cells with thousands of independent chromosomal allele replacements using mixed PCR products. We further show that the high efficiency of this approach enables the simultaneous replacement of both alleles in diploid cells. Using these new techniques, many of the most powerful yeast genetic manipulation strategies are now available in wild, industrial, and other prototrophic strains from across the diverse Saccharomyces genus. PMID:25209147

  18. High-efficiency genome editing and allele replacement in prototrophic and wild strains of Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Alexander, William G; Doering, Drew T; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2014-11-01

    Current genome editing techniques available for Saccharomyces yeast species rely on auxotrophic markers, limiting their use in wild and industrial strains and species. Taking advantage of the ancient loss of thymidine kinase in the fungal kingdom, we have developed the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene as a selectable and counterselectable marker that forms the core of novel genome engineering tools called the H: aploid E: ngineering and R: eplacement P: rotocol (HERP) cassettes. Here we show that these cassettes allow a researcher to rapidly generate heterogeneous populations of cells with thousands of independent chromosomal allele replacements using mixed PCR products. We further show that the high efficiency of this approach enables the simultaneous replacement of both alleles in diploid cells. Using these new techniques, many of the most powerful yeast genetic manipulation strategies are now available in wild, industrial, and other prototrophic strains from across the diverse Saccharomyces genus. PMID:25209147

  19. An association between Manic-depressive illness and a pseudoautosomal DNA marker

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Toshiaki; Ishida, Toru; Inayama, Yasuhiro; Nonomura, Yasuhiro; Kono, Yoshihiro; Asaba, Hiroyuki )

    1992-11-01

    This article reports on the association between manic-depressive illness and a polymorphic DNA marker in the pseudoautosomal region (Xp22.32; Yp11.3). The authors studied two markers in 49 biologically unrelated patients and 119 normal controls. Probe 362A (DXYS20) identified four alleles. Frequencies of the A4 allele were significantly higher in patients than in controls. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  20. SSR markers: a tool for species identification in Psidium (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Tuler, A C; Carrijo, T T; Nóia, L R; Ferreira, A; Peixoto, A L; da Silva Ferreira, M F

    2015-11-01

    Molecular DNA markers are used for detection of polymorphisms in individuals. As they are independent of developmental stage of the plant and environmental influences, they can be useful tools in taxonomy. The alleles of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers (or microsatellites) are traditionally used to identify taxonomic units. This application demands the laborious and costly delimitation of exclusive alleles in order to avoid homoplasy. Here, we propose a method for identification of species based on the amplification profile of groups of SSR markers obtained by a transferability study. The approach considers that the SSR are conserved among related species. In this context, using Psidium as a model, 141 SSR markers developed for Psidium guajava were transferred to 13 indigenous species of Psidium from the Atlantic Rainforest. Transferability of the markers was high and 28 SSR were conserved in all species. Four SSR groups were defined and they can help in the identification of all 13 Psidium species studied. A group of 31 SSR was genotyped, with one to six alleles each. The H0 varied from 0.0 to 0.46, and PIC from 0.0 to 0.74. Cluster analysis revealed shared alleles among species. The high percentage of SSR transferability found in Psidium evidences the narrow phylogenetic relationship existing among these species since transferability occurs by the preservation of the microsatellites and anchoring regions. The proposed method was useful for distinguishing the species of Psidium, being useful in taxonomic studies. PMID:26476530

  1. Prediction of heterosis using genome-wide SNP-marker data: application to egg production traits in white Leghorn crosses

    PubMed Central

    Amuzu-Aweh, E N; Bijma, P; Kinghorn, B P; Vereijken, A; Visscher, J; van Arendonk, J AM; Bovenhuis, H

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of heterosis has a long history with mixed success, partly due to low numbers of genetic markers and/or small data sets. We investigated the prediction of heterosis for egg number, egg weight and survival days in domestic white Leghorns, using ∼400 000 individuals from 47 crosses and allele frequencies on ∼53 000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). When heterosis is due to dominance, and dominance effects are independent of allele frequencies, heterosis is proportional to the squared difference in allele frequency (SDAF) between parental pure lines (not necessarily homozygous). Under these assumptions, a linear model including regression on SDAF partitions crossbred phenotypes into pure-line values and heterosis, even without pure-line phenotypes. We therefore used models where phenotypes of crossbreds were regressed on the SDAF between parental lines. Accuracy of prediction was determined using leave-one-out cross-validation. SDAF predicted heterosis for egg number and weight with an accuracy of ∼0.5, but did not predict heterosis for survival days. Heterosis predictions allowed preselection of pure lines before field-testing, saving ∼50% of field-testing cost with only 4% loss in heterosis. Accuracies from cross-validation were lower than from the model-fit, suggesting that accuracies previously reported in literature are overestimated. Cross-validation also indicated that dominance cannot fully explain heterosis. Nevertheless, the dominance model had considerable accuracy, clearly greater than that of a general/specific combining ability model. This work also showed that heterosis can be modelled even when pure-line phenotypes are unavailable. We concluded that SDAF is a useful predictor of heterosis in commercial layer breeding. PMID:24105438

  2. Estimates of epistatic and pleiotropic effects of casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) and thyroglobulin (TG) genetic markers on beef heifer performance traits enhanced by selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC II) was subjected to marker assisted selection for two years to equalize CSN1S1 and TG genetic marker frequencies to evaluate the epista...

  3. Functional analysis of 11 novel GBA alleles.

    PubMed

    Malini, Erika; Grossi, Serena; Deganuto, Marta; Rosano, Camillo; Parini, Rossella; Dominisini, Silvia; Cariati, Roberta; Zampieri, Stefania; Bembi, Bruno; Filocamo, Mirella; Dardis, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder due to the deficiency of the acid β-glucosidase, encoded by the GBA gene. In this study, we report the structural and functional characterization of 11 novel GBA alleles. Seven single missense alleles, P159S, N188I, E235K, P245T, W312S, S366R and W381C, and two alleles carrying in cis mutations, (N188S; G265R) and (E326K; D380N), were studied for enzyme activity in transiently transfected cells. All mutants were inactive except the P159S, which retained 15% of wild-type activity. To further characterize the alleles carrying two in cis mutations, we expressed constructs bearing singly each mutation. The presence of G265R or D380N mutations completely abolished enzyme activity, while N188S and E326K mutants retained 25 and 54% of wild-type activity, respectively. Two mutations, affecting the acceptor splice site of introns 5 (c.589-1G>A) and 9 (c.1389-1G>A), led to the synthesis of aberrant mRNA. Unpredictably, family studies showed that two alleles resulted from germline or 'de novo' mutations. These results strengthen the importance of performing a complete and accurate molecular analysis of the GBA gene in order to avoid misleading conclusions and provide a comprehensive functional analysis of new GBA mutations. PMID:24022302

  4. Allele frequency data for 15 autosomal STR loci in eight Indonesian subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Venables, Samantha J; Daniel, Runa; Sarre, Stephen D; Soedarsono, Nurtami; Sudoyo, Herawati; Suryadi, Helena; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Walsh, Simon J; Widodo, Putut T; McNevin, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary and cultural history can affect the genetic characteristics of a population and influences the frequency of different variants at a particular genetic marker (allele frequency). These characteristics directly influence the strength of forensic DNA evidence and make the availability of suitable allele frequency information for every discrete country or jurisdiction highly relevant. Population sub-structure within Indonesia has not been well characterised but should be expected given the complex geographical, linguistic and cultural architecture of the Indonesian population. Here we use forensic short tandem repeat (STR) markers to identify a number of distinct genetic subpopulations within Indonesia and calculate appropriate population sub-structure correction factors. This data represents the most comprehensive investigation of population sub-structure within Indonesia to date using these markers. The results demonstrate that significant sub-structure is present within the Indonesian population and must be accounted for using island specific allele frequencies and corresponding sub-structure correction factors in the calculation of forensic DNA match statistics. PMID:26517173

  5. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  6. Diversity of Lactase Persistence Alleles in Ethiopia: Signature of a Soft Selective Sweep

    PubMed Central

    Jones, BryonyL.; Raga, TamiruO.; Liebert, Anke; Zmarz, Pawel; Bekele, Endashaw; Danielsen, E.Thomas; Olsen, AndersKrger; Bradman, Neil; Troelsen, JesperT.; Swallow, DallasM.

    2013-01-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (?13910?T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other alleles (?13907?G, rs41525747; ?13915?G, rs41380347; ?14010?C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP, ?14009T>G (ss 820486563), is significantly associated with lactose-digester status, and invitro functional tests confirm that the ?14009?G allele also increases expression of an LCT promoter construct. The derived alleles in the LCT enhancer region are spread through several ethnic groups, and we report a greater genetic diversity in lactose digesters than in nondigesters. By examining flanking markers to control for the effects of mutation and demography, we further describe, from empirical evidence, the signature of a soft selective sweep. PMID:23993196

  7. Genetic Diversity and Relatedness of Sweet Cherry (Prunus Avium L.) Cultivars Based on Single Nucleotide Polymorphic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez i Marti, Angel; Athanson, Blessing; Koepke, Tyson; Font i Forcada, Carolina; Dhingra, Amit; Oraguzie, Nnadozie

    2012-01-01

    Most previous studies on genetic fingerprinting and cultivar relatedness in sweet cherry were based on isoenzyme, RAPD, and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. This study was carried out to assess the utility of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers generated from 3′ untranslated regions (UTR) for genetic fingerprinting in sweet cherry. A total of 114 sweet cherry germplasm representing advanced selections, commercial cultivars, and old cultivars imported from different parts of the world were screened with seven SSR markers developed from other Prunus species and with 40 SNPs obtained from 3′ UTR sequences of Rainier and Bing sweet cherry cultivars. Both types of marker study had 99 accessions in common. The SSR data was used to validate the SNP results. Results showed that the average number of alleles per locus, mean observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and polymorphic information content values were higher in SSRs than in SNPs although both set of markers were similar in their grouping of the sweet cherry accessions as shown in the dendrogram. SNPs were able to distinguish sport mutants from their wild type germplasm. For example, “Stella” was separated from “Compact Stella.” This demonstrates the greater power of SNPs for discriminating mutants from their original parents than SSRs. In addition, SNP markers confirmed parentage and also determined relationships of the accessions in a manner consistent with their pedigree relationships. We would recommend the use of 3′ UTR SNPs for genetic fingerprinting, parentage verification, gene mapping, and study of genetic diversity in sweet cherry. PMID:22737155

  8. Parenting Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    2005-01-01

    Parenting is a subject about which people typically hold strong opinions, but about which too little solid information or considered reflection exists. And clearly critical questions about parenting abound. Moreover, the family generally, and parenting specifically, are today in a greater state of flux, question, and re-definition than perhaps…

  9. Parental Involvment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Jeanne; And Others

    This document presents one module in a set of training resources for trainers to use with parents and/or professionals serving children with disabilities; focus is on parental involvement. The modules stress content and activities that build skills and offer resources to promote parent-professional collaboration. Each module takes about 2 hours to…

  10. Inbreeding load, average dominance and the mutation rate for mildly deleterious alleles in Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, J H

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this study is to provide information on the genetics of inbreeding depression in a primarily outcrossing population of Mimulus guttatus. Previous studies of this population indicate that there is tremendous inbreeding depression for nearly every fitness component and that almost all of this inbreeding depression is due to mildly deleterious alleles rather than recessive lethals or steriles. In this article I assayed the homozygous and heterozygous fitnesses of 184 highly inbred lines extracted from a natural population. Natural selection during the five generations of selfing involved in line formation essentially eliminated major deleterious alleles but was ineffective in purging alleles with minor fitness effects and did not appreciably diminish overall levels of inbreeding depression. Estimates of the average degree of dominance of these mildly deleterious alleles, obtained from the regression of heterozygous fitness on the sum of parental homozygous fitness, indicate that the detrimental alleles are partially recessive for most fitness traits, with h approximately 0.15 for cumulative measures of fitness. The inbreeding load, B, for total fitness is approximately 1.0 in this experiment. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that spontaneous mildly deleterious mutations occur at a rate >0.1 mutation per genome per generation. PMID:10581293

  11. Use of microsatellite markers in molecular analysis of segregating populations of papaya (Carica papaya L.) derived from backcrossing.

    PubMed

    Pinto, F O; Pereira, M G; Luz, L N; Cardozo, D L; Ramos, H C C; Macedo, C M P

    2013-01-01

    Brazil is the world leader in papaya production. However, only a small number of cultivars are registered for commercial planting, mainly owing to delays in obtaining cultivars and the high costs of the field phase of breeding programs. These costs can be reduced when molecular tools are combined with conventional breeding methods. In the present study, we conducted a molecular analysis of a self-fertilized population of a first backcrossing generation of BC1S1 papaya plants via microsatellite markers both to monitor the level of homozygosity and the gene/allele transfer that confers the Golden trait (fruit color) and to assess the parental genomic proportion in the genotypes studied. Based on the analysis of 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci, 19 genotypes with the Golden trait belonging to BC1S1 were evaluated in addition to the parental genotypes. Genetic distance was estimated through weighted index. The genotypes were then grouped using the hierarchical nearest neighbor method, and the analysis of principal coordinates was used to measure the proportion of parental genomes in the segregating genotypes. The mean value of the inbreeding coefficient was 0.36. The analysis of the principal coordinates revealed that on average, 64% of the recurrent parent genome was present in the population. Together, the analyses allowed the selection of 3 individuals for the next backcross cycle (33BC1S1-18, 34BC1S1-16, and 37BC1S1-10). These individuals had a higher proportion of the recurrent parent and were grouped close to the recurrent parent in the cluster analysis. PMID:23884768

  12. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. ); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. )

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  13. MHC class II alleles and haplotypes in patients with pemphigus vulgaris from India.

    PubMed

    Delgado, J C; Yunis, D E; Bozón, M V; Salazar, M; Deulofeut, R; Turbay, D; Mehra, N K; Pasricha, J S; Raval, R S; Patel, H; Shah, B K; Bhol, K; Alper, C A; Ahmed, A R; Yunis, E J

    1996-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes characterized by an autoantibody response against a keratinocyte adhesion molecule, desmoglein 3, causing acantholysis and blister formation. We compared high resolution MHC class II alleles and haplotype frequencies (HLA-DRB, DQA1 and DQB1) in 37 patients with PV to 89 haplotypes of normal relatives from New Delhi and Ahmedabad. We found that PV patients had significantly increased frequencies of DRB1*1404 (P < 0.0001), DQA1*0101 (P = 0.001), and DQB1*0503 (P < 0.0001). These associations were due to the increased frequencies of the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1404, DRB3*0202, DQA1*0101, DQB1*0503 in patients compared to control haplotypes (p < 0.0001). Also, patients from Ahmedabad had a significant increase in HLA-DQB1*0302 (p = 0.03). An identical amino acid sequence (Leu-Leu-Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Ala-Glu), in positions 67-74 of the beta domain of DRB alleles is restricted to some DR14 alleles. Therefore, there are three possible explanations for class II allele involvement in autoantibody in PV patients with class II haplotypes marked by HLA-DR14. First, the class II alleles could be markers for an unidentified susceptibility gene in linkage disequilibrium with them. Second, the primary association could be with DQB1*0503 and the association with HLA-DR14 alleles would be the result of linkage disequilibrium. Third, the HLA-DRB1 locus susceptibility could involve a specific amino acid sequence in the third hypervariable region shared by several HLA-DR14 alleles. PMID:9008309

  14. Allele-biased expression in differentiating human neurons: implications for neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingyan; Hrabovsky, Anastasia; Pedrosa, Erika; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Deyou; Lachman, Herbert M

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic processes and imprinting, along with genetic factors, lead to monoallelic or allele-biased gene expression. Stochastic monoallelic expression fine-tunes information processing in immune cells and the olfactory system, and imprinting plays an important role in development. Recent studies suggest that both stochastic events and imprinting may be more widespread than previously considered. We are interested in allele-biased gene expression occurring in the brain because parent-of-origin effects suggestive of imprinting appear to play a role in the transmission of schizophrenia (SZ) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in some families. In addition, allele-biased expression could help explain monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance and reduced penetrance. The ability to study allele-biased expression in human neurons has been transformed with the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and next generation sequencing. Using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) we identified 801 genes in differentiating neurons that were expressed in an allele-biased manner. These included a number of putative SZ and ASD candidates, such as A2BP1 (RBFOX1), ERBB4, NLGN4X, NRG1, NRG3, NRXN1, and NLGN1. Overall, there was a modest enrichment for SZ and ASD candidate genes among those that showed evidence for allele-biased expression (chi-square, p = 0.02). In addition to helping explain MZ twin discordance and reduced penetrance, the capacity to group many candidate genes affecting a variety of molecular and cellular pathways under a common regulatory process - allele-biased expression - could have therapeutic implications. PMID:22952857

  15. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S.; Riveron, Jacob M.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Irving, Helen; Yunta, Cristina; Paine, Mark J. I.; Wondji, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs) has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser) from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies. PMID:26517127

  16. Molecular analysis of chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance-associated alleles in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Sridaran, Sankar; Rodriguez, Betzabe; Soto, Aida Mercedes; Macedo De Oliveira, Alexandre; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is used as a first-line therapy for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nicaragua. We investigated the prevalence of molecular markers associated with CQ and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in P. falciparum isolates obtained from the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua. Blood spots for this study were made available from a CQ and SP drug efficacy trial conducted in 2005 and also from a surveillance study performed in 2011. Polymorphisms in P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter, dihydrofolate reductase, and dihydropteroate synthase gene loci that are associated with resistance to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine, respectively, were detected by DNA sequencing. In the 2005 dataset, only 2 of 53 isolates had a CQ resistance allele (CVIET), 2 of 52 had a pyrimethamine resistance allele, and 1 of 49 had a sulfadoxine resistance allele. In the 2011 dataset, none of 45 isolates analyzed had CQ or SP resistance alleles. PMID:24615126

  17. Molecular Analysis of Chloroquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine Resistance-Associated Alleles in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Sridaran, Sankar; Rodriguez, Betzabe; Mercedes Soto, Aida; Macedo De Oliveira, Alexandre; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is used as a first-line therapy for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nicaragua. We investigated the prevalence of molecular markers associated with CQ and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in P. falciparum isolates obtained from the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua. Blood spots for this study were made available from a CQ and SP drug efficacy trial conducted in 2005 and also from a surveillance study performed in 2011. Polymorphisms in P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter, dihydrofolate reductase, and dihydropteroate synthase gene loci that are associated with resistance to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine, respectively, were detected by DNA sequencing. In the 2005 dataset, only 2 of 53 isolates had a CQ resistance allele (CVIET), 2 of 52 had a pyrimethamine resistance allele, and 1 of 49 had a sulfadoxine resistance allele. In the 2011 dataset, none of 45 isolates analyzed had CQ or SP resistance alleles. PMID:24615126

  18. Association Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers with Agronomic Traits in Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yong; Liu, Hongmei; Xu, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    Tall fescue is widely used in temperate regions throughout the world as a dominant forage grass as well as a turfgrass, in pastoral and turf industry. However, the utilization of tall fescue was limited because of its leaf roughness, poor regeneration ability and poor stress resistance. New cultivars were desirable in modern pastoral industries exceed the potential of existing cultivars. Therefore, well understanding the agronomic traits and describing germplasms would help to overcome these constraints, and morphological evaluation of tall fescue germplasm is the key component in selecting rational parents for hybridization breeding. However, describing the morphological traits of tall fescue germplasm is costly and time-consuming. Fortunately, biotechnology approaches can supplement conventional breeding efforts for tall fescue improvement. Association mapping, as a powerful approach to identify association between agronomic traits and molecular markers has been widely used for enhancing the utilization, conservation and management of the tall fescue germplasms. Therefore, in the present research, 115 tall fescue accessions from different origins (25 accessions are cultivars; 31 accessions from America; 32 accessions from European; 7 accessions from Africa; 20 accessions from Asia), were evaluated for agronomic traits and genetic diversity with 90 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The panel displayed significant variation in spike count per plant (SCP) and spike weight (SW). However, BCS performed the lowest CV among all the observed agronomic traits. Three subpopulations were identified within the collections but no obvious relative kinship (K) was found. The GLM model was used to describe the association between SSR and agronomic traits. Fifty-one SSR markers associated with agronomic traits were observed. Twelve single-associated markers were associated with PH; six single-associated markers were associated with BCS; eight single-associated markers were associated with SW; five single-associated markers were associated with SC; seven single-associated markers were associated with SCP; three single-associated markers were associated with SL. Especially, we observed that the genetic variation of SW was explained 11.6 % by M37 marker. It is interesting to observe that nine markers (M1, M2, M35, M54 marker was associated with both BCS and SC; M3, M4 markers were associated with BCS, SW, and SC; M19 marker was associated with both pH and PD, M40 marker was associated with both SCP and SW; and M193 marker was associated with both PH and SL) were associated with more than two agronomic traits. Notably, Branch count per spike (BCS) was explained by four markers (M1, M2, M3, and M4) exceeding 10 %. These identified marker alleles associated with agronomic traits could provide important information and markers for molecular-assisted breeding that facilitate the breeding process in tall fescue. PMID:26186338

  19. Association Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers with Agronomic Traits in Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.).

    PubMed

    Lou, Yanhong; Hu, Longxing; Chen, Liang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yong; Liu, Hongmei; Xu, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    Tall fescue is widely used in temperate regions throughout the world as a dominant forage grass as well as a turfgrass, in pastoral and turf industry. However, the utilization of tall fescue was limited because of its leaf roughness, poor regeneration ability and poor stress resistance. New cultivars were desirable in modern pastoral industries exceed the potential of existing cultivars. Therefore, well understanding the agronomic traits and describing germplasms would help to overcome these constraints, and morphological evaluation of tall fescue germplasm is the key component in selecting rational parents for hybridization breeding. However, describing the morphological traits of tall fescue germplasm is costly and time-consuming. Fortunately, biotechnology approaches can supplement conventional breeding efforts for tall fescue improvement. Association mapping, as a powerful approach to identify association between agronomic traits and molecular markers has been widely used for enhancing the utilization, conservation and management of the tall fescue germplasms. Therefore, in the present research, 115 tall fescue accessions from different origins (25 accessions are cultivars; 31 accessions from America; 32 accessions from European; 7 accessions from Africa; 20 accessions from Asia), were evaluated for agronomic traits and genetic diversity with 90 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The panel displayed significant variation in spike count per plant (SCP) and spike weight (SW). However, BCS performed the lowest CV among all the observed agronomic traits. Three subpopulations were identified within the collections but no obvious relative kinship (K) was found. The GLM model was used to describe the association between SSR and agronomic traits. Fifty-one SSR markers associated with agronomic traits were observed. Twelve single-associated markers were associated with PH; six single-associated markers were associated with BCS; eight single-associated markers were associated with SW; five single-associated markers were associated with SC; seven single-associated markers were associated with SCP; three single-associated markers were associated with SL. Especially, we observed that the genetic variation of SW was explained 11.6 % by M37 marker. It is interesting to observe that nine markers (M1, M2, M35, M54 marker was associated with both BCS and SC; M3, M4 markers were associated with BCS, SW, and SC; M19 marker was associated with both pH and PD, M40 marker was associated with both SCP and SW; and M193 marker was associated with both PH and SL) were associated with more than two agronomic traits. Notably, Branch count per spike (BCS) was explained by four markers (M1, M2, M3, and M4) exceeding 10 %. These identified marker alleles associated with agronomic traits could provide important information and markers for molecular-assisted breeding that facilitate the breeding process in tall fescue. PMID:26186338

  20. Factors influencing ascertainment bias of microsatellite allele sizes: impact on estimates of mutation rates.

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Kimmel, Marek

    2013-10-01

    Microsatellite loci play an important role as markers for identification, disease gene mapping, and evolutionary studies. Mutation rate, which is of fundamental importance, can be obtained from interspecies comparisons, which, however, are subject to ascertainment bias. This bias arises, for example, when a locus is selected on the basis of its large allele size in one species (cognate species 1), in which it is first discovered. This bias is reflected in average allele length in any noncognate species 2 being smaller than that in species 1. This phenomenon was observed in various pairs of species, including comparisons of allele sizes in human and chimpanzee. Various mechanisms were proposed to explain observed differences in mean allele lengths between two species. Here, we examine the framework of a single-step asymmetric and unrestricted stepwise mutation model with genetic drift. Analysis is based on coalescent theory. Analytical results are confirmed by simulations using the simuPOP software. The mechanism of ascertainment bias in this model is a tighter correlation of allele sizes within a cognate species 1 than of allele sizes in two different species 1 and 2. We present computations of the expected average allele size difference, given the mutation rate, population sizes of species 1 and 2, time of separation of species 1 and 2, and the age of the allele. We show that when the past demographic histories of the cognate and noncognate taxa are different, the rate and directionality of mutations affect the allele sizes in the two taxa differently from the simple effect of ascertainment bias. This effect may exaggerate or reverse the effect of difference in mutation rates. We reanalyze literature data, which indicate that despite the bias, the microsatellite mutation rate estimate in the ancestral population is consistently greater than that in either human or chimpanzee and the mutation rate estimate in human exceeds or equals that in chimpanzee with the rate of allele length expansion in human being greater than that in chimpanzee. We also demonstrate that population bottlenecks and expansions in the recent human history have little impact on our conclusions. PMID:23946335

  1. Efficiency of typing unaffected relatives in an affected-sib-pair linkage study with single-locus and multiple tightly linked markers

    SciTech Connect

    Holmans, P.; Clayton, D.

    1995-11-01

    In an affected-sib-pair study, the parents are often unavailable for typing, particularly for diseases of late onset. In many cases, however, it is possible to sample unaffected siblings. It is therefore desirable to assess the contribution of such siblings to the power of such a study. The likelihood ratio introduced by Risch and improved by Holmans was extended to incorporate data from unaffected siblings. Tests based on two likelihoods were considered: the full likelihood of the data, based on the identity-by-descent (IBD) sharing states of the entire sibship, and a pseudolikelihood based on the IBD sharing states of the affected pair only, using the unaffected siblings to infer parental genotypes. The latter approach was found to be more powerful, except when penetrance was high. Typing an unaffected sibling, or just one parent, was found to give only a small increase in power except when the PIC of the marker was low. Even then, typing an unaffected relative increased the overall number of individuals that had to be typed to achieve a given power. If there is no highly informative marker locus in the area under study, it may be possible to {open_quotes}build{close_quotes} one by combining the alleles from two or more neighboring tightly linked loci into haplotypes. Typing two loci gave a sizeable power increase over a single locus, but typing further loci gave much smaller gains. Building haplotypes will introduce phase uncertainties, with the result that such a system will yield less power than will a single locus with the same number of alleles. This power loss was small, however, and did not affect the conclusions regarding the worth of typing unaffected relatives. 14 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Composition and functional analysis of low-molecular-weight glutenin alleles with Aroona near-isogenic lines of bread wheat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) strongly influence the bread-making quality of bread wheat. These proteins are encoded by a multi-gene family located at the Glu-A3, Glu-B3 and Glu-D3 loci on the short arms of homoeologous group 1 chromosomes, and show high allelic variation. To characterize the genetic and protein compositions of LMW-GS alleles, we investigated 16 Aroona near-isogenic lines (NILs) using SDS-PAGE, 2D-PAGE and the LMW-GS gene marker system. Moreover, the composition of glutenin macro-polymers, dough properties and pan bread quality parameters were determined for functional analysis of LMW-GS alleles in the NILs. Results Using the LMW-GS gene marker system, 14–20 LMW-GS genes were identified in individual NILs. At the Glu-A3 locus, two m-type and 2–4 i-type genes were identified and their allelic variants showed high polymorphisms in length and nucleotide sequences. The Glu-A3d allele possessed three active genes, the highest number among Glu-A3 alleles. At the Glu-B3 locus, 2–3 m-type and 1–3 s-type genes were identified from individual NILs. Based on the different compositions of s-type genes, Glu-B3 alleles were divided into two groups, one containing Glu-B3a, B3b, B3f and B3g, and the other comprising Glu-B3c, B3d, B3h and B3i. Eight conserved genes were identified among Glu-D3 alleles, except for Glu-D3f. The protein products of the unique active genes in each NIL were detected using protein electrophoresis. Among Glu-3 alleles, the Glu-A3e genotype without i-type LMW-GS performed worst in almost all quality properties. Glu-B3b, B3g and B3i showed better quality parameters than the other Glu-B3 alleles, whereas the Glu-B3c allele containing s-type genes with low expression levels had an inferior effect on bread-making quality. Due to the conserved genes at Glu-D3 locus, Glu-D3 alleles showed no significant differences in effects on all quality parameters. Conclusions This work provided new insights into the composition and function of 18 LMW-GS alleles in bread wheat. The variation of i-type genes mainly contributed to the high diversity of Glu-A3 alleles, and the differences among Glu-B3 alleles were mainly derived from the high polymorphism of s-type genes. Among LMW-GS alleles, Glu-A3e and Glu-B3c represented inferior alleles for bread-making quality, whereas Glu-A3d, Glu-B3b, Glu-B3g and Glu-B3i were correlated with superior bread-making quality. Glu-D3 alleles played minor roles in determining quality variation in bread wheat. Thus, LMW-GS alleles not only affect dough extensibility but greatly contribute to the dough resistance, glutenin macro-polymers and bread quality. PMID:23259617

  3. Differences in allele frequencies of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia SNPs in the Malaysian population.

    PubMed

    Alex, Livy; Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Lye, Say Hean; Bagali, Pramod; Ler, Lian Wee

    2012-06-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is caused by different interactions of lifestyle and genetic determinants. At the genetic level, it can be attributed to the interactions of multiple polymorphisms, or as in the example of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), it can be the result of a single mutation. A large number of genetic markers, mostly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) or mutations in three genes, implicated in autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), viz APOB (apolipoprotein B), LDLR (low density lipoprotein receptor) and PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9), have been identified and characterized. However, such studies have been insufficiently undertaken specifically in Malaysia and Southeast Asia in general. The main objective of this study was to identify ADH variants, specifically ADH-causing mutations and hypercholesterolemia-associated polymorphisms in multiethnic Malaysian population. We aimed to evaluate published SNPs in ADH causing genes, in this population and to report any unusual trends. We examined a large number of selected SNPs from previous studies of APOB, LDLR, PCSK9 and other genes, in clinically diagnosed ADH patients (n=141) and healthy control subjects (n=111). Selection of SNPs was initiated by searching within genes reported to be associated with ADH from known databases. The important finding was 137 mono-allelic markers (44.1%) and 173 polymorphic markers (55.8%) in both subject groups. By comparing to publicly available data, out of the 137 mono-allelic markers, 23 markers showed significant differences in allele frequency among Malaysians, European Whites, Han Chinese, Yoruba and Gujarati Indians. Our data can serve as reference for others in related fields of study during the planning of their experiments. PMID:22534770

  4. Heterozygous Mapping Strategy (HetMappS) for High Resolution Genotyping-By-Sequencing Markers: A Case Study in Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghui; Londo, Jason P.; Acharya, Charlotte B.; Mitchell, Sharon E.; Sun, Qi; Reisch, Bruce; Cadle-Davidson, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) provides opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low genotyping cost, but for highly heterozygous species, missing data and heterozygote undercalling complicate the creation of GBS genetic maps. To overcome these issues, we developed a publicly available, modular approach called HetMappS, which functions independently of parental genotypes and corrects for genotyping errors associated with heterozygosity. For linkage group formation, HetMappS includes both a reference-guided synteny pipeline and a reference-independent de novo pipeline. The de novo pipeline can be utilized for under-characterized or high diversity families that lack an appropriate reference. We applied both HetMappS pipelines in five half-sib F1 families involving genetically diverse Vitis spp. Starting with at least 116,466 putative SNPs per family, the HetMappS pipelines identified 10,440 to 17,267 phased pseudo-testcross (Pt) markers and generated high-confidence maps. Pt marker density exceeded crossover resolution in all cases; up to 5,560 non-redundant markers were used to generate parental maps ranging from 1,047 cM to 1,696 cM. The number of markers used was strongly correlated with family size in both de novo and synteny maps (r = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively). Comparisons between allele and tag frequencies suggested that many markers were in tandem repeats and mapped as single loci, while markers in regions of more than two repeats were removed during map curation. Both pipelines generated similar genetic maps, and genetic order was strongly correlated with the reference genome physical order in all cases. Independently created genetic maps from shared parents exhibited nearly identical results. Flower sex was mapped in three families and correctly localized to the known sex locus in all cases. The HetMappS pipeline could have wide application for genetic mapping in highly heterozygous species, and its modularity provides opportunities to adapt portions of the pipeline to other family types, genotyping technologies or applications. PMID:26244767

  5. Significance of TGFBR3 allelic loss in the deregulation of TGF? signaling in primary human endometrial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Ga?czy?ski, Krzysztof; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2016-02-01

    Downregulation of betaglycan (?-glycan) [transforming growth factor? receptor type III (TGF?R3)], which belongs to co-receptors of the TGF? pathway, occurs in a broad spectrum of primary human malignancies. However, in the case of endometrial cancer (EC), the mechanisms responsible for genetic alterations are still unknown. Therefore, we investigated allelic imbalance at the TGFBR3 locus(1p33?p32) in the context of ?-glycan mRNA and protein expression, as a possible genetic event determining ?-glycan deregulation in EC patients. Study of ?-glycan allelic imbalance in 48primary human ECs was performed with the use of three different microsatellite markers, spanned within or in direct proximity to the TGFBR3 locus. Real?time PCR and western blotting were used for ?-glycan mRNA and protein quantification methods, respectively. Altogether, 25 of 39(64%) informative cases and 25of 48(52%) of all specimens showed allelic imbalance in at least one microsatellite marker, concomitantly with decrease at both the ?-glycan transcript and protein levels. Interestingly, 54%(15/28), 36%(8/22) and 35%(7/20) of informative ECs displayed allelic loss in D1S188, D1S435 and D1S1588 microsatellite markers, respectively. It is worth pointing out that5out of39 (13%) informative cases showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at two microsatellite markers. Microsatellite instability(MSI) was found in two markers, but to a very strictly limited extent. None of the clinicoprognostic features was found to be of significance. Our results suggest that LOH in the TGFBR3 locus may be one of the mechanisms responsible for loss of ?-glycan expression. No correlation of LOH at the TGFBR3 locus with clinicopathological parameters suggests that allelic imbalance may be an early genetic event during neoplastic transformation of human endometrium. PMID:26548418

  6. Genetic linkage maps for Asian and American lotus constructed using novel SSR markers derived from the genome of sequenced cultivar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Nelumbo Adans. comprises two living species, N. nucifera Gaertan. (Asian lotus) and N. lutea Pers. (American lotus). A genetic linkage map is an essential resource for plant genetic studies and crop improvement but has not been generated for Nelumbo. We aimed to develop genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from the genome sequence and construct two genetic maps for Nelumbo to assist genome assembly and integration of a genetic map with the genome sequence. Results A total of 86,089 SSR motifs were identified from the genome sequences. Di- and tri-nucleotide repeat motifs were the most abundant, and accounted for 60.73% and 31.66% of all SSRs, respectively. AG/GA repeats constituted 51.17% of dinucleotide repeat motifs, followed by AT/TA (44.29%). Of 500 SSR primers tested, 386 (77.20%) produced scorable alleles with an average of 2.59 per primer, and 185 (37.00%) showed polymorphism among two parental genotypes, N. nucifera ‘Chinese Antique’ and N. lutea ‘AL1’, and six progenies of their F1 population. The normally segregating markers, which comprised 268 newly developed SSRs, 37 previously published SSRs and 53 sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers, were used for genetic map construction. The map for Asian lotus was 365.67 cM with 47 markers distributed in seven linkage groups. The map for American lotus was 524.51 cM, and contained 177 markers distributed in 11 genetic linkage groups. The number of markers per linkage group ranged from three to 34 with an average genetic distance of 3.97 cM between adjacent markers. Moreover, 171 SSR markers contained in linkage groups were anchored to 97 genomic DNA sequence contigs of ‘Chinese Antique’. The 97 contigs were merged into 60 scaffolds. Conclusion Genetic mapping of SSR markers derived from sequenced contigs in Nelumbo enabled the associated contigs to be anchored in the linkage map and facilitated assembly of the genome sequences of ‘Chinese Antique’. The present study reports the first construction of genetic linkage maps for Nelumbo, which can serve as reference linkage maps to accelerate characterization germplasm, genetic mapping for traits of economic interest, and molecular breeding with marker-assisted selection. PMID:23170872

  7. Identification of simple sequence repeat markers for utilizing wide-compatibility genes in inter-subspecific hybrids in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Sundaram, R M; Biradar, S K; Ahmed, M I; Viraktamath, B C; Siddiq, E A

    2006-08-01

    Although pronounced heterosis in inter-subspecific hybrids was known in rice for a long time, its utilization for hybrid rice breeding has been limited due to their hybrid sterility (HS). For the last two decades, however, a few inter-subspecific hybrids have been developed by incorporating wide-compatibility genes (WCG) that resolve HS, into parental lines of these inter-subspecific hybrids. For effective use of WCG, it is necessary to find convenient markers linked to WCG of practical importance. In this paper, initially a set of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in the vicinity of known WCG loci identified based on comparative linkage maps have been surveyed in a population derived from the three-way cross- IR36/Dular//Akihikari, where a known donor of WCG Dular was crossed to a representative indica and japonica cultivar. Of the five parental polymorphic markers, RM253 and RM276 were found to be closely linked to the WCG locus S5 at a distance of 3.0 and 2.8 cM, respectively. Later, loci for HS were examined in three F(2) populations derived from inter-subspecific crosses, with same set of SSR markers. The locus S8 was confirmed to have major influence on HS in the F(2 )population derived from CHMRF-1/Taichung65 since two SSR markers in its vicinity, RM412 and RM141, co-segregated with HS at a map distance of 7.6 and 4.8 cM, respectively. In the F(2) population derived from the cross BPT5204/Taipei309, three SSR markers in the vicinity of S5, RM50, RM276 and RM136 co-segregated with HS at a map distance of 4.2, 3.2 and 7.8 cM, respectively. In the third F(2 )population derived from Swarna/Taipei309, the SSR markers in the vicinity of S5, RM225, RM253, RM50, RM276 and RM136 were identified to co-segregate with HS at a map distance of 3.2, 2.6, 3.4, 2.6 and 6.6 cM, respectively. These results indicated a clear picture of WCG in Dular as well as the predominant role of HS alleles at S5 locus. The identified SSR markers are expected to be used for incorporation of WCG into parental lines in hybrid rice breeding to solve HS in inter-subspecific hybrids. PMID:16788798

  8. Stochastic Loss of Silencing of the Imprinted Ndn/NDN Allele, in a Mouse Model and Humans with Prader-Willi Syndrome, Has Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Unmehopa, Unga; Matarazzo, Valery; Watrin, Françoise; Linke, Matthias; Georges, Beatrice; Bischof, Jocelyn; Dijkstra, Femke; Bloemsma, Monique; Corby, Severine; Michel, François J.; Wevrick, Rachel; Zechner, Ulrich; Swaab, Dick; Dudley, Keith; Bezin, Laurent; Muscatelli, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that causes genes to be expressed from one allele only according to parental origin, the other allele being silent. Diseases can arise when the normally active alleles are not expressed. In this context, low level of expression of the normally silent alleles has been considered as genetic noise although such expression has never been further studied. Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a neurodevelopmental disease involving imprinted genes, including NDN, which are only expressed from the paternally inherited allele, with the maternally inherited allele silent. We present the first in-depth study of the low expression of a normally silent imprinted allele, in pathological context. Using a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches and comparing wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous mice deleted for Ndn, we show that, in absence of the paternal Ndn allele, the maternal Ndn allele is expressed at an extremely low level with a high degree of non-genetic heterogeneity. The level of this expression is sex-dependent and shows transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. In about 50% of mutant mice, this expression reduces birth lethality and severity of the breathing deficiency, correlated with a reduction in the loss of serotonergic neurons. In wild-type brains, the maternal Ndn allele is never expressed. However, using several mouse models, we reveal a competition between non-imprinted Ndn promoters which results in monoallelic (paternal or maternal) Ndn expression, suggesting that Ndn allelic exclusion occurs in the absence of imprinting regulation. Importantly, specific expression of the maternal NDN allele is also detected in post-mortem brain samples of PWS individuals. Our data reveal an unexpected epigenetic flexibility of PWS imprinted genes that could be exploited to reactivate the functional but dormant maternal alleles in PWS. Overall our results reveal high non-genetic heterogeneity between genetically identical individuals that might underlie the variability of the phenotype. PMID:24039599

  9. Stochastic loss of silencing of the imprinted Ndn/NDN allele, in a mouse model and humans with prader-willi syndrome, has functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Rieusset, Anne; Schaller, Fabienne; Unmehopa, Unga; Matarazzo, Valery; Watrin, Françoise; Linke, Matthias; Georges, Beatrice; Bischof, Jocelyn; Dijkstra, Femke; Bloemsma, Monique; Corby, Severine; Michel, François J; Wevrick, Rachel; Zechner, Ulrich; Swaab, Dick; Dudley, Keith; Bezin, Laurent; Muscatelli, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that causes genes to be expressed from one allele only according to parental origin, the other allele being silent. Diseases can arise when the normally active alleles are not expressed. In this context, low level of expression of the normally silent alleles has been considered as genetic noise although such expression has never been further studied. Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a neurodevelopmental disease involving imprinted genes, including NDN, which are only expressed from the paternally inherited allele, with the maternally inherited allele silent. We present the first in-depth study of the low expression of a normally silent imprinted allele, in pathological context. Using a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches and comparing wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous mice deleted for Ndn, we show that, in absence of the paternal Ndn allele, the maternal Ndn allele is expressed at an extremely low level with a high degree of non-genetic heterogeneity. The level of this expression is sex-dependent and shows transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. In about 50% of mutant mice, this expression reduces birth lethality and severity of the breathing deficiency, correlated with a reduction in the loss of serotonergic neurons. In wild-type brains, the maternal Ndn allele is never expressed. However, using several mouse models, we reveal a competition between non-imprinted Ndn promoters which results in monoallelic (paternal or maternal) Ndn expression, suggesting that Ndn allelic exclusion occurs in the absence of imprinting regulation. Importantly, specific expression of the maternal NDN allele is also detected in post-mortem brain samples of PWS individuals. Our data reveal an unexpected epigenetic flexibility of PWS imprinted genes that could be exploited to reactivate the functional but dormant maternal alleles in PWS. Overall our results reveal high non-genetic heterogeneity between genetically identical individuals that might underlie the variability of the phenotype. PMID:24039599

  10. Efficiency of the inbreeding coefficient f and other estimators in detecting null alleles, as revealed by empirical data of locus oke3 across 65 populations of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymorphic DNA markers, e.g. mini- or microsatellite (SSR) loci, are often removed from data analyses if an excess of homozygosity, presumably an indication of null alleles, is observed. However, exclusion of such loci can reduce available information if multiple loci carry null alleles. Because nu...

  11. Tetrasomic Segregation for Multiple Alleles in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Carlos F.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence of tetrasomic inheritance in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. and M. falcata L., for multiple codominant alleles at three isozymic loci is reported in this study. The locus Prx-1 governing anodal peroxidase and the loci Lap-1 and Lap-2 governing anodal leucine-aminopeptidase were studied by starch gel electrophoresis in seedling root tissue or seeds. The progenies from several di-, tri- or tetra-allelic plants belong to the species M. sativa and M. falcata and their hybrids were studied for the segregation of the three genes. In all cases, tetrasomic inheritance of chromosomal-type segregation was observed. In another progeny resulting from the crossing of two plants involving four different alleles at locus Lap-2, tetrasomic segregation with the possible occurrence of double reduction was observed. This study presents direct evidence of autotetraploidy and the existence of tetra-allelic loci in alfalfa. It also supports the concept that the species M. sativa and M. falcata are genetically close enough to be considered biotypes of a common species. PMID:17246077

  12. Comparing alleles between wild and domesticated tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At the USDA, ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit (PGRU), we conserve approximately 6,000 accessions of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and several hundred accessions of wild tomato species. Characterizing alleles in our collection will aid breeders and other researchers in using the germplasm. Domesti...

  13. Overcoming allelic specificity by immunization with five allelic forms of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Herrera, Raul; Diouf, Ababacar; Zhou, Hong; Mu, Jianbing; Hu, Zonghui; MacDonald, Nicholas J; Reiter, Karine; Nguyen, Vu; Shimp, Richard L; Singh, Kavita; Narum, David L; Long, Carole A; Miller, Louis H

    2013-05-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is a leading vaccine candidate, but the allelic polymorphism is a stumbling block for vaccine development. We previously showed that a global set of AMA1 haplotypes could be grouped into six genetic populations. Using this information, six recombinant AMA1 proteins representing each population were produced. Rabbits were immunized with either a single recombinant AMA1 protein or mixtures of recombinant AMA1 proteins (mixtures of 4, 5, or 6 AMA1 proteins). Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and purified IgG from each rabbit was used for growth inhibition assay (GIA) with 12 different clones of parasites (a total of 108 immunogen-parasite combinations). Levels of antibodies to all six AMA1 proteins were similar when the antibodies were tested against homologous antigens. When the percent inhibitions in GIA were plotted against the number of ELISA units measured with homologous AMA1, all data points followed a sigmoid curve, regardless of the immunogen. In homologous combinations, there were no differences in the percent inhibition between the single-allele and allele mixture groups. However, all allele mixture groups showed significantly higher percent inhibition than the single-allele groups in heterologous combinations. The 5-allele-mixture group showed significantly higher inhibition to heterologous parasites than the 4-allele-mixture group. On the other hand, there was no difference between the 5- and 6-allele-mixture groups. These data indicate that mixtures with a limited number of alleles may cover a majority of the parasite population. In addition, using the data from 72 immunogen-parasite combinations, we mathematically identified 13 amino acid polymorphic sites which significantly impact GIA activities. These results could be a foundation for the rational design of a future AMA1 vaccine. PMID:23429537

  14. Exploring the Distribution of Genetic Markers of Pharmacogenomics Relevance in Brazilian and Mexican Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz-Peña, Vania; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Roela, Rosimeire A.; Furuya-Mazzotti, Tatiane K.; Chammas, Roger; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; McLeod, Howard L.; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Studies of pharmacogenomics-related traits are increasingly being performed to identify loci that affect either drug response or susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the effect of the polymorphisms can differ in magnitude or be absent depending on the population being assessed. We used the Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array to characterize the distribution of polymorphisms of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) relevance in two samples from the most populous Latin American countries, Brazil and Mexico. The sample from Brazil included 268 individuals from the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, and was stratified into census categories. The sample from Mexico comprised 45 Native American Zapotecas and 224 self-identified Mestizo individuals from 5 states located in geographically distant regions in Mexico. We evaluated the admixture proportions in the Brazilian and Mexican samples using a panel of Ancestry Informative Markers extracted from the DMET array, which was validated with genome-wide data. A substantial variation in ancestral proportions across census categories in Brazil, and geographic regions in Mexico was identified. We evaluated the extent of genetic differentiation (measured as FST values) of the genetic markers of the DMET Plus array between the relevant parental populations. Although the average levels of genetic differentiation are low, there is a long tail of markers showing large frequency differences, including markers located in genes belonging to the Cytochrome P450, Solute Carrier (SLC) and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) families as well as other genes of PGx relevance such as ABCC8, ADH1A, CHST3, PON1, PPARD, PPARG, and VKORC1. We show how differences in admixture history may have an important impact in the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies at the population level. PMID:25419701

  15. Direct Detection of Insertion/Deletion Polymorphisms in an Autosomal Region by Analyzing High-Density Markers in Individual Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Sreemanta; Li, Honghua

    2002-01-01

    Direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphisms requires sample homozygosity. For the indel polymorphisms that have the deletion allele with a relatively low frequency in the autosomal regions, direct PCR detection becomes difficult or impossible. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first designed to directly detect indel polymorphisms in a human autosomal region (i.e., the immunoglobulin VH region), through use of single haploid sperm cells as subjects. Unique marker sequences (n=32), spaced at ?5-kb intervals, were selected near the 3? end of the VH region. A two-round multiplex PCR protocol was used to amplify these sequences from single sperm samples from nine unrelated healthy donors. The parental haplotypes of the donors were determined by examining the presence or absence of these markers. Seven clustered markers in 6 of the 18 haplotypes were missing and likely represented a 3540-kb indel polymorphism. The genotypes of the donors, with respect to this polymorphism, perfectly matched the expectation under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Three VH gene segments, of which two are functional, are affected by this polymorphism. According to these results, >10% of individuals in the human population may not have these gene segments in their genome, and ?44% may have only one copy of these gene segments. The biological impact of this polymorphism would be very interesting to study. The approach used in the present study could be applied to understand the physical structure and diversity of all other autosomal regions. PMID:12442231

  16. VARIATION OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AMONG SELECTED PAPAYA VARIETIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are simple, tandemly repeated mono- to hexa-nucleotide sequence motifs. Due to their co-dominant nature, ability to detect high levels of allelic diversity, and ubiquitous distribution, they have been widely used as genetic markers. Genomic researc...

  17. SSR Marker Analysis of Genetic Relationships within Hydrangea paniculata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity studies using 26 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers were conducted with 36 taxa of Hydrangea paniculata Sieb. The SSR loci were highly variable among the taxa, producing a mean of 5.8 alleles per locus. Three cultivars (Boskoop, Compact Grandiflora and Webb) were either identic...

  18. Microsatellite markers for the diploid Basidiomycete fungus, Armillaria mellea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We isolated and characterized 13 microsatellite markers for two North American populations (California and Pennsylvania) of Armillaria mellea, a fungal root pathogen responsible for Armillaria root disease of numerous horticultural crops and forest trees. The frequency of alleles ranged from two to...

  19. Paternity analysis using microsatellite markers to identify pollen donors in an olive grove.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Sonali; Guerin, Jenny; Collins, Graham; Ford, Chris; Sedgley, Margaret

    2005-10-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L.) is a wind-pollinated, allogamous species that is generally not considered to be self-compatible. In addition, cross-incompatibilities exist between cultivars that can result in low fruit set if compatible pollinisers are not planted nearby. In this study, microsatellite markers were used to identify 17 genotypes that were potential pollen donors in a commercial olive orchard. DNA typing with the same primers was also applied to 800 olive embryos collected from five cultivars in the grove over 2 years of study. Pollen donors for the cultivars Barnea, Corregiola, Kalamata, Koroneiki, and Mission were estimated by paternity analysis, based on the parental contribution of alleles in the genotypes of the embryos. The exclusion probability for the marker set was 0.998 and paternity was assigned on the basis of the 'most likely method'. Different pollen donors were identified for each of the maternal cultivars indicating that cross-compatibilities and incompatibilities varied between the genotypes studied. Cross-pollination was the principal method of fertilization, as selfing was only observed in two of the embryos studied and both of these were from the cultivar Mission. This is the first report where these techniques have been applied to survey the pollination patterns in an olive grove. The results indicate that careful planning in orchard design is required for efficient pollination between olive cultivars. PMID:16133312

  20. Evolutionary Dynamics of Sporophytic Self-Incompatibility Alleles in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, M. H.; Vekemans, X.; Christiansen, F. B.

    1997-01-01

    The stationary frequency distribution and allelic dynamics in finite populations are analyzed through stochastic simulations in three models of single-locus, multi-allelic sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance relationships among alleles. In one model, alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style (SSIcod), in the second, alleles form a dominance hierarchy in pollen and style (SSIdom). In the third model, alleles interact codominantly in the style and form a dominance hierarchy in the pollen (SSIdomcod). The SSIcod model behaves similarly to the model of gametophytic self-incompatibility, but the selection intensity is stronger. With dominance, dominant alleles invade the population more easily than recessive alleles and have a lower frequency at equilibrium. In the SSIdom model, recessive alleles have both a higher allele frequency and higher expected life span. In the SSIdomcod model, however, loss due to drift occurs more easily for pollen-recessive than for pollen-dominant alleles, and therefore, dominant alleles have a higher expected life span than the more recessive alleles. The process of allelic turnover in the SSIdomcod and SSIdom models is closely approximated by a random walk on a dominance ladder. Implications of the results for experimental studies of sporophytic self-incompatibility in natural populations are discussed. PMID:9335618

  1. Expanding the repertoire of gene tools for precise manipulation of the Clostridium difficile genome: allelic exchange using pyrE alleles.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yen Kuan; Ehsaan, Muhammad; Philip, Sheryl; Collery, Mark M; Janoir, Clare; Collignon, Anne; Cartman, Stephen T; Minton, Nigel P

    2013-01-01

    Sophisticated genetic tools to modify essential biological processes at the molecular level are pivotal in elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile, a major cause of healthcare associated disease. Here we have developed an efficient procedure for making precise alterations to the C. difficile genome by pyrE-based allelic exchange. The robustness and reliability of the method was demonstrated through the creation of in-frame deletions in three genes (spo0A, cwp84, and mtlD) in the non-epidemic strain 630Δerm and two genes (spo0A and cwp84) in the epidemic PCR Ribotype 027 strain, R20291. The system is reliant on the initial creation of a pyrE deletion mutant, using Allele Coupled Exchange (ACE), that is auxotrophic for uracil and resistant to fluoroorotic acid (FOA). This enables the subsequent modification of target genes by allelic exchange using a heterologous pyrE allele from Clostridium sporogenes as a counter-/negative-selection marker in the presence of FOA. Following modification of the target gene, the strain created is rapidly returned to uracil prototrophy using ACE, allowing mutant phenotypes to be characterised in a PyrE proficient background. Crucially, wild-type copies of the inactivated gene may be introduced into the genome using ACE concomitant with correction of the pyrE allele. This allows complementation studies to be undertaken at an appropriate gene dosage, as opposed to the use of multicopy autonomous plasmids. The rapidity of the 'correction' method (5-7 days) makes pyrE(-) strains attractive hosts for mutagenesis studies. PMID:23405251

  2. Microsatellites as DNA markers in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    He, Guohao; Meng, Ronghua; Newman, Melanie; Gao, Guoqing; Pittman, Roy N; Prakash, CS

    2003-01-01

    Background Genomic research of cultivated peanut has lagged behind other crop species because of the paucity of polymorphic DNA markers found in this crop. It is necessary to identify additional DNA markers for further genetic research in peanut. Results Microsatellite markers in cultivated peanut were developed using the SSR enrichment procedure. The results showed that the GA/CT repeat was the most frequently dispersed microsatellite in peanut. The primer pairs were designed for fifty-six different microsatellites, 19 of which showed a polymorphism among the genotypes studied. The average number of alleles per locus was 4.25, and up to 14 alleles were found at one locus. This suggests that microsatellite DNA markers produce a higher level of DNA polymorphism than other DNA markers in cultivated peanut. Conclusions It is desirable to isolate and characterize more DNA markers in cultivated peanut for more productive genomic studies, such as genetic mapping, marker-assisted selection, and gene discovery. The development of microsatellite markers holds a promise for such studies. PMID:12713672

  3. Analysis of some polymorphic markers of the CFTR gene in cystic fibrosis patients and healthy donors from the Moscow region

    SciTech Connect

    Amosenko, F.A.; Sazonova, M.A.; Kapranov, N.I.; Trubnikova, I.S.; Kalinin, V.N.

    1995-04-01

    Allelic frequencies of three polymorphic markers in the CFTR gene were estimated on chromosomes derived from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and healthy donors from Moscow and the Moscow region. These polymorphic markers are tetranucleotide tandem repeats GATT in intron 6B, M470V in exon 10, and T854T in exon 14 (fragment A). Frequencies at allele 1 of the M470V marker, along with allele 2 of GATT and T854T, are two times higher for CF patients without {Delta}F508 mutation than for healthy donors, and there is linkage disequilibrium of these alleles of the polymorphic markers analyzed with the CF gene. Allele 1 of M470V and T854T markers, as well as allele 2 of the GATT marker (six repeats), are absolutely linked to mutation F508 of the CFTR gene. Using the polymorphic markers studied, family analysis of CF was carried out in two families. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. First example of an FY*01 allele associated with weakened expression of Fya on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Patricia A; Horn, Trina; Keller, Jessica A; Heri, Suzanne M; Keller, Margaret A

    2015-01-01

    Duffy antigens are important in immunohematology. the reference allele for the Duffy gene (FY) is FY*02, which encodes Fy(b). An A>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at coding nucleotide (c.) 125 in exon 2 defines the FY*01 allele, which encodes the antithetical Fy(a). A C>T SNP at c.265 in the FY*02 allele is associated with weakening of Fy(b) expression on red blood cells (R BCs) (called Fy(x)). until recently, this latter change had not been described on a FY*01 background allele. Phenotype-matched units were desired for a multi-transfused Vietnamese fetus with ?-thalassemia. Genotyping of the fetus using a microarray assay that interrogates three SNPs (c.1-67, c.125, and c.265) in FY yielded indeterminate results for the predicted Duffy phenotype. Genomic sequencing of FY exon 2 showed that the fetal sample had one wild-type FY*01 allele and one new FY*01 allele with the c.265C>T SNP, which until recently had only been found on the FY*02 allele. Genotyping performed on samples from the proband's parents indicated that the father had the same FY genotype as the fetus. Flow cytometry, which has been previously demonstrated as a useful method to study antigen strength on cells, was used to determine if this new FY*01 allele was associated with reduced Fy(a) expression on the father's RBCs. Median fluorescence intensity of the father's RBCs (after incubation with anti-FY(a) and fluorescein-labeled anti-IgG) was similar to known FY*01 heterozygotes. and significantly weaker than known FY*01 homozygotes. In conclusion, the fetus and father both had one normal FY*01 allele and one new FY*01W.01, is associated with weakened expression of Fy(a) on RBCs. PMID:26829175

  5. Tri-allelic pattern of short tandem repeats identifies the murderer among identical twins and suggests an embryonic mutational origin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Feng; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Nan; Quan, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Monozygotic twins can be co-identified by genotyping of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, for distinguishing them, STR genotyping is ineffective, especially in the case of murder. Here, a rarely occurring tri-allelic pattern in the vWA locus (16, 18, 19) was identified only in the DNA of one identical twin, which could help to exonerate the innocent twin in a murder charge. This mutation was defined as primary through genotyping of the family and could be detected in blood, buccal and semen samples from the individual; however, two alternative allele-balanced di-allelic patterns (16, 18 or 16, 19) were detected in hair root sheath cells. Such a kind of segregation indicates a one-step mutation occurs in cell mitosis, which is after embryonic zygote formation and during the early development of the individual after the division of the blastocyte. Sequencing revealed the insertion between the allele 18 and 19 is a repeat unit of TAGA/TCTA (plus/minus strand), which belongs to "AGAT/ATCT"-based core repeats identified from all tri-allelic pattern reports recorded in the STR base and a detailed model was proposed for STR repeat length variation caused by false priming during DNA synthesis. Our model illustrates the possible origination of allele-balanced and unbalanced tri-allelic pattern, clarifies that the genotypes of parent-child mismatches, aberrant di-allelic patterns, and type 1 or 2 tri-allelic patterns should be considered as independent, but interconnected forms of STR mutation. PMID:25732248

  6. Fine-mapping and molecular marker development for Pi56(t), a NBS-LRR gene conferring broad-spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Bin; Zhu, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Jianyuan; Bordeos, Alicia; Wang, Guoliang; Leach, Jan E; Leung, Hei

    2013-04-01

    The major quantitative trait locus qBR9.1 confers broad-spectrum resistance to rice blast, and was mapped to a ~69.1 kb region on chromosome 9 that was inherited from resistant variety Sanhuangzhan No 2 (SHZ-2). Within this region, only one predicted disease resistance gene with nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) domains was found. Specific markers corresponding to this gene cosegregated with blast resistance in F2 and F3 populations derived from crosses of susceptible variety Texianzhan 13 (TXZ-13) to SHZ-2 and the resistant backcross line BC-10. We tentatively designate the gene as Pi56(t). Sequence analysis revealed that Pi56(t) encodes an NBS-LRR protein composed of 743 amino acids. Pi56(t) was highly induced by blast infection in resistant lines SHZ-2 and BC-10. The corresponding allele of Pi56(t) in the susceptible line TXZ-13 encodes a protein with an NBS domain but without LRR domain, and it was not induced by Magnaporthe oryzae infection. Three new cosegregating gene-specific markers, CRG4-1, CRG4-2 and CRG4-3, were developed. In addition, we evaluated polymorphism of the gene-based markers among popular varieties from national breeding programs in Asia and Africa. The presence of the CRG4-2 SHZ-2 allele cosegregated with a blast-resistant phenotype in two BC2F1 families of SHZ-2 crossed to recurrent parents IR64-Sub1 and Swarna-Sub1. CRG4-1 and CRG4-3 showed clear polymorphism among 19 varieties, suggesting that they can be used in marker-assisted breeding to combine Pi56(t) with other target genes in breeding lines. PMID:23400829

  7. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. PMID:25775930

  8. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Design of an F1 hybrid breeding strategy for ryegrasses based on selection of self-incompatibility locus-specific alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pembleton, Luke W.; Shinozuka, Hiroshi; Wang, Junping; Spangenberg, German C.; Forster, John W.; Cogan, Noel O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Relatively modest levels of genetic gain have been achieved in conventional ryegrass breeding when compared to cereal crops such as maize, current estimates indicating an annual improvement of 0.25–0.6% in dry matter production. This property is partially due to an inability to effectively exploit heterosis through the formation of F1 hybrids. Controlled crossing of ryegrass lines from geographically distant origins has demonstrated the occurrence of heterosis, which can result in increases of dry matter production in the order of 25%. Although capture of hybrid vigor offers obvious advantages for ryegrass cultivar production, to date there have been no effective and commercially suitable methods for obtaining high proportions of F1 hybrid seed. Continued advances in fine-scale genetic and physical mapping of the gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) loci (S and Z) of ryegrasses are likely in the near future to permit the identification of closely linked genetic markers that define locus-specific haplotypes, allowing prediction of allelic variants and hence compatibility between different plant genotypes. Given the availability of such information, a strategy for efficient generation of ryegrass cultivars with a high proportion of F1 hybrid individuals has been simulated, which is suitable for commercial implementation. Through development of two parental pools with restricted diversity at the SI loci, relative crossing compatibility between pools is increased. Based on simulation of various levels of SI allele diversity restriction, the most effective scheme will generate 83.33% F1 hybrids. Results from the study, including the impact of varying flowering time, are discussed along with a proposed breeding design for commercial application. PMID:26442077

  10. Pseudoautosomal marker DXYS20 and manic depression

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Erdmann, J.; Koerner, J.; Rietschel, M.; Propping, P. ); Rappold, G.A. ); Fritze, J. )

    1993-04-01

    Yoneda et al. (1992) observed a significant association between manic-depressive illness and a 13.5-kb band of the pseudoautosomal marker DXYS20 (probe 362A) in EcoRI digests of 49 Japanese patients compared with 119 controls. The 13.5-kb allele was designated [open quotes]A4 allele[close quotes] and was found on at least one chromosome in 46.9% of the patients, compared with 26.1% of the controls. The relative risk of the A4 allele for the disease was 2.51. The authors have genotyped the EcoRI RFLP in 73 patients (40 females and 33 males) who fulfill DSM-III-R criteria of manic-depressive illness (bipolar affective disorder) and in 79 controls (34 females and 45 males). All subjects included in the study were unrelated and were of German descent. They used the probe 3cos-PP, which, by sequence analysis, was shown to be directly homologous to the independently cloned probe 362A (Rappold et al. 1992). The pseudoautosomal locus DXYS20 represents a VNTR-like minisatellite, and many polymorphic bands are recognized by means of several restriction endonucleases (Page et al. 1987). In EcoRI digests, sizes of bands cluster, and the authors grouped their bands according to allele sizes used by Yoneda et al. In addition to the alleles reported by Yoneda et al., they observed a 10-kb band in five subjects. The results are shown in a table. The frequency of the A4 allele did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Thus, the data do not support a widespread or consistent association between DXYS20 and bipolar affective disorder. A large degree of ethnic variation is seen with DXYS20 (Rappold et al. 1992) and might explain the difference of allele frequencies in controls from Japan and Germany. Since VNTRs evolve rapidly, they may not always be the best markers to detect disease associations, where a positive effect requires linkage disequilibrium. In any case, it should be useful to study larger samples of Japanese patients and controls. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Genetic Exchange of Fimbrial Alleles Exemplifies the Adaptive Virulence Strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jennifer E.; Abramian, Jared R.; Dao, Doan-Hieu V.; Rigney, Todd W.; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram–negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed “keystone” pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions. PMID:24626479

  12. An improved MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry procedure and a novel DNA marker for identifying over-expressed Bx7 glutenin protein subunit in wheat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Islam, Shahidul; Ma, Junhong; Anwar, Masood; Chen, Jing; Yan, Yueming; Appels, Rudi; Ma, Wujun

    2014-12-01

    Wheat bread-making quality is mainly determined by glutenin proteins in the grain, which exist in a wide range of variable alleles with differential influence on processing attributes. A recently identified allele, Bx7 over-expression (Bx7(oe) ), has been showing highly significant positive effects on wheat dough strength over the normally expressed Bx7 allele. SDS-PAGE and normal RP-HPLC procedures failed to separate the two alleles. In the current study, an extensively optimised MALDI-TOF based procedure and a refined DNA based marker for efficiently differentiating Bx7(oe) from normal Bx7 allele were established. Results indicated that the MALDI-TOF procedure is cost effective, high throughput, and proven reliable, while the refined PCR marker only amplifies Bx7(oe) allele, a clear advantage over the previously developed codominant marker. PMID:25588305

  13. Spatial proximity of homologous alleles and long noncoding RNAs regulate a switch in allelic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Kapsetaki, Manouela; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Town, Terrence; Flavell, Richard A.; Spilianakis, Charalampos G.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological processes rely on the regulation of total mRNA levels in a cell. In diploid organisms, the transcriptional activation of one or both alleles of a gene may involve trans-allelic interactions that provide a tight spatial and temporal level of gene expression regulation. The mechanisms underlying such interactions still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of murine macrophages rapidly resulted in the actin-mediated and transient homologous spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles, which was necessary for the mono- to biallelic switch in gene expression. We identified two new complementary long noncoding RNAs transcribed from the TNFα locus and showed that their knockdown had opposite effects in Tnfα spatial proximity and allelic expression. Moreover, the observed spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles depended on pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) and T-helper-inducing POZ-Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK). This study suggests a role for lncRNAs in the regulation of somatic homologous spatial proximity and allelic expression control necessary for fine-tuning mammalian immune responses. PMID:25770217

  14. Molecular characterization of diverse CIMMYT maize inbred lines from eastern and southern Africa using single nucleotide polymorphic markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge of germplasm diversity and relationships among elite breeding materials is fundamentally important in crop improvement. We genotyped 450 maize inbred lines developed and/or widely used by CIMMYT breeding programs in both Kenya and Zimbabwe using 1065 SNP markers to (i) investigate population structure and patterns of relationship of the germplasm for better exploitation in breeding programs; (ii) assess the usefulness of SNPs for identifying heterotic groups commonly used by CIMMYT breeding programs; and (iii) identify a subset of highly informative SNP markers for routine and low cost genotyping of CIMMYT germplasm in the region using uniplex assays. Results Genetic distance for about 94% of the pairs of lines fell between 0.300 and 0.400. Eighty four percent of the pairs of lines also showed relative kinship values ≤ 0.500. Model-based population structure analysis, principal component analysis, neighbor-joining cluster analysis and discriminant analysis revealed the presence of 3 major groups and generally agree with pedigree information. The SNP markers did not show clear separation of heterotic groups A and B that were established based on combining ability tests through diallel and line x tester analyses. Our results demonstrated large differences among the SNP markers in terms of reproducibility, ease of scoring, polymorphism, minor allele frequency and polymorphic information content. About 40% of the SNPs in the multiplexed chip-based GoldenGate assays were found to be uninformative in this study and we recommend 644 of the 1065 for low to medium density genotyping in tropical maize germplasm using uniplex assays. Conclusions There were high genetic distance and low kinship coefficients among most pairs of lines, clearly indicating the uniqueness of the majority of the inbred lines in these maize breeding programs. The results from this study will be useful to breeders in selecting best parental combinations for new breeding crosses, mapping population development and marker assisted breeding. PMID:22443094

  15. Allelic association and extended haplotype analysis of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) candidate region in the French Candadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, L.R.; Prescott, G.; Rochette, C. |

    1994-09-01

    SMA is a common lower motor neuron disease characterized by progressive proximal limb and trunk muscle weakness. Despite the wide range in phenotypic severity, all three clinical types of childhood SMAs map to chromosome 5q11.2-5q13.3. The proximal (D5S557) flanking markers span about 1 Mb. We have previously demonstrated significant linkage disequilibrium between D5S125, D5S435, D5S351, JK53CA1/2 and SMA in the French Canadian population. We now present data for three new DNA markers mapping between D5S435 and D5S557 kindly provided to us by Drs. B. Wirth (A31), A. Burghes (Ag1) and A. MacKenzie (CATT-40G1). We identified 10 different A31 Alleles whose frequencies were similar for both normal and SMA chromosomes. Ag1 is a complex multi-allelic marker and specific primers amplified 1 (Class I), 2 or rarely 3 (Class II) alleles per chromosome. We observed significant association between Ag1 and SMA. For example, the 100 bp Ag1 fragment was typed on 20 of 73 SMA chromosomes and 0 of 74 normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). We also observed significant association between Ag1 Class genotypes and phenotypic severity. Class I chromosomes predominated in Type I SMA (p=.001) while Type II SMA individuals were generally heterozygous Class I/Class II (p=.001). Finally, we provide evidence for allelic association between Type I SMA and CATT-40G1, a tri-allelic sublocus of CATT-1. All of our Type I SMA chromosomes (n=20) carried a null allele compared to 40% of normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). Extended haplotype analyses indicated that > 19% of French Canadian SMA chromosomes appear to be ancestrally related to two unique haplotypes indicating their utility for linkage disequilibrium mapping.

  16. Y-chromosome specific alleles and haplotypes in European and Asian populations: linkage disequilibrium and geographic diversity.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R J; Earl, L; Fricke, B

    1997-10-01

    Variation on the Y chromosome may permit our understanding the evolution of the human paternal lineage and male gene flow. This study reports upon the distribution and non random association of alleles at four Y-chromosome specific loci in four populations, three Caucasoid (Italian, Greek and Slav) and one Asian. The markers include insertion/deletion (p12f), point mutation (92R7 and pY alpha I), and repeat sequence (p21A1) polymorphisms. Our data confirm that the p12f/TaqI 8 kb allele is a Caucasoid marker and that Asians are monomorphic at three of the loci (p12f, 92R7, and pY alpha I). The alleles at 92R7 and pY alpha I were found to be in complete disequilibrium in Europeans. Y-haplotype diversity was highly significant between Asians and all three European groups (P < 0.001), but the Greeks and Italians were also significantly different with respect to some alleles and haplotypes (P < 0.02). We find strong evidence that the p12f/TaqI 8 kb allele may have arisen only once, as a deletion event, and, additionally, that the present-day frequency distribution of Y chromosomes carrying the p12f/8 kb allele suggests that it may have been spread by colonising sea-faring peoples from the Near East, possibly the Phoenicians, rather than by expansion of Neolithic farmers into continental Europe. The p12f deletion is the key marker of a unique Y chromosome, found only in Caucasians to date, labelled 'Mediterranean' and this further increases the level of Y-chromosome diversity seen among Caucasoids when compared to the other major population groups. PMID:9386824

  17. A multicopy dinucleotide marker that maps close to the spinal muscular atrophy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Burghes, A.H.M.; Ingraham, S.E.; Kote-Jarai, Z.; Carpten, J.D.; DiDonato, C.J. ); McLean, M.; Surh, L. ); Thompson, T.G.; McPherson, J.D. ); Ikeda, J.E. ); Wirth, B. )

    1994-05-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder resulting in loss of motor neurons. The interval containing the SMA gene has been defined by linkage analysis as 5qcen-D5S435-SMA-D5S557-5qter. The authors have isolated a new dinucleotide repeat marker, CATT1, that lies between these two closest markers. The marker CATT1 has 16 alleles and is highly polymorphic. The marker can have 1 to 4 (or more) copies per chromosome, giving rise to individuals with up to 8 (or more) alleles. All of the subloci map between the markers D5S557 and D5S435 and lie in close proximity to one another. The marker CATT1 is linked to the SMA gene with a lod score of Z[sub max] = 34.42 at [theta] = 0 and crosses all available recombinants. Certain alleles occurred more frequently in either the SMA or normal populations, indicating significant allelic association between CATT1 and the SMA locus. Haplotype analysis combining US and Canadian SMA families reveals that one haplotype group (VII) occurs significantly more frequently in the SMA population than in the normal. This confirms the allelic association of CATT1 with the SMA locus. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Cryptic virulence and avirulence alleles revealed by controlled sexual recombination in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Kanvil, Sadia; Collins, C Matilda; Powell, Glen; Turnbull, Colin G N

    2015-02-01

    Although aphids are worldwide crop pests, little is known about aphid effector genes underlying virulence and avirulence. Here we show that controlling the genetics of both aphid and host can reveal novel recombinant genotypes with previously undetected allelic variation in both virulence and avirulence functions. Clonal F1 progeny populations were derived from reciprocal crosses and self-matings between two parental genotypes of pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) differing in virulence on a Medicago truncatula host carrying the RAP1 and RAP2 resistance genes. These populations showed Mendelian segregation consistent with aphid performance being controlled largely by a dominant virulence allele derived from only one parent. Altered segregation ratios on near-isogenic host genotypes differing in the region carrying RAP1 were indicative of additional heritable functions likely related to avirulence genes originating from both parents. Unexpectedly, some virulent F1 progeny were recovered from selfing of an avirulent parent, suggesting a reservoir of cryptic alleles. Host chlorosis was associated with virulence, whereas necrotic hypersensitive-like response was not. No maternal inheritance was found for any of these characteristics, ruling out sex-linked, cytoplasmic, and endosymbiotic factors. Our results demonstrate the tractability of dissecting the genetic basis of pest-host resistance mechanisms and indicate that the annual sexual cycle in aphids may lead to frequent novel genotypes with both increased and decreased virulence. Availability of genomes for both pest and host can facilitate definition of cognate gene-for-gene relationships, potentially leading to selection of crop genotypes with multiple resistance traits. PMID:25519896

  19. Cryptic Virulence and Avirulence Alleles Revealed by Controlled Sexual Recombination in Pea Aphids

    PubMed Central

    Kanvil, Sadia; Collins, C. Matilda; Powell, Glen; Turnbull, Colin G. N.

    2015-01-01

    Although aphids are worldwide crop pests, little is known about aphid effector genes underlying virulence and avirulence. Here we show that controlling the genetics of both aphid and host can reveal novel recombinant genotypes with previously undetected allelic variation in both virulence and avirulence functions. Clonal F1 progeny populations were derived from reciprocal crosses and self-matings between two parental genotypes of pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) differing in virulence on a Medicago truncatula host carrying the RAP1 and RAP2 resistance genes. These populations showed Mendelian segregation consistent with aphid performance being controlled largely by a dominant virulence allele derived from only one parent. Altered segregation ratios on near-isogenic host genotypes differing in the region carrying RAP1 were indicative of additional heritable functions likely related to avirulence genes originating from both parents. Unexpectedly, some virulent F1 progeny were recovered from selfing of an avirulent parent, suggesting a reservoir of cryptic alleles. Host chlorosis was associated with virulence, whereas necrotic hypersensitive-like response was not. No maternal inheritance was found for any of these characteristics, ruling out sex-linked, cytoplasmic, and endosymbiotic factors. Our results demonstrate the tractability of dissecting the genetic basis of pest-host resistance mechanisms and indicate that the annual sexual cycle in aphids may lead to frequent novel genotypes with both increased and decreased virulence. Availability of genomes for both pest and host can facilitate definition of cognate gene-for-gene relationships, potentially leading to selection of crop genotypes with multiple resistance traits. PMID:25519896

  20. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  1. Development of highly polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellite markers in Austrocedrus chilensis.

    PubMed

    Arana, María Verónica; Buonamici, Anna; Sebastiani, Federico; Alia, Ricardo; Gallo, Leonardo A; Marchelli, Paula; Moreno, Carolina; Vendramin, Giovanni G

    2008-07-01

    An enriched genomic library was constructed and 9 novel polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellite markers developed for Austrocedrus chilensis, the most economically important native conifer in the Andean Patagonian region. Polymorphism was investigated for these markers in 48 individuals from two populations. Numbers of alleles ranged from 3 to 19 and levels of observed heterozygosity among the 9 loci ranged from 0.32 to 0.95. No locus combinations exhibited linkage disequilibrium. These polymorphic markers will be useful tools for the study of demography and gene flow and more in general for population and conservation genetics of this species. PMID:21585920

  2. Leadership Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes how three principles of leadership presented by Heifetz (1994) in "Leadership Without Easy Answers" can be translated into the leadership parenting of young children. Focuses on distinguishing between child-rearing issues that require parents to act as trainers versus those demanding a problem-solving role, on responding to children's…

  3. Parent Express.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Elise, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Intended for use by parents of infants and toddlers, this series of 27 8-page month-by-month newsletters provides research-based information on infant and child development and care from 0 to 36 months. Topics in the series for infants include: becoming a parent; getting ready for child birth; the newborn child; and characteristics of the child at…

  4. Detection of new HLA-DPB1 alleles generated by interallelic gene conversion using PCR amplification of DPB1 second exon sequences from sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, H.; Zangenberg, G.; Bugawan, T.

    1994-09-01

    The rate at which allelic diversity at the HLA class I and class II loci evolves has been the subject of considerable controversy as have the mechanisms which generate new alleles. The patchwork pattern of polymorphism, particularly within the second exon of the HLA-DPB1 locus where the polymorphic sequence motifs are localized to 6 discrete regions, is consistent with the hypothesis that much of the allelic sequence variation may have been generated by segmental exchange (gene conversion). To measure the rate of new DPB1 variant generation, we have developed a strategy in which DPB1 second exon sequences are amplified from pools of FACS-sorted sperm (n=50) from a heterozygous sperm donor. Pools of sperm from these heterozygous individuals are amplified with an allele-specific primer for one allele and analyzed with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) complementary to the other allele. This screening procedure, which is capable of detecting a single variant molecule in a pool of parental alleles, allows the identification of new variants that have been generated by recombination and/or gene conversion between the two parental alleles. To control for potential PCR artifacts, the same screening procedure was carried out with mixtures of sperm from DPB1 *0301/*0301 and DPB1 *0401/ 0401 individuals. Pools containing putative new variants DPB1 alleles were analyzed further by cloning into M13 and sequencing the M13 clones. Our current estimate is that about 1/10,000 sperm from these heterozygous individuals represents a new DPB1 allele generated by micro-gene conversion within the second exon.

  5. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  6. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  7. Precision-engineering the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome with two-step allelic exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hmelo, Laura R.; Borlee, Bradley R.; Almblad, Henrik; Love, Michelle E.; Randall, Trevor E.; Tseng, Boo Shan; Lin, Chuyang; Irie, Yasuhiko; Storek, Kelly M.; Yang, Jaeun Jane; Siehnel, Richard J.; Howell, P. Lynne; Singh, Pradeep K.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Parsek, Matthew R.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Harrison, Joe J.

    2016-01-01

    Allelic exchange is an efficient method of bacterial genome engineering. This protocol describes the use of this technique to make gene knockouts and knockins, as well as single nucleotide insertions, deletions and substitutions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Unlike other approaches to allelic exchange, this protocol does not require heterologous recombinases to insert or excise selective markers from the target chromosome. Rather, positive and negative selection are enabled solely by suicide vector-encoded functions and host cell proteins. Here, mutant alleles, which are flanked by regions of homology to the recipient chromosome, are synthesized in vitro and then cloned into allelic exchange vectors using standard procedures. These suicide vectors are then introduced into recipient cells by conjugation. Homologous recombination then results in antibiotic resistant single-crossover mutants in which the plasmid has integrated site-specifically into the chromosome. Subsequently, unmarked double-crossover mutants are isolated directly using sucrose-mediated counter-selection. This two-step process yields seamless mutations that are precise to a single base pair of DNA. The entire procedure requires ~2 weeks. PMID:26492139

  8. Precision-engineering the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome with two-step allelic exchange.

    PubMed

    Hmelo, Laura R; Borlee, Bradley R; Almblad, Henrik; Love, Michelle E; Randall, Trevor E; Tseng, Boo Shan; Lin, Chuyang; Irie, Yasuhiko; Storek, Kelly M; Yang, Jaeun Jane; Siehnel, Richard J; Howell, P Lynne; Singh, Pradeep K; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Parsek, Matthew R; Schweizer, Herbert P; Harrison, Joe J

    2015-11-01

    Allelic exchange is an efficient method of bacterial genome engineering. This protocol describes the use of this technique to make gene knockouts and knock-ins, as well as single-nucleotide insertions, deletions and substitutions, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Unlike other approaches to allelic exchange, this protocol does not require heterologous recombinases to insert or excise selective markers from the target chromosome. Rather, positive and negative selections are enabled solely by suicide vector-encoded functions and host cell proteins. Here, mutant alleles, which are flanked by regions of homology to the recipient chromosome, are synthesized in vitro and then cloned into allelic exchange vectors using standard procedures. These suicide vectors are then introduced into recipient cells by conjugation. Homologous recombination then results in antibiotic-resistant single-crossover mutants in which the plasmid has integrated site-specifically into the chromosome. Subsequently, unmarked double-crossover mutants are isolated directly using sucrose-mediated counter-selection. This two-step process yields seamless mutations that are precise to a single base pair of DNA. The entire procedure requires ∼2 weeks. PMID:26492139

  9. Reduced XPC DNA repair gene mRNA levels in clinically normal parents of xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sikandar G; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Shahlavi, Tala; Ueda, Takahiro; Busch, David B; Inui, Hiroki; Emmert, Steffen; Imoto, Kyoko; Muniz-Medina, Vanessa; Baker, Carl C; DiGiovanna, John J; Schmidt, Deborah; Khadavi, Arash; Metin, Ahmet; Gozukara, Engin; Slor, Hanoch; Sarasin, Alain; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2006-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Patients with two mutant alleles of the XPC DNA repair gene have sun sensitivity and a 1000-fold increase in skin cancers. Clinically normal parents of XP-C patients have one mutant allele and one normal allele. As a step toward evaluating cancer risk in these XPC heterozygotes we characterized cells from 16 XP families. We identified 15 causative mutations (5 frameshift, 6 nonsense and 4 splicing) in the XPC gene in cells from 16 XP probands. All had premature termination codons (PTC) and absence of normal XPC protein on western blotting. The cell lines from 26 parents were heterozygous for the same mutations. We employed a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR assay as a rapid and sensitive method to measure XPC mRNA levels. The mean XPC mRNA levels in the cell lines from the XP-C probands were 24% (P<10(-7)) of that in 10 normal controls. This reduced XPC mRNA level in cells from XP-C patients was caused by the PTC that induces nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The mean XPC mRNA levels in cell lines from the heterozygous XP-C carriers were intermediate (59%, P=10(-4)) between the values for the XP patients and the normal controls. This study demonstrates reduced XPC mRNA levels in XP-C patients and heterozygotes. Thus, XPC mRNA levels may be evaluated as a marker of cancer susceptibility in carriers of mutations in the XPC gene. PMID:16081512

  10. Recovery of Heritable, Transposon-Induced, Mutant Alleles of the Rf2 Nuclear Restorer of T-Cytoplasm Maize

    PubMed Central

    Schnable, P. S.; Wise, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    T (Texas) cytoplasm is associated with a mitochondrial disruption that is phenotypically expressed during microsporogenesis resulting in male sterility. Restoration of pollen fertility in T-cytoplasm maize is controlled by dominant alleles at two unlinked, complementary, nuclear-encoded genes, rf1 and rf2. As a first step in the molecular isolation of the rf2 gene, 178,300 gametes derived from plants that carried the Mutator, Cy or Spm transposon families were screened for rf2 mutant alleles (rf2-m) via their inability to restore pollen fertility to T-cytoplasm male-sterile maize. Seven heritable rf2-m alleles were recovered from these transposon populations. Pedigrees and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based analyses indicated that all seven rf2-m alleles were derived independently. The ability to obtain rf2-m derivatives from Rf2 suggests that Rf2 alleles produce a functional product necessary to restore pollen fertility to cmsT. Molecular markers flanking the rf1 and rf2 loci were used to decipher segregation patterns in progenies segregating for the rf2-m alleles. These analyses provided preliminary evidence of a weak, third restorer gene of cmsT that can substitute for Rf1. PMID:7911770

  11. Characterization of 14 microsatellite markers for Silene acaulis (Caryophyllaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike; Hlaváčková, Iva; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Alsos, Inger Greve; Eidesen, Pernille Bronken

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Fifty candidate microsatellite markers, generated using 454 shotgun sequencing, were tested for the widespread arctic/alpine herb Silene acaulis (Caryophyllaceae). Methods and Results: Fourteen out of 50 markers resulted in polymorphic products with profiles that enabled interpretation. The numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to six, and the expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.06 to 0.68. Analysis of F0 and F1 samples proved that one allele was always inherited maternally. Four multiplex mixes have been developed. Conclusions: Microsatellite markers for this species will be a valuable tool to study detailed small-scale genetic patterns in an arctic/alpine herb and to relate them to demographic parameters. PMID:26421249

  12. Isolation of nuclear microsatellite markers for Cyperus fuscus (Cyperaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Böckelmann, Jörg; Wieser, David; Tremetsberger, Karin; Šumberová, Kateřina; Bernhardt, Karl-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were characterized in the extremely specialized ephemeral wetland plant species Cyperus fuscus (Cyperaceae). The markers will be used for studying population genetics in natural vs. anthropogenic habitats, on a European scale, and the role of the soil seed bank in the life cycle of this ephemeral species. Methods and Results: Twenty-one microsatellite loci were established and scored in two populations, with mean number of alleles of 2.6 and 2.9 and mean expected heterozygosity of 0.405 and 0.470, respectively. Forty-four additional loci with the number of alleles ranging from one to four (mean = 2.1) were successfully amplified in seven individuals. Conclusions: The novel microsatellite markers will be useful for studying the genetic structure of populations of this ephemeral plant as well as their seed bank. PMID:26649269

  13. Identification and DUS Testing of Rice Varieties through Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Pourabed, Ehsan; Jazayeri Noushabadi, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Seyed Hossein; Moheb Alipour, Naser; Zareyan, Abbas; Sadeghi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Identification and registration of new rice varieties are very important to be free from environmental effects and using molecular markers that are more reliable. The objectives of this study were, first, the identification and distinction of 40 rice varieties consisting of local varieties of Iran, improved varieties, and IRRI varieties using PIC, and discriminating power, second, cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and UPGMA algorithm, and, third, determining the ability of microsatellite markers to separate varieties utilizing the best combination of markers. For this research, 12 microsatellite markers were used. In total, 83 polymorphic alleles (6.91 alleles per locus) were found. In addition, the variation of PIC was calculated from 0.52 to 0.9. The results of cluster analysis showed the complete discrimination of varieties from each other except for IR58025A and IR58025B. Moreover, cluster analysis could detect the most of the improved varieties from local varieties. Based on the best combination of markers analysis, five pair primers together have shown the same results of all markers for detection among all varieties. Considering the results of this research, we can propose that microsatellite markers can be used as a complementary tool for morphological characteristics in DUS tests. PMID:25755666

  14. Identification and DUS Testing of Rice Varieties through Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Pourabed, Ehsan; Jazayeri Noushabadi, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Seyed Hossein; Moheb Alipour, Naser; Zareyan, Abbas; Sadeghi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Identification and registration of new rice varieties are very important to be free from environmental effects and using molecular markers that are more reliable. The objectives of this study were, first, the identification and distinction of 40 rice varieties consisting of local varieties of Iran, improved varieties, and IRRI varieties using PIC, and discriminating power, second, cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and UPGMA algorithm, and, third, determining the ability of microsatellite markers to separate varieties utilizing the best combination of markers. For this research, 12 microsatellite markers were used. In total, 83 polymorphic alleles (6.91 alleles per locus) were found. In addition, the variation of PIC was calculated from 0.52 to 0.9. The results of cluster analysis showed the complete discrimination of varieties from each other except for IR58025A and IR58025B. Moreover, cluster analysis could detect the most of the improved varieties from local varieties. Based on the best combination of markers analysis, five pair primers together have shown the same results of all markers for detection among all varieties. Considering the results of this research, we can propose that microsatellite markers can be used as a complementary tool for morphological characteristics in DUS tests. PMID:25755666

  15. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  16. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  17. Distribution of HLA DQ A1 alleles and genotypes in two Spanish populations (Aragon and Asturias).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jarreta, B; Bolea, M; Castellano, M; Hinojal, R; Abecia, E

    1996-08-15

    HLA DQ A1 is probably one of the PCR-based genetic marker systems most widely used in actual forensic casework analyses. As accurate data about the distribution of the alleles is one of the most important prerequisites for the application in forensic biology, we studied the allele distribution in two relevant Spanish populations (Aragonese and Asturian). Results were in good agreement with the Hardy-Weinberg law in both Aragonese and Asturian populations. The power of discrimination was 0.92 in the Aragonese and 0.93 in Asturian sample. A test for homogeneity of the HLA DQ A1 population data based on alelle frequency counts for 12 European samples was performed and no significant differences were found (P = 0.831). PMID:8837494

  18. Statistics of Natural Populations. II. Estimating an Allele Probability in Families Descended from Cryptic Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jonathan; Morrison, Melvin L.

    1985-01-01

    In population studies, adults are frequently difficult or inconvenient to identify for genotype, but a family profile of genotypes can be obtained from an unidentified female crossed with a single unidentified male. The problem is to estimate an allele frequency in the cryptic parental gene pool from the observed family profiles. For example, a worker may wish to estimate inversion frequencies in Drosophila; inversion karyotypes are cryptic in adults but visible in salivary gland squashes from larvae. A simple mixture model, which assumes the Hardy-Weinberg law, Mendelian laws and a single randomly chosen mate per female, provides the vehicle for studying three competing estimators of an allele frequency. A simple, heuristically appealing estimator called the Dobzhansky estimator is compared with the maximum likelihood estimator and a close relative called the grouped profiles estimator. The Dobzhansky estimator is computationally simple, consistent and highly efficient and is recommended in practice over its competitors. PMID:17246258

  19. Tracking human migrations by the analysis of the distribution of HLA alleles, lineages and haplotypes in closed and open populations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Vina, Marcelo A; Hollenbach, Jill A; Lyke, Kirsten E; Sztein, Marcelo B; Maiers, Martin; Klitz, William; Cano, Pedro; Mack, Steven; Single, Richard; Brautbar, Chaim; Israel, Shosahna; Raimondi, Eduardo; Khoriaty, Evelyne; Inati, Adlette; Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Thomson, Glenys; Stastny, Peter; Cao, Kai

    2012-03-19

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system shows extensive variation in the number and function of loci and the number of alleles present at any one locus. Allele distribution has been analysed in many populations through the course of several decades, and the implementation of molecular typing has significantly increased the level of diversity revealing that many serotypes have multiple functional variants. While the degree of diversity in many populations is equivalent and may result from functional polymorphism(s) in peptide presentation, homogeneous and heterogeneous populations present contrasting numbers of alleles and lineages at the loci with high-density expression products. In spite of these differences, the homozygosity levels are comparable in almost all of them. The balanced distribution of HLA alleles is consistent with overdominant selection. The genetic distances between outbred populations correlate with their geographical locations; the formal genetic distance measurements are larger than expected between inbred populations in the same region. The latter present many unique alleles grouped in a few lineages consistent with limited founder polymorphism in which any novel allele may have been positively selected to enlarge the communal peptide-binding repertoire of a given population. On the other hand, it has been observed that some alleles are found in multiple populations with distinctive haplotypic associations suggesting that convergent evolution events may have taken place as well. It appears that the HLA system has been under strong selection, probably owing to its fundamental role in varying immune responses. Therefore, allelic diversity in HLA should be analysed in conjunction with other genetic markers to accurately track the migrations of modern humans. PMID:22312049

  20. Tracking human migrations by the analysis of the distribution of HLA alleles, lineages and haplotypes in closed and open populations

    PubMed Central

    Vina, Marcelo A. Fernandez; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Maiers, Martin; Klitz, William; Cano, Pedro; Mack, Steven; Single, Richard; Brautbar, Chaim; Israel, Shosahna; Raimondi, Eduardo; Khoriaty, Evelyne; Inati, Adlette; Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Thomson, Glenys; Stastny, Peter; Cao, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system shows extensive variation in the number and function of loci and the number of alleles present at any one locus. Allele distribution has been analysed in many populations through the course of several decades, and the implementation of molecular typing has significantly increased the level of diversity revealing that many serotypes have multiple functional variants. While the degree of diversity in many populations is equivalent and may result from functional polymorphism(s) in peptide presentation, homogeneous and heterogeneous populations present contrasting numbers of alleles and lineages at the loci with high-density expression products. In spite of these differences, the homozygosity levels are comparable in almost all of them. The balanced distribution of HLA alleles is consistent with overdominant selection. The genetic distances between outbred populations correlate with their geographical locations; the formal genetic distance measurements are larger than expected between inbred populations in the same region. The latter present many unique alleles grouped in a few lineages consistent with limited founder polymorphism in which any novel allele may have been positively selected to enlarge the communal peptide-binding repertoire of a given population. On the other hand, it has been observed that some alleles are found in multiple populations with distinctive haplotypic associations suggesting that convergent evolution events may have taken place as well. It appears that the HLA system has been under strong selection, probably owing to its fundamental role in varying immune responses. Therefore, allelic diversity in HLA should be analysed in conjunction with other genetic markers to accurately track the migrations of modern humans. PMID:22312049

  1. Heteroduplex analysis can increase the informativeness of PCR-amplified VNTR markers: Application using a marker tightly linked to the COL2A1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, D.J.; Cohn, D.H. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA ); Koprivnikar, K.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism provide a high degree of informativeness in linkage studies. Whether performed by standard methods or by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), analysis of these markers involves assessment of the length of each allele. VNTR alleles usually differ in the number of tandem repeats. During PCR amplification of a VNTR closely linked to the type II collagen gene (COL2A1), we identified allelic microheterogeneity through the analysis of unique heteroduplexes between amplified strands of the two alleles. In one large pedigree, heteroduplex analysis identified only three distinct alleles. The identification of these heteroduplexes allowed the determination of the COL2A1 inheritance pattern in the family, which otherwise would have been noninformative. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Strong allelic association between Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome and D17S805

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, M.; Jagell, S.; Sillen, A.

    1994-09-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson Syndrom (SLS) is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation. It is an autosomal recessive trait that has been described in many populations, but is particularly frequent in the northern part of Sweden. A defect in the enzyme fatty alcohol: NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAD) has been suggested, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Based on linkage analysis and allelic association, the disorder has now been mapped to chromosome 17. Meiotic recombinations suggests that the gene is flanked by D17S805 on the centromeric and D17S783 and D17S925 on the telomeric side. These three markers map to the same location in reference pedigrees. Strong allelic association (chi-square 60.28, p<0.0003) to D17S805 suggests that the mutation is located at a limited distance on the telomeric side of this marker. It is possible that the gene can be identified by functional complementation of SLS cells using YACs from this region. Alternatively, positional cloning should be possible in this presumable small area. The markers identified are close and informative enough to allow accurate genetic diagnosis.

  3. Characterization of allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene MAO-A in trophectoderm cells of bovine embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A R; Aguiar Filho, L F C; Sousa, R V; Sartori, R; Franco, M M

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may affect epigenetic mechanisms and alter the expression of genes related to embryo development and X chromosome inactivation (XCI). We characterized allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) in the trophectoderm (TF) of embryos produced by SCNT. Total RNA was isolated from individual biopsies (N = 25), and the allele-specific expression assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Both paternal and maternal alleles were expressed in the trophectoderm. However, a higher frequency of the mono-allelic expression of a specific allele was observed (N = 17; 68%), with the remaining samples showing the presence of mRNA from both alleles (N = 8; 32%). Considering that MAO-A is subject to XCI in bovine, our results suggest that SCNT may influence XCI because neither an imprinted (mono-allelic expression in all samples) nor a random (presence of mRNA from both alleles in all samples) pattern of XCI was observed in TF. Due to the importance of XCI in mammalian embryo development and its sensitivity to in vitro conditions, X-linked genes subject to XCI are candidates for use in the development of embryo quality molecular markers for assisted reproduction. PMID:26505360

  4. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; et al

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcriptionmore » factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.« less

  5. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; Ziebell, Angela L.; Klapste, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Skyba, Oleksandr; Unda, Faride; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Douglas, Carl; Mansfield, Shawn; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Evans, Luke M.; Czarnecki, Olaf; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.

  6. Highly Informative Single-Copy Nuclear Microsatellite DNA Markers Developed Using an AFLP-SSR Approach in Black Spruce (Picea mariana) and Red Spruce (P. rubens)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yong-Zhong; Forneris, Natascha; Rajora, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea) and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana) and red spruce (Picea rubens) using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies. Principal Findings A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean = 0.67) in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean = 0.62) in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies. Significance The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce and other Picea species for various genetics, genomics, breeding, forensics, conservation studies and applications. PMID:25126846

  7. Total parenting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins to cast being a parent as a matter of "parenting," a technological deployment of skills and techniques, with the loss of older, more spontaneous and intuitive relations between parents and children. Smith examines this phenomenon further through a discussion of how it is captured to some extent in Hannah Arendt's notion of "natality" and how it is illuminated by Charles Dickens in his classic novel, Dombey and Son. PMID:20662172

  8. Teen Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen > Dating & Sex > Teen Parents Ages & ...

  9. Parenting Multiples

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth of a child. So parents of twins or higher-order multiples (triplets or more) can ... the chances of having multiples. The incidence of twin and higher-order multiple births has climbed rapidly ...

  10. Effective Parenting

    MedlinePlus

    ... older, slowing down and experiencing changes in your body Your relationship with your spouse or partner Your relationship with your parents and siblings Your friendships Evaluate problems in these areas, and how they might be ...

  11. Biased gene conversion skews allele frequencies in human populations, increasing the disease burden of recessive alleles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-10-01

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ≈ 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications. PMID:25279983

  12. Evaluation in beef cattle of six deoxyribonucleic acid markers developed for dairy traits reveals an osteopontin polymorphism associated with postweaning growth.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA markers have been reported to be associated with variation in dairy production traits. The objectives of this study were to 1) estimate allele frequencies in U.S. beef cattle and 2) evaluate association of marker genotype with beef production traits. Several genetic markers have been assoc...

  13. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; Dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (F(ST) coefficients) to the present database ranged from F(ST) = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to F(ST) = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  14. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (FST coefficients) to the present database ranged from FST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to FST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  15. A new and versatile method for the successful conversion of AFLP markers into simple single locus markers

    PubMed Central

    Brugmans, Bart; van der Hulst, Ron G. M.; Visser, Richard G. F.; Lindhout, Pim; van Eck, Herman J.

    2003-01-01

    Genetic markers can efficiently be obtained by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting because no prior information on DNA sequence is required. However, the conversion of AFLP markers from complex fingerprints into simple single locus assays is perceived as problematic because DNA sequence information is required for the design of new locus-specific PCR primers. In addition, single locus polymorphism (SNP) information is required to design an allele-specific assay. This paper describes a new and versatile method for the conversion of AFLP markers into simple assays. The protocol presented in this paper offers solutions for frequently occurring pitfalls and describes a procedure for the identification of the SNP responsible for the AFLP. By following this approach, a high success rate for the conversion of AFLP markers into locus-specific markers was obtained. PMID:12736321

  16. Microsatellite variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked Hawaiian Islands endemic: implications for reintroductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Seixas, Pedro P.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of genetic biodiversity in endangered wildlife populations is an important challenge to address since the loss of alleles and genetic drift may influence future adaptability. Reintroduction aims to re-establish species to restored or protected ecosystems; however, moving a subset of individuals may result in loss of gene variants during the management-induced bottleneck (i.e. translocation). The endangered Laysan teal Anas laysanensis was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 230 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan (1999 to 2009) and Midway (2007 to 2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within populations. However, 2 rare alleles found in the Laysan source population were not present in Midway’s reintroduced population, and a unique allele was discovered in an individual on Midway. Differentiation between island populations was low (FST = 0.6%), but statistically significant. Our results indicate that genetic drift had little effect on offspring generations 3 to 6 yr post-release and demonstrate the utility of using known founder events to help quantify genetic capture during translocations and to inform management decisions.

  17. Distribution of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in insulin-dependent Moroccan diabetics.

    PubMed

    Izaabel, H; Garchon, H J; Beaurain, G; Biga, M; Akhayat, O; Bach, J F; Caillat-Zucman, S

    1996-09-01

    HLA class II polymorphism in Moroccan IDDM patients has not been investigated so far. In this study, HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 allele and haplotype frequencies were analyzed in 125 unrelated Moroccan IDDM patients and 93 unrelated healthy controls, all originating from the Souss region and mostly of Berber origin. Some common features with other Caucasian groups were observed, in particular, a predisposing effect of the DRB1*03-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 and DRB1*04-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 alleles or allelic combinations. The Moroccan IDDM group also presented with more specific characteristics. Among DRB1*04 subtypes, DRB1*0405 was associated with susceptibility to and DRB1*0406 with protection from the disease. The haplotype and the relative predispositional effect (RPE) analyses indicated that the DRB1*08-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402 haplotype was also associated with susceptibility to IDDM. Interestingly, the DRB1*09-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0201 haplotype, completely absent from the control group and very rare in North African populations, was observed in 7.2% of the Moroccan diabetics. Conversely, the DRB1*07-DQA1*0201-DQB1*0201 and DRB1*15-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 haplotypes were associated with protection from IDDM. Finally, we observed an age-dependent genetic heterogeneity of IDDM, the frequencies of predisposing alleles being higher and those of protective alleles lower in childhood- than in adult-onset diabetics. Our data on Moroccan diabetics, together with data on European and Northern Mediterranean patients, suggest a gradient of various HLA class II predisposing and protective markers that link these populations. PMID:8872168

  18. Quantification of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations in the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, J.F.; Rapaport, J.M.; Dryia, T.P.

    1994-09-01

    New germline mutations in the human retinoblastoma gene preferentially arise on a paternally derived allele. In nonhereditary retinoblastoma, the initial somatic mutation seems to have no such bias. The few previous reports of these phenomena included relatively few cases (less than a dozen new germline or initial somatic mutations), so that the magnitude of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations is not known. Knowledge of the magnitude of the bias is valuable for genetic counseling, since, for example, patients with new germline mutations who reproduce transmit risk for retinoblastoma according to the risk that the transmitted allele has a germline mutation. We sought to quantitate the paternal allele bias and to determine whether paternal age is a factor possibly accounting for it. We studied 311 families with retinoblastoma (261 simplex, 50 multiplex) that underwent clinical genetic testing and 5 informative families recruited from earlier research. Using RFLPs and polymorphic microsatellites in the retinoblastoma gene, we could determine the parental origin of 45 new germline mutations and 44 probable initial somatic mutations. Thirty-seven of the 45 new germline mutations, or 82%, arose on a paternal allele while only 24 of the 44 initial somatic mutations (55%) did so. Increased paternal age does not appear to account for the excess of new paternal germline mutations, since the average age of fathers of children with new germline mutations (29.4 years, n=26, incomplete records on 11) was not significantly different from the average age of fathers of children with maternal germline mutations or somatic initial mutations (29.8 years, n=35, incomplete records on 17).

  19. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE) is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA) and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes) remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%). Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes in the human term placenta. ZNF331 is imprinted in human term placenta and might be a new ubiquitously imprinted gene, part of a primate-specific locus. Demonstration of partial imprinting of PHACTR2 calls for re-evaluation of the allelic pattern of expression for the PHACTR2-PLAGL1 locus. ASE was common in human term placenta. PMID:20403199

  20. Identification of multiple interacting alleles conferring low glycerol and high ethanol yield in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanolic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic engineering of industrial microorganisms often suffers from undesirable side effects on essential functions. Reverse engineering is an alternative strategy to improve multifactorial traits like low glycerol/high ethanol yield in yeast fermentation. Previous rational engineering of this trait always affected essential functions like growth and stress tolerance. We have screened Saccharomyces cerevisiae biodiversity for specific alleles causing lower glycerol/higher ethanol yield, assuming higher compatibility with normal cellular functionality. Previous work identified ssk1E330NK356N as causative allele in strain CBS6412, which displayed the lowest glycerol/ethanol ratio. Results We have now identified a unique segregant, 26B, that shows similar low glycerol/high ethanol production as the superior parent, but lacks the ssk1E330NK356N allele. Using segregants from the backcross of 26B with the inferior parent strain, we applied pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis and identified three minor quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to low glycerol/high ethanol production. Within these QTLs, we identified three novel alleles of known regulatory and structural genes of glycerol metabolism, smp1R110Q,P269Q, hot1P107S,H274Y and gpd1L164P as causative genes. All three genes separately caused a significant drop in the glycerol/ethanol production ratio, while gpd1L164P appeared to be epistatically suppressed by other alleles in the superior parent. The order of potency in reducing the glycerol/ethanol ratio of the three alleles was: gpd1L164P?>?hot1P107S,H274Y???smp1R110Q,P269Q. Conclusions Our results show that natural yeast strains harbor multiple specific alleles of genes controlling essential functions, that are apparently compatible with survival in the natural environment. These newly identified alleles can be used as gene tools for engineering industrial yeast strains with multiple subtle changes, minimizing the risk of negatively affecting other essential functions. The gene tools act at the transcriptional, regulatory or structural gene level, distributing the impact over multiple targets and thus further minimizing possible side-effects. In addition, the results suggest polygenic analysis of complex traits as a promising new avenue to identify novel components involved in cellular functions, including those important in industrial applications. PMID:23759206

  1. Parental Marital Quality, Parental Divorce, and Relations with Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Amato, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Examined data from 419 parents and their adult children to assess impact of parental marital quality and divorce while child is residing with parents on parent-child relations 12 years later. Low marital quality and divorce appeared to have independent effects on adult child-parent relations. Fathers' relationships suffered more than mothers';…

  2. Genome-wide screen of genes imprinted in sorghum endosperm, and the roles of allelic differential cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meishan; Li, Ning; He, Wenan; Zhang, Huakun; Yang, Wei; Liu, Bao

    2016-02-01

    Imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon referring to allele-biased expression of certain genes depending on their parent of origin. Accumulated evidence suggests that, while imprinting is a conserved mechanism across kingdoms, the identities of the imprinted genes are largely species-specific. Using deep RNA sequencing of endosperm 14 days after pollination in sorghum, 5683 genes (29.27% of the total 19 418 expressed genes) were found to harbor diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms between two parental lines. The analysis of parent-of-origin expression patterns in the endosperm of a pair of reciprocal F1 hybrids between the two sorghum lines led to identification of 101 genes with ≥ fivefold allelic expression difference in both hybrids, including 85 maternal expressed genes (MEGs) and 16 paternal expressed genes (PEGs). Thirty of these genes were previously identified as imprinted in endosperm of maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa) or Arabidopsis, while the remaining 71 genes are sorghum-specific imprinted genes relative to these three plant species. Allele-biased expression of virtually all of the 14 tested imprinted genes (nine MEGs and five PEGs) was validated by pyrosequencing using independent sources of RNA from various developmental stages and dissected parts of endosperm. Forty-six imprinted genes (30 MEGs and 16 PEGs) were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR, and the majority of them showed endosperm-specific or preferential expression relative to embryo and other tissues. DNA methylation analysis of the 5' upstream region and gene body for seven imprinted genes indicated that, while three of the four PEGs were associated with hypomethylation of maternal alleles, no MEG was associated with allele-differential methylation. PMID:26718755

  3. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  4. Cycle pattern of a R allelic variation. Progress report, 1 November 1978-31 January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kermicle, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Two R alleles vary in cycle fashion. The original, intensely pigmenting forms change to weakly acting ones which revert in turn to the original. Neither direction of change is correlated with recombination of flanking markers. The reversion frequencies do not differ from the respective frequencies of change in the forward direction. The changes are restricted in the life cycle to about the time of meiosis. Modifying tthe incidence of crossing over in the R region altered the frequency of reversion proportionately. These features of instability could result from switching by intrachromosomal recombination between alternative arrangements of an R segment associated with an inverted duplication.

  5. Deleterious Alleles in the Human Genome Are on Average Younger Than Neutral Alleles of the Same Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L.; Francioli, Laurent C.; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; van Ommen, G. J. B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669–673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans. PMID:23468643

  6. Deleterious alleles in the human genome are on average younger than neutral alleles of the same frequency.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L; Francioli, Laurent C; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Slagboom, P Eline; van Ommen, G J B; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669-673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans. PMID:23468643

  7. Cumulative-genetic plasticity, parenting and adolescent self-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Jay; Beaver, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The capacity to control or regulate one’s emotions, cognitions and behavior is central to competent functioning, with limitations in these abilities associated with developmental problems. Parenting appears to influence such self-regulation. Here the differential-susceptibility hypothesis is tested that the more putative ‘plasticity alleles’ adolescents carry, the more positively and negatively influenced they will be by, respectively, supportive and unsupportive parenting. Methods One thousand, five hundred and eighty-six (1586) adolescents (n = 754 males; n = 832 females) enrolled in the American Add Health project were scored in terms of how many of 5 putative ‘plasticity alleles’ they carried – the 10R allele of DAT1, the A1 allele of DRD2, the 7R allele of DRD4, the short allele of 5HTTLPR, and the 2R/3R alleles of MAOA. Then the effect of the resultant index (ranging from 0 to 5) of cumulative-genetic plasticity in moderating effects of parenting on adolescent self-regulation was evaluated. Results Consistent with differential susceptibility, the more plasticity alleles males (but not females) carried, the more and less self-regulation they manifested under, respectively, supportive and unsupportive parenting conditions. Conclusion Adolescent males appear to vary for genetic reasons in their susceptibility to parenting vis-à-vis self-regulation, perhaps due to epistatic and/or epigenetic processes. G×E research may benefit from compositing candidate genes. To afford comparative evaluation of differential-susceptibility vs. diathesis-stress models of environmental action, future G×E work should focus on positive as well as negative environmental conditions and developmental outcomes. PMID:21039487

  8. Combining Markers into Haplotypes Can Improve Population Structure Inference

    PubMed Central

    Gattepaille, Lucie M.; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies can generate dense sets of genetic markers for large numbers of individuals. For most species, these data will contain many markers in linkage disequilibrium (LD). To utilize such data for population structure inference, we investigate the use of haplotypes constructed by combining the alleles at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We introduce a statistic derived from information theory, the gain of informativeness for assignment (GIA), which quantifies the additional information for assigning individuals to populations using haplotype data compared to using individual loci separately. Using a two-locitwo-allele model, we demonstrate that combining markers in linkage equilibrium into haplotypes always leads to nonpositive GIA, suggesting that combining the two markers is not advantageous for ancestry inference. However, for loci in LD, GIA is often positive, suggesting that assignment can be improved by combining markers into haplotypes. Using GIA as a criterion for combining markers into haplotypes, we demonstrate for simulated data a significant improvement of assigning individuals to candidate populations. For the many cases that we investigate, incorrect assignment was reduced between 26% and 97% using haplotype data. For empirical data from French and German individuals, the incorrectly assigned individuals can, for example, be decreased by 73% using haplotypes. Our results can be useful for challenging population structure and assignment problems, in particular for studies where large-scale populationgenomic data are available. PMID:21868606

  9. HLA-DQα allele and genotype frequencies in various human populations determined by using enzymatic amplification and oligonucleotide probes

    PubMed Central

    Helmuth, Rhea; Fildes, Nicola; Blake, Edward; Luce, Michael C.; Chimera, J.; Madej, Roberta; Gorodezky, C.; Stoneking, Mark; Schmill, Norma; Klitz, William; Higuchi, Russell; Erlich, Henry A.

    1990-01-01

    Allele and genotype frequencies at the HLA-DQα locus have been determined by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and nonradioactive oligonucleotide probes. The probes define six alleles and 21 genotypes in a dot-blot format. A total of over 1,400 individuals from 11 populations has been typed by two different laboratories using this method. In contrast to some variable-number-of-tandem-repeat markers that have been used for identity determination, DQα genotype frequencies do not deviate significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all populations studied. The distribution of alleles varies significantly between most of these populations. In Caucasians, the allele frequencies range from 4.3% to 28.5%. In this population, the power of discrimination is .94, and, for paternity determination, the power of exclusion is .642. These population data will allow the use of the HLA-DQα marker in paternity determination, the analysis of individual identity in forensic samples, and anthropological studies. PMID:2393024

  10. Allelic Interactions Heritably Alter the Activity of a Metastable Maize Pl Allele

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J. B.; Patterson, G. I.; Coe-Jr., E. H.; Cone, K. C.; Chandler, V. L.

    1995-01-01

    The maize pl locus encodes a transcriptional activator of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. The Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele confers robust purple anthocyanin pigment in several tissues. Spontaneous derivatives of Pl-Rh, termed Pl'-mahogany (Pl'-mah), arise that confer reduced pigment and are meiotically heritable. These derivatives influence other Pl-Rh alleles such that only Pl'-mah alleles are transmitted from a Pl-Rh/Pl'-mah heterozygote. Genetic crosses establish that chromosomal segregation distortion does not explain this exclusive transmission and suggest that Pl-Rh invariably changes to Pl'-mah when exposed to Pl'-mah. Such behavior is a hallmark of paramutation. Cosegregation experiments demonstrate that this paramutagenic activity is genetically linked to the pl locus. By visually quantifying pl action through successive crosses, we find that phenotypic expression is inversely related to paramutagenic strength. In addition, the paramutagenic state is metastable; reversion to a nonparamutagenic Pl-Rh state can occur. The behavior of Pl-Rh is unique, yet it shares characteristics with paramutation at two other maize loci, b and r. Previous analysis of b and r paramutation revealed extensive differences and led to suggestions of distinct molecular mechanisms. Consideration of the common features of all three systems reinvigorates the interpretation that the mechanistic processes of these three allelic interactions are similar. PMID:8647404

  11. Schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for alleles that affect gene expression in adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alexander L; Jones, Lesley; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Sanders, Alan R; Purcell, Shaun; Visscher, Peter M; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    It is widely thought that alleles that influence susceptibility to common diseases, including schizophrenia, will frequently do so through effects on gene expression. Since only a small proportion of the genetic variance for schizophrenia has been attributed to specific loci, this remains an unproven hypothesis. The International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC) recently reported a substantial polygenic contribution to that disorder, and that schizophrenia risk alleles are enriched among SNPs selected for marginal evidence for association (p<0.5) from genome wide association studies (GWAS). It follows that if schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for those that affect gene expression, those marginally associated SNPs which are also eQTLs should carry more true association signals compared with SNPs which are not. To test this, we identified marginally associated (p<0.5) SNPs from two of the largest available schizophrenia GWAS datasets. We assigned eQTL status to those SNPs based upon an eQTL dataset derived from adult human brain. Using the polygenic score method of analysis reported by the ISC, we observed and replicated the observation that higher probability cis-eQTLs predicted schizophrenia better than those with a lower probability for being a cis-eQTL. Our data support the hypothesis that alleles conferring risk of schizophrenia are enriched among those that affect gene expression. Moreover, our data show that notwithstanding the likely developmental origin of schizophrenia, studies of adult brain tissue can in principle allow relevant susceptibility eQTLs to be identified. PMID:21339752

  12. Molecular marker assisted gene stacking for biotic and abiotic stress resistance genes in an elite rice cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Das, Gitishree; Rao, G. J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Severe yield loss due to various biotic stresses like bacterial blight (BB), gall midge (insect) and Blast (disease) and abiotic stresses like submergence and salinity are a serious constraint to the rice productivity throughout the world. The most effective and reliable method of management of the stresses is the enhancement of host resistance, through an economical and environmentally friendly approach. Through the application of marker assisted selection (MAS) technique, the present study reports a successful pyramidization of genes/QTLs to confer resistance/tolerance to blast (Pi2, Pi9), gall Midge (Gm1, Gm4), submergence (Sub1), and salinity (Saltol) in a released rice variety CRMAS2621-7-1 as Improved Lalat which had already incorporated with three BB resistance genes xa5, xa13, and Xa21 to supplement the Xa4 gene present in Improved Lalat. The molecular analysis revealed clear polymorphism between the donor and recipient parents for all the markers that are tagged to the target traits. The conventional backcross breeding approach was followed till BC3F1 generation and starting from BC1F1 onwards, marker assisted selection was employed at each step to monitor the transfer of the target alleles with molecular markers. The different BC3F1s having the target genes/QTLs were inter crossed to generate hybrids with all 10 stress resistance/tolerance genes/QTLs into a single plant/line. Homozygous plants for resistance/tolerance genes in different combinations were recovered. The BC3F3 lines were characterized for their agronomic and quality traits and promising progeny lines were selected. The SSR based background selection was done. Most of the gene pyramid lines showed a high degree of similarity to the recurrent parent for both morphological, grain quality traits and in SSR based background selection. Out of all the gene pyramids tested, two lines had all the 10 resistance/tolerance genes and showed adequate levels of resistance/tolerance against the five target stresses. The study demonstrates the potential of MAS for stacking of several genes into a single line with a high degree of parental genome recovery. PMID:26483798

  13. Tissue-specific imprinting of the mouse insulin-like growth factor II receptor gene correlates with differential allele-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Hu, J F; Oruganti, H; Vu, T H; Hoffman, A R

    1998-02-01

    Imprinted genes may be expressed uniparentally in a tissue- and development-specific manner. The insulin-like growth factor II receptor gene (Igf2r), one of the first imprinted genes to be identified, is an attractive candidate for studying the molecular mechanism of genomic imprinting because it is transcribed monoallelically in the mouse but biallelically in humans. To identify the factors that control genomic imprinting, we examined allelic expression of Igf2r at different ages in interspecific mice. We found that Igf2r is not always monoallelically expressed. Paternal imprinting of Igf2r is maintained in peripheral tissues, including liver, kidney, heart, spleen, intestine, bladder, skin, bone, and skeletal muscle. However, in central nervous system (CNS), Igf2r is expressed from both parental alleles. Southern analysis of the Igf2r promoter (region 1) revealed that, outside of the CNS where Igf2r is monoallelically expressed, the suppressed paternal allele is fully methylated while the expressed maternal allele is completely unmethylated. In CNS, however, both parental alleles are unmethylated in region 1. The importance of DNA methylation in the maintenance of the genomic imprint was also confirmed by the finding that Igf2r imprinting was relaxed by 5-azacytidine treatment. The correlation between genomic imprinting and allelic Igf2r methylation in CNS and other tissues thus suggests that the epigenetic modification in the promoter region may function as one of the major factors in maintaining the monoallelic expression of Igf2r. PMID:9482664

  14. "Gene-swap knock-in" cassette in mice to study allelic differences in human genes.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Dalton, T P; Stuart, G W; Carvan, M J

    2000-01-01

    Genetic differences in environmental toxicity and cancer susceptibility among individuals in a human population often reflect polymorphisms in the genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), drug transporters, and receptors that control DME levels. This field of study is called "ecogenetics", and a subset of this field--concerning genetic variability in response to drugs--is termed "pharmacogenetics". Although human-mouse differences might be 3- to perhaps 10-fold, human interindividual differences can be as great as 20-fold or more than 40-fold. It would be helpful, therefore, to study toxicokinetics/pharmacokinetics of particular environmental agents and drugs in mice containing these "high-" and "low-extreme" human alleles. We hope to use transgenic "knock-in" technology in order to insert human alleles in place of the orthologous mouse gene. However, the knock-in of each gene has normally been a separate event requiring the following: (a) construction of the targeting vector, (b) transfection into embryonic stem (ES) cells, (c) generation of a targeted mouse having germline transmission of the construct, and (d) backcross breeding of the knock-in mouse (at least 6-8 times) to produce a suitable genetically homogeneous background (i.e., to decrease "experimental noise"). These experiments require 1 1/2 to 2 years to complete, making this very powerful technology inefficient for routine applications. If, on the other hand, the initial knock-in targeting vector might include sequences that would allow the knocked-in gene to be exchanged (quickly and repeatedly) for one new allele after another, then testing distinctly different human polymorphic alleles in transgenic mice could be accomplished in a few months instead of several years. This "gene-swapping" technique will soon be done by zygotic injection of a "human allele cassette" into the sperm or fertilized ovum of the parental knock-in mouse inbred strain or by the cloning of whole mice from cumulus ovaricus cells or tail-snip fibroblasts containing the nucleus wherein each new human allele has already been "swapped." In mouse cells in culture using heterotypic lox sites, we and others have already succeeded in gene swapping, by exchanging one gene, including its regulatory regions, with a second gene (including its regulatory regions). It is anticipated that mouse lines carrying numerous human alleles will become commonplace early in the next millennium. PMID:11083106

  15. Disomic Inheritance and Segregation Distortion of SSR Markers in Two Populations of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. var. dactylon

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanwen; Wu, Yanqi; Anderson, Jeff A.; Moss, Justin Q.; Zhu, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Common bermudagrass [C. dactylon (L.) Pers. var. dactylon] is economically and environmentally the most important member among Cynodon species because of its extensive use for turf, forage and soil erosion control in the world. However, information regarding the inheritance within the taxon is limited. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to determine qualitative inheritance mode in common bermudagrass. Two tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36), first-generation selfed (S1) populations, 228 progenies of ‘Zebra’ and 273 from A12359, were analyzed for segregation with 21 and 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, respectively. It is concluded that the inheritance mode of tetraploid bermudagrass was complete or near complete disomic. It is evident that the two bermudagrass parents had an allotetraploid genome with two distinct subgenomes since 33 SSR primer pairs amplified 34 loci, each having two alleles. Severe transmission ratio distortions occurred in the Zebra population while less so in the A12359 population. The findings of disomic inheritance and segregation ratio distortion in common bermudagrass is significant in subsequent linkage map construction, quantitative trait locus mapping and marker-assisted selection in the species. PMID:26295707

  16. Exploitation of sulfonylurea resistance marker and non-homologous end joining mutants for functional analysis in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Y S; Cairns, T C; Chaudhari, Y K; Usher, J; Talbot, N J; Studholme, D J; Csukai, M; Haynes, K

    2015-06-01

    The lack of techniques for rapid assembly of gene deletion vectors, paucity of selectable marker genes available for genetic manipulation and low frequency of homologous recombination are major constraints in construction of gene deletion mutants in Zymoseptoria tritici. To address these issues, we have constructed ternary vectors for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of Z. tritici, which enable the single step assembly of multiple fragments via yeast recombinational cloning. The sulfonylurea resistance gene, which is a mutated allele of the Magnaporthe oryzae ILV2 gene, was established as a new dominant selectable marker for Z. tritici. To increase the frequency of homologous recombination, we have constructed Z. tritici strains deficient in the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double stranded break repair by inactivating the KU70 and KU80 genes. Targeted gene deletion frequency increased to more than 85% in both Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains, compared to ⩽10% seen in the wild type parental strain IPO323. The in vitro growth and in planta pathogenicity of the Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains were comparable to strain IPO323. Together these molecular tools add significantly to the platform available for genomic analysis through targeted gene deletion or promoter replacements and will facilitate large-scale functional characterization projects in Z. tritici. PMID:26092796

  17. Exploitation of sulfonylurea resistance marker and non-homologous end joining mutants for functional analysis in Zymoseptoria tritici

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Y.S.; Cairns, T.C.; Chaudhari, Y.K.; Usher, J.; Talbot, N.J.; Studholme, D.J.; Csukai, M.; Haynes, K.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of techniques for rapid assembly of gene deletion vectors, paucity of selectable marker genes available for genetic manipulation and low frequency of homologous recombination are major constraints in construction of gene deletion mutants in Zymoseptoria tritici. To address these issues, we have constructed ternary vectors for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of Z. tritici, which enable the single step assembly of multiple fragments via yeast recombinational cloning. The sulfonylurea resistance gene, which is a mutated allele of the Magnaporthe oryzae ILV2 gene, was established as a new dominant selectable marker for Z. tritici. To increase the frequency of homologous recombination, we have constructed Z. tritici strains deficient in the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double stranded break repair by inactivating the KU70 and KU80 genes. Targeted gene deletion frequency increased to more than 85% in both Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains, compared to ⩽10% seen in the wild type parental strain IPO323. The in vitro growth and in planta pathogenicity of the Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains were comparable to strain IPO323. Together these molecular tools add significantly to the platform available for genomic analysis through targeted gene deletion or promoter replacements and will facilitate large-scale functional characterization projects in Z. tritici. PMID:26092796

  18. Disomic Inheritance and Segregation Distortion of SSR Markers in Two Populations of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. var. dactylon.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanwen; Wu, Yanqi; Anderson, Jeff A; Moss, Justin Q; Zhu, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Common bermudagrass [C. dactylon (L.) Pers. var. dactylon] is economically and environmentally the most important member among Cynodon species because of its extensive use for turf, forage and soil erosion control in the world. However, information regarding the inheritance within the taxon is limited. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to determine qualitative inheritance mode in common bermudagrass. Two tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36), first-generation selfed (S1) populations, 228 progenies of 'Zebra' and 273 from A12359, were analyzed for segregation with 21 and 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, respectively. It is concluded that the inheritance mode of tetraploid bermudagrass was complete or near complete disomic. It is evident that the two bermudagrass parents had an allotetraploid genome with two distinct subgenomes since 33 SSR primer pairs amplified 34 loci, each having two alleles. Severe transmission ratio distortions occurred in the Zebra population while less so in the A12359 population. The findings of disomic inheritance and segregation ratio distortion in common bermudagrass is significant in subsequent linkage map construction, quantitative trait locus mapping and marker-assisted selection in the species. PMID:26295707

  19. Improving salt tolerance of lowland rice cultivar 'Rassi' through marker-aided backcross breeding in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Bimpong, Isaac Kofi; Manneh, Baboucarr; Sock, Mamadou; Diaw, Faty; Amoah, Nana Kofi Abaka; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Wopereis, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Salt stress affects about 25% of the 4.4 million ha of irrigated and lowland systems for rice cultivation in West Africa (WA). A major quantitative trait locus (QTLs) on chromosome 1 (Saltol) that enhances tolerance to salt stress at the vegetative stage has enabled the use of marker-assisted selection (MAS) to develop salt-tolerant rice cultivar(s) in WA. We used 3 cycles of backcrossing with selection based on DNA markers and field-testing using 'FL478' as tolerant donor and the widely grown 'Rassi' as recurrent parent. In the BC3F2 stage, salt-tolerant lines with over 80% Rassi alleles except in the region around Saltol segment were selected. 429 introgression lines (Saltol-ILs) were identified as tolerant at vegetative stage, of which 116 were field-tested for four seasons at the reproductive stage. Sixteen Saltol-ILs had less yield loss (3-26% relative to control trials), and 8 Saltol-ILs showed high yield potential under stress and non-stress conditions. The 16 Saltol-ILs had been included for further African-wide testing prior to release in 6 WA countries. MAS reduced the time for germplasm improvement from at least 7 to about 4 years. Our objective is to combine different genes/QTLs conferring tolerance to stresses under one genetic background using MAS. PMID:26566846

  20. QTL mapping and introgression of yield-related traits from Oryza glumaepatula to cultivated rice ( Oryza sativa) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Brondani, C.; Rangel, N.; Brondani, V.; Ferreira, E.

    2002-05-01

    Rice ( Oryza sativa) cultivar development currently faces the task of overcoming yield plateaus, which is difficult due to the narrow genetic base of breeding programs. Oryza glumaepatula is a diploid wild relative of cultivated rice, native to Central and South America, and is therefore a potential source of alleles of agronomic importance to rice breeding programs. We studied 11 agronomic traits in BC(2)F(2) families of the interspecific cross Oryza sativa x O. glumaepatula. Transgressive lines which are almost isogenic to the elite recurrent O. sativa parent were identified for most of these traits. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed by single-point and interval mapping using a molecular map based on 157 microsatellite and STS markers. Marker regions accounting for 14.5 to 72.9% of a phenotypic variation trait were identified in 9 of the 12 rice chromosomes. Positive QTL effects from O. glumaepatula were observed in chromosomal regions associated with tillering and panicle-number traits. PMID:12582630

  1. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  2. A modified Janus cassette (Sweet Janus) to improve allelic replacement efficiency by high-stringency negative selection in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Thompson, Claudette M; Lipsitch, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The Janus cassette permits marker-free allelic replacement or knockout in streptomycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) through sequential positive and negative selection. Spontaneous revertants of Janus can lead to high level of false-positives during negative selection, which necessitate a time-consuming post-selection screening process. We hypothesized that an additional counter-selectable marker in Janus would decrease the revertant frequency and reduce false-positives, since simultaneous reversion of both counter-selectable makers is much less likely. Here we report a modified cassette, Sweet Janus (SJ), in which the sacB gene from Bacillus subtilis conferring sucrose sensitivity is added to Janus. By using streptomycin and sucrose simultaneously as selective agents, the frequency of SJ double revertants was about 105-fold lower than the frequency of Janus revertants. Accordingly, the frequency of false-positives in the SJ-mediated negative selection was about 100-fold lower than what was seen for Janus. Thus, SJ enhances negative selection stringency and can accelerate allelic replacement in pneumococcus, especially when transformation frequency is low due to strain background or suboptimal transformation conditions. Results also suggested the sacB gene alone can function as a counter-selectable marker in the Gram-positive pneumococcus, which will have the advantage of not requiring a streptomycin-resistant strain for allelic replacement. PMID:24959661

  3. Use of Allele-Specific FAIRE to Determine Functional Regulatory Polymorphism Using Large-Scale Genotyping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew J. P.; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia; Eriksson, Per; Stender, Stefan; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Folkersen, Lasse; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Kumari, Meena; Palmen, Jutta; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS. PMID:22916038

  4. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew J P; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia; Eriksson, Per; Stender, Stefan; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Folkersen, Lasse; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Kumari, Meena; Palmen, Jutta; Hingorani, Aroon D; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS. PMID:22916038

  5. Allele and haplotype diversity of X-chromosomal STRs in Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Pasino, Serena; Caratti, Stefano; Del Pero, Massimiliano; Santovito, Alfredo; Torre, Carlo; Robino, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Twenty-one X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci, including the six clusters of linked markers DXS10148-DXS10135-DXS8378 (Xp22), DXS7132-DXS10079-DXS10074 (Xq12), DXS6801-DXS6809-DXS6789 (Xq21), DXS7424-DXS101 (Xq22), DXS10103-HPRTB-DXS10101 (Xq26), DXS8377-DXS10146-DXS10134-DXS7423 (Xq28) and the loci DXS6800, GATA172D05 and DXS10011 were typed in a population sample from Ivory Coast (n=125; 51 men and 74 women). Allele and haplotype frequencies as well as linkage disequilibrium data for kinship calculations are provided. On the whole, no significant differences in the genetic variability of X-STR markers were observed between Ivorians and other sub-Saharan African populations belonging to the Niger-Kordofanian linguistic group. PMID:21717153

  6. Inheritance of mutator activity in Zea mays as assayed by somatic instability of the bz2-mu1 allele.

    PubMed

    Walbot, V

    1986-12-01

    Mutator lines of maize were originally defined by their high forward mutation rate, now known to be caused by the transposition of numerous Mu elements. A high frequency of somatic instability, seen as a fine purple spotting pattern on the aleurone tissue, is characteristic of Mu-induced mutable alleles of genes of the anthocyanin pathway. Loss of such somatic instability has been correlated with the de novo, specific modification of Mu element DNA. In this report the presence or loss of somatic instability at the bz2-mu1 allele has been monitored to investigate the inheritance of the Mutator phenomenon. The active state is labile and may become weakly active (low fraction of spotted kernel progeny) or totally inactive (no spotted kernel progeny) during either outcrossing to non-Mutator lines or on self-pollination. In contrast, the inactive state is relatively permanent with rare reactivation in subsequent crosses to non-Mutator lines. Cryptic bz2-mu1 alleles in weakly active lines can be efficiently reactivated to somatic instability when crossed with an active line. However, in reciprocal crosses of active and totally inactive individuals, strong maternal effects were observed on the inactivation of a somatically unstable bz2-mu1 allele and on the reactivation of cryptic bz2-mu1 alleles. In general, the activity state of the female parent determines the mutability of the progeny. PMID:3803916

  7. Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Expression in the Rat Brain Both in Basal Condition and following Learning Predominantly Derives from the Maternal Allele

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaojing; Kohtz, Amy; Pollonini, Gabriella; Riccio, Andrea; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2) is known as a maternally imprinted gene involved in growth and development. Recently, Igf2 was found to also be regulated and required in the adult rat hippocampus for long-term memory formation, raising the question of its allelic regulation in adult brain regions following experience and in cognitive processes. We show that, in adult rats, Igf2 is abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in cognitive functions, like hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, compared to the peripheral tissues. In contrast to its maternal imprinting in peripheral tissues, Igf2 is mainly expressed from the maternal allele in these brain regions. The training-dependent increase in Igf2 expression derives proportionally from both parental alleles, and, hence, is mostly maternal. Thus, Igf2 parental expression in the adult rat brain does not follow the imprinting rules found in peripheral tissues, suggesting differential expression regulation and functions of imprinted genes in the brain. PMID:26495851

  8. Linkage disequilibrium and age of HLA region SNPs in relation to classic HLA gene alleles within Europe

    PubMed Central

    Evseeva, Irina; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Bonilla, Carolina; Tonks, Susan; Bodmer, Walter F

    2010-01-01

    The HLA region on chromosome 6 is gene-rich and under selective pressure because of the high proportion of immunity-related genes. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and allele frequencies in this region are highly differentiated across broad geographical populations, making it a region of interest for population genetics and immunity-related disease studies. We examined LD in this important region of the genome in six European populations using 166 putatively neutral SNPs and the classical HLA-A, -B and -C gene alleles. We found that the pattern of association between classic HLA gene alleles and SNPs implied that most of the SNPs predated the origin of classic HLA gene alleles. The SNPs most strongly associated with HLA gene alleles were in some cases highly predictive of the HLA allele carrier status (misclassification rates ranged from <1 to 27%) in independent populations using five or fewer SNPs, a much smaller number than tagSNP panels previously proposed and often with similar accuracy, showing that our approach may be a viable solution to designing new HLA prediction panels. To describe the LD within this region, we developed a new haplotype clustering method/software based on r2, which may be more appropriate for use within regions of strong LD. Haplotype blocks created using this proposed method, as well as classic HLA gene alleles and SNPs, were predictive of a northern versus southern European population membership (misclassification error rates ranged from 0 to 23%, depending on which independent population was used for prediction), indicating that this region may be a rich source of ancestry informative markers. PMID:20354563

  9. Development of microsatellite markers for the neotropical vine Dalechampia scandens (Euphorbiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Falahati-Anbaran, Mohsen; Stenien, Hans K.; Plabon, Christophe; Bolstad, Geir H.; Perez-Barrales, Rocio; Hansen, Thomas F.; Armbruster, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed to assess polymorphism and level of genetic diversity in four Mexican populations of the neotropical vine Dalechampia scandens (Euphorbiaceae). Methods and Results: Thirty-seven microsatellite markers representing bi-, tri-, tetra-, and pentanucleotide microsatellite repeats were developed. In total, 166 alleles were identified across 54 individuals. The number of alleles varied from one to 11 with an average of 4.49 alleles per locus. All loci except one were highly polymorphic between populations, whereas considerably less variation was detected within populations for most loci. The average observed and expected heterozygosities across study populations ranged from 0 to 0.63 and 0 to 0.59, respectively, for individual loci, and a deviation from HardyWeinberg equilibrium was observed for most loci. Conclusions: The developed markers may be useful for studying genetic structure, parentage analysis, mapping, phylogeography, and cross-amplification in other closely related species of Dalechampia. PMID:25202553

  10. Transferability of microsatellite and sequence tagged site markers in Oryza species.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Claudio; Rangel, Paulo Hideo Nakano; Borba, Tereza Cristina Oliveira; Brondani, Rosana Pereira Vianello

    2003-01-01

    The genus Oryza comprises 22 species which are potentially useful as a source of genetic variability that can be introgressed into the worldwide cultivated rice, Oryza sativa. Molecular markers are useful tools for monitoring gene introgressions and for detecting polymorphism among species. In this study, cross-amplification was estimated among 28 accessions of 16 Oryza species, representing the genomes AA, BB, CC, BBCC and CCDD, using 59 microsatellite (OG, OS and RM series) and 15 STS (Sequence Tagged Sites) markers. All markers amplified at least one Oryza species, indicating different levels of transferability across species. Markers based on microsatellite sequences amplified 37 % of the accessions, with an average of 6.58 alleles per locus and an average polymorphism information content (PIC) of 70 %. For STS markers, the amplification level was 53.3 %, and the average number of alleles and PIC values were 1.6 and 10 %, respectively. These Results showed that although the STS markers detected a reduced level of genetic diversity, the transferability was higher, indicating that they can be used for genetic analysis when evaluating less genetically related species of Oryza. Among the microsatellite markers, an analysis of species with an AA genome showed that the OG markers produced the highest level of polymorphic loci (54.6 %), followed by RM markers (48 %). Highly polymorphic and transferable molecular markers in Oryza can be useful for exploiting the genetic resources of this genus, for detecting allelic variants in loci associated with important agronomic traits, and for monitoring alleles introgressed from wild relatives to cultivated rice. PMID:14641482

  11. Preferential expression of a mutant allele of the amplified MDR1 (ABCB1) gene in drug-resistant variants of a human sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, G Kevin; Lacayo, Norman J; Durn, George E; Wang, Yan; Bangs, C Dana; Rea, Susan; Kovacs, Mary; Cherry, Athena M; Brown, J Martin; Sikic, Branimir I

    2002-08-01

    Activation of the MDR1 (ABCB1) gene is a common event conferring multidrug resistance (MDR) in human cancers. We investigated MDR1 activation in MDR variants of a human sarcoma line, some of which express a mutant MDR1, which facilitated the study of allelic gene expression. Structural alterations of MDR1, gene copy numbers, and allelic expression were analyzed by cytogenetic karyotyping, oligonucleotide hybridization, Southern blotting, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA heteroduplex assays. Both chromosome 7 alterations and several cytogenetic changes involving the 7q21 locus are associated with the development of MDR in these sarcoma cells. Multistep-selected cells and their revertants contain three- to six-fold MDR1 gene amplification compared with that of the drug-sensitive parental cell line MES-SA and single-step doxorubicin-selected mutants. MDR1 gene amplification precedes the emergence of a mutant allele in cells that were coselected with doxorubicin and a cyclosporin inhibitor of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization showed that the endogenous mutant allele was present as a single copy, with multiple copies of the normal allele. Reselection of revertant cells with doxorubicin in either the presence or the absence of the P-gp inhibitor resulted in exclusive reexpression of the mutant MDR1 allele, regardless of the presence of multiple wild-type MDR1 alleles. These data provide new insights into how multiple alleles are regulated in the amplicon of drug-resistant cancer cells and indicate that increased expression of an amplified gene can result from selective transcription of a single mutant allele of the gene. PMID:12112526

  12. Maternal transmission of a humanised Igf2r allele results in an Igf2 dependent hypomorphic and non-viable growth phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer; Frago, Susana; Bhnemann, Claudia; Carter, Emma J; Hassan, A Bassim

    2013-01-01

    The cation independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) functions in the transportation and regulation of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and mannose 6-phosphate modified proteins. The relative and specific titration of IGF2 by high affinity binding of IGF2R represents a mechanism that supports the parental conflict theory of genomic imprinting. Imprinting of Igf2 (paternal allele expressed) and Igf2r (maternal allele expressed) arose to regulate the relative supply of both proteins. Experiments in the mouse have established that loss of the maternal allele of Igf2r results in disproportionate growth and peri-natal lethality. In order to systematically investigate the consequences of loss of function and of hypomorphic alleles of Igf2r on growth functions, we introduced a conditional human IGF2R exon 3-48 cDNA into the intron 2 region of murine Igf2r. Here we show that the knock-in construct resulted in over-growth when the humanised Igf2r allele was maternally transmitted, a phenotype that was rescued by either paternal transmission of the humanised allele, expression of a wild-type paternal allele or loss of function of Igf2. We also show that expression of IGF2R protein was reduced to less than 50% overall in tissues previously known to be Igf2 growth dependent. This occurred despite the detection of mouse derived peptides, suggesting that trans-splicing of the knock-in human cDNA with the endogenous maternal mouse Igf2r allele. The phenotype following maternal transmission of the humanised allele resulted in overgrowth of the embryo, heart and placenta with partial peri-natal lethality, suggesting that further generation of hypomorphic Igf2r alleles are likely to be at the borderline of maintaining Igf2 dependent viability. PMID:23468951

  13. Parental Power and Adolescents' Parental Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acock, Alan C.; Yang, Wen Shan

    1984-01-01

    Combines McDonald's social power of parental identification with sex-linked models of parental identification to account for the identification of daughters (N=199) and sons (N=147) with their parents. Found that because of a halo effect, a gain in identification with one parent is not at the other parent's expense. (JAC)

  14. Identification of cattle carrying alleles associated with resistance and susceptibility to the Bovine Leukemia Virus progression by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Forletti, A; Juliarena, M A; Ceriani, C; Amadio, A F; Esteban, E; Gutiérrez, S E

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown a significant association between polymorphisms of the BoLA DRB3 gene and Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) infection profile. The presence of allele *1501 has been associated with high proviral load in peripheral blood while allele *0902 has been associated with low proviral load. The purpose of this study was to develop allele-specific real-time PCRs to identify cattle carrying alleles associated with resistance (BoLA DRB3*0902) or susceptibility (BoLA DRB3*1501) to the BLV progression. Specific primers were designed and differential amplification was carried out by real-time PCR and monitored by SYBR® Green dye in DNA samples from peripheral blood. Conditions were also adjusted for traditional PCR amplification (end point amplification). These methods are rapid, simple and suitable for high throughput screening, and could aid in marker-assisted selection of BLV-resistant and susceptible cattle. PMID:23958404

  15. Four novel PEPD alleles causing prolidase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Ledoux, P.; Scriver, C.; Hechtman, P. )

    1994-06-01

    Mutations at the PEPD locus cause prolidase (an enzyme specific for proline- and hydroxyproline-terminated dipeptides) deficiency (McKusick 170100), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by iminodipeptiduria, skin ulcers, mental retardation, and recurrent infections. Four PEPD mutations from five severely affected individuals were characterized by analysis of reverse-transcribed, PCR-amplified (RT-PCR) cDNA. The authors used SSCP analysis on four overlapping cDNA fragments covering the entire coding region of the PEPD gene and detected abnormal SSCP bands for the fragments spanning all or part of exons 13-15 in three of the probands. Direct sequencing of the mutant cDNAs showed a G[yields]A, 1342 substitution (G448R) in two patients and a 3-bp deletion ([Delta]E452 or [Delta]E453) in another. In the other two probands the amplified products were of reduced size. Direct sequencing of these mutant cDNAs revealed a deletion of exon 5 in one patient and of exon 7 in the other. Intronic sequences flanking exons 5 and 7 were identified using inverse PCR followed by direct sequencing. Conventional PCR and direct sequencing then established the intron-exon borders of the mutant genomic DNA revealing two splice acceptor mutations: a G[yields]C substitution at position -1 of intron 4 and an A[yields]G substitution at position -2 of intron 6. The results indicate that the severe form of prolidase deficiency is caused by multiple PEPD alleles. In this report the authors attempt to begin the process of describing these alleles and cataloging their phenotype expression. 31 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Development of genotyping by sequencing (GBS) and array derived SNP markers for stem rust resistance gene Sr42

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stem rust fungus, particularly race TTKSK (Ug99), poses a serious threat to world wheat production. Gene Sr42 or SrCad (which could be the same gene or an allele of Sr42) is effective against race TTKSK. However, known genetic markers for Sr42 are mostly SSR markers which are generally labor i...

  17. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus Robusta 5 accessions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus Robusta 5. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with Robusta 5 as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand Malling 9 X Robusta 5 population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1) and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German Idared X Robusta 5 population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6?cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90). In the US Otawa3 X Robusta5 population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY transcription factor previously associated with fire blight resistance. However, this QTL was not observed in the New Zealand or German populations. Conclusions The results suggest that the upper region of Robusta 5 linkage group 3 contains multiple genes contributing to fire blight resistance and that their contributions to resistance can vary depending upon pathogen virulence and other factors. Mapping markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes has proved a useful aid in defining these QTLs and developing markers for marker-assisted breeding of fire blight resistance. PMID:22471693

  18. Application of SRAP markers in the identification of Stylosanthes guianensis hybrids.

    PubMed

    Huang, C Q; Liu, G D; Bai, C J; Wang, W Q; Tang, J

    2014-09-01

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) is a new molecular marker technology developed based on polymerase chain reaction. The authenticity of 84 progenies of 8 hybrid combinations of Stylosanthes guianensis was identified by SRAP markers to select the true hybrids used in the present study. A total of 35 SRAP primer combinations were selected from the parents of 8 hybrid combinations. The selected polymorphism primer combinations were applied to identify the authenticity of all progenies. The male parents of the primer combinations had specific markers, whereas the female parents did not. 68 progenies exhibited male parent-specific bands, which were identified as true hybrids. The rest of the progenies were considered self-hybrids because of the absence of male parent-specific bands. The results of hybrid identification provided solid evidence for further studies of hybrids and demonstrated SRAP molecular markers as a useful technology for assessing the purity of S. guianensis hybrids. PMID:24965147

  19. A powerful test of parent-of-origin effects for quantitative traits using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon where the same alleles have unequal transcriptions and thus contribute differently to a trait depending on their parent of origin. This mechanism has been found to affect a variety of human disorders. Although various methods for testing parent-of-origin effect...

  20. An index marker map of chromosome 9 provides strong evidence for positive interference

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, D.J. ); Dib, C. ); Slaugenhaupt, S.A.; Gusella, J.F.; Haines, J.L. ); Povey, S. )

    1993-12-01

    An index marker map of chromosome 9 has been constructed using the CEPH reference pedigrees. The map comprises 26 markers, with a max. intermarker interval of 13.1 cM and only two intervals >10 cM. Placement of all but one marker into the map was achieved with >10,000:1 odds. The sex-equal length is 151 cM, with male length of 121 cM and female length of 185 cM. The map extends to within 2-3% of physical length at the telomeres, and its coverage therefore is expected to be within 20-30 cM of full map length. The markers are all of the GT/CA repeat type and have av. heterozygosity .77, with a range .60-.89. The map shows both marked contraction of genetic distance relative to physical distance in the pericentromeric region and expansion in the telomeric regions. Genotypic data were examined for errors by using the crossover routine of the program DATAMAN. Five new mutations were observed among 17,316 meiotic events examined. There were two double-crossover events occurring within an interval of 0-10 cM, and another eight were observed within an interval of 10-20 cM. Many of these could be due to additional mutational events in which one parental allele converted to the other by either gene conversion or random strand slippage. When there was no correction for these possible mutational events, the number of crossovers displayed by the maternal and paternal chromosomes was significantly different from that predicted by the Poisson distribution which would be expected in the absence of interference. In addition, the observed crossover distribution for paternally derived chromosomes was similar to that predicted from cytogenetic chiasma frequency observations. The data strongly support the occurrence of strong positive interference on human chromosome 9 and suggest that flanking markers at an interval of [le] 20 cM are generally sufficient for disease gene inheritance predictions in presymptomatic genetic counseling by linkage analysis. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. First report on HLA-DPA1 gene allelic distribution in the general Lebanese population

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Joseph; Shammaa, Dina; Abbas, Fatmeh; Mahfouz, Rami A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims HLA-DPA1 is an important marker in bone marrow and organ transplantation and a highly emerging screening parameter in histocompatibility laboratories. Being highly polymorphic, it has another significant value in detecting population origins and migrations. This is the first study to assess DPA1 allele frequencies in an Arab population. Methods The HLA DPA1 alleles were identified using the One-Lambda assays on a Luminex reverse SSO DNA typing system. Our study included 101 individuals coming from different Lebanese geographical areas representing the different communities and religious sects of the country. Results We compared the results of this study to 16 different populations and found very interesting similarities and differences between Lebanese people and individuals of European ancestry. Conclusion This study is the first to describe the different allelic frequencies of HLA-DPA1 in the Lebanese population and will serve as a template that can be later used for disease association studies both at the level of the country and internationally. PMID:27014585

  2. Genetic variability and distribution of mating type alleles in field populations of Leptosphaeria maculans from France.

    PubMed

    Gout, Lilian; Eckert, Maria; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is the most ubiquitous fungal pathogen of Brassica crops and causes the devastating stem canker disease of oilseed rape worldwide. We used minisatellite markers to determine the genetic structure of L. maculans in four field populations from France. Isolates were collected at three different spatial scales (leaf, 2-m2 field plot, and field) enabling the evaluation of spatial distribution of the mating type alleles and of genetic variability within and among field populations. Within each field population, no gametic disequilibrium between the minisatellite loci was detected and the mating type alleles were present at equal frequencies. Both sexual and asexual reproduction occur in the field, but the genetic structure of these populations is consistent with annual cycles of randomly mating sexual reproduction. All L. maculans field populations had a high level of gene diversity (H = 0.68 to 0.75) and genotypic diversity. Within each field population, the number of genotypes often was very close to the number of isolates. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that >99.5% of the total genetic variability was distributed at a small spatial scale, i.e., within 2-m2 field plots. Population differentiation among the four field populations was low (GST < 0.02), suggesting a high degree of gene exchange between these populations. The high gene flow evidenced here in French populations of L. maculans suggests a rapid countrywide diffusion of novel virulence alleles whenever novel resistance sources are used. PMID:16391041

  3. Genetic Variability and Distribution of Mating Type Alleles in Field Populations of Leptosphaeria maculans from France

    PubMed Central

    Gout, Lilian; Eckert, Maria; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is the most ubiquitous fungal pathogen of Brassica crops and causes the devastating stem canker disease of oilseed rape worldwide. We used minisatellite markers to determine the genetic structure of L. maculans in four field populations from France. Isolates were collected at three different spatial scales (leaf, 2-m2 field plot, and field) enabling the evaluation of spatial distribution of the mating type alleles and of genetic variability within and among field populations. Within each field population, no gametic disequilibrium between the minisatellite loci was detected and the mating type alleles were present at equal frequencies. Both sexual and asexual reproduction occur in the field, but the genetic structure of these populations is consistent with annual cycles of randomly mating sexual reproduction. All L. maculans field populations had a high level of gene diversity (H = 0.68 to 0.75) and genotypic diversity. Within each field population, the number of genotypes often was very close to the number of isolates. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that >99.5% of the total genetic variability was distributed at a small spatial scale, i.e., within 2-m2 field plots. Population differentiation among the four field populations was low (GST < 0.02), suggesting a high degree of gene exchange between these populations. The high gene flow evidenced here in French populations of L. maculans suggests a rapid countrywide diffusion of novel virulence alleles whenever novel resistance sources are used. PMID:16391041

  4. Total Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins

  5. Total Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins…

  6. Parental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, Audrey M.; Lehman, Stephanie; Clapp, John; Hovell, Melbourne; Sipan, Carol; Blumberg, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period during which many youth experiment with risk practices. This paper examined the association of parental monitoring with a range of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors among high-risk youth, while controlling for other demographic and environmental variables previously found to be associated with AOD

  7. Parental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, Audrey M.; Lehman, Stephanie; Clapp, John; Hovell, Melbourne; Sipan, Carol; Blumberg, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period during which many youth experiment with risk practices. This paper examined the association of parental monitoring with a range of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors among high-risk youth, while controlling for other demographic and environmental variables previously found to be associated with AOD…

  8. Constructive Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Sally

    This book turns important research and theory into essential, easy-to-follow guidelines for new parents and child care providers to help them focus on the critical first 3 years of life to build a strong foundation for the future. All the key areas of child development are covered, including self-esteem, and cognitive, motor and social

  9. Perceived Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wouters, Sofie; Doumen, Sarah; Germeijs, Veerle; Colpin, Hilde; Verschueren, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Contingent self-esteem (i.e., the degree to which one's self-esteem is dependent on meeting particular conditions) has been shown to predict a wide range of psychosocial and academic problems. This study extends previous research on contingent self-esteem by examining the predictive role of perceived parenting dimensions in a sample of early

  10. Perceived Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wouters, Sofie; Doumen, Sarah; Germeijs, Veerle; Colpin, Hilde; Verschueren, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Contingent self-esteem (i.e., the degree to which one's self-esteem is dependent on meeting particular conditions) has been shown to predict a wide range of psychosocial and academic problems. This study extends previous research on contingent self-esteem by examining the predictive role of perceived parenting dimensions in a sample of early…

  11. Constructive Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Sally

    This book turns important research and theory into essential, easy-to-follow guidelines for new parents and child care providers to help them focus on the critical first 3 years of life to build a strong foundation for the future. All the key areas of child development are covered, including self-esteem, and cognitive, motor and social…

  12. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  13. Novel thymidylate synthase enhancer region alleles in African populations.

    PubMed

    Marsh, S; Ameyaw, M M; Githang'a, J; Indalo, A; Ofori-Adjei, D; McLeod, H L

    2000-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) regulates the production of DNA synthesis precursors and is an important target of cancer chemotherapy. A polymorphic tandem repeat sequence in the enhancer region of the TS promoter was previously described, where the triple repeat gives higher in vitro gene expression than a double repeat. We recently identified ethnic differences in allele frequencies between Caucasian and Asian populations. We now describe assessment of genotype and allele frequencies of the TS polymorphism in 640 African (African American, Ghanaian and Kenyan) and Caucasian (UK, USA) subjects. The double and triple repeat were the predominant alleles in all populations studied. The frequency of the triple repeat allele was similar between Kenyan (49%), Ghanaian (56%), African American (52%), American Caucasian (54%) and British Caucasian (54%) subjects. However, two novel alleles contained 4 and 9 copies of the tandem repeat. These novel alleles were found at a higher allele frequency in African populations (Kenyan 7%, Ghanaian 3%, African American 2%) than Caucasians (UK 1%, USA 0%). The novel alleles identified in this study decrease in frequency with Western migration, while the common alleles are relatively stable. This is a unique example suggesting the influence of multiple selection pressures within individual populations. Hum Mutat 16:528, 2000. PMID:11102983

  14. Adolescents' and Parents' Conceptions of Parental Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1988-01-01

    Children ranging from fifth to twelfth grade, and their parents, were presented with items pertaining to family transgressions and asked to judge the legitimacy of parental jurisdiction, justify its wrongness or permissibility, and assess its contingency on parental authority. (PCB)

  15. EST-SSR markers from Heterodera glycines Ichinohe.

    PubMed

    Wang, H M; Zhao, H H; Zhao, C Z; Chu, D

    2014-10-01

    The soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines Ichinohe is a severe agricultural pest for which genetic resources are limited. In this study, 295 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified from 259 expressed sequenced tags (ESTs), Which were selected from 9,443 unigenes. The successful primer pairs were designed against six regions. In total, 30 alleles were identified from 30 individuals using the six markers, with an average of five alleles per locus (range, 4-7). The observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.074-0.900 and 0.266-0.775, respectively. Significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was found at three of the six loci. The EST-based SSR markers developed in this study may contribute to better understanding of the genetic structure of H. glycines populations. PMID:25720259

  16. Using Next Generation Sequencing for Multiplexed Trait-Linked Markers in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Amy; Wang, Shan; St. Amand, Paul; Bai, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the major type of marker for genotyping in many crops. However, the availability of SNP markers for important traits of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) that can be effectively used in marker-assisted selection (MAS) is still limited and SNP assays for MAS are usually uniplex. A shift from uniplex to multiplex assays will allow the simultaneous analysis of multiple markers and increase MAS efficiency. We designed 33 locus-specific markers from SNP or indel-based marker sequences that linked to 20 different quantitative trait loci (QTL) or genes of agronomic importance in wheat and analyzed the amplicon sequences using an Ion Torrent Proton Sequencer and a custom allele detection pipeline to determine the genotypes of 24 selected germplasm accessions. Among the 33 markers, 27 were successfully multiplexed and 23 had 100% SNP call rates. Results from analysis of "kompetitive allele-specific PCR" (KASP) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers developed from the same loci fully verified the genotype calls of 23 markers. The NGS-based multiplexed assay developed in this study is suitable for rapid and high-throughput screening of SNPs and some indel-based markers in wheat. PMID:26625271

  17. SSR marker-based analysis of genetic relatedness among sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) from breeding programs in China and other countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capillary electrophoresis-based molecular genotyping was conducted on 35 sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) and five clones of related wild species with 20 polymorphic SSR DNA markers. A total of 251 alleles were identified with 248 alleles displaying varying degrees of polymorphism and t...

  18. Maternal inheritance and chromosome 18 allele sharing in unilineal bipolar illness pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, E.S.; Badner, J.A.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.

    1996-04-09

    We have replicated the observation that there is excess maternal transmission of illness in a series of previously described unilineal Bipolar manic-depressive illness extended pedigrees. ({open_quotes}Transmission{close_quotes} is defined for any ill person in a pedigree when father or mother has a personal or immediate family history of major affective disorder.) We divided our pedigrees into exclusively maternal transmission (Mat) and mixed maternal-paternal transmission (in different pedigree branches) (Pat). Using affected sib-pair-analysis, linkage to a series of markers on chromosome 18p-cen was observed in the Pat but not the Mat pedigrees, with significantly greater identity by descent (IBD) at these markers in the Pat pedigrees. As compared with the pedigree series as a whole, the proportion of alleles IBD in the linkage region is much increased in the Pat pedigrees. As the sharing proportion of alleles in affected relative pairs increases, the number of such pairs needed to resolve the linkage region to a 1 cM interval becomes smaller. Genetic subdivision of an illness by clinical or pedigree configuration criteria may thus play an important role in discovery of disease susceptibility mutations. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Constraints on allele size at microsatellite loci: Implications for genetic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauta, M.J.; Weissing, F.J.

    1996-06-01

    Microsatellites are promising genetic markers for studying the demographic structure and phylogenetic history of populations. We present theoretical arguments indicating that the usefulness of microsatellite data for these purposes may be limited to a short time perspective and to relatively small populations. The evolution of selectively neutral markers is governed by the interaction of mutation and random genetic drift. Mutation pressure has the inherent tendency to shift different populations to the same distribution of alleles. Hence, mutation pressure is a homogenizing force, and population divergence is caused by random genetic drift. In case of allozymes or sequence data, the diversifying effect or drift is typically orders of magnitude larger than the homogenizing effect of mutation pressure. By a simple model, we demonstrate that the situation may be different for microsatellites where mutation rates are high and the range of alleles is limited. With the help of computer simulations, we investigate to what extent genetic distance measures applied to microsatellite data can nevertheless yield useful estimators for phylogenetic relationships or demographic parameters. We show that prediction based on microsatellite data are quite reliable in small populations, but that already in moderately sized populations the danger of misinterpretation is substantial. 22 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Isolation and characterization of 21 microsatellite markers in the barn owl (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Burri, R; Antoniazza, S; Siverio, F; Klein, A; Roulin, A; Fumagalli, L

    2008-09-01

    We report 21 new polymorphic microsatellite markers in the European barn owl (Tyto alba). The polymorphism of the reported markers was evaluated in a population situated in western Switzerland and in another from Tenerife, Canary Islands. The number of alleles per locus varies between two and 31, and expected heterozygosity per population ranges from 0.16 to 0.95. All loci are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no linkage disequilibrium was detected. Two loci exhibit a null allele in the Tenerife population. PMID:21585946

  1. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite markers in Hyptis pectinata (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Blank, A F; Jesus, A S; Santos, C P; Grando, C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Arrigoni-Blank, M F

    2014-01-01

    A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed and a set of 19 SSR markers were developed to characterize a germplasm collection of Hyptis pectinata (L.) Poit., maintained at the Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS). Fifteen markers of 19 ranged from moderately to highly polymorphic. A total of 113 alleles were identified, with a mean of 7.52 alleles per locus. The mean HO and HE were 0.582 and 0.657, respectively. The primers developed were efficient tools for accessing the genetic diversity of the germplasm collection analyzed and may also be useful for other studies involving this species and other species in the genus Hyptis. PMID:25501228

  2. Characterization of the WILMS-TF microsatellite marker in Hungarian dog populations.

    PubMed

    Zenke, Petra; Maróti-Agóts, A; Pádár, Zs; Zöldág, L

    2009-09-01

    Demand for correct and cost-effective genetic-based identification and parentage control has increasing importance in domestic animals, including dogs. In our study the applicability of a canine hyperpolymorphic microsatellite marker - which localized in the WILMS-TF (tumor factor) gene - was examined in mixed breed and purebred canine populations. The redesigned and shortened amplicons were genotyped using an allelic ladder which was constructed from sequence verified fragments. The nomenclature for allele calling based on repetition structures is suitable for international comparisons. Our study justified the potential use and efficiency of the marker D18S12 in parentage control. PMID:19700392

  3. Allelic expression of mammalian imprinted genes in a matrotrophic lizard, Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Oliver W; Brandley, Matthew C; Belov, Katherine; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that results in the differential expression of genes depending on their parent of origin. It occurs in both plants and live-bearing mammals, with imprinted genes typically regulating the ability of an embryo to manipulate the maternal provision of nutrients. Genomic imprinting increases the potential for selection to act separately on paternally and maternally expressed genes, which increases the number of opportunities that selection can facilitate embryonic control over maternal nutrient provision. By looking for imprinting in an independent matrotrophic lineage, the viviparous lizard Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii (Scincidae), we test the hypothesis that genomic imprinting facilitates the evolution of substantial placental nutrient transport to embryos (matrotrophy). We sequenced transcriptomes from the embryonic component of lizard placentae to determine whether there are parent-of-origin differences in expression of genes that are imprinted in mammals. Of these genes, 19 had sufficiently high expression in the lizard to identify polymorphisms in transcribed sequences. We identified bi-allelic expression in 17 genes (including insulin-like growth factor 2), indicating that neither allele was imprinted. These data suggest that either genomic imprinting has not evolved in this matrotrophic skink or, if it has, it has evolved in different genes to mammals. We outline how these hypotheses can be tested. This study highlights important differences between mammalian and reptile pregnancy and the absence of any shared imprinting genes reflects fundamental differences in the way that pregnancy has evolved in these two lineages. PMID:26943808

  4. Differential decay of parent-of-origin-specific genomic sharing in cystic fibrosis-affected sib pairs maps a paternally imprinted locus to 7q34

    PubMed Central

    Stanke, Frauke; Davenport, Colin; Hedtfeld, Silke; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease characterized by a high variability of disease severity and outcome that points to the role of environmental factors and modulating genes that shape the course of this multiorgan disease. We genotyped families of cystic fibrosis sib pairs homozygous for F508del-CFTR who represent extreme clinical phenotypes at informative microsatellite markers spanning a 38 Mb region between CFTR and 7qtel. Recombination events on both parental chromosomes were compared between siblings with concordant clinical phenotypes and siblings with discordant clinical phenotypes. Monitoring parent-of-origin-specific decay of genomic sharing delineated a 2.9-Mb segment on 7q34 in which excess of recombination on paternal chromosomes in discordant pairs was observed compared with phenotypically concordant sibs. This 2.9-Mb core candidate region was enriched in imprinting-related elements such as predicted CCCTC-binding factor consensus sites and CpG islands dense in repetitive elements. Moreover, allele frequencies at a microsatellite marker within the core candidate region differed significantly comparing mildly and severely affected cystic fibrosis sib pairs. The identification of this paternally imprinted locus on 7q34 as a modulator of cystic fibrosis disease severity shows that imprinted elements can be identified by straightforward fine mapping of break points in sib pairs with informative contrasting phenotypes. PMID:20051989

  5. Development of EST-based new SSR markers in seabuckthorn.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankit; Ghangal, Rajesh; Grover, Atul; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Sharma, Prakash C

    2010-12-01

    EST-based SSR markers were developed by screening a collection of 1584 clustered ESTs of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides). PCR primers were designed for the amplification of 30 microsatellite loci. Two to five allelic bands were displayed by nine primer pairs in H. rhamnoides genotypes and by eleven primer pairs in H. salicifolia genotypes. None of the thirty primer pairs detected polymorphism in H. tibetana genotypes. Considering the high polymorphism detected in the tested genotypes and their direct origin from the genic regions, these EST-SSR markers hold immense promise in seabuckthorn genome analysis, molecular breeding and population genetics. PMID:23572988

  6. Three selectable markers for transformation of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Gold, S E; Bakkeren, G; Davies, J E; Kronstad, J W

    1994-05-16

    Although Ustilago maydis is readily amenable to molecular genetic experimentation, few antibiotic-resistance markers are available for DNA-mediated transformation. This poses constraints on experiments involving targeted gene disruption and complementation. To address this problem, we constructed vectors using one of three additional genes as dominant selectable markers for transformation. Two genes, sat-1 (encoding streptothricin acetyltransferase) and Sh-ble (encoding a phleomycin-resistance polypeptide), are of bacterial origin and have been engineered for expression in Ustilago sp. The third gene encodes an allele of U. maydis beta-tubulin that confers resistance to the fungicide benomyl. PMID:7515016

  7. Microsatellite markers for the silver arowana (Osteoglossum bicirrhosum, Osteoglossidae, Osteoglossiformes).

    PubMed

    DE Jesus DA Silva, Themis; Hrbek, Tomas; Farias, Izeni P

    2009-05-01

    Osteoglossum bicirrhosum (silver arowana) is an important fish for the economy of the Amazon region, both as an ornamental fish and as a food fish. To provide tools for addressing ecological and genetic questions, we developed 19 polymorphic microsatellite markers that had between 2 and 7 alleles per locus in the 24 tested individuals. The transferability of many of the loci was confirmed for Osteoglossum ferreirai (black arowana) and Arapaima gigas, and for three African osteoglossiform species. PMID:21564825

  8. Joint Analysis of the DRD5 Marker Concludes Association with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Confined to the Predominantly Inattentive and Combined Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Naomi; Kirley, Aiveen; Hawi, Ziarih; Sham, Pak; Wickham, Harvey; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Smith, Shelley D.; Lee, Saretta Y.; Levy, Florence; Kent, Lindsey; Middle, Fiona; Rohde, Luis A.; Roman, Tatiana; Tahir, Eda; Yazgan, Yanke; Asherson, Philip; Mill, Jonathan; Thapar, Anita; Payton, Antony; Todd, Richard D.; Stephens, Timothy; Ebstein, Richard P.; Manor, Iris; Barr, Cathy L.; Wigg, Karen G.; Sinke, Richard J.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Smalley, Susan L.; Nelson, Stan F.; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Gill, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable, heterogeneous disorder of early onset, consisting of a triad of symptoms: inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. The disorder has a significant genetic component, and theories of etiology include abnormalities in the dopaminergic system, with DRD4, DAT1, SNAP25, and DRD5 being implicated as major susceptibility genes. An initial report of association between ADHD and the common 148-bp allele of a microsatellite marker located 18.5 kb from the DRD5 gene has been followed by several studies showing nonsignificant trends toward association with the same allele. To establish the postulated association of the (CA)n repeat with ADHD, we collected genotypic information from 14 independent samples of probands and their parents, analyzed them individually and, in the absence of heterogeneity, analyzed them as a joint sample. The joint analysis showed association with the DRD5 locus (P=.00005; odds ratio 1.24; 95% confidence interval 1.121.38). This association appears to be confined to the predominantly inattentive and combined clinical subtypes. PMID:14732906

  9. Development of nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers for the endangered conifer Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S.; L’Huillier, Laurent; Kurata, Seikan; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Isagi, Yuji; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Ito, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae), an endangered conifer species in New Caledonia. Methods and Results: Using sequencing by synthesis (SBS) of an RNA-Seq library, 15 polymorphic nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed. When evaluated with 48 individuals, these markers showed genetic variations ranging from two to 15 alleles and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0 to 0.881. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for examining the genetic diversity and structure of remaining wild populations and improving the genetic status of ex situ populations. PMID:26312198

  10. Induced instability of two Arabidopsis constitutive pathogen-response alleles.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Trevor L; Richards, Eric J

    2002-05-28

    Paramutation is an example of a non-Mendelian-directed allelic interaction that results in the epigenetic alteration of one allele. We describe a paramutation-like interaction between two alleles, bal and cpr1-1 (constitutive expressor of PR genes 1), which map to a complex R-like gene cluster on Arabidopsis chromosome 4. Both alleles cause dwarfing and constitutive defense responses, similar to another dwarf variant, ssi1 (suppressor of SA-insensitivity 1). Previous work has demonstrated that the bal and ssi1 phenotypes are caused by overexpression of an R-like gene from the cluster, which activates an salicylic acid-dependent defense pathway. Here, we show that the cpr1-1 variant does not alter gene expression from the R-like gene cluster. The bal and cpr1-1 alleles did not complement each other in F(1) hybrids, but F(2) populations that segregated bal and cpr1-1 alleles contained plants with normal morphology at a frequency of 20%. By using molecularly marked bal and cpr1-1 lines, we found that the majority of the normal phenotypes were correlated with inheritance of an altered cpr1-1 allele. Our observation that cpr1-1 is a metastable allele suggests that cpr1-1 is an epigenetic allele. The cpr1-1 allele is the third candidate epigenetic allele originating from this R-like gene cluster, making the region a possible hotspot of epigenetic variation. PMID:12032362

  11. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  12. Allele-Specific Amplification in Cancer Revealed by SNP Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Amplification, deletion, and loss of heterozygosity of genomic DNA are hallmarks of cancer. In recent years a variety of studies have emerged measuring total chromosomal copy number at increasingly high resolution. Similarly, loss-of-heterozygosity events have been finely mapped using high-throughput genotyping technologies. We have developed a probe-level allele-specific quantitation procedure that extracts both copy number and allelotype information from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data to arrive at allele-specific copy number across the genome. Our approach applies an expectation-maximization algorithm to a model derived from a novel classification of SNP array probes. This method is the first to our knowledge that is able to (a) determine the generalized genotype of aberrant samples at each SNP site (e.g., CCCCT at an amplified site), and (b) infer the copy number of each parental chromosome across the genome. With this method, we are able to determine not just where amplifications and deletions occur, but also the haplotype of the region being amplified or deleted. The merit of our model and general approach is demonstrated by very precise genotyping of normal samples, and our allele-specific copy number inferences are validated using PCR experiments. Applying our method to a collection of lung cancer samples, we are able to conclude that amplification is essentially monoallelic, as would be expected under the mechanisms currently believed responsible for gene amplification. This suggests that a specific parental chromosome may be targeted for amplification, whether because of germ line or somatic variation. An R software package containing the methods described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.dfci.harvard.edu/~tlaframb/PLASQ. PMID:16322765

  13. High-density Integrated Linkage Map Based on SSR Markers in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tae-Young; Sayama, Takashi; Takahashi, Masakazu; Takada, Yoshitake; Nakamoto, Yumi; Funatsuki, Hideyuki; Hisano, Hiroshi; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Kono, Izumi; Hoshi, Masako; Hanawa, Masayoshi; Yano, Chizuru; Xia, Zhengjun; Harada, Kyuya; Kitamura, Keisuke; Ishimoto, Masao

    2009-01-01

    A well-saturated molecular linkage map is a prerequisite for modern plant breeding. Several genetic maps have been developed for soybean with various types of molecular markers. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are single-locus markers with high allelic variation and are widely applicable to different genotypes. We have now mapped 1810 SSR or sequence-tagged site markers in one or more of three recombinant inbred populations of soybean (the US cultivar ‘Jack’ × the Japanese cultivar ‘Fukuyutaka’, the Chinese cultivar ‘Peking’ × the Japanese cultivar ‘Akita’, and the Japanese cultivar ‘Misuzudaizu’ × the Chinese breeding line ‘Moshidou Gong 503’) and have aligned these markers with the 20 consensus linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the integrated linkage map was 2442.9 cM, and the average number of molecular markers was 90.5 (range of 70–114) for the 20 LGs. We examined allelic diversity for 1238 of the SSR markers among 23 soybean cultivars or lines and a wild accession. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 7, with an average of 2.8. Our high-density linkage map should facilitate ongoing and future genomic research such as analysis of quantitative trait loci and positional cloning in addition to marker-assisted selection in soybean breeding. PMID:19531560

  14. Toward fully automated genotyping: genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution.

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, M W; Lancia, G; Ng, S K

    1995-01-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA)n repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. PMID:7485172

  15. Many Parents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseng, Torleiv; Moxnes, John F.

    2015-06-01

    In all living species at most, two parents are needed in order to make an offspring. In this paper, we assume that N parents are needed, and we calculate the optimum N in terms of fitness using a simple probabilistic approach. The probability of finding an attractive partner is set to P. The probability that this partner gives increased fitness is set to 1- R. We show that the best number of partners is N = 2 for any value of R as long as 1/2 < P < 2/3. For P < 1/2, the most beneficial is N = 1 partner. As P increases, there exists an optimum number of partners N > 2.

  16. Favorable QTL Alleles for Yield and Its Components Identified by Association Mapping in Chinese Upland Cotton Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Hongxian; Zhu, Xiefei; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium based association mapping is a powerful tool for dissecting the genetic basis underlying complex traits. In this study, an association mapping panel consisting of 356 representative Upland cotton cultivars was constructed, evaluated in three environments and genotyped using 381 SSRs to detect molecular markers associated with lint yield and its components. The results showed that abundant phenotypic and moderate genetic diversities existed within this germplasm panel. The population could be divided into two subpopulations, and weak relatedness was detected between pair-wise accessions. LD decayed to the background (r2 = 0.1182, P≤0.01), r2 = 0.1 and r2 = 0.2 level within 12–13 cM, 17–18 cM and 3–4 cM, respectively, providing the potential for association mapping of agronomically important traits in Chinese Upland cotton. A total of 55 marker-trait associations were detected between 26 SSRs and seven lint yield traits, based on a mixed linear model (MLM) and Bonferroni correction (P≤0.05/145, −log10P≥3.46). Of which 41 could be detected in more than one environment and 17 markers were simultaneously associated with two or more traits. Many associations were consistent with QTLs identified by linkage mapping in previous reports. Phenotypic values of alleles of each loci in 41 stably detected associations were compared, and 23 favorable alleles were identified. Population frequency of each favorable allele in historically released cultivar groups was also evaluated. The QTLs detected in this study will be helpful in further understanding the genetic basis of lint yield and its components, and the favorable alleles may facilitate future high-yield breeding by genomic selection in Upland cotton. PMID:24386089

  17. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  18. Analysis of HLA class II haplotypes in the Cayapa indians of ecuador: A novel DRBI allele reveals evidence for convergent evolution and balancing selection at position 86

    SciTech Connect

    Titus-Trachtenberg, E.A.; Erlich, H. ); Rickards, O.; De Stefano, G.F. )

    1994-07-01

    PCR amplification, oligonucleotide probe typing, and sequencing were used to analyze the HLA class II loci (DRB1, DQA1, DAB1, and DPB1) of an isolated South Amerindian tribe. Here the authors report HLA class II variation, including the identification of a new DRB1 allele, several novel DR/DQ haplotypes, and an unusual distribution of DPB1 alleles, among the Cayapa Indians (N=100) of Ecuador. A general reduction of HLA class II allelic variation in the Cayapa is consistent with a population bottleneck during the colonization of the Americas. The new Cayapa DRB1 allele, DRB1[sup *]08042, which arose by a G[yields]T point mutation in the parental DRB1[sup *]0802, contains a novel Val codon (GTT) at position 86. The generation of DRB1[sup *]08042 (Val-86) from DRB1[sup *]0802 (Gly-86) in the Cayapa, by a different mechanism than the (GT[yields]TG) change in the creation of DRB1[sub *]08041 (Val-86) from DRB1[sup *]0802 in Africa, implicates selection in the convergent evolution of position 86 DR[beta] variants. The DRB1[sup *]08042 allele has not been found in >1,800 Amerindian haplotypes and thus presumably arose after the Cayapa separated from other South American Amerindians. Selection pressure for increased haplotype diversity can be inferred in the generation and maintenance of three new DRB1[sup *]08042 haplotypes and several novel DR/DQ haplotypes in this population. The DPB1 allelic distribution in the Cayapa is also extraordinary, with two alleles, DPB1[sup *]1401, a very rare allele in North American Amerindian populations, and DPB1[sup *]0402, the most common Amerindian DPB1 allele, constituting 89% of the Cayapa DPB1. These data are consistent with the postulated rapid rate of evolution as noted for the class I HLA-B locus of other South American Indians. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  20. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences. PMID:26416087

  1. Case-control study of allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci in males with impulsive violent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhao, Hanqing; Yu, Haiying; Guo, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an accepted method for detecting associations between genotype and phenotype but it has not previously been used in the study of the genetics of impulsive violent behavior. Objective Compare the prevalence of different polymorphisms in 15 STR loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) between men with a history of impulsive violence and male control subjects without a history of impulsive violence. Methods The distributions of the alleles of the 15 STR loci were compared between 407 cases with impulsive violent behavior and 415 controls using AmpFlSTR® Identifiler™ kits. Results Compared to controls, the average frequencies of the following alleles were significantly lower in individuals with a history of violent behavior: allele 10 of TH01 (OR=0.29, 95%CI=0.16-0.52, p<0.0001,), allele 8 of TPOX (OR=0.71, 95%CI=0.58-0.86, p=0.0005), allele 9 of TPOX (OR=0.65, 95%CI=0.47-0.89, p=0.0072) and allele 14 of CSF1PO (OR=0.27, 95%CI=0.11-0.68, p=0.0035). One allele was significantly higher in cases than controls: allele 11 of TPOX (OR=1.79, 95%CI=1.45-2.22, p<0.0001). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first behavioral genetic study that clearly demonstrates a close relationship between specific genetic markers and impulsive aggression in non-psychiatric offenders. Further prospective work will be needed to determine whether or not the alleles identified can be considered risk factors for impulsive aggression and, if so, the underlying mechanisms that result in this relationship. PMID:24991178

  2. Serotonin transporter allelic variation in mothers predicts maternal sensitivity, behavior and attitudes toward 6-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Mileva-Seitz, V; Kennedy, J; Atkinson, L; Steiner, M; Levitan, R; Matthews, S G; Meaney, M J; Sokolowski, M B; Fleming, A S

    2011-04-01

    Maternal behavior in the new mother is a multidimensional set of responses to infant cues that are influenced by the mother's early life experiences. In this study, we wanted to test if mothers' early life experiences and mothers' genotype have interactive effects on maternal behaviors and attitudes, something which has not been previously explored. In a sample of 204 mothers, we assessed maternal genotype at the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and an adjacent upstream polymorphism (rs25531), together giving rise to three alleles: short (S), L(G) and L(A). Controlling for maternal age and parity, we showed that this genotype can predict differences in maternal sensitivity at 6 months postpartum: mothers with an S (or the functionally similar L(G)) allele were more sensitive than mothers who lacked the allele during a 30-min recorded mother-infant interaction (F (4,140) = 3.43; P = 0.01). Furthermore, we found highly significant gene-environment interactions in association with maternal behavior, such that mothers with no S or L(G) alleles oriented away more frequently from their babies if they also reported more negative early care quality (F (5,138) = 3.28; P = 0.008). Finally, we found significant gene-environment associations with maternal attitudes; mothers with the S allele and with greater early care quality scored higher on ratings of their perceived attachment to their baby (F (5,125) = 3.27; P = 0.008). The regression results show significant interactions between the reported quality of care mothers received from their own parents and genotype on both their frequency of orienting away from the infant during the interaction (F(5, 138) = 3.28; P = 0.008, Fig. 1a) and their perceived attachment feelings to the infant (F(5, 125) = 3.27; P = 0.008, Fig. 1b); however the direction of the effects for these two outcome measures were different from one another. With increasing care quality, mothers with the L(A)L(A) genotype (no S or L(G) allele) oriented away less frequently, while S or L(G) allele carriers showed no significant change. In contrast, with increasing early care quality. L(A)L(A) (no S or L(G) allele) mothers scored lower on perceived attachment to their infants, whereas S or L(G) allele carrying mothers scored higher. [corrected]. PMID:21232011

  3. RAPD markers linked to eastern filbert blight resistance in Corylus avellana.

    PubMed

    Mehlenbacher, S A; Brown, R N; Davis, J W; Chen, H; Bassil, N V; Smith, D C; Kubisiak, T L

    2004-02-01

    A total of 1,110 decamer primers were screened for RAPD markers linked to a dominant allele in hazelnut ( Corylus avellana) that confers resistance to eastern filbert blight caused by Anisogramma anomala. Twenty RAPD markers linked in coupling, and five markers linked in repulsion, were found. A seedling population was used to construct a linkage map of the region flanking the resistance locus. The map spans 46.6 cM, with 14 markers on one side of the resistance locus and eight on the other side. Eleven markers showed less than 3% recombination with resistance, including three that showed no recombination. Seven of these 11 markers are sufficiently robust to allow their use in marker-assisted selection. These include AA12(850) which shows no recombination, and six markers on one side of the resistance locus: 173(500), 152(800), 122(825), 275(1130), H19(650) and O16(1250). Marker 268(580), which flanks the resistance locus on the other side, is also suitable for use in marker-assisted selection, but shows 5.8% recombination with resistance. Other markers are less suitable for marker-assisted selection because of sensitivity to changes in primer or MgCl(2) concentration, or the long time required for electrophoresis to separate bands of similar size. The 16 markers closest to the resistance locus were cloned and sequenced. The W07(365) marker, which showed no recombination with the resistance locus but is difficult to score, includes a CT microsatellite repeat. The sequence information will allow the design of SCAR primers and eventual map-based cloning of the resistance allele. PMID:14569427

  4. Genome mapping of polyploid tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) with RFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Xu, W W; Sleper, D A; Chao, S

    1995-11-01

    Genetic mapping using molecular markers such as restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) has become a powerful tool for plant geneticists and breeders. Like many economically important polyploid plant species, detailed genetic studies of hexaploid tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) are complicated, and no genetic map has been established. We report here the first tall fescue genetic map. This map was generated from an F2 population of HD28-56 by 'Kentucky-31' and contains 108 RFLP markers. Although the two parental plants were heterozygous, the perennial and tillering growth habit, high degree of RFLP, and disomic inheritance of tall fescue enabled us to identify the segregating homologous alleles. The map covers 1274 cM on 19 linkage groups with an average of 5 loci per linkage group (LG) and 17.9 cM between loci. Mapping the homoeologous loci detected by the same probe allowed us to identify five homoeologous groups within which the gene orders were found to be generally conserved among homoeologous chromosomes. An exception was homoeologous group 5, in which only 2 of the 3 homoeologous chromosomes were identified. Using 12 genome-specific probes, we were able to assign several linkage groups to one of the three genomes (PG1G2) in tall fescue. All the loci detected by the 11 probes specific to the G1 and/or G2 genomes, with one exception, identified loci located on 4 chromosomes of two homoeologous groups (LG2a, LG2c, LG3a, and LG3c). A P-genome-specific probe was used to map a locus on LG5c. Comparative genome mapping with maize probes indicated that homoeologous group 3 and 2 chromosomes in tall fescue corresponded to maize chromosome 1. Difficulties and advantages of applying RFLP technology in polyploids with high levels of heterozygosity are discussed. PMID:24169982

  5. [Bone turnover marker].

    PubMed

    Miura, Masakazu; Satoh, Yuki

    2015-10-01

    Recently the clinical application of bone turnover markers (BTMs) have been achieved significant progress and the measurements of these indices give us better understanding of pathogenesis of osteoporosis. BTMs are known the bone formation marker, the bone resorption marker and the bone matrix-related marker, respectively. In the Guidelines for the Use of Bone Metabolic Markers in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteoporosis (2012 Edition) from publishing Japan Osteoporosis Society Committee, the newly and commonly BTMs were considered to give the normal reference value in Japanese people, the influence of renal function on BTMs. The flow chart of the measurement of bone resorption markers and bone formation markers when selecting drug treatment for osteoporosis, the evaluation of therapeutic effects of bone antiresorption drugs and/or bone formation promoting drug using bone resorption markers and/or bone formation marker were corrected newly in the guideline 2012 edition. Moreover, BTMs were suggested to contribute to adhere with osteoporosis treatment. BTMs are adapted to selection of the drug for osteoporosis and to evaluate the drug efficacy. Therefore, it is very important to guide the proper application and assessment of BTMs in clinical practice. PMID:26529926

  6. Microsatellite DNA markers for delineating population structure and kinship among the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Henderson, A.P.; Bocetti, C.I.; Currie, D.; Wunderle, J.M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 23 microsatellite DNA markers for the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii), a Nearctic/Neotropical migrant passerine. This suite of markers revealed moderate to high levels of allelic diversity (averaging 7.7 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 72%). Genotypic frequencies at 22 of 23 (95%) markers conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and no linkage disequilibrium was observed in blood samples taken from 14 warblers found on the wintering grounds in the Bahamas archipelago. Multilocus genotypes resulting from this suite of markers should reduce the amount of resources required for initiating new genetic studies assessing breeding structure, parentage, demographics, and individual-level ecological interactions for D. kirtlandii. ?? 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers from the Chinese Medicinal Herb Atractylodes macrocephala (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li; Shao, Zhong-Da; Wang, Zong-Chao; Fu, Cheng-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz. (Asteraceae) is an economically important Chinese medicinal herb. In this study, 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed from A. macrocephala using the compound microsatellite marker technique. Levels of polymorphism within the 15 markers were assessed using 83 individuals from two wild and two cultivated populations in China. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 20, with an average of 9.9 alleles. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.083 to 1.000 and from 0.097 to 0.938, respectively. These markers will be valuable for germplasm classification and identification, as well as for assessing the genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure among wild and cultivated populations of A. macrocephala. PMID:23443109

  8. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Jasminum sambac (Oleaceae) using Illumina shotgun sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Weirui

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers of Jasminum sambac (Oleaceae) were isolated to investigate wild germplasm resources and provide markers for breeding. Methods and Results: Illumina sequencing was used to isolate microsatellite markers from the transcriptome of J. sambac. A total of 1322 microsatellites were identified from 49,772 assembled unigenes. One hundred primer pairs were randomly selected to verify primer amplification efficiency. Out of these tested primer pairs, 31 were successfully amplified: 18 primer pairs yielded a single allele, seven exhibited fixed heterozygosity with two alleles, and only six displayed polymorphisms. Conclusions: This study obtained the first set of microsatellite markers for J. sambac, which will be helpful for the assessment of wild germplasm resources and the development of molecular marker–assisted breeding. PMID:26504683

  9. Characterization of fungus-specific microsatellite markers in the lichen fungus Usnea subfloridana (Parmeliaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Tõrra, Tiiu; Cornejo, Carolina; Cheenacharoen, Saran; Dal Grande, Francesco; Marmor, Liis; Scheidegger, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the haploid lichenized fungal species Usnea subfloridana to study its population subdivision and the species’ response to forest disturbance, fragmentation, and environmental pollution. • Methods and Results: We developed 14 polymorphic microsatellite markers using 454 pyrosequencing data of U. subfloridana. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 15, and Nei’s unbiased gene diversity averaged over nine markers without null alleles ranged from 0.64 to 0.67. Evaluation of the cross-species amplification in U. glabrescens and U. wasmuthii indicates that these markers are also informative in other Usnea species. • Conclusions: These markers will allow us to investigate the effects of forest management and environmental pollution on genetic population structure of U. subfloridana and closely related species. Moreover, they will help facilitate phylogeographic studies of U. subfloridana across the species’ distribution area in Europe. PMID:25202640

  10. Imputation of microsatellite alleles from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification across multiple Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite markers (MS) have traditionally been used for parental verification and are still the international standard in spite of their higher cost, error rate, and turnaround time compared with Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) -based assays. Despite domestic and international demands fr...

  11. Parenting Styles and Beliefs about Parental Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1994-01-01

    Suggests that models of parenting style, such as Baumrind's popular model, are insensitive to variations in parenting resulting from characteristics of the different situations in which the parenting is expressed. Argues that considering parenting in context adds greater specificity to the model and enhances the potential for predicting child…

  12. Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major histocompatibility complex class II? alleles of New World ranid frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play key roles in the vertebrate immune system. However, our understanding of the evolutionary processes and underlying genetic mechanisms shaping these genes is limited in many taxa, including amphibians, a group currently impacted by emerging infectious diseases. To further elucidate the evolution of the MHC in frogs (anurans) and develop tools for population genetics, we surveyed allelic diversity of the MHC class II ??1 domain in both genomic and complementary DNA of seven New World species in the genus Rana (Lithobates). To assign locus affiliation to our alleles, we used a "gene walking" technique to obtain intron 2 sequences that flanked MHC class II?? exon 2. Two distinct intron sequences were recovered, suggesting the presence of at least two class II?? loci in Rana. We designed a primer pair that successfully amplified an orthologous locus from all seven Rana species. In total, we recovered 13 alleles and documented trans-species polymorphism for four of the alleles. We also found quantitative evidence of selection acting on amino acid residues that are putatively involved in peptide binding and structural stability of the ??1 domain of anurans. Our results indicated that primer mismatch can result in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias, which influences the number of alleles that are recovered. Using a single locus may minimize PCR bias caused by primer mismatch, and the gene walking technique was an effective approach for generating single-copy orthologous markers necessary for future studies of MHC allelic variation in natural amphibian populations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases. PMID:26850319

  14. A comparison of single nucleotide polymorphism and microsatellite markers for analysis of parentage and kinship in a cooperatively breeding bird.

    PubMed

    Weinman, Lucia R; Solomon, Joseph W; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2015-05-01

    The development of genetic markers has revolutionized molecular studies within and among populations. Although poly-allelic microsatellites are the most commonly used genetic marker for within-population studies of free-living animals, biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, have also emerged as a viable option for use in nonmodel systems. We describe a robust method of SNP discovery from the transcriptome of a nonmodel organism that resulted in more than 99% of the markers working successfully during genotyping. We then compare the use of 102 novel SNPs with 15 previously developed microsatellites for studies of parentage and kinship in cooperatively breeding superb starlings (Lamprotornis superbus) that live in highly kin-structured groups. For 95% of the offspring surveyed, SNPs and microsatellites identified the same genetic father, but only when behavioural information about the likely parents at a nest was included to aid in assignment. Moreover, when such behavioural information was available, the number of SNPs necessary for successful parentage assignment was reduced by half. However, in a few cases where candidate fathers were highly related, SNPs did a better job at assigning fathers than microsatellites. Despite high variation between individual pairwise relatedness values, microsatellites and SNPs performed equally well in kinship analyses. This study is the first to compare SNPs and microsatellites for analyses of parentage and relatedness in a species that lives in groups with a complex social and kin structure. It should also prove informative for those interested in developing SNP loci from transcriptome data when published genomes are unavailable. PMID:25224810

  15. CGG allele size somatic mosaicism and methylation in FMR1 premutation alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, Dalyir I.; Mendoza-Morales, Guadalupe; Lo, Joyce; Cao, Ru; Hadd, Andrew; Latham, Gary J.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Hagerman, Randi; Tassone, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Background Greater than 200 CGG repeats in the 5′UTR of the FMR1 gene leads to epigenetic silencing and lack of the FMR1 protein, causing Fragile X Syndrome. Individuals carriers of a premutation (PM) allele with 55–200 CGG repeats are typically unmethylated and can present with clinical features defined as FMR1 associated conditions. Methods Blood samples from 17 male PM carriers were assessed clinically and molecularly by Southern Blot, Western Blot, PCR and QRT-PCR. Blood and brain tissue from additional 18 PM males were also similarly examined. Continuous outcomes were modeled using linear regression and binary outcomes were modeled using logistic regression. Results Methylated alleles were detected in different fractions of blood cells in all PM cases (n= 17). CGG repeat numbers correlated with percent of methylation and mRNA levels and, especially in the upper PM range, with greater number of clinical involvements. Inter/intra- tissue somatic instability and differences in percent methylation were observed between blood and fibroblasts (n=4) and also observed between blood and different brain regions in three of the 18 premutation cases examined. CGG repeat lengths in lymphocytes remained unchanged over a period of time ranging from 2–6 years, three cases for whom multiple samples were available. Conclusion In addition to CGG size instability, individuals with a PM expanded alleles can exhibit methylation and display more clinical features likely due to RNA toxicity and/or FMR1 silencing. The observed association between CGG repeat length and percent of methylation with the severity of the clinical phenotypes underscores the potential value of methylation in affected PM to further understand penetrance, inform diagnosis and to expand treatment options. PMID:24591415

  16. A Risk Allele for Nicotine Dependence in CHRNA5 Is a Protective Allele for Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Grucza, Richard A; Wang, Jen C.; Stitzel, Jerry A.; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Saccone, Scott F.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Cloninger, C. Robert; Neuman, Rosalind J.; Budde, John P.; Fox, Louis; Bertelsen, Sarah; Kramer, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Tischfield, Jay; Nurnberger, John. I.; Almasy, Laura; Porjesz, Bernice; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc A.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Rice, John P.; Goate, Alison M.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Background A non-synonymous coding polymorphism, rs16969968, of the CHRNA5 gene which encodes the alpha-5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been found to be associated with nicotine dependence (20). The goal of the present study is to examine the association of this variant with cocaine dependence. Methods Genetic association analysis in two, independent samples of unrelated cases and controls; 1.) 504 European-American participating in the Family Study on Cocaine Dependence (FSCD); 2.) 814 European Americans participating in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholsim (COGA). Results In the FSCD, there was a significant association between the CHRNA5 variant and cocaine dependence (OR = 0.67 per allele, p = 0.0045, assuming an additive genetic model), but in the reverse direction compared to that previously observed for nicotine dependence. In multivariate analyses that controlled for the effects of nicotine dependence, both the protective effect for cocaine dependence and the previously documented risk effect for nicotine dependence were statistically significant. The protective effect for cocaine dependence was replicated in the COGA sample. In COGA, effect sizes for habitual smoking, a proxy phenotype for nicotine dependence, were consistent with those observed in FSCD. Conclusion The minor (A) allele of rs16969968, relative to the major G allele, appears to be both a risk factor for nicotine dependence and a protective factor for cocaine dependence. The biological plausibility of such a bidirectional association stems from the involvement of nAChRs with both excitatory and inhibitory modulation of dopamine-mediated reward pathways. PMID:18519132

  17. Allelic sequence heterozygosity in single Giardia parasites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic heterogeneity has become a major inconvenience in the genotyping and molecular epidemiology of the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis, in particular for the major human infecting genotype, assemblage B. Sequence-based genotyping of assemblage B Giardia from patient fecal samples, where one or several of the commonly used genotyping loci (beta-giardin, triosephosphate isomerase and glutamate dehydrogenase) are implemented, is often hampered due to the presence of sequence heterogeneity in the sequencing chromatograms. This can be due to allelic sequence heterozygosity (ASH) and /or co-infections with parasites of different assemblage B sub-genotypes. Thus, two important questions have arisen; i) does ASH occur at the single cell level, and/or ii) do multiple sub-genotype infections commonly occur in patients infected with assemblage B, G. intestinalis isolates? Results We used micromanipulation in order to isolate single Giardia intestinalis, assemblage B trophozoites (GS isolate) and cysts from human patients. Molecular analysis at the tpi loci of trophozoites from the GS lineage indicated that ASH is present at the single cell level. Analyses of assemblage B Giardia cysts from clinical samples at the bg and tpi loci also indicated ASH at the single cell level. Additionally, alignment of sequence data from several different cysts that originated from the same patient yielded different sequence patterns, thus suggesting the presence of multiple sub-assemblage infections in congruence with ASH within the same patient. Conclusions Our results conclusively show that ASH does occur at the single cell level in assemblage B Giardia. Furthermore, sequence heterogeneity generated during sequence-based genotyping of assemblage B isolates may possess the complexity of single cell ASH in concurrence with co-infections of different assemblage B sub-genotypes. These findings explain the high abundance of sequence heterogeneity commonly found when performing sequence based genotyping of assemblage B Giardia, and illuminates the necessity of developing new G. intestinalis genotyping tools. PMID:22554281

  18. Plastid markers in Carya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated 8 "universal" plastid primers and qualified 3 as polymorphic and informative within Carya. Pecans of known lineage and geographic origin, representatives of other Carya species and interspecific hybrids were profiled. In an analysis of 169 Carya accessions, 21 alleles were observed am...

  19. Imprinted chromosomal domains revealed by allele-specific replication timing of the GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes

    SciTech Connect

    LaSalle, J.; Flint, A.; Lalande, M.

    1994-09-01

    The GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes are organized as a cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13. The genes are separated by around 100 kb and arranged in opposite transcriptional orientations. The GABA{sub A} receptor cluster lies near the Angelman and Prader-Willi loci and displays asynchronous DNA replication, suggesting that this region is subject to parental imprinting. In order to further study the association between DNA replication and imprinting, allele-specific replication was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with {lambda}-phage probes from the GABRB3/A5 region and a D15Z1 satellite probe to identify the parental origin of each chromosome. The replication kinetics of each allele was determined by using a flow sorter to fractionate mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes on the basis of cell cycle progression prior to FISH analysis. These kinetic studies reveal a 50-150 kb chromosomal domain extending from the middle of the GABRB3/A5 intergenic region into the GABRA5 5{prime}-UTR which displays maternal replication in early S with paternal replication delayed until the end of S. In contrast, genomic regions on either side of this maternal early replication domain exhibit the opposite pattern with paternal before maternal replication and both alleles replicating in the latter half of S. These results indicate that the GABRB3/A5 region is divided into domains in which replication timing is determined by parental origin. In addition to a loss of asynchronous replication, organization into replication timing domains is also lost in lymphocytes from maternal and paternal uniparental disomy 15 patients suggesting that a chromosome contribution from both parents is required for the establishment of the imprinted replication domains.

  20. QTL Analysis for Transgressive Resistance to Root-Knot Nematode in Interspecific Cotton (Gossypium spp.) Progeny Derived from Susceptible Parents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Mullens, Teresa R.; Yu, John Z.; Roberts, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    The southern root-knot nematode (RKN, Meloidogyne incognita) is a major soil-inhabiting plant parasite that causes significant yield losses in cotton (Gossypium spp.). Progeny from crosses between cotton genotypes susceptible to RKN produced segregants in subsequent populations which were highly resistant to this parasite. A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 138 lines developed from a cross between Upland cotton TM-1 (G. hirsutum L.) and Pima 3–79 (G. barbadense L.), both susceptible to RKN, was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) determining responses to RKN in greenhouse infection assays with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Compared to both parents, 53.6% and 52.1% of RILs showed less (P<0.05) root-galling index (GI) and had lower (P<0.05) nematode egg production (eggs per gram root, EGR). Highly resistant lines (transgressive segregants) were identified in this RIL population for GI and/or EGR in two greenhouse experiments. QTLs were identified using the single-marker analysis nonparametric mapping Kruskal-Wallis test. Four major QTLs located on chromosomes 3, 4, 11, and 17 were identified to account for 8.0 to 12.3% of the phenotypic variance (R2) in root-galling. Two major QTLs accounting for 9.7% and 10.6% of EGR variance were identified on chromosomes 14 and 23 (P<0.005), respectively. In addition, 19 putative QTLs (P<0.05) accounted for 4.5–7.7% of phenotypic variance (R2) in GI, and 15 QTLs accounted for 4.2–7.3% of phenotypic variance in EGR. In lines with alleles positive for resistance contributed by both parents in combinations of two to four QTLs, dramatic reductions of >50% in both GI and EGR were observed. The transgressive segregants with epistatic effects derived from susceptible parents indicate that high levels of nematode resistance in cotton may be attained by pyramiding positive alleles using a QTL mapping approach. PMID:22514682

  1. Effortful Control and Parenting: Associations with HPA Axis Reactivity in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryski, Katie R.; Dougherty, Lea R.; Dyson, Margaret W.; Olino, Thomas M.; Laptook, Rebecca S.; Klein, Daniel N.; Hayden, Elizabeth P.

    2013-01-01

    While activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is an adaptive response to stress, excessive HPA axis reactivity may be an important marker of childhood vulnerability to psychopathology. Parenting, including parent affect during parent-child interactions, may play an important role in shaping the developing HPA system; however,…

  2. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Pauline E; Berger, Frdric

    2010-03-01

    In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2) and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA) controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA) and PHERES1 (PHE1) controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis. PMID:20333248

  3. Population genetic structure of Oryza sativa in East and Southeast Asia and the discovery of elite alleles for grain traits

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaojing; Giang Tran Thi, Thu; Mawuli Edzesi, Wisdom; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Qiangming; Liu, Erbao; Wang, Yang; Qiang, Sheng; Liu, Linglong; Hong, Delin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes of 532 rice (Oryza sativa L.) accessions collected from East and Southeast Asia and detected abundant genetic diversity within the population. We identified 6 subpopulations and found a tendency towards directional evolution in O. sativa from low to high latitudes, with levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the 6 subpopulations ranging from 10 to 30 cM. We then investigated the phenotypic data for grain length, grain width, grain thickness and 1,000-grain weight over 4 years. Using a genome-wide association analysis, we identified 17 marker-trait associations involving 14 SSR markers on 12 chromosome arms, and 8 of the 17 associations were novel. The elite alleles were mined based on the phenotypic effects of the detected quantitative trait loci (QTLs). These elite alleles could be used to improve target traits through optimal cross designs, with the expected results obtained by pyramiding or substituting the elite alleles per QTL (independent of possible epistatic effects). Together, these results provide an in-depth understanding of the genetic diversity pattern among rice-grain traits across a broad geographic scale, which has potential use in future research work, including studies related to germplasm conservation and molecular breeding by design. PMID:26059752

  4. Allelic frequencies and association with carcass traits of six genes in local subpopulations of Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, Takahiro; Ibi, Takayuki; Siqintuya; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Akiyama, Takayuki; Yoshida, Emi; Imai, Kazumi; Matsui, Mayu; Uemura, Keiichi; Eto, Hisayoshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fujita, Tatsuo; Saito, Yosuke; Komatsu, Tomohiko; Hoshiba, Hiroshi; Mannen, Hideyuki; Sasazaki, Shinji; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is expected to accelerate the genetic improvement of Japanese Black cattle. However, verification of the effects of the genes for MAS in different subpopulations is required prior to the application of MAS. In this study, we investigated the allelic frequencies and genotypic effects for carcass traits of six genes, which can be used in MAS, in eight local subpopulations. These genes are SCD, FASN and SREBP1, which are associated with the fatty acid composition of meat, and NCAPG, MC1R and F11, which are associated with carcass weight, coat color and blood coagulation abnormality, respectively. The frequencies of desirable alleles of SCD and FASN were relatively high and that of NCAPG was relatively low, and NCAPG was significantly associated with several carcass traits, including carcass weight. The proportions of genotypic variance explained by NCAPG to phenotypic variance were 4.83 for carcass weight. We thus confirmed that NCAPG is a useful marker for selection of carcass traits in these subpopulations. In addition, we found that the desirable alleles of six genes showed no negative effects on carcass traits. Therefore, selection using these genes to improve target traits should not have negative impacts on carcass traits. PMID:26249527

  5. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish. PMID:26747053

  6. Bayesian Inference of Natural Selection from Allele Frequency Time Series.

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Joshua G; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2016-05-01

    The advent of accessible ancient DNA technology now allows the direct ascertainment of allele frequencies in ancestral populations, thereby enabling the use of allele frequency time series to detect and estimate natural selection. Such direct observations of allele frequency dynamics are expected to be more powerful than inferences made using patterns of linked neutral variation obtained from modern individuals. We developed a Bayesian method to make use of allele frequency time series data and infer the parameters of general diploid selection, along with allele age, in nonequilibrium populations. We introduce a novel path augmentation approach, in which we use Markov chain Monte Carlo to integrate over the space of allele frequency trajectories consistent with the observed data. Using simulations, we show that this approach has good power to estimate selection coefficients and allele age. Moreover, when applying our approach to data on horse coat color, we find that ignoring a relevant demographic history can significantly bias the results of inference. Our approach is made available in a C++ software package. PMID:27010022

  7. Characterisation of novel and rare Y-chromosome short tandem repeat alleles in self-declared South Australian Aboriginal database.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tegan E; Ottens, Renee; Ballantyne, Kaye N; Nagle, Nano; Henry, Julianne; Taylor, Duncan; Gardner, Michael G; Fitch, Alison J; Goodman, Amanda; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Mitchell, R John; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are used in forensic science laboratories all over the world, as their application is wide and often vital in solving casework. Analysis of an in-house database of South Australian self-declared Aboriginal males held by Forensic Science South Australia (FSSA) using the Applied Biosystem's AmpFℓSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit revealed 43 variant Y-STR alleles at 6 of the 17 loci. All variant alleles were sequenced to determine the exact repeat structure for each. As a high level of admixture has previously been found within the SA Aboriginal database, samples were haplogrouped using Y-SNPs to determine their likely geographical origin. Although a number of variant alleles were associated with non-Aboriginal Y-haplogroups, a high frequency was observed within the Australian K-M9 lineage. Detailed knowledge of these variant alleles may have further application in the development of new DNA markers for identification purposes, and in population and evolutionary studies of Australian Aborigines. PMID:24048501

  8. A Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Rad52 Allele Expressing a C-Terminal Truncation Protein: Activities and Intragenic Complementation of Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Boundy-Mills, K. L.; Livingston, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    A nonsense allele of the yeast RAD52 gene, rad52-327, which expresses the N-terminal 65% of the protein was compared to two missense alleles, rad52-1 and rad52-2, and to a deletion allele. While the rad52-1 and the deletion mutants have severe defects in DNA repair, recombination and sporulation, the rad52-327 and rad52-2 mutants retain either partial or complete capabilities in repair and recombination. These two mutants behave similarly in most tests of repair and recombination during mitotic growth. One difference between these two alleles is that a homozygous rad52-2 diploid fails to sporulate, whereas the homozygous rad52-327 diploid sporulates weakly. The low level of sporulation by the rad52-327 diploid is accompanied by a low percentage of spore viability. Among these viable spores the frequency of crossing over for markers along chromosome VII is the same as that found in wild-type spores. rad52-327 complements rad52-2 for repair and sporulation. Weaker intragenic complementation occurs between rad52-327 and rad52-1. PMID:8417987

  9. Mosaicism for FMR1 gene full mutation and intermediate allele in a female foetus: a postzygotic retraction event.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Susana Isabel; Pires, Luís Miguel; Ferrão, José; Sá, Joaquim; Serra, Armando; Carreira, Isabel Marques

    2013-09-15

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat in the 5'UTR of FMR1 gene. The occurrence of mosaicism is not uncommon, especially in male patients, whereas in females it is not so often reported. Here we report a female foetus that was subject to prenatal diagnosis, because of her mother being a premutation carrier. The foetus was identified as being a mosaic for an intermediate allele and a full mutation of FMR1 gene, in the presence of a normal allele. The mosaic status was confirmed in three different tissues of the foetus--amniotic fluid, skin biopsy and blood--the last two obtained after pregnancy termination. Karyotype analysis and X-chromosome STR markers analysis do not support the mosaicism as inheritance of both maternal alleles. Oligonucleotide array-CGH excluded an imbalance that could contain the primer binding site with a different repeat size. The obtained results give compelling evidence for a postzygotic expansion mechanism where the foetus mosaic pattern originated from expansion of the mother's premutation into a full mutation and consequent regression to an intermediate allele in a proportion of cells. These events occurred in early embryogenesis before the commitment of cells into the different tissues, as the three tested tissues of the foetus have the same mosaic pattern. The couple has a son with Fragile X mental retardation syndrome and choose to terminate this pregnancy after genetic counselling. PMID:23792063

  10. Effect of Glu-B3 allelic variation on sodium dodecyl sulfate sedimentation volume in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Si, Hongqi; Zhao, Manli; He, Fuxia; Ma, Chuanxi

    2013-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) sedimentation volume has long been used to characterize wheat flours and meals with the aim of predicting processing and end-product qualities. In order to survey the influence of low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GSs) at Glu-B3 locus on wheat SDS sedimentation volume, a total of 283 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties including landraces and improved and introduced cultivars were analyzed using 10 allele-specific PCR markers at the Glu-B3 locus. The highest allele frequency observed in the tested varieties was Glu-B3i with 21.9% in all varieties, 21.1% in landraces, 25.5% in improved cultivars, and 12% in introduced cultivars. Glu-B3 locus represented 8.6% of the variance in wheat SDS sedimentation volume, and Glu-B3b, Glu-B3g, and Glu-B3h significantly heightened the SDS sedimentation volume, but Glu-B3a, Glu-B3c, and Glu-B3j significantly lowered the SDS sedimentation volume. For the bread-making quality, the most desirable alleles Glu-B3b and Glu-B3g become more and more popular and the least desirable alleles Glu-B3a and Glu-B3c got less and less in modern improved cultivars, suggesting that wheat grain quality in China has been significantly improved through breeding effort. PMID:23861659

  11. Activation of the imprinted Polycomb Group Fie1 gene in maize endosperm requires demethylation of the maternal allele.

    PubMed

    Hermon, Pedro; Srilunchang, Kanok-orn; Zou, Jijun; Dresselhaus, Thomas; Danilevskaya, Olga N

    2007-07-01

    Imprinting refers to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression that is dependent upon gene inheritance from the maternal or paternal parent. Previously, we have identified two maize homologs of the single Arabidopsis Polycomb Group gene FIE. Here, we report on the expression pattern of these genes in individual gametes before and after fertilization, and on the role of DNA methylation in determining the maternal expression of the Fie1 gene. We found that Fie1 is neither expressed in the sperm, egg cell nor central cell before fertilization. Activation of the Fie1 maternal allele occurs around two days after pollination (DAP) in the primary endosperm and peaks at 10-11 DAP coinciding with endosperm transition from mitotic division to endoreduplication. In contrast, Fie2 is expressed in the egg cell and more intensively in the central cell similar to Arabidopsis FIE, which strongly supports the hypothesis that it functions as a repressor of endosperm development before fertilization. Using MSRE-PCR and bisulfite sequencing, we could show that the methylated inactive state is the default status of Fie1 in most tissues. In the endosperm the paternal Fie1 allele remains methylated and silent, but the maternal allele appears hypomethylated and active, explaining mono-allelic expression of Fie1 in the endosperm. Taking together, these data demonstrate that the regulation of Fie1 imprinting in maize is different from Arabidopsis and that Fie1 is likely to have acquired important novel functions for endosperm development. PMID:17437065

  12. Serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region: allele distributions in relationship to body weight and in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hinney, A; Barth, N; Ziegler, A; von Prittwitz, S; Hamann, A; Hennighausen, K; Pirke, K M; Heils, A; Rosenkranz, K; Roth, H; Coners, H; Mayer, H; Herzog, W; Siegfried, A; Lehmkuhl, G; Poustka, F; Schmidt, M H; Schäfer, H; Grzeschik, K H; Lesch, K P; Lentes, K U; Remschmidt, H; Hebebrand, J

    1997-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate a role for the serotonergic system in body weight regulation and eating disorders. The magnitude and duration of postsynaptic responses to serotonin (5-HT) is directed by the transport into and release from the presynaptic neuron. Recently, a common polymorphism of a repetitive element in the region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was identified that results in a system of two common alleles. The activity of the 5-HTT, as measured in in vitro assays and in human lymphoblastoid cell lines, is dependent on the respective genotype. We thus hypothesized that this polymorphism is relevant for weight regulation in general and is possibly involved in the etiology of anorexia nervosa (AN). Allele frequencies and genotypes were determined in a total of 385 unrelated obese children, adolescents and adults, 112 underweight subjects and 96 patients with AN. Furthermore, both parents of 98 obese children and adolescents and of 55 patients with AN, respectively, were genotyped, thus allowing to test for both association and linkage. The comparison of allele frequencies between obese and underweight probands provided no evidence for a major role of the 5-HTTLPR in weight regulation. Patients with AN had allele frequencies not significantly different to those observed for obese and underweight individuals. PMID:9395256

  13. Fostered and left behind alleles in peanut: interspecific QTL mapping reveals footprints of domestication and useful natural variation for breeding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Polyploidy can result in genetic bottlenecks, especially for species of monophyletic origin. Cultivated peanut is an allotetraploid harbouring limited genetic diversity, likely resulting from the combined effects of its single origin and domestication. Peanut wild relatives represent an important source of novel alleles that could be used to broaden the genetic basis of the cultigen. Using an advanced backcross population developed with a synthetic amphidiploid as donor of wild alleles, under two water regimes, we conducted a detailed QTL study for several traits involved in peanut productivity and adaptation as well as domestication. Results A total of 95 QTLs were mapped in the two water treatments. About half of the QTL positive effects were associated with alleles of the wild parent and several QTLs involved in yield components were specific to the water-limited treatment. QTLs detected for the same trait mapped to non-homeologous genomic regions, suggesting differential control in subgenomes as a consequence of polyploidization. The noteworthy clustering of QTLs for traits involved in seed and pod size and in plant and pod morphology suggests, as in many crops, that a small number of loci have contributed to peanut domestication. Conclusion In our study, we have identified QTLs that differentiated cultivated peanut from its wild relatives as well as wild alleles that contributed positive variation to several traits involved in peanut productivity and adaptation. These findings offer novel opportunities for peanut improvement using wild relatives. PMID:22340522

  14. Identification of individuals by analysis of biallelic DNA markers, using PCR and solid-phase minisequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, A C; Sajantila, A; Lukka, M

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a new method for forensic identification of individuals, in which a panel of biallelic DNA markers are amplified by the PCR, and the variable nucleotides are detected in the amplified DNA fragments by the solid-phase minisequencing method. A panel of 12 common polymorphic nucleotides located on different chromosomes with reported allele frequencies close to .5 were chosen for the test. The allele frequencies for most of the markers were found to be similar in the Finnish and other Caucasian populations. We also introduce a novel approach for rapid determination of the population frequencies of biallelic markers. By this approach we were able to determine the allele frequencies of the markers in the Finnish population, by quantitative analysis of three pooled DNA samples representing 3,000 individuals. The power of discrimination and exclusion of the solid-phase minisequencing typing test with 12 markers was similar to that of three VNTR markers that are routinely used in forensic analyses at our institute. The solid-phase minisequencing method was successfully applied to type paternity and forensic case samples. We also show that the quantitative nature of our method allows typing of mixed samples. PMID:8434605

  15. Parental licensure.

    PubMed

    Lykken, D T

    2001-11-01

    Most of the 1,400,000 men currently locked up in American prisons would have become tax-paying neighbors had they been switched in the hospital nursery and sent home with a mature, self-supporting, married couple. The parent with whom they did go home would in most instances not have been fit to adopt someone else's baby. It is argued that perhaps the only effective way to reduce crime and the other pathologies of the growing American underclass--apart from building still more prisons--would be to require from persons wishing to birth and rear a child of their own those same minimal criteria usually expected in adoptive parents. For evolutionary reasons, human beings are reluctant to interfere with the procreational rights of any person, no matter how immature, incompetent, or unsocialized he or she might be. In consequence, human beings tend not to think about the right of the child to a reasonable opportunity for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. PMID:11785157

  16. Identification of novel microsatellite markers <1 Mb from the HBB gene and development of a single-tube pentadecaplex PCR panel of highly polymorphic markers for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Tan, Arnold S C; Cheah, Felicia S H; Saw, Eugene E L; Chong, Samuel S

    2015-12-01

    Beta (?)-thalassemia is one of the most common monogenic diseases worldwide. Affected pregnancies can be avoided through preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), which commonly involves customized assays to detect the different combinations of ?-globin (HBB) gene mutations present in couples, in conjunction with linkage analysis of flanking microsatellite markers. Currently, the limited number of reported closely linked markers hampers their utility in indirect linkage-based PGD for this disorder. To increase the available markers closely flanking the HBB gene, an in silico search was performed to identify all markers within 1 Mb flanking the HBB gene. Fifteen markers with potentially high polymorphism information content (PIC) and heterozygosity values were selected and optimized into a single-tube pentadecaplex PCR panel. Allele frequencies and polymorphism and heterozygosity indices of each marker were assessed in five populations. A total of 238 alleles were observed from the 15 markers. PIC was >0.7 for all markers, with expected heterozygosity and observed heterozygosity values ranging from 0.74 to 0.90 and 0.72 to 0.88, respectively. Greater than 99% of individuals were heterozygous for at least seven markers, with at least two heterozygous markers on either side of the HBB gene. The pentadecaplex marker assay also performed reliably on single cells either directly or after whole genome amplification, thus validating its use in standalone linkage-based ?-thalassemia PGD or in conjunction with HBB mutation detection. PMID:26331357

  17. Allele frequencies of six STR loci in Argentine populations.

    PubMed

    Tourret, N; López Camelo, J; Vidal-Rioja, L

    1999-11-01

    Allele frequencies of six short tandem repeat (STR) loci were determined in a Caucasian urban sample of La Plata city and three Amerindian sample populations of Argentina. Allele frequencies showed differences between urbans and Amerindians, and among Amerindians as well. The degree of genetic differentiation of subpopulations was mainly due to the Amerindian contribution. Mapuche, Mocovi, and pooled Amerindian populations showed little evidence of HW disequilibrium, and association of alleles. In the urban sample, there is no evidence of population substructuring. Forensic probabilities of exclusion and matching showed high differences between the population groups. Finally, La Plata sample did not show differences with Caucasians from other geographic regions. PMID:10582366

  18. Development of Seven Microsatellite Markers Using Next Generation Sequencing for the Conservation on the Korean Population of Dorcus hopei (E. Saunders, 1854) (Coleoptera, Lucanidae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hwa; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun Jae

    2015-01-01

    We developed microsatellite markers for genetic structural analyses of Dorcus hopei, a stag beetle species, using next generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping for regional populations. A total of 407,070,351 base pairs of genomic DNA containing >4000 microsatellite loci except AT repeats were sequenced. From 76 loci selected for primer design, 27 were polymorphic. Of these 27 markers, 10 were tested on three regional populations: two Chinese (Shichuan and Guangxi) and one Korean (Wanju). Three markers were excluded due to inconsistent amplification, genotyping errors, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). By multi-locus genotyping, the allele number, observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content of seven microsatellite loci were ranged 2-10, 0.1333-1.0000, and 0.1228-0.8509, respectively. In an analysis on the genetic differentiation among regional populations including one Japanese population and one cross-breeding population, the individual colored bar-plots showed that both Chinese populations were closer to each other than to the Far East Asian populations. In Far East Asian populations, Wanju and Nirasaki populations could not be distinguished from each other because the frequency of genetic contents was very similar in some individuals of two populations. Moreover, the cross-breeding population contained all patterns of genetic contents shown in Chinese, Korean, and Japanese populations, compared with the genetic content frequency of each regional population. As a result, we examined whether the cross-breeding population might be a hybrid population, and might contain a possibility of interbreeding with Chinese populations in parental generations. Therefore, these markers will be useful for analyses of genetic diversity in populations, genetic relationships between regional populations, genetic structure analyses, and origin tests. PMID:26370965

  19. Development of Seven Microsatellite Markers Using Next Generation Sequencing for the Conservation on the Korean Population of Dorcus hopei (E. Saunders, 1854) (Coleoptera, Lucanidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Hwa; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun Jae

    2015-01-01

    We developed microsatellite markers for genetic structural analyses of Dorcus hopei, a stag beetle species, using next generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping for regional populations. A total of 407,070,351 base pairs of genomic DNA containing >4000 microsatellite loci except AT repeats were sequenced. From 76 loci selected for primer design, 27 were polymorphic. Of these 27 markers, 10 were tested on three regional populations: two Chinese (Shichuan and Guangxi) and one Korean (Wanju). Three markers were excluded due to inconsistent amplification, genotyping errors, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). By multi-locus genotyping, the allele number, observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content of seven microsatellite loci were ranged 2‒10, 0.1333‒1.0000, and 0.1228‒0.8509, respectively. In an analysis on the genetic differentiation among regional populations including one Japanese population and one cross-breeding population, the individual colored bar-plots showed that both Chinese populations were closer to each other than to the Far East Asian populations. In Far East Asian populations, Wanju and Nirasaki populations could not be distinguished from each other because the frequency of genetic contents was very similar in some individuals of two populations. Moreover, the cross-breeding population contained all patterns of genetic contents shown in Chinese, Korean, and Japanese populations, compared with the genetic content frequency of each regional population. As a result, we examined whether the cross-breeding population might be a hybrid population, and might contain a possibility of interbreeding with Chinese populations in parental generations. Therefore, these markers will be useful for analyses of genetic diversity in populations, genetic relationships between regional populations, genetic structure analyses, and origin tests. PMID:26370965

  20. A genetic linkage map of the Durum x Triticum dicoccoides backcross population based on SSRs and AFLP markers, and QTL analysis for milling traits.

    PubMed

    Elouafi, I; Nachit, M M

    2004-02-01

    Durum wheat ( Triticum turgidum L. var durum) is mainly produced and consumed in the Mediterranean region; it is used to produce several specific end-products; such as local pasta, couscous and burghul. To study the genetics of grain-milling quality traits, chromosomal locations, and interaction with the environment, a genetic linkage map of durum was constructed and the quantitative trait loci QTLs for the milling-related traits, test weight (TW) and thousand-kernel weight (TKW), were identified. The population constituted 114 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross: Omrabi 5 /Triticum dicoccoides 600545// Omrabi 5. TW and TKW were analyzed over 18 environments (sites x years). Single-sequence-repeat markers (SSRs), Amplified-fragment-length-polymorphism markers (AFLPs), and seed storage proteins (SSPs) showed a high level of polymorphism (>60%). The map was constructed with 124 SSRs, 149 AFLPs and 6 SSPs; its length covered 2,288.8 cM (8.2 cM/marker). The map showed high synteny with previous wheat maps, and both SSRs and AFLPs mapped evenly across the genome, with more markers in the B genome. However, some rearrangements were observed. For TW, a high genotypic effect was detected and two QTLs with epistasic effect were identified on 7AS and 6BS, explaining 30% of the total variation. The TKW showed a significant transgressive inheritance and five QTLs were identified, explaining 32% of the total variation, out of which 25% was of a genetic nature, and showing QTLxE interaction. The major TKW-QTLs were around the centromere region of 6B. For both traits, Omrabi 5 alleles had a significant positive effect. This population will be used to determine other QTLs of interest, as its parents are likely to harbor different genes for diseases and drought tolerance. PMID:14676946

  1. Parental Influences on Adolescent Adjustment: Parenting Styles Versus Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Min; Daniels, M. Harry; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    The study identified distinct patterns of parental practices that differentially influence adolescent behavior using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey (NELS:88) database. Following Brenner and Fox's research model (1999), the cluster analysis was used to classify the four types of parental practices. The clusters of parenting practices

  2. Parental Influences on Adolescent Adjustment: Parenting Styles Versus Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Min; Daniels, M. Harry; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    The study identified distinct patterns of parental practices that differentially influence adolescent behavior using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey (NELS:88) database. Following Brenner and Fox's research model (1999), the cluster analysis was used to classify the four types of parental practices. The clusters of parenting practices…

  3. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Alleles Alter HIV Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kumud K.; Qin, Min; Brummel, Sean S.; Angelidou, Konstantia; Trout, Rodney N.; Fenton, Terence; Spector, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background HLA class I molecules are ligands for killer cell immunoglobin like receptors (KIR) that control the antiviral response of natural killer (NK) cells. However, the effects of KIR and HLA (KIR/HLA) alleles on HIV disease of children have not been studied. Methods 993 antiretroviral naïve children with symptomatic HIV infection from PACTG protocols P152 and P300 were genotyped for KIR and HLA alleles using the Luminex platform. Linear regression was used to test the association between genotypes and baseline pre-ART HIV RNA, CD4+ lymphocyte count, and cognitive score, adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and study. The interaction between genetic markers and age was investigated. To account for multiple testing the false discovery rate (FDR) was controlled at 0.05. Results Children with the KIR2DS4*ALL FULL LENGTH (KIR2DS4*AFL) allele had higher CD4+ lymphocyte counts. Among children ≤2 years of age, the KIR2DS4*AFL was associated with lower plasma HIV RNA and higher cognitive index scores. KIR Cent2DS3/5_1 had lower CD4+ lymphocyte counts in children ≤2 years of age, while the presence of Tel1, Tel2DS4_2, Tel2DS4_4, Tel8, Tel2DS4_6 had higher CD4+ lymphocyte counts in all children. Presence of Cent2, Cent4 and Cent8 was associated with increased HIV RNA load in children ≤2 years. Presence of KIR3DL1+Bw4 was associated with higher CD4+ lymphocyte counts in all children. Among children >2 years old, KIR3DS1+Bw4-80I was associated with higher plasma HIV RNA, and Bw6/Bw6 was associated with lower plasma HIV RNA compared to children with KIR3DS1+Bw4-80I. Conclusions Presented data show for the first time that specific KIR alleles independently or combined with HLA ligands are associated with HIV RNA and CD4+ lymphocyte counts in infected, antiretroviral naive children; and many of these effect estimates appear to be age dependent. These data support a role for specific KIR alleles in HIV pathogenesis in children. PMID:26983081

  4. Reward Region Responsivity Predicts Future Weight Gain and Moderating Effects of the TaqIA Allele

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Kyle S.; Yokum, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Because no large prospective study has investigated neural vulnerability factors that predict future weight gain, we tested whether neural response to receipt and anticipated receipt of palatable food and monetary reward predicted body fat gain over a 3-year follow-up in healthy-weight adolescent humans and whether the TaqIA polymorphism moderates these relations. A total of 153 adolescents completed fMRI paradigms assessing response to these events; body fat was assessed annually over follow-up. Elevated orbitofrontal cortex response to cues signaling impending milkshake receipt predicted future body fat gain (r = 0.32), which is a novel finding that provides support for the incentive sensitization theory of obesity. Neural response to receipt and anticipated receipt of monetary reward did not predict body fat gain, which has not been tested previously. Replicating an earlier finding (Stice et al., 2008a), elevated caudate response to milkshake receipt predicted body fat gain for adolescents with a genetic propensity for greater dopamine signaling by virtue of possessing the TaqIA A2/A2 allele, but lower caudate response predicted body fat gain for adolescents with a genetic propensity for less dopamine signaling by virtue of possessing a TaqIA A1 allele, though this interaction was only marginal [p-value <0.05 corrected using voxel-level familywise error rate (pFWE) = 0.06]. Parental obesity, which correlated with TaqIA allele status (odds ratio = 2.7), similarly moderated the relation of caudate response to milkshake receipt to future body fat gain, which is another novel finding. The former interaction implies that too much or too little dopamine signaling and reward region responsivity increases risk for overeating, suggesting qualitatively distinct reward surfeit and reward deficit pathways to obesity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Because no large prospective study has investigated neural vulnerability factors that predict future weight gain we tested whether neural response to receipt and anticipated receipt of palatable food and monetary reward predicted body fat gain over 3-year follow-up in healthy-weight adolescent humans and whether the TaqIA polymorphism moderates these relations. Elevated reward activation in response to food cues predicted future body fat gain. Elevated reward response to food receipt predicted body fat gain for adolescents with a TaqIA A2/A2 allele and lower reward response predicted body fat gain for those with a TaqIA A1 allele. Results imply that too much or too little dopamine signaling and reward region responsivity increases risk for overeating. PMID:26180206

  5. Teens Parenting Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Jeanne Warren; Brunelli, Jean; McCullough, Sally

    Noting that specialized educational programs for teen parents should address the teen parents' needs for knowledge about self-development, pregnancy, parenting, and economic independence as well as problem solving and interpersonal skills, this series of guides for school-age parents and the parent educators working with such teens provides a…

  6. Parenting and Video Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinkuehler, Constance

    2016-01-01

    There is a terrific disconnect between parenting advice related to media and the realities of contemporary parenting. We condone enrichment parenting and condemn the use of "digital babysitters," admonishing parents who exceed the two-hour screen time limitation even when, all the while, no one is listening. Parents are not merely blasé…

  7. Involving Divorced Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarriff, Harold M.; Levine, Valerie

    1993-01-01

    In divorced families, the noncustodial parent is usually as important to the child as the residential parent. Schools should avoid actions that cause parental conflict, place one parent in a sole decision-making role, or deny a parent's access to information or involvement. School responsibilities governing routine correspondence, cyclical and…

  8. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

  9. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

  10. Parenting and Child DRD4 Genotype Interact to Predict Childrens Early Emerging Effortful Control

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather J.; Sheikh, Haroon I.; Dyson, Margaret W.; Olino, Thomas M.; Laptook, Rebecca S.; Durbin, C. Emily; Hayden, Elizabeth P.; Singh, Shiva M.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2012-01-01

    Effortful control (EC), or the trait-like capacity to regulate dominant responses, has important implications for childrens development. Although genetic factors and parenting likely influence EC, few studies have examined whether they interact to predict its development. The current study examined whether the DRD4 exon III variable number tandem repeat polymorphism moderated the relationship between parenting and childrens EC. A total of 382 three-year-olds and primary caregivers completed behavioural tasks assessing childrens EC and parenting. Childrens DRD4 genotypes moderated the relationship between parenting and EC: children with at least one 7-repeat allele displayed lower EC in the context of negative parenting than children without this allele. These findings suggest opportunities for modifying early risk for low EC. PMID:22862680

  11. Genetic diversity analysis in the section Caulorrhizae (genus Arachis) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Darío A; Bechara, Marcelo D; Curi, Rogério A; Monteiro, Jomar P; Valente, Sérgio E S; Gimenes, Marcos A; Lopes, Catalina R

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in 26 microsatellite loci from section Caulorrhizae germplasm was evaluated by using 33 accessions of A. pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Gregory and ten accessions of Arachis repens Handro. Twenty loci proved to be polymorphic and a total of 196 alleles were detected with an average of 9.8 alleles per locus. The variability found in those loci was greater than the variability found using morphological characters, seed storage proteins and RAPD markers previously used in this germplasm. The high potential of these markers to detect species-specific alleles and discriminate among accessions was demonstrated. The set of microsatellite primer pairs developed by our group for A. pintoi are useful molecular tools for evaluating Section Caulorrhizae germplasm, as well as that of species belonging to other Arachis sections. PMID:21637613

  12. Seventy microsatellite markers from Persea americana Miller (avocado) expressed sequence tags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for Persea americana Mill. were investigated to expand upon the number of informative microsatellite markers available for avocado. Seventy informative loci were discovered using twenty-four P. americana var. americana Mill. accessions. The number of alleles detected r...

  13. Establishment of codominant markers for rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single nucleotide length polymorphism (SNLP) was identified at the intron region of the Pi-ta gene to develop a codominant Pi-ta gene marker suitable for genotyping with an ABI automated machine. The DNA primer specific to the resistance Pi-ta allele was labeled with the blue dye as a forward pr...

  14. Establishment of codominant marker for rice blast resistance gene pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single nucleotide length polymorphism (SNLP) was identified at the intron region of the Pi-ta gene to develop a codominant Pi-ta gene marker suitable for genotyping with an ABI automated machine. The DNA primer specific to the resistance Pi-ta allele was labeled with the blue dye as a forward pr...

  15. Genetic characterization of guava (psidium guajava l.) Germplasm in the United States using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity of thirty five Psidium guajava accessions maintained at the USDA, National Plants Germplasm System, Hilo, HI, was characterized using 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Diversity analysis detected a total of 178 alleles ranging from four to 16. The observed mean heterozygosit...

  16. UPIC: Perl scripts to determine the number of SSR markers to run

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed Perl Scripts for the cost-effective planning of fingerprinting and genotyping experiments. The UPIC scripts detect the best combination of polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and provide coefficients of the amount of information obtainable (number of alleles of patter...

  17. Development of soybean aphid genomic SSR markers using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are very useful molecular markers due to locus-specific co-dominant and multi-allelic nature, high abundance in the genome, and high rates of transferability across species. The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) has become the most damaging in...

  18. MAOA, Early Experiences of Harsh Parenting, Irritable Opposition, and Bullying-Victimization: A Moderated Indirect-Effects Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Yvonne M.; Kretschmer, Tina; Barker, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Harsh parenting and child characteristics such as opposition and aggression have been found to relate to bullying, victimization, and bullying-victimization, yet not all children display equal vulnerability to harsh parenting. The monoamine oxidase A gene ("MAOA"; "low-activity" variant) may be a key vulnerability allele as it…

  19. MAPPING PHYSIOLOGICAL TRAITS IN CARICA PAPAYA USING MICROSATELLITE MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different varieties of papaya (Carica papaya L.) vary in the phenotypic expression of agronomically important traits. Genetic loci responsible for these differences can be mapped using DNA markers to genotype a segregating progeny population derived from a controlled cross between parents having dif...

  20. Evaluation of approaches for identifying population informative markers from high density SNP Chips