Science.gov

Sample records for parental marker alleles

  1. Marker assisted accelerated introgression of null allele of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Rani, Anita; Rawal, Reena; Mourya, Vaishali

    2015-01-01

    Development of kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI)-free soybean is crucial for soy-food industry as the heat inactivation employed to inactivate the anti-nutritional factor in regular soybean incurs extra cost and affects protein solubility. In the presented work, a null allele of KTI from PI542044 was introgressed into cultivar ‘JS97-52’ (recurrent parent) through marker assisted backcrossing. Foreground selection in BC1F2, BC2F2 and BC3F2 was carried out using the null allele-specific marker in tandem with SSR marker Satt228, tightly linked with a trypsin inhibitor Ti locus. Background selection in null allele-carrying plants through 106 polymorphic SSR markers across the genome led to the identification of 9 KTI-free lines exhibiting 98.6% average recurrent parent genome content (RPGC) after three backcrosses, which otherwise had required 5–6 backcrosses through conventional method. Introgressed lines (ILs) were free from KTI and yielded at par with recurrent parent. Reduction of 68.8–83.5% in trypsin inhibitor content (TIC) in ILs compared to the recurrent parent (‘JS97-52’) was attributed to the elimination of KTI. PMID:26719748

  2. Study on the application of parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guisen; Yang, Qingen; Huang, Daixin; Yu, Chunying; Yang, Rongzhi; Chen, Hui; Mei, Kun

    2005-11-25

    In paternity test, especially in motherless cases, the allele inherited from father (obligatory gene, OG) often cannot be determined. The paternity exclusion probability (PE) of a genetic marker is reduced considerably. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new technique, by which the parental origin of alleles can be determined without genealogical analysis. In this paper, we explored the possibility of using parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to determine the parental origin of alleles, choosing the imprinted single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) locus rs220028 (A/G) as a model system. We typed the SNP by mutagenically separated PCR (MS-PCR). The frequencies of alleles were A = 0.5085, G = 0.4915; the unbiased heterozygosity was 0.5020. In order to discriminate between the maternal allele and paternal allele, post-digestion MS-PCR, a novel PCR based methylation analysis and SNP typing technique was developed and performed on 18 heterozygous children, and the methylated maternal allele was detected specifically. As a pilot study on the use of epigenetic markers in forensic genetics, our results demonstrated the feasibility of using parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to determine the parental origin of alleles. PMID:16182958

  3. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-01-01

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population. PMID:25966202

  4. Assessing parent numbers from offspring genotypes: the importance of marker polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Sefc, Kristina M; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Methods to infer parent numbers from offspring genotypes either determine the minimum number of parents required to explain alleles and multilocus genotypes detected in the offspring or use models to incorporate information on population allele frequencies and allele segregation. Disparate results by different approaches suggest that one or perhaps all methods are subject to bias. Here, we investigate the performance of minimum parent number estimates, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses (programs COLONY and PARENTAGE) with respect to marker information content in simulated data sets without knowledge of parental genotypes. Offspring families of different sizes were assumed to share one parent and to be sired by 1 or 5 additional parents. All methods committed large errors in terms of underestimation (minimum value) and overestimation (COLONY), or both (PARENTAGE) of parent numbers, unless the data were highly informative, and their relative performances depended on full-sib group sizes and sire numbers. Increasing the number of markers with low gene diversity (H(e) < or = 0.68) yielded only slow improvement of the results, but all 3 methods performed well with 5-7 markers of H(e) = 0.84. We emphasize the importance of high marker polymorphism for inferring parent numbers and individual parent contributions, as well as for the detection of monogamous reproduction. PMID:18984859

  5. Development of ?-Carotene Rich Maize Hybrids through Marker-Assisted Introgression of ?-carotene hydroxylase Allele

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Vignesh; Hossain, Firoz; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Choudhary, Mukesh; Saha, Supradip; Bhat, Jayant S.; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Gupta, Hari S.

    2014-01-01

    Development of vitamin A-rich cereals can help in alleviating the widespread problem of vitamin A deficiency. We report here significant enhancement of kernel ?-carotene in elite maize genotypes through accelerated marker-assisted backcross breeding. A favourable allele (543 bp) of the ?-carotene hydroxylase (crtRB1) gene was introgressed in the seven elite inbred parents, which were low (1.4 µg/g) in kernel ?-carotene, by using a crtRB1-specific DNA marker for foreground selection. About 90% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in the selected progenies within two backcross generations. Concentration of ?-carotene among the crtRB1-introgressed inbreds varied from 8.6 to 17.5 µg/g - a maximum increase up to 12.6-fold over recurrent parent. The reconstituted hybrids developed from improved parental inbreds also showed enhanced kernel ?-carotene as high as 21.7 µg/g, compared to 2.6 µg/g in the original hybrid. The reconstituted hybrids evaluated at two locations possessed similar grain yield to that of original hybrids. These ?-carotene enriched high yielding hybrids can be effectively utilized in the maize biofortification programs across the globe. PMID:25486271

  6. Parental allelic variation at COL6A1 and congenital heart defects in trisomy 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kessling, A.M.; Howard, C.M.; Farrer, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Overt congenital heart defects (CHD) affect over 40% of newborns with Down syndrome. On the hypothesis that genetic variation on chromosome 21 determines this clinical variability, we studied a CHD candidate locus (COL6A1) on 21q22.3. We studied three RFLP loci in COL6A1 in 37 families of known British/Irish population of ancestral origin, and in population-matched controls. Each family had a child with trisomy 21 with or without accompanying congenital heart defect (CHD). Parental and meiotic origin of nondisjunction were determined using peri-centromeric markers. For the analysis, we considered groups of families with trisomic children with and without CHD, and subsets of nondisjoining and disjoining parents. Parental genotypes at nine control RFLP loci on chromosome 21 showed no association with CHD in the trisomic child. By contrast, parental genotypes at all three individual RFLP loci within COL6A1 showed statistically significant association with the trisomic child`s CHD status. Pairwise consideration of these loci in groups of families of trisomic children with and without CHD showed subsets of nondisjoining and disjoining parents to have different linkage disequilibrium patterns at these loci than population-matched controls. This suggests that the COL6A1 alleles of the parents are not representative of the population as a whole. Consideration of all three loci together as haplotypes supports this conclusion. Four results suggest that a functional mutation within, or in linkage disequilibrium with COL6A1 influences CHD outcome in trisomy 21.

  7. Foundation characteristics of edible Musa triploids revealed from allelic distribution of SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Hippolyte, I.; Jenny, C.; Gardes, L.; Bakry, F.; Rivallan, R.; Pomies, V.; Cubry, P.; Tomekpe, K.; Risterucci, A. M.; Roux, N.; Rouard, M.; Arnaud, E.; Kolesnikova-Allen, M.; Perrier, X.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The production of triploid banana and plantain (Musa spp.) cultivars with improved characteristics (e.g. greater disease resistance or higher yield), while still preserving the main features of current popular cultivars (e.g. taste and cooking quality), remains a major challenge for Musa breeders. In this regard, breeders require a sound knowledge of the lineage of the current sterile triploid cultivars, to select diploid parents that are able to transmit desirable traits, together with a breeding strategy ensuring final triploidization and sterility. Highly polymorphic single sequence repeats (SSRs) are valuable markers for investigating phylogenetic relationships. Methods Here, the allelic distribution of each of 22 SSR loci across 561 Musa accessions is analysed. Key Results and Conclusions We determine the closest diploid progenitors of the triploid ‘Cavendish’ and ‘Gros Michel’ subgroups, valuable information for breeding programmes. Nevertheless, in establishing the likely monoclonal origin of the main edible triploid banana subgroups (i.e. ‘Cavendish’, ‘Plantain’ and ‘Mutika-Lujugira’), we postulated that the huge phenotypic diversity observed within these subgroups did not result from gamete recombination, but rather from epigenetic regulations. This emphasizes the need to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of genome expression on a unique model in the plant kingdom. We also propose experimental standards to compare additional and independent genotyping data for reference. PMID:22323428

  8. On coding genotypes for genetic markers with multiple alleles in genetic association study of quantitative traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In genetic association study of quantitative traits using F? models, how to code the marker genotypes and interpret the model parameters appropriately is important for constructing hypothesis tests and making statistical inferences. Currently, the coding of marker genotypes in building F? models has mainly focused on the biallelic case. A thorough work on the coding of marker genotypes and interpretation of model parameters for F? models is needed especially for genetic markers with multiple alleles. Results In this study, we will formulate F? genetic models under various regression model frameworks and introduce three genotype coding schemes for genetic markers with multiple alleles. Starting from an allele-based modeling strategy, we first describe a regression framework to model the expected genotypic values at given markers. Then, as extension from the biallelic case, we introduce three coding schemes for constructing fully parameterized one-locus F? models and discuss the relationships between the model parameters and the expected genotypic values. Next, under a simplified modeling framework for the expected genotypic values, we consider several reduced one-locus F? models from the three coding schemes on the estimability and interpretation of their model parameters. Finally, we explore some extensions of the one-locus F? models to two loci. Several fully parameterized as well as reduced two-locus F? models are addressed. Conclusions The genotype coding schemes provide different ways to construct F? models for association testing of multi-allele genetic markers with quantitative traits. Which coding scheme should be applied depends on how convenient it can provide the statistical inferences on the parameters of our research interests. Based on these F? models, the standard regression model fitting tools can be used to estimate and test for various genetic effects through statistical contrasts with the adjustment for environmental factors. PMID:21936918

  9. A combined analysis of D22S278 marker alleles in affected sib-pairs: Support for a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at chromosome 22q12

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Vallada, H.; Collier, D.

    1996-02-16

    Several groups have reported weak evidence for linkage between schizophrenia and genetic markers located on chromosome 22q using the lod score method of analysis. However these findings involved different genetic markers and methods of analysis, and so were not directly comparable. To resolve this issue we have performed a combined analysis of genotypic data from the marker D22S278 in multiply affected schizophrenic families derived from 11 independent research groups worldwide. This marker was chosen because it showed maximum evidence for linkage in three independent datasets. Using the affected sib-pair method as implemented by the program ESPA, the combined dataset showed 252 alleles shared compared with 188 alleles not shared (chi-square 9.31, 1df, P = 0.001) where parental genotype data was completely known. When sib-pairs for whom parental data was assigned according to probability were included the number of alleles shared was 514.1 compared with 437.8 not shared (chi-square 6.12, 1df, P = 0.006). Similar results were obtained when a likelihood ratio method for sib-pair analysis was used. These results indicate that there may be a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at 22q12. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Regulatory Divergence between Parental Alleles Determines Gene Expression Patterns in Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Hueber, Yann; Dereeper, Alexis; Rialle, Stéphanie; Herrera, Juan-Carlos; Lashermes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Both hybridization and allopolyploidization generate novel phenotypes by conciliating divergent genomes and regulatory networks in the same cellular context. To understand the rewiring of gene expression in hybrids, the total expression of 21,025 genes and the allele-specific expression of over 11,000 genes were quantified in interspecific hybrids and their parental species, Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides using RNA-seq technology. Between parental species, cis- and trans-regulatory divergences affected around 32% and 35% of analyzed genes, respectively, with nearly 17% of them showing both. The relative importance of trans-regulatory divergences between both species could be related to their low genetic divergence and perennial habit. In hybrids, among divergently expressed genes between parental species and hybrids, 77% was expressed like one parent (expression level dominance), including 65% like C. eugenioides. Gene expression was shown to result from the expression of both alleles affected by intertwined parental trans-regulatory factors. A strong impact of C. eugenioides trans-regulatory factors on the upregulation of C. canephora alleles was revealed. The gene expression patterns appeared determined by complex combinations of cis- and trans-regulatory divergences. In particular, the observed biased expression level dominance seemed to be derived from the asymmetric effects of trans-regulatory parental factors on regulation of alleles. More generally, this study illustrates the effects of divergent trans-regulatory parental factors on the gene expression pattern in hybrids. The characteristics of the transcriptional response to hybridization appear to be determined by the compatibility of gene regulatory networks and therefore depend on genetic divergences between the parental species and their evolutionary history. PMID:25819221

  11. High-Resolution Analysis of Parent-of-Origin Allelic Expression in the Arabidopsis Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Roszak, Pawel; Beisel, Christian; Donoghue, Mark T. A.; Spillane, Charles; Nordborg, Magnus; Rehmsmeier, Marc; Köhler, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon leading to parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. In plants, genomic imprinting has mainly been observed in the endosperm, an ephemeral triploid tissue derived after fertilization of the diploid central cell with a haploid sperm cell. In an effort to identify novel imprinted genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we generated deep sequencing RNA profiles of F1 hybrid seeds derived after reciprocal crosses of Arabidopsis Col-0 and Bur-0 accessions. Using polymorphic sites to quantify allele-specific expression levels, we could identify more than 60 genes with potential parent-of-origin specific expression. By analyzing the distribution of DNA methylation and epigenetic marks established by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins using publicly available datasets, we suggest that for maternally expressed genes (MEGs) repression of the paternally inherited alleles largely depends on DNA methylation or PcG-mediated repression, whereas repression of the maternal alleles of paternally expressed genes (PEGs) predominantly depends on PcG proteins. While maternal alleles of MEGs are also targeted by PcG proteins, such targeting does not cause complete repression. Candidate MEGs and PEGs are enriched for cis-proximal transposons, suggesting that transposons might be a driving force for the evolution of imprinted genes in Arabidopsis. In addition, we find that MEGs and PEGs are significantly faster evolving when compared to other genes in the genome. In contrast to the predominant location of mammalian imprinted genes in clusters, cluster formation was only detected for few MEGs and PEGs, suggesting that clustering is not a major requirement for imprinted gene regulation in Arabidopsis. PMID:21698132

  12. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Sugarcane Parents in Chinese Breeding Programmes Using gSSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    You, Qian; Xu, Liping; Zheng, Yifeng; Que, Youxiong

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane is the most important sugar and bioenergy crop in the world. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 115 sugarcane genotypes used for parental crossing were genotyped based on five genomic simple sequence repeat marker (gSSR) loci and 88 polymorphic alleles of loci (100%) as detected by capillary electrophoresis. The values of genetic diversity parameters across the populations indicate that the genetic variation intrapopulation (90.5%) was much larger than that of interpopulation (9.5%). Cluster analysis revealed that there were three groups termed as groups I, II, and III within the 115 genotypes. The genotypes released by each breeding programme showed closer genetic relationships, except the YC series released by Hainan sugarcane breeding station. Using principle component analysis (PCA), the first and second principal components accounted for a cumulative 76% of the total variances, in which 43% were for common parents and 33% were for new parents, respectively. The knowledge obtained in this study should be useful to future breeding programs for increasing genetic diversity of sugarcane varieties and cultivars to meet the demand of sugarcane cultivation for sugar and bioenergy use. PMID:23990759

  13. 68 MOLECULAR GENETIC MARKERS Fig. 1. Mendelian inheritance of the Pstl RFLP alleles at the ovine AT3 locus.

    E-print Network

    Kocher, Thomas D.

    68 MOLECULAR GENETIC MARKERS o -- A1 Fig. 1. Mendelian inheritance of the Pstl RFLP alleles/Al and A1/A2 animals. pKT218 vector. The plasmid clone, pATIII-2/ was obtained from the American Type Science and Technology. References 1 Prochownik E.V. et al. (1983) J Biol Ghem 258, 8389-94. 2 Barendse W

  14. Citrus (Rutaceae) SNP markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; transferability across the Aurantioideae subfamily1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lor, Andres; Ancillo, Gema; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar) were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characterization. • Methods and Results: Forty-two SNP markers were developed using KASPar technology. Forty-one were successfully genotyped in all of the Citrus germplasm, where intra- and interspecific polymorphisms were observed. The transferability and diversity decreased with increasing taxonomic distance. • Conclusions: SNP markers based on the KASPar method developed from sequence data of a limited intrageneric discovery panel provide a valuable molecular resource for genetic diversity analysis of germplasm within a genus and should be useful for germplasm fingerprinting at a much broader diversity level. PMID:25202535

  15. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in the equine genome 

    E-print Network

    Mathiason, Kelli Janae

    1997-01-01

    Nine microsatellite markers were isolated from a horse genomic library in lambda bacteriophage. The markers were typed by PCR in 72 horses representing 14 breeds and in 36 parental animals of two Arabian half-sib families. Number of alleles...

  16. Genetic mapping, marker assisted selection and allelic relationships for the Pu6 gene conferring rust resistance in sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Bulos, Mariano; Vergani, Pablo Nicolas; Altieri, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Rust resistance in the sunflower line P386 is controlled by Pu6, a gene which was reported to segregate independently from other rust resistant genes, such as R4. The objectives of this work were to map Pu6, to provide and validate molecular tools for its identification, and to determine the linkage relationship of Pu6 and R4. Genetic mapping of Pu6 with six markers covered 24.8 cM of genetic distance on the lower end of linkage Group 13 of the sunflower consensus map. The marker most closely linked to Pu6 was ORS316 at 2.5 cM in the distal position. ORS316 presented five alleles when was assayed with a representative set of resistant and susceptible lines. Allelism test between Pu6 and R4 indicated that both genes are linked at a genetic distance of 6.25 cM. This is the first confirmation based on an allelism test that at least two members of the Radv/R4/R11/ R13a/R13b/Pu6 cluster of genes are at different loci. A fine elucidation of the architecture of this complex locus will allow designing and constructing completely new genomic regions combining genes from different resistant sources and the elimination of the linkage drag around each resistant gene. PMID:25320555

  17. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Perry, John R B; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davey Smith, George; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco E J; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth J F; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K

    2014-10-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P?parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and ?-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  18. Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J. Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coveillo, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D’adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco EJ; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul DP; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth JF; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild IA; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10?8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  19. New Markers from Sugar Metabolism ESTs: Tagging Positive Alleles from Saccharum spontaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited genetic gains, obtained from breeding for sugar content in different breeding programs worldwide suggest that a plateau has been reached for this trait. One way to overcome this obstacle would be to identify and introduce into commercial germplasm alternative alleles controlling sugar metab...

  20. Helicobacter pylori: correlation of the virulence marker iceA allele with clinical outcome in a high prevalence area.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, J; Abbas, Z; Khan, R; Salim, S A; Abrar, A; Awan, S; Ahmad, Z

    2015-01-01

    The association of Helicobacter pylori virulence marker 'induced by contact with epithelium A' (iceA) allele types was determined in H. pylori-related diseases and virulence markers. Gastric biopsies were obtained at EGD from patients for culture, histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for iceA types, cagA and vacA alleles. Two hundred and eighty-four H. pylori isolates were examined. iceA type 1 was positive in 177 (62%) and iceA type 2 in 158 (56%). In iceA type 2, gastric ulcer was present in 34 (21%) (P < 0.001) and carcinoma in 28 (25%) (P = 0.002), compared to nine (8%) and 2 (2%) in iceA type 2-negative cases. For iceA type 2, 139 (88%) were associated with chronic active gastritis compared to 95 (75%) (P = 0.006) in iceA type 2-negative. H. pylori cagA was positive in 101 (64%) iceA type 2 strains compared to 57 (45%) in negative strains (P = 0.002). H. pylori iceA type 2 was dominant and associated with cagA, chronic active inflammation, gastric ulcer and carcinoma. PMID:26126322

  1. Genomic Analysis of Parent-of-Origin Allelic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana Seeds

    E-print Network

    Gehring, Mary

    Differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles of a gene is referred to as gene imprinting, a form of epigenetic gene regulation common to flowering plants and mammals. In plants, imprinting primarily ...

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND ALLELE DIVERSITY OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS LINKED TO THE BARLEY ALUMINUM TOLERANCE GENE ALP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utilization of barley cultivars tolerant to aluminum (Al) is one of the most economical strategies for expanding barley production on acidic soils. A gene conferring Al tolerance in the barley cultivar "Dayton", Alp, has previously been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 4H with RFLP markers. ...

  3. Influence of sex of the transmitting parent as well as of parental allel size on the CTG expansion in myotonic dystrophy (DM)

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G.; Brueggenwirth, H.T.; Nillesen, W.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Hoppe, R.L.E.; Oost, B.A. van; Ropers, H.H.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Jansen, G.; Die, C.E.M. de; Hoeweler, C.J. Wieringa, B.

    1993-11-01

    In patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM), the severity of clinical signs is correlated with the length of a (CTG)[sub n] trinucleotide repeat sequence. This sequence tends to expand in subsequent generations. In order to examine the kinetics of this process and, in particular, the influence of the mutant-allele size and the sex of the transmitting parent, the authors have studied (CTG)[sub n] repeat lengths in the offspring of 38 healthy carriers with small mutations (less than 100 CTG trinucleotides, mean length [CTG][sub 67]). In these studies, the authors found a weakly positive correlation between the size of the mutation in the carrier parents and that in their offspring. Furthermore, the authors observed that, in the offspring of male transmitters, repeat lengths exceeding 100 CTG trinucleotides were much more frequent than in the offspring of carrier females (48 [92%] of 52 vs. 7 [44%] of 16, P = .0002). Similarly, in genealogical studies performed in 38 Dutch DM kindreds, an excess of nonmanifesting male transmitters was noted, which was most conspicuous in the generation immediately preceding that with phenotypic expression of DM. Thus, two separate lines of evidence suggest that the sex of the transmitting parent is an important factor that determines DM allele size in the offspring. On the basis of the data, the authors estimate that when both parents are asymptomatic, the odds are approximately 2:1 that the father carries the DM mutation. Because expansion of the CTG repeat is more rapid with male transmission, negative selection during spermatogenesis may be required to explain the exclusive maternal inheritance of severe congenital onset DM. 42 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Early Markers of Language and Attention: Mutual Contributions and the Impact of Parent-Infant Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartstein, Maria A.; Crawford, Jennifer; Robertson, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the contribution of attentional skills to early language, and the influence of early language markers on the development of attention, simultaneously examining the impact of parent-child interaction factors (reciprocity/synchrony and sensitivity/responsivity), including their potential moderator effects. All…

  5. [The Use of Specific DNA Markers for the Identification of Alleles of the FAD3 Genes in Rape (Brassica napus L.)].

    PubMed

    Lemesh, V A; Mozgova, G V; Grushetskaya, Z E; Sidorenko, E V; Pilyuk, Ya E; Bakanovskaya, A V

    2015-08-01

    A search was conducted for the alleles responsible for the quality of food-grade rapeseed oil in a collection of 21 samples of spring and winter oilseed rape of Belarusian and Russian breeding. We also developed A- and C-gene-specific DNA markers to assess the genomic polymorphisms of rape for FAD3 genes and selected plants with a low content of linolenic acid for use in the selection process. The development of a method for identifying FAD3 alleles, which control the level of linolenic acid in rapeseed oil, as well as of the design for new dCAPS markers, enabled the identification of plants homozygous for individual FAD3A and/or FAD3C genes in the F2-generation. These plants are currently involved in the selection process of new varieties with a reduced content of linolenic acid in rapeseed oil. PMID:26601489

  6. Personality traits as potential susceptibility markers: differential susceptibility to support among parents.

    PubMed

    Slagt, Meike; Dubas, Judith Semon; Denissen, Jaap J A; Dekovi?, Maja; van Aken, Marcel A G

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we examined whether parents are differentially susceptible to support from their spouse and adolescent child depending on their personality traits, and whether differences in susceptibility to support among parents, in turn, are linked to the quality of support parents give to their children. Participants in this three-wave longitudinal study were 288 two-parent Dutch families with an adolescent child. Fathers were on average 43.9 years old (SD?=?3.7 years), mothers were 41.7 years old (SD?=?3.3 years), and adolescents (50% girls) were 14.5 years old (SD?=?0.8 years). We found that the association between support from children toward their parents and subsequent support from parents toward their children was more pronounced for parents high on Openness, for better and for worse. Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Emotional Stability did not emerge as markers of differences in susceptibility. Also, parents did not differ in their susceptibility to support from their spouse, nor were differences in susceptibility found a year later when using data from a third wave. We found very modest support for differential susceptibility, only for Openness, and depending on the source of perceived support and on the timing of measurement. PMID:24471708

  7. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding. PMID:24926299

  8. Sibs with atopy and asthma share marker alleles at 11q13, but not at 7q31 or 14q32

    SciTech Connect

    Kate, L.P. ten; Collee, J.M.; Vries, H.G. de

    1994-09-01

    We studied allele sharing in 26 sib-pairs affected with atopy and asthma, recruited through a pediatric pulmonology department. Inclusion criteria were a positive score (2 symptoms or more) on a modified Dutch version of the MRC/ECCS questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and positive IgE tests (specific IgE 0.35 PRU/ml or more; total serum IgE for children under 10 years as described by Kjellmann et al., 1976; for older children 100 U/ml or over). Twenty-six sibpairs fulfilled these criteria. The microsatellites and polymorphic markers used in the analysis were 17bTA (an intragenic marker in the cystic fibrosis gene on 7q31); D11S534, D11S527, D11S97, PYGM, D11S480, Fc{epsilon}RI (all on 11q13, ordered from telomere to centromere) and D14S51 (a CA repeat close to the {alpha}-1-antitrypsin gene). We observed no sharing with the markers on 7q31 and 14q32, but significant sharing with markers on chromosome 11q13, especially D11S97, PYGM and D11S480. Sharing patterns were consistent with the existence of a dominant gene involved in the pathogenesis of atopic asthma on chromosome 11.

  9. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Two FAD3 Genes Controlling Linolenic Acid Content and Development of Allele-Specific Markers in Yellow Mustard (Sinapis alba)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Entang; Zeng, Fangqin; MacKay, Kimberly; Roslinsky, Vicky; Cheng, Bifang

    2014-01-01

    Development of yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.) with superior quality traits (low erucic and linolenic acid contents, and low glucosinolate content) can make this species as a potential oilseed crop. We have recently isolated three inbred lines Y1127, Y514 and Y1035 with low (3.8%), medium (12.3%) and high (20.8%) linolenic acid (C18?3) content, respectively, in this species. Inheritance studies detected two fatty acid desaturase 3 (FAD3) gene loci controlling the variation of C18?3 content. QTL mapping revealed that the two FAD3 gene loci responsible for 73.0% and 23.4% of the total variation and were located on the linkage groups Sal02 and Sal10, respectively. The FAD3 gene on Sal02 was referred to as SalFAD3.LA1 and that on Sal10 as SalFAD3.LA2. The dominant and recessive alleles were designated as LA1 and la1 for SalFAD3.LA1, and LA2 and la2 for SalFAD3.LA2. Cloning and alignment of the coding and genomic DNA sequences revealed that the SalFAD3.LA1 and SalFAD3.LA2 genes each contained 8 exons and 7 introns. LA1 had a coding DNA sequence (CDS) of 1143 bp encoding a polypeptide of 380 amino acids, whereas la1 was a loss-of-function allele due to an insertion of 584 bp in exon 3. Both LA2 and la2 had a CDS of 1152 bp encoding a polypeptide of 383 amino acids. Allele-specific markers for LA1, la1, LA2 and la2 co-segregated with the C18?3 content in the F2 populations and will be useful for improving fatty acid composition through marker assisted selection in yellow mustard breeding. PMID:24823372

  10. Allelic variation of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes located on chromosomes 2A and 2D and development of functional markers for the PPO genes in common wheat.

    PubMed

    He, X Y; He, Z H; Zhang, L P; Sun, D J; Morris, C F; Fuerst, E P; Xia, X C

    2007-06-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity is highly related to the undesirable browning of wheat-based end products, especially Asian noodles. Characterization of PPO genes and the development of their functional markers are of great importance for marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding. In the present study, complete genomic DNA sequences of two PPO genes, one each located on chromosomes 2A and 2D and their allelic variants were characterized by means of in silico cloning and experimental validation. Sequences were aligned at both DNA and protein levels. Two haplotypes on chromosome 2D showed 95.2% sequence identity at the DNA level, indicating much more sequence diversity than those on chromosome 2A with 99.6% sequence identity. Both of the PPO genes on chromosomes 2A and 2D contain an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,731 bp, encoding a PPO precursor peptide of 577 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of approximately 64 kD. Two complementary dominant STS markers, PPO16 and PPO29, were developed based on the PPO gene haplotypes located on chromosome 2D; they amplify a 713-bp fragment in cultivars with low PPO activity and a 490-bp fragment in those with high PPO activity, respectively. The two markers were mapped on chromosome 2DL using a doubled haploid population derived from the cross Zhongyou 9507/CA9632, and a set of nullisomic-tetrasomic lines and ditelosomic line 2DS of Chinese Spring. QTL analysis indicated that the PPO gene co-segregated with the two STS markers and was closely linked to SSR marker Xwmc41 on chromosome 2DL, explaining from 9.6 to 24.4% of the phenotypic variance for PPO activity across three environments. In order to simultaneously detect PPO loci on chromosomes 2A and 2D, a multiplexed marker combination PPO33/PPO16 was developed and yielded distinguishable DNA patterns in a number of cultivars. The STS marker PPO33 for the PPO gene on chromosome 2A was developed from the same gene sequences as PPO18 that we reported previously, and can amplify a 481-bp and a 290-bp fragment from cultivars with low and high PPO activity, respectively. A total of 217 Chinese wheat cultivars and advanced lines were used to validate the association between the polymorphic fragments and grain PPO activity. The results showed that the marker combination PPO33/PPO16 is efficient and reliable for evaluating PPO activity and can be used in wheat breeding programs aimed for noodle and other end product quality improvement. PMID:17426955

  11. nature biotechnology volume 30 number 4 april 2012 333 converted into homozygous parental breeding lines, as desirable allele

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    lines, as desirable allele combinations are lost through recombination during meiosis. That obstacle has. The pol- len was used to generate reverse-breeding haploids from which fertile double haploids were grown

  12. Recurrent parent genome recovery analysis in a marker-assisted backcrossing program of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-02-01

    Backcross breeding is the most commonly used method for incorporating a blast resistance gene into a rice cultivar. Linkage between the resistance gene and undesirable units can persist for many generations of backcrossing. Marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) along with marker-assisted selection (MAS) contributes immensely to overcome the main limitation of the conventional breeding and accelerates recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. The MABC approach was employed to incorporate (a) blast resistance gene(s) from the donor parent Pongsu Seribu 1, the blast-resistant local variety in Malaysia, into the genetic background of MR219, a popular high-yielding rice variety that is blast susceptible, to develop a blast-resistant MR219 improved variety. In this perspective, the recurrent parent genome recovery was analyzed in early generations of backcrossing using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Out of 375 SSR markers, 70 markers were found polymorphic between the parents, and these markers were used to evaluate the plants in subsequent generations. Background analysis revealed that the extent of RPG recovery ranged from 75.40% to 91.3% and from 80.40% to 96.70% in BC1F1 and BC2F1 generations, respectively. In this study, the recurrent parent genome content in the selected BC2F2 lines ranged from 92.7% to 97.7%. The average proportion of the recurrent parent in the selected improved line was 95.98%. MAS allowed identification of the plants that are more similar to the recurrent parent for the loci evaluated in backcross generations. The application of MAS with the MABC breeding program accelerated the recovery of the RP genome, reducing the number of generations and the time for incorporating resistance against rice blast. PMID:25553855

  13. Utility testing of an apple skin color MdMYB1 marker in two progenies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reported allele-specific dCAP PCR marker associated with apple fruit red skin color was tested in 18 elite breeding parents and two apple cross populations. Among all tested cultivars except one, a consistent relationship was observed between red fruit color and the presence of allele. In both pop...

  14. A Retrospective DNA Marker Assessment of the Development of Insect Resistant Soybean

    E-print Network

    Parrott, Wayne

    A Retrospective DNA Marker Assessment of the Development of Insect Resistant Soybean James M and to the retentionment of superior soybean cultivars [Glycine max (L.) Merr] with of undesirable PI donor alleles (PI) donor parents. Soybean insect resistance quantitative trait loci resistance alleles, or QTL

  15. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, Erin L.; Gedy, Bradley C.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Garey, Andrew L.; Emel, Sarah L.; Mumma, Matthew; Wagner, Helene H.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Cushman, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals.

  16. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, E.L.; Fedy, B.C.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.; Garey, A.L.; Emel, S.L.; Mumma, M.; Wagner, H.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Cushman, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Using microsatellite DNA markers to determine the genetic identity of parental clones used in the Louisiana sugarcane breeding program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane propagates asexually through vegetative cuttings. To validate the genetic identity of sugarcane clones during shipping and handling, we produced molecular fingerprints based on 21 microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers for 116 Louisiana parental clones that were included in the crossing program...

  18. A Critical Proton MR Spectroscopy Marker of Alzheimer's Disease Early Neurodegenerative Change: Low Hippocampal NAA/Cr Ratio Impacts APOE ?4 Mexico City Children and Their Parents.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Melo-Sánchez, Gastón; Rodríguez-Díaz, Joel; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Styner, Martin; Mukherjee, Partha S; Lin, Weili; Jewells, Valerie

    2015-10-27

    Severe air pollution exposures produce systemic, respiratory, myocardial, and brain inflammation and Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmarks in clinically healthy children. We tested whether hippocampal metabolite ratios are associated with contrasting levels of air pollution, APOE, and body mass index (BMI) in paired healthy children and one parent sharing the same APOE alleles. We used 1H-MRS to interrogate bilateral hippocampal single-voxel in 57 children (12.45 ± 3.4 years) and their 48 parents (37.5 ± 6.78 years) from a low pollution city versus Mexico City (MC). NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr metabolite ratios were analyzed. The right hippocampus NAA/Cr ratio was significantly different between cohorts (p?=?0.007). The NAA/Cr ratio in right hippocampus in controls versus APOE ?4 MC children and in left hippocampus in MC APOE ?4 parents versus their children was significantly different after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI (p?=?0.027 and 0.01, respectively). The NAA/Cr ratio is considered reflective of neuronal density/functional integrity/loss of synapses/higher pTau burden, thus a significant decrease in hippocampal NAA/Cr ratios may constitute a spectral marker of early neurodegeneration in young urbanites. Decreases in NAA/Cr correlate well with cognitive function, behavioral symptoms, and dementia severity; thus, since the progression of AD starts decades before clinical diagnosis, our findings support the hypothesis that under chronic exposures to fine particulate matter and ozone above the standards, neurodegenerative processes start in childhood and APOE ?4 carriers are at higher risk. Gene and environmental factors are critical in the development of AD and the identification and neuroprotection of young urbanites at high risk must become a public health priority. PMID:26402110

  19. A new Xist allele driven by a constitutively active promoter is dominated by Xist locus environment and exhibits the parent-of-origin effects.

    PubMed

    Amakawa, Yuko; Sakata, Yuka; Hoki, Yuko; Arata, Satoru; Shioda, Seiji; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Sado, Takashi

    2015-12-15

    The dosage difference of X-linked genes between the sexes in mammals is compensated for by genetic inactivation of one of the X chromosomes in XX females. A noncoding RNA transcribed from the Xist gene at the onset of X chromosome inactivation coats the X chromosome in cis and induces chromosome-wide heterochromatinization. Here, we report a new Xist allele (Xist(CAG)) driven by a CAG promoter, which is known to be constitutively active in many types of cells. The paternal transmission of Xist(CAG) resulted in the preferential inactivation of the targeted paternal X (Xp) not only in the extra-embryonic but also the embryonic lineage, whereas maternal transmission ended with embryonic lethality at the early postimplantation stage with a phenotype that resembled mutant embryos carrying a maternal deficiency in Tsix, an antisense negative regulator of Xist, in both sexes. Interestingly, we found that the upregulation of Xist(CAG) in preimplantation embryos temporally differed depending on its parental origin: its expression started at the 4- to 8-cell stages when paternally inherited, and Xist(CAG) was upregulated at the blastocyst stage when maternally inherited. This might indicate that the Xist locus on Xp is permissive to transcription, but the Xist locus on the maternal X (Xm) is not. We extrapolated from these findings that the maternal Xist allele might manifest a chromatin structure inaccessible by transcription factors relative to the paternal allele. This might underlie the mechanism for the maternal repression of Xist at the early cleavage stage when Tsix expression has not yet occurred on Xm. PMID:26511926

  20. Identification of Coupling and Repulsion Phase DNA Marker Associated With an Allele of a Gene Conferring Host Plant Resistance to Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV) in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp.)

    PubMed Central

    Daspute, Abhijit; Fakrudin, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigeonpea Sterility Mosaic Disease (PSMD) is an important foliar disease caused by Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV) which is transmitted by eriophyid mites (Aceria cajani Channabasavanna). In present study, a F2 mapping population comprising 325 individuals was developed by crossing PSMD susceptible genotype (Gullyal white) and PSMD resistant genotype (BSMR 736). We identified a set of 32 out of 300 short decamer random DNA markers that showed polymorphism between Gullyal white and BSMR 736 parents. Among them, eleven DNA markers showed polymorphism including coupling and repulsion phase type of polymorphism across the parents. Bulked Segregant Analysis (BSA), revealed that the DNA marker, IABTPPN7, produced a single coupling phase marker (IABTPPN7414) and a repulsion phase marker (IABTPPN7983) co-segregating with PSMD reaction. Screening of 325 F2 population using IABTPPN7 revealed that the repulsion phase marker, IABTPPN7983, was co-segregating with the PSMD responsive SV1 at a distance of 23.9 cM for Bidar PPSMV isolate. On the other hand, the coupling phase marker IABTPPN7414 did not show any linkage with PSMD resistance. Additionally, single marker analysis both IABTPPN7983 (P<0.0001) and IABTPPN 7414 (P<0.0001) recorded a significant association with the PSMD resistance and explained a phenotypic variance of 31 and 36% respectively in F2 population. The repulsion phase marker, IABTPPN7983, could be of use in Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS) in the PPSMV resistance breeding programmes of pigeonpea. PMID:25774108

  1. Childhood trauma and parental style: Relationship with markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and aggression in healthy and personality disordered subjects.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Jennifer R; Lee, Royce; Gozal, David; Coussons-Read, Mary; Coccaro, Emil F

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that early life trauma is associated with elevations in circulating markers of inflammation in human subjects. History of aggression as a behavior, or aggression as a personality trait, is also associated with elevations of these inflammatory markers. Since early life trauma is associated with the development and maintenance of aggression in later life we examined the relationship of early life adversity, plasma inflammation markers (IL-6 and CRP) and oxidative stress markers (8-OH-DG and 8-ISO), and aggression in adult subjects with (n=79) and without (n=55) personality disorder. We used a series of mediated and moderated path models to test whether the effects of early adversity on later aggression may be mediated through markers of inflammation. Childhood abuse and parental control were associated with basal IL-6 and CRP concentrations. Path modeling suggested that childhood abuse was associated with aggression indirectly through CRP while parental control influenced aggression indirectly through IL-6 and CRP. Furthermore, these effects were independent of the effect of current depression. The results suggest that disruption of inflammatory processes represent one pathway by which early adversity influences aggression. PMID:26423894

  2. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  3. Parental potentiation of vocalization as a marker for filial bonds in infant animals.

    PubMed

    Shair, Harry N

    2014-12-01

    Maternal and paternal potentiation of vocalization are two parts of a promising model of early life social bonds that has been and can be a useful tool in research. Most mammalian infants vocalize when isolated. Interactions with adult females just before isolation have been found to increase vocalizations in several species. Interactions with littermates and other social stimuli do not. In guinea pigs and pigs, the response is specific to the dam. In rats and octagon degus, an unrelated adult female from the colony is sufficient. The presence of an intact adult male in the test chamber with dam-reared pups evokes behavioral inhibition, a fear response. Previous exposure to the male in the home cage, biparental rearing, dramatically transforms the response of the pup. The pup treats the adult male as it does its dam, including potentiation of vocalization during a subsequent isolation. This article outlines the methods, advantages, and disadvantages of parental potentiation as a research tool, as well as a brief review of the evidence supporting its use as a marker for filial attachment. Future research directions are outlined. PMID:24915803

  4. Genetic variability of oil palm parental genotypes and performance of its' progenies as revealed by molecular markers and quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Norziha; Rafii Yusop, Mohd; Ithnin, Maizura; Saleh, Ghizan; Latif, M A

    2011-04-01

    Studies were conducted to assess the genetic relationships between the parental palms (dura and pisifera) and performance of their progenies based on nine microsatellite markers and 29 quantitative traits. Correlation analyses between genetic distances and hybrids performance were estimated. The coefficients of correlation values of genetic distances with hybrid performance were non-significant, except for mean nut weight and leaf number. However, the correlation coefficient of genetic distances with these characters was low to be used as predicted value. These results indicated that genetic distances based on the microsatellite markers may not be useful for predicting hybrid performance. The genetic distance analysis using UPGMA clustering system generated 5 genetic clusters with coefficient of 1.26 based on quantitative traits of progenies. The genotypes, DP16, DP14, DP4, DP13, DP12, DP15, DP8, DP1 and DP2 belonging to distant clusters and greater genetic distances could be selected for further breeding programs. PMID:21513898

  5. Bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers identify hybridization between rainbow trout and cutthroat trout subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Eight polymerase chain reaction primer sets amplifying bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers were developed that differentiate between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and various cutthroat trout (O. clarki) subspecies. The primers were tested within known F1 and first generation hybrid backcrosses and were shown to amplify codominantly within hybrids. Heterozygous individuals also amplified a slower migrating band that was a heteroduplex, caused by the annealing of polymerase chain reaction products from both species. These primer sets have numerous advantages for native cutthroat trout conservation including statistical genetic analyses of known crosses and simple hybrid identification.

  6. Molecular validation of multiple allele inheritance for dominant genic male sterility gene in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Song, Lai-Qiang; Fu, Ting-Dong; Tu, Jin-Xing; Ma, Cao-Zhi; Yang, Guang-Sheng

    2006-06-01

    Dominant genic male sterility (DGMS) has been playing an increasingly important role, not only as a tool for assisting in recurrent selection but also as an alternative approach for efficient production of hybrids. Previous studies indicate that fertility restoration of DGMS is the action of another unlinked dominant gene. Recently, through classical genetic analysis with various test populations we have verified that in a DGMS line 609AB the trait is inherited in a multiple allelic pattern. In this study, we applied molecular marker technology to provide further validation of the results. Eight amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers tightly linked to the male sterility allele (Ms) were identified in a BC1 population from a cross between 609A (a sterile plant in 609AB) and a temporary maintainer GS2467 as recurrent parent. Four out of the eight markers reproduced the same polymorphism in a larger BC(1) population generated with microspore-derived doubled haploid (DH) parents (S148 and S467). The two nearest AFLP markers SA12MG14 and P05MG15, flanking the Ms locus at respective distances of 0.3 centiMorgan (cM) and 1.6 cM, were converted into sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers designated SC6 and SC9. Based on the sequence difference of the marker P05MG15 between S148 and a DH restorer line S103, we further developed a SCAR marker SC9f that is specific to the restorer allele (Mf). The map distance between SC9f and Mf was consistent with that between SC9 and Ms allele. Therefore, successful conversion of the marker tightly linked to Ms into a marker tightly linked to Mf suggested that the restoration for DGMS in 609AB is controlled by an allele at the Ms locus or a tightly linked gene (regarded as an allele in practical application). The Ms and Mf-specific markers developed here will facilitate the breeding for new elite homozygous sterile lines and allow further research on map-based cloning of the Ms gene. PMID:16783591

  7. Nonword Repetition – A Clinical Marker for Specific Language Impairment in Swedish Associated with Parents’ Language-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Kalnak, Nelli; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Forssberg, Hans; Sahlén, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    First, we explore the performance of nonword repetition (NWR) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing children (TD) in order to investigate the accuracy of NWR as a clinical marker for SLI in Swedish-speaking school-age children. Second, we examine the relationship between NWR, family aggregation, and parental level of education in children with SLI. A sample of 61 children with SLI, and 86 children with TD, aged 8–12 years, were administered an NWR test. Family aggregation, measured as the prevalence of language and/or literacy problems (LLP) in parents of the children with SLI, was based on family history interviews. The sensitivity and specificity of nonword repetition was analyzed in a binary logistic regression, cut-off values were established with ROC curves, and positive and negative likelihood ratios reported. Results from the present study show that NWR distinguishes well between Swedish-speaking school-children with and without SLI. We found 90.2% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity at a cut-off level of ?2 standard deviations for binary scoring of nonwords. Differences between the SLI and TD groups showed large effect sizes for the two scoring measures binary (d?=?2.11) and percent correct consonants (PCC) (d?=?1.79). The children with SLI were split into two subgroups: those with no parents affected with LLP (n?=?12), and those with one or both parents affected (n?=?49). The subgroup consisting of affected parents had a significantly lower score on NWR binary (p?=?.037), and there was a great difference between the subgroups (d?=?0.7). When compared to the TD group, the difference from the subgroup with affected parents was almost one standard deviation larger (d?=?2.47) than the difference from the TD to the subgroup consisting of non-affected parents (d?=?1.57). Our study calls for further exploration of the complex interaction between family aggregation, language input, and phenotypes of SLI. PMID:24586859

  8. Allelic variation of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes located on chromosomes 2A and 2D and development of functional markers for the PPO genes in common wheat.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity is highly related to the undesirable browning of wheat-based end products, especially Asian noodles. Characterization of PPO genes and the development of their functional markers are of great importance for marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding. In the prese...

  9. Microsatellite (simple sequence repeat) marker-based paternity analysis of a seven-parent sugarcane polycross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not feasible to make all possible cross combinations among elite parents used in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeding programs, particularly within a single year. Hence, the polycross approach has been used to maximize the number of cross combinations that can be represented among progeny. Th...

  10. Clinic-Referred Mothers' Autobiographical Narratives as Markers of Their Parenting Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowinski, Katherine S.; Wahler, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Forty clinic-referred mothers completed questionnaires describing their children's problems and the mothers' parenting styles. In addition, each mother told three stories about their personal experiences in child care and one story about being cared for in their families of origin. Each story was transcribed and rated for coherence on six…

  11. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR -129C?>?T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that -129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with -129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-? concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-?1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than -129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo. PMID:26370050

  12. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR ?129C?>?T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that ?129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with ?129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-? concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-?1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than ?129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo. PMID:26370050

  13. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziff, Barry, Ed.; Hostettler, Karen, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    The newsletter of the California Association for the Gifted includes the following brief articles on parenting: "Your Challenge, Their Lives" (Barry Ziff); "Courage to Be Who I Am, Unafraid" (Elizabeth Meckstroth); "Attribution: A Key to Encouraging More Responsible Behavior in the Gifted" (Saundra Sparling); "A Parent's Perspective" (Carolyn…

  14. Existing potato markers and marker conversions

    E-print Network

    Douches, David S.

    Existing potato markers and marker conversions Walter De Jong PAA Workshop August 2009 1 #12;What of us will continue to use agarose gels for years to come #12;Example of a potato marker 4 PVY (Ryadg) ­ Kasai et al. 2000 Genome 43:1-8 allele specific amplification of a diagnostic product - potatoes

  15. Allelic Exchange.

    PubMed

    Lehman, McKenzie K; Bose, Jeffrey L; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2016-01-01

    Methods used to understand the function of a gene/protein are one of the hallmarks of modern molecular genetics. The ability to genetically manipulate bacteria has become a fundamental tool in studying these organisms and while basic cloning has become a routine task in molecular biology laboratories, generating directed mutations can be a daunting task. This chapter describes the method of allelic exchange in Staphylococcus aureus using temperature-sensitive plasmids that have successfully produced a variety of chromosomal mutations, including in-frame deletions, insertion of antibiotic-resistance cassettes, and even single-nucleotide point mutations. PMID:25646609

  16. Development of polysomic microsatellite markers for characterization of population structuring and phylogeography in the shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, Anne P.; King, Tim L.

    2012-01-01

    Shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum is an endangered polyploid fish species for which no nuclear DNA markers previously existed. To address this need, 86 polysomic loci were developed and characterized in 20 A. brevirostrum from five river systems and eight members (parents and six progeny) of a captive-bred family. All markers proved to be polymorphic, polysomic, and demonstrated direct inheritance when tested in a captive family. Eleven loci were included in a range-wide survey of 561 fish sampled from 17 geographic collections. Allelic diversity at these markers ranged from 7 to 24 alleles/locus and averaged 16.5 alleles/locus; sufficient diversity to produce unique multilocus genotypes. In the range-wide survey, a Mantel comparison of an ecological (1-Jaccard’s) and genetic (?PT; an analog to FST) distance metrics, identified a strong positive correlation (r = 0.98, P PT represents a viable metric for assessing genetic relatedness using this class of marker.

  17. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochim, Lisa; Mueller, Andrea

    This guide contains 15 learning activities that can be used in parenting classes, especially for adults with limited literacy skills. Activities include quotations for discussion and suggestions for conducting group discussions and writing lessons. The following activities are included: interpreting quotations about raising children; positive…

  18. [Polymorphism of SSR alleles in pear cultivars grown in Belarus].

    PubMed

    Urbanovich, O Iu; Kozlovskaia, Z A; Iakimovich, O A; Kartel', N A

    2011-03-01

    Using SSR markers designed for Malus x domestica Borkh, genetic polymorphism of 43 pear accessions cultivated in Belarus was examined. A total of 217 alleles were identified with the mean number of 12.8 alleles per marker. The mean PIC value was 0.81; the mean number of informative alleles, 6.49. The heterozygosity level ranged from 0.30 to 0.84. Genetic diversity of SSR alleles in pear and apple genomes was compared. A method of identification of commercial pear cultivars using a set of six SSR markers was suggested. PMID:21542305

  19. Complete sequence of HLA-B27 cDNA identified through the characterization of structural markers unique to the HLA-A, -B, and -C allelic series

    SciTech Connect

    Szoets, H.; Reithmueller, G.; Weiss, E.; Meo, T.

    1986-03-01

    Antigen HLA-B27 is a high-risk genetic factor with respect to a group of rheumatoid disorders, especially ankylosing spondylitis. A cDNA library was constructed from an autozygous B-cell line expressing HLA-B27, HLA-Cw1, and the previously cloned HLA-A2 antigen. Clones detected with an HLA probe were isolated and sorted into homology groups by differential hybridization and restriction maps. Nucleotide sequencing allowed the unambiguous assignment of cDNAs to HLA-A, -B, and -C loci. The HLA-B27 mRNA has the structure features and the codon variability typical of an HLA class I transcript but it specifies two uncommon amino acid replacements: a cysteine in position 67 and a serine in position 131. The latter substitution may have functional consequences, because it occurs in a conserved region and at a position invariably occupied by a species-specific arginine in humans and lysine in mice. The availability of the complete sequence of HLA-B27 and of the partial sequence of HLA-Cw1 allows the recognition of locus-specific sequence markers, particularly, but not exclusively, in the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains.

  20. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele-workbench. Additionally, all software is ready for immediate use from an Atmosphere Virtual Machine Image available from the iPlant Collaborative (www.iplantcollaborative.org). PMID:25541944

  1. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele-workbench. Additionally, all software is ready for immediate use from an Atmosphere Virtual Machine Image available from the iPlant Collaborative (www.iplantcollaborative.org). PMID:25541944

  2. Mining the Human Phenome Using Allelic Scores That Index Biological Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Munafò, Marcus; Whitfield, John B.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Dehghan, Abbas; Hirschhorn, Joel; Davey Smith, George

    2013-01-01

    It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We compared the explanatory ability of allelic scores in terms of their capacity to proxy for the intermediate of interest, and the extent to which they associated with disease. We found that allelic scores derived from known variants and allelic scores derived from hundreds of thousands of genetic markers explained significant portions of the variance in biological intermediates of interest, and many of these scores showed expected correlations with disease. Genome-wide allelic scores however tended to lack specificity suggesting that they should be used with caution and perhaps only to proxy biological intermediates for which there are no known individual variants. Power calculations confirm the feasibility of extending our strategy to the analysis of tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes in large genome-wide meta-analyses. We conclude that our method represents a simple way in which potentially tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes could be screened for causal relationships with disease without having to expensively measure these variables in individual disease collections. PMID:24204319

  3. Mining the human phenome using allelic scores that index biological intermediates.

    PubMed

    Evans, David M; Brion, Marie Jo A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Munafò, Marcus; Whitfield, John B; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Timpson, Nicholas J; St Pourcain, Beate; Lawlor, Debbie A; Martin, Nicholas G; Dehghan, Abbas; Hirschhorn, Joel; Smith, George Davey

    2013-10-01

    It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We compared the explanatory ability of allelic scores in terms of their capacity to proxy for the intermediate of interest, and the extent to which they associated with disease. We found that allelic scores derived from known variants and allelic scores derived from hundreds of thousands of genetic markers explained significant portions of the variance in biological intermediates of interest, and many of these scores showed expected correlations with disease. Genome-wide allelic scores however tended to lack specificity suggesting that they should be used with caution and perhaps only to proxy biological intermediates for which there are no known individual variants. Power calculations confirm the feasibility of extending our strategy to the analysis of tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes in large genome-wide meta-analyses. We conclude that our method represents a simple way in which potentially tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes could be screened for causal relationships with disease without having to expensively measure these variables in individual disease collections. PMID:24204319

  4. Opportunities of marker-assisted selection for rice fragrance through marker-trait association analysis of microsatellites and gene-based markers.

    PubMed

    Golestan Hashemi, F S; Rafii, M Y; Razi Ismail, M; Mohamed, M T M; Rahim, H A; Latif, M A; Aslani, F

    2015-09-01

    Developing fragrant rice through marker-assisted/aided selection (MAS) is an economical and profitable approach worldwide for the enrichment of an elite genetic background with a pleasant aroma. The PCR-based DNA markers that distinguish the alleles of major fragrance genes in rice have been synthesised to develop rice scent biofortification through MAS. Thus, the present study examined the aroma biofortification potential of these co-dominant markers in a germplasm panel of 189 F2 progeny developed from crosses between a non-aromatic variety (MR84) and a highly aromatic but low-yielding variety (MRQ74) to determine the most influential diagnostic markers for fragrance biofortification. The SSRs and functional DNA markers RM5633 (on chromosome 4), RM515, RM223, L06, NKSbad2, FMbadh2-E7, BADEX7-5, Aro7 and SCU015RM (on chromosome 8) were highly associated with the 2AP (2-acetyl-1-pyrroline) content across the population. The alleles traced via these markers were also in high linkage disequilibrium (R(2) > 0.70) and explained approximately 12.1, 27.05, 27.05, 27.05, 25.42, 25.42, 20.53, 20.43 and 20.18% of the total phenotypic variation observed for these biomarkers, respectively. F2 plants harbouring the favourable alleles of these effective markers produced higher levels of fragrance. Hence, these rice plants can be used as donor parents to increase the development of fragrance-biofortified tropical rice varieties adapted to growing conditions and consumer preferences, thus contributing to the global rice market. PMID:25865409

  5. Analysis of rice blast resistance in rice breeding parents from USA using molecular markers and pathogenicity assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease is caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. The Pi-ta gene in rice is effective in preventing infections by strains of M. oryzae that carry AVR-Pita1 in a gene for gene specificity. In the present study, two dominant markers YL153/YL154 and YL155/YL87 derived from diffe...

  6. DRD2 A1 allele and P300 abnormalities in obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, K. |; Wood, R.; Sheridan, L.P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous and prevalent disorder having both inheritable and environmental components. The role of the dopamine system in P300 has been implicated. We genotyped 193 neuropsychiatrically ill patients with and without comorbid drug and alcohol/abuse/dependence and obesity for the prevalence of the A1 allele of the DRD2 gene. We found a significant linear trend ({chi}{sup 2} = 40.4, df=1, p<0.00001) where the percent prevalence of the A1 increased with increasing polysubstance abuse. Where the A1 allele was found in 44% of 40 obese subjects, the A1 allele prevalence was found in as much as 91% of 11 obese subjects with comorbid polysubstance abuse. 53 obese subjects having a mean body weight (BMI) of 34.6{+-}8.2 were mapped for brain electrical activity and compared with 15 controls with a BMI of 22.3{+-}3.0 (P<.001). The P3 amplitude was significantly different (two tailed; t=3.24, df=16.2, P = 0.005), whereas P3 latency was not significant. Preliminarily, we found a significant decreased P3 amplitude correlated with parental polysubstance abuse (p=0.4) with prolongation of P3 latency correlated with the three risk factors of parental substance abuse, chemical dependency and carbohydrate bingeing (P<0.02). Finally, in a small sample, the A1 allele was present in 25% of probands having 0 risk compared to 66% in those obese subjects with any risk. This work represents the first electrophysiological data to implicate P3 abnormalities in a subset of obesity and further confirms an association of the DRD2 gene and a electrophysiological marker previously indicated to have predictive value in vulnerability to addictive behaviors.

  7. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [? angle = tan?1 (y/x) and y? = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis. PMID:23422023

  8. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Emily J; Stovold, Grahame T; Li, Yongjun; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B; Grattapaglia, Dario G; Dungey, Heidi S

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K). The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi-species SNP resource available with the EuCHIP60k, opens a whole new array of opportunities for high-throughput, genome-wide or targeted genotyping in species of Eucalyptus. PMID:26158446

  9. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, Emily J.; Stovold, Grahame T.; Li, Yongjun; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B.; Grattapaglia, Dario G.; Dungey, Heidi S.

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K). The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi-species SNP resource available with the EuCHIP60k, opens a whole new array of opportunities for high-throughput, genome-wide or targeted genotyping in species of Eucalyptus. PMID:26158446

  10. Leaf margin phenotype-specific restriction-site-associated DNA-derived markers for pineapple (Ananas comosus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Urasaki, Naoya; Goeku, Satoko; Kaneshima, Risa; Takamine, Tomonori; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Moromizato, Chie; Yonamine, Kaname; Hosaka, Fumiko; Terakami, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Shoda, Moriyuki

    2015-01-01

    To explore genome-wide DNA polymorphisms and identify DNA markers for leaf margin phenotypes, a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing analysis was employed to analyze three bulked DNAs of F1 progeny from a cross between a ‘piping-leaf-type’ cultivar, ‘Yugafu’, and a ‘spiny-tip-leaf-type’ variety, ‘Yonekura’. The parents were both Ananas comosus var. comosus. From the analysis, piping-leaf and spiny-tip-leaf gene-specific restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing tags were obtained and designated as PLSTs and STLSTs, respectively. The five PLSTs and two STSLTs were successfully converted to cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using the sequence differences between alleles. Based on the genotyping of the F1 with two SSR and three CAPS markers, the five PLST markers were mapped in the vicinity of the P locus, with the closest marker, PLST1_SSR, being located 1.5 cM from the P locus. The two CAPS markers from STLST1 and STLST3 perfectly assessed the ‘spiny-leaf type’ as homozygotes of the recessive s allele of the S gene. The recombination value between the S locus and STLST loci was 2.4, and STLSTs were located 2.2 cM from the S locus. SSR and CAPS markers are applicable to marker-assisted selection of leaf margin phenotypes in pineapple breeding. PMID:26175625

  11. Leaf margin phenotype-specific restriction-site-associated DNA-derived markers for pineapple (Ananas comosus L.).

    PubMed

    Urasaki, Naoya; Goeku, Satoko; Kaneshima, Risa; Takamine, Tomonori; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Moromizato, Chie; Yonamine, Kaname; Hosaka, Fumiko; Terakami, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Shoda, Moriyuki

    2015-06-01

    To explore genome-wide DNA polymorphisms and identify DNA markers for leaf margin phenotypes, a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing analysis was employed to analyze three bulked DNAs of F1 progeny from a cross between a 'piping-leaf-type' cultivar, 'Yugafu', and a 'spiny-tip-leaf-type' variety, 'Yonekura'. The parents were both Ananas comosus var. comosus. From the analysis, piping-leaf and spiny-tip-leaf gene-specific restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing tags were obtained and designated as PLSTs and STLSTs, respectively. The five PLSTs and two STSLTs were successfully converted to cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using the sequence differences between alleles. Based on the genotyping of the F1 with two SSR and three CAPS markers, the five PLST markers were mapped in the vicinity of the P locus, with the closest marker, PLST1_SSR, being located 1.5 cM from the P locus. The two CAPS markers from STLST1 and STLST3 perfectly assessed the 'spiny-leaf type' as homozygotes of the recessive s allele of the S gene. The recombination value between the S locus and STLST loci was 2.4, and STLSTs were located 2.2 cM from the S locus. SSR and CAPS markers are applicable to marker-assisted selection of leaf margin phenotypes in pineapple breeding. PMID:26175625

  12. Systematic search for markers linked to insulin-dependent diabetes on chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.R.; Shephard, J.M.; Berger, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    We tested 19 microsatellite markers on chromosome 17 for linkage with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Nuclear families (N = 235) with at least two affected offspring were provided by the British Diabetic Association, Human Biological Data Interchange, and our own lab. The mean interval ({plus_minus}sd) between markers was 8 {plus_minus} 3 cM. For each parent heterozygous at the marker locus being studied, we determined whether the same or different alleles were transmitted to the two affected sibs. The {open_quotes}degree of sharing{close_quotes} for each marker is the frequency with which the same parental allele is transmitted to both affected sibs. Linkage with IDDM susceptibility leads to values higher than 0.50 for degree of sharing. Unlike lods, this approach makes no assumption about mode of inheritance. Mean sharing for the 19 markers was 0.51 (range 0.460 to 0.557; sd = .03). Three markers on 17q (all mutually unlinked) showed sharing of {approximately}0.55. The degree of sharing was 228/414 = 0.551 for D17A807 ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.26, p = .04), 172/309 = 0.557 for D17S784 ({chi}{sup 2} = 3.96, p = .04), and 218/398 = 0.548 for D17S798 ({chi}{sup 2} = 3.63, p =.06). We also looked for evidence of linkage disequilibrium between IDDM and alleles of each of these markers, by means of the transmission/disequilibrium test of Spielman. No significant linkage disequilibrium was found for D17S784 or D17S798. However, allele 6 of D17S807 was transmitted from heterozygous parents to IDDM offspring with frequency 131/230 = 0.57 ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.45, p = .035), supporting linkage with IDDM. We are currently investigating other markers and candidate genes in the region of D17S807.

  13. Disturbances in reality testing as markers of risk in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder: a systematic review from a developmental psychopathology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Angela J; Allen, Timothy A; Cullen, Kathryn R; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This comprehensive review examined the prevalence and progression of disturbances in reality testing (DRT), defined as psychotic symptoms, cognitive disruptions, and thought problems, in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder (O-BD). Our approach was grounded in a developmental psychopathology perspective and considered a broader phenotype of risk within the bipolar–schizophrenia spectrum as measured by categorical and dimensional assessments of DRT in high-risk youth. Methods Relevant studies were identified from numerous sources (e.g., PubMed, reference sections, and colleagues). Inclusion criteria were: (i) family risk studies published between 1975 and 2012 in which O-BD were contrasted with a comparison group (e.g., offspring of parents who had other psychiatric disorders or were healthy) on DRT outcomes and (ii) results reported for categorical or dimensional assessments of DRT (e.g., schizophrenia, psychotic symptoms, cluster A personality traits, or thought problems), yielding a total of 23 studies. Results Three key findings emerged: (i) categorical approaches of DRT in O-BD produced low incidence base rates and almost no evidence of significant differences in DRT between O-BD and comparison groups, whereas (ii) many studies using dimensional assessments of DRT yielded significant group differences in DRT. Furthermore, (iii) preliminary evidence from dimensional measures suggested that the developmental progression of DRT in O-BD might represent a prodrome of severe psychological impairment. Conclusions Preliminary but promising evidence suggests that DRT is a probable marker of risk for future impairment in O-BD. Methodological strengths and weaknesses, the psychometric properties of primary DRT constructs, and future directions for developmental and longitudinal research with O-BD are discussed. PMID:24034419

  14. Md-ACS1 and Md-ACO1 genotyping of apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) breeding parents and suitability for marker-assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit ethylene production genotypes for Md-ACS1 and Md-ACO1 were determined for 60 apple cultivars and 35 advanced breeding selections. Two alleles for each gene are commonly found in cultivated apple. Earlier studies showed that genotypes homozygous for the ACS1-2 allele produce less ethylene and h...

  15. RNA-Seq Identifies SNP Markers for Growth Traits in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed; Vallejo, Roger L.; Leeds, Timothy D.; Palti, Yniv; Liu, Sixin; Sabbagh, Annas; Rexroad, Caird E.; Yao, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    Fast growth is an important and highly desired trait, which affects the profitability of food animal production, with feed costs accounting for the largest proportion of production costs. Traditional phenotype-based selection is typically used to select for growth traits; however, genetic improvement is slow over generations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) explain 90% of the genetic differences between individuals; therefore, they are most suitable for genetic evaluation and strategies that employ molecular genetics for selective breeding. SNPs found within or near a coding sequence are of particular interest because they are more likely to alter the biological function of a protein. We aimed to use SNPs to identify markers and genes associated with genetic variation in growth. RNA-Seq whole-transcriptome analysis of pooled cDNA samples from a population of rainbow trout selected for improved growth versus unselected genetic cohorts (10 fish from 1 full-sib family each) identified SNP markers associated with growth-rate. The allelic imbalances (the ratio between the allele frequencies of the fast growing sample and that of the slow growing sample) were considered at scores >5.0 as an amplification and <0.2 as loss of heterozygosity. A subset of SNPs (n?=?54) were validated and evaluated for association with growth traits in 778 individuals of a three-generation parent/offspring panel representing 40 families. Twenty-two SNP markers and one mitochondrial haplotype were significantly associated with growth traits. Polymorphism of 48 of the markers was confirmed in other commercially important aquaculture stocks. Many markers were clustered into genes of metabolic energy production pathways and are suitable candidates for genetic selection. The study demonstrates that RNA-Seq at low sequence coverage of divergent populations is a fast and effective means of identifying SNPs, with allelic imbalances between phenotypes. This technique is suitable for marker development in non-model species lacking complete and well-annotated genome reference sequences. PMID:22574143

  16. Genetic differentiation and hybrid identification using microsatellite markers in closely related wild species.

    PubMed

    Turchetto, Caroline; Segatto, Ana Lúcia A; Beduschi, Júlia; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the genetic basis of speciation is critical for understanding the evolutionary history of closely related wild species. Recently diverged species facilitate the study of speciation because many genetic and morphological characteristics are still shared by the organisms under study. The Petunia genus grows in South American grasslands and comprises both recently diverged wild species and commercial species. In this work, we analysed two closely related species: Petunia exserta, which has a narrow endemic range and grows exclusively in rocky shelters, and Petunia axillaris, which is widely distributed and comprises three allopatric subspecies. Petunia axillaris ssp. axillaris and P. exserta occur in sympatry, and putative hybrids between them have been identified. Here, we analysed 14 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) in 126 wild individuals and 13 putative morphological hybrids with the goals of identifying differentially encoded alleles to characterize their natural genetic diversity, establishing a genetic profile for each taxon and to verify the presence of hybridization signal. Overall, 143 alleles were identified and all taxa contained private alleles. Four major groups were identified in clustering analyses, which indicated that there are genetic distinctions among the groups. The markers evaluated here will be useful in evolutionary studies involving these species and may help categorize individuals by species, thus enabling the identification of hybrids between both their putative taxa. The individuals with intermediate morphology presented private alleles of their both putative parental species, although they showed a level of genetic mixing that was comparable with some of the individuals with typical P. exserta morphology. The EST-SSR markers scattered throughout the Petunia genome are very efficient tools for characterizing the genetic diversity in wild taxa of this genus and aid in identifying interspecific hybrids based on the presence of private alleles. These properties indicate that these markers will be helpful tools in evolutionary studies. PMID:26187606

  17. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. PMID:25549886

  18. Characterisation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) varieties using microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sugar beet is an obligate outcrossing species. Varieties consist of mixtures of plants from various parental combinations. As the number of informative morphological characteristics is limited, this leads to some problems in variety registration research. Results We have developed 25 new microsatellite markers for sugar beet. A selection of 12 markers with high quality patterns was used to characterise 40 diploid and triploid varieties. For each variety 30 individual plants were genotyped. The markers amplified 3-21 different alleles. Varieties had up to 7 different alleles at one marker locus. All varieties could be distinguished. For the diploid varieties, the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.458 to 0.744. The average inbreeding coefficient Fis was 0.282 ± 0.124, but it varied widely among marker loci, from Fis = +0.876 (heterozygote deficiency) to Fis = -0.350 (excess of heterozygotes). The genetic differentiation among diploid varieties was relatively constant among markers (Fst = 0.232 ± 0.027). Among triploid varieties the genetic differentiation was much lower (Fst = 0.100 ± 0.010). The overall genetic differentiation between diploid and triploid varieties was Fst = 0.133 across all loci. Part of this differentiation may coincide with the differentiation among breeders' gene pools, which was Fst = 0.063. Conclusions Based on a combination of scores for individual plants all varieties can be distinguished using the 12 markers developed here. The markers may also be used for mapping and in molecular breeding. In addition, they may be employed in studying gene flow from crop to wild populations. PMID:20482800

  19. Stacking Pima S-6 fiber length alleles in a Tamcot 2111 background 

    E-print Network

    Souder, Christopher Lee

    2003-01-01

    Molecular markers can be used to stack fiber quality alleles among recombinant inbred lines and thus, aid in the development of unique genotypes. The objective of this study was to determine the potential for stacking Gossypium barbadense (Pima S-6...

  20. Genetic segregation of microsatellite markers in Saccharum officinarum and S. spontaneum.

    PubMed

    Edmé, S J; Glynn, N G; Comstock, J C

    2006-11-01

    Genetic mapping techniques can be used to study the interaction between two different genomes after hybridization. This study investigated a Saccharum officinarum (Green German or GG, 2n approximately 11x approximately 110) x S. spontaneum (IND 81-146 or IND, 2n approximately 7x approximately 56) interspecific cross. Segregation of 193 microsatellite (SSR) loci was evaluated in the F(1) progeny of 169 full-sibs of the cross. Following the two-way pseudo-testcross strategy and 'cross pollination' population type, linkage groups (LG) and phases were established for each parent map, using the criteria of LOD score > or = 3.0 and a maximum recombination frequency of 0.35. Of the 193 markers analyzed, 61 were IND-specific, 106 were GG-specific, and 26 were heterozygous in both parents. About 78% of the markers segregated in a Mendelian fashion and 22% were distorted (as evaluated by chi(2)-tests, P < or = 0.01). The GG map included 91 marker loci arranged into 25 LG covering 1180 cM of the officinarum genome. The IND map consisted of 46 marker loci assembled into 10 LG, which spanned 614 cM of the spontaneum genome. A specific chromosome associated with segregation distortion was detected in the female (GG) genome only, probably as a result of double reduction. The segregation patterns of the marker loci indicated a centromere-driven distortion process with the shared allelic markers (as putative centromeres) regulating the placement and association of markers with opposite phase (coupling vs repulsion) and dosage on either side. Although incomplete, the framework maps were informative with respect to segregation distortion, chromosome fusion, rearrangements, and translocations, observed in both parental genomes as a result of their merger. PMID:16912699

  1. Allelic Diversity and Its Implications for the Rate of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Armando; García-Dorado, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation is usually estimated empirically from statistics based on population gene frequencies, but alternative statistics based on allelic diversity (number of allelic types) can provide complementary information. There is a lack of knowledge, however, on the evolutionary implications attached to allelic-diversity measures, particularly in structured populations. In this article we simulated multiple scenarios of single and structured populations in which a quantitative trait subject to stabilizing selection is adapted to different fitness optima. By forcing a global change in the optima we evaluated which diversity variables are more strongly correlated with both short- and long-term adaptation to the new optima. We found that quantitative genetic variance components for the trait and gene-frequency-diversity measures are generally more strongly correlated with short-term response to selection, whereas allelic-diversity measures are more correlated with long-term and total response to selection. Thus, allelic-diversity variables are better predictors of long-term adaptation than gene-frequency variables. This observation is also extended to unlinked neutral markers as a result of the information they convey on the demographic population history. Diffusion approximations for the allelic-diversity measures in a finite island model under the infinite-allele neutral mutation model are also provided. PMID:24121776

  2. Development of 11 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the blackberry rust fungus Phragmidium violaceum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Uredinales fungus Phragmidium violaceum, which causes leaf rust on European blackberry (Rubus fruticosus L. aggregate). Allele frequency ranged between two and seventeen alleles per locus with no evidence of linkage disequilibrium amon...

  3. Characterisation of microsatellite markers from sugarcane (Saccharum sp.), a highly polyploid species.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro; Taylor; Henry

    2000-06-29

    Cultivated sugarcane varieties (Saccharum spp) are derived from complex interspecific hybridisations between the species S. spontaneum (2n=40-128) and S. officinarum (2n=60 or 80). To analyse this complex genome, the potential of microsatellite repeats as genetic markers in sugarcane with respect to their abundance, variability and ability to detect polymorphisms was investigated. A set of microsatellite markers for genome analysis in cultivated sugarcane was identified from an enriched genomic DNA library constructed from Saccharum sp. cv Q124. Sequencing of 798 sugarcane genomic DNA clones from an enriched microsatellite library, yielded 457 inserts containing microsatellite repeat motifs. Just over 84% of the microsatellites contained dinucleotide or trinucleotide repeats averaging 15 and 13 repeat motifs, respectively. Primer sets were designed and synthesised for over 100 microsatellite sequences and tested on a set of five sugarcane cultivars. Both, heterozygosity as witnessed by the number of alleles, and length polymorphisms as seen in the differences in PCR product size for a particular allele were observed. Microsatellite markers are likely to have many applications in sugarcane genetics and breeding including germplasm analysis, cultivar identification, parent evaluation and marker assisted breeding. PMID:10814819

  4. Cultivar identification and genetic relationship of pineapple (Ananas comosus) cultivars using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Kuan, C S; Weng, I S; Tsai, C C

    2015-01-01

    The genetic relationships among 27 pineapple [Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.] cultivars and lines were examined using 16 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The number of alleles per locus of the SSR markers ranged from 2 to 6 (average 3.19), for a total of 51 alleles. Similarity coefficients were calculated on the basis of 51 amplified bands. A dendrogram was created according to the 16 SSR markers by the unweighted pair-group method. The banding patterns obtained from the SSR primers allowed most of the cultivars and lines to be distinguished, with the exception of vegetative clones. According to the dendrogram, the 27 pineapple cultivars and lines were clustered into three main clusters and four individual clusters. As expected, the dendrogram showed that derived cultivars and lines are closely related to their parental cultivars; the genetic relationships between pineapple cultivars agree with the genealogy of their breeding history. In addition, the analysis showed that there is no obvious correlation between SSR markers and morphological characters. In conclusion, SSR analysis is an efficient method for pineapple cultivar identification and can offer valuable informative characters to identify pineapple cultivars in Taiwan. PMID:26634465

  5. DNA profiling of pineapple cultivars in Japan discriminated by SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Moriyuki; Urasaki, Naoya; Sakiyama, Sumisu; Terakami, Shingo; Hosaka, Fumiko; Shigeta, Narumi; Nishitani, Chikako; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2012-01-01

    We developed 18 polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in pineapple (Ananas comosus) by using genomic libraries enriched for GA and CA motifs. The markers were used to genotype 31 pineapple accessions, including seven cultivars and 11 breeding lines from Okinawa Prefecture, 12 foreign accessions and one from a related species. These SSR loci were highly polymorphic: the 31 accessions contained three to seven alleles per locus, with an average of 4.1. The values of expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.76, with an average of 0.52. All 31 accessions could be successfully differentiated by the 18 SSR markers, with the exception of ‘N67-10’ and ‘Hawaiian Smooth Cayenne’. A single combination of three markers TsuAC004, TsuAC010 and TsuAC041, was enough to distinguish all accessions with one exception. A phenogram based on the SSR genotypes did not show any distinct groups, but it suggested that pineapples bred in Japan are genetically diversed. We reconfirmed the parentage of 14 pineapple accessions by comparing the SSR alleles at 17 SSR loci in each accession and its reported parents. The obtained information will contribute substantially to protecting plant breeders’ rights. PMID:23341750

  6. Parent-of-origin dependent gene-specific knock down in mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Khursheed; Kues, Wilfried A.; Niemann, Heiner . E-mail: niemann@tzv.fal.de

    2007-07-06

    In mice hemizygous for the Oct4-GFP transgene, the F1 embryos show parent-of-origin dependent expression of the marker gene. F1 embryos with a maternally derived OG2 allele (OG2{sup mat}/-) express GFP in the oocyte and during preimplantation development until the blastocyst stage indicating a maternal and embryonic expression pattern. F1-embryos with a paternally inherited OG2 allele (OG2{sup pat}/-) express GFP from the 4- to 8-cell stage onwards showing only embryonic expression. This allows to study allele specific knock down of GFP expression. RNA interference (RNAi) was highly efficient in embryos with the paternally inherited GFP allele, whereas embryos with the maternally inherited GFP allele showed a delayed and less stringent suppression, indicating that the initial levels of the target transcript and the half life of the protein affect RNAi efficacy. RT-PCR analysis revealed only minimum of GFP mRNA. These results have implications for studies of gene silencing in mammalian embryos.

  7. are linked, multiple comparisons at the same locus are correlated, and not all DNA markers are equally

    E-print Network

    Hartl, Daniel L.

    mutations that confer resistance to drugs or vaccine-induced immunity, and po- tentially to identify. Lander, L. Kruglyak, Nature Genet. 11, 241 (1995). 24. Linkage of the resistance allele to two distinct marker alleles, 2 and 4, could be explained by recombination between resistance and marker alleles

  8. Analyses of Allele-Specific Gene Expression in Highly Divergent Mouse Crosses Identifies Pervasive Allelic Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, James J; Zhabotynsky, Vasyl; Sun, Wei; Huang, Shunping; Pakatci, Isa Kemal; Kim, Yunjung; Wang, Jeremy R; Morgan, Andrew P; Calaway, John D; Aylor, David L; Yun, Zaining; Bell, Timothy A; Buus, Ryan J; Calaway, Mark E; Didion, John P; Gooch, Terry J; Hansen, Stephanie D; Robinson, Nashiya N; Shaw, Ginger D; Spence, Jason S; Quackenbush, Corey R; Barrick, Cordelia J; Nonneman, Randal J.; Kim, Kyungsu; Xenakis, James; Xie, Yuying; Valdar, William; Lenarcic, Alan B; Wang, Wei; Welsh, Catherine E; Fu, Chen-Ping; Zhang, Zhaojun; Holt, James; Guo, Zhishan; Threadgill, David W; Tarantino, Lisa M; Miller, Darla R; Zou, Fei; McMillan, Leonard; Sullivan, Patrick F; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex human traits are influenced by variation in regulatory DNA through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Since regulatory elements are conserved between humans and mice, a thorough annotation of cis regulatory variants in mice could aid in this process. Here we provide a detailed portrait of mouse gene expression across multiple tissues in a three-way diallel. Greater than 80% of mouse genes have cis regulatory variation. These effects influence complex traits and usually extend to the human ortholog. Further, we estimate that at least one in every thousand SNPs creates a cis regulatory effect. We also observe two types of parent-of-origin effects, including classical imprinting and a novel, global allelic imbalance in favor of the paternal allele. We conclude that, as with humans, pervasive regulatory variation influences complex genetic traits in mice and provide a new resource toward understanding the genetic control of transcription in mammals. PMID:25730764

  9. Simultaneous inference of haplotypes and alleles at a causal gene

    PubMed Central

    Larribe, Fabrice; Dupont, Mathieu J.; Boucher, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    We present a methodology which jointly infers haplotypes and the causal alleles at a gene influencing a given trait. Often in human genetic studies, the available data consists of genotypes (series of genetic markers along the chromosomes) and a phenotype. However, for many genetic analyses, one needs haplotypes instead of genotypes. Our methodology is not only able to estimate haplotypes conditionally on the disease status, but is also able to infer the alleles at the unknown disease locus. Some applications of our methodology are in genetic mapping and in genetic counseling. PMID:26500677

  10. Prediction of liability to orofacial clefting using genetic and craniofacial data from parents.

    PubMed Central

    Mossey, P A; Arngrimsson, R; McColl, J; Vintiner, G M; Connor, J M

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P)) and isolated cleft palate (CP) are separate clinical entities and for both polygenic multifactorial aetiology has been proposed. Parents of children with orofacial clefting have been shown to have distinctive differences in their facial shape when compared to matched controls. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that genetic and morphometric factors predispose to orofacial clefting and that these markers differ for CL(P) and CP. Methods-Polymorphisms at the transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) locus in 83 parents of children with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts were analysed, and their craniofacial morphology was assessed using lateral cephalometry. RESULTS: Parents of children with CL(P) and CP showed an increased frequency of the TGFalpha/TaqI C2 allele (RR=4.10, p=0.009) relative to the comparison group. Also the TGFalpha/BamHI A1 allele was more prevalent in the CP parents. MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Using stepwise logistic regression analysis the TGFalpha/TaqI C2 polymorphism provides the best model for liability to orofacial clefting. To determine the type of clefting a model involving interaction between the parental TGFalpha/BamHI and TGFalpha/RsaI genotypes showed the best fit. Using genotype only to predict the clefting defect in the children according to parental genotype, 68.3% could be correctly classified. By adding information on craniofacial measurements in the parents, 76% of CP and 94% of CL(P) parents could be correctly classified. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a model for prediction of liability to orofacial clefting. These findings suggest that different molecular aberrations at the TGFalpha locus may modify the risk for CP and CL(P). Images PMID:9610799

  11. A novel linkage map of sugarcane with evidence for clustering of retrotransposon-based markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of sugarcane as a sustainable crop has unlimited applications. The crop is one of the most economically viable for renewable energy production, and CO2 balance. Linkage maps are valuable tools for understanding genetic and genomic organization, particularly in sugarcane due to its complex polyploid genome of multispecific origins. The overall objective of our study was to construct a novel sugarcane linkage map, compiling AFLP and EST-SSR markers, and to generate data on the distribution of markers anchored to sequences of scIvana_1, a complete sugarcane transposable element, and member of the Copia superfamily. Results The mapping population parents (‘IAC66-6’ and ‘TUC71-7’) contributed equally to polymorphisms, independent of marker type, and generated markers that were distributed into nearly the same number of co-segregation groups (or CGs). Bi-parentally inherited alleles provided the integration of 19 CGs. The marker number per CG ranged from two to 39. The total map length was 4,843.19?cM, with a marker density of 8.87?cM. Markers were assembled into 92 CGs that ranged in length from 1.14 to 404.72?cM, with an estimated average length of 52.64?cM. The greatest distance between two adjacent markers was 48.25?cM. The scIvana_1-based markers (56) were positioned on 21 CGs, but were not regularly distributed. Interestingly, the distance between adjacent scIvana_1-based markers was less than 5?cM, and was observed on five CGs, suggesting a clustered organization. Conclusions Results indicated the use of a NBS-profiling technique was efficient to develop retrotransposon-based markers in sugarcane. The simultaneous maximum-likelihood estimates of linkage and linkage phase based strategies confirmed the suitability of its approach to estimate linkage, and construct the linkage map. Interestingly, using our genetic data it was possible to calculate the number of retrotransposon scIvana_1 (~60) copies in the sugarcane genome, confirming previously reported molecular results. In addition, this research possibly will have indirect implications in crop economics e.g., productivity enhancement via QTL studies, as the mapping population parents differ in response to an important fungal disease. PMID:22742069

  12. Molecular breeding for introgression of fatty acid desaturase mutant alleles (ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B) enhances oil quality in high and low oil containing peanut genotypes.

    PubMed

    Janila, Pasupuleti; Pandey, Manish K; Shasidhar, Yaduru; Variath, Murali T; Sriswathi, Manda; Khera, Pawan; Manohar, Surendra S; Nagesh, Patne; Vishwakarma, Manish K; Mishra, Gyan P; Radhakrishnan, T; Manivannan, N; Dobariya, K L; Vasanthi, R P; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    High oleate peanuts have two marketable benefits, health benefits to consumers and extended shelf life of peanut products. Two mutant alleles present on linkage group a09 (ahFAD2A) and b09 (ahFAD2B) control composition of three major fatty acids, oleic, linoleic and palmitic acids which together determine peanut oil quality. In conventional breeding, selection for fatty acid composition is delayed to advanced generations. However by using DNA markers, breeders can reject large number of plants in early generations and therefore can optimize time and resources. Here, two approaches of molecular breeding namely marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) and marker-assisted selection (MAS) were employed to transfer two FAD2 mutant alleles from SunOleic 95R into the genetic background of ICGV 06110, ICGV 06142 and ICGV 06420. In summary, 82 MABC and 387 MAS derived introgression lines (ILs) were developed using DNA markers with elevated oleic acid varying from 62 to 83%. Oleic acid increased by 0.5-1.1 folds, with concomitant reduction of linoleic acid by 0.4-1.0 folds and palmitic acid by 0.1-0.6 folds among ILs compared to recurrent parents. Finally, high oleate ILs, 27 with high oil (53-58%), and 28 ILs with low oil content (42-50%) were selected that may be released for cultivation upon further evaluation. PMID:26566838

  13. Estimation of genetic marker effects for CAPN1, CAST, and GHR on carcass quality traits in Angus cattle selected to increase minor marker frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and interactions cannot be accurately estimated when minor marker allele frequencies (MAF) are low. To increase the accuracy of estimation for three marker systems in commercial use, an Angus population at USMARC was subjected to marker assisted-selection for multiple years t...

  14. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  15. Marker development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  16. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  17. Allele-Dependent Barley Grain ?-Amylase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Erkkilä, Maria J.; Leah, Robert; Ahokas, Hannu; Cameron-Mills, Verena

    1998-01-01

    The wild ancestor of cultivated barley, Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum (K. Koch) A. & Gr. (H. spontaneum), is a source of wide genetic diversity, including traits that are important for malting quality. A high ?-amylase trait was previously identified in H. spontaneum strains from Israel, and transferred into the backcross progeny of a cross with the domesticated barley cv Adorra. We have used Southern-blot analysis and ?-amy1 gene characterization to demonstrate that the high ?-amylase trait in the backcross line is co-inherited with the ?-amy1 gene from the H. spontaneum parent. We have analyzed the ?-amy1 gene organization in various domesticated and wild-type barley strains and identified three distinct ?-amy1 alleles. Two of these ?-amy1 alleles were present in modern barley, one of which was specifically found in good malting barley cultivars. The third allele, linked with high grain ?-amylase activity, was found only in a H. spontaneum strain from the Judean foothills in Israel. The sequences of three isolated ?-amy1 alleles are compared. The involvement of specific intron III sequences, in particular a 126-bp palindromic insertion, in the allele-dependent expression of ?-amylase activity in barley grain is proposed. PMID:9625721

  18. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Genetic Diversity and Relatedness of Sweet Cherry (Prunus Avium L.) Cultivars Based on Single Nucleotide Polymorphic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez i Marti, Angel; Athanson, Blessing; Koepke, Tyson; Font i Forcada, Carolina; Dhingra, Amit; Oraguzie, Nnadozie

    2012-01-01

    Most previous studies on genetic fingerprinting and cultivar relatedness in sweet cherry were based on isoenzyme, RAPD, and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. This study was carried out to assess the utility of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers generated from 3? untranslated regions (UTR) for genetic fingerprinting in sweet cherry. A total of 114 sweet cherry germplasm representing advanced selections, commercial cultivars, and old cultivars imported from different parts of the world were screened with seven SSR markers developed from other Prunus species and with 40 SNPs obtained from 3? UTR sequences of Rainier and Bing sweet cherry cultivars. Both types of marker study had 99 accessions in common. The SSR data was used to validate the SNP results. Results showed that the average number of alleles per locus, mean observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and polymorphic information content values were higher in SSRs than in SNPs although both set of markers were similar in their grouping of the sweet cherry accessions as shown in the dendrogram. SNPs were able to distinguish sport mutants from their wild type germplasm. For example, “Stella” was separated from “Compact Stella.” This demonstrates the greater power of SNPs for discriminating mutants from their original parents than SSRs. In addition, SNP markers confirmed parentage and also determined relationships of the accessions in a manner consistent with their pedigree relationships. We would recommend the use of 3? UTR SNPs for genetic fingerprinting, parentage verification, gene mapping, and study of genetic diversity in sweet cherry. PMID:22737155

  20. MICROSATELLITE MARKERS FOR THE GRAPEVINE PATHOGEN, EUTYPA LATA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We isolated and characterized nine polymorphic microsatellite markers for Eutypa lata, a fungal pathogen responsible for Eutypa dieback of grapevine, in populations from two California vineyards (24 isolates per vineyard). Allele frequency ranged from two to 11 alleles per locus and haploid gene di...

  1. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5?- and 3?-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3?-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5?-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3?- nor the 5?-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold, in our population. These data circumscribe the influence of these polymorphisms in the clinical outcome of 5-FU and question their use for establishing 5-FU dosage, above all when additional genetic factors are not considered. PMID:26166093

  2. Segregation of male-sterility alleles across a species boundary.

    PubMed

    Weller, S G; Sakai, A K; Culley, T M; Duong, L; Danielson, R E

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid zones may serve as bridges permitting gene flow between species, including alleles influencing the evolution of breeding systems. Using greenhouse crosses, we assessed the likelihood that a hybrid zone could serve as a conduit for transfer of nuclear male-sterility alleles between a gynodioecious species and a hermaphroditic species with very rare females in some populations. Segregation patterns in progeny of crosses between rare females of hermaphroditic Schiedea menziesii and hermaphroditic plants of gynodioecious Schiedea salicaria heterozygous at the male-sterility locus, and between female S. salicaria and hermaphroditic plants from the hybrid zone, were used to determine whether male-sterility was controlled at the same locus in the parental species and the hybrid zone. Segregations of females and hermaphrodites in approximately equal ratios from many of the crosses indicate that the same nuclear male-sterility allele occurs in the parent species and the hybrid zone. These rare male-sterility alleles in S. menziesii may result from gene flow from S. salicaria through the hybrid zone, presumably facilitated by wind pollination in S. salicaria. Alternatively, rare male-sterility alleles might result from a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii, or possibly de novo evolution of male sterility. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some species of Schiedea have probably evolved separate sexes independently, but not in the lineage containing S. salicaria and S. menziesii. High levels of selfing and expression of strong inbreeding depression in S. menziesii, which together should favour females in populations, argue against a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii. PMID:24417506

  3. Bone Markers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  4. allele.freq.plot Plots population allele frequencies per locus represented by dots of varying size

    E-print Network

    Borges, Rita

    allele.freq.plot Plots population allele frequencies per locus represented by dots of varying size Description For each locus a plot is constructed in a new window. Allele frequencies are represented by dots of varying diameter. Allele codes are indicated on the x axis and populations on the y axis Usage allele.freq.plot

  5. Allelic Variation in Paralogs of GDP-l-Galactose Phosphorylase Is a Major Determinant of Vitamin C Concentrations in Apple Fruit1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Chagné, David; Laing, William A.; Keulemans, Johan; Davey, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genetic factors underlying the regulation of fruit vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid [AsA]) concentrations, quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies were carried out in an F1 progeny derived from a cross between the apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars Telamon and Braeburn over three years. QTL were identified for AsA, glutathione, total antioxidant activity in both flesh and skin tissues, and various quality traits, including flesh browning. Four regions on chromosomes 10, 11, 16, and 17 contained stable fruit AsA-QTL clusters. Mapping of AsA metabolic genes identified colocations between orthologs of GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and nucleobase-ascorbate transporter within these QTL clusters. Of particular interest are the three paralogs of MdGGP, which all colocated within AsA-QTL clusters. Allelic variants of MdGGP1 and MdGGP3 derived from the cultivar Braeburn parent were also consistently associated with higher fruit total AsA concentrations both within the mapping population (up to 10-fold) and across a range of commercial apple germplasm (up to 6-fold). Striking differences in the expression of the cv Braeburn MdGGP1 allele between fruit from high- and low-AsA genotypes clearly indicate a key role for MdGGP1 in the regulation of fruit AsA concentrations, and this MdGGP allele-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism marker represents an excellent candidate for directed breeding for enhanced fruit AsA concentrations. Interestingly, colocations were also found between MdDHAR3-3 and a stable QTL for browning in the cv Telamon parent, highlighting links between the redox status of the AsA pool and susceptibility to flesh browning. PMID:23001142

  6. Allelic variation in paralogs of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase is a major determinant of vitamin C concentrations in apple fruit.

    PubMed

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Chagné, David; Laing, William A; Keulemans, Johan; Davey, Mark W

    2012-11-01

    To identify the genetic factors underlying the regulation of fruit vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid [AsA]) concentrations, quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies were carried out in an F1 progeny derived from a cross between the apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars Telamon and Braeburn over three years. QTL were identified for AsA, glutathione, total antioxidant activity in both flesh and skin tissues, and various quality traits, including flesh browning. Four regions on chromosomes 10, 11, 16, and 17 contained stable fruit AsA-QTL clusters. Mapping of AsA metabolic genes identified colocations between orthologs of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and nucleobase-ascorbate transporter within these QTL clusters. Of particular interest are the three paralogs of MdGGP, which all colocated within AsA-QTL clusters. Allelic variants of MdGGP1 and MdGGP3 derived from the cultivar Braeburn parent were also consistently associated with higher fruit total AsA concentrations both within the mapping population (up to 10-fold) and across a range of commercial apple germplasm (up to 6-fold). Striking differences in the expression of the cv Braeburn MdGGP1 allele between fruit from high- and low-AsA genotypes clearly indicate a key role for MdGGP1 in the regulation of fruit AsA concentrations, and this MdGGP allele-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism marker represents an excellent candidate for directed breeding for enhanced fruit AsA concentrations. Interestingly, colocations were also found between MdDHAR3-3 and a stable QTL for browning in the cv Telamon parent, highlighting links between the redox status of the AsA pool and susceptibility to flesh browning. PMID:23001142

  7. Evidence for mito-nuclear and sex-linked reproductive barriers between the hybrid Italian sparrow and its parent species.

    PubMed

    Trier, Cassandra N; Hermansen, Jo S; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Bailey, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    Studies of reproductive isolation between homoploid hybrid species and their parent species have rarely been carried out. Here we investigate reproductive barriers between a recently recognized hybrid bird species, the Italian sparrow Passer italiae and its parent species, the house sparrow P. domesticus and Spanish sparrow P. hispaniolensis. Reproductive barriers can be difficult to study in hybrid species due to lack of geographical contact between taxa. However, the Italian sparrow lives parapatrically with the house sparrow and both sympatrically and parapatrically with the Spanish sparrow. Through whole-transcriptome sequencing of six individuals of each of the two parent species we identified a set of putatively parent species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. After filtering for coverage, genotyping success (>97%) and multiple SNPs per gene, we retained 86 species-informative, genic, nuclear and mitochondrial SNP markers from 84 genes for analysis of 612 male individuals. We show that a disproportionately large number of sex-linked genes, as well as the mitochondria and nuclear genes with mitochondrial function, exhibit sharp clines at the boundaries between the hybrid and the parent species, suggesting a role for mito-nuclear and sex-linked incompatibilities in forming reproductive barriers. We suggest that genomic conflict via interactions between mitochondria and sex-linked genes with mitochondrial function ("mother's curse") at one boundary and centromeric drive at the other may best explain our findings. Hybrid speciation in the Italian sparrow may therefore be influenced by mechanisms similar to those involved in non-hybrid speciation, but with the formation of two geographically separated species boundaries instead of one. Spanish sparrow alleles at some loci have spread north to form reproductive barriers with house sparrows, while house sparrow alleles at different loci, including some on the same chromosome, have spread in the opposite direction to form barriers against Spanish sparrows. PMID:24415954

  8. Mapping with RAD (restriction-site associated DNA) markers to rapidly identify QTL for stem rust resistance in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W F; Saha, M C; Johnson, E A; Slabaugh, M B

    2011-05-01

    A mapping population was created to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola in Lolium perenne. A susceptible and a resistant plant were crossed to produce a pseudo-testcross population of 193 F(1) individuals. Markers were produced by the restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) process, which uses massively parallel and multiplexed sequencing of reduced-representation libraries. Additional simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers were combined with the RAD markers to produce maps for the female (738 cM) and male (721 cM) parents. Stem rust phenotypes (number of pustules per plant) were determined in replicated greenhouse trials by inoculation with a field-collected, genetically heterogeneous population of urediniospores. The F(1) progeny displayed continuous distribution of phenotypes and transgressive segregation. We detected three resistance QTL. The most prominent QTL (qLpPg1) is located near 41 cM on linkage group (LG) 7 with a 2-LOD interval of 8 cM, and accounts for 30-38% of the stem rust phenotypic variance. QTL were detected also on LG1 (qLpPg2) and LG6 (qLpPg3), each accounting for approximately 10% of phenotypic variance. Alleles of loci closely linked to these QTL originated from the resistant parent for qLpPg1 and from both parents for qLpPg2 and qLpPg3. Observed quantitative nature of the resistance may be due to partial-resistance effects against all pathogen genotypes, or qualitative effects completely preventing infection by only some genotypes in the genetically mixed inoculum. RAD markers facilitated rapid construction of new genetic maps in this outcrossing species and will enable development of sequence-based markers linked to stem rust resistance in L. perenne. PMID:21344184

  9. Genetic diversity analysis among collected purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) accessions using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Alam, M Amirul; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Arolu, Ibrahim Wasiu; Abdul Latif, M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships among 45 collected purslane accessions were evaluated using ISSR markers. The 28 primers gave a total of 167 bands, among which 163 were polymorphic (97.6%). The genetic diversity as estimated by Shannon's information index was 0.513, revealing a quite high level of genetic diversity in the germplasm. The average number of observed allele, effective allele, expected heterozygosity, polymorphic information content (PIC) and Nei's index were 5.96, 1.59, 0.43, 0.35 and 0.35, respectively. The UPGMA dendrogram based on Nei's genetic distance grouped the whole germplasm into 7 distinct clusters. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that 89% of total variation occurred within population, while 11% were found among populations. Based on the constructed dendrogram using ISSR markers those accessions that are far from each other by virtue of genetic origin and diversity index (like Ac1 and Ac42; Ac19 and Ac45; Ac9 and Ac23; Ac18 and A25; Ac24 and Ac18) are strongly recommended to select as parent for future breeding program to develop high yielding and stress tolerant purslane variety in contribution to global food security. PMID:25468001

  10. No Evidence for Enrichment in Schizophrenia for Common Allelic Associations at Imprinted Loci

    PubMed Central

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Kirov, George; Rees, Elliott; Isles, Anthony R.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Most genetic studies assume that the function of a genetic variant is independent of the parent from which it is inherited, but this is not always true. The best known example of parent-of-origin effects arises with respect to alleles at imprinted loci. In classical imprinting, characteristically, either the maternal or paternal copy is expressed, but not both. Only alleles present in one of the parental copies of the gene, the expressed copy, is likely to contribute to disease. It has been postulated that imprinting is important in central nervous system development, and that consequently, imprinted loci may be involved in schizophrenia. If this is true, allowing for parent-of-origin effects might be important in genetic studies of schizophrenia. Here, we use genome-wide association data from one of the world’s largest samples (N = 695) of parent schizophrenia-offspring trios to test for parent-of-origin effects. To maximise power, we restricted our analyses to test two main hypotheses. If imprinting plays a disproportionate role in schizophrenia susceptibility, we postulated a) that alleles showing robust evidence for association to schizophrenia from previous genome-wide association studies should be enriched for parent-of-origin effects and b) that genes at loci imprinted in humans or mice should be enriched both for genome-wide significant associations, and in our sample, for parent-of-origin effects. Neither prediction was supported in the present study. We have shown, that it is unlikely that parent-of-origin effects or imprinting play particularly important roles in schizophrenia, although our findings do not exclude such effects at specific loci nor do they exclude such effects among rare alleles. PMID:26633303

  11. The effect of wild card designations and rare alleles in forensic DNA database searches.

    PubMed

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John S; Curran, James M; Morling, Niels

    2015-05-01

    Forensic DNA databases are powerful tools used for the identification of persons of interest in criminal investigations. Typically, they consist of two parts: (1) a database containing DNA profiles of known individuals and (2) a database of DNA profiles associated with crime scenes. The risk of adventitious or chance matches between crimes and innocent people increases as the number of profiles within a database grows and more data is shared between various forensic DNA databases, e.g. from different jurisdictions. The DNA profiles obtained from crime scenes are often partial because crime samples may be compromised in quantity or quality. When an individual's profile cannot be resolved from a DNA mixture, ambiguity is introduced. A wild card, F, may be used in place of an allele that has dropped out or when an ambiguous profile is resolved from a DNA mixture. Variant alleles that do not correspond to any marker in the allelic ladder or appear above or below the extent of the allelic ladder range are assigned the allele designation R for rare allele. R alleles are position specific with respect to the observed/unambiguous allele. The F and R designations are made when the exact genotype has not been determined. The F and R designation are treated as wild cards for searching, which results in increased chance of adventitious matches. We investigated the probability of adventitious matches given these two types of wild cards. PMID:25576850

  12. Development of genic-SSR markers by deep transcriptome sequencing in pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh], one of the most important food legumes of semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, has limited genomic resources, particularly expressed sequence based (genic) markers. We report a comprehensive set of validated genic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using deep transcriptome sequencing, and its application in genetic diversity analysis and mapping. Results In this study, 43,324 transcriptome shotgun assembly unigene contigs were assembled from 1.696 million 454 GS-FLX sequence reads of separate pooled cDNA libraries prepared from leaf, root, stem and immature seed of two pigeonpea varieties, Asha and UPAS 120. A total of 3,771 genic-SSR loci, excluding homopolymeric and compound repeats, were identified; of which 2,877 PCR primer pairs were designed for marker development. Dinucleotide was the most common repeat motif with a frequency of 60.41%, followed by tri- (34.52%), hexa- (2.62%), tetra- (1.67%) and pentanucleotide (0.76%) repeat motifs. Primers were synthesized and tested for 772 of these loci with repeat lengths of ?18 bp. Of these, 550 markers were validated for consistent amplification in eight diverse pigeonpea varieties; 71 were found to be polymorphic on agarose gel electrophoresis. Genetic diversity analysis was done on 22 pigeonpea varieties and eight wild species using 20 highly polymorphic genic-SSR markers. The number of alleles at these loci ranged from 4-10 and the polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.46 to 0.72. Neighbor-joining dendrogram showed distinct separation of the different groups of pigeonpea cultivars and wild species. Deep transcriptome sequencing of the two parental lines helped in silico identification of polymorphic genic-SSR loci to facilitate the rapid development of an intra-species reference genetic map, a subset of which was validated for expected allelic segregation in the reference mapping population. Conclusion We developed 550 validated genic-SSR markers in pigeonpea using deep transcriptome sequencing. From these, 20 highly polymorphic markers were used to evaluate the genetic relationship among species of the genus Cajanus. A comprehensive set of genic-SSR markers was developed as an important genomic resource for diversity analysis and genetic mapping in pigeonpea. PMID:21251263

  13. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae).

    PubMed

    Quan, Zhiwu; Pan, Lei; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and identified in the aquatic plant Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae). This species, which belongs to basal Magnoliophyta, reproduces sexually. All of these 11 microsatellite markers yielded 25 alleles in a survey of a wild population of 34 individuals. Two or three alleles per locus were detected, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.056 to 0.634 and observed heterozygosity from 0.000 to 0.088. These simple sequence repeat markers will be useful for evaluating the genetic structure of the E. ferox population in the future. PMID:21564641

  14. Always look on both sides: Phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily,...

  15. Announcement of Population Data Allele frequencies for 70 autosomal SNP loci with

    E-print Network

    Announcement of Population Data Allele frequencies for 70 autosomal SNP loci with U.S. Caucasian nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). For each sample, the 70 SNP markers were typed in 11 unique 6-plexes-Weinberg equilibrium indicated a statistically significant result. In order to evaluate the minimum number of SNP loci

  16. Molecular mapping of the mutant fap4(A24) allele for elevated palmitate concentration in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.] oil with an elevated palmitate concentration is useful for some food and industrial applications. The objective of this study was to map the genetic location of the fap4(A24) allele that controls an increase in palmitate concentration and to identify molecular marker...

  17. Genomic analysis of hybrid rice varieties reveals numerous superior alleles that contribute to heterosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuehui; Yang, Shihua; Gong, Junyi; Zhao, Yan; Feng, Qi; Gong, Hao; Li, Wenjun; Zhan, Qilin; Cheng, Benyi; Xia, Junhui; Chen, Neng; Hao, Zhongna; Liu, Kunyan; Zhu, Chuanrang; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Danlin; Zhou, Congcong; Lu, Yiqi; Weng, Qijun; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Li, Jiayang; Han, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of heterosis is one of the most important applications of genetics in agriculture. However, the genetic mechanisms of heterosis are only partly understood, and a global view of heterosis from a representative number of hybrid combinations is lacking. Here we develop an integrated genomic approach to construct a genome map for 1,495 elite hybrid rice varieties and their inbred parental lines. We investigate 38 agronomic traits and identify 130 associated loci. In-depth analyses of the effects of heterozygous genotypes reveal that there are only a few loci with strong overdominance effects in hybrids, but a strong correlation is observed between the yield and the number of superior alleles. While most parental inbred lines have only a small number of superior alleles, high-yielding hybrid varieties have several. We conclude that the accumulation of numerous rare superior alleles with positive dominance is an important contributor to the heterotic phenomena. PMID:25651972

  18. Transgene- and locus-dependent imprinting reveals allele-specific chromosome conformations.

    PubMed

    Lonfat, Nicolas; Montavon, Thomas; Jebb, David; Tschopp, Patrick; Nguyen Huynh, Thi Hanh; Zakany, Jozsef; Duboule, Denis

    2013-07-16

    When positioned into the integrin ?-6 gene, an Hoxd9lacZ reporter transgene displayed parental imprinting in mouse embryos. While the expression from the paternal allele was comparable with patterns seen for the same transgene when present at the neighboring HoxD locus, almost no signal was scored at this integration site when the transgene was inherited from the mother, although the Itga6 locus itself is not imprinted. The transgene exhibited maternal allele-specific DNA hypermethylation acquired during oogenesis, and its expression silencing was reversible on passage through the male germ line. Histone modifications also corresponded to profiles described at known imprinted loci. Chromosome conformation analyses revealed distinct chromatin microarchitectures, with a more compact structure characterizing the maternally inherited repressed allele. Such genetic analyses of well-characterized transgene insertions associated with a de novo-induced parental imprint may help us understand the molecular determinants of imprinting. PMID:23818637

  19. Evidence of Allelic Suppression for Transcripts Expressed in Day 30 Pig Embryos by SNP Genotyping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic imprinting results in alleles being differentially expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Parthenogenetic and biparental pig embryo gene expression profiles were compared using three cDNA microarray platforms. Comparison of the profiles of the two tissue types indicated different...

  20. Multiplexed assays for evaluation of Y-SNP markers in US populations

    E-print Network

    Multiplexed assays for evaluation of Y-SNP markers in US populations Peter M. Vallone*, John M chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, we constructed several novel multiplex allele) multiplex kit to examine 50 Y-SNP markers in 229 males from two US Caucasian and African American

  1. Allelic Differences within and among Sister Spores of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus etunicatum Suggest Segregation at Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are root-inhabiting fungi that form mutualistic symbioses with their host plants. AMF are made up of coenocytic networks of hyphae through which nuclei and organelles can freely migrate. In this study, we investigated the possibility of a genetic bottleneck and segregation of allelic variation at sporulation for a low-copy Polymerase1-like gene, PLS. Specifically, our objectives were (1) to estimate what allelic diversity is passed on to a single spore (2) to determine whether this diversity is less than the total amount of variation found in all spores (3) to investigate whether there is any differential segregation of allelic variation. We inoculated three tomato plants with a single spore of Glomus etunicatum each and after six months sampled between two and three daughter spores per tomato plant. Pyrosequencing PLS amplicons in eight spores revealed high levels of allelic diversity; between 43 and 152 alleles per spore. We corroborated the spore pyrosequencing results with Sanger- and pyrosequenced allele distributions from the original parent isolate. Both sequencing methods retrieved the most abundant alleles from the offspring spore allele distributions. Our results indicate that individual spores contain only a subset of the total allelic variation from the pooled spores and parent isolate. Patterns of allele diversity between spores suggest the possibility for segregation of PLS alleles among spores. We conclude that a genetic bottleneck could potentially occur during sporulation in AMF, with resulting differences in genetic variation among sister spores. We suggest that the effects of this bottleneck may be countered by anastomosis (hyphal fusion) between related hyphae. PMID:24386173

  2. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections. PMID:26407876

  3. RHD allele distribution in Africans of Mali

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Franz F; Moulds, Joann M; Tounkara, Anatole; Kouriba, Bourema; Flegel, Willy A

    2003-01-01

    Background Aberrant and non-functional RHD alleles are much more frequent in Africans than in Europeans. The DAU cluster of RHD alleles exemplifies that the alleles frequent in Africans have evaded recognition until recently. A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in any African population was lacking. Results We surveyed the molecular structure and frequency of RHD alleles in Mali (West Africa) by evaluating 116 haplotypes. Only 69% could be attributed to standard RHD (55%) or the RHD deletion (14%). The aberrant RHD allele DAU-0 was predicted for 19%, RHD? for 7% and Ccdes for 4% of all haplotypes. DAU-3 and the new RHD allele RHD(L207F), dubbed DMA, were found in one haplotype each. A PCR-RFLP for the detection of the hybrid Rhesus box diagnostic for the RHD deletion in Europeans was false positive in 9 individuals, including all carriers of RHD? . Including two silent mutations and the RHD deletion, a total of 9 alleles could be differentiated. Conclusion Besides standard RHD and the RHD deletion, DAU-0, RHD? and Ccdes are major alleles in Mali. Our survey proved that the most frequent alleles of West Africans have been recognized allowing to devise reliable genotyping and phenotyping strategies. PMID:14505497

  4. DNA Marker Transmission and Linkage Analysis in Populations Derived from a Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) x Erianthus arundinaceus Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-wen; Deng, Hai-hua; Liu, Rui; He, Hui-yi; Fu, Cheng; Chen, Yong-sheng; Liu, Fu-ye; Li, Qi-wei; Jackson, Phillip; Aitken, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Introgression of Erianthus arundinaceus has been the focus of several sugarcane breeding programs in the world, because the species has desirable traits such as high biomass production, vigour, ratooning ability and good resistance to environmental stresses and disease. In this study four genetic maps were constructed for two intergeneric populations. The first population (BC1) was generated from a cross between an Erianthus/Saccharum hybrid YC96-40 and a commercial sugarcane variety CP84-1198. The second population (BC2) was generated from a cross between YCE01-116, a progeny of the BC1 cross and NJ57-416, a commercial sugarcane cultivar. Markers across both populations were generated using 35 AFLP and 23 SSR primer pairs. A total of 756 and 728 polymorphic markers were scored in the BC1 and BC2 populations, respectively. In the BC1 population, a higher proportion of markers was derived from the Erianthus ancestor than those from the Saccharum ancestor Badila. In the BC2 population, both the number and proportion of markers derived from Erianthus were approximately half of those in the BC1 population. Linkage analysis led to the construction of 38, 57, 36 and 47 linkage groups (LGs) for YC96-40, CP84-1198, YCE01-116, and NJ57-416, encompassing 116, 174, 97 and 159 markers (including single dose, double dose and bi-parental markers), respectively. These LGs could be further placed into four, five, five and six homology groups (HGs), respectively, based on information from multi-allelic SSR markers and repulsion phase linkages detected between LGs. Analysis of repulsion phase linkage indicated that Erianthus behaved like a true autopolyploid. PMID:26053338

  5. High interpopulation homogeneity in Central Argentina as assessed by Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs)

    PubMed Central

    García, Angelina; Dermarchi, Darío A.; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Pauro, Maia; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2015-01-01

    The population of Argentina has already been studied with regard to several genetic markers, but much more data are needed for the appropriate definition of its genetic profile. This study aimed at investigating the admixture patterns and genetic structure in Central Argentina, using biparental markers and comparing the results with those previously obtained by us with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the same samples. A total of 521 healthy unrelated individuals living in 13 villages of the Córdoba and San Luis provinces were tested. The individuals were genotyped for ten autosomal ancestry informative markers (AIMs). Allele frequencies were compared with those of African, European and Native American populations, chosen to represent parental contributions. The AIM estimates indicated a greater influence of the Native American ancestry as compared to previous studies in the same or other Argentinean regions, but smaller than that observed with the mtDNA tests. These differences can be explained, respectively, by different genetic contributions between rural and urban areas, and asymmetric gene flow occurred in the past. But a most unexpected finding was the marked interpopulation genetic homogeneity found in villages located in diverse geographic environments across a wide territory, suggesting considerable gene flow. PMID:26500436

  6. High interpopulation homogeneity in Central Argentina as assessed by Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs).

    PubMed

    García, Angelina; Dermarchi, Darío A; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Pauro, Maia; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M; Salzano, Francisco M; Hutz, Mara H

    2015-01-01

    The population of Argentina has already been studied with regard to several genetic markers, but much more data are needed for the appropriate definition of its genetic profile. This study aimed at investigating the admixture patterns and genetic structure in Central Argentina, using biparental markers and comparing the results with those previously obtained by us with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the same samples. A total of 521 healthy unrelated individuals living in 13 villages of the Córdoba and San Luis provinces were tested. The individuals were genotyped for ten autosomal ancestry informative markers (AIMs). Allele frequencies were compared with those of African, European and Native American populations, chosen to represent parental contributions. The AIM estimates indicated a greater influence of the Native American ancestry as compared to previous studies in the same or other Argentinean regions, but smaller than that observed with the mtDNA tests. These differences can be explained, respectively, by different genetic contributions between rural and urban areas, and asymmetric gene flow occurred in the past. But a most unexpected finding was the marked interpopulation genetic homogeneity found in villages located in diverse geographic environments across a wide territory, suggesting considerable gene flow. PMID:26500436

  7. Phenotypic and QTL allelic associations among embryonic developmental rate, body size, and precocious maturation in male rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Colin J; Bernier, Nicholas J; Danzmann, Roy G; Ferguson, Moira M

    2014-12-01

    We examined associations among embryonic developmental rate (EDR) as measured by hatching time, juvenile body weight (BW) and propensity for precocial sexual maturation (PM) at two years in two sets of diallel crosses of rainbow trout produced in two spawning seasons (September and December) at both the phenotypic and genotypic levels. Dams and sires had highly significant effects on the body weight of their male juvenile progeny on three measurement dates where parental effects remained consistent through time. Dams spawning earlier in the season produced a greater number of mature male progeny (56.7%) than did later spawning females (25.6%). The families from the December lot showed the expected associations among traits in that earlier hatching fish were significantly heavier on all three measurement dates than later hatching fish and were more likely to mature earlier when families were combined. Moreover, earlier maturing fish were significantly heavier on the third measurement date than those that did not mature. In the September lot, mature fish were significantly heavier as juveniles on all three measurement dates than immature fish as predicted but no significant associations were detected between EDR and BW or between PM and EDR. Significant QTL were detected for all three traits but the linkage group location varied depending on the trait and half-sib group analyzed (across dams and sires in each lot). A strong QTL for EDR with genome-wide effects was detected on linkage group RT-8 in all four half-sib analyses. None of the four linkage groups analyzed had QTL for all three traits. However, the phenotypic association between EDR and BW observed in the December lot was supported by the co-localization of QTL to linkage group RT-8 and a positive coupling of allelic effects. RT-8 marker alleles significantly associated with faster EDR were also associated with larger BW and this was observed in numerous families on all three measurement dates. Linkage group RT-24 had weaker QTL for all three traits in the September lot but these were not detected in the same half-sib group simultaneously. At the allelic level, marker alleles for faster EDR were also associated with BW but only at the third measurement date and the progeny of one male. Similarly, RT-30 had weaker QTL for EDR and PM in the December paternal half-sib analysis but no associations were evident at the allelic level. The detection of associations between life history traits and growth at both the phenotypic and genotypic levels has significant implications to aquaculture breeding programs where selection for a desirable trait may lead to unwanted alterations of other traits. Furthermore, the differences between spawning season lots emphasize the complex interaction between environment and genotype on economically important traits and the resulting challenges for aquaculture. PMID:25023604

  8. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144?0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  9. Allelic Variation in a Willow Warbler Genomic Region Is Associated with Climate Clines

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Keith W.; Liedvogel, Miriam; Addison, BriAnne; Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Lifjeld, Jan T.; Lundberg, Max; Åkesson, Susanne; Bensch, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1) that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1) allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2) these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3) the northern-allele or “altitude variant” of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios. PMID:24788148

  10. Biased Allele Expression and Aggression in Hybrid Honeybees may be Influenced by Inappropriate Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Joshua D.; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Miguel E.; Tsuruda, Jennifer M.; Hunt, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid effects are often exhibited asymmetrically between reciprocal families. One way this could happen is if silencing of one parent’s allele occurs in one lineage but not the other, which could affect the phenotypes of the hybrids asymmetrically by silencing that allele in only one of the hybrid families. We have previously tested for allele-specific expression biases in hybrids of European and Africanized honeybees and we found that there was an asymmetric overabundance of genes showing a maternal bias in the family with a European mother. Here, we further analyze allelic bias in these hybrids to ascertain whether they may underlie previously described asymmetries in metabolism and aggression in similar hybrid families and we speculate on what mechanisms may produce this biased allele usage. We find that there are over 500 genes that have some form of biased allele usage and over 200 of these are biased toward the maternal allele but only in the family with European maternity, mirroring the pattern observed for aggression and metabolic rate. This asymmetrically biased set is enriched for genes in loci associated with aggressive behavior and also for mitochondrial-localizing proteins. It contains many genes that play important roles in metabolic regulation. Moreover we find genes relating to the piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway, which is involved in chromatin modifications and epigenetic regulation and may help explain the mechanism underlying this asymmetric allele use. Based on these findings and previous work investigating aggression and metabolism in bees, we propose a novel hypothesis; that the asymmetric pattern of biased allele usage in these hybrids is a result of inappropriate use of piRNA-mediated nuclear-cytoplasmic signaling that is normally used to modulate aggression in honeybees. This is the first report of widespread asymmetric effects on allelic expression in hybrids and may represent a novel mechanism for gene regulation. PMID:26648977

  11. Development of simple sequence repeat markers for the soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon J; Stone, Christine L; Posada-Buitrago, Martha Lucia; Boore, Jeffrey L; Neelam, Beena A; Stephens, Robert M; Luster, Douglas G; Frederick, Reid D; Pedley, Kerry F

    2008-11-01

    Twenty-four simple sequence repeat markers were developed for Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungal pathogen of soybean (Glycine max) and other legumes. All 24 of the loci were evaluated on 28 isolates of P. pachyrhizi. Twenty-one loci were polymorphic, with allelic diversity ranging from two to eight alleles, and null alleles were observed for eight of the 24 loci. A preliminary screen with the closely related species, P. meibomiae, indicated that these primer pairs are specific to P. pachyrhizi. PMID:21586030

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in white-tailed deer 

    E-print Network

    DeWoody, James Andrew

    1994-01-01

    the repeat. of these seven loci, five amplified well and exhibited polymorphism in animals from a pedigreed herd of whitetail deer. All five markers show codominant Mendelian inheritance in the pedigreed families. Heterozygositites, allele frequencies...

  13. S-genotype identification based on allele-specific PCR in Japanese pear

    PubMed Central

    Nashima, Kenji; Terakami, Shingo; Nishio, Sogo; Kunihisa, Miyuki; Nishitani, Chikako; Saito, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2015-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) is controlled by the single, multi-allelic S-locus. Information about the S-genotypes is important for breeding and the selection of pollen donors for fruit production. Rapid and reliable S-genotype identification system is necessary for efficient breeding of new cultivars in Japanese pear. We designed S allele-specific PCR primer pairs for ten previously reported S-RNase alleles (S1–S9 and Sk) as simple and reliable method. Specific nucleotide sequences were chosen to design the primers to amplify fragments of only the corresponding S alleles. The developed primer pairs were evaluated by using homozygous S-genotypes (S1/S1–S9/S9 and S4sm/S4sm) and 14 major Japanese pear cultivars, and found that S allele-specific primer pairs can identify S-genotypes effectively. The S allele-specific primer pairs developed in this study will be useful for efficient S-genotyping and for marker-assisted selection in Japanese pear breeding programs. PMID:26175617

  14. S-genotype identification based on allele-specific PCR in Japanese pear.

    PubMed

    Nashima, Kenji; Terakami, Shingo; Nishio, Sogo; Kunihisa, Miyuki; Nishitani, Chikako; Saito, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2015-06-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) is controlled by the single, multi-allelic S-locus. Information about the S-genotypes is important for breeding and the selection of pollen donors for fruit production. Rapid and reliable S-genotype identification system is necessary for efficient breeding of new cultivars in Japanese pear. We designed S allele-specific PCR primer pairs for ten previously reported S-RNase alleles (S (1)-S (9) and S (k)) as simple and reliable method. Specific nucleotide sequences were chosen to design the primers to amplify fragments of only the corresponding S alleles. The developed primer pairs were evaluated by using homozygous S-genotypes (S (1)/S (1)-S (9)/S (9) and S (4sm)/S (4sm)) and 14 major Japanese pear cultivars, and found that S allele-specific primer pairs can identify S-genotypes effectively. The S allele-specific primer pairs developed in this study will be useful for efficient S-genotyping and for marker-assisted selection in Japanese pear breeding programs. PMID:26175617

  15. Examining Two Sets of Introgression Lines in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Reveals Favorable Alleles that Improve Grain Zn and Fe Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xia; Cheng, Li-Rui; Xu, Jian-Long; Shi, Yu-Min; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    In the modern world, the grain mineral concentration (GMC) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) not only includes important micronutrient elements such as iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), but it also includes toxic heavy metal elements, especially cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). To date, the genetic mechanisms underlying the regulation of GMC, especially the genetic background and G × E effects of GMC, remain largely unknown. In this study, we adopted two sets of backcross introgression lines (BILs) derived from IR75862 (a Zn-dense rice variety) as the donor parent and two elite indica varieties, Ce258 and Zhongguangxiang1, as recurrent parents to detect QTL affecting GMC traits including Fe, Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations in two environments. We detected a total of 22 loci responsible for GMC traits, which are distributed on all 12 rice chromosomes except 5, 9 and 10. Six genetic overlap (GO) regions affecting multiple elements were found, in which most donor alleles had synergistic effects on GMC. Some toxic heavy metal-independent loci (such as qFe1, qFe2 and qZn12) and some regions that have opposite genetic effects on micronutrient (Fe and Zn) and heavy metal element (Pb) concentrations (such as GO-IV) may be useful for marker-assisted biofortification breeding in rice. We discuss three important points affecting biofortification breeding efforts in rice, including correlations between different GMC traits, the genetic background effect and the G × E effect. PMID:26161553

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT MARKERS FOR THE PLANT PATHOGENIC RUST FUNGUS, PUCCINIA TRITICINA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighteen polymorphic di- and trinucleotide simple sequence repeat markers were developed for the phytopathogenic rust fungus, Puccinia triticina. The allelic diversity varied from 2 to 9 alleles per locus. Levels of observed heterozygosity (HO) ranged from 0.095 to 0.952. Seven of the loci deviated ...

  17. Development of simple sequence repeat markers for the soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed 24 simple sequence repeat markers for Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungal pathogen of soybean (Glycine max) and other legumes. All 24 of the loci were evaluated on 28 isolates of P. pachyrhizi. Twenty-one loci were polymorphic, with allelic diversity ranging from two to eight alleles, and...

  18. Puroindoline allelic diversity in Indian wheat germplasm and identification of new allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Arora, Shaweta; Singh, Kashmir; Garg, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality trait that influences product development in wheat. This trait is governed by variation in puroindoline proteins (PINA and PINB). Our study evaluated 551 Indian wheat germplasm lines for diversity in Pina and Pinb genes. Eighty-two lines were shortlisted for full length sequencing and grain hardness studies. Sequencing studies identified six unknown alleles: two for the Pina gene and four for the Pinb gene. Five of them were novel with non-synonymous changes in the corresponding amino acid sequences. Identified mutations in the deduced mature proteins and their pre- and pro-peptides influenced the hardness characteristics of the grain. We classified these 82 varieties into different hardness categories with reference to international and Indian systems of classification. The majority of Indian wheat varieties were categorized as hard. This study revealed that unexplored Indian wheat germplasm can be a good source of genetic variability for both Pina and Pinb genes, helping in marker-assisted breeding and in obtaining wheat with different textural properties. PMID:26366114

  19. Puroindoline allelic diversity in Indian wheat germplasm and identification of new allelic variants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Arora, Shaweta; Singh, Kashmir; Garg, Monika

    2015-09-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality trait that influences product development in wheat. This trait is governed by variation in puroindoline proteins (PINA and PINB). Our study evaluated 551 Indian wheat germplasm lines for diversity in Pina and Pinb genes. Eighty-two lines were shortlisted for full length sequencing and grain hardness studies. Sequencing studies identified six unknown alleles: two for the Pina gene and four for the Pinb gene. Five of them were novel with non-synonymous changes in the corresponding amino acid sequences. Identified mutations in the deduced mature proteins and their pre- and pro-peptides influenced the hardness characteristics of the grain. We classified these 82 varieties into different hardness categories with reference to international and Indian systems of classification. The majority of Indian wheat varieties were categorized as hard. This study revealed that unexplored Indian wheat germplasm can be a good source of genetic variability for both Pina and Pinb genes, helping in marker-assisted breeding and in obtaining wheat with different textural properties. PMID:26366114

  20. An association between Manic-depressive illness and a pseudoautosomal DNA marker

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Toshiaki; Ishida, Toru; Inayama, Yasuhiro; Nonomura, Yasuhiro; Kono, Yoshihiro; Asaba, Hiroyuki )

    1992-11-01

    This article reports on the association between manic-depressive illness and a polymorphic DNA marker in the pseudoautosomal region (Xp22.32; Yp11.3). The authors studied two markers in 49 biologically unrelated patients and 119 normal controls. Probe 362A (DXYS20) identified four alleles. Frequencies of the A4 allele were significantly higher in patients than in controls. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Isolation of Microsatellite Markers in the Calliptamus Genus (Orthoptera, Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, E.; Pages, C.; Blondin, L.; Billot, C.; Rivallan, R.; Vassal, JM.; Lecoq, M.; Risterucci, AM.

    2010-01-01

    The Calliptamus genus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) includes locust and grasshopper species, some of which have a high economic impact. Using an enriched methodology, 10 microsatellite markers have been developed from two species, Calliptamus italicus and Calliptamus barbarus. These polymorphic markers were tested on different populations of three Calliptamus species: C. italicus, C. barbarus, C. wattenwylianus. Two markers were amplified on the three species, as well as four on C. barbarus and two on C. italicus. In each species, 9 to 23 alleles per locus were observed. These molecular markers might prove to be a new and interesting tool for Calliptamus population genetics and dispersion studies. PMID:20883130

  2. Parenting Conflicts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Parenting Conflicts Article Body My spouse and I have different ... making responsibilities are divided within the family. Overt Conflict Too often, parents argue and openly challenge each ...

  3. Parent Involvement 

    E-print Network

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    To be successful, a 4-H program must have parent involvement. Although 4-H leaders and Extension agents may interest young people in becoming members, they need the parents' goodwill and support to keep them interested, ...

  4. Effective Parenting

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | ... good job as parents? There is a whole history to your parent-child relationship that began at ...

  5. Molecular characterisation of indigenous Swedish apple cultivars based on SSR and S-allele analysis.

    PubMed

    Garkava-Gustavsson, L; Kolodinska Brantestam, A; Sehic, J; Nybom, H

    2008-06-01

    Trees of 68 apple cultivars, aimed for preservation by the 'National Program for diversity of cultivated plants' as mandate cultivars, were analysed using a set of 10 SSR (simple sequence repeat) primer pairs and the self-incompatibility (S-)locus to evaluate genetic diversity and reveal inter-cultivar relationships. The 12 polymorphic SSR loci exhibited 2 to 15 alleles, with expected heterozygozity (H(e)) ranging from 0.36 to 0.88 and a mean of 0.74. Numerous alleles were classified as rare or unique (35% and 18% respectively). For the S-locus, a total of 14 alleles were identified in this study. Five alleles, S1-S3, S5 and S7 had frequencies ranging from 11 to 18%, whereas the remaining 9 alleles were below 6%. All sexually obtained cultivars could be distinguished with the set of SSR loci. Sports were identical with their progenitors in two cases, but differed in one SSR allele in a third case. An SSR-based dendrogram, based on Roger's genetic distances, did not reveal any clear pattern of clustering. The genetic distances were, however, correlated with a corresponding matrix obtained in a previously conducted RAPD-based study of the same cultivars. Non-mandate parents of Swedish mandate cultivars together with some other reference cultivars were included in this study to check the accuracy of allele scoring, verify parentage and compare the results of this study with those presented in previously published studies. Some discrepancies in allele sizing were revealed and the possibilities of avoiding this problem are discussed. PMID:18667000

  6. Association Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers with Agronomic Traits in Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yong; Liu, Hongmei; Xu, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    Tall fescue is widely used in temperate regions throughout the world as a dominant forage grass as well as a turfgrass, in pastoral and turf industry. However, the utilization of tall fescue was limited because of its leaf roughness, poor regeneration ability and poor stress resistance. New cultivars were desirable in modern pastoral industries exceed the potential of existing cultivars. Therefore, well understanding the agronomic traits and describing germplasms would help to overcome these constraints, and morphological evaluation of tall fescue germplasm is the key component in selecting rational parents for hybridization breeding. However, describing the morphological traits of tall fescue germplasm is costly and time-consuming. Fortunately, biotechnology approaches can supplement conventional breeding efforts for tall fescue improvement. Association mapping, as a powerful approach to identify association between agronomic traits and molecular markers has been widely used for enhancing the utilization, conservation and management of the tall fescue germplasms. Therefore, in the present research, 115 tall fescue accessions from different origins (25 accessions are cultivars; 31 accessions from America; 32 accessions from European; 7 accessions from Africa; 20 accessions from Asia), were evaluated for agronomic traits and genetic diversity with 90 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The panel displayed significant variation in spike count per plant (SCP) and spike weight (SW). However, BCS performed the lowest CV among all the observed agronomic traits. Three subpopulations were identified within the collections but no obvious relative kinship (K) was found. The GLM model was used to describe the association between SSR and agronomic traits. Fifty-one SSR markers associated with agronomic traits were observed. Twelve single-associated markers were associated with PH; six single-associated markers were associated with BCS; eight single-associated markers were associated with SW; five single-associated markers were associated with SC; seven single-associated markers were associated with SCP; three single-associated markers were associated with SL. Especially, we observed that the genetic variation of SW was explained 11.6 % by M37 marker. It is interesting to observe that nine markers (M1, M2, M35, M54 marker was associated with both BCS and SC; M3, M4 markers were associated with BCS, SW, and SC; M19 marker was associated with both pH and PD, M40 marker was associated with both SCP and SW; and M193 marker was associated with both PH and SL) were associated with more than two agronomic traits. Notably, Branch count per spike (BCS) was explained by four markers (M1, M2, M3, and M4) exceeding 10 %. These identified marker alleles associated with agronomic traits could provide important information and markers for molecular-assisted breeding that facilitate the breeding process in tall fescue. PMID:26186338

  7. Parenting Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    2005-01-01

    Parenting is a subject about which people typically hold strong opinions, but about which too little solid information or considered reflection exists. And clearly critical questions about parenting abound. Moreover, the family generally, and parenting specifically, are today in a greater state of flux, question, and re-definition than perhaps…

  8. Valuing Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Linda Kreger, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on the role of parents in the education of their gifted children contains two feature articles. "'Pushy and Domineering': A Stigma Placed on Parents of Gifted Children," by Lynn C. Cole and Roxana M. DellaVecchia, examines how parents are perceived as "pushy and domineering" when they strongly advocate for appropriate education…

  9. Locus-specific brackets for reliable typing of Y-chromosome short tandem repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Butler, John M; Appleby, Jill E; Duewer, David L

    2005-06-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci, widely used as genetic markers in disease diagnostic studies and human identity applications, are traditionally genotyped through comparison of allele sizes to a sequenced allelic ladder. Allelic ladders permit a floating bin allele calling method to be utilized, which enables reliable allele calling across laboratories, instrument platforms, and electrophoretic conditions. Precise sizing methods for STR allele calling involving fixed bins can also be used when a high degree of precision has been demonstrated within an instrument platform and a set of electrophoretic conditions. An alternative method for reliable genotyping of STR markers, locus-specific brackets (LSBs), is introduced here. LSBs are artificial alleles created through molecular biology manipulations to be shorter or longer than alleles commonly seen in populations under investigation. The size and repeat number of measured alleles are interpolated between the two LSB products that are mixed with the polymerase chain reaction-amplified STR alleles. The advantages and limitations of the LSB approach are described along with a concordance study between the LSB typing approach and other STR typing methods. Complete agreement was observed with 162 samples studied at 5 Y-chromosome loci. PMID:15934054

  10. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Cumulative-genetic plasticity, parenting and adolescent self-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Jay; Beaver, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The capacity to control or regulate one’s emotions, cognitions and behavior is central to competent functioning, with limitations in these abilities associated with developmental problems. Parenting appears to influence such self-regulation. Here the differential-susceptibility hypothesis is tested that the more putative ‘plasticity alleles’ adolescents carry, the more positively and negatively influenced they will be by, respectively, supportive and unsupportive parenting. Methods One thousand, five hundred and eighty-six (1586) adolescents (n = 754 males; n = 832 females) enrolled in the American Add Health project were scored in terms of how many of 5 putative ‘plasticity alleles’ they carried – the 10R allele of DAT1, the A1 allele of DRD2, the 7R allele of DRD4, the short allele of 5HTTLPR, and the 2R/3R alleles of MAOA. Then the effect of the resultant index (ranging from 0 to 5) of cumulative-genetic plasticity in moderating effects of parenting on adolescent self-regulation was evaluated. Results Consistent with differential susceptibility, the more plasticity alleles males (but not females) carried, the more and less self-regulation they manifested under, respectively, supportive and unsupportive parenting conditions. Conclusion Adolescent males appear to vary for genetic reasons in their susceptibility to parenting vis-à-vis self-regulation, perhaps due to epistatic and/or epigenetic processes. G×E research may benefit from compositing candidate genes. To afford comparative evaluation of differential-susceptibility vs. diathesis-stress models of environmental action, future G×E work should focus on positive as well as negative environmental conditions and developmental outcomes. PMID:21039487

  12. Characteristics of Y-STR Loci and Y-Chromosome Sex-Typing Markers in Commercial Kits Markers in bold font are the 11 recommended by SWGDAM and present in all kits. DYS391 is present in PowerPlex Fusion and

    E-print Network

    Characteristics of Y-STR Loci and Y-Chromosome Sex-Typing Markers in Commercial Kits MarkersPlex Fusion and GlobalFiler to aid sex-typing. The Y-chromosome positions were determined using the February is for PowerPlex Y23 and Yfiler Plus allelic ladder alleles. Information from Butler, J.M. (2015) Advanced

  13. A review on SNP and other types of molecular markers and their use in animal genetics

    PubMed Central

    Vignal, Alain; Milan, Denis; SanCristobal, Magali; Eggen, André

    2002-01-01

    During the last ten years, the use of molecular markers, revealing polymorphism at the DNA level, has been playing an increasing part in animal genetics studies. Amongst others, the microsatellite DNA marker has been the most widely used, due to its easy use by simple PCR, followed by a denaturing gel electrophoresis for allele size determination, and to the high degree of information provided by its large number of alleles per locus. Despite this, a new marker type, named SNP, for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, is now on the scene and has gained high popularity, even though it is only a bi-allelic type of marker. In this review, we will discuss the reasons for this apparent step backwards, and the pertinence of the use of SNPs in animal genetics, in comparison with other marker types. PMID:12081799

  14. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  16. Heterozygous Mapping Strategy (HetMappS) for High Resolution Genotyping-By-Sequencing Markers: A Case Study in Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghui; Londo, Jason P.; Acharya, Charlotte B.; Mitchell, Sharon E.; Sun, Qi; Reisch, Bruce; Cadle-Davidson, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) provides opportunities to generate high-resolution genetic maps at a low genotyping cost, but for highly heterozygous species, missing data and heterozygote undercalling complicate the creation of GBS genetic maps. To overcome these issues, we developed a publicly available, modular approach called HetMappS, which functions independently of parental genotypes and corrects for genotyping errors associated with heterozygosity. For linkage group formation, HetMappS includes both a reference-guided synteny pipeline and a reference-independent de novo pipeline. The de novo pipeline can be utilized for under-characterized or high diversity families that lack an appropriate reference. We applied both HetMappS pipelines in five half-sib F1 families involving genetically diverse Vitis spp. Starting with at least 116,466 putative SNPs per family, the HetMappS pipelines identified 10,440 to 17,267 phased pseudo-testcross (Pt) markers and generated high-confidence maps. Pt marker density exceeded crossover resolution in all cases; up to 5,560 non-redundant markers were used to generate parental maps ranging from 1,047 cM to 1,696 cM. The number of markers used was strongly correlated with family size in both de novo and synteny maps (r = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively). Comparisons between allele and tag frequencies suggested that many markers were in tandem repeats and mapped as single loci, while markers in regions of more than two repeats were removed during map curation. Both pipelines generated similar genetic maps, and genetic order was strongly correlated with the reference genome physical order in all cases. Independently created genetic maps from shared parents exhibited nearly identical results. Flower sex was mapped in three families and correctly localized to the known sex locus in all cases. The HetMappS pipeline could have wide application for genetic mapping in highly heterozygous species, and its modularity provides opportunities to adapt portions of the pipeline to other family types, genotyping technologies or applications. PMID:26244767

  17. Improvements to a Markerless Allelic Exchange System for Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Plaut, Roger D.; Stibitz, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A system was previously developed for conducting I-SceI-mediated allelic exchange in Bacillus anthracis. In this system, recombinational loss of a chromosomally-integrated allelic exchange vector is stimulated by creation of a double-stranded break within the vector by the homing endonuclease I-SceI. Although this system is reasonably efficient and represents an improvement in the tools available for allelic exchange in B. anthracis, researchers are nonetheless required to “pick and patch” colonies in order to identify candidate "exchangeants." In the present study, a number of improvements have been made to this system: 1) an improved I-SceI-producing plasmid includes oriT so that both plasmids can now be introduced by conjugation, thus avoiding the need for preparing electro-competent cells of each integration intermediate; 2) antibiotic markers have been changed to allow the use of the system in select agent strains; and 3) both plasmids have been marked with fluorescent proteins, allowing the visualization of plasmid segregation on a plate and obviating the need for “picking and patching.” These modifications have made the process easier, faster, and more efficient, allowing for parallel construction of larger numbers of mutant strains. Using this improved system, the genes encoding the tripartite anthrax toxin were deleted singly and in combination from plasmid pXO1 of Sterne strain 34F2. In the course of this study, we determined that DNA transfer to B. anthracis could be accomplished by conjugation directly from a methylation-competent E. coli strain. PMID:26624016

  18. Natural Allelic Diversity, Genetic Structure and Linkage Disequilibrium Pattern in Wild Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Alice; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Mohar; Bansal, Kailash C.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of natural allelic diversity and understanding the genetic structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD) pattern in wild germplasm accessions by large-scale genotyping of informative microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers is requisite to facilitate chickpea genetic improvement. Large-scale validation and high-throughput genotyping of genome-wide physically mapped 478 genic and genomic microsatellite markers and 380 transcription factor gene-derived SNP markers using gel-based assay, fluorescent dye-labelled automated fragment analyser and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass array have been performed. Outcome revealed their high genotyping success rate (97.5%) and existence of a high level of natural allelic diversity among 94 wild and cultivated Cicer accessions. High intra- and inter-specific polymorphic potential and wider molecular diversity (11–94%) along with a broader genetic base (13–78%) specifically in the functional genic regions of wild accessions was assayed by mapped markers. It suggested their utility in monitoring introgression and transferring target trait-specific genomic (gene) regions from wild to cultivated gene pool for the genetic enhancement. Distinct species/gene pool-wise differentiation, admixed domestication pattern, and differential genome-wide recombination and LD estimates/decay observed in a six structured population of wild and cultivated accessions using mapped markers further signifies their usefulness in chickpea genetics, genomics and breeding. PMID:25222488

  19. Exploring the Distribution of Genetic Markers of Pharmacogenomics Relevance in Brazilian and Mexican Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz-Peña, Vania; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Roela, Rosimeire A.; Furuya-Mazzotti, Tatiane K.; Chammas, Roger; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; McLeod, Howard L.; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Studies of pharmacogenomics-related traits are increasingly being performed to identify loci that affect either drug response or susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the effect of the polymorphisms can differ in magnitude or be absent depending on the population being assessed. We used the Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array to characterize the distribution of polymorphisms of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) relevance in two samples from the most populous Latin American countries, Brazil and Mexico. The sample from Brazil included 268 individuals from the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, and was stratified into census categories. The sample from Mexico comprised 45 Native American Zapotecas and 224 self-identified Mestizo individuals from 5 states located in geographically distant regions in Mexico. We evaluated the admixture proportions in the Brazilian and Mexican samples using a panel of Ancestry Informative Markers extracted from the DMET array, which was validated with genome-wide data. A substantial variation in ancestral proportions across census categories in Brazil, and geographic regions in Mexico was identified. We evaluated the extent of genetic differentiation (measured as FST values) of the genetic markers of the DMET Plus array between the relevant parental populations. Although the average levels of genetic differentiation are low, there is a long tail of markers showing large frequency differences, including markers located in genes belonging to the Cytochrome P450, Solute Carrier (SLC) and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) families as well as other genes of PGx relevance such as ABCC8, ADH1A, CHST3, PON1, PPARD, PPARG, and VKORC1. We show how differences in admixture history may have an important impact in the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies at the population level. PMID:25419701

  20. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S.; Riveron, Jacob M.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Irving, Helen; Yunta, Cristina; Paine, Mark J. I.; Wondji, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs) has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser) from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies. PMID:26517127

  1. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Riveron, Jacob M; Bibby, Jaclyn; Irving, Helen; Yunta, Cristina; Paine, Mark J I; Wondji, Charles S

    2015-10-01

    Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs) has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser) from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies. PMID:26517127

  2. Allele frequency data for 15 autosomal STR loci in eight Indonesian subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Venables, Samantha J; Daniel, Runa; Sarre, Stephen D; Soedarsono, Nurtami; Sudoyo, Herawati; Suryadi, Helena; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Walsh, Simon J; Widodo, Putut T; McNevin, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary and cultural history can affect the genetic characteristics of a population and influences the frequency of different variants at a particular genetic marker (allele frequency). These characteristics directly influence the strength of forensic DNA evidence and make the availability of suitable allele frequency information for every discrete country or jurisdiction highly relevant. Population sub-structure within Indonesia has not been well characterised but should be expected given the complex geographical, linguistic and cultural architecture of the Indonesian population. Here we use forensic short tandem repeat (STR) markers to identify a number of distinct genetic subpopulations within Indonesia and calculate appropriate population sub-structure correction factors. This data represents the most comprehensive investigation of population sub-structure within Indonesia to date using these markers. The results demonstrate that significant sub-structure is present within the Indonesian population and must be accounted for using island specific allele frequencies and corresponding sub-structure correction factors in the calculation of forensic DNA match statistics. PMID:26517173

  3. Efficiency of the inbreeding coefficient f and other estimators in detecting null alleles, as revealed by empirical data of locus oke3 across 65 populations of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymorphic DNA markers, e.g. mini- or microsatellite (SSR) loci, are often removed from data analyses if an excess of homozygosity, presumably an indication of null alleles, is observed. However, exclusion of such loci can reduce available information if multiple loci carry null alleles. Because nu...

  4. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

    E-print Network

    Daelemans, Caroline; Ritchie, Matthew E.; Smits, Guillaume; Abu-Amero, Sayeda; Sudbery, Ian M.; Forrest, Matthew S.; Campino, Susana; Clark, Taane G.; Stanier, Philip; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Deloukas, Panos; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Tavare, Simon; Moore, Gudrun E.; Dunham, Ian

    2010-04-19

    of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18...

  5. Biased Allele Expression and Aggression in Hybrid Honeybees may be Influenced by Inappropriate Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Joshua D; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Miguel E; Tsuruda, Jennifer M; Hunt, Greg J

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid effects are often exhibited asymmetrically between reciprocal families. One way this could happen is if silencing of one parent's allele occurs in one lineage but not the other, which could affect the phenotypes of the hybrids asymmetrically by silencing that allele in only one of the hybrid families. We have previously tested for allele-specific expression biases in hybrids of European and Africanized honeybees and we found that there was an asymmetric overabundance of genes showing a maternal bias in the family with a European mother. Here, we further analyze allelic bias in these hybrids to ascertain whether they may underlie previously described asymmetries in metabolism and aggression in similar hybrid families and we speculate on what mechanisms may produce this biased allele usage. We find that there are over 500 genes that have some form of biased allele usage and over 200 of these are biased toward the maternal allele but only in the family with European maternity, mirroring the pattern observed for aggression and metabolic rate. This asymmetrically biased set is enriched for genes in loci associated with aggressive behavior and also for mitochondrial-localizing proteins. It contains many genes that play important roles in metabolic regulation. Moreover we find genes relating to the piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway, which is involved in chromatin modifications and epigenetic regulation and may help explain the mechanism underlying this asymmetric allele use. Based on these findings and previous work investigating aggression and metabolism in bees, we propose a novel hypothesis; that the asymmetric pattern of biased allele usage in these hybrids is a result of inappropriate use of piRNA-mediated nuclear-cytoplasmic signaling that is normally used to modulate aggression in honeybees. This is the first report of widespread asymmetric effects on allelic expression in hybrids and may represent a novel mechanism for gene regulation. PMID:26648977

  6. Fiducial marker placement for intraoperative spine localization.

    PubMed

    Marichal, Daniel A; Barnett, David W; Meler, James D; Layton, Kennith F

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great increase in the number of cases of image-guided fiducial marker placement for the purposes of stereotactic radiosurgery. At the authors' parent institution, a tertiary referral academic medical center, the placement of fiducial markers has also been used for the purposes of localization before spine surgery. Given the reported prevalence of "wrong-site" surgical intervention documented in the medical literature, particularly involving spinal surgery, the neurosurgical department at the authors' institution has requested the expertise of interventional radiology for assistance in preoperative spine localization. Therefore, there are medicolegal, medical cost, and patient care implications of image-guided fiducial marker placement. PMID:21109457

  7. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pena, S D; de Souza, K T; de Andrade, M; Chakraborty, R

    1994-01-01

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the small alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, we observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of "cooperative" changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8290589

  8. Analysis of some polymorphic markers of the CFTR gene in cystic fibrosis patients and healthy donors from the Moscow region

    SciTech Connect

    Amosenko, F.A.; Sazonova, M.A.; Kapranov, N.I.; Trubnikova, I.S.; Kalinin, V.N.

    1995-04-01

    Allelic frequencies of three polymorphic markers in the CFTR gene were estimated on chromosomes derived from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and healthy donors from Moscow and the Moscow region. These polymorphic markers are tetranucleotide tandem repeats GATT in intron 6B, M470V in exon 10, and T854T in exon 14 (fragment A). Frequencies at allele 1 of the M470V marker, along with allele 2 of GATT and T854T, are two times higher for CF patients without {Delta}F508 mutation than for healthy donors, and there is linkage disequilibrium of these alleles of the polymorphic markers analyzed with the CF gene. Allele 1 of M470V and T854T markers, as well as allele 2 of the GATT marker (six repeats), are absolutely linked to mutation F508 of the CFTR gene. Using the polymorphic markers studied, family analysis of CF was carried out in two families. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Inheritance of seed colour and identification of RAPD and AFLP markers linked to the seed colour gene in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhi-wen, Liu; Ting-dong, Fu; Jin-xing, Tu; Bao-yuan, Chen

    2005-01-01

    In China Polima cytoplasmic male sterility (cms) is currently the most important hybrid system used for the breeding of hybrids. In an effort to develop yellow-seeded Polima cms restorer lines, we used yellow-seeded, doubled haploid (DH) line No.2127-17 as the gene source in crosses with two elite black-seeded Polima cms R lines, Hui5148-2 and 99Yu42, which originated from our breeding programme. The inheritance of seed colour was investigated in the F2, BC1 and F1-derived DH progenies of the two crosses. Seed colour was found to be under the control of the maternal genotype and the yellow seed trait to be partially dominant over the black seed trait. Segregation analysis revealed a single gene locus for the partial dominance of yellow seed colour. Of 810 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers, 240 (29.6%) revealed polymorphisms between the parents. Of the 240 RAPD primers and 512 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) primer pairs, four RAPDs and 16 AFLP pairs showed polymorphisms between the bulks, with two RAPD and eight AFLP markers being identified in the vicinity of the seed-coat colour gene locus using a DH progeny population-derived from the cross Hui5148-2xNo.2127-17-of 127 individuals in combination with the bulked segregant analysis strategy. Seven of these latter ten markers were linked to the allele for yellow seed, whereas the other three were linked to the allele for black seed. The seed-coat colour gene locus was bracketed by two tightly linked markers, EA02MG08 (2.4 cM) and S1129 (3.9 cM). The partial dominance and single gene control of the yellow seed-coat colour trait together with the available molecular markers will greatly facilitate the future breeding of yellow-seeded hybrid varieties. PMID:15565377

  10. Seed fates in crop–wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  11. Seed fates in crop-wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects.

    PubMed

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-02-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  12. An improved MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry procedure and a novel DNA marker for identifying over-expressed Bx7 glutenin protein subunit in wheat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Islam, Shahidul; Ma, Junhong; Anwar, Masood; Chen, Jing; Yan, Yueming; Appels, Rudi; Ma, Wujun

    2014-12-01

    Wheat bread-making quality is mainly determined by glutenin proteins in the grain, which exist in a wide range of variable alleles with differential influence on processing attributes. A recently identified allele, Bx7 over-expression (Bx7(oe) ), has been showing highly significant positive effects on wheat dough strength over the normally expressed Bx7 allele. SDS-PAGE and normal RP-HPLC procedures failed to separate the two alleles. In the current study, an extensively optimised MALDI-TOF based procedure and a refined DNA based marker for efficiently differentiating Bx7(oe) from normal Bx7 allele were established. Results indicated that the MALDI-TOF procedure is cost effective, high throughput, and proven reliable, while the refined PCR marker only amplifies Bx7(oe) allele, a clear advantage over the previously developed codominant marker. PMID:25588305

  13. Significance of TGFBR3 allelic loss in the deregulation of TGF? signaling in primary human endometrial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Ga?czy?ski, Krzysztof; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2016-02-01

    Downregulation of betaglycan (?-glycan) [transforming growth factor ? receptor type III (TGF?R3)], which belongs to co-receptors of the TGF? pathway, occurs in a broad spectrum of primary human malignancies. However, in the case of endometrial cancer (EC), the mechanisms responsible for genetic alterations are still unknown. Therefore, we investigated allelic imbalance at the TGFBR3 locus (1p33?p32) in the context of ?-glycan mRNA and protein expression, as a possible genetic event determining ?-glycan deregulation in EC patients. Study of ?-glycan allelic imbalance in 48 primary human ECs was performed with the use of three different microsatellite markers, spanned within or in direct proximity to the TGFBR3 locus. Real?time PCR and western blotting were used for ?-glycan mRNA and protein quantification methods, respectively. Altogether, 25 of 39 (64%) informative cases and 25 of 48 (52%) of all specimens showed allelic imbalance in at least one microsatellite marker, concomitantly with decrease at both the ?-glycan transcript and protein levels. Interestingly, 54% (15/28), 36% (8/22) and 35% (7/20) of informative ECs displayed allelic loss in D1S188, D1S435 and D1S1588 microsatellite markers, respectively. It is worth pointing out that 5 out of 39 (13%) informative cases showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at two microsatellite markers. Microsatellite instability (MSI) was found in two markers, but to a very strictly limited extent. None of the clinicoprognostic features was found to be of significance. Our results suggest that LOH in the TGFBR3 locus may be one of the mechanisms responsible for loss of ?-glycan expression. No correlation of LOH at the TGFBR3 locus with clinicopathological parameters suggests that allelic imbalance may be an early genetic event during neoplastic transformation of human endometrium. PMID:26548418

  14. Microsatellite markers for the diploid Basidiomycete fungus, Armillaria mellea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We isolated and characterized 13 microsatellite markers for two North American populations (California and Pennsylvania) of Armillaria mellea, a fungal root pathogen responsible for Armillaria root disease of numerous horticultural crops and forest trees. The frequency of alleles ranged from two to...

  15. Forensic Performance of Short Amplicon Insertion-Deletion (InDel) Markers

    E-print Network

    HID-38plex and DIPplex. - Independence of the markers. 3- Results - Allele frequency analysisDel Polymorphisms: Introduction and Concept. 2- Materials and Methods: - InDel assays HID-38plex and DIPplex amplicons HID-38plex R. Pereira et al Electrophoresis (2009) · 38plex PCR · 38 InDel markers (on 22

  16. Associations between STR autosomal markers and longevity.

    PubMed

    Bediaga, N G; Aznar, J M; Elcoroaristizabal, X; Albóniga, O; Gómez-Busto, F; Artaza Artabe, I; Rocandio, Ana; de Pancorbo, M M

    2015-10-01

    Life span is a complex and multifactorial trait, which is shaped by genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and stochastic factors. The possibility that highly hypervariable short tandem repeats (STRs) associated with longevity has been largely explored by comparing the genotypic pools of long lived and younger individuals, but results so far have been contradictory. In view of these contradictory findings, the present study aims to investigate whether HUMTHO1 and HUMCSF1PO STRs, previously associated with longevity, exert a role as a modulator of life expectancy, as well as to assess the extent to which other autosomal STR markers are associated with human longevity in population from northern Spain. To that end, 21 autosomal microsatellite markers have been studied in 304 nonagenarian individuals (more than 90 years old) and 516 younger controls of European descent. Our results do not confirm the association found in previous studies between longevity and THO1 and CSF1PO loci. However, significant association between longevity and autosomal STR markers D12S391, D22S1045, and DS441 was observed. Even more, when we compared allelic frequency distribution of the 21 STR markers between cases and controls, we found that 6 out of the 21 STRs studied showed different allelic frequencies, thus suggesting that the genomic portrait of the human longevity is far complex and probably shaped by a high number of genomic loci. PMID:26335621

  17. Microsatellites as DNA markers in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    He, Guohao; Meng, Ronghua; Newman, Melanie; Gao, Guoqing; Pittman, Roy N; Prakash, CS

    2003-01-01

    Background Genomic research of cultivated peanut has lagged behind other crop species because of the paucity of polymorphic DNA markers found in this crop. It is necessary to identify additional DNA markers for further genetic research in peanut. Results Microsatellite markers in cultivated peanut were developed using the SSR enrichment procedure. The results showed that the GA/CT repeat was the most frequently dispersed microsatellite in peanut. The primer pairs were designed for fifty-six different microsatellites, 19 of which showed a polymorphism among the genotypes studied. The average number of alleles per locus was 4.25, and up to 14 alleles were found at one locus. This suggests that microsatellite DNA markers produce a higher level of DNA polymorphism than other DNA markers in cultivated peanut. Conclusions It is desirable to isolate and characterize more DNA markers in cultivated peanut for more productive genomic studies, such as genetic mapping, marker-assisted selection, and gene discovery. The development of microsatellite markers holds a promise for such studies. PMID:12713672

  18. Stochastic Loss of Silencing of the Imprinted Ndn/NDN Allele, in a Mouse Model and Humans with Prader-Willi Syndrome, Has Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Unmehopa, Unga; Matarazzo, Valery; Watrin, Françoise; Linke, Matthias; Georges, Beatrice; Bischof, Jocelyn; Dijkstra, Femke; Bloemsma, Monique; Corby, Severine; Michel, François J.; Wevrick, Rachel; Zechner, Ulrich; Swaab, Dick; Dudley, Keith; Bezin, Laurent; Muscatelli, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that causes genes to be expressed from one allele only according to parental origin, the other allele being silent. Diseases can arise when the normally active alleles are not expressed. In this context, low level of expression of the normally silent alleles has been considered as genetic noise although such expression has never been further studied. Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a neurodevelopmental disease involving imprinted genes, including NDN, which are only expressed from the paternally inherited allele, with the maternally inherited allele silent. We present the first in-depth study of the low expression of a normally silent imprinted allele, in pathological context. Using a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches and comparing wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous mice deleted for Ndn, we show that, in absence of the paternal Ndn allele, the maternal Ndn allele is expressed at an extremely low level with a high degree of non-genetic heterogeneity. The level of this expression is sex-dependent and shows transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. In about 50% of mutant mice, this expression reduces birth lethality and severity of the breathing deficiency, correlated with a reduction in the loss of serotonergic neurons. In wild-type brains, the maternal Ndn allele is never expressed. However, using several mouse models, we reveal a competition between non-imprinted Ndn promoters which results in monoallelic (paternal or maternal) Ndn expression, suggesting that Ndn allelic exclusion occurs in the absence of imprinting regulation. Importantly, specific expression of the maternal NDN allele is also detected in post-mortem brain samples of PWS individuals. Our data reveal an unexpected epigenetic flexibility of PWS imprinted genes that could be exploited to reactivate the functional but dormant maternal alleles in PWS. Overall our results reveal high non-genetic heterogeneity between genetically identical individuals that might underlie the variability of the phenotype. PMID:24039599

  19. FINDbase: a worldwide database for genetic variation allele frequencies updated

    PubMed Central

    Georgitsi, Marianthi; Viennas, Emmanouil; Antoniou, Dimitris I.; Gkantouna, Vassiliki; van Baal, Sjozef; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzimas, Giannis; Patrinos, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FIND base; http://www.findbase.org) records frequencies of causative genetic variations worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group or geographical region, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any related external resources and the genetic variation together with its frequency in that population. In addition to the regular data content updates, we report the following significant advances: (i) the systematic collection and thorough documentation of population/ethnic group-specific pharmacogenomic markers allele frequencies for 144 markers in 14 genes of pharmacogenomic interest from different classes of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, representing 150 populations and ethnic groups worldwide; (ii) the development of new data querying and visualization tools in the expanded FINDbase data collection, built around Microsoft’s PivotViewer software (http://www.getpivot.com), based on Microsoft Silverlight technology (http://www.silverlight.net) that facilitates querying of large data sets and visualizing the results; and (iii) the establishment of the first database journal, by affiliating FINDbase with Human Genomics and Proteomics, a new open-access scientific journal, which would serve as a prime example of a non-profit model for sustainable database funding. PMID:21113021

  20. Parent Express.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Elise, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Intended for use by parents of infants and toddlers, this series of 27 8-page month-by-month newsletters provides research-based information on infant and child development and care from 0 to 36 months. Topics in the series for infants include: becoming a parent; getting ready for child birth; the newborn child; and characteristics of the child at…

  1. Design of an F1 hybrid breeding strategy for ryegrasses based on selection of self-incompatibility locus-specific alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pembleton, Luke W.; Shinozuka, Hiroshi; Wang, Junping; Spangenberg, German C.; Forster, John W.; Cogan, Noel O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Relatively modest levels of genetic gain have been achieved in conventional ryegrass breeding when compared to cereal crops such as maize, current estimates indicating an annual improvement of 0.25–0.6% in dry matter production. This property is partially due to an inability to effectively exploit heterosis through the formation of F1 hybrids. Controlled crossing of ryegrass lines from geographically distant origins has demonstrated the occurrence of heterosis, which can result in increases of dry matter production in the order of 25%. Although capture of hybrid vigor offers obvious advantages for ryegrass cultivar production, to date there have been no effective and commercially suitable methods for obtaining high proportions of F1 hybrid seed. Continued advances in fine-scale genetic and physical mapping of the gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) loci (S and Z) of ryegrasses are likely in the near future to permit the identification of closely linked genetic markers that define locus-specific haplotypes, allowing prediction of allelic variants and hence compatibility between different plant genotypes. Given the availability of such information, a strategy for efficient generation of ryegrass cultivars with a high proportion of F1 hybrid individuals has been simulated, which is suitable for commercial implementation. Through development of two parental pools with restricted diversity at the SI loci, relative crossing compatibility between pools is increased. Based on simulation of various levels of SI allele diversity restriction, the most effective scheme will generate 83.33% F1 hybrids. Results from the study, including the impact of varying flowering time, are discussed along with a proposed breeding design for commercial application. PMID:26442077

  2. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API). PMID:26456067

  3. Pseudoautosomal marker DXYS20 and manic depression

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Erdmann, J.; Koerner, J.; Rietschel, M.; Propping, P. ); Rappold, G.A. ); Fritze, J. )

    1993-04-01

    Yoneda et al. (1992) observed a significant association between manic-depressive illness and a 13.5-kb band of the pseudoautosomal marker DXYS20 (probe 362A) in EcoRI digests of 49 Japanese patients compared with 119 controls. The 13.5-kb allele was designated [open quotes]A4 allele[close quotes] and was found on at least one chromosome in 46.9% of the patients, compared with 26.1% of the controls. The relative risk of the A4 allele for the disease was 2.51. The authors have genotyped the EcoRI RFLP in 73 patients (40 females and 33 males) who fulfill DSM-III-R criteria of manic-depressive illness (bipolar affective disorder) and in 79 controls (34 females and 45 males). All subjects included in the study were unrelated and were of German descent. They used the probe 3cos-PP, which, by sequence analysis, was shown to be directly homologous to the independently cloned probe 362A (Rappold et al. 1992). The pseudoautosomal locus DXYS20 represents a VNTR-like minisatellite, and many polymorphic bands are recognized by means of several restriction endonucleases (Page et al. 1987). In EcoRI digests, sizes of bands cluster, and the authors grouped their bands according to allele sizes used by Yoneda et al. In addition to the alleles reported by Yoneda et al., they observed a 10-kb band in five subjects. The results are shown in a table. The frequency of the A4 allele did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Thus, the data do not support a widespread or consistent association between DXYS20 and bipolar affective disorder. A large degree of ethnic variation is seen with DXYS20 (Rappold et al. 1992) and might explain the difference of allele frequencies in controls from Japan and Germany. Since VNTRs evolve rapidly, they may not always be the best markers to detect disease associations, where a positive effect requires linkage disequilibrium. In any case, it should be useful to study larger samples of Japanese patients and controls. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Tri-allelic pattern of short tandem repeats identifies the murderer among identical twins and suggests an embryonic mutational origin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Feng; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Nan; Quan, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Monozygotic twins can be co-identified by genotyping of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, for distinguishing them, STR genotyping is ineffective, especially in the case of murder. Here, a rarely occurring tri-allelic pattern in the vWA locus (16, 18, 19) was identified only in the DNA of one identical twin, which could help to exonerate the innocent twin in a murder charge. This mutation was defined as primary through genotyping of the family and could be detected in blood, buccal and semen samples from the individual; however, two alternative allele-balanced di-allelic patterns (16, 18 or 16, 19) were detected in hair root sheath cells. Such a kind of segregation indicates a one-step mutation occurs in cell mitosis, which is after embryonic zygote formation and during the early development of the individual after the division of the blastocyte. Sequencing revealed the insertion between the allele 18 and 19 is a repeat unit of TAGA/TCTA (plus/minus strand), which belongs to "AGAT/ATCT"-based core repeats identified from all tri-allelic pattern reports recorded in the STR base and a detailed model was proposed for STR repeat length variation caused by false priming during DNA synthesis. Our model illustrates the possible origination of allele-balanced and unbalanced tri-allelic pattern, clarifies that the genotypes of parent-child mismatches, aberrant di-allelic patterns, and type 1 or 2 tri-allelic patterns should be considered as independent, but interconnected forms of STR mutation. PMID:25732248

  5. Characterization of 14 microsatellite markers for Silene acaulis (Caryophyllaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike; Hlavá?ková, Iva; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Alsos, Inger Greve; Eidesen, Pernille Bronken

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Fifty candidate microsatellite markers, generated using 454 shotgun sequencing, were tested for the widespread arctic/alpine herb Silene acaulis (Caryophyllaceae). Methods and Results: Fourteen out of 50 markers resulted in polymorphic products with profiles that enabled interpretation. The numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to six, and the expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.06 to 0.68. Analysis of F0 and F1 samples proved that one allele was always inherited maternally. Four multiplex mixes have been developed. Conclusions: Microsatellite markers for this species will be a valuable tool to study detailed small-scale genetic patterns in an arctic/alpine herb and to relate them to demographic parameters. PMID:26421249

  6. Isolation of nuclear microsatellite markers for Cyperus fuscus (Cyperaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Böckelmann, Jörg; Wieser, David; Tremetsberger, Karin; Šumberová, Kate?ina; Bernhardt, Karl-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were characterized in the extremely specialized ephemeral wetland plant species Cyperus fuscus (Cyperaceae). The markers will be used for studying population genetics in natural vs. anthropogenic habitats, on a European scale, and the role of the soil seed bank in the life cycle of this ephemeral species. Methods and Results: Twenty-one microsatellite loci were established and scored in two populations, with mean number of alleles of 2.6 and 2.9 and mean expected heterozygosity of 0.405 and 0.470, respectively. Forty-four additional loci with the number of alleles ranging from one to four (mean = 2.1) were successfully amplified in seven individuals. Conclusions: The novel microsatellite markers will be useful for studying the genetic structure of populations of this ephemeral plant as well as their seed bank. PMID:26649269

  7. Recycling selectable markers in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Abuin, A; Bradley, A

    1996-01-01

    As a result of gene targeting, selectable markers are usually permanently introduced into the mammalian genome. Multiple gene targeting events in the same cell line can therefore exhaust the pool of markers available and limit subsequent manipulations or genetic analysis. In this study, we describe the combined use of homologous and CRE-loxP-mediated recombination to generate mouse embryonic stem cell lines carrying up to four targeted mutations and devoid of exogenous selectable markers. A cassette that contains both positive and negative selectable markers flanked by loxP sites, rendering it excisable by the CRE protein, was constructed. Homologous recombination and positive selection were used to disrupt the Rep-3 locus, a gene homologous to members of the mutS family of DNA mismatch repair genes. CRE-loxP-mediated recombination and negative selection were then used to recover clones in which the cassette had been excised. The remaining allele of Rep-3 was then subjected to a second round of targeting and excision with the same construct to generate homozygous, marker-free cell lines. Subsequently, both alleles of mMsh2, another mutS homolog, were disrupted in the same fashion to obtain cell lines homozygous for targeted mutations at both the Rep-3 and mMsh2 loci and devoid of selectable markers. Thus, embryonic stem cell lines obtained in this fashion are suitable for further manipulation and analysis involving the use of selectable markers. PMID:8657161

  8. Estimating African American admixture proportions by use of population-specific alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Parra, E J; Marcini, A; Akey, J; Martinson, J; Batzer, M A; Cooper, R; Forrester, T; Allison, D B; Deka, R; Ferrell, R E; Shriver, M D

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed the European genetic contribution to 10 populations of African descent in the United States (Maywood, Illinois; Detroit; New York; Philadelphia; Pittsburgh; Baltimore; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans; and Houston) and in Jamaica, using nine autosomal DNA markers. These markers either are population-specific or show frequency differences >45% between the parental populations and are thus especially informative for admixture. European genetic ancestry ranged from 6.8% (Jamaica) to 22.5% (New Orleans). The unique utility of these markers is reflected in the low variance associated with these admixture estimates (SEM 1.3%-2.7%). We also estimated the male and female European contribution to African Americans, on the basis of informative mtDNA (haplogroups H and L) and Y Alu polymorphic markers. Results indicate a sex-biased gene flow from Europeans, the male contribution being substantially greater than the female contribution. mtDNA haplogroups analysis shows no evidence of a significant maternal Amerindian contribution to any of the 10 populations. We detected significant nonrandom association between two markers located 22 cM apart (FY-null and AT3), most likely due to admixture linkage disequilibrium created in the interbreeding of the two parental populations. The strength of this association and the substantial genetic distance between FY and AT3 emphasize the importance of admixed populations as a useful resource for mapping traits with different prevalence in two parental populations. PMID:9837836

  9. Evaluation in beef cattle of six deoxyribonucleic acid markers developed for dairy traits reveals an osteopontin polymorphism associated with postweaning growth.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA markers have been reported to be associated with variation in dairy production traits. The objectives of this study were to 1) estimate allele frequencies in U.S. beef cattle and 2) evaluate association of marker genotype with beef production traits. Several genetic markers have been assoc...

  10. Detection of new HLA-DPB1 alleles generated by interallelic gene conversion using PCR amplification of DPB1 second exon sequences from sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, H.; Zangenberg, G.; Bugawan, T.

    1994-09-01

    The rate at which allelic diversity at the HLA class I and class II loci evolves has been the subject of considerable controversy as have the mechanisms which generate new alleles. The patchwork pattern of polymorphism, particularly within the second exon of the HLA-DPB1 locus where the polymorphic sequence motifs are localized to 6 discrete regions, is consistent with the hypothesis that much of the allelic sequence variation may have been generated by segmental exchange (gene conversion). To measure the rate of new DPB1 variant generation, we have developed a strategy in which DPB1 second exon sequences are amplified from pools of FACS-sorted sperm (n=50) from a heterozygous sperm donor. Pools of sperm from these heterozygous individuals are amplified with an allele-specific primer for one allele and analyzed with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) complementary to the other allele. This screening procedure, which is capable of detecting a single variant molecule in a pool of parental alleles, allows the identification of new variants that have been generated by recombination and/or gene conversion between the two parental alleles. To control for potential PCR artifacts, the same screening procedure was carried out with mixtures of sperm from DPB1 *0301/*0301 and DPB1 *0401/ 0401 individuals. Pools containing putative new variants DPB1 alleles were analyzed further by cloning into M13 and sequencing the M13 clones. Our current estimate is that about 1/10,000 sperm from these heterozygous individuals represents a new DPB1 allele generated by micro-gene conversion within the second exon.

  11. Evaluation of a 49 InDel Marker HID panel in two specific populations of South America and one population of Northern Africa.

    PubMed

    Moura-Neto, R S; Silva, R; Mello, I C; Nogueira, T; Al-Deib, A A; LaRue, B; King, J; Budowle, B

    2015-03-01

    The majority of STR loci are not ideal for the analysis of forensic samples with degraded and/or low template DNA. One alternative to overcome these limitations is the use of bi-allelic markers, which have low mutation rates and shorter amplicons. Human identification (HID) InDel marker panels have been described in several countries, including Brazil. The commercial kit available is, however, mostly suitable for Europeans, with lower discrimination power for other population groups. Recently, a combination of 49 InDel markers used in four different ethnic groups in the USA has been shown to be more informative than another panel from Portugal, already tested in a Rio de Janeiro sample. However, these 49 InDels have yet to be applied to other admixed or isolated populations. We assessed the efficiency of this panel in two urban admixed populations (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Tripoli, Libya) and one isolated Native Brazilian community. All markers are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) after the Bonferroni correction, and no Linkage disequilibrium was detected. Assuming loci independence and no substructure effect, cumulative RMP was 2.7×10(-18), 1.5×10(-20), and 4.5×10(-20) for Native Brazilian, Rio de Janeiro, and Tripoli populations, respectively. The overall Fst value was 0.05512. Rio de Janeiro and Tripoli showed similar admixture levels, however for Native Brazilians one parental cluster represented over 60 % of the total parental population. We conclude that this panel is suitable for HID on these urban populations, but is less efficient for the isolated group. PMID:25516412

  12. Total parenting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins to cast being a parent as a matter of "parenting," a technological deployment of skills and techniques, with the loss of older, more spontaneous and intuitive relations between parents and children. Smith examines this phenomenon further through a discussion of how it is captured to some extent in Hannah Arendt's notion of "natality" and how it is illuminated by Charles Dickens in his classic novel, Dombey and Son. PMID:20662172

  13. Teen Parents

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Teen Parents Article Body A girl who has decided ... prenatal vitamins and iron is so important. Preparing Teens For Parenthood Fears about the future are common ...

  14. Parenting Multiples

    MedlinePLUS

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Impetigo Head Lice Vomiting Chickenpox Helping Kids Deal ... speaking directly to each child, as well as reading to them and encouraging language. Social skills can ...

  15. Allele and Haplotype Diversity of 26 X-STR Loci in Four Nationality Populations from China

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Li; Zhao, Hu; Wu, Ye-Da; Huang, Xiao-Ling; Lu, De-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Background Haplotype analysis of closely associated markers has proven to be a powerful tool in kinship analysis, especially when short tandem repeats (STR) fail to resolve uncertainty in relationship analysis. STR located on the X chromosome show stronger linkage disequilibrium compared with autosomal STR. So, it is necessary to estimate the haplotype frequencies directly from population studies as linkage disequilibrium is population-specific. Methodology and Findings Twenty-six X-STR loci including six clusters of linked markers DXS6807-DXS8378-DXS9902(Xp22), DXS7132-DXS10079-DXS10074-DXS10075-DXS981 (Xq12), DXS6801-DXS6809-DXS6789-DXS6799(Xq21), DXS7424-DXS101-DXS7133(Xq22), DXS6804-GATA172D05(Xq23), DXS8377-DXS7423 (Xq28) and the loci DXS6800, DXS6803, DXS9898, GATA165B12, DXS6854, HPRTB and GATA31E08 were typed in four nationality (Han, Uigur, Kazakh and Mongol) samples from China (n?=?1522, 876 males and 646 females). Allele and haplotype frequency as well as linkage disequilibrium data for kinship calculation were observed. The allele frequency distribution among different populations was compared. A total of 5–20 alleles for each locus were observed and altogether 289 alleles for all the selected loci were found. Allele frequency distribution for most X-STR loci is different in different populations. A total of 876 male samples were investigated by haplotype analysis and for linkage disequilibrium. A total of 89, 703, 335, 147, 39 and 63 haplotypes were observed. Haplotype diversity was 0.9584, 0.9994, 0.9935, 0.9736, 0.9427 and 0.9571 for cluster I, II, III, IV, V and VI, respectively. Eighty-two percent of the haplotype of cluster IIwas found only once. And 94% of the haplotype of cluster III show a frequency of <1%. Conclusions These results indicate that allele frequency distribution for most X-STR loci is population-specific and haplotypes of six clusters provide a powerful tool for kinship testing and relationship investigation. So it is necessary to obtain allele frequency and haplotypes data of the linked loci for forensic application. PMID:23805185

  16. Recovery of Heritable, Transposon-Induced, Mutant Alleles of the Rf2 Nuclear Restorer of T-Cytoplasm Maize

    PubMed Central

    Schnable, P. S.; Wise, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    T (Texas) cytoplasm is associated with a mitochondrial disruption that is phenotypically expressed during microsporogenesis resulting in male sterility. Restoration of pollen fertility in T-cytoplasm maize is controlled by dominant alleles at two unlinked, complementary, nuclear-encoded genes, rf1 and rf2. As a first step in the molecular isolation of the rf2 gene, 178,300 gametes derived from plants that carried the Mutator, Cy or Spm transposon families were screened for rf2 mutant alleles (rf2-m) via their inability to restore pollen fertility to T-cytoplasm male-sterile maize. Seven heritable rf2-m alleles were recovered from these transposon populations. Pedigrees and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based analyses indicated that all seven rf2-m alleles were derived independently. The ability to obtain rf2-m derivatives from Rf2 suggests that Rf2 alleles produce a functional product necessary to restore pollen fertility to cmsT. Molecular markers flanking the rf1 and rf2 loci were used to decipher segregation patterns in progenies segregating for the rf2-m alleles. These analyses provided preliminary evidence of a weak, third restorer gene of cmsT that can substitute for Rf1. PMID:7911770

  17. Heteroduplex analysis can increase the informativeness of PCR-amplified VNTR markers: Application using a marker tightly linked to the COL2A1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, D.J.; Cohn, D.H. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA ); Koprivnikar, K.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism provide a high degree of informativeness in linkage studies. Whether performed by standard methods or by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), analysis of these markers involves assessment of the length of each allele. VNTR alleles usually differ in the number of tandem repeats. During PCR amplification of a VNTR closely linked to the type II collagen gene (COL2A1), we identified allelic microheterogeneity through the analysis of unique heteroduplexes between amplified strands of the two alleles. In one large pedigree, heteroduplex analysis identified only three distinct alleles. The identification of these heteroduplexes allowed the determination of the COL2A1 inheritance pattern in the family, which otherwise would have been noninformative. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Estimating pollen flow using SSR markers and paternity exclusion: accounting for mistyping.

    PubMed

    Slavov, G T; Howe, G T; Gyaourova, A V; Birkes, D S; Adams, W T

    2005-09-01

    Highly informative genetic markers, such as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), can be used to directly measure pollen flow by parentage analysis. However, mistyping (i.e. false inference of genotypes caused by the occurrence of null alleles, mutations, and detection errors) can lead to substantial biases in the estimates obtained. Using computer simulations, we evaluated a direct method for estimating pollen immigration using SSR markers and a paternity exclusion approach. This method accounts for mistyping and does not rely on assumptions about the distribution of male reproductive success. If ignored, even minor rates of mistyping (1.5%) resulted in overestimating pollen immigration by up to 150%. When we required at least two mismatching loci before excluding candidate fathers from paternity, the resulting pollen immigration estimates had small biases for rates of mistyping up to 4.5%. Requiring at least three mismatches for exclusion was needed to minimize the upward biases of pollen immigration caused by rates of mistyping up to 10.5%. The minimum number of highly variable SSR loci needed to minimize cryptic gene flow and obtain reliable estimates of pollen immigration varied from five to seven for a sampling scheme applicable to most conifers (i.e. when paternal haplotypes can be unambiguously determined). Between five and nine highly variable SSR loci were needed for a more general sampling scheme that is applicable to all diploid seed plants. With moderately variable SSR markers, consistently accurate estimates of pollen immigration could be obtained only for rates of mistyping up to 4.5%. We developed the POLLEN FLOW (PFL) computer program which can be used to obtain unbiased and precise estimates of pollen immigration under a wide range of conditions, including population sizes as large as 600 parents and mistyping rates as high as 10.5%. PMID:16101777

  19. Cryptic virulence and avirulence alleles revealed by controlled sexual recombination in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Kanvil, Sadia; Collins, C Matilda; Powell, Glen; Turnbull, Colin G N

    2015-02-01

    Although aphids are worldwide crop pests, little is known about aphid effector genes underlying virulence and avirulence. Here we show that controlling the genetics of both aphid and host can reveal novel recombinant genotypes with previously undetected allelic variation in both virulence and avirulence functions. Clonal F1 progeny populations were derived from reciprocal crosses and self-matings between two parental genotypes of pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) differing in virulence on a Medicago truncatula host carrying the RAP1 and RAP2 resistance genes. These populations showed Mendelian segregation consistent with aphid performance being controlled largely by a dominant virulence allele derived from only one parent. Altered segregation ratios on near-isogenic host genotypes differing in the region carrying RAP1 were indicative of additional heritable functions likely related to avirulence genes originating from both parents. Unexpectedly, some virulent F1 progeny were recovered from selfing of an avirulent parent, suggesting a reservoir of cryptic alleles. Host chlorosis was associated with virulence, whereas necrotic hypersensitive-like response was not. No maternal inheritance was found for any of these characteristics, ruling out sex-linked, cytoplasmic, and endosymbiotic factors. Our results demonstrate the tractability of dissecting the genetic basis of pest-host resistance mechanisms and indicate that the annual sexual cycle in aphids may lead to frequent novel genotypes with both increased and decreased virulence. Availability of genomes for both pest and host can facilitate definition of cognate gene-for-gene relationships, potentially leading to selection of crop genotypes with multiple resistance traits. PMID:25519896

  20. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. PMID:25775930

  1. Parental Marital Quality, Parental Divorce, and Relations with Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Amato, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Examined data from 419 parents and their adult children to assess impact of parental marital quality and divorce while child is residing with parents on parent-child relations 12 years later. Low marital quality and divorce appeared to have independent effects on adult child-parent relations. Fathers' relationships suffered more than mothers';…

  2. Precision-engineering the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome with two-step allelic exchange.

    PubMed

    Hmelo, Laura R; Borlee, Bradley R; Almblad, Henrik; Love, Michelle E; Randall, Trevor E; Tseng, Boo Shan; Lin, Chuyang; Irie, Yasuhiko; Storek, Kelly M; Yang, Jaeun Jane; Siehnel, Richard J; Howell, P Lynne; Singh, Pradeep K; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Parsek, Matthew R; Schweizer, Herbert P; Harrison, Joe J

    2015-11-01

    Allelic exchange is an efficient method of bacterial genome engineering. This protocol describes the use of this technique to make gene knockouts and knock-ins, as well as single-nucleotide insertions, deletions and substitutions, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Unlike other approaches to allelic exchange, this protocol does not require heterologous recombinases to insert or excise selective markers from the target chromosome. Rather, positive and negative selections are enabled solely by suicide vector-encoded functions and host cell proteins. Here, mutant alleles, which are flanked by regions of homology to the recipient chromosome, are synthesized in vitro and then cloned into allelic exchange vectors using standard procedures. These suicide vectors are then introduced into recipient cells by conjugation. Homologous recombination then results in antibiotic-resistant single-crossover mutants in which the plasmid has integrated site-specifically into the chromosome. Subsequently, unmarked double-crossover mutants are isolated directly using sucrose-mediated counter-selection. This two-step process yields seamless mutations that are precise to a single base pair of DNA. The entire procedure requires ?2 weeks. PMID:26492139

  3. A compound-heterozygous Marfan patient: two defective fibrillin alleles result in a lethal phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Karttunen, L.; Raghunath, M.; Lönnqvist, L.; Peltonen, L.

    1994-01-01

    We describe here the identification of defined mutations in both alleles of the fibrillin gene (FBN1) in a compound-heterozygote Marfan syndrome (MFS) child who had a very severe form of MFS resulting in death from cardiac failure at the age of 4 mo. The nonconsanguineous parents were both affected with MFS. The father's heterozygous point mutation has earlier been reported to result in W217G substitution, the mother was here shown to carry a heterozygous point mutation resulting in G2627R substitution, and the child had inherited both these mutations. The mutant FBN1 alleles were demonstrated to be transcribed with equal efficiency compared with the normal alleles, but metabolic labeling of fibroblast cultures from the child and both parents showed reduced biosynthesis and secretion of profibrillin. Also, the respective amounts of fibrillin in cell-culture media and extracellular-matrix extracts were markedly diminished, particularly in the cell cultures from father and child. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis of the cell cultures of all three family members revealed a drastically reduced amount of microfibrils, and virtually no visible fibrils could be seen in the case of the compound-heterozygote child. These findings demonstrate incomplete dominance of fibrillin mutations and underline the fatal consequences of the complete absence of normal fibrillin molecules in the microfibrils. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7977366

  4. Associations of HLA alleles with specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci have been implicated in several neurodevelopmental disorders in which language is affected. However, to date, no studies have investigated the possible involvement of HLA loci in specific language impairment (SLI), a disorder that is defined primarily upon unexpected language impairment. We report association analyses of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and HLA types in a cohort of individuals affected by language impairment. Methods We perform quantitative association analyses of three linguistic measures and case-control association analyses using both SNP data and imputed HLA types. Results Quantitative association analyses of imputed HLA types suggested a role for the HLA-A locus in susceptibility to SLI. HLA-A A1 was associated with a measure of short-term memory (P = 0.004) and A3 with expressive language ability (P = 0.006). Parent-of-origin effects were found between HLA-B B8 and HLA-DQA1*0501 and receptive language. These alleles have a negative correlation with receptive language ability when inherited from the mother (P = 0.021, P = 0.034, respectively) but are positively correlated with the same trait when paternally inherited (P = 0.013, P = 0.029, respectively). Finally, case control analyses using imputed HLA types indicated that the DR10 allele of HLA-DRB1 was more frequent in individuals with SLI than population controls (P = 0.004, relative risk = 2.575), as has been reported for individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Conclusion These preliminary data provide an intriguing link to those described by previous studies of other neurodevelopmental disorders and suggest a possible role for HLA loci in language disorders. PMID:24433325

  5. Characterization of allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene MAO-A in trophectoderm cells of bovine embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A R; Aguiar Filho, L F C; Sousa, R V; Sartori, R; Franco, M M

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may affect epigenetic mechanisms and alter the expression of genes related to embryo development and X chromosome inactivation (XCI). We characterized allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) in the trophectoderm (TF) of embryos produced by SCNT. Total RNA was isolated from individual biopsies (N = 25), and the allele-specific expression assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Both paternal and maternal alleles were expressed in the trophectoderm. However, a higher frequency of the mono-allelic expression of a specific allele was observed (N = 17; 68%), with the remaining samples showing the presence of mRNA from both alleles (N = 8; 32%). Considering that MAO-A is subject to XCI in bovine, our results suggest that SCNT may influence XCI because neither an imprinted (mono-allelic expression in all samples) nor a random (presence of mRNA from both alleles in all samples) pattern of XCI was observed in TF. Due to the importance of XCI in mammalian embryo development and its sensitivity to in vitro conditions, X-linked genes subject to XCI are candidates for use in the development of embryo quality molecular markers for assisted reproduction. PMID:26505360

  6. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Molecular marker assisted gene stacking for biotic and abiotic stress resistance genes in an elite rice cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Das, Gitishree; Rao, G. J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Severe yield loss due to various biotic stresses like bacterial blight (BB), gall midge (insect) and Blast (disease) and abiotic stresses like submergence and salinity are a serious constraint to the rice productivity throughout the world. The most effective and reliable method of management of the stresses is the enhancement of host resistance, through an economical and environmentally friendly approach. Through the application of marker assisted selection (MAS) technique, the present study reports a successful pyramidization of genes/QTLs to confer resistance/tolerance to blast (Pi2, Pi9), gall Midge (Gm1, Gm4), submergence (Sub1), and salinity (Saltol) in a released rice variety CRMAS2621-7-1 as Improved Lalat which had already incorporated with three BB resistance genes xa5, xa13, and Xa21 to supplement the Xa4 gene present in Improved Lalat. The molecular analysis revealed clear polymorphism between the donor and recipient parents for all the markers that are tagged to the target traits. The conventional backcross breeding approach was followed till BC3F1 generation and starting from BC1F1 onwards, marker assisted selection was employed at each step to monitor the transfer of the target alleles with molecular markers. The different BC3F1s having the target genes/QTLs were inter crossed to generate hybrids with all 10 stress resistance/tolerance genes/QTLs into a single plant/line. Homozygous plants for resistance/tolerance genes in different combinations were recovered. The BC3F3 lines were characterized for their agronomic and quality traits and promising progeny lines were selected. The SSR based background selection was done. Most of the gene pyramid lines showed a high degree of similarity to the recurrent parent for both morphological, grain quality traits and in SSR based background selection. Out of all the gene pyramids tested, two lines had all the 10 resistance/tolerance genes and showed adequate levels of resistance/tolerance against the five target stresses. The study demonstrates the potential of MAS for stacking of several genes into a single line with a high degree of parental genome recovery. PMID:26483798

  8. STR Markers & CE Instrumentation

    E-print Network

    -separated Time Points Scan numbers Colorseparation Sizing AlleleCalling Interpretation 14,16 Nucleotide length DNA "Sizes" STR Alleles Repeat number Raw Data Scan numbers Genotype Mobility relative to an internal (13,15) 1/1449 samples CT SNP 172 bp downstream from repeat #12;Primer Binding Site Mutations Causing

  9. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Jasminum sambac (Oleaceae) using Illumina shotgun sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Weirui

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers of Jasminum sambac (Oleaceae) were isolated to investigate wild germplasm resources and provide markers for breeding. Methods and Results: Illumina sequencing was used to isolate microsatellite markers from the transcriptome of J. sambac. A total of 1322 microsatellites were identified from 49,772 assembled unigenes. One hundred primer pairs were randomly selected to verify primer amplification efficiency. Out of these tested primer pairs, 31 were successfully amplified: 18 primer pairs yielded a single allele, seven exhibited fixed heterozygosity with two alleles, and only six displayed polymorphisms. Conclusions: This study obtained the first set of microsatellite markers for J. sambac, which will be helpful for the assessment of wild germplasm resources and the development of molecular marker–assisted breeding. PMID:26504683

  10. Rifampin Resistance, Beijing-W Clade-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Cluster Group 2 Phylogeny, and the Rv2629 191-C Allele in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains?

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Aladegbami, Bola; Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Dai, Yang; Safi, Hassan; Brimacombe, Michael; Helb, Danica; Alland, David

    2008-01-01

    Rifampin resistance is a key prognostic marker for treatment success in tuberculosis patients. Recently, Wang et al. demonstrated that Rv2629 A191C mutations were present in 99.1% of rifampin-resistant and 0% of rifampin-susceptible clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and that overexpression of the Rv2629 191C allele in Mycobacterium smegmatis produced an eightfold increase in rifampin resistance. These results suggested that Rv2629 could be a cause of rifampin resistance and a valuable target for rifampin resistance detection assays. We developed a molecular-beacon assay to study the association between Rv2629 191 alleles and rifampin resistance in 246 geographically and phylogenetically diverse clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. The 191C allele was present in 30/98 (30.6%) rifampin-resistant isolates and 25/148 (16.9%) rifampin-susceptible isolates and was more common in isolates from Asia. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated complete overlap between the 191C allele and single nucleotide polymorphism cluster group 2 (SCG-2), a phylogenetic lineage that corresponds to the Beijing-W clade of M. tuberculosis. All 55 (100%) 191C isolates were SCG-2, while none of the 191 191A isolates were SCG-2 (P < 0.001). No association was found between the 191C allele and rifampin resistance in an analysis that included the SCG type (P = 1.0). Also, in contrast to the findings of Wang et al., we found that overexpression of either Rv2629 191 allele in M. smegmatis did not produce an increase in rifampin resistance. We conclude that the Rv2629 191C allele is not associated with rifampin resistance and that the allele cannot be used as a molecular target to detect rifampin resistance. The allele appears to be an excellent marker for the Beijing-W clade/SCG-2 phylogenetic group. PMID:18550732

  11. Improving salt tolerance of lowland rice cultivar 'Rassi' through marker-aided backcross breeding in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Bimpong, Isaac Kofi; Manneh, Baboucarr; Sock, Mamadou; Diaw, Faty; Amoah, Nana Kofi Abaka; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Wopereis, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Salt stress affects about 25% of the 4.4 million ha of irrigated and lowland systems for rice cultivation in West Africa (WA). A major quantitative trait locus (QTLs) on chromosome 1 (Saltol) that enhances tolerance to salt stress at the vegetative stage has enabled the use of marker-assisted selection (MAS) to develop salt-tolerant rice cultivar(s) in WA. We used 3 cycles of backcrossing with selection based on DNA markers and field-testing using 'FL478' as tolerant donor and the widely grown 'Rassi' as recurrent parent. In the BC3F2 stage, salt-tolerant lines with over 80% Rassi alleles except in the region around Saltol segment were selected. 429 introgression lines (Saltol-ILs) were identified as tolerant at vegetative stage, of which 116 were field-tested for four seasons at the reproductive stage. Sixteen Saltol-ILs had less yield loss (3-26% relative to control trials), and 8 Saltol-ILs showed high yield potential under stress and non-stress conditions. The 16 Saltol-ILs had been included for further African-wide testing prior to release in 6 WA countries. MAS reduced the time for germplasm improvement from at least 7 to about 4 years. Our objective is to combine different genes/QTLs conferring tolerance to stresses under one genetic background using MAS. PMID:26566846

  12. Disomic Inheritance and Segregation Distortion of SSR Markers in Two Populations of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. var. dactylon

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanwen; Wu, Yanqi; Anderson, Jeff A.; Moss, Justin Q.; Zhu, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Common bermudagrass [C. dactylon (L.) Pers. var. dactylon] is economically and environmentally the most important member among Cynodon species because of its extensive use for turf, forage and soil erosion control in the world. However, information regarding the inheritance within the taxon is limited. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to determine qualitative inheritance mode in common bermudagrass. Two tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36), first-generation selfed (S1) populations, 228 progenies of ‘Zebra’ and 273 from A12359, were analyzed for segregation with 21 and 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, respectively. It is concluded that the inheritance mode of tetraploid bermudagrass was complete or near complete disomic. It is evident that the two bermudagrass parents had an allotetraploid genome with two distinct subgenomes since 33 SSR primer pairs amplified 34 loci, each having two alleles. Severe transmission ratio distortions occurred in the Zebra population while less so in the A12359 population. The findings of disomic inheritance and segregation ratio distortion in common bermudagrass is significant in subsequent linkage map construction, quantitative trait locus mapping and marker-assisted selection in the species. PMID:26295707

  13. Exploitation of sulfonylurea resistance marker and non-homologous end joining mutants for functional analysis in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Y S; Cairns, T C; Chaudhari, Y K; Usher, J; Talbot, N J; Studholme, D J; Csukai, M; Haynes, K

    2015-06-01

    The lack of techniques for rapid assembly of gene deletion vectors, paucity of selectable marker genes available for genetic manipulation and low frequency of homologous recombination are major constraints in construction of gene deletion mutants in Zymoseptoria tritici. To address these issues, we have constructed ternary vectors for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of Z. tritici, which enable the single step assembly of multiple fragments via yeast recombinational cloning. The sulfonylurea resistance gene, which is a mutated allele of the Magnaporthe oryzae ILV2 gene, was established as a new dominant selectable marker for Z. tritici. To increase the frequency of homologous recombination, we have constructed Z. tritici strains deficient in the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double stranded break repair by inactivating the KU70 and KU80 genes. Targeted gene deletion frequency increased to more than 85% in both Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains, compared to ?10% seen in the wild type parental strain IPO323. The in vitro growth and in planta pathogenicity of the Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains were comparable to strain IPO323. Together these molecular tools add significantly to the platform available for genomic analysis through targeted gene deletion or promoter replacements and will facilitate large-scale functional characterization projects in Z. tritici. PMID:26092796

  14. QTL mapping and introgression of yield-related traits from Oryza glumaepatula to cultivated rice ( Oryza sativa) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Brondani, C.; Rangel, N.; Brondani, V.; Ferreira, E.

    2002-05-01

    Rice ( Oryza sativa) cultivar development currently faces the task of overcoming yield plateaus, which is difficult due to the narrow genetic base of breeding programs. Oryza glumaepatula is a diploid wild relative of cultivated rice, native to Central and South America, and is therefore a potential source of alleles of agronomic importance to rice breeding programs. We studied 11 agronomic traits in BC(2)F(2) families of the interspecific cross Oryza sativa x O. glumaepatula. Transgressive lines which are almost isogenic to the elite recurrent O. sativa parent were identified for most of these traits. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed by single-point and interval mapping using a molecular map based on 157 microsatellite and STS markers. Marker regions accounting for 14.5 to 72.9% of a phenotypic variation trait were identified in 9 of the 12 rice chromosomes. Positive QTL effects from O. glumaepatula were observed in chromosomal regions associated with tillering and panicle-number traits. PMID:12582630

  15. Exploitation of sulfonylurea resistance marker and non-homologous end joining mutants for functional analysis in Zymoseptoria tritici

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Y.S.; Cairns, T.C.; Chaudhari, Y.K.; Usher, J.; Talbot, N.J.; Studholme, D.J.; Csukai, M.; Haynes, K.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of techniques for rapid assembly of gene deletion vectors, paucity of selectable marker genes available for genetic manipulation and low frequency of homologous recombination are major constraints in construction of gene deletion mutants in Zymoseptoria tritici. To address these issues, we have constructed ternary vectors for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of Z. tritici, which enable the single step assembly of multiple fragments via yeast recombinational cloning. The sulfonylurea resistance gene, which is a mutated allele of the Magnaporthe oryzae ILV2 gene, was established as a new dominant selectable marker for Z. tritici. To increase the frequency of homologous recombination, we have constructed Z. tritici strains deficient in the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double stranded break repair by inactivating the KU70 and KU80 genes. Targeted gene deletion frequency increased to more than 85% in both Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains, compared to ?10% seen in the wild type parental strain IPO323. The in vitro growth and in planta pathogenicity of the Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains were comparable to strain IPO323. Together these molecular tools add significantly to the platform available for genomic analysis through targeted gene deletion or promoter replacements and will facilitate large-scale functional characterization projects in Z. tritici. PMID:26092796

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF PCR-BASED SNP MARKER OF RICE Waxy GENE WITH CONFRONTING TWO-PAIR PRIMERS.

    PubMed

    Cai, H; Xu, D; Zhou, L; Cheng, J; Zhang, Z; Wu, J; You, A

    2015-07-01

    Rice amylose content (AC) is a key determinant for grain end-use quality attributes. The base substitution (G --> T) at +1 loci of the first intron (In1) of Waxy (Wx), a major gene controlling AC in rice, results in decreased AC. A new SNP typing method of Wx In1 based on polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers (PCR-CTPP) was reported here: first its practicability was confirmed by 23 varieties with known SN P and AC; and then the segregation ratio at target SN P loci were checked and it fitted well for 1 :2: 1 single gene segregation; at last SNP typing and AC assay with 150 mini core collections (MCC) in China showed that average AC of 53 G type varieties (22.5%) was significantly higher than that of 97 T type varieties (13.7%) (p < 0.01) and the target SNP loci explained 77.8% AC variation. So this method could be used to estimate AC of rice variety roughly or in marker-assisted-breeding, that is, using variety with known and desired AC as Wx allele donor parent and aided with crossbreed, backcross and marker-assisted selection (MAS) reported here rice breeders could improve AC of varieties with comprehensively excellent performance to meet special end-products. PMID:26410932

  17. Strong allelic association between Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome and D17S805

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, M.; Jagell, S.; Sillen, A.

    1994-09-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson Syndrom (SLS) is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation. It is an autosomal recessive trait that has been described in many populations, but is particularly frequent in the northern part of Sweden. A defect in the enzyme fatty alcohol: NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAD) has been suggested, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Based on linkage analysis and allelic association, the disorder has now been mapped to chromosome 17. Meiotic recombinations suggests that the gene is flanked by D17S805 on the centromeric and D17S783 and D17S925 on the telomeric side. These three markers map to the same location in reference pedigrees. Strong allelic association (chi-square 60.28, p<0.0003) to D17S805 suggests that the mutation is located at a limited distance on the telomeric side of this marker. It is possible that the gene can be identified by functional complementation of SLS cells using YACs from this region. Alternatively, positional cloning should be possible in this presumable small area. The markers identified are close and informative enough to allow accurate genetic diagnosis.

  18. A powerful test of parent-of-origin effects for quantitative traits using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon where the same alleles have unequal transcriptions and thus contribute differently to a trait depending on their parent of origin. This mechanism has been found to affect a variety of human disorders. Although various methods for testing parent-of-origin effect...

  19. Fundamentals of Population Genetics Mechanisms of Allele Frequency Changes

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Weigang

    Genetics and Evolution Definition Evolution = Divergence Between Populations = Fixation of New AllelesFundamentals of Population Genetics Mechanisms of Allele Frequency Changes Case Studies Chapter 4. Population Genetics Weigang Qiu Department of Biological Sciences Hunter College BIOL 375 Molecular Evolution

  20. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C; Sykes, Robert; Ziebell, Angela L; Porth, Ilga; Skyba, Oleksandr; Unda, Faride; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Douglas, Carl; Mansfield, Shawn; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Evans, Luke M; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.

  1. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C; Sykes, Robert; et al

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcriptionmore »factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.« less

  2. Transferability of microsatellite and sequence tagged site markers in Oryza species.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Claudio; Rangel, Paulo Hideo Nakano; Borba, Tereza Cristina Oliveira; Brondani, Rosana Pereira Vianello

    2003-01-01

    The genus Oryza comprises 22 species which are potentially useful as a source of genetic variability that can be introgressed into the worldwide cultivated rice, Oryza sativa. Molecular markers are useful tools for monitoring gene introgressions and for detecting polymorphism among species. In this study, cross-amplification was estimated among 28 accessions of 16 Oryza species, representing the genomes AA, BB, CC, BBCC and CCDD, using 59 microsatellite (OG, OS and RM series) and 15 STS (Sequence Tagged Sites) markers. All markers amplified at least one Oryza species, indicating different levels of transferability across species. Markers based on microsatellite sequences amplified 37 % of the accessions, with an average of 6.58 alleles per locus and an average polymorphism information content (PIC) of 70 %. For STS markers, the amplification level was 53.3 %, and the average number of alleles and PIC values were 1.6 and 10 %, respectively. These Results showed that although the STS markers detected a reduced level of genetic diversity, the transferability was higher, indicating that they can be used for genetic analysis when evaluating less genetically related species of Oryza. Among the microsatellite markers, an analysis of species with an AA genome showed that the OG markers produced the highest level of polymorphic loci (54.6 %), followed by RM markers (48 %). Highly polymorphic and transferable molecular markers in Oryza can be useful for exploiting the genetic resources of this genus, for detecting allelic variants in loci associated with important agronomic traits, and for monitoring alleles introgressed from wild relatives to cultivated rice. PMID:14641482

  3. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  4. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (FST coefficients) to the present database ranged from FST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to FST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  5. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E. (Cross Plains, WI); Pan, David (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  6. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  7. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  8. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  9. Distribution of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in insulin-dependent Moroccan diabetics.

    PubMed

    Izaabel, H; Garchon, H J; Beaurain, G; Biga, M; Akhayat, O; Bach, J F; Caillat-Zucman, S

    1996-09-01

    HLA class II polymorphism in Moroccan IDDM patients has not been investigated so far. In this study, HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 allele and haplotype frequencies were analyzed in 125 unrelated Moroccan IDDM patients and 93 unrelated healthy controls, all originating from the Souss region and mostly of Berber origin. Some common features with other Caucasian groups were observed, in particular, a predisposing effect of the DRB1*03-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 and DRB1*04-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 alleles or allelic combinations. The Moroccan IDDM group also presented with more specific characteristics. Among DRB1*04 subtypes, DRB1*0405 was associated with susceptibility to and DRB1*0406 with protection from the disease. The haplotype and the relative predispositional effect (RPE) analyses indicated that the DRB1*08-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402 haplotype was also associated with susceptibility to IDDM. Interestingly, the DRB1*09-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0201 haplotype, completely absent from the control group and very rare in North African populations, was observed in 7.2% of the Moroccan diabetics. Conversely, the DRB1*07-DQA1*0201-DQB1*0201 and DRB1*15-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 haplotypes were associated with protection from IDDM. Finally, we observed an age-dependent genetic heterogeneity of IDDM, the frequencies of predisposing alleles being higher and those of protective alleles lower in childhood- than in adult-onset diabetics. Our data on Moroccan diabetics, together with data on European and Northern Mediterranean patients, suggest a gradient of various HLA class II predisposing and protective markers that link these populations. PMID:8872168

  10. Microsatellite variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked Hawaiian Islands endemic: implications for reintroductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Seixas, Pedro P.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of genetic biodiversity in endangered wildlife populations is an important challenge to address since the loss of alleles and genetic drift may influence future adaptability. Reintroduction aims to re-establish species to restored or protected ecosystems; however, moving a subset of individuals may result in loss of gene variants during the management-induced bottleneck (i.e. translocation). The endangered Laysan teal Anas laysanensis was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 230 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan (1999 to 2009) and Midway (2007 to 2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within populations. However, 2 rare alleles found in the Laysan source population were not present in Midway’s reintroduced population, and a unique allele was discovered in an individual on Midway. Differentiation between island populations was low (FST = 0.6%), but statistically significant. Our results indicate that genetic drift had little effect on offspring generations 3 to 6 yr post-release and demonstrate the utility of using known founder events to help quantify genetic capture during translocations and to inform management decisions.

  11. Total Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins…

  12. Parental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, Audrey M.; Lehman, Stephanie; Clapp, John; Hovell, Melbourne; Sipan, Carol; Blumberg, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period during which many youth experiment with risk practices. This paper examined the association of parental monitoring with a range of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors among high-risk youth, while controlling for other demographic and environmental variables previously found to be associated with AOD…

  13. Constructive Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Sally

    This book turns important research and theory into essential, easy-to-follow guidelines for new parents and child care providers to help them focus on the critical first 3 years of life to build a strong foundation for the future. All the key areas of child development are covered, including self-esteem, and cognitive, motor and social…

  14. Aging Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on aging parents. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include adult children, dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the…

  15. Perceived Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wouters, Sofie; Doumen, Sarah; Germeijs, Veerle; Colpin, Hilde; Verschueren, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Contingent self-esteem (i.e., the degree to which one's self-esteem is dependent on meeting particular conditions) has been shown to predict a wide range of psychosocial and academic problems. This study extends previous research on contingent self-esteem by examining the predictive role of perceived parenting dimensions in a sample of early…

  16. Cycle pattern of a R allelic variation. Progress report, 1 November 1978-31 January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kermicle, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Two R alleles vary in cycle fashion. The original, intensely pigmenting forms change to weakly acting ones which revert in turn to the original. Neither direction of change is correlated with recombination of flanking markers. The reversion frequencies do not differ from the respective frequencies of change in the forward direction. The changes are restricted in the life cycle to about the time of meiosis. Modifying tthe incidence of crossing over in the R region altered the frequency of reversion proportionately. These features of instability could result from switching by intrachromosomal recombination between alternative arrangements of an R segment associated with an inverted duplication.

  17. Comparison of allele frequencies of eight STR loci from Argentinian Amerindian and European populations.

    PubMed

    Sala, A; Penacino, G; Corach, D

    1998-10-01

    Eight STR systems (THO1, FABP, VWA, FES/FPS, HPRTB, F13A1, CSF1PO, and D6S366) were investigated in different ethnic groups of Argentina. Allele and genotype frequencies, power of exclusion, and discriminative power were investigated. Hardy-Weinberg expectations were calculated from heterozygosity levels. FST and G tests demonstrated that significant differences exist among the investigated populations for some of the eight STRs markers. The Wichi Indians are clearly separated from the Mapuche and Tehuelche, who in turn are closer to the European population, suggesting non-Amerindian admixture. PMID:9780520

  18. Efficiency gain of marker-assisted backcrossing by sequentially increasing marker densities over generations.

    PubMed

    Prigge, Vanessa; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Dhillon, Baldev S; Frisch, Matthias

    2009-06-01

    Expenses for marker assays are the major costs in marker-assisted backcrossing programs for the transfer of target genes from a donor into the genetic background of a recipient genotype. Our objectives were to (1) investigate the effect of employing sequentially increasing marker densities over backcross generations on the recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery and the number of marker data points (MDP) required, and (2) determine optimum designs for attaining RPG thresholds of 93-98% with a minimum number of MDP. We simulated the introgression of one dominant target gene for genome models of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) with varying marker distances of 5-80 cM and population sizes of 30-250 plants across BC(1) to BC(3) generations. Employing less dense maps in early backcross generations resulted in savings of over 50% in the number of required MDP compared with using a constant set of markers and was accompanied only by small reductions in the attained RPG values. The optimum designs were characterized by increasing marker densities and increasing population sizes in advanced generations for both genome models. We conclude that increasing simultaneously the marker density and the population size from early to advanced backcross generations results in gene introgression with a minimum number of required MDP. PMID:19407987

  19. Marker assisted selection of low phytic acid trait in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Sureshkumar, S; Tamilkumar, P; Senthil, N; Nagarajan, P; Thangavelu, A U; Raveendran, M; Vellaikumar, S; Ganesan, K N; Balagopal, R; Vijayalakshmi, G; Shobana, V

    2014-02-01

    Maize is the third important major food crop. Breeding for low phytate maize genotypes is an effective strategy for decreasing the content of kernel phytic acid (a chelator of cations such as Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) ) and thereby increasing the bioavailability of nutritive minerals in human diet and animal feed. Previous studies have established that a mutant plant with a lpa2-2 allele accumulates less phytic acid in seeds. Therefore, the marker assisted backcross breeding (MABB), which involves introgression of lpa2-2 recessive allele (which confer low phytate trait) from a lpa2-2 mutant line into a well-adapted line using backcrosses and selection of lines possessing lpa2-2 allele in each backcross population using molecular markers, is an effective strategy for developing low phytate maize. So far, no studies have developed any lpa2-2 allele specific molecular markers for this purpose. Here, using backcross and selfed progenies, obtained by crossing low phytate mutant line 'EC 659418' (i.e. donor of lpa2-2 allele) into agronomically superior line 'UMI395', we have validated that a SSR marker 'umc2230', located 0.4 cM downstream of lpa2-2, cosegregate, in a Mendelian fashion, with low phytic acid trait. Therefore umc2230 can be dependably used in MABB for the development of low phytate maize. PMID:24627970

  20. Using Next Generation Sequencing for Multiplexed Trait-Linked Markers in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Amy; Wang, Shan; St Amand, Paul; Bai, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the major type of marker for genotyping in many crops. However, the availability of SNP markers for important traits of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) that can be effectively used in marker-assisted selection (MAS) is still limited and SNP assays for MAS are usually uniplex. A shift from uniplex to multiplex assays will allow the simultaneous analysis of multiple markers and increase MAS efficiency. We designed 33 locus-specific markers from SNP or indel-based marker sequences that linked to 20 different quantitative trait loci (QTL) or genes of agronomic importance in wheat and analyzed the amplicon sequences using an Ion Torrent Proton Sequencer and a custom allele detection pipeline to determine the genotypes of 24 selected germplasm accessions. Among the 33 markers, 27 were successfully multiplexed and 23 had 100% SNP call rates. Results from analysis of "kompetitive allele-specific PCR" (KASP) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers developed from the same loci fully verified the genotype calls of 23 markers. The NGS-based multiplexed assay developed in this study is suitable for rapid and high-throughput screening of SNPs and some indel-based markers in wheat. PMID:26625271

  1. Using Next Generation Sequencing for Multiplexed Trait-Linked Markers in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Amy; Wang, Shan; St. Amand, Paul; Bai, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the major type of marker for genotyping in many crops. However, the availability of SNP markers for important traits of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) that can be effectively used in marker-assisted selection (MAS) is still limited and SNP assays for MAS are usually uniplex. A shift from uniplex to multiplex assays will allow the simultaneous analysis of multiple markers and increase MAS efficiency. We designed 33 locus-specific markers from SNP or indel-based marker sequences that linked to 20 different quantitative trait loci (QTL) or genes of agronomic importance in wheat and analyzed the amplicon sequences using an Ion Torrent Proton Sequencer and a custom allele detection pipeline to determine the genotypes of 24 selected germplasm accessions. Among the 33 markers, 27 were successfully multiplexed and 23 had 100% SNP call rates. Results from analysis of "kompetitive allele-specific PCR" (KASP) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers developed from the same loci fully verified the genotype calls of 23 markers. The NGS-based multiplexed assay developed in this study is suitable for rapid and high-throughput screening of SNPs and some indel-based markers in wheat. PMID:26625271

  2. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature. PMID:23475683

  3. For Parents and Kids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A A A Listen En Español For Parents & Kids Diabetes is a disease that affects the whole ... balance between caring and hovering. Explore: For Parents & Kids Parent's Perspective Parents of children with diabetes share ...

  4. Isolation and characterization of 21 microsatellite markers in the barn owl (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Burri, R; Antoniazza, S; Siverio, F; Klein, A; Roulin, A; Fumagalli, L

    2008-09-01

    We report 21 new polymorphic microsatellite markers in the European barn owl (Tyto alba). The polymorphism of the reported markers was evaluated in a population situated in western Switzerland and in another from Tenerife, Canary Islands. The number of alleles per locus varies between two and 31, and expected heterozygosity per population ranges from 0.16 to 0.95. All loci are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no linkage disequilibrium was detected. Two loci exhibit a null allele in the Tenerife population. PMID:21585946

  5. Development of nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers for the endangered conifer Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S.; L’Huillier, Laurent; Kurata, Seikan; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Isagi, Yuji; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Ito, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae), an endangered conifer species in New Caledonia. Methods and Results: Using sequencing by synthesis (SBS) of an RNA-Seq library, 15 polymorphic nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed. When evaluated with 48 individuals, these markers showed genetic variations ranging from two to 15 alleles and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0 to 0.881. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for examining the genetic diversity and structure of remaining wild populations and improving the genetic status of ex situ populations. PMID:26312198

  6. Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Expression in the Rat Brain Both in Basal Condition and following Learning Predominantly Derives from the Maternal Allele

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaojing; Kohtz, Amy; Pollonini, Gabriella; Riccio, Andrea; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2) is known as a maternally imprinted gene involved in growth and development. Recently, Igf2 was found to also be regulated and required in the adult rat hippocampus for long-term memory formation, raising the question of its allelic regulation in adult brain regions following experience and in cognitive processes. We show that, in adult rats, Igf2 is abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in cognitive functions, like hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, compared to the peripheral tissues. In contrast to its maternal imprinting in peripheral tissues, Igf2 is mainly expressed from the maternal allele in these brain regions. The training-dependent increase in Igf2 expression derives proportionally from both parental alleles, and, hence, is mostly maternal. Thus, Igf2 parental expression in the adult rat brain does not follow the imprinting rules found in peripheral tissues, suggesting differential expression regulation and functions of imprinted genes in the brain. PMID:26495851

  7. Use of allele-specific FAIRE to determine functional regulatory polymorphism using large-scale genotyping arrays.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew J P; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia; Eriksson, Per; Stender, Stefan; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Folkersen, Lasse; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Kumari, Meena; Palmen, Jutta; Hingorani, Aroon D; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-?), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta?=?0.016; p?=?0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-? expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS. PMID:22916038

  8. Use of Allele-Specific FAIRE to Determine Functional Regulatory Polymorphism Using Large-Scale Genotyping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew J. P.; Howard, Philip; Shah, Sonia; Eriksson, Per; Stender, Stefan; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Folkersen, Lasse; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Kumari, Meena; Palmen, Jutta; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.

    2012-01-01

    Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-?), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta?=?0.016; p?=?0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-? expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS. PMID:22916038

  9. Development of microsatellite markers for Isodon longitubus (Lamiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tadashi; Yamashiro, Asuka; Dohzono, Ikumi; Maki, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Isodon longitubus to study the natural hybridization of the species and its congeners. • Methods and Results: A total of 10 primer sets were developed for I. longitubus. From the initial screening, all of 10 loci were polymorphic with five to 19 alleles per locus in the Mt. Ishizuchi population, whereas nine loci were polymorphic with two to 12 alleles per loci in the Toon population. Although one locus was monomorphic at one population, the observed and expected heterozygosity values estimated from 34 I. longitubus samples ranged from 0.273 to 1.000 and from 0.483 to 0.918, respectively. Six primer sets could amplify all three species examined in this study (I. inflexus, I. japonicus, and I. shikokianus). • Conclusions: The 10 microsatellite markers developed here will be useful in analyzing the population genetic structure of I. longitubus and in studying the natural hybridization between Isodon species. PMID:25202487

  10. Allele and haplotype diversity of X-chromosomal STRs in Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Pasino, Serena; Caratti, Stefano; Del Pero, Massimiliano; Santovito, Alfredo; Torre, Carlo; Robino, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Twenty-one X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci, including the six clusters of linked markers DXS10148-DXS10135-DXS8378 (Xp22), DXS7132-DXS10079-DXS10074 (Xq12), DXS6801-DXS6809-DXS6789 (Xq21), DXS7424-DXS101 (Xq22), DXS10103-HPRTB-DXS10101 (Xq26), DXS8377-DXS10146-DXS10134-DXS7423 (Xq28) and the loci DXS6800, GATA172D05 and DXS10011 were typed in a population sample from Ivory Coast (n=125; 51 men and 74 women). Allele and haplotype frequencies as well as linkage disequilibrium data for kinship calculations are provided. On the whole, no significant differences in the genetic variability of X-STR markers were observed between Ivorians and other sub-Saharan African populations belonging to the Niger-Kordofanian linguistic group. PMID:21717153

  11. Biased Gene Conversion Skews Allele Frequencies in Human Populations, Increasing the Disease Burden of Recessive Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ? 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications. PMID:25279983

  12. Many Parents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseng, Torleiv; Moxnes, John F.

    2015-06-01

    In all living species at most, two parents are needed in order to make an offspring. In this paper, we assume that N parents are needed, and we calculate the optimum N in terms of fitness using a simple probabilistic approach. The probability of finding an attractive partner is set to P. The probability that this partner gives increased fitness is set to 1- R. We show that the best number of partners is N = 2 for any value of R as long as 1/2 < P < 2/3. For P < 1/2, the most beneficial is N = 1 partner. As P increases, there exists an optimum number of partners N > 2.

  13. Genetic Introgression and Species Boundary of Two Geographically Overlapping Pine Species Revealed by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaogang; Xu, Jin; Li, Shuxian; Yin, Tongming

    2014-01-01

    Gene introgression and hybrid barriers have long been a major focus of studies of geographically overlapping species. Two pine species, Pinus massoniana and P. hwangshanensis, are frequently observed growing adjacent to each other, where they overlap in a narrow hybrid zone. As a consequence, these species constitute an ideal system for studying genetic introgression and reproductive barriers between naturally hybridizing, adjacently distributed species. In this study, we sampled 270 pine trees along an elevation gradient in Anhui Province, China and analyzed these samples using EST-SSR markers. The molecular data revealed that direct gene flow between the two species was fairly low, and that the majority of gene introgression was intermediated by backcrossing. On the basis of empirical observation, the on-site distribution of pines was divided into a P. massoniana zone, a hybrid zone, and a P. hwangshanensis zone. STRUCTURE analysis revealed the existence of a distinct species boundary between the two pine species. The genetic boundary of the hybrid zone, on the other hand, was indistinct owing to intensive backcrossing with parental species. Compared with P. massoniana, P. hwangshanensis was found to backcross with the hybrids more intensively, consistent with the observation that morphological and anatomical characteristics of trees in the contact zone were biased towards P. hwangshanensis. The introgression ability of amplified alleles varied across species, with some being completely blocked from interspecific introgression. Our study has provided a living example to help explain the persistence of adjacently distributed species coexisting with their interfertile hybrids. PMID:24977711

  14. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  15. Reduced Life- and Healthspan in Mice Carrying a Mono-Allelic BubR1 MVA Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wijshake, Tobias; Malureanu, Liviu A.; Baker, Darren J.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; van de Sluis, Bart; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Mosaic Variegated Aneuploidy (MVA) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by inaccurate chromosome segregation and high rates of near-diploid aneuploidy. Children with MVA syndrome die at an early age, are cancer prone, and have progeroid features like facial dysmorphisms, short stature, and cataracts. The majority of MVA cases are linked to mutations in BUBR1, a mitotic checkpoint gene required for proper chromosome segregation. Affected patients either have bi-allelic BUBR1 mutations, with one allele harboring a missense mutation and the other a nonsense mutation, or mono-allelic BUBR1 mutations combined with allelic variants that yield low amounts of wild-type BubR1 protein. Parents of MVA patients that carry single allele mutations have mild mitotic defects, but whether they are at risk for any of the pathologies associated with MVA syndrome is unknown. To address this, we engineered a mouse model for the nonsense mutation 2211insGTTA (referred to as GTTA) found in MVA patients with bi-allelic BUBR1 mutations. Here we report that both the median and maximum lifespans of the resulting BubR1+/GTTA mice are significantly reduced. Furthermore, BubR1+/GTTA mice develop several aging-related phenotypes at an accelerated rate, including cataract formation, lordokyphosis, skeletal muscle wasting, impaired exercise ability, and fat loss. BubR1+/GTTA mice develop mild aneuploidies and show enhanced growth of carcinogen-induced tumors. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the BUBR1 GTTA mutation compromises longevity and healthspan, raising the interesting possibility that mono-allelic changes in BUBR1 might contribute to differences in aging rates in the general population. PMID:23300461

  16. Effortful Control and Parenting: Associations with HPA Axis Reactivity in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryski, Katie R.; Dougherty, Lea R.; Dyson, Margaret W.; Olino, Thomas M.; Laptook, Rebecca S.; Klein, Daniel N.; Hayden, Elizabeth P.

    2013-01-01

    While activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is an adaptive response to stress, excessive HPA axis reactivity may be an important marker of childhood vulnerability to psychopathology. Parenting, including parent affect during parent-child interactions, may play an important role in shaping the developing HPA system; however,…

  17. Microsatellite markers for the silver arowana (Osteoglossum bicirrhosum, Osteoglossidae, Osteoglossiformes).

    PubMed

    DE Jesus DA Silva, Themis; Hrbek, Tomas; Farias, Izeni P

    2009-05-01

    Osteoglossum bicirrhosum (silver arowana) is an important fish for the economy of the Amazon region, both as an ornamental fish and as a food fish. To provide tools for addressing ecological and genetic questions, we developed 19 polymorphic microsatellite markers that had between 2 and 7 alleles per locus in the 24 tested individuals. The transferability of many of the loci was confirmed for Osteoglossum ferreirai (black arowana) and Arapaima gigas, and for three African osteoglossiform species. PMID:21564825

  18. Characterizing allelic association in the genome era

    PubMed Central

    WEIR, B. S.; LAURIE, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Whole genome data are allowing the estimation of population genetic parameters with an accuracy not imagined 50 years ago. Variation in these parameters along the genome is being found empirically where once only approximate theoretical values were available. Along with increased information, however, has come the issue of multiple testing and the realization that high values of the coefficients of variation of quantities such as relatedness measures may make it difficult to draw inferences. This review concentrates on measures of allelic association within and between individuals and within and between populations. PMID:21429275

  19. Chinese Parenting Reconsideration: Parenting Practices in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fu-mei; Luster, Tom

    This study examined authoritative and authoritarian parenting and specific parenting practices among Chinese mothers with preschoolers. The final sample consisted of 463 mothers with their 3 to 7 year-olds from 11 preschools, in Taiwan. Mothers completed a Chinese translation of the Parenting Behavior Questionnaire that assessed their parenting

  20. Microsatellite Marker Analysis as a Typing System for Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Foulet, F.; Nicolas, N.; Eloy, O.; Botterel, F.; Gantier, J.-C.; Costa, J.-M.; Bretagne, S.

    2005-01-01

    Candida glabrata is one of the most important causes of nosocomial fungal infection. We investigated, using a multiplex PCR, three polymorphic microsatellite markers, RPM2, MTI, and ERG3, in order to obtain a rapid genotyping method for C. glabrata. One set of primers was designed for each locus, and one primer of each set was dye labeled to read PCR signals using an automatic sequencer. Eight reference strains including other Candida species and 138 independent C. glabrata clinical isolates were tested. The clinical isolates were collected from different anatomical sites of adult patients either hospitalized in different wards of two different hospitals or not hospitalized. Since C. glabrata is haploid, one single PCR product for each PCR set was obtained and assigned to an allele. The numbers of different alleles were 5, 7, and 15 for the RPM2, MTI, and ERG3 loci, respectively. The number of allelic associations was 21, leading to a discriminatory power of 0.84. The markers were stable after 25 subcultures, and the amplifications were specific for C. glabrata. A factorial correspondence analysis did not indicate any correlation between the 21 multilocus genotypes and the clinical data (source, sex, ward, anatomical sites). Microsatellite marker analysis is a rapid and reliable technique to investigate clinical issues concerning C. glabrata. However, its discriminatory power should be improved by testing other polymorphic microsatellite loci. PMID:16145109

  1. Description and Power Analysis of Two Tests for Detecting Recent Population Bottlenecks from Allele Frequency Data

    PubMed Central

    Cornuet, J. M.; Luikart, G.

    1996-01-01

    When a population experiences a reduction of its effective size, it generally develops a heterozygosity excess at selectively neutral loci, i.e., the heterozygosity computed from a sample of genes is larger than the heterozygosity expected from the number of alleles found in the sample if the population were at mutation drift equilibrium. The heterozygosity excess persists only a certain number of generations until a new equilibrium is established. Two statistical tests for detecting a heterozygosity excess are described. They require measurements of the number of alleles and heterozygosity at each of several loci from a population sample. The first test determines if the proportion of loci with heterozygosity excess is significantly larger than expected at equilibrium. The second test establishes if the average of standardized differences between observed and expected heterozygosities is significantly different from zero. Type I and II errors have been evaluated by computer simulations, varying sample size, number of loci, bottleneck size, time elapsed since the beginning of the bottleneck and level of variability of loci. These analyses show that the most useful markers for bottleneck detection are those evolving under the infinite allele model (IAM) and they provide guidelines for selecting sample sizes of individuals and loci. The usefulness of these tests for conservation biology is discussed. PMID:8978083

  2. Genetic variability and distribution of mating type alleles in field populations of Leptosphaeria maculans from France.

    PubMed

    Gout, Lilian; Eckert, Maria; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is the most ubiquitous fungal pathogen of Brassica crops and causes the devastating stem canker disease of oilseed rape worldwide. We used minisatellite markers to determine the genetic structure of L. maculans in four field populations from France. Isolates were collected at three different spatial scales (leaf, 2-m2 field plot, and field) enabling the evaluation of spatial distribution of the mating type alleles and of genetic variability within and among field populations. Within each field population, no gametic disequilibrium between the minisatellite loci was detected and the mating type alleles were present at equal frequencies. Both sexual and asexual reproduction occur in the field, but the genetic structure of these populations is consistent with annual cycles of randomly mating sexual reproduction. All L. maculans field populations had a high level of gene diversity (H = 0.68 to 0.75) and genotypic diversity. Within each field population, the number of genotypes often was very close to the number of isolates. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that >99.5% of the total genetic variability was distributed at a small spatial scale, i.e., within 2-m2 field plots. Population differentiation among the four field populations was low (GST < 0.02), suggesting a high degree of gene exchange between these populations. The high gene flow evidenced here in French populations of L. maculans suggests a rapid countrywide diffusion of novel virulence alleles whenever novel resistance sources are used. PMID:16391041

  3. Microsatellite DNA markers for delineating population structure and kinship among the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Henderson, A.P.; Bocetti, C.I.; Currie, D.; Wunderle, J.M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 23 microsatellite DNA markers for the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii), a Nearctic/Neotropical migrant passerine. This suite of markers revealed moderate to high levels of allelic diversity (averaging 7.7 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 72%). Genotypic frequencies at 22 of 23 (95%) markers conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and no linkage disequilibrium was observed in blood samples taken from 14 warblers found on the wintering grounds in the Bahamas archipelago. Multilocus genotypes resulting from this suite of markers should reduce the amount of resources required for initiating new genetic studies assessing breeding structure, parentage, demographics, and individual-level ecological interactions for D. kirtlandii. ?? 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. AB163. Microsatellite markers for preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Vietnamese DMD and hemophilia: a female carriers

    PubMed Central

    Tuan-Pham, Le Anh; Tran, Thinh Huy; Tran, Dat Quoc; Minh, Nguyen Thi; Huong, Nguyen Lien; Tien, Nguyen Viet; Ta, Van Thanh; Bui, The Hung; Tran, Van Khanh

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite polymorphic markers were powerful tool to perform single cell diagnosis for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in X-linked recessive disorders. This type of analysis requires haplotypes information of carrier mothers and affected sons. We present 12 Vietnamese families with duchenne muscular dystrophin (DMD) or Hemophilia A affected sons, six with each disorder. We established haplotypes based on linked microsatellite polymorphic markers in these families and performed diagnosis enabling embryo transfer from the PGD cycle. We also perform haplotypes analysis in five more families for each disease to identify more informative markers among other, in order to construct better strategy for future diagnosis. Microsatellite polymorphic markers flanking the F8 and DMD gene were used to identify haplotypes. Polar bodies (PB) were biopsied and analyzed to determine allelic association between the mutation and markers in multiplex PCR reaction. The results showed that 13 out of 28 embryos were found to be not affected by F8 or DMD gene inherited mutations and were available for transfer. Marker DXS9907, DSTR44, DSTR49 for DMD gene and marker FXS1073, DXS9897, DXS1073 for F8 gene were identified as the most frequent markers shown heterozygous alleles in mother carriers. PB analysis by microsatellite markers were proved to be useful technique for PGD of DMD and Hemophilia A families. Better strategy for PB diagnosis was built.

  5. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status.

    PubMed

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Rico, Tom; Lo, Betty; Aran, Adi; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-04-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression in peripheral white blood cells of 50 narcolepsy versus 47 controls (half of whom were DQB1*06:02 positive) and observed the largest differences between the groups in the signal from HLA probes. Further studies of HLA-DQ expression (mRNA and protein in a subset) in 125 controls and 147 narcolepsy cases did not reveal any difference, a result we explain by the lack of proper control of allelic diversity in Affymetrix HLA probes. Rather, a clear effect of DQB1*06:02 allelic dosage on DQB1*06:02 mRNA levels (1.65-fold) and protein (1.59-fold) could be demonstrated independent of disease status. These results indicate that allelic dosage is transmitted into changes in heterodimer availability, a phenomenon that may explain the increased risk for narcolepsy in DQB1*06:02 homozygotes versus heterozygotes. PMID:22326585

  6. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  7. Maternal inheritance and chromosome 18 allele sharing in unilineal bipolar illness pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, E.S.; Badner, J.A.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.

    1996-04-09

    We have replicated the observation that there is excess maternal transmission of illness in a series of previously described unilineal Bipolar manic-depressive illness extended pedigrees. ({open_quotes}Transmission{close_quotes} is defined for any ill person in a pedigree when father or mother has a personal or immediate family history of major affective disorder.) We divided our pedigrees into exclusively maternal transmission (Mat) and mixed maternal-paternal transmission (in different pedigree branches) (Pat). Using affected sib-pair-analysis, linkage to a series of markers on chromosome 18p-cen was observed in the Pat but not the Mat pedigrees, with significantly greater identity by descent (IBD) at these markers in the Pat pedigrees. As compared with the pedigree series as a whole, the proportion of alleles IBD in the linkage region is much increased in the Pat pedigrees. As the sharing proportion of alleles in affected relative pairs increases, the number of such pairs needed to resolve the linkage region to a 1 cM interval becomes smaller. Genetic subdivision of an illness by clinical or pedigree configuration criteria may thus play an important role in discovery of disease susceptibility mutations. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Development of Seven Microsatellite Markers Using Next Generation Sequencing for the Conservation on the Korean Population of Dorcus hopei (E. Saunders, 1854) (Coleoptera, Lucanidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Hwa; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun Jae

    2015-01-01

    We developed microsatellite markers for genetic structural analyses of Dorcus hopei, a stag beetle species, using next generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping for regional populations. A total of 407,070,351 base pairs of genomic DNA containing >4000 microsatellite loci except AT repeats were sequenced. From 76 loci selected for primer design, 27 were polymorphic. Of these 27 markers, 10 were tested on three regional populations: two Chinese (Shichuan and Guangxi) and one Korean (Wanju). Three markers were excluded due to inconsistent amplification, genotyping errors, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). By multi-locus genotyping, the allele number, observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content of seven microsatellite loci were ranged 2?10, 0.1333?1.0000, and 0.1228?0.8509, respectively. In an analysis on the genetic differentiation among regional populations including one Japanese population and one cross-breeding population, the individual colored bar-plots showed that both Chinese populations were closer to each other than to the Far East Asian populations. In Far East Asian populations, Wanju and Nirasaki populations could not be distinguished from each other because the frequency of genetic contents was very similar in some individuals of two populations. Moreover, the cross-breeding population contained all patterns of genetic contents shown in Chinese, Korean, and Japanese populations, compared with the genetic content frequency of each regional population. As a result, we examined whether the cross-breeding population might be a hybrid population, and might contain a possibility of interbreeding with Chinese populations in parental generations. Therefore, these markers will be useful for analyses of genetic diversity in populations, genetic relationships between regional populations, genetic structure analyses, and origin tests. PMID:26370965

  9. Development of Seven Microsatellite Markers Using Next Generation Sequencing for the Conservation on the Korean Population of Dorcus hopei (E. Saunders, 1854) (Coleoptera, Lucanidae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hwa; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun Jae

    2015-01-01

    We developed microsatellite markers for genetic structural analyses of Dorcus hopei, a stag beetle species, using next generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping for regional populations. A total of 407,070,351 base pairs of genomic DNA containing >4000 microsatellite loci except AT repeats were sequenced. From 76 loci selected for primer design, 27 were polymorphic. Of these 27 markers, 10 were tested on three regional populations: two Chinese (Shichuan and Guangxi) and one Korean (Wanju). Three markers were excluded due to inconsistent amplification, genotyping errors, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). By multi-locus genotyping, the allele number, observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content of seven microsatellite loci were ranged 2-10, 0.1333-1.0000, and 0.1228-0.8509, respectively. In an analysis on the genetic differentiation among regional populations including one Japanese population and one cross-breeding population, the individual colored bar-plots showed that both Chinese populations were closer to each other than to the Far East Asian populations. In Far East Asian populations, Wanju and Nirasaki populations could not be distinguished from each other because the frequency of genetic contents was very similar in some individuals of two populations. Moreover, the cross-breeding population contained all patterns of genetic contents shown in Chinese, Korean, and Japanese populations, compared with the genetic content frequency of each regional population. As a result, we examined whether the cross-breeding population might be a hybrid population, and might contain a possibility of interbreeding with Chinese populations in parental generations. Therefore, these markers will be useful for analyses of genetic diversity in populations, genetic relationships between regional populations, genetic structure analyses, and origin tests. PMID:26370965

  10. Parental licensure.

    PubMed

    Lykken, D T

    2001-11-01

    Most of the 1,400,000 men currently locked up in American prisons would have become tax-paying neighbors had they been switched in the hospital nursery and sent home with a mature, self-supporting, married couple. The parent with whom they did go home would in most instances not have been fit to adopt someone else's baby. It is argued that perhaps the only effective way to reduce crime and the other pathologies of the growing American underclass--apart from building still more prisons--would be to require from persons wishing to birth and rear a child of their own those same minimal criteria usually expected in adoptive parents. For evolutionary reasons, human beings are reluctant to interfere with the procreational rights of any person, no matter how immature, incompetent, or unsocialized he or she might be. In consequence, human beings tend not to think about the right of the child to a reasonable opportunity for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. PMID:11785157

  11. MAOA, Early Experiences of Harsh Parenting, Irritable Opposition, and Bullying-Victimization: A Moderated Indirect-Effects Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Yvonne M.; Kretschmer, Tina; Barker, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Harsh parenting and child characteristics such as opposition and aggression have been found to relate to bullying, victimization, and bullying-victimization, yet not all children display equal vulnerability to harsh parenting. The monoamine oxidase A gene ("MAOA"; "low-activity" variant) may be a key vulnerability allele as it…

  12. Inheritance and interactions of incompatibility alleles in the tetraploid sour cherry.

    PubMed

    Boskovi?, R I; Wolfram, B; Tobutt, K R; Cerovi?, R; Sonneveld, T

    2006-01-01

    Three progenies of sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) were analysed to correlate self-(in)compatibility status with S-RNase phenotype in this allotetraploid hybrid of sweet and ground cherry. Self-(in)compatibility was assessed in the field and by monitoring pollen tube growth after selfing. The S-RNase phenotypes were determined by isoelectric focusing of stylar proteins and staining for RNase activity and, for the parents, confirmed by PCR. Seedling phenotypes were generally consistent with disomic segregation of S-RNase alleles. The genetic arrangements of the parents were deduced to be 'Köröser' (self-incompatible) S1S4.S(B) S(D), 'Schattenmorelle' (self-compatible) S6S13.S(B)S(B), and clone 43.87 (self-compatible) S4S13.S(B)S(B), where "." separates the two homologous genomes. The presence of S4 and S6 alleles at the same locus led to self-incompatibility, whereas S13 and S(B) at homologous loci led to self-compatibility. The failure of certain heteroallelic genotypes in the three crosses or in the self-incompatible seedlings indicates that S4 and S6 are dominant to S(B). However, the success of S13S(B) pollen on styles expressing corresponding S-RNases indicates competitive interaction or lack of pollen-S components. In general, the universal compatibility of S13S(B) pollen may explain the frequent occurrence of S13 and S(B) together in sour cherry cultivars. Alleles S(B) and S(D), that are presumed to derive from ground cherry, and S13, presumably from sweet cherry, were sequenced. Our findings contribute to an understanding of inheritance of self-(in)compatibility, facilitate screening of progenies for self-compatibility and provide a basis for studying molecular interactions in heteroallelic pollen. PMID:16307228

  13. Parental Influences on Adolescent Adjustment: Parenting Styles Versus Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Min; Daniels, M. Harry; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    The study identified distinct patterns of parental practices that differentially influence adolescent behavior using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey (NELS:88) database. Following Brenner and Fox's research model (1999), the cluster analysis was used to classify the four types of parental practices. The clusters of parenting practices…

  14. Homeostatic Maintenance of Allele-Specific p16 Methylation in Cancer Cells Accompanied by Dynamic Focal Methylation and Hydroxymethylation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sisi; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Zhao-jun; Su, Na; Wilson, James; Lu, Zhe-ming; Deng, Dajun

    2014-01-01

    Aim p16 Methylation frequently occurs in carcinogenesis. While it has been hypothesized that the p16 methylation states are dynamically maintained in cancer cells, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has not been available until now. Methods A fusion cell model was established which reprogrammed the native DNA methylation pattern of the cells. The methylation status of the p16 alleles was then repeatedly quantitatively analyzed in the fusion monoclonal, parental cancer cell lines (p16-completely methylated-AGS and unmethylated-MGC803), and HCT116 non-fusion cell using DHPLC and bisulfite sequencing. Histone methylation was analyzed using chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP)-PCR. P16 expression status was determined using immuno-staining and RT-PCR. Results The methylation status for the majority of the p16 alleles was stably maintained in the fusion monoclonal cells after up to 60 passages. Most importantly, focal de novo methylation, demethylation, and hydroxymethylation were consistently observed within about 27% of the p16 alleles in the fusion monoclones, but not the homozygously methylated or unmethylated parental cells. Furthermore, subclones of the monoclones consistently maintained the same p16 methylation pattern. A similar phenomenon was also observed using the p16 hemi-methylated HCT116 non-fusion cancer cell line. Interestingly, transcription was not observed in p16 alleles that were hydroxymethylated with an antisense-strand-specific pattern. Also, the levels of H3K9 and H3K4 trimethylation in the fusion cells were found to be slightly lower than the parental AGS and MGC803 cells, respectively. Conclusion The present study provides the first direct evidence confirming that the methylation states of p16 CpG islands is not only homeostatically maintained, but also accompanied by a dynamic process of transient focal methylation, demethylation, and hydroxymethylation in cancer cells. PMID:24828678

  15. Impact of ABCB1 allelic variants on QTc interval prolongation

    PubMed Central

    Sissung, Tristan M.; Gardner, Erin R.; Piekarz, Richard L.; Howden, Reuben; Chen, Xaiohong; Woo, Sukyung; Franke, Ryan; Clark, James A.; Miller-DeGraff, Laura; Steinberg, Seth M.; Venzon, David; Liewehr, David; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Bates, Susan E.; Price, Douglas K.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Cabell, Christopher; Sparreboom, Alex; Figg, William D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose While the ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) drug transporter is a constituent of several blood-tissue barriers (i.e. blood-brain and blood-nerve), its participation in a putative blood-heart barrier has been poorly explored. ABCB1 could decrease the intracardiac concentrations of drugs that cause QT-prolongation and cardiotoxicity. Experimental design ABCB1-related romidepsin transport kinetics were explored in LLC-PK1 cells transfected with different ABCB1 genetic variants. ABCB1 plasma and intracardiac concentrations were determined in Abcb1a/1b (?/?) mice and wild-type FVB controls. These same mice were used to evaluate romidepsin-induced QTc prolongation over time. Finally, a cohort of 83 individuals with available QTcB and ABCB1 genotyping data were used to compare allelic variation in ABCB1 versus QTc-prolongation phenotype. Results Here, we demonstrate that mice lacking the ABCB1-type P-glycoprotein have higher intracardiac concentrations of a model ABCB1 substrate, romidepsin, that correspond to changes in QT-prolongation from baseline (?QTc) over time. Consistent with this observation, we also demonstrate that patients carrying genetic variants that could raise ABCB1 expression in the cardiac endothelium have lower ?QTc following a single dose of romidepsin. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that Abcb1-type P-glycoprotein can limit intracardiac exposure to a drug that mediates QT-prolongation and suggests that certain commonly inherited polymorphisms in ABCB1 may serve as markers for QT-prolongation following the administration of ABCB1-substrate drugs. PMID:21106724

  16. Triglyceride associated polymorphisms of the APOA5 gene have very different allele frequencies in Pune, India compared to Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Chandak, Giriraj R; Ward, Kirsten J; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Pandit, Anand N; Bavdekar, Ashish; Joglekar, Charu V; Fall, Caroline HD; Mohankrishna, P; Wilkin, Terence J; Metcalf, Bradley S; Weedon, Michael N; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2006-01-01

    Background The APOA5 gene variants, -1131T>C and S19W, are associated with altered triglyceride concentrations in studies of subjects of Caucasian and East Asian descent. There are few studies of these variants in South Asians. We investigated whether the two APOA5 variants also show similar association with various lipid parameters in Indian population as in the UK white subjects. Methods We genotyped 557 Indian adults from Pune, India, and 237 UK white adults for -1131T>C and S19W variants in the APOA5 gene, compared their allelic and genotype frequency and determined their association with fasting serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol levels using univariate general linear analysis. APOC3 SstI polymorphism was also analyzed in 175 Pune Indian subjects for analysis of linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 variants. Results The APOA5 -1131C allele was more prevalent in Indians from Pune (Pune Indians) compared to UK white subjects (allele frequency 20% vs. 4%, p = 0.00001), whereas the 19W allele was less prevalent (3% vs. 6% p = 0.0015). Patterns of linkage disequilibrium between the two variants were similar between the two populations and confirmed that they occur on two different haplotypes. In Pune Indians, the presence of -1131C allele and the 19W allele was associated with a 19% and 15% increase respectively in triglyceride concentrations although only -1131C was significant (p = 0.0003). This effect size was similar to that seen in the UK white subjects. Analysis of the APOC3 SstI polymorphism in 175 Pune Indian subjects showed that this variant is not in appreciable linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 -1131T>C variant (r2 = 0.07). Conclusion This is the first study to look at the role of APOA5 in Asian Indian subjects that reside in India. The -1131C allele is more prevalent and the 19W allele is less prevalent in Pune Indians compared to UK Caucasians. We confirm that the APOA5 variants are associated with triglyceride levels independent of ethnicity and that this association is similar in magnitude in Asian Indians and Caucasians. The -1131C allele is present in 36% of the Pune Indian population making it a powerful marker for looking at the role of elevated triglycerides in important conditions such as pancreatitis, diabetes and coronary heart disease. PMID:17032446

  17. Microsatellite markers linked to stem rust resistance allele Sr9a in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.: Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. & E Henn., is one of the most serious diseases of wheat worldwide. Host resistance is more effective and durable when several stem rust resistance (Sr) genes are pyramided into a single genotype, a process that can be ...

  18. Four novel PEPD alleles causing prolidase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Ledoux, P.; Scriver, C.; Hechtman, P.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations at the PEPD locus cause prolidase deficiency (McKusick 170100), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by iminodipeptiduria, skin ulcers, mental retardation, and recurrent infections. Four PEPD mutations from five severely affected individuals were characterized by analysis of reverse-transcribed, PCR-amplified (RT-PCR) cDNA. We used SSCP analysis on four overlapping cDNA fragments covering the entire coding region of the PEPD gene and detected abnormal SSCP bands for the fragment spanning all or part of exons 13-15 in three of the probands. Direct sequencing of the mutant cDNAs showed a G-->A, 1342 substitution (G448R) in two patients and a 3-bp deletion (delta E452 or delta E453) in another. In the other two probands the amplified products were of reduced size. Direct sequencing of these mutant cDNAs revealed a deletion of exon 5 in one patient and of exon 7 in the other. Intronic sequences flanking exons 5 and 7 were identified using inverse PCR followed by direct sequencing. Conventional PCR and direct sequencing then established the intron-exon borders of the mutant genomic DNA revealing two splice acceptor mutations: a G-->C substitution at position -1 of intron 4 and an A-->G substitution at position -2 of intron 6. Our results indicate that the severe form of prolidase deficiency is caused by multiple PEPD alleles. In this report we attempt to begin the process of describing these alleles and cataloging their phenotypic expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8198124

  19. Evaluation of approaches for identifying population informative markers from high density SNP Chips

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic markers can be used to identify and verify the origin of individuals. Motivation for the inference of ancestry ranges from conservation genetics to forensic analysis. High density assays featuring Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers can be exploited to create a reduced panel containing the most informative markers for these purposes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate methods of marker selection and determine the minimum number of markers from the BovineSNP50 BeadChip required to verify the origin of individuals in European cattle breeds. Delta, Wright's FST, Weir & Cockerham's FST and PCA methods for population differentiation were compared. The level of informativeness of each SNP was estimated from the breed specific allele frequencies. Individual assignment analysis was performed using the ranked informative markers. Stringency levels were applied by log-likelihood ratio to assess the confidence of the assignment test. Results A 95% assignment success rate for the 384 individually genotyped animals was achieved with < 80, < 100, < 140 and < 200 SNP markers (with increasing stringency threshold levels) across all the examined methods for marker selection. No further gain in power of assignment was achieved by sampling in excess of 200 SNP markers. The marker selection method that required the lowest number of SNP markers to verify the animal's breed origin was Wright's FST (60 to 140 SNPs depending on the chosen degree of confidence). Certain breeds required fewer markers (< 100) to achieve 100% assignment success. In contrast, closely related breeds require more markers (~200) to achieve > 95% assignment success. The power of assignment success, and therefore the number of SNP markers required, is dependent on the levels of genetic heterogeneity and pool of samples considered. Conclusions While all SNP selection methods produced marker panels capable of breed identification, the power of assignment varied markedly among analysis methods. Thus, with effective exploration of available high density genetic markers, a diagnostic panel of highly informative markers can be produced. PMID:21569514

  20. Seventy microsatellite markers from Persea americana Miller (avocado) expressed sequence tags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for Persea americana Mill. were investigated to expand upon the number of informative microsatellite markers available for avocado. Seventy informative loci were discovered using twenty-four P. americana var. americana Mill. accessions. The number of alleles detected r...

  1. Establishment of codominant markers for rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single nucleotide length polymorphism (SNLP) was identified at the intron region of the Pi-ta gene to develop a codominant Pi-ta gene marker suitable for genotyping with an ABI automated machine. The DNA primer specific to the resistance Pi-ta allele was labeled with the blue dye as a forward pr...

  2. Establishment of codominant marker for rice blast resistance gene pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single nucleotide length polymorphism (SNLP) was identified at the intron region of the Pi-ta gene to develop a codominant Pi-ta gene marker suitable for genotyping with an ABI automated machine. The DNA primer specific to the resistance Pi-ta allele was labeled with the blue dye as a forward pr...

  3. UPIC: Perl scripts to determine the number of SSR markers to run

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed Perl Scripts for the cost-effective planning of fingerprinting and genotyping experiments. The UPIC scripts detect the best combination of polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and provide coefficients of the amount of information obtainable (number of alleles of patter...

  4. Characterization of twelve microsatellite markers for the native redbud tree (Cercis canadensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight microsatellite DNA markers were developed for studies of gene flow in the redbud tree (Cercis canadensis), which is native to North America. The loci were unlinked and polymorphic in a sample of 22 individuals collected from a single population in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Allele number ranged fr...

  5. Development of soybean aphid genomic SSR markers using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are very useful molecular markers due to locus-specific co-dominant and multi-allelic nature, high abundance in the genome, and high rates of transferability across species. The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) has become the most damaging in...

  6. Genetic characterization of guava (psidium guajava l.) Germplasm in the United States using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity of thirty five Psidium guajava accessions maintained at the USDA, National Plants Germplasm System, Hilo, HI, was characterized using 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Diversity analysis detected a total of 178 alleles ranging from four to 16. The observed mean heterozygosit...

  7. Selection for genetic markers in beef cattle reveals complex associations of thyroglobulin and casein1-S1 with carcass and meat traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic markers in casein (CSN1S1) and thyroglobulin (TG) genes have previously been associated with fat distribution in cattle. Determining the nature of these genetic associations (additive, recessive, or dominant) has been difficult because both markers have small minor allele frequencies in mos...

  8. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  9. Parenting while Being Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.; Williams, Reginald; Fields, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the dynamics of parenting while being in a homeless context. The mosaic of stressors involved in this homeless parenting process are explicated and discussed. In addition, resources and strategies that may support parenting are presented and discussed.

  10. Kawasaki Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... Other Parents Are Reading All About Allergies First Aid: What ...

  11. [Bone turnover marker].

    PubMed

    Miura, Masakazu; Satoh, Yuki

    2015-10-01

    Recently the clinical application of bone turnover markers (BTMs) have been achieved significant progress and the measurements of these indices give us better understanding of pathogenesis of osteoporosis. BTMs are known the bone formation marker, the bone resorption marker and the bone matrix-related marker, respectively. In the Guidelines for the Use of Bone Metabolic Markers in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteoporosis (2012 Edition) from publishing Japan Osteoporosis Society Committee, the newly and commonly BTMs were considered to give the normal reference value in Japanese people, the influence of renal function on BTMs. The flow chart of the measurement of bone resorption markers and bone formation markers when selecting drug treatment for osteoporosis, the evaluation of therapeutic effects of bone antiresorption drugs and/or bone formation promoting drug using bone resorption markers and/or bone formation marker were corrected newly in the guideline 2012 edition. Moreover, BTMs were suggested to contribute to adhere with osteoporosis treatment. BTMs are adapted to selection of the drug for osteoporosis and to evaluate the drug efficacy. Therefore, it is very important to guide the proper application and assessment of BTMs in clinical practice. PMID:26529926

  12. Population genetic structure of Oryza sativa in East and Southeast Asia and the discovery of elite alleles for grain traits.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaojing; Giang Tran Thi, Thu; Mawuli Edzesi, Wisdom; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Qiangming; Liu, Erbao; Wang, Yang; Qiang, Sheng; Liu, Linglong; Hong, Delin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes of 532 rice (Oryza sativa L.) accessions collected from East and Southeast Asia and detected abundant genetic diversity within the population. We identified 6 subpopulations and found a tendency towards directional evolution in O. sativa from low to high latitudes, with levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the 6 subpopulations ranging from 10 to 30 cM. We then investigated the phenotypic data for grain length, grain width, grain thickness and 1,000-grain weight over 4 years. Using a genome-wide association analysis, we identified 17 marker-trait associations involving 14 SSR markers on 12 chromosome arms, and 8 of the 17 associations were novel. The elite alleles were mined based on the phenotypic effects of the detected quantitative trait loci (QTLs). These elite alleles could be used to improve target traits through optimal cross designs, with the expected results obtained by pyramiding or substituting the elite alleles per QTL (independent of possible epistatic effects). Together, these results provide an in-depth understanding of the genetic diversity pattern among rice-grain traits across a broad geographic scale, which has potential use in future research work, including studies related to germplasm conservation and molecular breeding by design. PMID:26059752

  13. Population genetic structure of Oryza sativa in East and Southeast Asia and the discovery of elite alleles for grain traits

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaojing; Giang Tran Thi, Thu; Mawuli Edzesi, Wisdom; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Qiangming; Liu, Erbao; Wang, Yang; Qiang, Sheng; Liu, Linglong; Hong, Delin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes of 532 rice (Oryza sativa L.) accessions collected from East and Southeast Asia and detected abundant genetic diversity within the population. We identified 6 subpopulations and found a tendency towards directional evolution in O. sativa from low to high latitudes, with levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the 6 subpopulations ranging from 10 to 30?cM. We then investigated the phenotypic data for grain length, grain width, grain thickness and 1,000-grain weight over 4 years. Using a genome-wide association analysis, we identified 17 marker-trait associations involving 14 SSR markers on 12 chromosome arms, and 8 of the 17 associations were novel. The elite alleles were mined based on the phenotypic effects of the detected quantitative trait loci (QTLs). These elite alleles could be used to improve target traits through optimal cross designs, with the expected results obtained by pyramiding or substituting the elite alleles per QTL (independent of possible epistatic effects). Together, these results provide an in-depth understanding of the genetic diversity pattern among rice-grain traits across a broad geographic scale, which has potential use in future research work, including studies related to germplasm conservation and molecular breeding by design. PMID:26059752

  14. Upstream Transcription Factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants regulate lipoprotein metabolism in women and USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yue-Mei; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Oksala, Niku; Levula, Mari; Raitoharju, Emma; Collings, Auni; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Juonala, Markus; Marniemi, Jukka; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Seppälä, Ilkka; Mennander, Ari; Tarkka, Matti; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Salenius, Juha Pekka; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas; Laitinen, Tomi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Laaksonen, Reijo; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T.; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2014-01-01

    Upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants significantly influence future risk of cardiovascular disease and overall mortality in females. We investigated sex-specific effects of USF1 gene allelic variants on serum indices of lipoprotein metabolism, early markers of asymptomatic atherosclerosis and their changes during six years of follow-up. In addition, we investigated the cis-regulatory role of these USF1 variants in artery wall tissues in Caucasians. In the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, 1,608 participants (56% women, aged 31.9 ± 4.9) with lipids and cIMT data were included. For functional study, whole genome mRNA expression profiling was performed in 91 histologically classified atherosclerotic samples. In females, serum total, LDL cholesterol and apoB levels increased gradually according to USF1 rs2516839 genotypes TT < CT < CC and rs1556259 AA < AG < GG as well as according to USF1 H3 (GCCCGG) copy number 0 < 1 < 2. Furthermore, the carriers of minor alleles of rs2516839 (C) and rs1556259 (G) of USF1 gene had decreased USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaques (P = 0.028 and 0.08, respectively) as compared to non-carriers. The genetic variation in USF1 influence USF1 transcript expression in advanced atherosclerosis and regulates levels and metabolism of circulating apoB and apoB-containing lipoprotein particles in sex-dependent manner, but is not a major determinant of early markers of atherosclerosis. PMID:24722012

  15. A Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Rad52 Allele Expressing a C-Terminal Truncation Protein: Activities and Intragenic Complementation of Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Boundy-Mills, K. L.; Livingston, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    A nonsense allele of the yeast RAD52 gene, rad52-327, which expresses the N-terminal 65% of the protein was compared to two missense alleles, rad52-1 and rad52-2, and to a deletion allele. While the rad52-1 and the deletion mutants have severe defects in DNA repair, recombination and sporulation, the rad52-327 and rad52-2 mutants retain either partial or complete capabilities in repair and recombination. These two mutants behave similarly in most tests of repair and recombination during mitotic growth. One difference between these two alleles is that a homozygous rad52-2 diploid fails to sporulate, whereas the homozygous rad52-327 diploid sporulates weakly. The low level of sporulation by the rad52-327 diploid is accompanied by a low percentage of spore viability. Among these viable spores the frequency of crossing over for markers along chromosome VII is the same as that found in wild-type spores. rad52-327 complements rad52-2 for repair and sporulation. Weaker intragenic complementation occurs between rad52-327 and rad52-1. PMID:8417987

  16. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5?32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5?32/CCR5?32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  17. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5?32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5?32/CCR5?32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  18. Implementing a Student Allele Database via the World Wide Web

    E-print Network

    Newberg, Heidi

    and implementation of the Human Genome Diver- sity Project's Student Allele Database Facility and its interface via Diversity project which we describe in this section. The Human Genome Diversity--Student Allele Database that illustrates many facets of the Human Genome Project. The project is centered around a hands-on laboratory

  19. Genome-wide mapping of allele-specific protein-

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    they lead to allele-specific gene expression remains to be determined. Dosage compensation regulates another that monoallelic expression of autosomal genes is not limited to genes linked to the immune or nervous systems of allele-specific gene expression. Mammalian somatic cells typically contain two copies of every gene

  20. Supplementary Information Measurement of the human allele frequency spectrum demonstrates

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    Supplementary Information Measurement of the human allele frequency spectrum demonstrates greater and validations based on Hinds et al. 36 6) Impact of length of bottleneck on modeling 39 7) Derived allele state filtering and balancing of SNPs from different sources: We eliminated SNPs that did not pass HapMap

  1. Tyrosinase and Tyrosinase Related Protein 1 Alleles Specify Domestic Cat

    E-print Network

    Eizirik, Eduardo

    Tyrosinase and Tyrosinase Related Protein 1 Alleles Specify Domestic Cat Coat Color Phenotypes in domestic cat coat color, we determined the complete nucleotide coding sequence of the domestic cat genes microsatellite, previously found to be fixed in a cat breed selected for the chocolate (b) allele of the B locus

  2. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations Simon Gravela , Brenna M. Henna technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations

  3. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  4. Once a Parent, Always a Parent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Lynelle; Cottone, Ben

    The information in this pamphlet is designed to assist parents in helping their children cope with divorce or separation. Parents are urged to build a constructive life for themselves and their children and to continue to make children feel that they are loved. There are four sets of guidelines offered to parents. The first two are designed to…

  5. Development of microsatellite markers for Carallia brachiata (Rhizophoraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Yinmeng; Xie, Hongxian; Qiao, Sitan; Yuan, Yang; Liu, Ying; Shi, Xianggang; Shu, Mi; Jin, Jianhua; Shi, Suhua; Tan, Fengxiao; Huang, Yelin

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Carallia brachiata to assess the genetic diversity and structure of this terrestrial species of the Rhizophoraceae. Methods and Results: Based on transcriptome data for C. brachiata, 40 primer pairs were initially designed and tested, of which 18 were successfully amplified and 11 were polymorphic. For these microsatellites, one to three alleles per locus were identified. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.727 and 0 to 0.520, respectively. In addition, all primers were successfully amplified in two congeners: C. pectinifolia and C. garciniifolia. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers described here will be useful in population genetic studies of C. brachiata and related species, suggesting that developing microsatellite markers from next-generation sequencing data can be efficient for genetic studies across this genus. PMID:25798345

  6. Comprehensive analysis of imprinted genes in maize reveals allelic variation for imprinting and limited conservation with other species

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Amanda J.; Bilinski, Paul; Eichten, Steven R.; Vaughn, Matthew W.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Gehring, Mary; Springer, Nathan M.

    2013-01-01

    In plants, a subset of genes exhibit imprinting in endosperm tissue such that expression is primarily from the maternal or paternal allele. Imprinting may arise as a consequence of mechanisms for silencing of transposons during reproduction, and in some cases imprinted expression of particular genes may provide a selective advantage such that it is conserved across species. Separate mechanisms for the origin of imprinted expression patterns and maintenance of these patterns may result in substantial variation in the targets of imprinting in different species. Here we present deep sequencing of RNAs isolated from reciprocal crosses of four diverse maize genotypes, providing a comprehensive analysis that allows evaluation of imprinting at more than 95% of endosperm-expressed genes. We find that over 500 genes exhibit statistically significant parent-of-origin effects in maize endosperm tissue, but focused our analyses on a subset of these genes that had >90% expression from the maternal allele (69 genes) or from the paternal allele (108 genes) in at least one reciprocal cross. Over 10% of imprinted genes show evidence of allelic variation for imprinting. A comparison of imprinting in maize and rice reveals that 13% of genes with syntenic orthologs in both species exhibit conserved imprinting. Genes that exhibit conserved imprinting between maize and rice have elevated nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution ratios compared with other imprinted genes, suggesting a history of more rapid evolution. Together, these data suggest that imprinting only has functional relevance at a subset of loci that currently exhibit imprinting in maize. PMID:24218619

  7. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences. PMID:26416087

  8. Applying SNP marker technology in the cacao breeding program at the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this investigation 45 parental cacao plants and five progeny derived from the parental stock studied were genotyped using six SNP markers to determine off-types or mislabeled clones and to authenticate crosses made in the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) breeding program. Investigation wa...

  9. Genetic markers and biochemical evaluation in the winter triticale identification and breeding.

    PubMed

    Abugalieva, A I; Turuspekov, E K; Abugalieva, S I; Savin, T V

    2014-01-01

    Winter hexaploid triticale lines and cultivars were identified by protein (storage and enzyme) and DNA markers. The locus of B-Amy-2 and Adh-1 were characterized by two alleles, Mdh-1 by 3 alleles, B-Amy-1 and Mdh-2 by 4 alleles and the locus controlling cathodic peroxidase isozymes, a-amylase and esterase by 6, 9 and 12 alleles, respectively. Intra-and intervarietal variation, for the enzyme coding loci, gliadin and glutenine were found. According to the isoenzyme analysis and the grain quality lines 28 and 49 (softness, high amylose content: 28.9-25.6, protein: 11,6- 11,2% and albumin 50-43%) could be marked as genotypes suitable for brewing and were characterized by allele b-Amy-1-b. Genotypes 1420 and 1434 are good for bread making with a hardness index between 52 and 62 and a W value (alveograph) of 110- 120. Allele a-Amy-b is positively correlated with amylose content (r = 0.601) and negatively with protein content (r - 0.490), the correlation of the presence of allele 1-Amy-1-b and amylose content is r- 0.549. Three breeding lines had 40% amylose content in grain and flour. Furthermore, the presence of allele Mdh-1 was associated with a high content of glutenin (r = 0.568), and controlled by genes localized in a single linkage group. Also statistically significant correlations for Mdh-1 -a and Prx-D containing albumin to total protein (%) could observed. It was illustrated that the peroxidase activity and free proline content can be used as resistance markers to abiotic factors. PMID:26072592

  10. Plastid markers in Carya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated 8 "universal" plastid primers and qualified 3 as polymorphic and informative within Carya. Pecans of known lineage and geographic origin, representatives of other Carya species and interspecific hybrids were profiled. In an analysis of 169 Carya accessions, 21 alleles were observed am...

  11. Distribution of human leukocyte antigens-E alleles in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kimkong, Ingorn; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Pimtanothai, Nattiya

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) -E alleles in Thailand. HLA-E alleles were assigned by using a polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP) method and direct sequencing in 200 healthy individuals. They comprised 100 Thai, 50 Chinese and 50 Thai-Chinese. From the results, three alleles of HLA-E could be detected in these populations. The E*0101 was the most common allele in Thai and Thai-Chinese with allelic frequencies of 42.5 per cent and 38 per cent, respectively. The other HLA-E allele frequencies of Thai origin were 33 per cent for E*01031 and 24.5 per cent for E*01032, respectively. Among Thai-Chinese, the allele frequencies of HLA-E were 31 per cent for E*01031 and E*01032, respectively. Whereas, the E*01031 was the predominant allele in Chinese origin with a frequency of 39 per cent, followed by E*0101 and E*01032 with 32 per cent and 29 per cent, respectively. No E*01033, E*0102 and E*0104 could be detected in all individuals. When comparing the distribution of HLA-E alleles between each of the populations (Thai vs Chinese, Thai vs Thai-Chinese and Chinese vs Thai-Chinese), no significant difference could be found among these populations. In addition, there was no significant difference of the distribution of HLA-E alleles between the study populations and other populations from Asian countries, reported previously. However, there were significant differences between the populations (Thai, Chinese and Thai-Chinese) and Danish (chi2 = 15.64, p = 0.0004; chi2 = 24.58, p = 0.0000046; chi2 = 14.69, p = 0.00065, respectively). PMID:12929994

  12. Cotton Marker Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To address the lack of available molecular markers for cotton, Cotton Incorporated has spearheaded an initiative to create the Cotton Microsatellite Database (CMD), and several groups are actively involved in projects to generate, screen and map cotton molecular markers. CMD is a centralized databas...

  13. Molecular Markers What is a molecular marker?

    E-print Network

    Peever, Tobin

    markers · genetic linkage maps ­ map-based cloning ·DNA fingerprinting ­ strain or clone identification - these multicopy probes have proven useful for DNA fingerprinting. ·sequencing of these multicopy probes has heterostrophus genomic DNA with single- and multicopy probes RFLP: DNA fingerprinting with a repetitive probe

  14. A Search for Parent-of-Origin Effects on Honey Bee Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Sarah D.; Tsuruda, Jennifer M.; Gibson, Joshua D.; Emore, Christine M.; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Miguel E.; Queller, David C.; Strassmann, Joan E.; Grozinger, Christina M.; Gribskov, Michael R.; San Miguel, Phillip; Westerman, Rick; Hunt, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Parent-specific gene expression (PSGE) is little known outside of mammals and plants. PSGE occurs when the expression level of a gene depends on whether an allele was inherited from the mother or the father. Kin selection theory predicts that there should be extensive PSGE in social insects because social insect parents can gain inclusive fitness benefits by silencing parental alleles in female offspring. We searched for evidence of PSGE in honey bees using transcriptomes from reciprocal crosses between European and Africanized strains. We found 46 transcripts with significant parent-of-origin effects on gene expression, many of which overexpressed the maternal allele. Interestingly, we also found a large proportion of genes showing a bias toward maternal alleles in only one of the reciprocal crosses. These results indicate that PSGE may occur in social insects. The nonreciprocal effects could be largely driven by hybrid incompatibility between these strains. Future work will help to determine if these are indeed parent-of-origin effects that can modulate inclusive fitness benefits. PMID:26048562

  15. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  16. Characterization of phenylalanine hydroxylase alleles in untreated phenylketonuria patients from Victoria, Australia: origin of alleles and haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Ramus, S J; Treacy, E P; Cotton, R G

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene were identified in a group of untreated phenylketonuria patients from Victoria, Australia. Ninety-eight percent of the alleles were identified, and a total of 26 different mutations were detected on 83 independent chromosomes. The three most prevalent mutations--R408W, I65T, and IVS12nt1--together accounted for 54% of the alleles. A number of alleles were demonstrated, by genealogical studies, to be of Irish or Scottish origin, including a newly described mutation 1197/1198 del A. The distribution and relative frequencies of the more common alleles in this population parallel observed frequencies in the British Isles and are consistent with the known history of Caucasian settlement of this region of Australia. We have analyzed the haplotype and polymorphic short tandem-repeat allele of the mutant chromosomes and describe a number of new associations. Images Figure 2 PMID:7726156

  17. Molecular and biochemical characterization of puroindoline a and b alleles in Chinese landraces and historical cultivars.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; He, Z H; Xia, X C; Xia, L Q; Zhang, X Y; Lillemo, M; Morris, C F

    2006-02-01

    Kernel hardness that is conditioned by puroindoline genes has a profound effect on milling, baking and end-use quality of bread wheat. In this study, 219 landraces and 166 historical cultivars from China and 12 introduced wheats were investigated for their kernel hardness and puroindoline alleles, using molecular and biochemical markers. The results indicated that frequencies of soft, mixed and hard genotypes were 42.7, 24.3, and 33.0%, respectively, in Chinese landraces and 45.2, 13.9, and 40.9% in historical cultivars. The frequencies of PINA null, Pinb-D1b and Pinb-D1p genotypes were 43.8, 12.3, and 39.7%, respectively, in hard wheat of landraces, while 48.5, 36.8, and 14.7%, respectively, in historical hard wheats. A new Pinb-D1 allele, designated Pinb-D1t, was identified in two landraces, Guangtouxianmai and Hongmai from the Guizhou province, with the characterization of a glycine to arginine substitution at position 47 in the coding region of Pinb gene. Surprisingly, a new Pina-D1 allele, designated Pina-D1m, was detected in the landrace Hongheshang, from the Jiangsu province, with the characterization of a proline to serine substitution at position 35 in the coding region of Pina gene; it was the first novel mutation found in bread wheat, resulting in a hard endosperm with PINA expression. Among the PINA null genotypes, an allele designed as Pina-D1l, was detected in five landraces with a cytosine deletion at position 265 in Pina locus; while another novel Pina-D1 allele, designed as Pina-D1n, was identified in six landraces, with the characterization of an amino acid change from tryptophan-43 to a 'stop' codon in the coding region of Pina gene. The study of puroindoline polymorphism in Chinese wheat germplasm could provide useful information for the further understanding of the molecular basis of kernel hardness in bread wheat. PMID:16344983

  18. SNP marker discovery in koala TLR genes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J; Johnson, Rebecca N; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O'Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases. PMID:25799012

  19. SNP Marker Discovery in Koala TLR Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J.; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O’Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases. PMID:25799012

  20. Increased Power for Detection of Parent-of-Origin Effects via the Use of Haplotype Estimation.

    PubMed

    Howey, Richard; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Töpf, Ana; Nudel, Ron; Goodship, Judith A; Keavney, Bernard D; Cordell, Heather J

    2015-09-01

    Parent-of-origin (or imprinting) effects relate to the situation in which traits are influenced by the allele inherited from only one parent and the allele from the other parent has little or no effect. Given SNP genotype data from case-parent trios, the parent of origin of each allele in the offspring can often be deduced unambiguously; however, this is not true when all three individuals are heterozygous. Most existing methods for investigating parent-of-origin effects operate on a SNP-by-SNP basis and either perform some sort of averaging over the possible parental transmissions or else discard ambiguous trios. If the correct parent of origin at a SNP could be determined, this would provide extra information and increase the power for detecting the effects of imprinting. We propose making use of the surrounding SNP information, via haplotype estimation, to improve estimation of parent of origin at a test SNP for case-parent trios, case-mother duos, and case-father duos. This extra information is then used in a multinomial modeling approach for estimating parent-of-origin effects at the test SNP. We show through computer simulations that our approach has increased power over previous approaches, particularly when the data consist only of duos. We apply our method to two real datasets and find a decrease in significance of p values in genomic regions previously thought to possibly harbor imprinting effects, thus weakening the evidence that such effects actually exist in these regions, although some regions retain evidence of significant effects. PMID:26320892

  1. New microsatellite markers for Campanula pyramidalis (Campanulaceae) and cross-amplification in closely related species1

    PubMed Central

    Radosavljevi?, Ivan; Jakse, Jernej; Satovic, Zlatko; Javornik, Branka; Jankovi?, Ivana; Liber, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were identified and characterized to study the genetic diversity and structure, conservation status, taxonomy, and biogeography of subspecific taxa and populations of Campanula pyramidalis (Campanulaceae). Methods and Results: Eleven microsatellite markers were developed from genomic libraries enriched for di- and trinucleotide repeats. A total of 80 alleles were observed in the tested natural population. The number of alleles per locus, observed heterozygosity, and expected heterozygosity ranged from four to 13, 0.217 to 0.913, and 0.521 to 0.895, respectively. Conclusions: The new microsatellite markers will be useful for studying genetic diversity and structure as well as for better assessing the conservation status of subspecific taxa and populations of C. pyramidalis. Furthermore, a set of seven loci was successfully cross-amplified in C. secundiflora and C. versicolor and will be of great value for addressing unsolved taxonomic and biogeographic issues within the C. pyramidalis species complex. PMID:25798343

  2. Polymorphic SSR markers for Plasmopara obducens (Peronosporaceae), the newly emergent downy mildew pathogen of Impatiens (Balsaminaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Rivera, Yazmín; Veltri, Daniel; Crouch, Jo Anne

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for Plasmopara obducens, the causal agent of the newly emergent downy mildew disease of Impatiens walleriana. Methods and Results: A 202-Mb draft genome assembly was generated from P. obducens using Illumina technology and mined to identify 13,483 SSR motifs. Primers were synthesized for 62 marker candidates, of which 37 generated reliable PCR products. Testing of the 37 markers using 96 P. obducens samples showed 96% of the markers were polymorphic, with 2?6 alleles observed. Observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.000?0.892 and 0.023?0.746, respectively. Just 17 markers were sufficient to identify all multilocus genotypes. Conclusions: These are the first SSR markers available for this pathogen, and one of the first molecular resources. These markers will be useful in assessing variation in pathogen populations and determining the factors contributing to the emergence of destructive impatiens downy mildew disease. PMID:26649270

  3. Toward fully automated genotyping: Allele assignment, pedigree construction, phase determination, and recombination detection in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Burks, M.B.; Hoop, R.C.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-10-01

    Human genetic maps have made quantum leaps in the past few years, because of the characterization of >2,000 CA dinucleotide repeat loci: these PCR-based markers offer extraordinarily high PIC, and within the next year their density is expected to reach intervals of a few centimorgans per marker. These new genetic maps open new avenues for disease gene research, including large-scale genotyping for both simple and complex disease loci. However, the allele patterns of many dinucleotide repeat loci can be complex and difficult to interpret, with genotyping errors a recognized problem. Furthermore, the possibility of genotyping individuals at hundreds or thousands of polymorphic loci requires improvements in data handling and analysis. The automation of genotyping and analysis of computer-derived haplotypes would remove many of the barriers preventing optimal use of dense and informative dinucleotide genetic maps. Toward this end, we have automated the allele identification, genotyping, phase determinations, and inheritance consistency checks generated by four CA repeats within the 2.5-Mbp, 10-cM X-linked dystrophin gene, using fluorescein-labeled multiplexed PCR products analyzed on automated sequencers. The described algorithms can deconvolute and resolve closely spaced alleles, despite interfering stutter noise; set phase in females; propagate the phase through the family; and identify recombination events. We show the implementation of these algorithms for the completely automated interpretation of allele data and risk assessment for five Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy families. The described approach can be scaled up to perform genome-based analyses with hundreds or thousands of CA-repeat loci, using multiple fluorophors on automated sequencers. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. HLA-DRB1*14 is a protective allele for multiple sclerosis in an admixed Colombian population

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar-Giraldo, David; Díaz-Cruz, Camilo; Burbano, Lisseth-Estefania; Guío, Claudia-Marcela; Reyes, Saúl; Cortes, Fabián; Cárdenas-Robledo, Simón; Narváez, Diana M.; Cárdenas, Wilmer; Porras, Alexandra; Lattig, María-Claudia; Groot de Restrepo, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine ancestry informative markers, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, and the association between HLA-DRB1 alleles and multiple sclerosis (MS) in a group of patients from Bogotá, Colombia. Methods: In this case-control study, genomic DNA was isolated and purified from blood samples. HLA-DRB1 allele genotyping was done using PCR. Mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 was amplified and haplogroups were determined using HaploGrep software. Genomic ancestry was estimated by genotyping a panel of ancestry informative markers. To test the association of HLA polymorphisms and MS, we ran separate multivariate logistic regression models. Bonferroni correction was used to account for multiple regression tests. Results: A total of 100 patients with MS (mean age 40.4 ± 12 years; 70% females) and 200 healthy controls (mean age 37.6 ± 11 years; 83.5% females) were included in the analysis. Ancestry proportions and haplogroup frequencies did not differ between patients and controls. HLA-DRB1*15 was present in 31% of cases and 13.5% of controls, whereas HLA-DRB1*14 was present in 5% of cases and 15.5% of controls. In the multivariate model, HLA-DRB1*15 was significantly associated with MS (odds ratio [OR] = 3.05, p < 0.001), whereas HLA-DRB1*14 was confirmed as a protective factor in our population (OR = 0.16, p = 0.001). Conclusions: This study provides evidence indicating that HLA-DRB1*15 allele confers susceptibility to MS and HLA-DRB1*14 allele exerts resistance to MS in a highly admixed population. This latter finding could partially explain the low prevalence of MS in Bogotá, Colombia.

  5. Parent-child Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlich, A. C., Ed.

    This survey investigates 6 major questions: (1) do adolescents and their parents perceive youth as overindulged; (2) are parent-child communication channels open; (3) has understanding between parents and their children broken down; (4) do children identify with their parents; (5) has discipline been permissive; and (6) do adolescents reject the…

  6. Parental Involvement. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains seven articles about meaningful participation by parents, particularly Hispanic and other minority parents, in the education of their children. "Parents Reclaiming Their Schools: New Initiative Brings Parents Together for Better Schools" (Aurelio M. Montemayor) describes objectives and activities of a Texas-based coalition…

  7. Children of Incarcerated Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Katherine, Ed.; Johnston, Denise, Ed.

    The arrest and imprisonment of a parent is significant trauma for children, and children of incarcerated parents are at high risk for juvenile delinquency. This book for social workers, psychologists, and others who work with children whose parents are incarcerated examines parental incarceration, its impact on children, care and placement of…

  8. Customizing Parenting Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddard, H. Wallace; Dennis, Steven A.

    2004-01-01

    The authors of this article discuss customizing parent education which requires customized assessment. At Auburn University, Kreg Edgmon and Wally Goddard developed a parent assessment based on the National Extension Parent Education Model (NEPEM) (Smith, Cudaback, Goddard, & Myers-Walls, 1994). All items in the parent assessment were tested with…

  9. A Chance to Parent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Susan; Brillhart, Lindsay; Lightfoot, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    While parents with disabilities may face big challenges, with appropriate supports, many can be great parents. Just like other parents, they do not have to be responsible for every part of childrearing all by themselves. All parents rely on supports to help raise their children, such as day care, carpools, schools, babysitting co-ops, or advice…

  10. Meet the Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Notification tools can do more than alert the school community to an emergency. New systems are cultivating parental involvement by sending home daily reports on students' behavior, attendance, and performance. South El Monte High School's new parent notification system, a service from TeleParent, contacts parents personally by text message or…

  11. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  12. Involving Today's Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators Journal, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents the attempts of four teachers to get parents involved in and excited about school music. Includes a description of a school concert that included a performance by band parents; parents clubs for orchestra, band, or choral groups; newsletters; and a band class in which parents learned to play their child's instrument. (DK)

  13. Quality control of genotypes using heritability estimates of gene content at the marker.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Natalia S; Legarra, Andres; Vitezica, Zulma G; Tsuruta, Shogo; Aguilar, Ignacio; Misztal, Ignacy; Cantet, Rodolfo J C

    2015-03-01

    Quality control filtering of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a key step when analyzing genomic data. Here we present a practical method to identify low-quality SNPs, meaning markers whose genotypes are wrongly assigned for a large proportion of individuals, by estimating the heritability of gene content at each marker, where gene content is the number of copies of a particular reference allele in a genotype of an animal (0, 1, or 2). If there is no mutation at the marker, gene content has an additive heritability of 1 by construction. The method uses restricted maximum likelihood (REML) to estimate heritability of gene content at each SNP and also builds a likelihood-ratio test statistic to test for zero error variance in genotyping. As a by-product, estimates of the allele frequencies of markers at the base population are obtained. Using simulated data with 10% permutation error (4% actual error) in genotyping, the method had a specificity of 0.96 (4% of correct markers are rejected) and a sensitivity of 0.99 (1% of wrong markers are accepted) if markers with heritability lower than 0.975 are discarded. Checking of Mendelian errors resulted in a lower sensitivity (0.84) for the same simulation. The proposed method is further illustrated with a real data set with genotypes from 3534 animals genotyped for 50,433 markers from the Illumina PorcineSNP60 chip and a pedigree of 6473 individuals; those markers underwent very little quality control. A total of 4099 markers with P-values lower than 0.01 were discarded based on our method, with associated estimates of heritability as low as 0.12. Contrary to other techniques, our method uses all information in the population simultaneously, can be used in any population with markers and pedigree recordings, and is simple to implement using standard software for REML estimation. Scripts for its use are provided. PMID:25567991

  14. Association mapping for frost tolerance using multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) population in faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Sallam, Ahmed; Martsch, Regina

    2015-08-01

    A multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) derived from 11 founder lines in faba bean was used in this study to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for frost tolerance traits using the association mapping method with 156 SNP markers. This MAGIC population consists of a set of 189 genotypes from the Göttingen Winter Bean Population. The association panel was tested in two different experiments, i.e. a frost and a hardening experiment. Six morphological traits, leaf fatty acid composition, relative water content in shoots were scored in this study. The genotypes presented a large genetic variation for all traits that were highly heritable after frost and after hardening. High phenotypic significant correlations were established between traits. The principal coordinates analysis resulted in no clear structure in the current population. Association mapping was performed using a general linear model and mixed linear model with kinship. A False discovery rate of 0.20 (and 0.05) was used to test the significance of marker-trait association. As a result, many putative QTLs for 13 morphological and physiological traits were detected using both models. The results reveal that QTL mapping by association analysis is a powerful method of detecting the alleles associated with frost tolerance in the winter faba bean which can be used in accelerating breeding programs. PMID:26041397

  15. Allelic loss on chromosome 10q in human lung cancer: association with tumour progression and metastatic phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, S.; Wolf, G.; Bockmühl, U.; Gellert, K.; Dietel, M.; Petersen, I.

    1998-01-01

    We analysed 78 carcinomas of the lung for allelic losses on chromosome 10q. The tumours were of different stage and grade and comprised 22 small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLC), 40 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 11 adenocarcinomas, four large-cell carcinomas and one carcinoid. They were investigated by six polymorphic markers located between 10q21 and 10qter. We observed a high incidence of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in SCLC (91%) and metastatic SCC (56%). Non-metastatic SCC showed deletions in three cases (14%) and no LOH was found in the other types of non-small-cell lung cancer. The statistical analysis indicated that the presence of LOH correlated significantly with advanced tumour stages in the entire collective and in particular within the SCLC and SCC subgroups. For SCC, a positive association was found between LOH and metastases formation, while in SCLC the number of non-metastatic tumours was too small for a final conclusion. Whereas SCLC was frequently characterized by multiple allelic losses, suggesting the deletion of the entire chromosomal arm, SCC showed interstitial imbalances. A high incidence of allelic loss was observed between the markers D10S677 and D10S1223. The analysis of five informative cases suggested the presence of two non-overlapping regions between the loci D10S677/D10S1237 and D10S1213/D10S1223. In SCLC, we did not find mutations in the putative tumour-suppressor gene MXI1. The data indicate that LOH on chromosome 10q is associated with tumour progression in SCC and SCLC. Thus it may become a useful genetic marker in the assessment of the malignant potential of these tumour types. Images Figure 1 PMID:9460998

  16. Reconceptualizing Parent Involvement: Parent as Accomplice or Parent as Partner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt, Nichole M.; Brooks, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Policy statements of the last two decades have directed schools to enter into partnerships with parents to enhance the social, emotional, and academic growth of their children. However, in practice and scholarship, parental involvement has been constructed as attendance to school-based activities and needs. This article draws on data from an…

  17. Favorable alleles for stem water-soluble carbohydrates identified by association analysis contribute to grain weight under drought stress conditions in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyu; Zhang, Bin; Li, Runzhi; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian

    2015-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental constraint to crop distribution and productivity. Stem water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) buffer wheat grain yield against conditions unfavorable for photosynthesis during the grain filling stage. In this study, 262 winter wheat accessions and 209 genome-wide SSR markers were collected and used to undertake association analysis based on a mixed linear model (MLM). The WSC in different internodes at three growth stages and 1000-grain weight (TGW) were investigated under four environmental regimes (well-watered, drought stress during the whole growth period, and two levels of terminal drought stress imposed by chemical desiccation under the well-watered and drought stress during the whole growth period conditions). Under diverse drought stress conditions, WSC in lower internodes showed significant positive correlations with TGW, especially at the flowering stage under well-watered conditions and at grain filling under drought stress. Sixteen novel WSC-favorable alleles were identified, and five of them contributed to significantly higher TGW. In addition, pyramiding WSC favorable alleles was not only effective for obtaining accessions with higher WSC, but also for enhancing TGW under different water regimes. During the past fifty years of wheat breeding, WSC was selected incidentally. The average number of favorable WSC alleles increased from 1.13 in the pre-1960 period to 4.41 in the post-2000 period. The results indicate a high potential for using marker-assisted selection to pyramid WSC favorable alleles in improving WSC and TGW in wheat. PMID:25768726

  18. Validation of SSR markers associated with rust (Uromyces fabae) resistance in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Rai, Rashmi; Singh, Brahma Deo; Chand, Ramesh; Srivastava, Chandra Prakash

    2015-04-01

    Pea rust is a devastating disease of peas especially in the sub-tropical regions of the world and greatly influenced by the environmental conditions during disease development. Molecular markers associated with pea rust resistance would be useful in marker assisted selection (MAS). Utility of molecular markers associated with the pea rust resistance were evaluated in 30 diverse pea genotypes using four SSR markers (AA446 and AA505 flanking the major QTL Qruf; AD146 and AA416 flanking the minor QTL, Qruf1). QTL, Qruf flanking markers were able to identify all the resistant genotypes when used together, except Pant P 31. While, SSR markers AD146 and AA416 flanking the minor QTL, Qruf1 were able to identify all the pea resistant genotypes used for validation, except for HUDP-11 by AD146 and Pant P 31 by AA416. Similarly, SSR markers AA446 and AA505 were able to identify all the susceptible pea genotypes, except IPFD 99-13, HFP 9415 and S- 143. SSR markers AD146 and AA416 were together able to identify all the pea susceptible genotypes used for validation, except KPMR 526, KPMR 632 and IPFD 99-13. On the basis of marker allele analysis it may be concluded that SSR markers (AA446, AA505, AD146 and AA416) can be used in MAS of pea rust resistance. PMID:25964717

  19. Association and Validation of Yield-Favored Alleles in Chinese Cultivars of Common Wheat (Triticumaestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Guo, Jie; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Boqiao; Cheng, Xiaoming; Qin, Lin; Li, Tian; Shi, Weiping; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian; Yang, Wuyun; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueyong; Cheng, Shunhe

    2015-01-01

    Common wheat is one of the most important crops in China, which is the largest producer in the world. A set of 230 cultivars was used to identify yield-related loci by association mapping. This set was tested for seven yield-related traits, viz. plant height (PH), spike length (SL), spikelet number per spike (SNPS), kernel number per spike (KNPS), thousand-kernel weight (TKW), kernel weight per spike (KWPS), and sterile spikelet number (SSN) per plant in four environments. A total of 106 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers distributed on all 21 chromosomes were used to screen the set. Twenty-one and 19 of them were associated with KNPS and TKW, respectively. Association mapping detected 73 significant associations across 50 SSRs, and the phenotypic variation explained (R2) by the associations ranged from 1.54 to 23.93%. The associated loci were distributed on all chromosomes except 4A, 7A, and 7D. Significant and potentially new alleles were present on 8 chromosomes, namely 1A, 1D, 2A, 2D, 3D, 4B, 5B, and 6B. Further analysis showed that genetic effects of associated loci were greatly influenced by association panels, and the R2 of crucial loci were lower in modern cultivars than in the mini core collection, probably caused by strong selection in wheat breeding. In order to confirm the results of association analysis, yield-related favorable alleles Xgwm135-1A138, Xgwm337-1D186, Xgwm102-2D144, and Xgwm132-6B128 were evaluated in a double haploid (DH) population derived from Hanxuan10 xLumai14.These favorable alleles that were validated in various populations might be valuable in breeding for high-yield. PMID:26067129

  20. Association and Validation of Yield-Favored Alleles in Chinese Cultivars of Common Wheat (Triticumaestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boqiao; Cheng, Xiaoming; Qin, Lin; Li, Tian; Shi, Weiping; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian; Yang, Wuyun; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueyong; Cheng, Shunhe

    2015-01-01

    Common wheat is one of the most important crops in China, which is the largest producer in the world. A set of 230 cultivars was used to identify yield-related loci by association mapping. This set was tested for seven yield-related traits, viz. plant height (PH), spike length (SL), spikelet number per spike (SNPS), kernel number per spike (KNPS), thousand-kernel weight (TKW), kernel weight per spike (KWPS), and sterile spikelet number (SSN) per plant in four environments. A total of 106 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers distributed on all 21 chromosomes were used to screen the set. Twenty-one and 19 of them were associated with KNPS and TKW, respectively. Association mapping detected 73 significant associations across 50 SSRs, and the phenotypic variation explained (R2) by the associations ranged from 1.54 to 23.93%. The associated loci were distributed on all chromosomes except 4A, 7A, and 7D. Significant and potentially new alleles were present on 8 chromosomes, namely1A, 1D, 2A, 2D, 3D, 4B, 5B, and 6B. Further analysis showed that genetic effects of associated loci were greatly influenced by association panels, and the R2 of crucial loci were lower in modern cultivars than in the mini core collection, probably caused by strong selection in wheat breeding. In order to confirm the results of association analysis, yield-related favorable alleles Xgwm135-1A138, Xgwm337-1D186, Xgwm102-2D144, and Xgwm132-6B128 were evaluated in a double haploid (DH) population derived from Hanxuan10 xLumai14.These favorable alleles that were validated in various populations might be valuable in breeding for high-yield. PMID:26067129

  1. ‘Overgrowth’ mutants in barley and wheat: new alleles and phenotypes of the ‘Green Revolution’ Della gene

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Peter Michael

    2013-01-01

    A suppressor screen using dwarf mutants of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) led to the isolation of ‘overgrowth’ derivatives, which retained the original dwarfing gene but grew at a faster rate because of a new mutation. The new mutations were in the Slender1 (Sln1) gene (11/13 cases), which encodes the DELLA protein central to gibberellin (GA) signalling, showed 100% genetic linkage to Sln1 (1/13), or were in the Spindly1 (Spy1) gene (1/13), which encodes another protein involved in GA signalling. The overgrowth mutants were characterized by increased GA signalling, although the extent still depended on the background GA biosynthesis capacity, GA receptor function, and DELLA activity. A comparison between two GA responses, ?-amylase production and leaf growth rate, revealed degrees of specificity for both the overgrowth allele and the GA response under consideration. Many overgrowth mutants were also isolated in a dwarf line of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and 19 new alleles were identified in the Rht-B1 gene, one of the ‘Green Revolution’ semi-dwarfing genes and the orthologue of Sln1. The sites of amino acid substitutions in the DELLA proteins of both species provide insight into DELLA function, and included examples where identical but independent substitutions were observed. In both species, the starting lines were too dwarfed to be directly useful in breeding programmes, but new overgrowth derivatives with semidwarf heights have now been characterized. The variation they exhibit in GA-influenced traits identifies novel alleles with perfect markers that are of potential use in breeding. PMID:23382550

  2. Maternal personality, parenting cognitions, and parenting practices.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Marc H; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Haynes, O Maurice

    2011-05-01

    A community sample of 262 European American mothers of firstborn 20-month-olds completed a personality inventory and measures of parenting cognitions (knowledge, self-perceptions, and reports about behavior) and was observed in interaction with their children from which measures of parenting practices (language, sensitivity, affection, and play) were independently coded. Factor analyses of the personality inventory replicated extraction of the 5-factor model of personality (Openness, Neuroticism, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness). When controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, the 5 personality factors qua variables and in patterns qua clusters related differently to diverse parenting cognitions and practices, supporting the multidimensional, modular, and specific nature of parenting. Maternal personality in the normal range, a theoretically important but empirically neglected factor in everyday parenting, has meaning in studies of parenting, child development, and family process. PMID:21443335

  3. Development of microsatellite markers for the apomictic triploid fern Myriopteris lindheimeri (Pteridaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Grusz, Amanda L.; Pryer, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for investigating the population dynamics of Myriopteris lindheimeri (Pteridaceae), an apomictic triploid fern endemic to deserts of the southwestern United States and Mexico. Methods and Results: Using 454 sequencing, 21 microsatellite markers were developed. Of these, 14 were polymorphic with up to five alleles per locus and eight markers amplified in one or more congeneric close relatives (M. covillei, M. fendleri, M. aurea, and M. rufa). To demonstrate marker utility, M. lindheimeri samples from three Arizona populations were genotyped at nine loci. For each population, diversity measures including percent polymorphic loci, frequency of heterozygotes across all loci, and genotypic diversity were calculated. Across the three populations, on average, 63% of loci were polymorphic, the average frequency of heterozygotes (across all loci) was 0.32, and average genotypic diversity was 0.34. Conclusions: These markers provide a foundation for future studies exploring polyploidy and apomixis in myriopterid ferns. PMID:26649266

  4. Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers in Pulsatilla vulgaris (Ranunculaceae) using next-generation sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    DiLeo, Michelle F.; Graf, René; Holderegger, Rolf; Rico, Yessica; Wagner, Helene H.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: We developed novel microsatellite markers for the perennial plant Pulsatilla vulgaris (Ranunculaceae) to investigate the effects of fragmentation on gene flow in this imperiled species. Methods and Results: We identified microsatellites and developed primers based on 454 shotgun sequences. We identified 14 markers that were polymorphic and produced clean bands. Of these, eight could be analyzed as diploids. Genotyping of 97 individuals across two populations revealed these markers to be highly polymorphic with seven to 17 alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity from 0.41 to 0.83. Conclusions: The markers are highly informative and will be used to test if the reintroduction of shepherding in southern Germany improves genetic connectivity among fragmented populations of P. vulgaris. The combination of diploid and tetraploid markers presented here will be useful in resolving the polyploidization history of this and related species. PMID:26191465

  5. Genetic variability in Brazilian wheat cultivars assessed by microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most important food staples in the south of Brazil. Understanding genetic variability among the assortment of Brazilian wheat is important for breeding. The aim of this work was to molecularly characterize the thirty-six wheat cultivars recommended for various regions of Brazil, and to assess mutual genetic distances, through the use of microsatellite markers. Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers (PMM) delineated all 36 of the samples, revealing a total of 74 simple sequence repeat (SSR) alleles, i.e. an average of 3.2 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC value) calculated to assess the informativeness of each marker ranged from 0.20 to 0.79, with a mean of 0.49. Genetic distances among the 36 cultivars ranged from 0.10 (between cultivars Ocepar 18 and BRS 207) to 0.88 (between cultivars CD 101 and Fudancep 46), the mean distance being 0.48. Twelve groups were obtained by using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means analysis (UPGMA), and thirteen through the Tocher method. Both methods produced similar clusters, with one to thirteen cultivars per group. The results indicate that these tools may be used to protect intellectual property and for breeding and selection programs. PMID:21637519

  6. The Turkish Future Marker

    E-print Network

    Yavas, Feryal

    1980-01-01

    The Turkish future marker has uses which can adequately be analyzed under the modal system of the language. This lends support to the hypothesis that futurity is as much a modal notion as a temporal one....

  7. The Fate of Chromosomes and Alleles in an Allohexaploid Brassica Population

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Annaliese S.; Nelson, Matthew N.; Takahira, Junko; Cowling, Wallace A.; Alves, Gustavo Moreira; Chaudhuri, Arkaprava; Chen, Ning; Ragu, Mohana E.; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Coriton, Olivier; Huteau, Virginie; Eber, Frédérique; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Batley, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Production of allohexaploid Brassica (2n = AABBCC) is a promising goal for plant breeders due to the potential for hybrid heterosis and useful allelic contributions from all three of the Brassica genomes present in the cultivated diploid (2n = AA, 2n = BB, 2n = CC) and allotetraploid (2n = AABB, 2n = AACC, and 2n = BBCC) crop species (canola, cabbages, mustards). We used high-throughput SNP molecular marker assays, flow cytometry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to characterize a population of putative allohexaploids derived from self-pollination of a hybrid from the novel cross (B. napus × B. carinata) × B. juncea to investigate whether fertile, stable allohexaploid Brassica can be produced. Allelic segregation in the A and C genomes generally followed Mendelian expectations for an F2 population, with minimal nonhomologous chromosome pairing. However, we detected no strong selection for complete 2n = AABBCC chromosome complements, with weak correlations between DNA content and fertility (r2 = 0.11) and no correlation between missing chromosomes or chromosome segments and fertility. Investigation of next-generation progeny resulting from one highly fertile F2 plant using FISH revealed general maintenance of high chromosome numbers but severe distortions in karyotype, as evidenced by recombinant chromosomes and putative loss/duplication of A- and C-genome chromosome pairs. Our results show promise for the development of meiotically stable allohexaploid lines, but highlight the necessity of selection for 2n = AABBCC karyotypes. PMID:24558262

  8. Construction of mutant alleles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae without cloning: overview and the delitto perfetto method.

    PubMed

    Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Geisberg, Joseph V

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, methods for introducing specific new mutations at target loci in the yeast genome have involved the preparation of disruption or gene-replacement cassettes via multiple cloning steps. Sequences used for targeting these cassettes or integrating vectors are typically several hundred base pairs long. A variety of newer methods rely on the design of custom PCR oligonucleotides containing shorter sequence tails (?50 nt) for targeting the locus of interest. These techniques obviate the need for cloning steps and allow construction of mutagenesis cassettes by PCR amplification. Such cassettes may be used for gene deletion, epitope tagging, or site-specific mutagenesis. The strategies differ in several ways, most notably with respect to whether they allow reuse of the selection marker and whether extra sequences are left behind near the target locus. This unit presents a summary of methods for targeted mutagenesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae loci without cloning, including PCR-based allele replacement, delitto perfetto, and MIRAGE. Next, a protocol is provided for the delitto perfetto PCR- and oligonucleotide-based mutagenesis method, which offers particular advantages for generating several different mutant alleles of the same gene. PMID:24510296

  9. Blood group O alleles in Native Americans: implications in the peopling of the Americas.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Mena, Benito; Estrada, F Javier; Ulloa-Arvizu, Raúl; Guido, Miriam; Méndez, Rocío; Coral, Ramón; Canto, Thelma; Granados, Julio; Rubí-Castellanos, Rodrigo; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2010-05-01

    All major ABO blood alleles are found in most populations worldwide, whereas the majority of Native Americans are nearly exclusively in the O group. O allele molecular characterization could aid in elucidating the possible causes of group O predominance in Native American populations. In this work, we studied exon 6 and 7 sequence diversity in 180 O blood group individuals from four different Mesoamerican populations. Additionally, a comparative analysis of genetic diversity and population structure including South American populations was performed. Results revealed no significant differences among Mesoamerican and South American groups, but showed significant differences within population groups attributable to previously detected differences in genetic drift and founder effects throughout the American continent. Interestingly, in all American populations, the same set of haplotypes O(1), O(1v), and O(1v(G542A)) was present, suggesting the following: (1) that they constitute the main genetic pool of the founding population of the Americas and (2) that they derive from the same ancestral source, partially supporting the single founding population hypothesis. In addition, the consistent and restricted presence of the G542A mutation in Native Americans compared to worldwide populations allows it to be employed as an Ancestry informative marker (AIM). Present knowledge of the peopling of the Americas allows the prediction of the way in which the G542A mutation could have emerged in Beringia, probably during the differentiation process of Asian lineages that gave rise to the founding population of the continent. PMID:19862808

  10. Allele-Specific Associations of 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 with ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Siegal, Victoria I.; Olvet, Doreen M.; Kibria, Saniya; Kirsch, Sarah F.; Hatchwell, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of the present study were to examine the association between a common serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) polymorphism 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 with severity of attentiondeficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms. Methods Mothers and teachers completed a validated DSM-IV-referenced rating scale for ADHD and ASD symptoms in 118 children with ASD. Results Analyses indicated that children with at least one copy of the S or LG allele obtained significantly more severe maternal ratings of hyperactivity (p=0.001; ?p2=0.097) and impulsivity (p=0.027; ?p2=0.044) but not inattention (p=0.061; ?p2=0.032), controlling for ASD severity, than children homozygous for the LA allele. Conversely, mothers’ ratings indicated that children with LA/LA genotype had more severe ASD social deficits than S+ or LG allele carriers (p=0.003; ?p2=0.081), controlling for ADHD symptom severity. Teachers’ ratings though consistent with mothers’ ratings of hyperactivity and social deficits were marginally significant (p=0.07/p=0.09). There was some evidence that the magnitude of parent-teacher agreement regarding symptom severity varied as a function of the child’s genotype. Conclusion The 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 polymorphism or its correlates may modulate severity of ADHD and ASD symptoms in children with ASD, but in different ways. These tentative, hypothesis-generating findings require replication with larger independent samples. PMID:23123360

  11. Rapid detection of autosomal aneuploidy using microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.N.; Teshima, I.E.; Winsor, E.J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Trisomy occurs in at least 4% of all clinically recognized pregnancies, making it the most common type of chromosome abnormality in humans. The most commonly occurring trisomies are those of chromosomes 13, 18, 21 and aneuploidy of X and Y, accounting for about 0.3% of all newborns and a much higher percentage of conceptuses. In Canada, prenatal chromosome analysis by amniocentesis is offered to those women {ge} 35 years of age at the time of delivery or equivalent risk by maternal serum screen. We are developing a rapid molecular diagnostic test to detect the most common autosomal aneuploidies in prenatal and neonatal samples. The tests makes use of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat markers labeled with fluorescent tags which allow analysis on a GENESCANNER automated fragment analyzer (ABI). Multiple polymorphic markers have been selected on each of chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. At a given locus, trisomic fetuses/neonates will have either three alleles or two alleles with one allele having twice the intensity of the other. Unaffected individuals have two equal intensity alleles. We are conducting a blind study that will compare the detection efficiencies of FISH analysis on uncultured cells and the molecular method on confirmation amniotic fluid samples collected at the time of termination of affected fetuses. Results on cultured amniocytes from one such patient confirmed that trisomy 21 can be detected. FISH was not done on this sample. In addition, detection efficiency of the molecular method in whole blood samples from affected neonates is also being studied. To date, two such samples have been tested, one with trisomy 13 and one with trisomy 18, and both samples were diagnosed correctly. Preliminary results suggest that this method may provide a valuable tool for the rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy.

  12. Allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin genes: models and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vettermann, Christian; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes is one of the most evolutionarily conserved features of the adaptive immune system and underlies the monospecificity of B cells. While much has been learned about how Ig allelic exclusion is established during B-cell development, the relevance of monospecificity to B-cell function remains enigmatic. Here, we review the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain the establishment of Ig allelic exclusion and focus on the molecular mechanisms utilized by developing B cells to ensure the monoallelic expression of Ig? and Ig? light chain genes. We also discuss the physiological consequences of Ig allelic exclusion and speculate on the importance of monospecificity of B cells for immune recognition. PMID:20727027

  13. A New Electrophoresis Technique to Seperate Microsatellite Alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been used commonly for microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) analysis, but they are labor- intensive and not always able to provide accurate sizes for different alleles. Capillary sequencers provide automated analysis and accur...

  14. Development of Genomic Markers and Mapping Tools for Assembling the Allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L. Draft Genome Sequence 

    E-print Network

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M

    2015-04-01

    of markers and samples, Dr. Martin Ganal, Jana Lemm and Joerg Plieske at TraitGenetics for assisting with cluster file development, Dr. Cindy Lawley at Illumina for assistance with development and technical assistance, Dr. David Stelly, Dr. Allen Van.... ....................................................... 96 Figure 4.3 Classification of scorable SNP markers according to Illumina GenTrain score. .............................................................................................................. 99 Figure 4.4 Distribution of minor allele...

  15. A robust TDT-type association test under informative parental missingness.

    PubMed

    Chen, J H; Cheng, K F

    2011-02-10

    Many family-based association tests rely on the random transmission of alleles from parents to offspring. Among them, the transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) may be considered to be the most popular statistical test. The TDT statistic and its variations were proposed to evaluate nonrandom transmission of alleles from parents to the diseased children. However, in family studies, parental genotypes may be missing due to parental death, loss, divorce, or other reasons. Under some missingness conditions, nonrandom transmission of alleles may still occur even when the gene and disease are not associated. As a consequence, the usual TDT-type tests would produce excessive false positive conclusions in association studies. In this paper, we propose a novel TDT-type association test which is not only simple in computation but also robust to the joint effect of population stratification and informative parental missingness. Our test is model-free and allows for different mechanisms of parental missingness across subpopulations. We use a simulation study to compare the performance of the new test with TDT and point out the advantage of the new method. PMID:20963765

  16. Identification of incompatibility alleles in the tetraploid species sour cherry.

    PubMed

    Tobutt, K R; Boskovi?, R; Cerovi?, R; Sonneveld, T; Ruzi?, D

    2004-03-01

    The incompatibility genetics of sour cherry ( Prunus cerasus), an allotetraploid species thought to be derived from sweet cherry (diploid) and ground cherry (tetraploid), were investigated by test crossing and by analysis of stylar ribonucleases which are known to be the products of incompatibility alleles in sweet cherry. Stylar extracts of 36 accessions of sour cherry were separated electrophoretically and stained for ribonuclease activity. The zymograms of most accessions showed three bands, some two or four. Of the ten bands seen, six co-migrated with bands that in sweet cherry are attributed to the incompatibility alleles S(1), S(3), S(4), S(6, ) S(9) and S(13). 'Cacanski Rubin', 'Erdi Botermo B', 'Koros' and 'Ujfehertoi Furtos', which showed bands apparently corresponding to S(1) and S(4), were test pollinated with the sweet cherry 'Merton Late' ( S(1) S(4)). Monitoring pollen tube growth, and, in one case, fruit set, showed that these crosses were incompatible and that the four sour cherries indeed have the alleles S(1) and S(4). Likewise, test pollination of 'Marasca Piemonte', 'Marasca Savena' and 'Morello, Dutch' with 'Noble' ( S(6) S(13)) showed that these three sour cherries have the alleles S(6) and S(13). S(13) was very frequent in sour cherry cultivars, but is rare in sweet cherry cultivars, whereas with S(3) the situation is reversed. It was suggested that the other four bands are derived from ground cherry and one of these, provisionally attributed to S(B), occurred frequently in a small set of ground cherry accessions surveyed. Analysing some progenies from sour by sweet crosses by S allele-specific PCR and monitoring the success of some sweet by sour crosses were informative. They indicated mostly disomic inheritance, with sweet cherry S alleles belonging to one locus and, presumably, the ground cherry alleles to the other, and helped clarify the genomic arrangement of the alleles and the interactions in heteroallelic pollen. PMID:14689184

  17. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D.; O`Brien, S.

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  18. Cellular localization and allele-selective inhibition of mutant huntingtin protein by peptide nucleic acid oligomers containing the fluorescent nucleobase [bis-o-(aminoethoxy)phenyl]pyrrolocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiaxin; Dodd, David W.; Hudson, Robert H. E.; Corey, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a successful DNA/RNA mimic. A major challenge for research is to invent chemically modified PNAs that retain the favorable properties of the parent compound while improving biological recognition. Here we test modified PNAs containing [bis-o-(aminoethoxy)phenyl]pyrrolocytosine bases designed to engage guanine with an additional hydrogen bond. We observe elevated melting temperatures, localization to cellular compartments, and allele-selective inhibition of mutant huntingtin protein expression. PMID:19783436

  19. Characterization of microsatellite DNA markers for the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii: Primer note

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackler, J.C.; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.; Leslie, David M., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Two trinucleotide and seven tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated from an alligator snapping turtle Macrochelys temminckii. To assess the degree of variability in these nine microsatellite loci, we genotyped 174 individuals collected from eight river drainage basins in the southeastern USA. These markers revealed a moderate degree of allelic diversity (six to 16 alleles per locus) and observed heterozygosity (0.166-0.686). These polymorphic microsatellite loci provide powerful tools for population genetic studies for a species that is afforded some level of conservation protection in every state in which it occurs. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  20. Microsatellite marker isolation and development for the giant Pacific Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toussaint, Rebecca K.; Sage, G. Kevin; Talbot, Sandra L.; Scheel, David

    2012-01-01

    We isolated and developed 18 novel microsatellite markers for the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) and examined them for 31 individuals from Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. These loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 11 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 65%). Seven loci deviated from Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) due to heterozygote deficiency for the PWS population, although deviations were not observed for all these loci in other populations, suggesting the PWS population is not in mutation-drift equilibrium. These novel microsatellite loci yielded sufficient genetic diversity for potential use in population genetics, individual identification, and parentage studies.

  1. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  2. PCR-based markers for the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm4a in wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Z-Q; Wei, J-B; Cheng, S-H

    2004-06-01

    Gene tagging is the basis of marker-assisted selection and map-based cloning. To develop PCR-based markers for Pm4a, a dominant powdery mildew resistance gene of wheat, we surveyed 46 group 2 microsatellite markers between Pm4a near-isogenic line (NIL) CI 14124 and the recurrent parent Chancellor (Cc). One of the markers, gwm356, detected polymorphism and was used for genotyping an F(2) population of 85 plants derived from CI 14124 x Cc. Linkage mapping indicated that Xgwm356 was linked to Pm4a at a distance of 4.8 cM. To identify more PCR-based markers for Pm4a, we also converted the restriction fragment length polymorphism marker BCD1231 linked to it into a sequence-tagged site (STS) marker. The STS primer designed based on the end sequences of BCD1231 amplified an approximately 1.6-kb monomorphic band in both parents. Following digestion of the products with the four-cutter enzymes HaeIII and MspI, it was discovered that the band from CI 14124 consisted of at least two products, one of which had a digestion pattern different from the band from Cc. In the F(2) population, the cleaved polymorphism revealed by the STS marker between the parents co-segregated with powdery mildew resistance. To design Pm4a-specific PCR markers, the 1.6-kb band from Cc and the fragment associated with Pm4a in CI 14124 were sequenced and compared. Based on these sequences a new PCR marker was identified, which detected a 470-bp product only in the Pm4a-containing lines. These PCR-based markers provide a cost-saving option for marker-assisted selection of Pm4a. PMID:14985977

  3. Radiosensitivity of Human Fibroblasts is Associated With Amino Acid Substitution Variants in Susceptible Genes And Correlates With The Number of Risk Alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbeih, Ghazi . E-mail: galsbeih@kfshrc.edu.sa; El-Sebaie, Medhat; Al-Harbi, Najla; Al-Buhairi, Muneera; Al-Hadyan, Khaled; Al-Rajhi, Nasser

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Genetic predictive markers of radiosensitivity are being sought for stratifying radiotherapy for cancer patients and risk assessment of radiation exposure. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes are associated with, and the number of risk alleles has incremental effect on, individual radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six amino acid substitution variants (ATM 1853 Asp/Asn G>A, p53 72 Arg/Pro G>C, p21 31 Ser/Arg C>A, XRCC1 399 Arg/Gln G>A, XRCC3 241 Thr/Met C>T, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu/Pro T>C) were genotyped by direct sequencing in 54 fibroblast strains of different radiosensitivity. Results: The clonogenic survival fraction at 2 Gy range was 0.15-0.50 (mean, 0.34, standard deviation, 0.08). The mean survival fraction at 2 Gy divided the cell strains into radiosensitive (26 cases) and normal (28 controls). A significant association was observed between the survival fraction at 2 Gy and ATM 1853 Asn, XRCC3 241 Met, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu alleles (p = 0.05, p = 0.02, and p = 0.02, respectively). The p53 72 Arg allele showed a borderline association (p = 0.07). The number of risk alleles increased with increasing radiosensitivity, and the group comparison showed a statistically significant difference between the radiosensitive and control groups (p {<=}0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes influence cellular radiation response and that the number of risk alleles has a combined effect on radiosensitivity. Individuals with multiple risk alleles could be more susceptible to radiation effects than those with fewer risk alleles. These results may have implications in predicting normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy and risk assessment of radiation exposure.

  4. MHC genotyping of non-model organisms using next-generation sequencing: a new methodology to deal with artefacts and allelic dropout

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is the most important genetic marker to study patterns of adaptive genetic variation determining pathogen resistance and associated life history decisions. It is used in many different research fields ranging from human medical, molecular evolutionary to functional biodiversity studies. Correct assessment of the individual allelic diversity pattern and the underlying structural sequence variation is the basic requirement to address the functional importance of MHC variability. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are likely to replace traditional genotyping methods to a great extent in the near future but first empirical studies strongly indicate the need for a rigorous quality control pipeline. Strict approaches for data validation and allele calling to distinguish true alleles from artefacts are required. Results We developed the analytical methodology and validated a data processing procedure which can be applied to any organism. It allows the separation of true alleles from artefacts and the evaluation of genotyping reliability, which in addition to artefacts considers for the first time the possibility of allelic dropout due to unbalanced amplification efficiencies across alleles. Finally, we developed a method to assess the confidence level per genotype a-posteriori, which helps to decide which alleles and individuals should be included in any further downstream analyses. The latter method could also be used for optimizing experiment designs in the future. Conclusions Combining our workflow with the study of amplification efficiency offers the chance for researchers to evaluate enormous amounts of NGS-generated data in great detail, improving confidence over the downstream analyses and subsequent applications. PMID:23937623

  5. Uniparental genetic markers in South Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of uniparental systems in South Amerindians was undertaken. Variability in the Y-chromosome haplogroups were assessed in 68 populations and 1,814 individuals whereas that of Y-STR markers was assessed in 29 populations and 590 subjects. Variability in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup was examined in 108 populations and 6,697 persons, and sequencing studies used either the complete mtDNA genome or the highly variable segments 1 and 2. The diversity of the markers made it difficult to establish a general picture of Y-chromosome variability in the populations studied. However, haplogroup Q1a3a* was almost always the most prevalent whereas Q1a3* occurred equally in all regions, which suggested its prevalence among the early colonizers. The STR allele frequencies were used to derive a possible ancient Native American Q-clade chromosome haplotype and five of six STR loci showed significant geographic variation. Geographic and linguistic factors moderately influenced the mtDNA distributions (6% and 7%, respectively) and mtDNA haplogroups A and D correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with latitude. The data analyzed here provide rich material for understanding the biological history of South Amerindians and can serve as a basis for comparative studies involving other types of data, such as cultural data. PMID:22888284

  6. Tightly linked flanking microsatellite markers for the Usher syndrome type I locus on the short arm of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Keats, B.J.B.; Nouri, N.; Pelias, M.Z.; Deininger, P.L. ); Litt, M. )

    1994-04-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by profound congenital hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction followed by the onset of progressive pigmentary retinopathy in childhood or early adolescence. A locus (USH1C) for one form of this disease was previously assigned to the short arm of chromosome 11 through linkage studies in the Acadian population of southwestern Louisiana. Linkage analyses of a set of microsatellite markers in 27 Acadian families provide evidence that USH1C lies between D11S861 and D11S928. Three markers (D11S419, D11S921, and D11S899) that lie between the flanking markers show no recombination with USH1C, and all 54 chromosomes with the abnormal allele at the disease locus have identical alleles for D11S419 and D11S921. This haplotype was found on only 10 of 50 chromosomes with the normal allele at the disease locus, suggesting a strong founder effect. Of the 54 chromosomes with the abnormal allele, 12 had a divergent allele at D11S899. These results suggest that USH1C is in the 2-3-cM interval between D11S861 and D11S899. 16 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Tightly linked flanking microsatellite markers for the Usher syndrome type I locus on the short arm of chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Keats, B. J.; Nouri, N.; Pelias, M. Z.; Deininger, P. L.; Litt, M.

    1994-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by profound congenital hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction followed by the onset of progressive pigmentary retinopathy in childhood or early adolescence. A locus (USH1C) for one form of this disease was previously assigned to the short arm of chromosome 11 through linkage studies in the Acadian population of southwestern Louisiana. Linkage analyses of a set of microsatellite markers in 27 Acadian families provide evidence that USH1C lies between D11S861 and D11S928. Three markers (D11S419, D11S921, and D11S899) that lie between the flanking markers show no recombination with USH1C, and all 54 chromosomes with the abnormal allele at the disease locus have identical alleles for D11S419 and D11S921. This haplotype was found on only 10 of 50 chromosomes with the normal allele at the disease locus, suggesting a strong founder effect. Of the 54 chromosomes with the abnormal allele, 12 had a divergent allele at D11S899. These results suggest that USH1C is in the 2-3-cM interval between D11S861 and D11S899. PMID:8128966

  8. A powerful likelihood method for the analysis of linkage disequilibrium between trait loci and one or more polymorphic marker loci

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, J.D.

    1995-03-01

    Historically, most methods for detecting linkage disequilibrium were designed for use with diallelic marker loci, for which the analysis is straightforward. With the advent of polymorphic markers with many alleles, the normal approach to their analysis has been either to extend the methodology for two-allele systems (leading to an increase in df and to a corresponding loss of power) or to select the allele believed to be associated and then collapse the other alleles, reducing, in a biased way, the locus to a diallelic system. I propose a likelihood-based approach to testing for linkage disequilibrium, an approach that becomes more conservative as the number of alleles increases, and as the number of markers considered jointly increases in a multipoint test for linkage disequilibrium, while maintaining high power. Properties of this method for detecting associations and fine mapping the location of disease traits are investigated. It is found to be, in general, more powerful than conventional methods, and it provides a tractable framework for the fine mapping of new disease loci. Application to the cystic fibrosis data of Kerem et al. is included to illustrate the method. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of IDH1G105 polymorphism as prognostic marker in intermediate-risk AML.

    PubMed

    Fasan, Annette; Haferlach, Claudia; Eder, Christiane; Alpermann, Tamara; Quante, Anne; Peters, Annette; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    Germline polymorphisms in genes mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may have prognostic impact. Therefore, the relevance of the polymorphism IDH1G105 (IDH1105(GGT) minor allele) was evaluated in the context of concomitant molecular mutations in a cohort of 507 AML cases with intermediate-risk cytogenetics. In addition, a cohort of 475 healthy controls was analyzed for this polymorphism. IDH1105(GGT) minor allele was found in 10 % of AML patients and 9 % of healthy controls. While no differences were seen with regard to cytomorphology or cytogenetics, immunophenotyping revealed significantly reduced expression of the progenitor marker CD34 in AML cases harboring IDH1105(GGT) minor allele. Cases with IDH1105(GGT) minor allele as compared to those with the IDH1105(GGC) major allele had significantly longer event-free survival (EFS) (median 16 vs 11 months, p?=?0.013) which was most pronounced in the age group >60 years (median 14 vs 9 months, p?=?0.007) and in the NPM1 mutated/FLT3-ITD/FLT3wt ratio <0.5 group (median 61 vs 13 months, p?=?0.012). However, this association is not independent of other prognostic parameters, and we conclude that IDH1105(GGT) minor allele has to be considered in the context of the genetic background of the individual AML analyzed. PMID:26351014

  10. Molecular analysis of Hurler syndrome in Druze and Muslim Arab patients in Israel: multiple allelic mutations of the IDUA gene in a small geographic area.

    PubMed Central

    Bach, G; Moskowitz, S M; Tieu, P T; Matynia, A; Neufeld, E F

    1993-01-01

    The mutations underlying Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IH) in Druze and Muslim Israeli Arab patients have been characterized. Four alleles were identified, using a combination of (a) PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed RNA or genomic DNA segments, (b) cycle sequencing of PCR products, and (c) restriction-enzyme analysis. One allele has two amino acid substitutions, Gly409-->Arg in exon 9 and Ter-->Cys in exon 14. The other three alleles have mutations in exon 2 (Tyr64-->Ter), exon 7 (Gln310-->Ter), or exon 8 (Thr366-->Pro). Transfection of mutagenized cDNAs into Cos-1 cells showed that two missense mutations, Thr366-->Pro and Ter-->Cys, permitted the expression of only trace amounts of alpha-L-iduronidase activity, whereas Gly409-->Arg permitted the expression of 60% as much enzyme as did the normal cDNA. The nonsense mutations were associated with abnormalities of RNA processing: (1) both a very low level of mRNA and skipping of exon 2 for Tyr64-->Ter and (2) utilization of a cryptic splice site for Gln310-->Ter. In all instances, the probands were found homozygous, and the parents heterozygous, for the mutant alleles, as anticipated from the consanguinity in each family. The two-mutation allele was identified in a family from Gaza; the other three alleles were found in seven families, five of them Druze, residing in a very small area of northern Israel. Since such clustering suggests a classic founder effect, the presence of three mutant alleles of the IDUA gene was unexpected. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8328452

  11. Maternal Personality, Parenting Cognitions, and Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Haynes, O. Maurice

    2011-01-01

    A community sample of 262 European American mothers of firstborn 20-month-olds completed a personality inventory and measures of parenting cognitions (knowledge, self-perceptions, and reports about behavior) and was observed in interaction with their children from which measures of parenting practices (language, sensitivity, affection, and play)…

  12. Parent to Parent: Giftedness with a Twist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Christy D.

    2012-01-01

    Discovering that a child is gifted can be both exhilarating and daunting. Parents watch in amazement and awe as their 3-year-old reads a first-grade-level book flawlessly, or they might listen to their preschool child's distress over seeing a homeless person on the street. Parents observe as their 6-year-old dismantles a broken CD player and…

  13. Association analysis of SSR markers with phenology, grain, and Stover-yield related traits in pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.).

    PubMed

    Kannan, Baskaran; Senapathy, Senthilvel; Bhasker Raj, Arcot Gajaraj; Chandra, Subhash; Muthiah, Arunachalam; Dhanapal, Arun Prabhu; Hash, Charles Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pearl millet is a staple food crop for millions of people living in the arid and semi-arid tropics. Molecular markers have been used to identify genomic regions linked to traits of interest by conventional QTL mapping and association analysis. Phenotypic recurrent selection is known to increase frequencies of favorable alleles and decrease those unfavorable for the traits under selection. This study was undertaken (i) to quantify the response to recurrent selection for phenotypic traits during breeding of the pearl millet open-pollinated cultivar "CO (Cu) 9" and its four immediate progenitor populations and (ii) to assess the ability of simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker alleles to identify genomic regions linked to grain and stover yield-related traits in these populations by association analysis. A total of 159 SSR alleles were detected across 34 selected single-copy SSR loci. SSR marker data revealed presence of subpopulations. Association analysis identified genomic regions associated with flowering time located on linkage group (LG) 6 and plant height on LG4, LG6, and LG7. Marker alleles on LG6 were associated with stover yield, and those on LG7 were associated with grain yield. Findings of this study would give an opportunity to develop marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or marker-assisted population improvement (MAPI) strategies to increase the rate of gain for pearl millet populations undergoing recurrent selection. PMID:24526909

  14. Association Analysis of SSR Markers with Phenology, Grain, and Stover-Yield Related Traits in Pearl Millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.)

    PubMed Central

    Senapathy, Senthilvel; Chandra, Subhash; Muthiah, Arunachalam; Dhanapal, Arun Prabhu; Hash, Charles Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pearl millet is a staple food crop for millions of people living in the arid and semi-arid tropics. Molecular markers have been used to identify genomic regions linked to traits of interest by conventional QTL mapping and association analysis. Phenotypic recurrent selection is known to increase frequencies of favorable alleles and decrease those unfavorable for the traits under selection. This study was undertaken (i) to quantify the response to recurrent selection for phenotypic traits during breeding of the pearl millet open-pollinated cultivar “CO (Cu) 9” and its four immediate progenitor populations and (ii) to assess the ability of simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker alleles to identify genomic regions linked to grain and stover yield-related traits in these populations by association analysis. A total of 159 SSR alleles were detected across 34 selected single-copy SSR loci. SSR marker data revealed presence of subpopulations. Association analysis identified genomic regions associated with flowering time located on linkage group (LG) 6 and plant height on LG4, LG6, and LG7. Marker alleles on LG6 were associated with stover yield, and those on LG7 were associated with grain yield. Findings of this study would give an opportunity to develop marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or marker-assisted population improvement (MAPI) strategies to increase the rate of gain for pearl millet populations undergoing recurrent selection. PMID:24526909

  15. Development and characterization of microsatellites markers from the macaw.

    PubMed

    Nucci, S M; Azevedo-Filho, J A; Colombo, C A; Priolli, R H G; Coelho, R M; Mata, T L; Zucchi, M I

    2008-01-01

    Macaw (Acrocomia aculeata) is a native palm tree from tropical forests, highly abundant in Brazil and cited as one of the principal sources of plant oil, thus presenting a high potential for biodiesel production. We have optimized and utilized a set of eight polymorphic microsatellite markers for A. aculeata from an enriched genomic library. Automatic sequencing and fluorescence detection were employed to analyse 43 individuals from natural populations. In this study, we have obtained an average number of five alleles per locus. These loci will be employed in future studies of population genetics by providing subsidy information for the species conservation and genetic breeding. PMID:21585762

  16. Definitive high resolution typing of HLA-E allelic polymorphisms: Identifying potential errors in existing allele data.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, C; Kawasaki, A; Gassner, C; Sageshima, N; Nose, Y; Hatake, K; Geraghty, D E; Ishitani, A

    2002-09-01

    A set of robust PCR-SSP reactions were developed for each of the five polymorphic sites that define the five alleles of the HLA class Ib gene, HLA-E. This method was developed using 28 homozygous cell lines and further tested in a sample of African-Americans, a sample of Japanese, and a core panel of cell lines compiled for the 13th International Histocompatibility Workshop. Three alleles were found in each of these four sample groups, HLA-E*0101 (64.29, 50.00, 32.00 and 56.58%, respectively), *01031 (5.36, 20.65, 39.00 and 18.42%) and *01032 (30.35, 29.35, 29.00, and 25.00%). HLA-E*0102 was not detected in any of these samples nor in the cell line, LCL 722.221, in which this allele was originally described. HLA-E*0104 was not found either. This latter allele was originally reported in Japanese at a frequency of 1/22 (4.5%), which should have been high enough to have resulted in multiple occurrences of the *0104 allele in the samples tested in this study. We propose that the existence of the HLA-E*0102 and E*0104 alleles should be questioned. PMID:12445303

  17. Discovery of Genome-Wide Microsatellite Markers in Scombridae: A Pilot Study on Albacore Tuna

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Natacha; Duthoy, Stéphanie; Destombes, Antoine; Bodin, Nathalie; West, Wendy; Puech, Alexis; Bourjea, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analysis provide a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at a low cost. Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies, and high quality markers can be discovered in non-model organisms, such as tuna, with these recent developments. Here, we use a high-throughput method to isolate microsatellite markers in albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, based on coupling multiplex enrichment and next-generation sequencing on 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. The crucial minimum number of polymorphic markers to infer evolutionary and ecological processes for this species has been described for the first time. We provide 1670 microsatellite design primer pairs, and technical and molecular genetics selection resulting in 43 polymorphic microsatellite markers. On this panel, we characterized 34 random and selectively neutral markers («neutral») and 9 «non-neutral» markers. The variability of «neutral» markers was screened with 136 individuals of albacore tuna from southwest Indian Ocean (42), northwest Indian Ocean (31), South Africa (31), and southeast Atlantic Ocean (32). Power analysis demonstrated that the panel of genetic markers can be applied in diversity and population genetics studies. Global genetic diversity for albacore was high with a mean number of alleles at 16.94; observed heterozygosity 66% and expected heterozygosity 77%. The number of individuals was insufficient to provide accurate results on differentiation. Of the 9 «non-neutral» markers, 3 were linked to a sequence of known function. The one is located to a sequence having an immunity function (ThuAla-Tcell-01) and the other to a sequence having energy allocation function (ThuAla-Hki-01). These two markers were genotyped on the 136 individuals and presented different diversity levels. ThuAla-Tcell-01 has a high number of alleles (20), heterozygosity (87–90%), and assignment index. ThuAla-Hki-01 has a lower number of alleles (9), low heterozygosity (24–27%), low assignment index and significant inbreeding. Finally, the 34 «neutral» and 3 «non-neutral» microsatellites markers were tested on four economically important Scombridae species—Thunnus albacares, Thunnus thynnus, Thunnus obesus, and Acanthocybium solandri. PMID:26544051

  18. Assessment of genetic diversity in the sorghum reference set using EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Ramu, P; Billot, C; Rami, J-F; Senthilvel, S; Upadhyaya, H D; Ananda Reddy, L; Hash, C T

    2013-08-01

    Selection and use of genetically diverse genotypes are key factors in any crop breeding program to develop cultivars with a broad genetic base. Molecular markers play a major role in selecting diverse genotypes. In the present study, a reference set representing a wide range of sorghum genetic diversity was screened with 40 EST-SSR markers to validate both the use of these markers for genetic structure analyses and the population structure of this set. Grouping of accessions is identical in distance-based and model-based clustering methods. Genotypes were grouped primarily based on race within the geographic origins. Accessions derived from the African continent contributed 88.6 % of alleles confirming the African origin of sorghum. In total, 360 alleles were detected in the reference set with an average of 9 alleles per marker. The average PIC value was 0.5230 with a range of 0.1379-0.9483. Sub-race, guinea margaritiferum (Gma) from West Africa formed a separate cluster in close proximity to wild accessions suggesting that the Gma group represents an independent domestication event. Guineas from India and Western Africa formed two distinct clusters. Accessions belongs to the kafir race formed the most homogeneous group as observed in earlier studies. This analysis suggests that the EST-SSR markers used in the present study have greater discriminating power than the genomic SSRs. Genetic variance within the subpopulations was very high (71.7 %) suggesting that the germplasm lines included in the set are more diverse. Thus, this reference set representing the global germplasm is an ideal material for the breeding community, serving as a community resource for trait-specific allele mining as well as genome-wide association mapping. PMID:23708149

  19. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    KidsHealth from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ...

  20. Parenting the Gifted Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Marolyn; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The authors discuss difficulties in parenting gifted adolescents whose development may be strikingly uneven. Research is cited regarding fostering self confidence, task persistence, goal direction, and the acquisition of an androgynous self-concept. Democratic parenting is also discussed. (CL)

  1. When Your Parents Fight

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Body Works Main Page When Your Parents Fight KidsHealth > Kids > Feelings > My Home & Family > When Your ... of kids. What Does It Mean When Parents Fight? Kids often worry about what it means when ...

  2. CYP1A1 protein activity is associated with allelic variation in pterygium tissues and cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mei-Ling; Tsai, Yi-Yu; Chiang, Chun-Chi; Huang, Ying-Che; Chou, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Lee, Huei

    2012-01-01

    Background A thymine/cytosine point mutation in the MSP I restriction site of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) has been linked to susceptibility to smoking-related cancers and is reported to result in increased enzyme activity. Therefore, we sought to determine whether allelic variation of CYP1A1 is associated with protein expression and protein activity in pterygium. Methods We collected 150 pterygium samples and 50 normal conjunctiva samples, which served as controls. DNA samples were extracted from blood cells and then subjected to real-time ploymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine CYP1A1 genotype. CYP1A1 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining with a monoclonal antibody for CYP1A1. Pterygium epithelial cells (PECs), cultured in a serum-free culture medium, real-time PCR, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to understand the effect of CYP1A1 allelic variation in protein expression and activity. Results Forty-eight (33.3%) pterygium specimens tested positive for CYP1A1 protein expression. CYP1A1 protein expression was significantly greater in the pterygium group than in the control group (p<0.0001). In addition, CYP1A1 protein expression was associated with allelic variation. CYP1A1 protein expression was significantly greater in the m2/m2 group than in the m1/m1and m1/m2 groups (p=0.006). In the cell model, CYP1A1 protein expression and b[a]P 7,8-diol 9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-like DNA adducts increased in CYP1A1 m2/m2 (genotype T/T) PEC cells as compared with m1/m2 (genotype C/T) and m1/m1 (genotype C/C) cells. Conclusions CYP1A1 expression in pterygium correlates with allelic variation and can be used as an independent risk marker. PMID:22876118

  3. Inactive alleles of cytochrome P450 2C19 may be positively selected in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 CYP2C19 metabolizes a wide range of pharmacologically active substances and a relatively small number of naturally occurring environmental toxins. Poor activity alleles of CYP2C19 are very frequent worldwide, particularly in Asia, raising the possibility that reduced metabolism could be advantageous in some circumstances. The evolutionary selective forces acting on this gene have not previously been investigated. We analyzed CYP2C19 genetic markers from 127 Gambians and on 120 chromosomes from Yoruba, Europeans and Asians (Japanese?+?Han Chinese) in the Hapmap database. Haplotype breakdown was explored using bifurcation plots and relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH). Allele frequency differentiation across populations was estimated using the fixation index (FST) and haplotype diversity with coalescent models. Results Bifurcation plots suggested conservation of alleles conferring slow metabolism (CYP2C19*2 and *3). REHH was high around CYP2C19*2 in Yoruba (REHH 8.3, at 133.3 kb from the core) and to a lesser extent in Europeans (3.5, at 37.7 kb) and Asians (2.8, at ?29.7 kb). FST at the CYP2C19 locus was low overall (0.098). CYP2C19*3 was an FST outlier in Asians (0.293), CYP2C19 haplotype diversity?allele CYP2C19*2 is subject to positive selective forces worldwide. Similar evidence was also found for CYP2C19*3 which is frequent only in Asia. FST is low at the CYP2C19 locus, suggesting balancing selection overall. The biological factors responsible for these selective pressures are currently unknown. One possible explanation is that early humans were exposed to a ubiquitous novel toxin activated by CYP2C19. The genetic adaptation took place within the last 10,000 years which coincides with the development of systematic agricultural practices. PMID:24690327

  4. Genetic analysis of a local population of Oryza glumaepatula using SSR markers: implications for management and conservation programs.

    PubMed

    de Campos Vaz, Ana Rosa; de Oliveira Borba, Tereza Cristina; Brondani, Claudio; Rangel, Paulo Hideo Nakano; de Oliveira Camargo, Graziela Silvia; de Campos Telles, Mariana Pires; Filho, José Alexandre Felizola Diniz; Brondani, Rosana Pereira Vianello

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge of natural diversity and population structures of wild species, which might be related to cultivated species, is fundamental for conservation and breeding purposes. In this study, a genetic characterization of a large population of Oryza glumaepatula, occurring in a 10 km(2) area located at Tamengo Basin (Paraguay River, Brazil), was performed using SSR markers. This population is annually dragged from the river to permit navigation; one goal of this study was to examine the impact of this removal on genetic variability. From 18 polymorphic SSR markers, a total of 190 alleles were detected in a sample of 126 individuals, with an average of 10.3 alleles/locus, and a H(e) of 0.67. The five QTL-related markers showed an average H(e) value of 0.56, while the remaining 13 markers detected an average estimate of 0.70. An apparent outcrossing rate of 30%, a high proportion of alleles at low frequencies (56%), and the presence of exclusive alleles (9.5%) were found, with strong evidence of the establishment of individuals from different populations upstream in the Paraguay River. For conservation purposes, the river drag has no effect on the population. However, periodical seed collection from the Corumbá population can preserve part of the genetic variability present in upstream populations reducing the need for upriver collecting expeditions. PMID:19636802

  5. Cultivar identification, pedigree verification, and diversity analysis among Peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) Cultivars based on Simple Sequence Repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic relationships and pedigree inferences among peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) accessions and breeding lines used in genetic improvement were evaluated using 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 80 alleles were detected among the 37 peach accessions with an average of 5.53...

  6. Evaluation of genetic diversity and pedigree within crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) cultivars using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity was estimated for 93 crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) cultivars (51 L. indica cultivars, 5 L. fauriei cultivars, and 37 interspecific hybrids) using 78 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. SSR loci were highly variable among the cultivars, detecting an average of 6.6 alleles per l...

  7. Development of Genic and Genomic SSR Markers of Robusta Coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre Ex A. Froehner)

    PubMed Central

    Hendre, Prasad S.; Aggarwal, Ramesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Coffee breeding and improvement efforts can be greatly facilitated by availability of a large repository of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) based microsatellite markers, which provides efficiency and high-resolution in genetic analyses. This study was aimed to improve SSR availability in coffee by developing new genic?/genomic-SSR markers using in-silico bioinformatics and streptavidin-biotin based enrichment approach, respectively. The expressed sequence tag (EST) based genic microsatellite markers (EST-SSRs) were developed using the publicly available dataset of 13,175 unigene ESTs, which showed a distribution of 1 SSR/3.4 kb of coffee transcriptome. Genomic SSRs, on the other hand, were developed from an SSR-enriched small-insert partial genomic library of robusta coffee. In total, 69 new SSRs (44 EST-SSRs and 25 genomic SSRs) were developed and validated as suitable genetic markers. Diversity analysis of selected coffee genotypes revealed these to be highly informative in terms of allelic diversity and PIC values, and eighteen of these markers (?27%) could be mapped on a robusta linkage map. Notably, the markers described here also revealed a very high cross-species transferability. In addition to the validated markers, we have also designed primer pairs for 270 putative EST-SSRs, which are expected to provide another ca. 200 useful genetic markers considering the high success rate (88%) of marker conversion of similar pairs tested/validated in this study. PMID:25461752

  8. Microsatellite DNA markers for assessing phylogeographic and population structure in Preble's meadow jumping mice (Zapus hudsonius preblei) and cross-amplification among neighbouring taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Young, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 14 tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA markers in Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei). The identified markers displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 4.9 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 55.1%). Genotypic and allelic frequencies in a collection of 30 individuals conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations and indicated no linkage disequilibrium. High levels of cross-amplification (95% overall) among neighbouring subspecies and two congeners (Zapus princeps and Zapus trinotatus) were observed. Multilocus genotypes resulting from these markers appear to provide ample genetic diversity for studies assessing individual- and population-level ecological interactions within Z. h. preblei and evolutionary relationships among neighbouring subspecies (Z. h. campestris, Z. h. intermedius, Z. h. pallidus and Z. h. luteus). ?? 2006 The Authors.

  9. The Teen Parent Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, H. Prentice, Jr.; Walker, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Pregnant teenagers and young parents often do not receive the quality of education available to other students. Most schools do not have a separate facility or program that deals with their special needs. Pregnant teens and teen parents should not be left behind. The Teen Parent Academy--a unique program in a predominantly Hispanic Texas border…

  10. Parenting: The Underdeveloped Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National PTA, Chicago, IL.

    This parent education curriculum contains a variety of materials designed to help local Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs) hold meetings for parents on child rearing. The materials help organizers plan meetings on topics such as dating, drugs, and careers. The unit contains a leader's guide, which contains a description of how to plan meetings,…

  11. WCPSS Parent Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Bob

    A study examined parents' opinions about the Wake County (Raleigh, North Carolina) public school system (WCPSS). Opinions were sought on the following areas at both the school and district level: school climate, quality of educational programs, expectations of students, school and system pride, parent involvement, and responsiveness to parent

  12. Parent's Journal. [Videotape Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    Parent's Journal is a set of 16 videotapes for parents of prenatal, infant, and toddler-age children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on the life stories and experiences of capable mothers and…

  13. The Parent Loan Trap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Marian; Supiano, Beckie; Fuller, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    As the cost of college has spiraled ever upward and median family income has fallen, the loan program, called Parent PLUS, has become indispensable for increasing numbers of parents desperate to make their children's college plans work. Last year the government disbursed $10.6-billion in Parent PLUS loans to just under a million families. Even…

  14. Surrogate Parent Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Education, Augusta. Div. of Special Services.

    This manual, which is designed for surrogate parents, social workers, and educational personnel working with the Maine Surrogate Parent Program, attempts to ensure that children without available parents or guardians are provided with equal educational opportunities. Individual sections address the following topics: program purpose, definitions,…

  15. Training Surrogate Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan A.

    The role of surrogate parents in advocating for handicapped children whose parents or guardians are unknown or unavailable, or children who are wards of the state is discussed and a surrogate parent training program in South Dakota is described. The program provides 20 hours of instruction including lecture and large group discussion, small group…

  16. Educational Surrogate Parent Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Dept. of Public Instruction, Bismarck.

    This manual is intended for individuals who agree to act as educational surrogate parents for children with disabilities in North Dakota. Section 1 provides an overview of the educational surrogate parent service, including surrogate parent qualifications, protections, responsibilities, confidentiality, and the surrogate's partnership with the…

  17. Parent Surrogate Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Office of Special Education.

    The manual is intended to help parent surrogates carry out their role by providing an overview of the special education decisionmaking process in Maryland. The parent surrogate is responsible for representing the child in all matters relating to identification, evaluation, educational placement, and programing. Roles of the parent surrogate are…

  18. Successful Parent Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    Key ingredients to successful parent meetings include planning with parents and including the children; assessing parents' needs and interests; planning the details of the meeting, such as meeting place, transportation, child care arrangements, and refreshments and activities; and planning the key elements of the meeting, such as presentations and…

  19. Parenting after Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  20. Parents, Publishers and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPlante, William

    The relationship between educational textbook publishers and parents has, in the past, been restricted to parents glancing at their children's textbooks. Now, however, as a result of a general increase of interest in education, the schools' need for parental help in the learning process, and the increased instructional focus of the media (such as…

  1. Parental Rights in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volz, Marlin M.

    Chapter 15 in a book on school law summarizes court decisions and legislation concerning the rights of parents in the education of children. On purely educational matters, the interest of the parent normally must yield to the dominant interest of the state. Parental arguments are strongest when they can sincerely rely upon religious beliefs that…

  2. Family Problems Single Parenting

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Family Problems Single Parenting Dual Careers Anxiety Depression Parent/Child Conflict Job "Burnout Life Transition Aging Parents Unresolved Grief Marital Problems Sexual Problems Personal Concerns to assist employees who may be dealing with personal problems that affect their relationships at home

  3. Mytilus galloprovincialis-type foot-protein-1 alleles occur at low frequency among mussels in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Koolhaas, Anita; Bol, Anneke; Piersma, Theunis

    2002-11-01

    The presence of M. galloprovincialis-type genes among the population of mussels in the Dutch Wadden Sea, historically described as M. edulis, was assessed. We applied the molecular technique in which a fragment of the gene coding for an adhesive protein of the byssus of mussels is amplified by PCR and assayed for length using electrophoresis. Among 321 individual mussels collected in August-October 2001 at 14 sites (5 intertidal, 9 subtidal) widely dispersed over the Dutch Wadden Sea, 6 specimens (collected at 5 sites) were found that showed a heterozygote genotype with both the M. edulis- and the M. galloprovincialis-type alleles being amplified; all others were identified as homozygotes for the M. edulis-type allele. Differentiation in frequencies of heterozygotes among sites was not detected. The fact that the M. galloprovincialis-type allele was present at low frequency (0.0093) may be attributed to one of three possible, and not mutually exclusive, causes: incomplete diagnosticity of this marker, an historically stable introgression zone in the Wadden Sea, or a recent invasion.

  4. Evaluation of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach by Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozcinar, Zehra; Ekizoglu, Nihat

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of parent involvement in children's education, research clearly shows that it is difficult to effectively involve parents. This study aims to capture parents' views of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach (BPIA) designed to secure parent involvement in education by strengthening school-parent communication. Data…

  5. Parenting Beliefs, Parental Stress, and Social Support Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Respler-Herman, Melissa; Mowder, Barbara A.; Yasik, Anastasia E.; Shamah, Renee

    2012-01-01

    The present study built on prior research by examining the relationship of parental stress and social support to parenting beliefs and behaviors. A sample of 87 parents provided their views concerning the importance of parenting characteristics as well as their level of parental stress and perceived social support. These parents completed the…

  6. Personality and Parenting Style in Parents of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huver, Rose M. E.; Otten, Roy; de Vries, Hein; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Since parental personality traits are assumed to play a role in parenting behaviors, the current study examined the relation between parental personality and parenting style among 688 Dutch parents of adolescents in the SMILE study. The study assessed Big Five personality traits and derived parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian,…

  7. Forensic Value of the Multi-Copy Y-STR Marker DYS464 The Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) marker DYS464 was first reported by Redd et al. Forensic Sci. Int. (2002) 130:97-111 and appears to be the most polymorphic Y-STR marker discovered to-

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Forensic Value of the Multi-Copy Y-STR Marker DYS464 The Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y occur over a 1.8 megabase (Mb) stretch near the DAZ region around 25 Mb on the Y-chromosome. Allele. This region was demonstrated to have palindromic sequences in the recent publication of the human Y-chromosome

  8. Polymorphic human (CTAT)n microsatellite provides a conserved linkage marker for mouse mutants causing cleft palate, vestibular defects, obesity and ataxia

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.

    1994-09-01

    The Twirler mutation (Tw) causing cleft palate {plus_minus} cleft lip, vestibular defects and obesity is located within 0.5 cM of an ataxia locus (ax) on mouse chromosome 18. We identified a transgene-induced insertional mutation with vestibular and craniofacial defects that appears to be a new allele of Twirler. Mouse DNA flanking the transgene insertion site was isolated from a cosmid library. An evolutionarily conserved, zoo blot positive cosmid subclone was used to probe a human {lambda} genomic library. From the sequence of a highly homologous human {lambda} clone, we designed STS primers and screened a human P1 library. DNA from two positive P1 clones was hybridized with simple sequence probes, and a (CTAT){sub 12} repeat was detected. Analysis of 62 CEPH parents with primers flanking the repeat identified six alleles containing 9 to 14 copies of the repeat, at frequencies of 0.17, 0.17, 0.17, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.07, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was 49/62 with a calculated PIC value of 0.76. This polymorphic microsatellite marker, designated Umi3, was mapped to the predicted conserved human linkage group by analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels. The anticipated short distance between Umi3 and the disease genes will facilitate detection of linkage in small families. We would like to type appropriate human pedigrees with Umi3 in order to identify patients with inherited disorders homologous to the mouse mutations Twirler and ataxia.

  9. Allelic Richness following Population Founding Events – A Stochastic Modeling Framework Incorporating Gene Flow and Genetic Drift

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Gili; Templeton, Alan R.; Zarmi, Yair; Bar-David, Shirli

    2014-01-01

    Allelic richness (number of alleles) is a measure of genetic diversity indicative of a population's long-term potential for adaptability and persistence. It is used less commonly than heterozygosity as a genetic diversity measure, partially because it is more mathematically difficult to take into account the stochastic process of genetic drift for allelic richness. This paper presents a stochastic model for the allelic richness of a newly founded population experiencing genetic drift and gene flow. The model follows the dynamics of alleles lost during the founder event and simulates the effect of gene flow on maintenance and recovery of allelic richness. The probability of an allele's presence in the population was identified as the relevant statistical property for a meaningful interpretation of allelic richness. A method is discussed that combines the probability of allele presence with a population's allele frequency spectrum to provide predictions for allele recovery. The model's analysis provides insights into the dynamics of allelic richness following a founder event, taking into account gene flow and the allele frequency spectrum. Furthermore, the model indicates that the “One Migrant per Generation” rule, a commonly used conservation guideline related to heterozygosity, may be inadequate for addressing preservation of diversity at the allelic level. This highlights the importance of distinguishing between heterozygosity and allelic richness as measures of genetic diversity, since focusing merely on the preservation of heterozygosity might not be enough to adequately preserve allelic richness, which is crucial for species persistence and evolution. PMID:25526062

  10. theoretical population biology 50, 91 104 (1996) The Sampling Theory of Neutral Alleles in an

    E-print Network

    1996-01-01

    theoretical population biology 50, 91 104 (1996) The Sampling Theory of Neutral Alleles, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8104 Received July 24, 1995 The sampling distribution of neutral alleles of allele types in a sample of N individuals from an island when the allele frequen- cies among immigrants

  11. Novel breast cancer risk alleles and interaction with ionizing radiation among U.S. Radiologic Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Parveen; Doody, Michele M.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Alexander, Bruce H.; Yeager, Meredith; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Thomas, Gilles; Hunter, David J.; Simon, Steven L.; Weinstock, Robert M.; Rosenstein, Marvin; Stovall, Marilyn; Preston, Dale L.; Linet, Martha S.; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2010-01-01

    As genome-wide association studies of breast cancer are replicating findings and refinement studies are narrowing the signal location, additional efforts are necessary to elucidate the underlying functional relationships. One approach is to evaluate variation in risk by genotype based on known breast carcinogens, such as ionizing radiation. Given the public health concerns associated with recent increases in medical radiation exposure, this approach may also identify potentially susceptible sub-populations. We examined interaction between 27 newly identified breast cancer risk alleles (identified within the NCI Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium genome-wide association studies) and occupational and medical diagnostic radiation exposure among 859 cases and 1083 controls nested within the United States Radiologic Technologists cohort. We did not find significant variation in the radiation-related breast cancer risk for the variant in RAD51L1 (rs10483813) on 14q24.1 as we had hypothesized. In exploratory analyses, we found that the radiation-associated breast cancer risk varied significantly by linked markers in 5p12 (rs930395, rs10941679, rs2067980, and rs4415084) in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S30 (MRPS30) gene (pinteraction=0.04). Chance, however, may explain these findings, and as such, these results need to be confirmed in other populations with low to moderate levels of radiation exposure. Even though a complete understanding by which these variants may increase breast cancer risk remains elusive, this approach may yield clues for further investigation. PMID:20095854

  12. Allele-Specific Network Reveals Combinatorial Interaction That Transcends Small Effects in Psoriasis GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Climer, Sharlee; Templeton, Alan R.; Zhang, Weixiong

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of genetic markers have shown associations with various complex diseases, yet the “missing heritability” remains alarmingly elusive. Combinatorial interactions may account for a substantial portion of this missing heritability, but their discoveries have been impeded by computational complexity and genetic heterogeneity. We present BlocBuster, a novel systems-level approach that efficiently constructs genome-wide, allele-specific networks that accurately segregate homogenous combinations of genetic factors, tests the associations of these combinations with the given phenotype, and rigorously validates the results using a series of unbiased validation methods. BlocBuster employs a correlation measure that is customized for single nucleotide polymorphisms and returns a multi-faceted collection of values that captures genetic heterogeneity. We applied BlocBuster to analyze psoriasis, discovering a combinatorial pattern with an odds ratio of 3.64 and Bonferroni-corrected p-value of 5.01×10?16. This pattern was replicated in independent data, reflecting robustness of the method. In addition to improving prediction of disease susceptibility and broadening our understanding of the pathogenesis underlying psoriasis, these results demonstrate BlocBuster's potential for discovering combinatorial genetic associations within heterogeneous genome-wide data, thereby transcending the limiting “small effects” produced by individual markers examined in isolation. PMID:25233071

  13. Characterization of 23 polymorphic SSR markers in Salix humboldtiana (Salicaceae) using next-generation sequencing and cross-amplification from related species1

    PubMed Central

    Bozzi, Jorge A.; Liepelt, Sascha; Ohneiser, Sebastian; Gallo, Leonardo A.; Marchelli, Paula; Leyer, Ilona; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Mengel, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: We present a set of 23 polymorphic nuclear microsatellite loci, 18 of which are identified for the first time within the riparian species Salix humboldtiana (Salicaceae) using next-generation sequencing. Methods and Results To characterize the 23 loci, up to 60 individuals were sampled and genotyped at each locus. The number of alleles ranged from two to eight, with an average of 4.43 alleles per locus. The effective number of alleles ranged from 1.15 to 3.09 per locus, and allelic richness ranged from 2.00 to 7.73 alleles per locus. Conclusions The new marker set will be used for future studies of genetic diversity and differentiation as well as for unraveling spatial genetic structures in S. humboldtiana populations in northern Patagonia, Argentina. PMID:25909042

  14. Paternal allelic mutation at the Kcnq1 locus reduces pancreatic ?-cell mass by epigenetic modification of Cdkn1c

    PubMed Central

    Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Etoh, Hiroaki; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Teruyama, Kyoko; Shibutani, Yuki; Ihara, Yuka; Kawada, Yukina; Bartolome, Alberto; Hashimoto, Naoko; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Koyanagi-Kimura, Maki; Kanno, Ayumi; Hirota, Yushi; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Nishimura, Wataru; Inoue, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Higgins, Michael J.; Yasuda, Kazuki; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Susumu; Kasuga, Masato; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors are important determinants of the onset and progression of diabetes mellitus. Numerous susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes, including potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily Q, member1 (KCNQ1), have been identified in humans by genome-wide analyses and other studies. Experiments with genetically modified mice have also implicated various genes in the pathogenesis of diabetes. However, the possible effects of the parent of origin for diabetes susceptibility alleles on disease onset have remained unclear. Here, we show that a mutation at the Kcnq1 locus reduces pancreatic ?-cell mass in mice by epigenetic modulation only when it is inherited from the father. The noncoding RNA KCNQ1 overlapping transcript1 (Kcnq1ot1) is expressed from the Kcnq1 locus and regulates the expression of neighboring genes on the paternal allele. We found that disruption of Kcnq1 results in reduced Kcnq1ot1 expression as well as the increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (Cdkn1c), an imprinted gene that encodes a cell cycle inhibitor, only when the mutation is on the paternal allele. Furthermore, histone modification at the Cdkn1c promoter region in pancreatic islets was found to contribute to this phenomenon. Our observations suggest that the Kcnq1 genomic region directly regulates pancreatic ?-cell mass and that genomic imprinting may be a determinant of the onset of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26100882

  15. Paternal allelic mutation at the Kcnq1 locus reduces pancreatic ?-cell mass by epigenetic modification of Cdkn1c.

    PubMed

    Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Etoh, Hiroaki; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Teruyama, Kyoko; Shibutani, Yuki; Ihara, Yuka; Kawada, Yukina; Bartolome, Alberto; Hashimoto, Naoko; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Koyanagi-Kimura, Maki; Kanno, Ayumi; Hirota, Yushi; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Nishimura, Wataru; Inoue, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Higgins, Michael J; Yasuda, Kazuki; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Susumu; Kasuga, Masato; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2015-07-01

    Genetic factors are important determinants of the onset and progression of diabetes mellitus. Numerous susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes, including potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily Q, member1 (KCNQ1), have been identified in humans by genome-wide analyses and other studies. Experiments with genetically modified mice have also implicated various genes in the pathogenesis of diabetes. However, the possible effects of the parent of origin for diabetes susceptibility alleles on disease onset have remained unclear. Here, we show that a mutation at the Kcnq1 locus reduces pancreatic ?-cell mass in mice by epigenetic modulation only when it is inherited from the father. The noncoding RNA KCNQ1 overlapping transcript1 (Kcnq1ot1) is expressed from the Kcnq1 locus and regulates the expression of neighboring genes on the paternal allele. We found that disruption of Kcnq1 results in reduced Kcnq1ot1 expression as well as the increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (Cdkn1c), an imprinted gene that encodes a cell cycle inhibitor, only when the mutation is on the paternal allele. Furthermore, histone modification at the Cdkn1c promoter region in pancreatic islets was found to contribute to this phenomenon. Our observations suggest that the Kcnq1 genomic region directly regulates pancreatic ?-cell mass and that genomic imprinting may be a determinant of the onset of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26100882

  16. Allele distribution and genetic diversity of VNTR loci in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from different sources

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seongbeom; Whittam, Thomas S; Boxrud, David J; Bartkus, Joanne M; Saeed, A Mahdi

    2008-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a zoonotic pathogen, which can be found in many sources including animals and the environment. However, little is known about the molecular relatedness among S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources. We have applied multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) to study the genetic diversity of S. Enteritidis isolates from human and non-human sources. Results We identified 38 unique MLVA types using nine VNTR loci markers for discrimination between 145 S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources including humans (n = 41), chickens (n = 45), and eggs (n = 40). There were 20 distinct MLVA types identified from human isolates, 17 distinct MLVA types from chicken isolates, and 5 from egg isolates. We compared allele distribution and frequency for each VNTR marker and measured allelic polymorphism within each VNTR locus of S. Enteritidis isolates from the sources using Nei's diversity index (D). Differences in allele distribution and frequency were detected in most loci of study isolates. Different genetic diversity for certain loci was identified in isolates from different sources. The average of genetic diversity (D) was lower in egg isolates (0.16) compared to human (0.41) and chicken (0.30). However, for loci SE3, SE7, and SE9, human isolates showed significantly higher diversity than both chicken and egg isolates. Whereas for loci SE5 and SE10, chicken isolates had significantly higher diversity than both human and egg isolates. Minimum-spanning tree (MST) comprised one major cluster, a minor cluster, and four clonal expansions. MLVA application enabled a cluster analysis by the MST of the S. Enteritidis isolates by sources, which allows a great insight into the genetic relatedness and the possible flow of these organisms between different reservoirs and humans. Conclusion Differences in allele distribution and genetic diversity of VNTR loci in S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources were found. Polymorphism in most of the VNTR loci was more frequent among human S. Enteritidis isolates than isolates from chickens or eggs. Therefore, VNTR profiles of S. Enteritidis isolates from a specific source should be further evaluated as potential markers in epidemiologic investigations to trace S. Enteritidis to their probable source. PMID:18793420

  17. Microsatellite markers for the yam bean Pachyrhizus (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; Soengas, Beatriz; Utge, José; Lambourdière, Josie; Sørensen, Marten

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the understudied root crop yam bean (Pachyrhizus spp.) to investigate intraspecific diversity and interspecific relationships within the genus Pachyrhizus. • Methods and Results: Seventeen nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with perfect di- and trinucleotide repeats were developed from 454 pyrosequencing of SSR-enriched genomic libraries. Loci were characterized in P. ahipa and wild and cultivated populations of four closely related species. All loci successfully cross-amplified and showed high levels of polymorphism, with number of alleles ranging from three to 12 and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.095 to 0.831 across the genus. • Conclusions: By enabling rapid assessment of genetic diversity in three native neotropical crops, P. ahipa, P. erosus, and P. tuberosus, and two wild relatives, P. ferrugineus and P. panamensis, these markers will allow exploration of the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of the genus Pachyrhizus. PMID:25202568

  18. Maximum-likelihood and markov chain monte carlo approaches to estimate inbreeding and effective size from allele frequency changes.

    PubMed Central

    Laval, Guillaume; SanCristobal, Magali; Chevalet, Claude

    2003-01-01

    Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian (MCMC algorithm) estimates of the increase of the Wright-Malécot inbreeding coefficient, F(t), between two temporally spaced samples, were developed from the Dirichlet approximation of allelic frequency distribution (model MD) and from the admixture of the Dirichlet approximation and the probabilities of fixation and loss of alleles (model MDL). Their accuracy was tested using computer simulations in which F(t) = 10% or less. The maximum-likelihood method based on the model MDL was found to be the best estimate of F(t) provided that initial frequencies are known exactly. When founder frequencies are estimated from a limited set of founder animals, only the estimates based on the model MD can be used for the moment. In this case no method was found to be the best in all situations investigated. The likelihood and Bayesian approaches give better results than the classical F-statistics when markers exhibiting a low polymorphism (such as the SNP markers) are used. Concerning the estimations of the effective population size all the new estimates presented here were found to be better than the F-statistics classically used. PMID:12871924

  19. Allele frequencies for 40 autosomal SNP loci typed for US population samples using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kiesler, Kevin M.; Vallone, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To type a set of 194 US African American, Caucasian, and Hispanic samples (self-declared ancestry) for 40 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers intended for human identification purposes. Methods Genotyping was performed on an automated commercial electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the PLEX-ID. The 40 SNP markers were amplified in eight unique 5plex PCRs, desalted, and resolved based on amplicon mass. For each of the three US sample groups statistical analyses were performed on the resulting genotypes. Results The assay was found to be robust and capable of genotyping the 40 SNP markers consuming approximately 4 nanograms of template per sample. The combined random match probabilities for the 40 SNP assay ranged from 10?16 to 10?21. Conclusion The multiplex PLEX-ID SNP-40 assay is the first fully automated genotyping method capable of typing a panel of 40 forensically relevant autosomal SNP markers on a mass spectrometry platform. The data produced provided the first allele frequencies estimates for these 40 SNPs in a National Institute of Standards and Technology US population sample set. No population bias was detected although one locus deviated from its expected level of heterozygosity. PMID:23771752

  20. Presence / Absence Marker Discovery in RAD Markers for Multiplexed Samples in the Context of Next-Generation Sequencing 

    E-print Network

    Nikooienejad, Amir

    2013-07-24

    Page 3.1 Illumina-compatible library structure with potential indexing sites . . 12 3.2 Flow chart of the proposed algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 6.1 Counts of all RAD markers in Parent 1 vs. Parent 2 for a wheat breeding study... is to introduce a fast algorithm to produce such barcodes speci cally de- signed for Illumina sequencing machines. It takes into account all potential sources of noise that can lead to false demultiplexing in the design process and makes barcodes robust...

  1. Metastatic Competence Can Emerge with Selection of Preexisting Oncogenic Alleles without a Need of New Mutations.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Leni S; Vanharanta, Sakari; Obenauf, Anna C; Pirun, Mono; Viale, Agnes; Socci, Nicholas D; Massagué, Joan

    2015-09-15

    Several experimental models faithfully recapitulate many important facets of human metastatic disease. Here, we have performed whole-exome sequencing in five widely used experimental metastasis models that were independently derived through in vivo selection from heterogeneous human cancer cell lines. In addition to providing an important characterization of these model systems, our study examines the genetic evolution of metastatic phenotypes. We found that in vivo selected highly metastatic cell populations showed little genetic divergence from the corresponding parental population. However, selection of genetic variations that preexisted in parental populations, including the well-established oncogenic mutations KRAS(G13D) and BRAF(G464V), was associated with increased metastatic capability. Conversely, expression of the wild-type BRAF allele in metastatic cells inhibited metastatic outgrowth as well as tumor initiation in mice. Our findings establish that metastatic competence can arise from heterogeneous cancer cell populations without the need for acquisition of additional mutations and that such competence can benefit from further selection of tumor-initiating mutations that seed primary tumorigenesis. PMID:26208905

  2. Exome sequencing can detect pathogenic mosaic mutations present at low allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Lise, Stefano; Harrison, Victoria; Stewart, Helen; Jayawant, Sandeep; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Deng, Alexander T; Murphy, Valerie Elizabeth; Sadighi Akha, Elham; Rimmer, Andy; Mathieson, Iain; Knight, Samantha J L; Kini, Usha; Taylor, Jenny C; Keays, David A

    2012-01-01

    The development of next generation sequencing (NGS) has radically transformed the scientific landscape, making it possible to sequence the exome of any given individual in a cost-effective way. The power of this approach has been demonstrated by a number of groups who have identified pathogenic mutations in small pedigrees that have been resistant to traditional genetic mapping. Recently it has become clear that exome sequencing has great potential with respect to sporadic disease and the identification of de novo mutations. This is highlighted by studies reporting whole-exome sequencing of patient-parental trios affected by learning disability, autism and schizophrenia. It is widely anticipated that the introduction of this technique into a clinical setting will revolutionise genetic diagnosis. However, the sensitivity of NGS exome sequencing is currently unclear. Here, we describe the exome sequencing of DNA samples from a patient with double cortex syndrome and her parents, resulting in the detection of a mosaic splicing mutation in LIS1. This variant was found at an allele frequency of just 18%, demonstrating that NGS methods have the capacity to identify pathogenic mosaic mutations present at a low level. PMID:22129557

  3. RNA-Seq using two populations reveals genes and alleles controlling wood traits and growth in Eucalyptus nitens.

    PubMed

    Thavamanikumar, Saravanan; Southerton, Simon; Thumma, Bala

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus nitens is a perennial forest tree species grown mainly for kraft pulp production in many parts of the world. Kraft pulp yield (KPY) is a key determinant of plantation profitability and increasing the KPY of trees grown in plantations is a major breeding objective. To speed up the breeding process, molecular markers that can predict KPY are desirable. To achieve this goal, we carried out RNA-Seq studies on trees at extremes of KPY in two different trials to identify genes and alleles whose expression correlated with KPY. KPY is positively correlated with growth measured as diameter at breast height (DBH) in both trials. In total, six RNA bulks from two treatments were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq platform. At 5% false discovery rate level, 3953 transcripts showed differential expression in the same direction in both trials; 2551 (65%) were down-regulated and 1402 (35%) were up-regulated in low KPY samples. The genes up-regulated in low KPY trees were largely involved in biotic and abiotic stress response reflecting the low growth among low KPY trees. Genes down-regulated in low KPY trees mainly belonged to gene categories involved in wood formation and growth. Differential allelic expression was observed in 2103 SNPs (in 1068 genes) and of these 640 SNPs (30%) occurred in 313 unique genes that were also differentially expressed. These SNPs may represent the cis-acting regulatory variants that influence total gene expression. In addition we also identified 196 genes which had Ka/Ks ratios greater than 1.5, suggesting that these genes are under positive selection. Candidate genes and alleles identified in this study will provide a valuable resource for future association studies aimed at identifying molecular markers for KPY and growth. PMID:24967893

  4. Paleoreconstruction by biological markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Wolfgang K.; Moldowan, J. Michael

    1981-06-01

    During diagenesis and conversion of the original lipid fraction of biological systems to petroleum hydrocarbons, the following four basic events needed for paleoreconstruction may be monitored by biological markers: (1) sourcing, (2) maturation, (3) migration and (4) biodegradation. Actual cases of applying biological markers to petroleum exploration problems in different parts of the world are demonstrated. Cretaceous- and Phosphoria-sourced oils in the Wyoming Thrust Belt can be distinguished from one another by high quality source fingerprinting of biomarker terpanes using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Identification of recently discovered biological markers, head-to-head isoprenoids, allows source differentiation between some oils from Sumatra. The degree of crude oil maturation in basins from California, Alaska, Russia, Wyoming and Louisiana can be assessed by specific biomarker ratios ( 20S/20R sterane epimers). Field evidence from such interpretation is augmented by laboratory pyrolysis of the rock. Extensive migration is documented by biomarkers in several oils. Biological marker results are consistent with the geological setting and add a dimension in assisting the petroleum explorationist toward paleoreconstruction.

  5. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  6. Old Stone Field Marker

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This is a stone field marker that marked boundaries for land ownership. In the early days of Land Office Recordings, this is one type of monument used. Trees, Posts, Iron Pipes and as shown stones were used to mark off land during the Land Rush days. Later, when mapping was being done, Brass Caps wi...

  7. Development and Initial Validation of a Parent Report Measure of the Behavioral Development of Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Maurice A.; Ward, Rebecca A.; Savona, Danielle; Regehr, Kaleigh; Parker, Kevin; Hudson, Melissa; Penning, Henderika; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a new parent report instrument--Parent Observation of Early Markers Scale (POEMS)--to monitor the behavioral development of infants at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) because they have older affected siblings. Parents of 108 at-risk infants (74 males, 34 females) completed the POEMS from child age 1-24 months.…

  8. Apolipoprotein E alleles in women with severe pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Rigó, J; Fintor, L; Karádi, I; Tóth, T

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of apolipoprotein E (apoE) alleles among women with severe pre-eclampsia. The presence of the three most common apoE alleles (epsilon 2, epsilon 3, epsilon 4) was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in three groups of white women: non-pregnant healthy (n = 101), pregnant healthy (n = 52), and pregnant with a diagnosis of severe pre-eclampsia (n = 54). The frequency of apo epsilon 2 was highest among women with severe pre-eclampsia (16.6%) followed by non-pregnant women (12.9%), and those experiencing a healthy pregnancy (10.6%). The higher frequency of the apo epsilon 2 allele detected among women with severe pre-eclampsia suggests that apoE may play a role in the development of pre-eclampsia. PMID:9659248

  9. Quantitative Single-letter Sequencing: a method for simultaneously monitoring numerous known allelic variants in single DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Monsion, Baptiste; Duborjal, Hervé; Blanc, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Background Pathogens such as fungi, bacteria and especially viruses, are highly variable even within an individual host, intensifying the difficulty of distinguishing and accurately quantifying numerous allelic variants co-existing in a single nucleic acid sample. The majority of currently available techniques are based on real-time PCR or primer extension and often require multiplexing adjustments that impose a practical limitation of the number of alleles that can be monitored simultaneously at a single locus. Results Here, we describe a novel method that allows the simultaneous quantification of numerous allelic variants in a single reaction tube and without multiplexing. Quantitative Single-letter Sequencing (QSS) begins with a single PCR amplification step using a pair of primers flanking the polymorphic region of interest. Next, PCR products are submitted to single-letter sequencing with a fluorescently-labelled primer located upstream of the polymorphic region. The resulting monochromatic electropherogram shows numerous specific diagnostic peaks, attributable to specific variants, signifying their presence/absence in the DNA sample. Moreover, peak fluorescence can be quantified and used to estimate the frequency of the corresponding variant in the DNA population. Using engineered allelic markers in the genome of Cauliflower mosaic virus, we reliably monitored six different viral genotypes in DNA extracted from infected plants. Evaluation of the intrinsic variance of this method, as applied to both artificial plasmid DNA mixes and viral genome populations, demonstrates that QSS is a robust and reliable method of detection and quantification for variants with a relative frequency of between 0.05 and 1. Conclusion This simple method is easily transferable to many other biological systems and questions, including those involving high throughput analysis, and can be performed in any laboratory since it does not require specialized equipment. PMID:18291029

  10. Parent Stress and Its Relation to Parent Perceptions of Communication following Parent-Coached Language Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ashlyn L.; Romski, Mary Ann; Sevcik, Rose A.; Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The effects of a parent-coached language intervention on parent stress and its relation to parent perceptions of communication development were examined in 60 parents of toddlers with developmental delays. Results indicated that overall parent stress was not high prior to or following language intervention. Parents' perceptions about the severity…

  11. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. ); Boogen, C. )

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  12. Two length variants of the microsatellite FH2295 as markers for body size of female Portuguese water dogs.

    PubMed

    Bérubé, S C; Johnsson, P R; Bunimov, N; Boivin, C; Laneuville, O

    2012-02-01

    Genetic studies in purebred Portuguese water dogs (PWD) have previously identified genetic loci controlling skeleton size. The FH2295 genetic marker was reported to control 43.6% of the size variation in this breed. In the present study, we amplified and sequenced the genomic DNA from female PWD of different sizes in the region of the FH2295 genetic marker. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of 700 and 800 bp were generated and sequencing revealed the presence of a microsatellite marker including either 5 or 24 repeats of the tetranucleotide sequence "CTTT". Dogs were divided into groups based on their genotypes: homozygote for the short allele (II) or homozygote for the long allele (BB) or heterozygote (IB). The smallest dogs were homozygous with 24 repeats and the largest dogs were homozygous with five repeats. Genetic transmission of the microsatellite marker appears to follow Mendelian laws since all puppies born to a homozygous small dog genotyped "BB" included one or two "B" allele. We applied a PCR method to characterize the sequence of the previously identified dog genetic marker FH2295 and propose that the length of the microsatellite identified could be used as a predictor for the body size of female PWD. PMID:22081432

  13. Genetic Confirmation of Mungbean (Vigna radiata) and Mashbean (Vigna mungo) Interspecific Recombinants using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ghulam; Hameed, Amjad; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ahsan, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad J.; Iqbal, Nayyer

    2015-01-01

    Molecular confirmation of interspecific recombinants is essential to overcome the issues like self-pollination, environmental influence, and inadequacy of morphological characteristics during interspecific hybridization. The present study was conducted for genetic confirmation of mungbean (female) and mashbean (male) interspecific crosses using molecular markers. Initially, polymorphic random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), universal rice primers (URP), and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers differentiating parent genotypes were identified. Recombination in hybrids was confirmed using these polymorphic DNA markers. The NM 2006 × Mash 88 was most successful interspecific cross. Most of true recombinants confirmed by molecular markers were from this cross combination. SSR markers were efficient in detecting genetic variability and recombination with reference to specific chromosomes and particular loci. SSR (RIS) and RAPD identified variability dispersed throughout the genome. In conclusion, DNA based marker assisted selection (MAS) efficiently confirmed the interspecific recombinants. The results provided evidence that MAS can enhance the authenticity of selection in mungbean improvement program. PMID:26697053

  14. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis of sweet kernel apricot in China based on SSR and ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Liu, M P; Du, H Y; Zhu, G P; Fu, D L; Tana, W Y

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to evaluate genetic diversity among 22 sweet kernel apricot accessions and 12 cultivars in China to provide information on how to improve the utilization of kernel apricot germplasms. The results showed that 10 pairs of SSR primers screened from 40 primer pairs amplified 43 allelic variants, all of which were polymorphic (100%), and 9 ISSR primers selected from 100 primers amplified 67 allelic variants with 50 polymorphic bands (74.63%). There was a relatively distant genetic relationship between the 34 samples, where their genetic similarity coefficient was between 0.62 and 0.99. The UPGMA dendrogram constructed using combined data of the two marker systems separated the genotypes into three main clusters. PMID:26345904

  16. Joint analysis of bivariate competing risks survival times and genetic markers data.

    PubMed

    Begun, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Bivariate survival models with discretely distributed frailty based on the major gene concept and applied to the data on related individuals such as twins and sibs can be used to estimate the underlying hazard, the relative risk and the frequency of the longevity allele. To determine the position of the longevity gene, additional genetic markers data are needed. If the action of the longevity allele does not depend on its position in the genome, these two problems can be solved separately using a two-step procedure. We proposed an extension of this method allowing us to search the position of two longevity genes at a chromosome using the bivariate survival data with correlated competing risks combined with genetic markers data. We have studied the properties of the model with two longevity genes located on the same and on different chromosomes using simulated data sets. PMID:23903070

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers in the African deciduous tree Terminalia superba (Combretaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Demenou, Boris B.; Migliore, Jérémy; Tosso, Felicien; Kaymak, Esra; Hardy, Olivier J.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellites were designed and characterized in the African timber forest tree Terminalia superba (Combretaceae). Due to their high variability, these markers are suitable to investigate gene flow patterns and the structure of genetic diversity. Methods and Results: From a genomic library obtained by next-generation sequencing, seven monomorphic and 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed. The polymorphic microsatellites displayed two to 27 alleles (mean 11.4; expected heterozygosity range 0.283–0.940, mean 0.736) in one population from southeastern Cameroon. Genotypes were typical of an outbreeding diploid species, although null alleles explain a significant heterozygote deficit in three loci. Cross-amplification in three congeneric species (T. ivorensis, T. avicennioides, and T. mantaly) failed, suggesting that T. superba is rather divergent. Conclusions: This set of newly developed microsatellite markers will be useful for assessing the genetic diversity, population structure, and demographic history of T. superba in tropical African forests. PMID:26697276

  18. Screening for simple sequence repeat markers in Puccinia striiformis tritici based on genomic sequence*

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Gang-ming; Wang, Fu-ping; Luo, Huai-yong; Jiang, Shu-chang; Zheng, Wen-ming; Huang, Li-li; Kang, Zhen-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) is the obligate biotrophic fungus responsible for stripe rust wheat. In this study, we developed and characterized 20 polymorphic microsatellite markers from the genomic sequence of an isolate of Chinese Pst race CY32. Polymorphism at each simple sequence repeat (SSR) locus was determined using 32 Pst isolates from 7 countries. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 7 across isolates, and the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.33 to 0.97 (mean 0.62) and 0.23 to 0.73 (mean 0.51), respectively. As expected the genomic SSR markers were more polymorphic than the expressed sequence tag (EST)-SSR markers developed previously. These markers will be more useful for population genetics and molecular genetics studies in Pst. PMID:26238548

  19. Screening for simple sequence repeat markers in Puccinia striiformis tritici based on genomic sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Gang-ming; Wang, Fu-ping; Luo, Huai-yong; Jiang, Shu-chang; Zheng, Wen-ming; Huang, Li-li; Kang, Zhen-sheng

    2015-08-01

    Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) is the obligate biotrophic fungus responsible for stripe rust wheat. In this study, we developed and characterized 20 polymorphic microsatellite markers from the genomic sequence of an isolate of Chinese Pst race CY32. Polymorphism at each simple sequence repeat (SSR) locus was determined using 32 Pst isolates from 7 countries. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 7 across isolates, and the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.33 to 0.97 (mean 0.62) and 0.23 to 0.73 (mean 0.51), respectively. As expected the genomic SSR markers were more polymorphic than the expressed sequence tag (EST)-SSR markers developed previously. These markers will be more useful for population genetics and molecular genetics studies in Pst. PMID:26238548

  20. Increased homozygosity at four microsatellite marker loci in Pima Indian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, S.M.; Knowler, W.C.; Bogardus, C.

    1994-09-01

    Using 100 Marshfield-derived (MFD) microsatellite markers (screening set v.2) and DNA from 13 Pima Indians, none of whom were first degree relatives, we observed 4 marker loci on 3 different chromosomes which showed marked deviation from the reported heterozygosities for the Caucasian CEPH families. These 4 markers were also tested in 60 individuals from 8 different multigenerational pedigrees. For the marker MFD77, only a single allele was observed for all individuals tested. Our results indicate that a high degree of genetic homogeneity occurs in limited regions of the genome in the Pima Indian population. We are investigating the possibility that these regions of homogeneity might be associated with disease susceptibility in this population with a high prevalence of obesity, gallstones and diabetes mellitus.

  1. POLYMORPHIC CHLOROPLAST MICROSATELLITE MARKERS IN THE OCTOPLOID LEPIDIUM MEYENII (BRASSICACEAE) AND CROSS-SPECIES AMPLIFICATION IN LEPIDIUM

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Quiros, Carlos F.; Tay, C. David; Bailey, C. Donovan

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study As a crop and medicinal plant, the octoploid Andean endemic Lepidium meyenii suffers from taxonomic uncertainty. Few molecular markers are available to genotype individuals or track gene flow in wild and cultivated material. Methods and Results Using available sequence data, eight cpSSR primer pairs were developed for L. meyenii. Levels of polymorphism checked in 56 individual L. meyenii, including cultivated and wild material, revealed that the number of alleles per locus ranged from three to five, and intrapopulation allele frequencies ranged from 0.071 to 1.0. Polymerase-chain-reaction screens using our cpSSR primers in 27 other Lepidium species and three Coronopus species suggested a high degree of interspecific amplification. Conclusions These polymorphic cpSSR markers should prove useful in characterizing genetic variation among cultivated and wild L. meyenii. Additionally, interspecific amplifications suggest that these markers will be useful for the study of related taxa. PMID:21616787

  2. HLA-DRB1 Class II antigen level alleles are associated with persistent HPV infection in Mexican women; a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for malignant lesions and cervical cancer. A widely studied element in the search for genetic factors influencing risk HPV infection diseases is allelic variation of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus. The study was designed to search for HLA susceptibility alleles contributing to the persistence of HPV infection in Mexican women. Methods A total of 172 subjects were divided into three groups: 1) HPV–persistent patients; 2) HPV–cleared; and 3) HPV–reinfected patients. They were screened for HPV types using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR-sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP) was used for HLA DRB1 and DQB1 typing. Results We observed that HLA-DQB1*0501 allele might be associated with susceptibility of reinfection with HPV (p?=?0.01, OR?=?4.9, CI 95%?=?1.3 -18.7). Allele frequency of HLA-DRB1*14 was particularly reduced in patients with cancer when compared with the HPV–persistent group (p?=?0.04), suggesting that this allele is a possible protective factor for the development of cervical cancer (OR?=?2.98). HLA-DRB1*07 might be associated with viral clearance (p?=?0.04). Conclusions Genetic markers for HPV infection susceptibility are different in each population, in Mexicans several HLA-DQB1 alleles might be associated with an enhanced risk for viral persistence. In contrast, DRB1*14, seems to confer protection against cervical cancer. PMID:24000898

  3. Brief communication: Evolution of a specific O allele (O1vG542A) supports unique ancestry of Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Villanea, Fernando A; Bolnick, Deborah A; Monroe, Cara; Worl, Rosita; Cambra, Rosemary; Leventhal, Alan; Kemp, Brian M

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1v(G542A) , which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1v(G542A) was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1v(G542A) is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene speaking groups share close ancestry with other Native American groups and support a Beringian origin of the allele, consistent with the Beringian Incubation Model. If O1v(G542A) is found in pre-Columbian populations, it would further support a Beringian origin of the allele, rather than a more recent introduction of the allele into the Americas via gene flow from one or more populations which have admixed with Native Americans over the past five centuries. We identified this allele in one Na-Dene population at a frequency of 0.11, and one ancient California population at a frequency of 0.20. Our results support a Beringian origin of O1v(G542A) , which is distributed today among all Native American groups that have been genotyped in appreciable numbers at this locus. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that Na-Dene and other Native American populations primarily derive their ancestry from a single source population. PMID:23868176

  4. Characterization of 15 tetranucleotide microsatellite markers in the ringtail (Bassariscus astutus).

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Rena M; Roemer, Gary W; Pollinger, John P; Wayne, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    We characterized 15 polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellite markers for the ringtail, Bassariscus astutus. We tested these loci in 21 individuals captured in Arizona and Texas and found six to 19 alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.381 to 1.000 and from 0.381 to 0.941, respectively. All loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and none were in linkage disequilibrium. These markers may be used to investigate population genetics and mating patterns in this species. PMID:21564605

  5. Characterization of new microsatellite markers derived from sequence databases for the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae).

    PubMed

    Yáñez, José M; González, Ruth; Angulo, Jenniffer; Vidal, Rodrigo; Santos, José L; Martínez, Victor

    2008-11-01

    The emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), a member of ratite family, is native to Australia and has been introduced to other countries worldwide. In this work, 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for emu from public sequences. Polymorphism was surveyed in 22 individuals from two different populations kept in captivity. Between two and 11 alleles were found per locus, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.05 to 0.85, in accordance with expectations. These markers will be useful as tools for detecting levels of genetic variation, reconstructing pedigrees (for quantitative genetic analysis) and identifying markers associated to fitness traits in emu populations. PMID:21586070

  6. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Veratrum maackii (Melanthiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Iijima, Satoshi; Maki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed in Veratrum maackii (Melanthiaceae) to assess the pattern of population genetic structures across the species’ distribution. Methods and Results: Ten polymorphic loci were isolated from V. maackii using 454 shotgun pyrosequencing and the biotin capture method. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 19. The observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.143 to 0.929 and 0.269 to 0.904, respectively. Conclusions: These newly developed microsatellite markers are useful for assessing the genetic diversity, population structure, and demographic history of V. maackii across its distribution range. PMID:26082881

  7. Analysis of chromosome 22 markers in nine schizophrenia pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Holik, J.; Reimherr, F.

    1994-03-15

    Previous results of a genome-wide survey for schizophrenia susceptibility genes in nine multiplex families indicated a possible region of linkage on chromosome 22. We therefore tested for linkage using ten highly polymorphic chromosome 22 DNA markers. Lod score analyses were suggestive of linkage for several markers on the distal end of the chromosome; however, no lod score exceeded 3 assuming either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive transmission. The highest lod score was 2.09 (theta = 0.10) for marker D22S276 assuming autosomal recessive inheritance. Based on simulation analyses, this result is unlikely to represent a false positive. Analyses using information from affected individuals only resulted in reduced lod scores, with a maximum of 1.40 (theta = 0.05) for D22S276 assuming autosomal recessive inheritance. Two nonparametric methods, sib pair analysis and the Affected-Pedigree-Member method, also yielded suggestive but inconclusive findings; results were positive, but strict thresholds of significance were not met. Additionally, we tested one candidate gene, the Arylsulfatase A gene, located in the region of 22q13.31-qter. Results were again inconclusive, though the DNA marker available for this gene was a 2-allele RFLP with heterozygosity of 0.5, and therefore not maximally informative. Further investigation of this chromosomal region and this and other candidate genes may be warranted. 37 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. cpDNA microsatellite markers for Lemna minor (Araceae): Phylogeographic implications1

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Gowher A.; Shah, Manzoor A.; Reshi, Zafar A.; Atangana, Alain R.; Khasa, Damase P.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A lack of genetic markers impedes our understanding of the population biology of Lemna minor. Thus, the development of appropriate genetic markers for L. minor promises to be highly useful for population genetic studies and for addressing other life history questions regarding the species. • Methods and Results: For the first time, we characterized nine polymorphic and 24 monomorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers in L. minor using DNA samples of 26 individuals sampled from five populations in Kashmir and of 17 individuals from three populations in Quebec. Initially, we designed 33 primer pairs, which were tested on genomic DNA from natural populations. Nine loci provided markers with two alleles. Based on genotyping of the chloroplast DNA fragments from 43 sampled individuals, we identified one haplotype in Quebec and 11 haplotypes in Kashmir, of which one occurs in 56% of the genotypes, one in 8%, and nine in 4%, respectively. There was a maximum of two alleles per locus. • Conclusions: These new chloroplast microsatellite markers for L. minor and haplotype distribution patterns indicate a complex phylogeographic history that merits further investigation. PMID:25202636

  9. Novel microsatellite markers suitable for genetic studies in the white button mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Spataro, Cathy; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2009-10-01

    Co-dominant microsatellite molecular markers were obtained from the Agaricus bisporus cultivated mushroom. Their potential for both the molecular characterisation of commercial strains and the monitoring of the intraspecific genetic variation was demonstrated. The analysis of 673 unique sequences issued from public database and 59 from an enriched A. bisporus genomic library resulted in the development of a total of 33 single sequence repeat or microsatellite (SSR) markers. Their usefulness for genetic analysis was assessed on 28 strains, which include six cultivars representative of traditional lineage, two hybrids and 20 strains originating from wild populations. A. bisporus SSR markers displayed each from two to ten alleles, with an average of 5.6 alleles per locus. The observed heterozygosity ranged from 0 to 0.88. Cluster analysis resulting from SSR fingerprintings was in agreement with published A. bisporus population structure. A combination of only three selected SSR markers was sufficient to discriminate unambiguously 27 out of 28 distinct genotypes. However, the two genetically related hybrids were not distinguishable. Multiplexing was tested, and up to seven loci could be genotyped simultaneously. We are therefore reporting the first development in A. bisporus of a set of microsatellite markers powerful and suitable for genetic analysis. PMID:19455324

  10. Development of polymorphic microsatellite markers for Dioscorea zingiberensis and cross-amplification in other Dioscorea species.

    PubMed

    Yan, Q-Q; Sun, X-Q; Guo, J-L; Hang, Y-Y; Li, M-M

    2013-01-01

    Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H. Wright (Dioscoreaceae) is an endemic species in central and southwestern China. In order to study the genetic diversity and population structure of this species, 19 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed using a dual-suppression PCR technique. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 21, with an average of 9.53. All the markers showed high transferability in cross-species amplification in other species of sect. Stenophora. PMID:24085440

  11. Genome Wide Characterization of Short Tandem Repeat Markers in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Xu, Qiang; Mayer, Christoph; Deng, Xiuxin

    2014-01-01

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) is one of the major cultivated and most-consumed citrus species. With the goal of enhancing the genomic resources in citrus, we surveyed, developed and characterized microsatellite markers in the ?347 Mb sequence assembly of the sweet orange genome. A total of 50,846 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 146.4 SSRs/Mbp. Dinucleotide repeats are the most frequent repeat class and the highest density of SSRs was found in chromosome 4. SSRs are non-randomly distributed in the genome and most of the SSRs (62.02%) are located in the intergenic regions. We found that AT-rich SSRs are more frequent than GC-rich SSRs. A total number of 21,248 SSR primers were successfully developed, which represents 89 SSR markers per Mb of the genome. A subset of 950 developed SSR primer pairs were synthesized and tested by wet lab experiments on a set of 16 citrus accessions. In total we identified 534 (56.21%) polymorphic SSR markers that will be useful in citrus improvement. The number of amplified alleles ranges from 2 to 12 with an average of 4 alleles per marker and an average PIC value of 0.75. The newly developed sweet orange primer sequences, their in silico PCR products, exact position in the genome assembly and putative function are made publicly available. We present the largest number of SSR markers ever developed for a citrus species. Almost two thirds of the markers are transferable to 16 citrus relatives and may be used for constructing a high density linkage map. In addition, they are valuable for marker-assisted selection studies, population structure analyses and comparative genomic studies of C. sinensis with other citrus related species. Altogether, these markers provide a significant contribution to the citrus research community. PMID:25148383

  12. Association Mapping of Seed Oil and Protein Content in Sesamum indicum L. Using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Miao, Hongmei; Wei, Libin; Zhang, Tide; Han, Xiuhua; Zhang, Haiyang

    2014-01-01

    Sesame is an important oil crop for the high oil content and quality. The seed oil and protein contents are two important traits in sesame. To identify the molecular markers associated with the seed oil and protein contents in sesame, we systematically performed the association mapping among 369 worldwide germplasm accessions under 5 environments using 112 polymorphic SSR markers. The general linear model (GLM) was applied with the criteria of logP?3.0 and high stability under all 5 environments. Among the 369 sesame accessions, the oil content ranged from 27.89%–58.73% and the protein content ranged from 16.72%–27.79%. A significant negative correlation of the oil content with the protein content was found in the population. A total of 19 markers for oil content were detected with a R2 value range from 4% to 29%; 24 markers for protein content were detected with a R2 value range from 3% to 29%, of which 19 markers were associated with both traits. Moreover, partial markers were confirmed using mixed linear model (MLM) method, which suggested that the oil and protein contents are controlled mostly by major genes. Allele effect analysis showed that the allele associated with high oil content was always associated with low protein content, and vice versa. Of the 19 markers associated with oil content, 17 presented near the locations of the plant lipid pathway genes and 2 were located just next to a fatty acid elongation gene and a gene encoding Stearoyl-ACP Desaturase, respectively. The findings provided a valuable foundation for oil synthesis gene identification and molecular marker assistant selection (MAS) breeding in sesame. PMID:25153139

  13. Genome-Wide Computational Analysis of Musa Microsatellites: Classification, Cross-Taxon Transferability, Functional Annotation, Association with Transposons & miRNAs, and Genetic Marker Potential

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Liu, Yuxuan; Li, Chunyu; Sheng, Ou; Mayer, Christoph; Yi, Ganjun

    2015-01-01

    The development of organized, informative, robust, user-friendly, and freely accessible molecular markers is imperative to the Musa marker assisted breeding program. Although several hundred SSR markers have already been developed, the number of informative, robust, and freely accessible Musa markers remains inadequate for some breeding applications. In view of this issue, we surveyed SSRs in four different data sets, developed large-scale non-redundant highly informative therapeutic SSR markers, and classified them according to their attributes, as well as analyzed their cross-taxon transferability and utility for the genetic study of Musa and its relatives. A high SSR frequency (177 per Mbp) was found in the Musa genome. AT-rich dinucleotide repeats are predominant, and trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant in transcribed regions. A significant number of Musa SSRs are associated with pre-miRNAs, and 83% of these SSRs are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic SSR markers. Overall, 74% of the SSR markers were polymorphic, and 94% were transferable to at least one Musa spp. Two hundred forty-three markers generated a total of 1047 alleles, with 2-8 alleles each and an average of 4.38 alleles per locus. The PIC values ranged from 0.31 to 0.89 and averaged 0.71. We report the largest set of non-redundant, polymorphic, new SSR markers to be developed in Musa. These additional markers could be a valuable resource for marker-assisted breeding, genetic diversity and genomic studies of Musa and related species. PMID:26121637

  14. Genetic diversity of Qatari date palm using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Elmeer, K; Mattat, I

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity in the date palm germplasm of 59 female accessions representing 12 cultivars from different locations in Qatar was investigated using 14 loci of simple-sequence repeat (SSR) primers. A total of 94 alleles, with a mean of 6.7 alleles per locus, were scored. The number of alleles per locus varied from 3 (primer mPdCIR090) to 11 (primers mPdCIR010 and mPdCIR015). The amplified SSR band sizes ranged from 104 to 330 bp. The mean gene diversity was 0.66 and ranged from 0.39 (locus mPdCIRO93) to 0.86 (locus mPdCIR015), indicating that the Qatari date palm collection has a high degree of genetic diversity. The heterozygosity ranged from 0 (marker mPdCIR090) to 98% (marker mPdCIR010). Forty-four percent of the variability is explained at the inter-population level, while 56% of the variability is maintained within individuals. However, the loci mPdCIR044, mPdCIR057, mPdCIR090, and mPdCIR093 revealed that the total gene diversity is explained at the inter-population level. The Qatari populations Khalas, Shishi, Barhi, Hillali, Khnaizi, Gar, and Jabri showed significant differentiation compared to all other populations. The average fixation index was 0.24814, showing that about 24.81% of the genetic variation was present among populations, which correlated with analysis of molecular variance. PMID:25867305

  15. Parenting by lying

    PubMed Central

    Heyman, Gail D.; Luu, Diem H.; Lee, Kang

    2010-01-01

    The present set of studies identifies the phenomenon of `parenting by lying', in which parents lie to their children as a means of influencing their emotional states and behaviour. In Study 1, undergraduates (n = 127) reported that their parents had lied to them while maintaining a concurrent emphasis on the importance of honesty. In Study 2 (n = 127), parents reported lying to their children and considered doing so to be acceptable under some circumstances, even though they also reported teaching their children that lying is unacceptable. As compared to European American parents, Asian American parents tended to hold a more favourable view of lying to children for the purpose of promoting behavioural compliance. PMID:20930948

  16. Nonfrequent but well-documented, rare and very rare HLA alleles observed in the Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Grubic, Z; Burek Kamenaric, M; Maskalan, M; Stingl Jankovic, K; Zunec, R

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of nonfrequent, rare and very rare alleles among Croats and to estimate whether they are associated with specific alleles at other human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci. This retrospective study included the typing results from the last 10?years; total number of individuals included was approximately 45,000. Among 17 alleles so far observed only once in our population, 6 (A*24:41, B*07:02:28, B*35:03:03, B*39:40N, DRB1*13:23 and DRB1*14:111) belong to very rare alleles, 2 (B*44:16 and DRB1*01:31) belong to rare alleles according to the 'Rare Alleles Detector' tool ( www.allelefrequencies.net), while for the B*35:101:01 allele published data exist only in the IMGT/HLA database. The remaining eight HLA alleles observed only once among Croats are considered as frequent according to the 'Rare Alleles Detector'. Those 17 HLA alleles are not declared as common well defined (CWD) alleles in the CWD allele catalogue 2.0.0. Haplotype analysis of nonfrequent alleles detected in our sample supports the idea that different populations, although similar in some aspects regarding HLA allele and haplotype distribution, still have some unique characteristics. This is the case for A*01:02, B*39:10 and DRB1*13:32 which form haplotypes unreported to date among our subjects. PMID:25413106

  17. Tri-allelic pattern at the TPOX locus: a familial study.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Alvarez, Luís; Amorim, António; Batista Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-02-10

    Alleles at the TPOX STR locus have 6-14 different numbers of a four-nucleotide (AATG) repeat motif arranged in tandem. Although tri-allelic genotypes are generally rare, the TPOX tri-allelic pattern has a higher frequency, varying widely among populations. Despite this, there are few accurate reports to disclose the nature of the TPOX third allele. In this work we present data obtained from 45 individuals belonging to the same pedigree, in which there are cases of tri-allelic TPOX genotypes. The subjects were apparently healthy with a normal biological development. We noticed six tri-allelic cases in this family, and all of them were women. Karyotype analysis showed no occurrence of partial 2p trisomy. All the tri-allelic cases had the genotype 8-10-11, probably due to three copies of the TPOX STR sequence in all cells (Type 2 tri-allelic pattern). Based on previous data we assumed the allele 10 as the TPOX third allele. The pedigree analyses show evidences that the TPOX extra-allele was the allele10, it is placed far from the main TPOX locus, and that there is a potential linkage of the TPOX extra-allele-10 with Xq. This was the first study that included a large pedigree analysis in order to understand the nature TPOX tri-allelic pattern. PMID:24144843

  18. Estimating parental relationship in linkage analysis of recessive traits

    SciTech Connect

    Merette, C.; Ott, J.

    1996-05-17

    In linkage analysis of recessive traits, parental relationship is important. For the case that it is unknown, the question is investigated as to whether estimating parental relationship and using the estimated relationship in linkage analysis is beneficial. Results show that estimating parental relationship can reliably be carried out on the basis of 50-100 genetic marker loci (analysis based on theory by Thompson). Misspecification of parental relationship leads to a loss of linkage informativeness, but not to false-positive evidence for linkage. An asymptotic bias in the recombination fraction estimate occurs when parents are unrelated and falsely taken to be related, but no such bias is seen when related parents are taken to be unrelated. Results from this investigation suggest that an estimated parental relationship may be used in linkage analysis as if it were the correct relationship, when evidence for the estimated relationship is supported by a likelihood ratio of at least 10:1 against the parents being unrelated. 9 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Renal transplant rejection markers.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, Wilfried

    2007-10-01

    Acute rejection is one of the key factors which determine long-term graft function and survival in renal transplant patients. Timely detection and treatment of rejection is therefore, an important goal in the post-transplant surveillance. The standard care with serum creatinine measurements and biopsy upon allograft dysfunction implies that acute rejection is detected in an advanced stage. Therefore, non-invasive monitoring for acute rejection by markers in blood and urine has been tried over the past decades. This review describes the requirements that should be met by non-invasive markers. The experience with single biomarkers and with newer approaches--mRNA expression analysis, metabolomics, and proteomics--will be discussed, including future directions of necessary research. PMID:17786452

  20. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 1: Children and Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with different types of parents and the forces that shape parenting, this volume, the first of four volumes on parenting deals specifically with parent-child relationships throughout the lifespan and the parenting of children of different physical, behavioral, and intellectual needs. The volume consists of 12 chapters as follows: (1)…

  1. Family and Relationship Influences on Parenting Behaviors of Young Parents

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Trace; Murphy, Alexandrea; Lewis, Jessica; Divney, Anna; Albritton, Tashuna; Magriples, Urania; Gordon, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Assess the influence of relationship and family factors during pregnancy on parenting behavior 6 months postpartum among low-income young parents. Methods 434 young expectant couples were recruited from obstetrics clinics during pregnancy and followed 6-months postpartum. Using a series of general estimating equations to control for the correlated nature of the data, we assessed the influence of relationship factors (e.g., relationship satisfaction, attachment) and family factors (e.g., family functioning, family history) during pregnancy on parenting (e.g., parenting involvement, time spent caregiving, parenting experiences, and parenting sense of competence) 6 months postpartum controlling for covariates. Results Relationship functioning related to parenting involvement, caregiving, parenting experiences, and parenting sense of competence. In addition, several family factors related to parenting. Mother involvement during childhood was related to more parenting involvement, parenting positive experiences, and parenting sense of competence. History of being spanked as a child related to less time spent caregiving and less positive life change from being a parent. Further, gender significantly moderated the associations between relationship and family factors and parenting behavior. Male’ parenting behavior was more influenced by relationship and family factors than females. Conclusions This study suggests the importance of relationship and family contexts for parenting behaviors of young mothers and fathers, highlighting the potential utility of involving both young mothers and fathers in parenting programs, and developing interventions that focus on strengthening young parents’ romantic relationships and that address negative parenting experienced during childhood. PMID:24113495

  2. Parenting Training for Intellectually Disabled Parents: A Cochrane Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coren, Esther; Thomae, Manuela; Hutchfield, Jemeela

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a Cochrane/Campbell systematic review of the evidence on the effect of parent training to support the parenting of parents with intellectual disabilities. Method: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing parent training interventions for parents with intellectual disability with usual care or with a control…

  3. www.parent.ttu.edu THE PARENT AND FAMILY GUIDE

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    www.parent.ttu.edu GUNSUP! AND #12;#12;THE PARENT AND FAMILY GUIDE Texas Tech University 2015-2016 Provided by: Parent and Family Relations 201Q Student Union Building Box 42024, TTU Lubbock, Texas 79409..................................................................................................2 Texas Texas Parents Association (Tech Parents

  4. Parenting and Adolescents' Accuracy in Perceiving Parental Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knafo, Ariel; Schwartz, Shalom H.

    2003-01-01

    Examined potential predictors of Israeli adolescents' accuracy in perceiving parental values. Found that accuracy in perceiving parents' overall value system correlated positively with parents' actual and perceived value agreement and perceived parental warmth and responsiveness, but negatively with perceived value conflict, indifferent parenting,…

  5. Mental Representations of Relationships, Parent Belief Systems, and Parenting Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grusec, Joan E.; And Others

    Research on determinants of parenting behavior has traditionally focused on parents' goals and beliefs about child rearing or on the effect of parents' own attachment experiences. In an effort to relate these two approaches, a study was conducted to examine parent behaviors and attitudes in 94 parent-child dyads. Dyads consisted of 20 fathers and…

  6. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S. (El Cerrito, CA); Karu, Alexander E. (Kensington, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  7. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  8. PUTATIVE ALLELES FOR INCREASED YIELD FROM SOYBEAN PLANT INTRODUCTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving seed yield of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars is an important goal of breeding programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate two soybean plant introductions (PIs) as sources of alleles for the enhancement of seed yield in North American cultivars. A soybean population ...

  9. Haplotype allelic classes for detecting ongoing positive selection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural selection eliminates detrimental and favors advantageous phenotypes. This process leaves characteristic signatures in underlying genomic segments that can be recognized through deviations in allelic or haplotypic frequency spectra. To provide an identifiable signature of recent positive selection that can be detected by comparison with the background distribution, we introduced a new way of looking at genomic polymorphisms: haplotype allelic classes. Results The model combines segregating sites and haplotypic information in order to reveal useful data characteristics. We developed a summary statistic, Svd, to compare the distribution of the haplotypes carrying the selected allele with the distribution of the remaining ones. Coalescence simulations are used to study the distributions under standard population models assuming neutrality, demographic scenarios and selection models. To test, in practice, haplotype allelic class performance and the derived statistic in capturing deviation from neutrality due to positive selection, we analyzed haplotypic variation in detail in the locus of lactase persistence in the three HapMap Phase II populations. Conclusions We showed that the Svd statistic is less sensitive than other tests to confounding factors such as demography or recombination. Our approach succeeds in identifying candidate loci, such as the lactase-persistence locus, as targets of strong positive selection and provides a new tool complementary to other tests to study natural selection in genomic data. PMID:20109229

  10. Allelism and Molecular Mapping of Soybean Necrotic Root Mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutability of the w4 flower color locus in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is conditioned by an allele designated w4-m. Germinal revertants recovered among self-pollinated progeny of mutable plants have been associated with the generation of necrotic root mutations, chlorophyll-deficiency mutation...

  11. Multifragment alleles in DNA fingerprints of the parrot, Amazona ventralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, M.K.; White, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Human DNA probes that identify variable numbers of tandem repeat loci are being used to generate DNA fingerprints in many animal and plant species. In most species the majority of the sc rable autoradiographic bands of the DNA fingerprint represent alleles from numerous unlinked loci. This study was initiated to use DNA fingerprints to determine the amount of band-sharing among captive Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis) with known genetic relationships. This would form the data base to examine DNA fingerprints of the closely related and endangered Puerto Rican parrot (A. vittata) and to estimate the degree of inbreeding in the relic population. We found by segregation analysis of the bands scored in the DNA fingerprints of the Hispaniolan parrots that there may be as few as two to five loci identified by the human 33.15 probe. Furthermore, at one locus we identified seven alleles, one of which is represented by as many as 19 cosegregating bands. It is unknown how common multiband alleles might be in natural populations, and their existence will cause problems in the assessment of relatedness by band-sharing analysis. We believe, therefore, that a pedigree analysis should be included in all DNA fingerprinting studies, where possible, in order to estimate the number of loci identified by a minisatellite DNA probe and to examine the nature of their alleles.

  12. Estimating the age of alleles by use of intraallelic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, M.; Rannala, B.

    1997-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the age of an allele by use of its frequency and the extent of variation among different copies. The method uses the joint distribution of the number of copies in a population sample and the coalescence times of the intraallelic gene genealogy conditioned on the number of copies. The linear birth-death process is used to approximate the dynamics of a rare allele in a finite population. A maximum-likelihood estimate of the age of the allele is obtained by Monte Carlo integration over the coalescence times. The method is applied to two alleles at the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) locus, {Delta}F508 and G542X, for which intraallelic variability at three intronic microsatellite loci has been examined. Our results indicate that G542X is somewhat older than {Delta}F508. Although absolute estimates depend on the mutation rates at the microsatellite loci, our results support the hypothesis that {Delta}F508 arose <500 generations ({approx}10,000 years) ago. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Extensive allele-specific translational regulation in hybrid mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jingyi; Wang, Xi; McShane, Erik; Zauber, Henrik; Sun, Wei; Selbach, Matthias; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Translational regulation is mediated through the interaction between diffusible trans-factors and cis-elements residing within mRNA transcripts. In contrast to extensively studied transcriptional regulation, cis-regulation on translation remains underexplored. Using deep sequencing-based transcriptome and polysome profiling, we globally profiled allele-specific translational efficiency for the first time in an F1 hybrid mouse. Out of 7,156 genes with reliable quantification of both alleles, we found 1,008 (14.1%) exhibiting significant allelic divergence in translational efficiency. Systematic analysis of sequence features of the genes with biased allelic translation revealed that local RNA secondary structure surrounding the start codon and proximal out-of-frame upstream AUGs could affect translational efficiency. Finally, we observed that the cis-effect was quantitatively comparable between transcriptional and translational regulation. Such effects in the two regulatory processes were more frequently compensatory, suggesting that the regulation at the two levels could be coordinated in maintaining robustness of protein expression. PMID:26253569

  14. Efficient nonmeiotic allele introgression in livestock using custom endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wenfang; Carlson, Daniel F.; Lancto, Cheryl A.; Garbe, John R.; Webster, Dennis A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    We have expanded the livestock gene editing toolbox to include transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nuclease (TALEN)- and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-stimulated homology-directed repair (HDR) using plasmid, rAAV, and oligonucleotide templates. Toward the genetic dehorning of dairy cattle, we introgressed a bovine POLLED allele into horned bull fibroblasts. Single nucleotide alterations or small indels were introduced into 14 additional genes in pig, goat, and cattle fibroblasts using TALEN mRNA and oligonucleotide transfection with efficiencies of 10–50% in populations. Several of the chosen edits mimic naturally occurring performance-enhancing or disease- resistance alleles, including alteration of single base pairs. Up to 70% of the fibroblast colonies propagated without selection harbored the intended edits, of which more than one-half were homozygous. Edited fibroblasts were used to generate pigs with knockout alleles in the DAZL and APC genes to model infertility and colon cancer. Our methods enable unprecedented meiosis-free intraspecific and interspecific introgression of select alleles in livestock for agricultural and biomedical applications. PMID:24014591

  15. Simple allelic-phenotype diversity and differentiation statistics for allopolyploids

    E-print Network

    Jiggins, Francis

    RB, UK The analysis of genetic diversity within and between populations is a routine task share alleles. As a result, analysis of genetic diversity patterns in allopolyploids has tended to rely: disomic inheritance; FDASH; FST; genetic differentiation; genetic diversity; polyploidy Introduction

  16. Cancer Cell Allele-Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    E-print Network

    Vazquez, Alexei

    Cancer Cell Article Allele-Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation Xin Yu,1,4,6 Alexei Vazquez,1 Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using as either DNA contact mutants (e.g., p53R273H ) when the mutation occurs in a DNA binding residue

  17. INVESTIGATION Evidence for a Natural Allelic Series at the Maize

    E-print Network

    Doebley, John

    typically biallelic, like Mendel's classic loci, or do genes often harbor allelic series, i.e., multiple at the teosinte branched1 (tb1) gene in natural populations of teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, Z. mays ssp populations as defined by number of genes involved and the effect sizes of these genes (Tanksley 1993; Mackay

  18. Genetic diversity of loquat germplasm (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb) Lindl) assessed by SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Soriano, José Miguel; Romero, Carlos; Vilanova, Santiago; Llácer, Gerardo; Badenes, María Luisa

    2005-02-01

    Genetic relationships among 40 loquat (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb) Lindl) accessions that originated from different countries and that are part of the germplasm collection of the Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias (IVIA) (Valencia, Spain) were evaluated using microsatellites. Thirty primer pairs flanking microsatellites previously identified in Malus x domestica (Borkh.) were assayed. Thirteen of them amplified polymorphic products and unambiguously distinguished 34 genotypes from the 40 accessions analyzed. Six accessions showing identical marker patterns were Spanish local varieties thought to have been derived from 'Algerie' by a mutational process very common in loquat species. A total of 39 alleles were detected in the population studied, with a mean value of 2.4 alleles per locus. The expected and observed heterozygosities were 0.46 and 51% on average, respectively, leading to a negative value of the Wright's fixation index (-0.20). The values of these parameters indicate a smaller degree of genetic diversity in the set of loquat accessions analyzed than in other members of the Rosaceae family. Unweighted pair-group method (UPGMA) cluster analysis, based on Nei's genetic distance, generally grouped genotypes according to their geographic origins and pedigrees. The high number of alleles and the high expected heterozygosity detected with SSR markers developed in Malus x domestica (Borkh.) make them a suitable tool for loquat cultivar identification, confirming microsatellite marker transportability among genera in the Rosaceae family. PMID:15729402

  19. Fibrillin levels in a severely affected Marfan syndrome patient with a null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, M.; Withers, A.P.; Al-Ghaban, Z. |

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by defects in the cardiovascular, skeletal and ocular systems. A patient was first examined in 1992 having survived an acute sortic dissection with subsequent composite repair and insertion of a prosthetic aortic valve. Clinical examination revealed arachnodactyly, narrow, high arched palate with dental crowding, an arm span exceeding her height by 10.5 cm, joint laxity and bilateral lens subluxation. Analysis of the family showed affected members in three generations and the fibrillin gene, FBN1, was shown to segregate with the disease when using polymorphic markers including an RsaI polymorphism in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the gene. Analysis of patient mRNA for this RsaI polymorphism by RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-PCR) amplification and restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR products showed that the copy of the gene segregating with the disease was not transcribed. No low level expression of this allele was observed despite RT-PCR amplification incorporating radioactively labelled dCTP, thus revealing a null allele phenotype. Western blotting analysis of fibrillin secreted by the patient`s dermal fibroblasts using fibrillin-specific antibodies showed only normal sized fibrillin protein. However, immunohistochemical studies of the patient`s tissue and fibroblasts showed markedly lowered levels in staining of microfibrillar structures compared with age-matched controls. This low level of expression of the protein affected in Marfan syndrome in a patient with such severe clinical manifestations is surprising since current understanding would suggest that this molecular phenotype should lead to a mild clinical disorder.

  20. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S.

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Allele characterization of genes required for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance identifies Rpg5 as the R gene.

    PubMed

    Arora, D; Gross, T; Brueggeman, R

    2013-11-01

    A highly virulent form of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK is virulent on both wheat and barley, presenting a major threat to world food security. The recessive and temperature-sensitive rpg4 gene is the only effective source of resistance identified in barley (Hordeum vulgare) against P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK. Efforts to position clone rpg4 localized resistance to a small interval on barley chromosome 5HL, tightly linked to the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) resistance (R) gene Rpg5. High-resolution genetic analysis and post-transcriptional gene silencing of the genes at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus determined that three tightly linked genes (Rpg5, HvRga1, and HvAdf3) are required together for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance. Alleles of the three genes were analyzed from a diverse set of 14 domesticated barley lines (H. vulgare) and 8 wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum) to characterize diversity that may determine incompatibility (resistance). The analysis determined that HvAdf3 and HvRga1 code for predicted functional proteins that do not appear to contain polymorphisms determining the compatible (susceptible) interactions with the wheat stem rust pathogen and were expressed at the transcriptional level from both resistant and susceptible barley lines. The HvAdf3 alleles shared 100% amino acid identity among all 22 genotypes examined. The P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines with HvRga1 alleles containing the limited amino acid substitutions unique to the susceptible varieties also contained predicted nonfunctional rpg5 alleles. Thus, susceptibility in these lines is likely due to the nonfunctional RPG5 proteins. The Rpg5 allele analysis determined that 9 of the 13 P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines contain alleles that either code for predicted truncated proteins as the result of a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a stop codon at amino acid 161, a single cytosine indel causing a frame shift, and a stop codon at amino acid 217, or an indel that deleted the entire STPK domain. The three P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible lines (Swiss landraces Hv489, Hv492, and Hv611) and the wild barley accession WBDC160 contain rpg5 alleles predicted to encode full-length proteins containing a nonsynonomous nucleotide substitution that results in the amino acid substitution E1287A. This amino acid substitution present in the uncharacterized C-terminal domain is not found in any resistant line and may be important to elicit the resistance reaction. These data suggest that rpg4-mediated resistance against many wheat stem rust pathogen races, including P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK, rely on the Rpg5 R gene; thus, rpg4- and Rpg5-mediated resistance rely on a common R gene and should not be considered completely distinct. The data also determined that Rpg5 gene-specific molecular markers could be used to detect rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance for marker-assisted selection. PMID:23841622

  2. Allelic loss of chromosome 4q21 approximately 23 associates with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocarcinogenesis and elevated alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Lin, Ming-Wei; Lu, Shu-Fen; Wu, Dai-Chen; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Lai, Ming-Yang; Hsu, Hey-Chi; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer

    2004-10-01

    Allelic loss of chromosome 4q is one of the most frequent genetic aberrations found in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and suggests the presence of putative tumor suppressor genes within this region. To precisely define the region containing these tumor suppressor genes for further positional cloning, we tried a detailed deletion mapping strategy in 149 HCCs by using 49 microsatellite markers covering 4q12 approximately 25. A common region with allelic loss has been identified based on the interstitial deletions occurring within it; this region is found between D4S1534 and D4S1572 (a 17.5-cM genetic interval). When we included all cases with limited aberration regions for comparison, 2 smaller regions were derived: 1 between D4S1534 and D4S2460 (3.52 cM) and 1 between D4S2433 and D4S1572 (8.44 cM). A few candidate genes were found to be down-regulated in HCCs, but without sequence mutations. In these HCCs, 4q alleleic loss was associated with hepatitis B virus infection status and the elevation of serum alpha-fetoprotein (>/=400 ng/mL). In conclusion, the current study not only mapped a common allelic loss region on chromosome 4q, but it also revealed that its loss may be involved in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocarcinogenesis and the elevation of serum alpha-fetoprotein. PMID:15382172

  3. Identification of novel genetic markers and evaluation of genetic structure in a population of Japanese crested ibis.

    PubMed

    Tsubono, Kanako; Taniguchi, Yukio; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Yamada, Takahisa; Sugiyama, Toshie; Homma, Kosuke; Kaneko, Yoshinori; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Iwaisaki, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    Japanese population of the Japanese crested ibis Nipponia nippon was founded by five individuals gifted from the People's Republic of China. In order to exactly evaluate genetic structure, we first performed development of novel genetic makers using 89 microsatellite primer pairs of related species for cross-amplification. Of these, only three primer pairs were useful for the genetic markers. Additionally, we sequenced allelic PCR products of these three markers together with 10 markers previously identified. Most markers showed typical microsatellite repeat units, but two markers were not simple microsatellites. Moreover, over half of the markers did not have the same repeat units as those of the original species. These results suggested that development of novel genetic markers in this population by cross-amplification is not efficient, partly because of low genetic diversity. Furthermore, the cluster analysis by STRUCTURE program using 17 markers showed that the five founders were divided into two clusters. However, the genetic relationships among the founders indicated by the clustering seemed to be questionable, because the analysis relied largely on a small number of triallelic markers, in spite of the addition of the three useful markers. Therefore, more efficient methods for identifying large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms are desirable. PMID:24330458

  4. Nomenclature for alleles of the thiopurine methyltransferase gene

    PubMed Central

    Appell, Malin L.; Berg, Jonathan; Duley, John; Evans, William E.; Kennedy, Martin A.; Lennard, Lynne; Marinaki, Tony; McLeod, Howard L.; Relling, Mary V.; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Weinshilboum, Richard; Yeoh, Allen E.J.; McDonagh, Ellen M.; Hebert, Joan M.; Klein, Teri E.; Coulthard, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The drug-metabolizing enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) has become one of the best examples of pharmacogenomics to be translated into routine clinical practice. TPMT metabolizes the thiopurines 6-mercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine, and azathioprine, drugs that are widely used for treatment of acute leukemias, inflammatory bowel diseases, and other disorders of immune regulation. Since the discovery of genetic polymorphisms in the TPMT gene, many sequence variants that cause a decreased enzyme activity have been identified and characterized. Increasingly, to optimize dose, pretreatment determination of TPMT status before commencing thiopurine therapy is now routine in many countries. Novel TPMT sequence variants are currently numbered sequentially using PubMed as a source of information; however, this has caused some problems as exemplified by two instances in which authors’ articles appeared on PubMed at the same time, resulting in the same allele numbers given to different polymorphisms. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish an order and consensus to the numbering of known and novel TPMT sequence variants. To address this problem, a TPMT nomenclature committee was formed in 2010, to define the nomenclature and numbering of novel variants for the TPMT gene. A website (http://www.imh.liu.se/tpmtalleles) serves as a platform for this work. Researchers are encouraged to submit novel TPMT alleles to the committee for designation and reservation of unique allele numbers. The committee has decided to renumber two alleles: nucleotide position 106 (G > A) from TPMT*24 to TPMT*30 and position 611 (T > C, rs79901429) from TPMT*28 to TPMT*31. Nomenclature for all other known alleles remains unchanged. PMID:23407052

  5. Nomenclature for alleles of the thiopurine methyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Appell, Malin L; Berg, Jonathan; Duley, John; Evans, William E; Kennedy, Martin A; Lennard, Lynne; Marinaki, Tony; McLeod, Howard L; Relling, Mary V; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Weinshilboum, Richard; Yeoh, Allen E J; McDonagh, Ellen M; Hebert, Joan M; Klein, Teri E; Coulthard, Sally A

    2013-04-01

    The drug-metabolizing enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) has become one of the best examples of pharmacogenomics to be translated into routine clinical practice. TPMT metabolizes the thiopurines 6-mercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine, and azathioprine, drugs that are widely used for treatment of acute leukemias, inflammatory bowel diseases, and other disorders of immune regulation. Since the discovery of genetic polymorphisms in the TPMT gene, many sequence variants that cause a decreased enzyme activity have been identified and characterized. Increasingly, to optimize dose, pretreatment determination of TPMT status before commencing thiopurine therapy is now routine in many countries. Novel TPMT sequence variants are currently numbered sequentially using PubMed as a source of information; however, this has caused some problems as exemplified by two instances in which authors' articles appeared on PubMed at the same time, resulting in the same allele numbers given to different polymorphisms. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish an order and consensus to the numbering of known and novel TPMT sequence variants. To address this problem, a TPMT nomenclature committee was formed in 2010, to define the nomenclature and numbering of novel variants for the TPMT gene. A website (http://www.imh.liu.se/tpmtalleles) serves as a platform for this work. Researchers are encouraged to submit novel TPMT alleles to the committee for designation and reservation of unique allele numbers. The committee has decided to renumber two alleles: nucleotide position 106 (G>A) from TPMT*24 to TPMT*30 and position 611 (T>C, rs79901429) from TPMT*28 to TPMT*31. Nomenclature for all other known alleles remains unchanged. PMID:23407052

  6. Allelotype of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: fractional allele loss correlates with survival.

    PubMed Central

    Field, J. K.; Kiaris, H.; Risk, J. M.; Tsiriyotis, C.; Adamson, R.; Zoumpourlis, V.; Rowley, H.; Taylor, K.; Whittaker, J.; Howard, P.

    1995-01-01

    Allelic imbalance or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies have been used extensively to identify regions on chromosomes that may contain putative tumour-suppressor genes. We have undertaken an extensive allelotype of 80 specimens of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) using 145 polymorphic microsatellite markers on 39 chromosome arms. Allelic imbalances were found most frequently on chromosome arms 3p, 9p, 17p and 18q with over 45% LOH and imbalances on 1p, 1q, 2p, 5q, 6p, 6q, 8p, 8q, 9q, 11q, 13q, 17q and 19q were found in more than 20% of SCCHN. These LOH data were analysed against a range of clinicopathological parameters which included previously untreated and previously treated tumours; correlations were found between LOH on 9q and nodes at pathology (P = 0.02) and between histopathological grade and LOH on 12q (P = 0.02) and 13q (P = 0.01). In the group of previously untreated tumours, a correlation was found between site of tumour and LOH on 3p (P = 0.019), and 8p (P = 0.029), while TNM staging correlated with LOH on 3p (P = 0.019) and 17p (P = 0.016). Fractional allele loss (FAL) was calculated for 52 tumours with LOH data on nine or more chromosomal arms and found to have a median value of 0.22 (range 0.0-0.80). Correlations were found between FAL > median value and nodes at pathology (P = 0.01) and tumour grade (P = 0.06), demonstrating that advanced tumours with lymph node metastasis often had LOH at multiple sites. FAL > median value was found to correlate with a poor survival (P < 0.03) and, furthermore, FAL > median value correlated with poor survival in the previously untreated patients (P < 0.019). These results indicate that assessment of the accumulation of genetic damage, as provided by allelotype data, provides a useful molecular indicator of the tumour behaviour and clinical outcome. Images Figure 1 PMID:7577465

  7. Identification of Putative Molecular Markers Associated with Root Traits in Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner.

    PubMed

    Achar, Devaraja; Awati, Mallikarjuana G; Udayakumar, M; Prasad, T G

    2015-01-01

    Coffea canephora exhibit poor root system and are very sensitive to drought stress that affects growth and production. Deeper root system has been largely empirical as better avoidance to soil water limitation in drought condition. The present study aimed to identify molecular markers linked to high root types in Coffea canephora using molecular markers. Contrasting parents, L1 valley with low root and S.3334 with high root type, were crossed, and 134 F1 individuals were phenotyped for root and associated physiological traits (29 traits) and genotyped with 41 of the 320 RAPD and 9 of the 55 SSR polymorphic primers. Single marker analysis was deployed for detecting the association of markers linked to root associated traits by SAS software. There were 13 putative RAPD markers associated with root traits such as root length, secondary roots, root dry weight, and root to shoot ratio, in which root length associated marker OPS1850 showed high phenotypic variance of 6.86%. Two microsatellite markers linked to root length (CPCM13400) and root to shoot ratio (CM211300). Besides, 25 markers were associated with more than one trait and few of the markers were associated with positively related physiological traits and can be used in marker assisted trait selection. PMID:25821599

  8. The number of alleles at a microsatellite defines the allele frequency spectrum and facilitates fast accurate estimation of theta.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical work focused on microsatellite variation has produced a number of important results, including the expected distribution of repeat sizes and the expected squared difference in repeat size between two randomly selected samples. However, closed-form expressions for the sampling distribution and frequency spectrum of microsatellite variation have not been identified. Here, we use coalescent simulations of the stepwise mutation model to develop gamma and exponential approximations of the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum, a distribution central to the description of microsatellite variation across the genome. For both approximations, the parameter of biological relevance is the number of alleles at a locus, which we express as a function of ?, the population-scaled mutation rate, based on simulated data. Discovered relationships between ?, the number of alleles, and the frequency spectrum support the development of three new estimators of microsatellite ?. The three estimators exhibit roughly similar mean squared errors (MSEs) and all are biased. However, across a broad range of sample sizes and ? values, the MSEs of these estimators are frequently lower than all other estimators tested. The new estimators are also reasonably robust to mutation that includes step sizes greater than one. Finally, our approximation to the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum provides a null distribution of microsatellite variation. In this context, a preliminary analysis of the effects of demographic change on the frequency spectrum is performed. We suggest that simulations of the microsatellite frequency spectrum under evolutionary scenarios of interest may guide investigators to the use of relevant and sometimes novel summary statistics. PMID:20605970

  9. The Number of Alleles at a Microsatellite Defines the Allele Frequency Spectrum and Facilitates Fast Accurate Estimation of ?

    PubMed Central

    Haasl, Ryan J.; Payseur, Bret A.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical work focused on microsatellite variation has produced a number of important results, including the expected distribution of repeat sizes and the expected squared difference in repeat size between two randomly selected samples. However, closed-form expressions for the sampling distribution and frequency spectrum of microsatellite variation have not been identified. Here, we use coalescent simulations of the stepwise mutation model to develop gamma and exponential approximations of the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum, a distribution central to the description of microsatellite variation across the genome. For both approximations, the parameter of biological relevance is the number of alleles at a locus, which we express as a function of ?, the population-scaled mutation rate, based on simulated data. Discovered relationships between ?, the number of alleles, and the frequency spectrum support the development of three new estimators of microsatellite ?. The three estimators exhibit roughly similar mean squared errors (MSEs) and all are biased. However, across a broad range of sample sizes and ? values, the MSEs of these estimators are frequently lower than all other estimators tested. The new estimators are also reasonably robust to mutation that includes step sizes greater than one. Finally, our approximation to the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum provides a null distribution of microsatellite variation. In this context, a preliminary analysis of the effects of demographic change on the frequency spectrum is performed. We suggest that simulations of the microsatellite frequency spectrum under evolutionary scenarios of interest may guide investigators to the use of relevant and sometimes novel summary statistics. PMID:20605970

  10. Profile: parents help themselves.

    PubMed

    Woods, G E

    1981-01-01

    A short account is given of a voluntary organization, PACE, formed by parents of young handicapped children in Leeds. PACE provides friendship and help to other parents, arranges the toy library, riding for the disabled and other activities for the children. It also raises money that is needed for special projects. PMID:6452232

  11. Understanding the Parent's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Sally Smith's contribution to the world of children with learning disabilities is well documented, particularly by the other contributors to this journal. An area deserving attention, but one usually overlooked, is Smith's understanding of the parent's perspective--the challenges of parenting a child with learning disabilities. It was a priceless…

  12. Parents Leading the Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kathy Goetz

    1996-01-01

    This special issue of the Family Resource Coalition Report presents personal experiences and reflections regarding parent involvement and leadership in family support. Articles in this issue are: (1) "The Vaughn Family Center: It's My Story" (Jorge Lara and Matt Oppenheim); (2) "Asking the Right Questions is Key to Developing Parent Advocacy" (Luz…

  13. Gay and Lesbian Parents

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Gay and Lesbian Parents Article Body I am gay. Should I worry how this will affect my children? Millions of children have one or more gay and/or lesbian parents. For some children, having ...

  14. Parent Resources Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Early Childhood Services.

    This resource inventory is for the use of parent groups and others who are concerned with the provision of parent education and suppport services. There are two parts to the inventory. Section 1 contains the titles of articles and standard bibliographic information, as well as annotations of contents. Copies of the articles are available through…

  15. Parent Resources Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education Response Centre, Edmonton.

    This resource inventory is for the use of parent groups and others who are concerned with parent education and support services. The inventory contains the titles of articles, copies of which are available through the Alberta Education Response Centre. The articles and publications listed cover a wide range of topics related to child development…

  16. Parenting by Automatic Pilot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, J. Brien

    This guide on parenting suggests ideas and methods to build self-esteem, courage, decision-making, and loving which are so important to child success and happiness. The introduction notes that this book is written for what seems to be the majority of parents who, despite the availability of much writing and other information on the subject of…

  17. Parenting, Pressures and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chance, Graham W.

    2000-01-01

    In the 1990s, parenting became a difficult effort to balance work demands with children's needs. However, Canadian and U.S. government policies have not met changing family needs for child care, other services, paid parental leave, and work flexibility. Canada's long-awaited National Children's Agenda has the potential to modernize family policy…

  18. Handling "Helicopter Parents"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2006-01-01

    Once upon a time, parents would help their children move into dorm rooms and apartments, then wave good-bye for the semester. Not anymore. Baby boomers have arguably been more involved in their children's educations--and their lives in general--than any preceding generation of parents, university observers say. And boomers see no reason why that…

  19. Handbook on Parents' Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Exceptional Children's Services.

    This handbook is intended to inform parents of children with disabilities with information about parent rights, the rights of the child, and the responsibilities of the local education agency (LEA) toward meeting the special needs of the child. Individual sections address the following topics: special education laws and children with disabilities,…

  20. Exceptional Parent, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stanley, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve 1996 issues of "Exceptional Parent" magazine provide a variety of articles and resources on parenting the child or young adult with a disability. The January issue is a resource guide, with directories of national organizations, associations, products, and services. The February issue focuses on early childhood, including articles on…