Sample records for parental marker alleles

  1. Molecular markers and allelic relationships of anthracnose resistance gene cluster B4 in common bean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Belén Méndez-Vigo; Cristina Rodríguez-Suárez; Astrid Pañeda; Juan José Ferreira; Ramón Giraldez

    2005-01-01

    Allelism tests and molecular marker analyses were combined to characterize the genes that, proceeding from the germplasm lines ‘A493’ and ‘A321’, confer resistance to bean anthracnose in the new breeding lines ‘A1220’ and ‘A1231’, respectively, developed through backcross breeding, using the dry bean landrace ‘Andecha’ as the recurrent parent. Allelism tests indicate that resistance to race 38 of anthracnose in

  2. Aligning male and female linkage maps of apple (Malus pumila Mill.) using multi-allelic markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Maliepaard; F. H. Alston; G. van Arkel; L. M. Brown; E. Chevreau; F. Dunemann; K. M. Evans; S. Gardiner; P. Guilford; A. W. van Heusden; J. Janse; F. Laurens; J. R. Lynn; A. G. Manganaris; A. P. M. den Nijs; N. Periam; E. Rikkerink; P. Roche; C. Ryder; S. Sansavini; H. Schmidt; S. Tartarini; J. J. Verhaegh; M. Vrielink-van Ginkel; G. J. King

    1998-01-01

    Linkage maps for the apple cultivars ‘Prima’ and ‘Fiesta’ were constructed using RFLP, RAPD, isozyme, AFLP, SCAR and microsatellite\\u000a markers in a ‘Prima’?‘Fiesta’ progeny of 152 individuals. Seventeen linkage groups, putatively corresponding to the seventeen\\u000a haploid apple chromosomes, were obtained for each parent. These maps were aligned using 67 multi-allelic markers that were\\u000a heterozygous in both parents. A large number

  3. Selective detection of parental alleles in imprinted gene, H19

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nori Nakayashiki; Jun Kanetake; Masataka Takamiya; Yasuhiro Aoki

    2004-01-01

    An autosomal polymorphism, designated H19FR which located upstream of imprinted H19 gene, was investigated. Three allelic bands of H19FR system were detected by PCR amplification followed by constant denaturing gel electrophoresis (CDGE). In digested genomic DNA by methylation-sensitive endonuclease or McrBC, paternal or maternal allele of H19FR was selectively detectable, respectively. This parental typing was applicable to the DNA isolated

  4. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-01-01

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population. PMID:25966202

  5. Development of ?-Carotene Rich Maize Hybrids through Marker-Assisted Introgression of ?-carotene hydroxylase Allele

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Vignesh; Hossain, Firoz; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Choudhary, Mukesh; Saha, Supradip; Bhat, Jayant S.; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Gupta, Hari S.

    2014-01-01

    Development of vitamin A-rich cereals can help in alleviating the widespread problem of vitamin A deficiency. We report here significant enhancement of kernel ?-carotene in elite maize genotypes through accelerated marker-assisted backcross breeding. A favourable allele (543 bp) of the ?-carotene hydroxylase (crtRB1) gene was introgressed in the seven elite inbred parents, which were low (1.4 µg/g) in kernel ?-carotene, by using a crtRB1-specific DNA marker for foreground selection. About 90% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in the selected progenies within two backcross generations. Concentration of ?-carotene among the crtRB1-introgressed inbreds varied from 8.6 to 17.5 µg/g - a maximum increase up to 12.6-fold over recurrent parent. The reconstituted hybrids developed from improved parental inbreds also showed enhanced kernel ?-carotene as high as 21.7 µg/g, compared to 2.6 µg/g in the original hybrid. The reconstituted hybrids evaluated at two locations possessed similar grain yield to that of original hybrids. These ?-carotene enriched high yielding hybrids can be effectively utilized in the maize biofortification programs across the globe. PMID:25486271

  6. Development of ?-carotene rich maize hybrids through marker-assisted introgression of ?-carotene hydroxylase allele.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Vignesh; Hossain, Firoz; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Choudhary, Mukesh; Saha, Supradip; Bhat, Jayant S; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Gupta, Hari S

    2014-01-01

    Development of vitamin A-rich cereals can help in alleviating the widespread problem of vitamin A deficiency. We report here significant enhancement of kernel ?-carotene in elite maize genotypes through accelerated marker-assisted backcross breeding. A favourable allele (543 bp) of the ?-carotene hydroxylase (crtRB1) gene was introgressed in the seven elite inbred parents, which were low (1.4 µg/g) in kernel ?-carotene, by using a crtRB1-specific DNA marker for foreground selection. About 90% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in the selected progenies within two backcross generations. Concentration of ?-carotene among the crtRB1-introgressed inbreds varied from 8.6 to 17.5 µg/g - a maximum increase up to 12.6-fold over recurrent parent. The reconstituted hybrids developed from improved parental inbreds also showed enhanced kernel ?-carotene as high as 21.7 µg/g, compared to 2.6 µg/g in the original hybrid. The reconstituted hybrids evaluated at two locations possessed similar grain yield to that of original hybrids. These ?-carotene enriched high yielding hybrids can be effectively utilized in the maize biofortification programs across the globe. PMID:25486271

  7. Self-(in)compatibility inheritance and allele-specific marker development in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fangqin; Cheng, Bifang

    2014-01-01

    Yellow mustard (Sinapis alba) has a sporophytic self-incompatibility reproduction system. Genetically stable self-incompatible (SI) and self-compatible (SC) inbred lines have recently been developed in this crop. Understanding the S haplotype of different inbred lines and the inheritance of the self-(in)compatibility (SI/SC) trait is very important for breeding purposes. In this study, we used the S-locus gene-specific primers in Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea to clone yellow mustard S-locus genes of SI lines Y514 and Y1130 and SC lines Y1499 and Y1501. The PCR amplification results and DNA sequences of the S-locus genes revealed that Y514 carried the class I S haplotype, while Y1130, Y1499, and Y1501 had the class II S haplotype. The results of our genetic studies indicated that self-incompatibility was dominant over self-compatibility and controlled by a one-gene locus in the two crosses of Y514 × Y1499 and Y1130 × Y1501. Of the five S-locus gene polymorphic primer pairs, Sal-SLGI and Sal-SRKI each generated one dominant marker for the SI phenotype of Y514; Sal-SLGII and Sal-SRKII produced dominant marker(s) for the SC phenotype of Y1501 and Y1499; Sal-SP11II generated one dominant marker for Y1130. These markers co-segregated with the SI/SC phenotype in the F2 populations of the two crosses. In addition, co-dominant markers were developed by mixing the two polymorphic primer pairs specific for each parent in the multiplex PCR, which allowed zygosity to be determined in the F2 populations. The SI/SC allele-specific markers have proven to be very useful for the selection of the desirable SC genotypes in our yellow mustard breeding program. PMID:24482603

  8. Allelic divergence and cultivar-specific SSR alleles revealed by capillary electrophoresis using fluorescence-labeled SSR markers in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amaresh; Grisham, Michael P; Pan, Yong-Bao

    2014-06-01

    Though sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) are complex aneupolyploid hybrids, genetic evaluation and tracking of clone- or cultivar-specific alleles become possible through capillary electrophoresis (CE) using fluorescence-labeled SSR markers. Twenty-four sugarcane cultivars, 12 each from India and the USA, were genetically assessed using 21 fluorescence-labeled polymorphic SSR markers. These markers primed the amplification of 213 alleles. Of these alleles, 161 were common to both Indian and US cultivars, 25 were specific to the Indian cultivars, and 27 were observed only in the US cultivars. Only 10 alleles were monomorphic. A high level of heterozygosity was observed in both Indian (82.4%) and US (91.1%) cultivars resulting in average polymorphism information content (PIC) values of 0.66 and 0.77 and marker index (MI) values of 5.07 and 5.58, respectively. Pearson correlation between PIC and MI was significant in both sets of cultivars (r = 0.58 and 0.69). UPGMA clustering separated cultivars into three distinct clusters at 59% homology level. These results propose the potential utility of six Indian cultivar-specific SSR alleles (mSSCIR3_182, SMC486CG_229, SMC36BUQ_125, mSSCIR74_216, SMC334BS_154, and mSSCIR43_238) in sugarcane breeding, vis a vis transporting CE-based evaluation in clone or variety identity testing, cross fidelity assessments, and genetic relatedness among species of the genus Saccharum and related genera. PMID:25247737

  9. Parental allelic variation at COL6A1 and congenital heart defects in trisomy 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kessling, A.M.; Howard, C.M.; Farrer, M.J. [St. Mary`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Overt congenital heart defects (CHD) affect over 40% of newborns with Down syndrome. On the hypothesis that genetic variation on chromosome 21 determines this clinical variability, we studied a CHD candidate locus (COL6A1) on 21q22.3. We studied three RFLP loci in COL6A1 in 37 families of known British/Irish population of ancestral origin, and in population-matched controls. Each family had a child with trisomy 21 with or without accompanying congenital heart defect (CHD). Parental and meiotic origin of nondisjunction were determined using peri-centromeric markers. For the analysis, we considered groups of families with trisomic children with and without CHD, and subsets of nondisjoining and disjoining parents. Parental genotypes at nine control RFLP loci on chromosome 21 showed no association with CHD in the trisomic child. By contrast, parental genotypes at all three individual RFLP loci within COL6A1 showed statistically significant association with the trisomic child`s CHD status. Pairwise consideration of these loci in groups of families of trisomic children with and without CHD showed subsets of nondisjoining and disjoining parents to have different linkage disequilibrium patterns at these loci than population-matched controls. This suggests that the COL6A1 alleles of the parents are not representative of the population as a whole. Consideration of all three loci together as haplotypes supports this conclusion. Four results suggest that a functional mutation within, or in linkage disequilibrium with COL6A1 influences CHD outcome in trisomy 21.

  10. Snapshots of Selection: Changes in SNP Allele Frequencies during Phenotypic, Marker-Assisted, and Genomewide Selection in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in allele frequencies underlie improvements in mean performance for quantitative traits. Limited published information is available on how genomewide marker-allele frequencies change during phenotypic and marker-based selection for multiple traits in applied breeding programs. Here we descri...

  11. Allele capture by selection for flanking markers: A new method for analyzing multigenic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.E.; Roderick, T.H.; Paigen, K. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States)

    1995-12-31

    in complex living organisms like mammals, most important processes are controlled by sets of interacting genes organized in biological pathways. A vital area of research during the coming decades will be to identify the genes that regulate such pathways and to analyze their functions. We here outline a new procedure to accomplish this: allele capture using flanking markers. Here illustrated for mice, it should be useful for all organisms in which adequate numbers of marker genes are available. This procedure combines mankind`s oldest and best proven logical technique, selective breeding, with the modern technologies of molecular markers, linkage analyses and computer programs. 7 refs.

  12. A combined analysis of D22S278 marker alleles in affected sib-pairs: Support for a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at chromosome 22q12

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Vallada, H.; Collier, D. [Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom)] [and others] [Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom); and others

    1996-02-16

    Several groups have reported weak evidence for linkage between schizophrenia and genetic markers located on chromosome 22q using the lod score method of analysis. However these findings involved different genetic markers and methods of analysis, and so were not directly comparable. To resolve this issue we have performed a combined analysis of genotypic data from the marker D22S278 in multiply affected schizophrenic families derived from 11 independent research groups worldwide. This marker was chosen because it showed maximum evidence for linkage in three independent datasets. Using the affected sib-pair method as implemented by the program ESPA, the combined dataset showed 252 alleles shared compared with 188 alleles not shared (chi-square 9.31, 1df, P = 0.001) where parental genotype data was completely known. When sib-pairs for whom parental data was assigned according to probability were included the number of alleles shared was 514.1 compared with 437.8 not shared (chi-square 6.12, 1df, P = 0.006). Similar results were obtained when a likelihood ratio method for sib-pair analysis was used. These results indicate that there may be a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at 22q12. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Identification of two novel waxy alleles and development of their molecular markers in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuangen; Zhao, Ganlin; Li, Yan; Fan, Jing; Ding, Guoxiang; Zhao, Jiqun; Ni, Xianlin; Xu, Yongju; Wang, Wenming

    2013-05-01

    High amylopectin grains of waxy sorghum have a high economic value in the food and bioenergy industries because of their increased starch digestibility and higher ethanol conversion rate compared with wild-type sorghum grains. Mutation in the granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) gene contributes to the waxy phenotype. Two classes of waxy alleles, wx(a) and wx(b), have been characterized previously. In the present work, we identified two novel types of waxy mutations in the sorghum GBSS gene, designated as wx(c) and wx(d). The wx(c) allele has a G deletion at the 5' splicing site of the ninth intron, causing a shift of the 5' cleavage site; in turn, a reading frame shift occurred and resulted in an early translation termination. The wx(d) allele contained a mutation at the 3' splicing site of the 10th intron, which led to a splicing site shift and resulted in the deletion of five amino acids (GTGKK) in the predicted translation product. Furthermore, cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers were developed to detect the wx(c) and wx(d) alleles. With these markers, classification of waxy alleles was performed in nearly 100 sorghum accessions from our breeding program. Most waxy sorghum cultivars in China were either wx(a) or wx(c), implying that these two mutations are preferentially maintained during domestic selection in glutinous sorghum production. PMID:23789996

  14. Regulatory Divergence between Parental Alleles Determines Gene Expression Patterns in Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Hueber, Yann; Dereeper, Alexis; Rialle, Stéphanie; Herrera, Juan-Carlos; Lashermes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Both hybridization and allopolyploidization generate novel phenotypes by conciliating divergent genomes and regulatory networks in the same cellular context. To understand the rewiring of gene expression in hybrids, the total expression of 21,025 genes and the allele-specific expression of over 11,000 genes were quantified in interspecific hybrids and their parental species, Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides using RNA-seq technology. Between parental species, cis- and trans-regulatory divergences affected around 32% and 35% of analyzed genes, respectively, with nearly 17% of them showing both. The relative importance of trans-regulatory divergences between both species could be related to their low genetic divergence and perennial habit. In hybrids, among divergently expressed genes between parental species and hybrids, 77% was expressed like one parent (expression level dominance), including 65% like C. eugenioides. Gene expression was shown to result from the expression of both alleles affected by intertwined parental trans-regulatory factors. A strong impact of C. eugenioides trans-regulatory factors on the upregulation of C. canephora alleles was revealed. The gene expression patterns appeared determined by complex combinations of cis- and trans-regulatory divergences. In particular, the observed biased expression level dominance seemed to be derived from the asymmetric effects of trans-regulatory parental factors on regulation of alleles. More generally, this study illustrates the effects of divergent trans-regulatory parental factors on the gene expression pattern in hybrids. The characteristics of the transcriptional response to hybridization appear to be determined by the compatibility of gene regulatory networks and therefore depend on genetic divergences between the parental species and their evolutionary history. PMID:25819221

  15. Chromosome-Wide Analysis of Parental Allele-Specific Chromatin and DNA Methylation ? §

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purnima; Wu, Xiwei; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Li, Arthur X.; Rauch, Tibor A.; Pfeifer, Gerd P.; Mann, Jeffrey R.; Szabó, Piroska E.

    2011-01-01

    To reveal the extent of domain-wide epigenetic features at imprinted gene clusters, we performed a high-resolution allele-specific chromatin analysis of over 100 megabases along the maternally or paternally duplicated distal chromosome 7 (Chr7) and Chr15 in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). We found that reciprocal allele-specific features are limited to imprinted genes and their differentially methylated regions (DMRs), whereas broad local enrichment of H3K27me3 (BLOC) is a domain-wide feature at imprinted clusters. We uncovered novel allele-specific features of BLOCs. A maternally biased BLOC was found along the H19-Igf2 domain. A paternal allele-specific gap was found along Kcnq1ot1, interrupting a biallelic BLOC in the Kcnq1-Cdkn1c domain. We report novel allele-specific chromatin marks at the Peg13 and Slc38a4 DMRs, Cdkn1c upstream region, and Inpp5f_v2 DMR and paternal allele-specific CTCF binding at the Peg13 DMR. Additionally, we derived an imprinted gene predictor algorithm based on our allele-specific chromatin mapping data. The binary predictor H3K9ac and CTCF or H3K4me3 in one allele and H3K9me3 in the reciprocal allele, using a sliding-window approach, recognized with precision the parental allele specificity of known imprinted genes, H19, Igf2, Igf2as, Cdkn1c, Kcnq1ot1, and Inpp5f_v2 on Chr7 and Peg13 and Slc38a4 on Chr15. Chromatin features, therefore, can unequivocally identify genes with imprinted expression. PMID:21321082

  16. Understanding allele shift using SSR markers in pedigree, modified bulk, and SSD breeding methods in rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Kanbar; N Pirany; A Al-Ouda; HE Shashidhar

    2009-01-01

    needs to be maintained or increased in the selected progenies and the favorite genes from the donor parents should be increased. Comparative studies on different breeding methods using DNA markers are not well established. In this study, three breeding procedures—pedigree, SSD, and modified bulk—were used to advance the materials derived from a cross between divergent rice parents Moroberekan and IR20

  17. Analysis of simple tandem repeat (STR) marker allele distributions in a Balinese population

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, R.; Ashler, J.H.; Friedman, T.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Genotypes for 53 simple tandem repeat (STR) markers distributed at greater than 39 cM intervals throughout the genome were determined for 46 individuals from the village of Bengkala, Bali. This village dates to at least the thirteenth century, has approximately 2,200 individuals and has an oral and written tradition suggesting genetic bottlenecks. The allele frequency distributions in Bengkala were compared with distributions obtained by typing individuals in the CEPH data base using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov two sample test. Twenty-eight of the 53 markers showed differences (p<0.05) in distribution between the two populations. Allele frequencies of tetranucleotide STRs were much more similar between the two populations than were those of dinucleotide STRs (p < 0.0043). This may be due to the higher mutation rate of tetranucleotide STRs, combining with selection on repeat lengths, to produce a {open_quotes}stable{close_quotes} allele distribution. Population heterogeneity in Bengkala was indicated by an excess of observed homozygosity, deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at seven loci, and significant genotypic disequilibrium between physically unlinked loci. These analyses serve as a resource to map a gene causing non-syndromal autosomal recessive deafness in Bengkala, and to corroborate the anthropological study of the history and social structure of the village.

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of sugarcane parents in Chinese breeding programmes using gSSR markers.

    PubMed

    You, Qian; Xu, Liping; Zheng, Yifeng; Que, Youxiong

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane is the most important sugar and bioenergy crop in the world. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 115 sugarcane genotypes used for parental crossing were genotyped based on five genomic simple sequence repeat marker (gSSR) loci and 88 polymorphic alleles of loci (100%) as detected by capillary electrophoresis. The values of genetic diversity parameters across the populations indicate that the genetic variation intrapopulation (90.5%) was much larger than that of interpopulation (9.5%). Cluster analysis revealed that there were three groups termed as groups I, II, and III within the 115 genotypes. The genotypes released by each breeding programme showed closer genetic relationships, except the YC series released by Hainan sugarcane breeding station. Using principle component analysis (PCA), the first and second principal components accounted for a cumulative 76% of the total variances, in which 43% were for common parents and 33% were for new parents, respectively. The knowledge obtained in this study should be useful to future breeding programs for increasing genetic diversity of sugarcane varieties and cultivars to meet the demand of sugarcane cultivation for sugar and bioenergy use. PMID:23990759

  19. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Sugarcane Parents in Chinese Breeding Programmes Using gSSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    You, Qian; Xu, Liping; Zheng, Yifeng; Que, Youxiong

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane is the most important sugar and bioenergy crop in the world. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 115 sugarcane genotypes used for parental crossing were genotyped based on five genomic simple sequence repeat marker (gSSR) loci and 88 polymorphic alleles of loci (100%) as detected by capillary electrophoresis. The values of genetic diversity parameters across the populations indicate that the genetic variation intrapopulation (90.5%) was much larger than that of interpopulation (9.5%). Cluster analysis revealed that there were three groups termed as groups I, II, and III within the 115 genotypes. The genotypes released by each breeding programme showed closer genetic relationships, except the YC series released by Hainan sugarcane breeding station. Using principle component analysis (PCA), the first and second principal components accounted for a cumulative 76% of the total variances, in which 43% were for common parents and 33% were for new parents, respectively. The knowledge obtained in this study should be useful to future breeding programs for increasing genetic diversity of sugarcane varieties and cultivars to meet the demand of sugarcane cultivation for sugar and bioenergy use. PMID:23990759

  20. Development of PCR-based allele-specific and InDel marker sets for nine rice blast resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Yoshida, H; Ashikawa, I

    2006-07-01

    Blast resistance is one of the most important traits in rice breeding, and application of molecular markers for blast resistance breeding is likely to allow the rapid screening for the trait during early growth stages, without the need for inoculation of pathogen and phenotyping. Allele-specific PCR markers and insertion/deletion (InDel) markers, which genotype single-nucleotide polymorphisms and InDel polymorphisms, respectively, are useful tools for marker-assisted selections. We developed sets of allele-specific PCR and InDel markers for nine rice blast resistance genes -- Piz, Piz-t, Pit, Pik, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pita, Pita-2, and Pib -- which are commonly used in Japanese blast resistance rice breeding programs. For each resistance gene, we used the segregation information from thousands of progeny in several crosses or published gene locations to generate a marker that cosegregated with the gene and markers that closely flanked the gene on either side. The developed cosegregating markers uniquely discriminated among each of the lines with the individual resistance genes (except for Pita and Pita-2). Therefore, these markers will likely facilitate the development of multiline cultivars carrying one or a combination of these nine blast resistance genes. In addition, the systems we developed may be valuable tools in the quality control of seed production from blast-resistant multiline cultivars. PMID:16791691

  1. Development of PCR assays diagnostic for RFLP marker alleles closely linked to alleles Gro1 and H1 , conferring resistance to the root cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis in potato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens Niewöhner; Francesco Salamini; Christiane Gebhardt

    1995-01-01

    The use of RFLPs for marker-assisted selection schemes in potato breeding is hampered by the fact that RFLP technology requires good laboratory facilities, technical skills and high financial input. Marker technology based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) would facilitate the application of marker-assisted selection. PCR assays have been developed that are diagnostic for RFLP alleles at two marker loci,CP56

  2. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in the equine genome

    E-print Network

    Mathiason, Kelli Janae

    1997-01-01

    Nine microsatellite markers were isolated from a horse genomic library in lambda bacteriophage. The markers were typed by PCR in 72 horses representing 14 breeds and in 36 parental animals of two Arabian half-sib families. Number of alleles...

  3. Marker-Assisted Selection for Recognizing Wheat Mutant Genotypes Carrying HMW Glutenin Alleles Related to Baking Quality

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Mohammad Javad; Bihamta, Mohammad Reza; Naserian Khiabani, Behnam; Tahernezhad, Zahra; Hallajian, Mohammad Taher; Shamsi, Marzieh Varasteh

    2014-01-01

    Allelic diversity of HMW glutenin loci in several studies revealed that allelic combinations affect dough quality. Dx5 + Dy10 subunits are related to good baking quality and Dx2 + Dy12 are related to undesirable baking quality. One of the most regular methods to evaluate the baking quality is SDS-PAGE which is used to improve baking quality labs. Marker-assisted selection is the method which can recognize the alleles related to baking quality and this method is based on polymerase chain reaction. 10 pairs of specific primers related to Dx2, Dx2.1, Dx5, Dy10, and Dy12 subunits were used for recognizing baking quality of some wheat varieties and some mutant genotypes. Only 5 pairs of them could show the specific bands. All subunits were recognized by the primers except Dx2.1. Some of the primers were extracted from previous studies and the others were designed based on D genome subunits of wheat. SDS-PAGE method accomplished having confidence in these marker's results. To realize the effect of mutation, seed storage proteins were measured. It showed that mutation had effect on the amount of seed storage protein on the mutant seeds (which showed polymorphism). PMID:24883389

  4. Genetic mapping, marker assisted selection and allelic relationships for the Pu 6 gene conferring rust resistance in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Bulos, Mariano; Vergani, Pablo Nicolas; Altieri, Emiliano

    2014-09-01

    Rust resistance in the sunflower line P386 is controlled by Pu 6 , a gene which was reported to segregate independently from other rust resistant genes, such as R 4 . The objectives of this work were to map Pu 6 , to provide and validate molecular tools for its identification, and to determine the linkage relationship of Pu 6 and R 4 . Genetic mapping of Pu 6 with six markers covered 24.8 cM of genetic distance on the lower end of linkage Group 13 of the sunflower consensus map. The marker most closely linked to Pu 6 was ORS316 at 2.5 cM in the distal position. ORS316 presented five alleles when was assayed with a representative set of resistant and susceptible lines. Allelism test between Pu 6 and R 4 indicated that both genes are linked at a genetic distance of 6.25 cM. This is the first confirmation based on an allelism test that at least two members of the R adv /R 4 /R 11 / R 13a /R 13b /Pu 6 cluster of genes are at different loci. A fine elucidation of the architecture of this complex locus will allow designing and constructing completely new genomic regions combining genes from different resistant sources and the elimination of the linkage drag around each resistant gene. PMID:25320555

  5. Improvement of marker-based predictability of Apparent Amylose Content in japonica rice through GBSSI allele mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apparent Amylose Content (AAC), regulated by the Waxy gene, represents the key determinant of rice cooking properties. In occidental countries high AAC rice represents the most requested market class but the availability of molecular markers allowing specific selection of high AAC varieties is limited. Results In this study, the effectiveness of available molecular markers in predicting AAC was evaluated in a collection of 127 rice accessions (125 japonica ssp. and 2 indica ssp.) characterized by AAC values from glutinous to 26%. The analyses highlighted the presence of several different allelic patterns identifiable by a few molecular markers, and two of them, i.e., the SNPs at intron1 and exon 6, were able to explain a maximum of 79.5% of AAC variation. However, the available molecular markers haplotypes did not provide tools for predicting accessions with AAC higher than 24.5%. To identify additional polymorphisms, the re-sequencing of the Waxy gene and 1kbp of the putative upstream regulatory region was performed in 21 genotypes representing all the AAC classes identified. Several previously un-characterized SNPs were identified and four of them were used to develop dCAPS markers. Conclusions The addition of the SNPs newly identified slightly increased the AAC explained variation and allowed the identification of a haplotype almost unequivocally associated to AAC higher than 24.5%. Haplotypes at the waxy locus were also associated to grain length and length/width (L/W) ratio. In particular, the SNP at the first intron, which identifies the Wx a and Wx b alleles, was associated with differences in the width of the grain, the L/W ratio and the length of the kernel, most likely as a result of human selection. PMID:24383761

  6. Methylation of novel markers of fragile X alleles is inversely correlated with FMRP expression and FMR1 activation ratio.

    PubMed

    Godler, David Eugeny; Tassone, Flora; Loesch, Danuta Zuzanna; Taylor, Annette Kimball; Gehling, Freya; Hagerman, Randi Jenssen; Burgess, Trent; Ganesamoorthy, Devika; Hennerich, Debbie; Gordon, Lavinia; Evans, Andrew; Choo, K H; Slater, Howard Robert

    2010-04-15

    The fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by silencing of the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1) and the absence of its product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), resulting from CpG island methylation associated with large CGG repeat expansions (more than 200) termed full mutation (FM). We have identified a number of novel epigenetic markers for FXS using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), naming the most informative fragile X-related epigenetic element 1 (FREE1) and 2 (FREE2). Methylation of both regions was correlated with that of the FMR1 CpG island detected using Southern blot (FREE1 R = 0.97; P < 0.00001, n = 23 and FREE2 R = 0.93; P < 0.00001, n = 23) and negatively correlated with lymphocyte expression of FMRP (FREE1 R = -0.62; P = 0.01, n = 15 and FREE2 R = -0.55; P = 0.03, n = 15) in blood of partially methylated 'high functioning' FM males. In blood of FM carrier females, methylation of both markers was inversely correlated with the FMR1 activation ratio (FREE1 R = -0.93; P < 0.0001, n = 12 and FREE2 R = -0.95; P < 0.0001, n = 9). In a sample set of 49 controls, 18 grey zone (GZ 40-54 repeats), 22 premutation (PM 55-170 repeats) and 22 (affected) FXS subjects, the FREE1 methylation pattern was consistent between blood and chorionic villi as a marker of methylated FM alleles and could be used to differentiate FXS males and females from controls, as well as from carriers of GZ/PM alleles, but not between GZ and PM alleles and controls. Considering its high-throughput and specificity for pathogenic FM alleles, low cost and minimal DNA requirements, FREE MALDI-TOF MS offers a unique tool in FXS diagnostics and newborn population screening. PMID:20118148

  7. Investigator HDplex markers: allele frequencies and mutational events in a North Italian population.

    PubMed

    Turrina, Stefania; Ferrian, Melissa; Caratti, Stefano; De Leo, Domenico

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) analysis represents the method of election in forensic genetics and up to now, 23 STRs are available for these purposes. However, in particular circumstances such as human identification or complex kinship cases, examination of additional STRs may be required in order to obtain reliable conclusions. For this purpose, a new multiplex STR system, namely Investigator® HDplex kit (QIAGEN) that coamplifies a set of 12 autosomal loci, 9 of which, represents novel supplementary STRs, was recently developed. A population sample of 359 unrelated healthy subjects residing in North Italy was typed to determine allele frequencies, forensic parameters and genetic distances among European populations. Furthermore, to evaluate the suitability of the HDplex kit as an auxiliary tool for paternity testing, mutation rates were estimated on 84 confirmed family trios. The 12 loci resulted highly informative with a combined power of discrimination of 0.999998 and no departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed with the sole exception of locus D4S2366. From the comparison of our population sample and European reference populations, a single significant difference was revealed with the Poland population at D4S2366 locus. With regard to the mutation rate study, on a total of 2,016 meioses considered, six single-step mutational events were observed and the average mutation rate calculated was of 2.94?×?10(-3) per locus per generation (95 % confidence interval, 1.08?×?10(-3)-6.39?×?10(-3)). PMID:25205546

  8. Parent psychological states predict changes in inflammatory markers in children with asthma and healthy children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jutta M. Wolf; Gregory E. Miller; Edith Chen

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that parent mental health is associated with asthma morbidity in children. However, the biological pathways explaining these relationships are not known. The present study tested whether parent psychological characteristics could predict longitudinal changes in inflammatory markers in children with asthma and a comparison group of healthy children.For this, 33 healthy children (17m\\/16f; 13.5years) and 50 children

  9. Allelic database and divergence among Psidium accessions by using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    da Costa, S R; Santos, C A F

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the genetic variability among guava accessions and wild Psidium species of the Embrapa Semiárido germplasm collection by using microsatellite loci to guide genetic resources and breeding programs, emphasizing crosses between guava and other Psidium species. DNA was extracted using the 2X CTAB method, and polymerase chain reaction products were analyzed on 6% denatured polyacrylamide gels stained with silver nitrate. The unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic average dendrogram generated from the distance matrix of the Jaccard coefficient for 183 alleles of 13 microsatellite loci was used for visualization of genetic similarity. The number of base pairs was estimated using inverse mobility method based on the regression of known-size products. Analysis of molecular variance was performed using total decomposition between and within guava accessions. The accessions showed similarity from 0.75 to 1.00, with the dendrogram presenting cophenetic value of 0.85. Five groups were observed: the first included guava accessions; the second, P. guineense accessions; the third, one accession of P. friedrichsthalianum; and the last 2 groups, P. cattleianum. The genetic similarity among P. guineense and some guava accessions were above 80%, suggesting greater possibility to obtain interspecies hybrids between these 2 species. The genetic variability between the accessions was considered to be high (?ST = 0.238), indicating that guava genetic variability is not uniformly distributed among the 9 Brazilian states from where the accession were obtained. Obtaining a greater number of accessions by Brazilian states is recommended in order to have greater diversity among the species. PMID:24391028

  10. Early Markers of Language and Attention: Mutual Contributions and the Impact of Parent-Infant Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartstein, Maria A.; Crawford, Jennifer; Robertson, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the contribution of attentional skills to early language, and the influence of early language markers on the development of attention, simultaneously examining the impact of parent-child interaction factors (reciprocity/synchrony and sensitivity/responsivity), including their potential moderator effects. All…

  11. [Allelic state of the molecular marker for the golden nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) resistance gene H1 among Ukrainian and world cultivars of potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum)].

    PubMed

    Karelov, A V; Pilipenko, L A; Kozub, N A; Bondus, R A; Borzykh, A U; Sozinov, I A; Blium, Ia B; Sozinov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was determination of allelic state of the H1 resistance gene against the pathotypes Ro1 and Ro4 of golden potato cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) among Ukrainian and world potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum) cultivars. The allelic condition of the TG689 marker was determined by PCR with DNA samples isolated from tubers of potato and primers, one pair of which flanks the allele-specific region and the other one was used for the control of DNA quality. Among analyzed 77 potato cultivars the allele of marker associated with the H1-type resistance was found in 74% of Ukrainian and 90% foreign ones although some of those cultivars proved to be susceptible to the golden potato nematode in field. The obtained data confirm the presence of H1-resistance against golden nematode pathotypes Ro1 and Ro4 among the Ukrainian potato cultivars and efficiency of the used marker within the accuracy that has been declared by its authors. PMID:24228497

  12. Deletion and allelic exchange of the Aspergillus fumigatus veA locus via a novel recyclable marker module.

    PubMed

    Krappmann, Sven; Bayram, Ozgür; Braus, Gerhard H

    2005-07-01

    Detailed evaluation of gene functions in an asexual fungus requires advanced methods of molecular biology. For the generation of targeted gene deletions in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus we designed a novel blaster module allowing dominant selection of transformants due to resistance to phleomycin as well as dominant (counter)selection of a Cre recombinase-mediated marker excision event. For validation purposes we have deleted the A. fumigatus pabaA gene in a wild-type isolate by making use of this cassette. The resulting pabaA::loxP strain served as the recipient for subsequent targeting of the velvet locus. Homologous reconstitution of the deleted gene was performed by an allele whose expression is driven in a nitrogen source-dependent manner, as validated by Northern analyses. Overexpression of the veA locus in A. fumigatus does not result in any obvious phenotype, whereas the sporulation capacities of the veA null mutant are reduced on nitrate-containing medium, a phenotype that is completely restored in the reconstituted strain. PMID:16002655

  13. Enrichment of an intraspecific genetic map of upland cotton by developing markers using parental RAD sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hantao; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Beibei; Shen, Chao; Lin, Zhongxu

    2015-04-01

    RAD sequencing was performed using DH962 and Jimian5 as upland cotton mapping parents. Sequencing data for DH962 and Jimian5 were assembled into the genome sequences of ?55.27 and ?57.06 Mb, respectively. Analysing genome sequences of the two parents, 1,323 SSR, 3,838 insertion/deletion (InDel), and 9,366 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) primer pairs were developed. All of the SSRs, 121 InDels, 441 SNPs, and other 6,747 primer pairs were screened in the two parents, and a total of 535 new polymorphic loci were identified. A genetic map including 1,013 loci was constructed using these results and 506 loci previously published for this population. Twenty-seven new QTLs for yield and fibre quality were identified, indicating that the efficiency of QTL detection was greatly improved by the increase in map density. Comparative genomics showed there to be considerable homology and collinearity between the AT and A2 genomes and between the DT and D5 genomes, although there were a few exchanges and introgressions among the chromosomes of the A2 genome. Here, the development of markers using parental RAD sequencing was effective, and a high-density intraspecific genetic map was constructed. This map can be used for molecular marker-assisted selection in cotton. PMID:25656006

  14. Enrichment of an intraspecific genetic map of upland cotton by developing markers using parental RAD sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hantao; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Beibei; Shen, Chao; Lin, Zhongxu

    2015-01-01

    RAD sequencing was performed using DH962 and Jimian5 as upland cotton mapping parents. Sequencing data for DH962 and Jimian5 were assembled into the genome sequences of ?55.27 and ?57.06 Mb, respectively. Analysing genome sequences of the two parents, 1,323 SSR, 3,838 insertion/deletion (InDel), and 9,366 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) primer pairs were developed. All of the SSRs, 121 InDels, 441 SNPs, and other 6,747 primer pairs were screened in the two parents, and a total of 535 new polymorphic loci were identified. A genetic map including 1,013 loci was constructed using these results and 506 loci previously published for this population. Twenty-seven new QTLs for yield and fibre quality were identified, indicating that the efficiency of QTL detection was greatly improved by the increase in map density. Comparative genomics showed there to be considerable homology and collinearity between the AT and A2 genomes and between the DT and D5 genomes, although there were a few exchanges and introgressions among the chromosomes of the A2 genome. Here, the development of markers using parental RAD sequencing was effective, and a high-density intraspecific genetic map was constructed. This map can be used for molecular marker-assisted selection in cotton. PMID:25656006

  15. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding. PMID:24926299

  16. Sibs with atopy and asthma share marker alleles at 11q13, but not at 7q31 or 14q32

    SciTech Connect

    Kate, L.P. ten; Collee, J.M. [Free Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vries, H.G. de [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We studied allele sharing in 26 sib-pairs affected with atopy and asthma, recruited through a pediatric pulmonology department. Inclusion criteria were a positive score (2 symptoms or more) on a modified Dutch version of the MRC/ECCS questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and positive IgE tests (specific IgE 0.35 PRU/ml or more; total serum IgE for children under 10 years as described by Kjellmann et al., 1976; for older children 100 U/ml or over). Twenty-six sibpairs fulfilled these criteria. The microsatellites and polymorphic markers used in the analysis were 17bTA (an intragenic marker in the cystic fibrosis gene on 7q31); D11S534, D11S527, D11S97, PYGM, D11S480, Fc{epsilon}RI (all on 11q13, ordered from telomere to centromere) and D14S51 (a CA repeat close to the {alpha}-1-antitrypsin gene). We observed no sharing with the markers on 7q31 and 14q32, but significant sharing with markers on chromosome 11q13, especially D11S97, PYGM and D11S480. Sharing patterns were consistent with the existence of a dominant gene involved in the pathogenesis of atopic asthma on chromosome 11.

  17. Recurrent parent genome recovery analysis in a marker-assisted backcrossing program of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-02-01

    Backcross breeding is the most commonly used method for incorporating a blast resistance gene into a rice cultivar. Linkage between the resistance gene and undesirable units can persist for many generations of backcrossing. Marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) along with marker-assisted selection (MAS) contributes immensely to overcome the main limitation of the conventional breeding and accelerates recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. The MABC approach was employed to incorporate (a) blast resistance gene(s) from the donor parent Pongsu Seribu 1, the blast-resistant local variety in Malaysia, into the genetic background of MR219, a popular high-yielding rice variety that is blast susceptible, to develop a blast-resistant MR219 improved variety. In this perspective, the recurrent parent genome recovery was analyzed in early generations of backcrossing using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Out of 375 SSR markers, 70 markers were found polymorphic between the parents, and these markers were used to evaluate the plants in subsequent generations. Background analysis revealed that the extent of RPG recovery ranged from 75.40% to 91.3% and from 80.40% to 96.70% in BC1F1 and BC2F1 generations, respectively. In this study, the recurrent parent genome content in the selected BC2F2 lines ranged from 92.7% to 97.7%. The average proportion of the recurrent parent in the selected improved line was 95.98%. MAS allowed identification of the plants that are more similar to the recurrent parent for the loci evaluated in backcross generations. The application of MAS with the MABC breeding program accelerated the recovery of the RP genome, reducing the number of generations and the time for incorporating resistance against rice blast. PMID:25553855

  18. Detection and molecular characterization of two FAD3 genes controlling linolenic acid content and development of allele-specific markers in yellow mustard (Sinapis alba).

    PubMed

    Tian, Entang; Zeng, Fangqin; MacKay, Kimberly; Roslinsky, Vicky; Cheng, Bifang

    2014-01-01

    Development of yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.) with superior quality traits (low erucic and linolenic acid contents, and low glucosinolate content) can make this species as a potential oilseed crop. We have recently isolated three inbred lines Y1127, Y514 and Y1035 with low (3.8%), medium (12.3%) and high (20.8%) linolenic acid (C18?3) content, respectively, in this species. Inheritance studies detected two fatty acid desaturase 3 (FAD3) gene loci controlling the variation of C18?3 content. QTL mapping revealed that the two FAD3 gene loci responsible for 73.0% and 23.4% of the total variation and were located on the linkage groups Sal02 and Sal10, respectively. The FAD3 gene on Sal02 was referred to as SalFAD3.LA1 and that on Sal10 as SalFAD3.LA2. The dominant and recessive alleles were designated as LA1 and la1 for SalFAD3.LA1, and LA2 and la2 for SalFAD3.LA2. Cloning and alignment of the coding and genomic DNA sequences revealed that the SalFAD3.LA1 and SalFAD3.LA2 genes each contained 8 exons and 7 introns. LA1 had a coding DNA sequence (CDS) of 1143 bp encoding a polypeptide of 380 amino acids, whereas la1 was a loss-of-function allele due to an insertion of 584 bp in exon 3. Both LA2 and la2 had a CDS of 1152 bp encoding a polypeptide of 383 amino acids. Allele-specific markers for LA1, la1, LA2 and la2 co-segregated with the C18?3 content in the F2 populations and will be useful for improving fatty acid composition through marker assisted selection in yellow mustard breeding. PMID:24823372

  19. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Two FAD3 Genes Controlling Linolenic Acid Content and Development of Allele-Specific Markers in Yellow Mustard (Sinapis alba)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Entang; Zeng, Fangqin; MacKay, Kimberly; Roslinsky, Vicky; Cheng, Bifang

    2014-01-01

    Development of yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.) with superior quality traits (low erucic and linolenic acid contents, and low glucosinolate content) can make this species as a potential oilseed crop. We have recently isolated three inbred lines Y1127, Y514 and Y1035 with low (3.8%), medium (12.3%) and high (20.8%) linolenic acid (C18?3) content, respectively, in this species. Inheritance studies detected two fatty acid desaturase 3 (FAD3) gene loci controlling the variation of C18?3 content. QTL mapping revealed that the two FAD3 gene loci responsible for 73.0% and 23.4% of the total variation and were located on the linkage groups Sal02 and Sal10, respectively. The FAD3 gene on Sal02 was referred to as SalFAD3.LA1 and that on Sal10 as SalFAD3.LA2. The dominant and recessive alleles were designated as LA1 and la1 for SalFAD3.LA1, and LA2 and la2 for SalFAD3.LA2. Cloning and alignment of the coding and genomic DNA sequences revealed that the SalFAD3.LA1 and SalFAD3.LA2 genes each contained 8 exons and 7 introns. LA1 had a coding DNA sequence (CDS) of 1143 bp encoding a polypeptide of 380 amino acids, whereas la1 was a loss-of-function allele due to an insertion of 584 bp in exon 3. Both LA2 and la2 had a CDS of 1152 bp encoding a polypeptide of 383 amino acids. Allele-specific markers for LA1, la1, LA2 and la2 co-segregated with the C18?3 content in the F2 populations and will be useful for improving fatty acid composition through marker assisted selection in yellow mustard breeding. PMID:24823372

  20. Dissemination of the highly expressed Bx7 glutenin subunit (Glu-B1al allele) in wheat as revealed by novel PCR markers and RP-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Butow, B J; Gale, K R; Ikea, J; Juhász, A; Bedö, Z; Tamás, L; Gianibelli, M C

    2004-11-01

    Increased expression of the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Bx7 is associated with improved dough strength of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flour. Several cultivars and landraces of widely different genetic backgrounds from around the world have now been found to contain this so-called 'over-expressing' allelic form of the Bx7 subunit encoded by Glu-B1al. Using three methods of identification, SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC and PCR marker analysis, as well as pedigree information, we have traced the distribution and source of this allele from a Uruguayan landrace, Americano 44D, in the mid-nineteenth century. Results are supported by knowledge of the movement of wheat lines with migrants. All cultivars possessing the Glu-B1al allele can be identified by the following attributes: (1) the elution of the By sub-unit peak before the Dx sub-unit peak by RP-HPLC, (2) high expression levels of Bx7 (>39% Mol% Bx), (3) a 43 bp insertion in the matrix-attachment region (MAR) upstream of the gene promoter relative to Bx7 and an 18 bp nucleotide duplication in the coding region of the gene. Evidence is presented indicating that these 18 and 43 bp sequence insertions are not causal for the high expression levels of Bx7 as they were also found to be present in a small number of hexaploid species, including Chinese Spring, and species expressing Glu-B1ak and Glu-B1a alleles. In addition, these sequence inserts were found in different isolates of the tetraploid wheat, T. turgidum, indicating that these insertion/deletion events occurred prior to hexaploidization. PMID:15340686

  1. Genetic Markers in Blood in a Canadian Eskimo Population with a Comparison of Allele Frequencies in Circumpolar Populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phyllis J. McAlpine; S.-H. Chen; Diane W. Cox; J. B. Dossetor; Eloise Giblett; A. G. Steinberg; Nancy E. Simpson

    1974-01-01

    38 genetically determined marker systems were examined in blood samples obtained from a relatively isolated population of Eskimos living in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. 2,3-DPGM, sGOT, sGPT, PGM1; 6PGD, AcP, E2 cholinesterase, haptoglobin, Gm, Inv, and HL-A were found to exist in polymorphic form, while no variation of the remaining 27 markers was detected in the population. The 2,3-DPGM 2–1

  2. Identification of FAD2 and FAD3 genes in Brassica napus genome and development of allele-specific markers for high oleic and low linolenic acid contents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingyong; Fan, Chuchuan; Guo, Zhenhua; Qin, Jie; Wu, Jianzhong; Li, Qingyuan; Fu, Tingdong; Zhou, Yongming

    2012-08-01

    Modification of oleic acid (C18:1) and linolenic acid (C18:3) contents in seeds is one of the major goals for quality breeding after removal of erucic acid in oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The fatty acid desaturase genes FAD2 and FAD3 have been shown as the major genes for the control of C18:1 and C18:3 contents. However, the genome structure and locus distributions of the two gene families in amphidiploid B. napus are still not completely understood to date. In the present study, all copies of FAD2 and FAD3 genes in the A- and C-genome of B. napus and its two diploid progenitor species, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, were identified through bioinformatic analysis and extensive molecular cloning. Two FAD2 genes exist in B. rapa and B. oleracea, and four copies of FAD2 genes exist in B. napus. Three and six copies of FAD3 genes were identified in diploid species and amphidiploid species, respectively. The genetic control of high C18:1 and low C18:3 contents in a double haploid population was investigated through mapping of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the traits and the molecular cloning of the underlying genes. One major QTL of BnaA.FAD2.a located on A5 chromosome was responsible for the high C18:1 content. A deleted mutation in the BnaA.FAD2.a locus was uncovered, which represented a previously unidentified allele for the high oleic variation in B. napus species. Two major QTLs on A4 and C4 chromosomes were found to be responsible for the low C18:3 content in the DH population as well as in SW Hickory. Furthermore, several single base pair changes in BnaA.FAD3.b and BnaC.FAD3.b were identified to cause the phenotype of low C18:3 content. Based on the results of genetic mapping and identified sequences, allele-specific markers were developed for FAD2 and FAD3 genes. Particularly, single-nucleotide amplified polymorphisms markers for FAD3 alleles were demonstrated to be a reliable type of SNP markers for unambiguous identification of genotypes with different content of C18:3 in amphidiploid B. napus. PMID:22534790

  3. Deletion and Allelic Exchange of the Aspergillus fumigatus veA Locus via a Novel Recyclable Marker Module

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sven Krappmann; Ozgur Bayram; Gerhard H. Braus

    2005-01-01

    Detailed evaluation of gene functions in an asexual fungus requires advanced methods of molecular biology. For the generation of targeted gene deletions in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus we designed a novel blaster module allowing dominant selection of transformants due to resistance to phleomycin as well as dominant (counter)selection of a Cre recombinase-mediated marker excision event. For validation purposes we

  4. Utility testing of an apple skin color MdMYB1 marker in two progenies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reported allele-specific dCAP PCR marker associated with apple fruit red skin color was tested in 18 elite breeding parents and two apple cross populations. Among all tested cultivars except one, a consistent relationship was observed between red fruit color and the presence of allele. In both pop...

  5. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, Erin L.; Gedy, Bradley C.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Garey, Andrew L.; Emel, Sarah L.; Mumma, Matthew; Wagner, Helene H.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Cushman, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals.

  6. Effects of sample size, number of markers, and allelic richness on the detection of spatial genetic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landguth, E.L.; Fedy, B.C.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.; Garey, A.L.; Emel, S.L.; Mumma, M.; Wagner, H.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Cushman, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of study design on the ability to detect the effects of landscape pattern on gene flow is one of the most pressing methodological gaps in landscape genetic research. To investigate the effect of study design on landscape genetics inference, we used a spatially-explicit, individual-based program to simulate gene flow in a spatially continuous population inhabiting a landscape with gradual spatial changes in resistance to movement. We simulated a wide range of combinations of number of loci, number of alleles per locus and number of individuals sampled from the population. We assessed how these three aspects of study design influenced the statistical power to successfully identify the generating process among competing hypotheses of isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-barrier, and isolation-by-landscape resistance using a causal modelling approach with partial Mantel tests. We modelled the statistical power to identify the generating process as a response surface for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions after introduction of isolation-by-landscape resistance. All three variables (loci, alleles and sampled individuals) affect the power of causal modelling, but to different degrees. Stronger partial Mantel r correlations between landscape distances and genetic distances were found when more loci were used and when loci were more variable, which makes comparisons of effect size between studies difficult. Number of individuals did not affect the accuracy through mean equilibrium partial Mantel r, but larger samples decreased the uncertainty (increasing the precision) of equilibrium partial Mantel r estimates. We conclude that amplifying more (and more variable) loci is likely to increase the power of landscape genetic inferences more than increasing number of individuals. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Psychosocial and Biological Markers of Daily Lives of Midlife Parents of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Almeida, David M.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Savla, Jyoti; Stawski, Robert S.; Hong, Jinkuk; Taylor, Julie Lounds

    2009-01-01

    Using daily telephone interviews, 82 midlife parents (mean age = 57.4) of children with disabilities (mean age = 29.9) were compared with a closely matched sample of unaffected parents (N = 82) to elucidate the daily experience of non-normative parenting. In addition, salivary cortisol samples were obtained to examine whether parents of children…

  8. The inheritance of genetic markers in microspore-derived plants of barley Hordeum vulgare L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Thompson; K. Chalmers; R. Waugh; B. P. Forster; W. T. B. Thomas; P. D. S. Caligari; W. Powell

    1991-01-01

    Biochemical, molecular and morphological markers have been used to monitor the segregation of alleles at major gene loci in microspore-derived lines of four spring barley crosses and their parents. Significant deviations from the expected Mendelian ratios were observed for four of the ten markers studied in the cross. Distorted ratios were associated with loci located on chromosomes 4H and 6H.

  9. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being the best. Conclusions Different allele coding methods lead to the same inference in the marker-based and equivalent models when a fixed general mean is included in the model. However, reliabilities of genomic breeding values are affected by the allele coding method used. The centered coding has some numerical advantages when Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used. PMID:21703021

  10. Psychosocial and Biological Markers of Daily Lives of Midlife Parents of Children with Disabilities*

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Almeida, David M.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Savla, Jyoti; Stawski, Robert S.; Hong, Jinkuk; Taylor, Julie Lounds

    2009-01-01

    Using daily telephone interviews, 82 midlife parents (mean age = 57.4) of children with disabilities (mean age = 29.9) were compared with a closely matched sample of unaffected parents (n = 82) to elucidate the daily experience of nonnormative parenting. In addition, salivary cortisol samples were obtained to examine whether parents of children with disabilities had dysregulated diurnal rhythms and the extent to which the amount of time spent with children was associated with divergent patterns of cortisol expression. We found that parents of children with disabilities had similar patterns of daily time use and similar likelihood of positive daily events as the comparison group, but they had elevated levels of stress, negative affect, and physical symptoms, all reported on a daily basis. In addition, their diurnal rhythm of cortisol expression differed significantly from the comparison group, a pattern that was strongest for parents of children with disabilities on days when they spent more time with their children. PMID:19413131

  11. Bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers identify hybridization between rainbow trout and cutthroat trout subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Eight polymerase chain reaction primer sets amplifying bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers were developed that differentiate between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and various cutthroat trout (O. clarki) subspecies. The primers were tested within known F1 and first generation hybrid backcrosses and were shown to amplify codominantly within hybrids. Heterozygous individuals also amplified a slower migrating band that was a heteroduplex, caused by the annealing of polymerase chain reaction products from both species. These primer sets have numerous advantages for native cutthroat trout conservation including statistical genetic analyses of known crosses and simple hybrid identification.

  12. Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lao Parents and Teachers Association, Minneapolis, MN.

    This collection presents advice to help parents help their children succeed in school. Information sheets are included from many sources, in English and translated into Lao by the Lao Parents and Teachers Association. The emphasis is on the elementary grades, although some of the materials are useful for parents of high school students. The…

  13. Nonword repetition--a clinical marker for specific language impairment in Swedish associated with parents' language-related problems.

    PubMed

    Kalnak, Nelli; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Forssberg, Hans; Sahlén, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    First, we explore the performance of nonword repetition (NWR) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing children (TD) in order to investigate the accuracy of NWR as a clinical marker for SLI in Swedish-speaking school-age children. Second, we examine the relationship between NWR, family aggregation, and parental level of education in children with SLI. A sample of 61 children with SLI, and 86 children with TD, aged 8-12 years, were administered an NWR test. Family aggregation, measured as the prevalence of language and/or literacy problems (LLP) in parents of the children with SLI, was based on family history interviews. The sensitivity and specificity of nonword repetition was analyzed in a binary logistic regression, cut-off values were established with ROC curves, and positive and negative likelihood ratios reported. Results from the present study show that NWR distinguishes well between Swedish-speaking school-children with and without SLI. We found 90.2% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity at a cut-off level of -2 standard deviations for binary scoring of nonwords. Differences between the SLI and TD groups showed large effect sizes for the two scoring measures binary (d?=?2.11) and percent correct consonants (PCC) (d?=?1.79). The children with SLI were split into two subgroups: those with no parents affected with LLP (n?=?12), and those with one or both parents affected (n?=?49). The subgroup consisting of affected parents had a significantly lower score on NWR binary (p?=?.037), and there was a great difference between the subgroups (d?=?0.7). When compared to the TD group, the difference from the subgroup with affected parents was almost one standard deviation larger (d?=?2.47) than the difference from the TD to the subgroup consisting of non-affected parents (d?=?1.57). Our study calls for further exploration of the complex interaction between family aggregation, language input, and phenotypes of SLI. PMID:24586859

  14. Nonword Repetition – A Clinical Marker for Specific Language Impairment in Swedish Associated with Parents’ Language-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Kalnak, Nelli; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Forssberg, Hans; Sahlén, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    First, we explore the performance of nonword repetition (NWR) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing children (TD) in order to investigate the accuracy of NWR as a clinical marker for SLI in Swedish-speaking school-age children. Second, we examine the relationship between NWR, family aggregation, and parental level of education in children with SLI. A sample of 61 children with SLI, and 86 children with TD, aged 8–12 years, were administered an NWR test. Family aggregation, measured as the prevalence of language and/or literacy problems (LLP) in parents of the children with SLI, was based on family history interviews. The sensitivity and specificity of nonword repetition was analyzed in a binary logistic regression, cut-off values were established with ROC curves, and positive and negative likelihood ratios reported. Results from the present study show that NWR distinguishes well between Swedish-speaking school-children with and without SLI. We found 90.2% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity at a cut-off level of ?2 standard deviations for binary scoring of nonwords. Differences between the SLI and TD groups showed large effect sizes for the two scoring measures binary (d?=?2.11) and percent correct consonants (PCC) (d?=?1.79). The children with SLI were split into two subgroups: those with no parents affected with LLP (n?=?12), and those with one or both parents affected (n?=?49). The subgroup consisting of affected parents had a significantly lower score on NWR binary (p?=?.037), and there was a great difference between the subgroups (d?=?0.7). When compared to the TD group, the difference from the subgroup with affected parents was almost one standard deviation larger (d?=?2.47) than the difference from the TD to the subgroup consisting of non-affected parents (d?=?1.57). Our study calls for further exploration of the complex interaction between family aggregation, language input, and phenotypes of SLI. PMID:24586859

  15. Microsatellite (simple sequence repeat) marker-based paternity analysis of a seven-parent sugarcane polycross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not feasible to make all possible cross combinations among elite parents used in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeding programs, particularly within a single year. Hence, the polycross approach has been used to maximize the number of cross combinations that can be represented among progeny. Th...

  16. Clinic-Referred Mothers' Autobiographical Narratives as Markers of Their Parenting Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowinski, Katherine S.; Wahler, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Forty clinic-referred mothers completed questionnaires describing their children's problems and the mothers' parenting styles. In addition, each mother told three stories about their personal experiences in child care and one story about being cared for in their families of origin. Each story was transcribed and rated for coherence on six…

  17. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markun, Patricia Maloney, Ed.

    This document contains 11 articles which are concerned with the education and development of people who are, or will be, parents. The term "parenting" is used to emphasize the need to help fathers and mothers to deal effectively with their own children. Also, the term reflects the growing awareness that child rearing is the function of many…

  18. Microsatellite allele dose and configuration establishment (MADCE): an integrated approach for genetic studies in allopolyploids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic studies in allopolyploid plants are challenging because of the presence of similar sub-genomes, which leads to multiple alleles and complex segregation ratios. In this study, we describe a novel method for establishing the exact dose and configuration of microsatellite alleles for any accession of an allopolyploid plant species. The method, named Microsatellite Allele Dose and Configuration Establishment (MADCE), can be applied to mapping populations and pedigreed (breeding) germplasm in allopolyploids. Results Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the power and robustness of the MADCE method. In the mapping case, five microsatellites were analysed. These microsatellites amplified 35 different alleles based on size. Using MADCE, we uncovered 30 highly informative segregating alleles. A conventional approach would have yielded only 19 fully informative and six partially informative alleles. Of the ten alleles that were present in all progeny (and thereby ignored or considered homozygous when using conventional approaches), six were found to segregate by dosage when analysed with MADCE. Moreover, the full allelic configuration of the mapping parents could be established, including null alleles, homozygous loci, and alleles that were present on multiple homoeologues. In the second case, 21 pedigreed cultivars were analysed using MADCE, resulting in the establishment of the full allelic configuration for all 21 cultivars and a tracing of allele flow over multiple generations. Conclusions The procedure described in this study (MADCE) enhances the efficiency and information content of mapping studies in allopolyploids. More importantly, it is the first technique to allow the determination of the full allelic configuration in pedigreed breeding germplasm from allopolyploid plants. This enables pedigree-based marker-trait association studies the use of algorithms developed for diploid crops, and it may increase the effectiveness of LD-based association studies. The MADCE method therefore enables researchers to tackle many of the genotyping problems that arise when performing mapping, pedigree, and association studies in allopolyploids. We discuss the merits of MADCE in comparison to other marker systems in polyploids, including SNPs, and how MADCE could aid in the development of SNP markers in allopolyploids. PMID:22340438

  19. Construction of a genetic linkage map in tetraploid species using molecular markers.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Z W; Hackett, C A; Bradshaw, J E; McNicol, J W; Milbourne, D

    2001-01-01

    This article presents methodology for the construction of a linkage map in an autotetraploid species, using either codominant or dominant molecular markers scored on two parents and their full-sib progeny. The steps of the analysis are as follows: identification of parental genotypes from the parental and offspring phenotypes; testing for independent segregation of markers; partition of markers into linkage groups using cluster analysis; maximum-likelihood estimation of the phase, recombination frequency, and LOD score for all pairs of markers in the same linkage group using the EM algorithm; ordering the markers and estimating distances between them; and reconstructing their linkage phases. The information from different marker configurations about the recombination frequency is examined and found to vary considerably, depending on the number of different alleles, the number of alleles shared by the parents, and the phase of the markers. The methods are applied to a simulated data set and to a small set of SSR and AFLP markers scored in a full-sib population of tetraploid potato. PMID:11238421

  20. Research article Allele frequencies of six miniSTR markers in a population sample from Northern German and its application on forensic stain analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrike Herzog; Christa Augustin; Klaus Puschel

    A population study on six miniSTR loci (D10S1248, D14S1434, D22S1045, D1S1677, D2S441 and D4S2364) was performed on Northern German unrelated individuals. Allele frequencies and the usual forensic statistical parameters were defined. Additionally, the six loci were tested on DNA samples from mobiles phones, gear shifts plus steering wheels to test their robustness and sensitivity.

  1. Allele frequencies of six miniSTR markers in a population sample from Northern German and its application on forensic stain analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrike Herzog; Christa Augustin; Klaus Püschel

    2008-01-01

    A population study on six miniSTR loci (D10S1248, D14S1434, D22S1045, D1S1677, D2S441 and D4S2364) was performed on Northern German unrelated individuals. Allele frequencies and the usual forensic statistical parameters were defined.Additionally, the six loci were tested on DNA samples from mobiles phones, gear shifts plus steering wheels to test their robustness and sensitivity.

  2. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spock, Benjamin; And Others

    Various aspects of child-rearing are covered in this transcript of a program broadcast in the National Public Radio weekly series, "Options in Education." Authors of current popular books on parenting are interviewed. Benjamin Spock discusses changes (including sex role revisions) in his "Baby and Child Care" since the 1946 first edition. Eda…

  3. Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochim, Lisa; Mueller, Andrea

    This guide contains 15 learning activities that can be used in parenting classes, especially for adults with limited literacy skills. Activities include quotations for discussion and suggestions for conducting group discussions and writing lessons. The following activities are included: interpreting quotations about raising children; positive…

  4. Ethnic-Difference Markers for Use in Mapping by Admixture Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Collins-Schramm, Heather E.; Phillips, Carolyn M.; Operario, Darwin J.; Lee, Jane S.; Weber, James L.; Hanson, Robert L.; Knowler, William C.; Cooper, Richard; Li, Hongzhe; Seldin, Michael F.

    2002-01-01

    Mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD) is a potentially powerful technique for the mapping of complex genetic diseases. The practical requirements of this method include (a) a set of markers spanning the genome that have large allele-frequency differences between the parental ethnicities contributing to the admixed population and (b) an understanding of the extent of admixture in the study population. To this end, a DNA-pooling technique was used to screen microsatellite and diallelic insertion/deletion markers for allele-frequency differences between putative representatives of the parental populations of the admixed Mexican American (MA) and African American (AA) populations. Markers with promising pooled differences were then confirmed by individual genotyping in both the parental and admixed populations. For the MA population, screening of >600 markers identified 151 ethnic-difference markers (EDMs) with ?>0.30 (where ? is the absolute value of each allele-frequency difference between two populations, summed over all marker alleles and divided by two) that are likely to be useful for MALD analysis. For the AA population, analysis of >400 markers identified 97 EDMs. In addition, individual genotyping of these markers in Pima Amerindians, Yavapai Amerindians, European American (EA) individuals, Africans from Zimbabwe, MA individuals, and AA individuals, as well as comparison to the CEPH genotyping set, suggests that the differences between subpopulations of an ethnicity are small for many markers with large interethnic differences. Estimates of admixture that are based on individual genotyping of these markers are consistent with a 60% EA:40% Amerindian contribution to MA populations and with a 20% EA:80% African contribution to AA populations. Taken together, these data suggest that EDMs with large interpopulation and small intrapopulation differences can be readily identified for MALD studies in both AA and MA populations. PMID:11845411

  5. Microsatellite marker development and Mendelian analysis in the Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei).

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Husband, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) is an endangered arboreal macropodid endemic to the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea (PNG). We developed 5 microsatellite markers for D. matschiei, which are the first markers developed for Dendrolagus. We screened 17 additional markers that were developed for other marsupial taxa and identified 3 that were polymorphic in D. matschiei. We estimated allelic and genetic diversity with the set of 8 markers by analyzing 22 D. matschiei from Wasaunon on the Huon Peninsula, PNG. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 9 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.440 to 0.794. We tested for null alleles and Mendelian inheritance by analyzing 19 pairs of D. matschiei parents and offspring from Association of Zoos and Aquariums institutions. Null alleles were not detected and Mendelian inheritance was followed for all 8 markers. We also evaluated the reliability of using the markers to amplify DNA extracted from D. matschiei fecal samples and the ability of the markers to amplify DNA samples from Goodfellow's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi ssp.), Doria's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus dorianus ssp.), and Grizzled tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus inustus ssp.). Microsatellite markers can be used to inform management decisions to conserve D. matschiei in captivity and the wild. PMID:19783838

  6. Transformation of QTL genotypic effects to allelic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Yoshitaka

    2005-01-01

    The genotypic and allelic effect models are equivalent in terms of QTL detection in a simple additive model, but the QTL allelic model has the advantage of providing direct information for marker-assisted selection. However, the allelic matrix is four times as large as the genotypic IBD matrix, causing computational problems, especially in genome scans examining multiple positions. Transformation from genotypic to allelic effects, after estimating the genotypic effects with a smaller IBD matrix, can solve this problem. Although the validity of transformation from genotypic to allelic effects has been disputed, this work proves that transformation can successfully yield unique allelic effects when genotypic and allelic IBD matrixes exist. PMID:16093016

  7. IDDM2 - VNTR -encoded Susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes: Dominant Protection and Parental Transmission of Alleles of the Insulin Gene-linked Minisatellite Locus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon T. Bennett; Amanda J. Wilson; Francesco Cucca; Jørn Nerup; Flemming Pociot; Patricia A. McKinney; Anthony H. Barnett; Stephen C. Bain; John A. Todd

    1996-01-01

    IDDM2-encoded predisposition to type 1 diabetes has recently been mapped to the minisatellite or variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) locus upstream of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor II genes on human chromosome 11p15.5. In a UK case-control study (n=228 sporadic diabetics;n=441 healthy controls), we show here that the genotype homozygous for VNTR class I alleles is predisposing to

  8. Association between AgI-CA alleles and severity of autosomal recessive proximal spina lmuscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    DiDonato, C.J.; Carpten, J.D.; Fuerst, P.; Ingraham, S.E.; Mendell, J.R.; Burghes, A.H.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Morgan, K. [McGill Univ. (Canada); Prescott, G.; Simard, L.R. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal (Canada); McPherson, J.D. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been mapped to an 850-kb interval on 5q11.2-q13.3, between the centromeric D5S823 and telomeric D5S557 markers. We report a new complex marker, Ag1-CA, that lies in this interval, whose primers produce one, two, or rarely three amplification-fragment-length variants (AFLVs) per allele. Class I chromosomes are those which amplify a single AFLV allele, and class II chromosomes are those which amplify an allele with two or three AFLVs. Ag1-CA shows highly significant allelic association with type I SMA in both the French Canadian (Hopital Sainte-Justine (HSJ)) and American (Ohio State University (OSU)) populations (P < .0001). Significant association between the Ag1-CA genotype and disease severity was also observed. Type I patients were predominantly homozygous for class I chromosomes (P = .0003 OSU; P = 0.0012 HSJ), whereas the majority of type II patients were heterozygous for class I and II chromosomes (P = .0014 OSU; P = .001 HSJ). There was no significant difference in Ag1-CA genotype frequencies between type III patients (P = .5 OSU; P = .25 HSJ) and the paired normal chromosomes from both carrier parents. Our results indicate that Ag1-CA is the most closely linked marker to SMA and defines the critical candidate-gene region. Finally, we have proposed a model that should be taken into consideration when screening candidates SMA genes.

  9. Identification of incompatibility alleles and characterisation of molecular markers genetically linked to the A incompatibility locus in the white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis Larraya; María M. Peñas; Gumer Pérez; Cruz Santos; Enrique Ritter; Antonio G. Pisabarro; Lucía Ramírez

    1999-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is a hetertothallic homobasidiomycete whose mating is controlled by a bifactorial tetrapolar genetic system. Although this\\u000a mechanism is well accepted, there is a lack of knowledge about its molecular basis, as the incompatibility loci have not been\\u000a cloned and sequenced. As a first step towards the elucidation of the molecular structure of the A-type incompatibility locus, molecular markers

  10. Rapid pyramiding major resistance genes into parental lines in tomato hybrid breeding employing marker-assisted backcrossing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The success of marker-assisted pyramiding major resistance genes depends upon several factors, including the closeness between the markers and the target gene, the number of target genes to be pyramided, the kind of molecular markers to be used, and available technical facilities. This talk will dis...

  11. Genetic variation in the functional ENG allele inherited from the non-affected parent associates with presence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia 1 (HHT1) and may influence expression of PTPN14.

    PubMed

    Letteboer, Tom G W; Benzinou, Michael; Merrick, Christopher B; Quigley, David A; Zhau, Kechen; Kim, Il-Jin; To, Minh D; Jablons, David M; van Amstel, Johannes K P; Westermann, Cornelius J J; Giraud, Sophie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Lesca, Gaetan; Berg, Jonathan H; Balmain, Allan; Akhurst, Rosemary J

    2015-01-01

    HHT shows clinical variability within and between families. Organ site and prevalence of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) depend on the HHT causative gene and on environmental and genetic modifiers. We tested whether variation in the functional ENG allele, inherited from the unaffected parent, alters risk for pulmonary AVM in HHT1 mutation carriers who are ENG haploinsufficient. Genetic association was found between rs10987746 of the wild type ENG allele and presence of pulmonary AVM [relative risk = 1.3 (1.0018-1.7424)]. The rs10987746-C at-risk allele associated with lower expression of ENG RNA in a panel of human lymphoblastoid cell lines (P = 0.004). Moreover, in angiogenically active human lung adenocarcinoma tissue, but not in uninvolved quiescent lung, rs10987746-C was correlated with expression of PTPN14 (P = 0.004), another modifier of HHT. Quantitative TAQMAN expression analysis in a panel of normal lung tissues from 69 genetically heterogeneous inter-specific backcross mice, demonstrated strong correlation between expression levels of Eng, Acvrl1, and Ptpn14 (r2 = 0.75-0.9, P < 1 × 10(-12)), further suggesting a direct or indirect interaction between these three genes in lung in vivo. Our data indicate that genetic variation within the single functional ENG gene influences quantitative and/or qualitative differences in ENG expression that contribute to risk of pulmonary AVM in HHT1, and provide correlative support for PTPN14 involvement in endoglin/ALK1 lung biology in vivo. PTPN14 has been shown to be a negative regulator of Yap/Taz signaling, which is implicated in mechanotransduction, providing a possible molecular link between endoglin/ALK1 signaling and mechanical stress. EMILIN2, which showed suggestive genetic association with pulmonary AVM, is also reported to interact with Taz in angiogenesis. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms regulating these interactions in endothelial cells may ultimately provide more rational choices for HHT therapy. PMID:25815003

  12. Existing potato markers and marker conversions

    E-print Network

    Douches, David S.

    ) ­ Kasai et al. 2000 Genome 43:1-8 allele specific amplification of a diagnostic product - potatoes progeny #12;How do CAPS markers work? (CAPS = cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence) 7 1. Amplify all Eco RI reference: Konieczny A, Ausubel FM. Plant J 1993 4(2):403-410 #12;an unpublished marker linked

  13. Combined use of maternal, paternal and bi-parental genetic markers for the identification of wolf–dog hybrids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Vilà; C Walker; A-K Sundqvist; Ø Flagstad; Z Andersone; A Casulli; I Kojola; H Valdmann; J Halverson; H Ellegren

    2003-01-01

    The identification of hybrids is often a subject of primary concern for the development of conservation and management strategies, but can be difficult when the hybridizing species are closely related and do not possess diagnostic genetic markers. However, the combined use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), autosomal and Y chromosome genetic markers may allow the identification of hybrids and of the

  14. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele-workbench. Additionally, all software is ready for immediate use from an Atmosphere Virtual Machine Image available from the iPlant Collaborative (www.iplantcollaborative.org). PMID:25541944

  15. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele-workbench. Additionally, all software is ready for immediate use from an Atmosphere Virtual Machine Image available from the iPlant Collaborative (www.iplantcollaborative.org). PMID:25541944

  16. Mining the human phenome using allelic scores that index biological intermediates.

    PubMed

    Evans, David M; Brion, Marie Jo A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Munafò, Marcus; Whitfield, John B; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Timpson, Nicholas J; St Pourcain, Beate; Lawlor, Debbie A; Martin, Nicholas G; Dehghan, Abbas; Hirschhorn, Joel; Davey Smith, George

    2013-10-01

    It is common practice in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to focus on the relationship between disease risk and genetic variants one marker at a time. When relevant genes are identified it is often possible to implicate biological intermediates and pathways likely to be involved in disease aetiology. However, single genetic variants typically explain small amounts of disease risk. Our idea is to construct allelic scores that explain greater proportions of the variance in biological intermediates, and subsequently use these scores to data mine GWAS. To investigate the approach's properties, we indexed three biological intermediates where the results of large GWAS meta-analyses were available: body mass index, C-reactive protein and low density lipoprotein levels. We generated allelic scores in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and in publicly available data from the first Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We compared the explanatory ability of allelic scores in terms of their capacity to proxy for the intermediate of interest, and the extent to which they associated with disease. We found that allelic scores derived from known variants and allelic scores derived from hundreds of thousands of genetic markers explained significant portions of the variance in biological intermediates of interest, and many of these scores showed expected correlations with disease. Genome-wide allelic scores however tended to lack specificity suggesting that they should be used with caution and perhaps only to proxy biological intermediates for which there are no known individual variants. Power calculations confirm the feasibility of extending our strategy to the analysis of tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes in large genome-wide meta-analyses. We conclude that our method represents a simple way in which potentially tens of thousands of molecular phenotypes could be screened for causal relationships with disease without having to expensively measure these variables in individual disease collections. PMID:24204319

  17. Imputation of microsatellite alleles from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification across multiple Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Matthew C.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Wiggans, George R.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Weber, Kristina L.; Penedo, Cecilia T.; Berry, Donagh P.; Flynn, John; Garcia, Jose F.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Albuquerque, Milla; Silva, Marcos V. G. B.; Machado, Marco A.; Coffey, Mike; Moore, Kirsty; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Genestout, Lucie; Mazza, Raffaele; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Simpson, Barry; Marques, Elisa; McEwan, John C.; Cromie, Andrew; Coutinho, Luiz L.; Kuehn, Larry A.; Keele, John W.; Piper, Emily K.; Cook, Jim; Williams, Robert; Van Tassell, Curtis P.

    2013-01-01

    To assist cattle producers transition from microsatellite (MS) to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for parental verification we previously devised an effective and inexpensive method to impute MS alleles from SNP haplotypes. While the reported method was verified with only a limited data set (N = 479) from Brown Swiss, Guernsey, Holstein, and Jersey cattle, some of the MS-SNP haplotype associations were concordant across these phylogenetically diverse breeds. This implied that some haplotypes predate modern breed formation and remain in strong linkage disequilibrium. To expand the utility of MS allele imputation across breeds, MS and SNP data from more than 8000 animals representing 39 breeds (Bos taurus and B. indicus) were used to predict 9410 SNP haplotypes, incorporating an average of 73 SNPs per haplotype, for which alleles from 12 MS markers could be accurately be imputed. Approximately 25% of the MS-SNP haplotypes were present in multiple breeds (N = 2 to 36 breeds). These shared haplotypes allowed for MS imputation in breeds that were not represented in the reference population with only a small increase in Mendelian inheritance inconsistancies. Our reported reference haplotypes can be used for any cattle breed and the reported methods can be applied to any species to aid the transition from MS to SNP genetic markers. While ~91% of the animals with imputed alleles for 12 MS markers had ?1 Mendelian inheritance conflicts with their parents' reported MS genotypes, this figure was 96% for our reference animals, indicating potential errors in the reported MS genotypes. The workflow we suggest autocorrects for genotyping errors and rare haplotypes, by MS genotyping animals whose imputed MS alleles fail parentage verification, and then incorporating those animals into the reference dataset. PMID:24065982

  18. Prediction of hybrid performance in maize using molecular markers and joint analyses of hybrids and parental inbreds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tobias A. Schrag; Jens Möhring; Albrecht E. Melchinger; Barbara Kusterer; Baldev S. Dhillon; Hans-Peter Piepho; Matthias Frisch

    2010-01-01

    The identification of superior hybrids is important for the success of a hybrid breeding program. However, field evaluation\\u000a of all possible crosses among inbred lines requires extremely large resources. Therefore, efforts have been made to predict\\u000a hybrid performance (HP) by using field data of related genotypes and molecular markers. In the present study, the main objective\\u000a was to assess the

  19. Genetic variability among elite red clover ( Trifolium pratense L.) parents used in Chile as revealed by RAPD markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugo Campos-de Quiroz; Fernando Ortega-Klose

    2001-01-01

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is one of the main forage species of temperate regions. Cultivars of red clover are heterogeneous which makes their genetic\\u000a analysis difficult. We applied RAPDs (Random Amplifed Polymorphic DNA) in order to assess the genetic relationship and levels\\u000a of genetic variability existing among a group of 16 elite red clover parents organised in four subsets

  20. VNTR allele frequency distributions under the stepwise mutation model: A computer simulation approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Shriver; Li Jin; Ranajit Chakraborty; Eric Boerwinkle

    1993-01-01

    Variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) are a class of highly informative and widely dispersed genetic markers. Despite their wide application in biological science, little is known about their mutational mechanisms or population dynamics. The objective of this work was to investigate four summary measures of VNTR allele frequency distributions: number of alleles, number of modes, range in allele size,

  1. Disturbances in reality testing as markers of risk in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder: a systematic review from a developmental psychopathology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Angela J; Allen, Timothy A; Cullen, Kathryn R; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This comprehensive review examined the prevalence and progression of disturbances in reality testing (DRT), defined as psychotic symptoms, cognitive disruptions, and thought problems, in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder (O-BD). Our approach was grounded in a developmental psychopathology perspective and considered a broader phenotype of risk within the bipolar–schizophrenia spectrum as measured by categorical and dimensional assessments of DRT in high-risk youth. Methods Relevant studies were identified from numerous sources (e.g., PubMed, reference sections, and colleagues). Inclusion criteria were: (i) family risk studies published between 1975 and 2012 in which O-BD were contrasted with a comparison group (e.g., offspring of parents who had other psychiatric disorders or were healthy) on DRT outcomes and (ii) results reported for categorical or dimensional assessments of DRT (e.g., schizophrenia, psychotic symptoms, cluster A personality traits, or thought problems), yielding a total of 23 studies. Results Three key findings emerged: (i) categorical approaches of DRT in O-BD produced low incidence base rates and almost no evidence of significant differences in DRT between O-BD and comparison groups, whereas (ii) many studies using dimensional assessments of DRT yielded significant group differences in DRT. Furthermore, (iii) preliminary evidence from dimensional measures suggested that the developmental progression of DRT in O-BD might represent a prodrome of severe psychological impairment. Conclusions Preliminary but promising evidence suggests that DRT is a probable marker of risk for future impairment in O-BD. Methodological strengths and weaknesses, the psychometric properties of primary DRT constructs, and future directions for developmental and longitudinal research with O-BD are discussed. PMID:24034419

  2. Assignment of SNP allelic configuration in polyploids using competitive allele-specific PCR: application to citrus triploid progeny

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is a major component of eukaryote evolution. Estimation of allele copy numbers for molecular markers has long been considered a challenge for polyploid species, while this process is essential for most genetic research. With the increasing availability and whole-genome coverage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, it is essential to implement a versatile SNP genotyping method to assign allelic configuration efficiently in polyploids. Scope This work evaluates the usefulness of the KASPar method, based on competitive allele-specific PCR, for the assignment of SNP allelic configuration. Citrus was chosen as a model because of its economic importance, the ongoing worldwide polyploidy manipulation projects for cultivar and rootstock breeding, and the increasing availability of SNP markers. Conclusions Fifteen SNP markers were successfully designed that produced clear allele signals that were in agreement with previous genotyping results at the diploid level. The analysis of DNA mixes between two haploid lines (Clementine and pummelo) at 13 different ratios revealed a very high correlation (average = 0·9796; s.d. = 0·0094) between the allele ratio and two parameters [? angle = tan?1 (y/x) and y? = y/(x + y)] derived from the two normalized allele signals (x and y) provided by KASPar. Separated cluster analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) from mixed DNA simulating triploid and tetraploid hybrids provided 99·71 % correct allelic configuration. Moreover, triploid populations arising from 2n gametes and interploid crosses were easily genotyped and provided useful genetic information. This work demonstrates that the KASPar SNP genotyping technique is an efficient way to assign heterozygous allelic configurations within polyploid populations. This method is accurate, simple and cost-effective. Moreover, it may be useful for quantitative studies, such as relative allele-specific expression analysis and bulk segregant analysis. PMID:23422023

  3. NUMBER OF SEX ALLELES IN A SAMPLE OF HONEYBEE COLONIES Jean-Marie CORNUET Franck ARIES

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NUMBER OF SEX ALLELES IN A SAMPLE OF HONEYBEE COLONIES Jean-Marie CORNUET Franck ARIES Station of bree- ding work, this paper gives the theoretical distribution of the number of sex alleles in a sample the factors interfering with this trait, there is the possible identity of sex alleles of the workers' parents

  4. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, Emily J.; Stovold, Grahame T.; Li, Yongjun; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B.; Grattapaglia, Dario G.; Dungey, Heidi S.

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K). The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi-species SNP resource available with the EuCHIP60k, opens a whole new array of opportunities for high-throughput, genome-wide or targeted genotyping in species of Eucalyptus. PMID:26158446

  5. Leaf margin phenotype-specific restriction-site-associated DNA-derived markers for pineapple (Ananas comosus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Urasaki, Naoya; Goeku, Satoko; Kaneshima, Risa; Takamine, Tomonori; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Moromizato, Chie; Yonamine, Kaname; Hosaka, Fumiko; Terakami, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Shoda, Moriyuki

    2015-01-01

    To explore genome-wide DNA polymorphisms and identify DNA markers for leaf margin phenotypes, a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing analysis was employed to analyze three bulked DNAs of F1 progeny from a cross between a ‘piping-leaf-type’ cultivar, ‘Yugafu’, and a ‘spiny-tip-leaf-type’ variety, ‘Yonekura’. The parents were both Ananas comosus var. comosus. From the analysis, piping-leaf and spiny-tip-leaf gene-specific restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing tags were obtained and designated as PLSTs and STLSTs, respectively. The five PLSTs and two STSLTs were successfully converted to cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using the sequence differences between alleles. Based on the genotyping of the F1 with two SSR and three CAPS markers, the five PLST markers were mapped in the vicinity of the P locus, with the closest marker, PLST1_SSR, being located 1.5 cM from the P locus. The two CAPS markers from STLST1 and STLST3 perfectly assessed the ‘spiny-leaf type’ as homozygotes of the recessive s allele of the S gene. The recombination value between the S locus and STLST loci was 2.4, and STLSTs were located 2.2 cM from the S locus. SSR and CAPS markers are applicable to marker-assisted selection of leaf margin phenotypes in pineapple breeding. PMID:26175625

  6. Microsatellite marker diversity in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, M W; Giraldo, M C; Buendía, H F; Tovar, E; Duque, M C; Beebe, S E

    2006-06-01

    A diversity survey was used to estimate allelic diversity and heterozygosity of 129 microsatellite markers in a panel of 44 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes that have been used as parents of mapping populations. Two types of microsatellites were evaluated, based respectively on gene coding and genomic sequences. Genetic diversity was evaluated by estimating the polymorphism information content (PIC), as well as the distribution and range of alleles sizes. Gene-based microsatellites proved to be less polymorphic than genomic microsatellites in terms of both number of alleles (6.0 vs. 9.2) and PIC values (0.446 vs. 0.594) while greater size differences between the largest and the smallest allele were observed for the genomic microsatellites than for the gene-based microsatellites (31.4 vs. 19.1 bp). Markers that showed a high number of alleles were identified with a maximum of 28 alleles for the marker BMd1. The microsatellites were useful for distinguishing Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes, for uncovering the races within each genepool and for separating wild accessions from cultivars. Greater polymorphism and race structure was found within the Andean gene pool than within the Mesoamerican gene pool and polymorphism rate between genotypes was consistent with genepool and race identity. Comparisons between Andean genotypes had higher polymorphism (53.0%) on average than comparisons among Mesoamerican genotypes (33.4%). Within the Mesoamerican parental combinations, the intra-racial combinations between Mesoamerica and Durango or Jalisco race genotypes showed higher average rates of polymorphism (37.5%) than the within-race combinations between Mesoamerica race genotypes (31.7%). In multiple correspondance analysis we found two principal clusters of genotypes corresponding to the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools and subgroups representing specific races especially for the Nueva Granada and Peru races of the Andean gene pool. Intra population diversity was higher within the Andean genepool than within the Mesoamerican genepool and this pattern was observed for both gene-based and genomic microsatellites. Furthermore, intra-population diversity within the Andean races (0.356 on average) was higher than within the Mesoamerican races (0.302). Within the Andean gene pool, race Peru had higher diversity compared to race Nueva Granada, while within the Mesoamerican gene pool, the races Durango, Guatemala and Jalisco had comparable levels of diversity which were below that of race Mesoamerica. PMID:16614831

  7. Red cell glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) variation in Afro-Jamaican, Asiatic Indian, and Dutch populations. Is the GPX1*2 allele of "Thomas" variant an African marker?

    PubMed

    Meera Khan, P; Verma, C; Wijnen, L M; Jairaj, S

    1984-01-01

    A Cellogel procedure for screening the electrophoretic variants of the human red cell glutathione peroxidase ( GPX1 ) was described. Three hundred and ninety eight Dutch persons living in various parts of The Netherlands, 385 individuals born in various states of India, and 72 Jamaicans of African origin living in Birmingham, UK, were screened for GPX1 variants. The Dutch were monomorphic, while one Afro-Jamaican female and two males and one female of the 116 Punjabis were found to be variants indistinguishable from each other in their pattern of electrophoresis. The clear five banded pattern of the variant indicated that the subunit structure of the human red cell glutathione peroxidase is most probably a tetramer and suggested that the variant is the expression of a heterozygote due to alleles at an autosomal locus. The corresponding phenotype was designated tentatively as GPX1 2-1 and the alleles as GPX1 *1 and GPX1 *2 respectively. The variant 2-1 was found to be identical to the "Thomas" variant described by Beutler and West (1974). Thus so far, in addition to the Afro-Americans and Ashkenazi Jews (Beutler et al. 1974), the Punjabis of the Indian subcontinent (this report) were found to exhibit the GPX1 polymorphism due to the GPX1 *2 allele. The data discussed in this paper (which included unpublished observations on several African and non-African populations) suggest that the GPX1 *2 allele is originally an African variant and hint that the present day Punjabis of Indian subcontinent, like Ashkenazi Jews, are "predominantly of Mediterranean origin with some proportion of African ancestry" ( Mourant et al. 1976). PMID:6586636

  8. EST and EST-SSR marker resources for Iris

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shunxue; Okashah, Rebecca A; Cordonnier-Pratt, Marie-Michele; Pratt, Lee H; Ed Johnson, Virgil; Taylor, Christopher A; Arnold, Michael L; Knapp, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Background Limited DNA sequence and DNA marker resources have been developed for Iris (Iridaceae), a monocot genus of 200–300 species in the Asparagales, several of which are horticulturally important. We mined an I. brevicaulis-I. fulva EST database for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and developed ortholog-specific EST-SSR markers for genetic mapping and other genotyping applications in Iris. Here, we describe the abundance and other characteristics of SSRs identified in the transcript assembly (EST database) and the cross-species utility and polymorphisms of I. brevicaulis-I. fulva EST-SSR markers among wild collected ecotypes and horticulturally important cultivars. Results Collectively, 6,530 ESTs were produced from normalized leaf and root cDNA libraries of I. brevicaulis (IB72) and I. fulva (IF174), and assembled into 4,917 unigenes (1,066 contigs and 3,851 singletons). We identified 1,447 SSRs in 1,162 unigenes and developed 526 EST-SSR markers, each tracing a different unigene. Three-fourths of the EST-SSR markers (399/526) amplified alleles from IB72 and IF174 and 84% (335/399) were polymorphic between IB25 and IF174, the parents of I. brevicaulis × I. fulva mapping populations. Forty EST-SSR markers were screened for polymorphisms among 39 ecotypes or cultivars of seven species – 100% amplified alleles from wild collected ecotypes of Louisiana Iris (I.brevicaulis, I.fulva, I. nelsonii, and I. hexagona), whereas 42–52% amplified alleles from cultivars of three horticulturally important species (I. pseudacorus, I. germanica, and I. sibirica). Ecotypes and cultivars were genetically diverse – the number of alleles/locus ranged from two to 18 and mean heterozygosity was 0.76. Conclusion Nearly 400 ortholog-specific EST-SSR markers were developed for comparative genetic mapping and other genotyping applications in Iris, were highly polymorphic among ecotypes and cultivars, and have broad utility for genotyping applications within the genus. PMID:19515254

  9. Identification of a putative DNA replication origin in the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit beta3 and alpha5 gene cluster on human chromosome 15q11-q13, a region associated with parental imprinting and allele-specific replication timing.

    PubMed

    Sinnett, D; Woolf, E; Xie, W; Glatt, K; Kirkness, E F; Nielsen, T O; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M; Price, G B; Lalande, M

    1996-09-16

    The region containing the GABAA receptor beta3 and alpha5 subunit-encoding genes is subject to parental imprinting and is organized in different allele-specific replication timing domains. A 60-kb domain displaying a maternal early/paternal late pattern of allele-specific replication timing asynchrony is nested within a larger region displaying the opposite pattern. The proximal portion of this maternal early replicating domain is incorporated into phage clone lambda84. In order to identify DNA structures which may be associated with the boundary between the replication domains, phage lambda84 has been subcloned into smaller fragments and several of these have been analyzed by nucleotide sequencing. A plot of helical stability for 13kb of contiguous sequence reveals several A + T-rich regions which display potential DNA unwinding. The plasmid subclones from phage lambda84 have been analyzed for bent DNA and one of these, p82, contains bent DNA and overlaps with the region of highest potential helical instability. Of the seven plasmids tested, only p82 shows strong autonomous replication activity in an in vitro replication assay, with replication initiating within the genomic insert. These results suggest that a putative origin of DNA replication contained within p82 may play a role in establishing the allele-specific replication timing domains in the GABAA receptor subunit gene cluster. PMID:8964494

  10. The Maintenance of Single-Locus Polymorphism. IV. Models with Mutation from Existing Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, H. G.; Marks, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of viability selection to maintain allelic polymorphism is investigated using a constructionist approach. In extensions to the models we have previously proposed, a population is bombarded with a series of mutations whose fitnesses in conjunction with other alleles are functions of the corresponding fitnesses with a particular allele, the parent allele, already in the population. Allele frequencies are iterated simultaneously, thus allowing alleles to be driven to extinction by selection. Such models allow very high levels of polymorphism to evolve: up to 38 alleles in one case. Alleles that are lethal as homozygotes can evolve to surprisingly high frequencies. The joint evolution of allele frequencies and viabilities highlights the necessity to consider more than the current morphology of a population. Comparisons are made with the neutral theory of evolution and it is suggested that failure to reject neutrality using the Ewens-Watterson test cannot be regarded as evidence for the neutral theory. PMID:1732162

  11. A genetic linkage map for hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) based on RAPD and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Mehlenbacher, Shawn A; Brown, Rebecca N; Nouhra, Eduardo R; Gökirmak, Tufan; Bassil, Nahla V; Kubisiak, Thomas L

    2006-02-01

    A linkage map for European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) was constructed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and the 2-way pseudotestcross approach. A full-sib population of 144 seedlings from the cross OSU 252.146 x OSU 414.062 was used. RAPD markers in testcross configuration, segregating 1:1, were used to construct separate maps for each parent. Fifty additional RAPD loci were assigned to linkage groups as accessory markers whose exact location could not be determined. Markers in intercross configuration, segregating 3:1, were used to pair groups in one parent with their homologues in the other. Eleven groups were identified for each parent, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of hazelnut (n = x = 11). Thirty of the 31 SSR loci were able to be assigned to a linkage group. The maternal map included 249 RAPD and 20 SSR markers and spanned a distance of 661 cM. The paternal map included 271 RAPD and 28 SSR markers and spanned a distance of 812 cM. The maps are quite dense, with an average of 2.6 cM between adjacent markers. The S-locus, which controls pollen-stigma incompatibility, was placed on chromosome 5S where 6 markers linked within a distance of 10 cM were identified. A locus for resistance to eastern filbert blight, caused by Anisogramma anomala, was placed on chromosome 6R for which two additional markers tightly linked to the dominant allele were identified and sequenced. These maps will serve as a starting point for future studies of the hazelnut genome, including map-based cloning of important genes. The inclusion of SSR loci on the map will make it useful in other populations. PMID:16498462

  12. Tight Clustering and Hemizygosity of Apomixis-Linked Molecular Markers in Pennisetum squamulatum Implies Genetic Control of Apospory by a Divergent Locus that may have no Allelic Form in Sexual Genotypes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peggy Ozias-Akins; Dominique Roche; Wayne W. Hanna

    1998-01-01

    Apomixis is a naturally occurring mode of reproduction that results in embryo formation without the involvement of meiosis or fertilization of the egg. Seed-derived progeny of an apomictic plant are genetically identical to the maternal parent. We are studying a form of apomixis called apospory that occurs in the genus Pennisetum, a taxon in the grass family. A cultivated member

  13. SSR Marker Analysis of Genetic Relationships within Hydrangea Macrophylla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity studies using 39 SSR markers were carried out with 114 taxa of H. macrophylla. The SSR loci were highly variable among the taxa, producing a mean of 8.26 alleles per locus. Overall allelic richness was relatively high at 5.12 alleles per locus. Subspecies serrata contained nearly t...

  14. Mexican American ancestry-informative markers: examination of population structure and marker characteristics in European Americans, Mexican Americans, Amerindians and Asians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather E. Collins-Schramm; Bill Chima; Takanobu Morii; Kimberly Wah; Yolanda Figueroa; Lindsey A. Criswell; Robert L. Hanson; William C. Knowler; Gabriel Silva; John W. Belmont; Michael F. Seldin

    2004-01-01

    Markers with large differences in allele frequencies between ethnicities provide ancestry information that can be applied to genetic studies. We identified over 100 biallelic ancestry informative markers (AIMs) with large allele frequency differences between European Americans (EA) and Pima Amerindians from laboratory and database screens. For 35 of these markers, Mayan, Yavapai and Quechuan Amerindians were genotyped and compared with

  15. The relationship between parental genetic or phenotypic divergence and progeny variation in the maize nested association mapping population

    PubMed Central

    Hung, H-Y; Browne, C; Guill, K; Coles, N; Eller, M; Garcia, A; Lepak, N; Melia-Hancock, S; Oropeza-Rosas, M; Salvo, S; Upadyayula, N; Buckler, E S; Flint-Garcia, S; McMullen, M D; Rocheford, T R; Holland, J B

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate selection of parents for the development of mapping populations is pivotal to maximizing the power of quantitative trait loci detection. Trait genotypic variation within a family is indicative of the family's informativeness for genetic studies. Accurate prediction of the most useful parental combinations within a species would help guide quantitative genetics studies. We tested the reliability of genotypic and phenotypic distance estimators between pairs of maize inbred lines to predict genotypic variation for quantitative traits within families derived from biparental crosses. We developed 25 families composed of ?200 random recombinant inbred lines each from crosses between a common reference parent inbred, B73, and 25 diverse maize inbreds. Parents and families were evaluated for 19 quantitative traits across up to 11 environments. Genetic distances (GDs) among parents were estimated with 44 simple sequence repeat and 2303 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. GDs among parents had no predictive value for progeny variation, which is most likely due to the choice of neutral markers. In contrast, we observed for about half of the traits measured a positive correlation between phenotypic parental distances and within-family genetic variance estimates. Consequently, the choice of promising segregating populations can be based on selecting phenotypically diverse parents. These results are congruent with models of genetic architecture that posit numerous genes affecting quantitative traits, each segregating for allelic series, with dispersal of allelic effects across diverse genetic material. This architecture, common to many quantitative traits in maize, limits the predictive value of parental genotypic or phenotypic values on progeny variance. PMID:22027895

  16. Individual-based genotype analysis in studies of parentage and population assignment: how many loci, how many alleles?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis Bernatchez; Pierre Duchesne

    2000-01-01

    We developed multivatiate analytical models to predict the probability of assigning offspring to parental cou- ples as a function of population size, number of loci, and allelic diversity and the relationships between the probability of allocating individuals to their population of origin as a function of number of loci and allelic diversity. The parent- age model predicts that the number

  17. Allele age and a test for selection on rare alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, M

    2000-01-01

    An approximate expression for the probability distribution of the age of a neutral allele as a function of its frequency is derived for a population undergoing arbitrary changes in population size. A simple maximum-likelihood estimator of allele age based on frequency is also obtained. The distribution of allele age, combined with a model predicting the extent of intra-allelic variability generated by mutation and recombination, leads to a statistical test of whether a rare allele has experienced natural selection. The test is based on finding whether there is too little or too much intra-allelic variability to be consistent with the observed frequency. The test is applied to the locus, BRCA1, associated with early-onset breast cancer in humans and shows that two common disease-associated alleles (5382insC and 185delAG) appear to have been subject to natural selection. PMID:11127913

  18. Parent-of-origin dependent gene-specific knock down in mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Khursheed [Department of Biotechnology, Institute for Animal Breeding, Mariensee, 31535 Neustadt (Germany); Kues, Wilfried A. [Department of Biotechnology, Institute for Animal Breeding, Mariensee, 31535 Neustadt (Germany); Niemann, Heiner [Department of Biotechnology, Institute for Animal Breeding, Mariensee, 31535 Neustadt (Germany)]. E-mail: niemann@tzv.fal.de

    2007-07-06

    In mice hemizygous for the Oct4-GFP transgene, the F1 embryos show parent-of-origin dependent expression of the marker gene. F1 embryos with a maternally derived OG2 allele (OG2{sup mat}/-) express GFP in the oocyte and during preimplantation development until the blastocyst stage indicating a maternal and embryonic expression pattern. F1-embryos with a paternally inherited OG2 allele (OG2{sup pat}/-) express GFP from the 4- to 8-cell stage onwards showing only embryonic expression. This allows to study allele specific knock down of GFP expression. RNA interference (RNAi) was highly efficient in embryos with the paternally inherited GFP allele, whereas embryos with the maternally inherited GFP allele showed a delayed and less stringent suppression, indicating that the initial levels of the target transcript and the half life of the protein affect RNAi efficacy. RT-PCR analysis revealed only minimum of GFP mRNA. These results have implications for studies of gene silencing in mammalian embryos.

  19. Cystic fibrosis allele frequency, sex ratio anomalies and fertility: a new theory for the dissemination of mutant alleles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorian J. Pritchard

    1991-01-01

    The observation that mothers of cystic fibrosis patients come from sibships that are larger than those of the fathers is explained by a decrease in sex ratio with increasing size of parental sibships. This feature also provides the basis for a new theory for the dissemination of the major mutant allele, deduced to have arisen 2700–5000 years ago, in accordance

  20. Development and characterization of genomic SSR markers in Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chengcheng; Wu, Yanqi; Taliaferro, Charles M; Bell, Greg E; Martin, Dennis L; Smith, Mike W

    2014-08-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are a major molecular tool for genetic and genomic research that have been extensively developed and used in major crops. However, few are available in African bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy), an economically important warm-season turfgrass species. African bermudagrass is mainly used for hybridizations with common bermudagrass [C. dactylon var. dactylon (L.) Pers.] in the development of superior interspecific hybrid turfgrass cultivars. Accordingly, the major objective of this study was to develop and characterize a large set of SSR markers. Genomic DNA of C. transvaalensis '4200TN 24-2' from an Oklahoma State University (OSU) turf nursery was extracted for construction of four SSR genomic libraries enriched with [CA](n), [GA](n), [AAG](n), and [AAT](n) as core repeat motifs. A total of 3,064 clones were sequenced at the OSU core facility. The sequences were categorized into singletons and contiguous sequences to exclude redundancy. From the two sequence categories, 1,795 SSR loci were identified. After excluding duplicate SSRs by comparison with previously developed SSR markers using a nucleotide basic local alignment tool, 1,426 unique primer pairs (PPs) were designed. Out of the 1,426 designed PPs, 981 (68.8 %) amplified alleles of the expected size in the donor DNA. Polymorphisms of the SSR PPs tested in eight C. transvaalensis plants were 93 % polymorphic with 544 markers effective in all genotypes. Inheritance of the SSRs was examined in six F(1) progeny of African parents 'T577' × 'Uganda', indicating 917 markers amplified heritable alleles. The SSR markers developed in the study are the first large set of co-dominant markers in African bermudagrass and should be highly valuable for molecular and traditional breeding research. PMID:24585252

  1. Linkage mapping in apomictic and sexual Kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis L.) genotypes using a two way pseudo-testcross strategy based on AFLP and SAMPL markers.

    PubMed

    Porceddu, A.; Albertini, E.; Barcaccia, G.; Falistocco, E.; Falcinelli, M.

    2002-02-01

    The high versatility of the mode of reproduction and the retention of a pollen recognition system are the factors responsible for the extreme complexity of the genome in Poa pratensis L. Two genetic maps, one of an apomictic and one of a sexual genotype, were constructed using a two-way pseudo-testcross strategy and multiplex PCR-based molecular markers (AFLP and SAMPL). Due to the high ploidy level and the uncertainty of chromosome pairing-behavior at meiosis, only parent-specific single-dose markers (SDMs) that segregated 1:1 in an F(1) mapping population (161 out of 299 SAMPLs, and 70 out of 275 AFLPs) were used for linkage analysis. A total of 41 paternal (33 SAMPLs and 8 AFLPs) and 47 maternal (33 SAMPLs and 14 AFLPs) SDMs, tested to be linked in coupling phase, were mapped to 7+7 linkage groups covering 367 and 338.4 cM, respectively. The comparison between the two marker systems revealed that SAMPL markers were statistically more efficient than AFLP ones in detecting parent-specific SDMs (75% vs 32.4%). There were no significant differences in the percentages of distorted marker alleles detected by the two marker systems (27.8% of SAMPLs vs 21.3% of AFLPs). The pairwise comparison of co-segregational groups for linkage detection between marker loci suggested that at least some of the P. pratensis chromosomes pair preferentially at meiosis-I. PMID:12582697

  2. Detection of favorable alleles for plant height and crown rust tolerance in three connected populations of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Pauly, Laurence; Flajoulot, Sandrine; Garon, Jérôme; Julier, Bernadette; Béguier, Vincent; Barre, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    Plant height, which is an estimator of vegetative yield, and crown rust tolerance are major criteria for perennial ryegrass breeding. Genetic improvement has been achieved through phenotypic selection but it should be speeded up using marker-assisted selection, especially in this heterozygous species suffering from inbreeding depression. Using connected multiparental populations should increase the diversity studied and could substantially increase the power of quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection. The objective of this study was to detect the best alleles for plant height and rust tolerance among three connected populations derived from elite material by comparing an analysis per parent and a multipopulation connected analysis. For the studied traits, 17 QTL were detected with the analysis per parent while the additive and dominance models of the multipopulation connected analysis made it possible to detect 33 and 21 QTL, respectively. Favorable alleles have been detected in all parents. Only a few dominance effects were detected and they generally had lower values than the additive effects. The additive model of the multipopulation connected analysis was the most powerful as it made it possible to detect most of the QTL identified in the other analyses and 11 additional QTL. Using this model, plant growth QTL and rust tolerance QTL explained up to 19 and 38.6% of phenotypic variance, respectively. This example involving three connected populations is promising for an application on polycross progenies, traditionally used in breeding programs. Indeed, polycross progenies actually are a set of several connected populations. PMID:22234605

  3. Stability of Iso-alleles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aloha M. Hannah; Curt Stern

    1956-01-01

    THE high stability of most genes when kept under natural conditions is deduced from the relative rarity of spontaneous mutations which produce striking deviations from normality. The existence of wild-type iso-alleles, that is, of different alleles usually causing the same normal phenotype although distinguishable by their effects under special conditions, raises the question whether mutations from one iso-allele to another

  4. Distinguishing species of European sturgeons Acipenser spp. using microsatellite allele sequences.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, O; Hänni, C; Berrebi, P

    2011-01-01

    Five microsatellite markers were analysed and their alleles were sequenced for the three sturgeon species that lived in western Europe: the European sturgeon Acipenser sturio, the Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus and the Adriatic sturgeon Acipenser naccarii. A total of 94 different allele sequences were obtained. Fixed mutations in the flanking regions or in the core repeat of microsatellites provided a clear distinction between the different species. Comparison of allele sequences also provided some insights into microsatellites and the evolution of Acipenser species. These nuclear markers can be used to solve species determination problems, and combined with mitochondrial markers, will be useful to identify introgression and hybridization among the three species. Moreover, because they are short and with a limited allele size range, they are particularly suited for analysis of museum specimens or archaeological remains. PMID:21235556

  5. Parental antagonism, relatedness asymmetries, and genomic imprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Haig, D

    1997-01-01

    The theory of inclusive fitness can be modified to consider separate coefficients of relatedness for an individual's maternal and paternal alleles. A gene is said to have parentally antagonistic effects if it has an inclusive fitness benefit when maternally derived, but an inclusive fitness cost when paternally derived (or vice versa). Parental antagonism favours the evolution of alleles that are expressed only when maternally derived or only when paternally derived (genomic imprinting). PMID:9404029

  6. A novel linkage map of sugarcane with evidence for clustering of retrotransposon-based markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of sugarcane as a sustainable crop has unlimited applications. The crop is one of the most economically viable for renewable energy production, and CO2 balance. Linkage maps are valuable tools for understanding genetic and genomic organization, particularly in sugarcane due to its complex polyploid genome of multispecific origins. The overall objective of our study was to construct a novel sugarcane linkage map, compiling AFLP and EST-SSR markers, and to generate data on the distribution of markers anchored to sequences of scIvana_1, a complete sugarcane transposable element, and member of the Copia superfamily. Results The mapping population parents (‘IAC66-6’ and ‘TUC71-7’) contributed equally to polymorphisms, independent of marker type, and generated markers that were distributed into nearly the same number of co-segregation groups (or CGs). Bi-parentally inherited alleles provided the integration of 19 CGs. The marker number per CG ranged from two to 39. The total map length was 4,843.19?cM, with a marker density of 8.87?cM. Markers were assembled into 92 CGs that ranged in length from 1.14 to 404.72?cM, with an estimated average length of 52.64?cM. The greatest distance between two adjacent markers was 48.25?cM. The scIvana_1-based markers (56) were positioned on 21 CGs, but were not regularly distributed. Interestingly, the distance between adjacent scIvana_1-based markers was less than 5?cM, and was observed on five CGs, suggesting a clustered organization. Conclusions Results indicated the use of a NBS-profiling technique was efficient to develop retrotransposon-based markers in sugarcane. The simultaneous maximum-likelihood estimates of linkage and linkage phase based strategies confirmed the suitability of its approach to estimate linkage, and construct the linkage map. Interestingly, using our genetic data it was possible to calculate the number of retrotransposon scIvana_1 (~60) copies in the sugarcane genome, confirming previously reported molecular results. In addition, this research possibly will have indirect implications in crop economics e.g., productivity enhancement via QTL studies, as the mapping population parents differ in response to an important fungal disease. PMID:22742069

  7. Bridging the genotyping gap: using genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to add high-density SNP markers and new value to traditional bi-parental mapping and breeding populations.

    PubMed

    Spindel, Jennifer; Wright, Mark; Chen, Charles; Cobb, Joshua; Gage, Joseph; Harrington, Sandra; Lorieux, Mathias; Ahmadi, Nourollah; McCouch, Susan

    2013-11-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) is the latest application of next-generation sequencing protocols for the purposes of discovering and genotyping SNPs in a variety of crop species and populations. Unlike other high-density genotyping technologies which have mainly been applied to general interest "reference" genomes, the low cost of GBS makes it an attractive means of saturating mapping and breeding populations with a high density of SNP markers. One barrier to the widespread use of GBS has been the difficulty of the bioinformatics analysis as the approach is accompanied by a high number of erroneous SNP calls which are not easily diagnosed or corrected. In this study, we use a 384-plex GBS protocol to add 30,984 markers to an indica (IR64) × japonica (Azucena) mapping population consisting of 176 recombinant inbred lines of rice (Oryza sativa) and we release our imputation and error correction pipeline to address initial GBS data sparsity and error, and streamline the process of adding SNPs to RIL populations. Using the final imputed and corrected dataset of 30,984 markers, we were able to map recombination hot and cold spots and regions of segregation distortion across the genome with a high degree of accuracy, thus identifying regions of the genome containing putative sterility loci. We mapped QTL for leaf width and aluminum tolerance, and were able to identify additional QTL for both phenotypes when using the full set of 30,984 SNPs that were not identified using a subset of only 1,464 SNPs, including a previously unreported QTL for aluminum tolerance located directly within a recombination hotspot on chromosome 1. These results suggest that adding a high density of SNP markers to a mapping or breeding population through GBS has a great value for numerous applications in rice breeding and genetics research. PMID:23918062

  8. Allelic configuration and polysomic inheritance of highly variable microsatellites in tetraploid gynodioecious Thymus praecox agg

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Urs Landergott; Yamama Naciri; J. Jakob Schneller; Rolf Holderegger

    2006-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a pivotal role in plant evolution. However, polyploids with polysomic inheritance have hitherto been severely underrepresented in plant population genetic studies, mainly due to a lack of appropriate molecular genetic markers. Here we report the establishment and experimental validation of six fully informative microsatellite markers in tetraploid gynodioecious Thymus praecox agg. Sequence data of 150 microsatellite alleles and

  9. Digital single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis for allelic imbalance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Digital single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis is developed to amplify a single template from a pool of DNA samples, thereby generating the amplicons that are homogeneous in sequence. Different fluorophores are then applied as probes to detect and discriminate different alleles (paternal vs maternal alleles or wild-type vs mutant), which can be readily counted. In this way, digital SNP analysis transforms the exponential and analog signals from conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to linear and digital ones. Digital SNP analysis has the following advantages. First, statistical analysis of the PCR products becomes available as the alleles can be directly counted. Second, this technology is designed to generate PCR products of the same size; therefore, DNA degradation would not be a problem as it commonly occurs when microsatellite markers are used to assess allelic status in clinical samples. Last, digital SNP analysis is designed to amplify a relatively small amount of DNA samples, which is available in some clinical samples. Digital SNP analysis has been applied in quantification of mutant alleles and detection of allelic imbalance in clinical specimens and it represents another example of the power of PCR and provides unprecedented opportunities for molecular genetic analysis. PMID:15542903

  10. Distribution of FMR-1 and associated microsatellite alleles in a normal Chinese population

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, N.; Houck, G.E. Jr.; Li, S.; Dobkin, C.; Brown, W.T. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States); Xixian Liu; Shen Gou [Tongji Medical Univ., Wuhan (China)

    1994-07-15

    The CGG repeat size distribution of the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR-1) was studied in a population of normal Chinese X chromosomes along with that of two proximal microsatellite polymorphic markers: FRAXAC1 and DXS548. The most common CGG repeat allele was 29 (47.2%) with 30 being second most common (26%). This distribution was different from that seen in Caucasian controls, where the most common allele was 30 repeats. Other differences with Caucasian controls included a secondary model peak at 36 repeats and the absence of peaks at 20 or 23 repeats. There were only two FRAXAC1 and five DXS548 alleles found in the Chinese sample. A striking linkage disequilibrium of FMR-1 alleles with FRAXAC1 alleles was observed, in that 90% of the 29 CGG repeat alleles but only 41% of the 30 CGG repeat alleles had the FRAXAC1 152 bp allele (18 AC repeats). This disequilibrium suggests that slippage between the closely spaced normal CGG repeat alleles, 29 and 30, and between 152 and 154 FRAXAC1 alleles is very rare. This study lays the groundwork for an understanding of founder chromosome effects in comparing Asian and Caucasian populations. 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Allele age and a test for selection on rare alleles

    E-print Network

    Slatkin, Montgomery

    frequency. The test is applied to the locus, BRCA1, associated with early-onset breast cancer in humans reduce average allele age from the value in equation (1) but that overdominance in ¢tness greatly

  12. Mapping a disease locus by allelic?association

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A.; Morton, N. E.

    1998-01-01

    Allelic association provides a means to map disease genes that, in a dense map of polymorphic markers, has considerably higher resolution than linkage methods. We describe here a composite likelihood estimate of location for a disease gene against a high-resolution marker map by using allele frequencies at linked loci. Data may be family-based, as in the transmission disequilibrium test, or from a case-control study. ?2 tests, logarithm of odds, standard errors, and information weights are provided. The method is illustrated by analysis of published cystic fibrosis haplotypes, in which ?F508 is more accurately localized than by other association studies. This differs from current approaches by adopting a more general Malecot model for isolation by distance, where distance here is between marker and disease locus, allowance for errors in the map and model, and freedom from assumptions about demography, systematic pressures, and the ratio of physical to genetic distance. When these assumptions are introduced the number of generations since the original mutation may be estimated, but this is not required to determine location and its standard error, so that evidence from allelic association may be efficiently combined with linkage evidence to identify a region for positional cloning of a disease gene. PMID:9465087

  13. Inheritance of two different alleles of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene carrying the recurrent Pro664Leu mutation in a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Bourbon, M; Fowler, A M; Sun, X M; Soutar, A K

    1999-09-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene that result in impaired clearance of plasma LDL and increased risk of coronary heart disease. Numerous different mutations have been found in FH patients worldwide, the majority of which are infrequent in out-bred populations and account for 2% or less of patients with the disorder in large cohorts. Thus, it was surprising to find that two homozygous FH patients referred to a single hospital in the UK were both apparently homozygous for the Pro664Leu mutation. One, an Asian patient, was a true homozygote. The other, of English origin, had inherited two different alleles of the LDL-receptor gene with the same mutation from unrelated parents, as inferred from the haplotype of polymorphic markers. A third, clinically homozygous FH patient, despite being the offspring of first cousins, had inherited one 'Asian' Pro664Leu allele, but an allele with a 1-bp deletion in exon 5 from the other parent. The Pro664Leu mutation in the LDL-receptor gene has now been described in heterozygous patients of very different ethnic origin and is associated with different haplotypes, suggesting that the same base change at a CpG may have recurred as many as six times. PMID:10563483

  14. GENOPROB: COMPUTATION OF GENOTYPE AND GRANDPARENTAL ORIGIN PROBABILITIES IN COMPLEX PEDIGREES WITH MISSING MARKER DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GenoProb analyzes genetic marker data in complex pedigrees with missing marker data using an iterative allelic peeling algorithm. Its output has been used for QTL detection, marker assisted selection, and identification and correction of errors in marker data and pedigrees. It computes the approxima...

  15. MICROSATELLITE MARKERS FOR THE GRAPEVINE PATHOGEN, EUTYPA LATA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We isolated and characterized nine polymorphic microsatellite markers for Eutypa lata, a fungal pathogen responsible for Eutypa dieback of grapevine, in populations from two California vineyards (24 isolates per vineyard). Allele frequency ranged from two to 11 alleles per locus and haploid gene di...

  16. Bone Markers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  17. Enhanced low-template DNA analysis conditions and investigation of allele dropout patterns.

    PubMed

    Hedell, Ronny; Dufva, Charlotte; Ansell, Ricky; Mostad, Petter; Hedman, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Forensic DNA analysis applying PCR enables profiling of minute biological samples. Enhanced analysis conditions can be applied to further push the limit of detection, coming with the risk of visualising artefacts and allele imbalances. We have evaluated the consecutive increase of PCR cycles from 30 to 35 to investigate the limitations of low-template (LT) DNA analysis, applying the short tandem repeat (STR) analysis kit PowerPlex ESX 16. Mock crime scene DNA extracts of four different quantities (from around 8-84 pg) were tested. All PCR products were analysed using 5, 10 and 20 capillary electrophoresis (CE) injection seconds. Bayesian models describing allele dropout patterns, allele peak heights and heterozygote balance were developed to assess the overall improvements in EPG quality with altered PCR/CE settings. The models were also used to evaluate the impact of amplicon length, STR marker and fluorescent label on the risk for allele dropout. The allele dropout probability decreased for each PCR cycle increment from 30 to 33 PCR cycles. Irrespective of DNA amount, the dropout probability was not affected by further increasing the number of PCR cycles. For the 42 and 84 pg samples, mainly complete DNA profiles were generated applying 32 PCR cycles. For the 8 and 17 pg samples, the allele dropouts decreased from 100% using 30 cycles to about 75% and 20%, respectively. The results for 33, 34 and 35 PCR cycles indicated that heterozygote balance and stutter ratio were mainly affected by DNA amount, and not directly by PCR cycle number and CE injection settings. We found 32 and 33 PCR cycles with 10 CE injection seconds to be optimal, as 34 and 35 PCR cycles did not improve allele detection and also included CE saturation problems. We find allele dropout probability differences between several STR markers. Markers labelled with the fluorescent dyes CXR-ET (red in electropherogram) and TMR-ET (shown as black) generally have higher dropout risks compared with those labelled with JOE (green) and fluorescein (blue). Overall, the marker D10S1248 has the lowest allele dropout probability and D8S1179 the highest. The marker effect is mainly pronounced for 30-32 PCR cycles. Such effects would not be expected if the amplification efficiencies were identical for all markers. Understanding allele dropout risks and the variability in peak heights and balances is important for correct interpretation of forensic DNA profiles. PMID:25282604

  18. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients.Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3'-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5'-UTR polymorphisms).For neither the 3'- nor the 5'-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance.The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold, in our population. These data circumscribe the influence of these polymorphisms in the clinical outcome of 5-FU and question their use for establishing 5-FU dosage, above all when additional genetic factors are not considered. PMID:26166093

  19. Parental origin of sequence variants associated with complex diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir; Gisli Masson; Gudmar Thorleifsson; Patrick Sulem; Soren Besenbacher; Aslaug Jonasdottir; Asgeir Sigurdsson; Kari Th. Kristinsson; Adalbjorg Jonasdottir; Michael L. Frigge; Arnaldur Gylfason; Pall I. Olason; Sigurjon A. Gudjonsson; Sverrir Sverrisson; Simon N. Stacey; Bardur Sigurgeirsson; Kristrun R. Benediktsdottir; Helgi Sigurdsson; Thorvaldur Jonsson; Rafn Benediktsson; Jon H. Olafsson; Oskar Th. Johannsson; Astradur B. Hreidarsson; Gunnar Sigurdsson; Benjamin F. Voight; Laura J. Scott; Christian Dina; Eleftheria Zeggini; Cornelia Huth; Yurii S. Aulchenko; Ryan P. Welch; Laura J. McCulloch; Teresa Ferreira; Harald Grallert; Najaf Amin; Guanming Wu; Cristen J. Willer; Soumya Raychaudhuri; Shaun Purcell; Steve A. McCarroll; Claudia Langenberg; Oliver M. Hoffmann; Josée Dupuis; Lu Qi; Ayellet V. Segrè; Mandy van Hoek; Pau Navarro; Kristin Ardlie; Beverley Balkau; Amanda J. Bennett; Roza Blagieva; Eric Boerwinkle; Lori L. Bonnycastle; Kristina Bengtsson Boström; Bert Bravenboer; Suzannah Bumpstead; Noël P. Burtt; Guillaume Charpentier; Peter S. Chines; Marilyn Cornelis; David J. Couper; Gabe Crawford; Alex S. F. Doney; Katherine S. Elliott; Amanda L. Elliott; Michael R. Erdos; Caroline S. Fox; Christopher S. Franklin; Martha Ganser; Christian Gieger; Niels Grarup; Todd Green; Simon Griffin; Christopher J. Groves; Candace Guiducci; Samy Hadjadj; Neelam Hassanali; Christian Herder; Bo Isomaa; Anne U. Jackson; Paul R. V. Johnson; Torben Jørgensen; Wen H. L. Kao; Norman Klopp; Peter Kraft; Johanna Kuusisto; Torsten Lauritzen; Man Li; Alouisius Lieverse; Cecilia M. Lindgren; Valeriya Lyssenko; Michel Marre; Thomas Meitinger; Kristian Midthjell; Mario A Morken; Narisu Narisu; Peter Nilsson; Katharine R. Owen; Felicity Payne; John R. B. Perry; Ann-Kristin Petersen; Carl Platou; Christine Proença; Inga Prokopenko; Wolfgang Rathmann; N. William Rayner; Neil R. Robertson; Ghislain Rocheleau; Michael Roden; Michael J. Sampson; Richa Saxena; Beverley M. Shields; Peter Shrader; Nicholas Smith; Thomas Sparsø; Klaus Strassburger; Heather M. Stringham; Qi Sun; Amy J. Swift; Barbara Thorand; Jean Tichet; Tiinamaija Tuomi; Rob van Dam; Thijs van Herpt; G. Bragi Walters; Michael N. Weedon; Jacqueline Witteman; Richard N. Bergman; Stephane Cauchi; Francis S. Collins; Anna L. Gloyn; Ulf Gyllensten; Torben Hansen; Winston A. Hide; Graham A. Hitman; Albert Hofman; David Hunter; Kristian Hveem; Markku Laakso; Karen L. Mohlke; Andrew D. Morris; Colin N. A. Palmer; Peter P. Pramstaller; Igor Rudan; Eric Sijbrands; Lincoln D. Stein; Jaakko Tuomilehto; Andre Uitterlinden; Mark Walker; Nicholas J. Wareham; Richard M. Watanabe; Goncalo R. Abecasis; Inês Barroso; Bernhard O. Boehm; Harry Campbell; Mark J. Daly; Jose C. Florez; Timothy M. Frayling; Leif Groop; Andrew T. Hattersley; Frank B. Hu; James B. Meigs; Andrew P. Morris; James S. Pankow; Oluf Pedersen; Rob Sladek; Unnur Thorsteinsdottir; H.-Erich Wichmann; James F. Wilson; Thomas Illig; Philippe Froguel; Cornelia M. van Duijn; David Altshuler; Michael Boehnke; Anne C. Ferguson-Smith; Daniel F. Gudbjartsson; Augustine Kong; Kari Stefansson

    2009-01-01

    Effects of susceptibility variants may depend on from which parent they are inherited. Although many associations between sequence variants and human traits have been discovered through genome-wide associations, the impact of parental origin has largely been ignored. Here we show that for 38,167 Icelanders genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips, the parental origin of most alleles can be determined.

  20. Evidence for Mito-Nuclear and Sex-Linked Reproductive Barriers between the Hybrid Italian Sparrow and Its Parent Species

    PubMed Central

    Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Bailey, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of reproductive isolation between homoploid hybrid species and their parent species have rarely been carried out. Here we investigate reproductive barriers between a recently recognized hybrid bird species, the Italian sparrow Passer italiae and its parent species, the house sparrow P. domesticus and Spanish sparrow P. hispaniolensis. Reproductive barriers can be difficult to study in hybrid species due to lack of geographical contact between taxa. However, the Italian sparrow lives parapatrically with the house sparrow and both sympatrically and parapatrically with the Spanish sparrow. Through whole-transcriptome sequencing of six individuals of each of the two parent species we identified a set of putatively parent species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. After filtering for coverage, genotyping success (>97%) and multiple SNPs per gene, we retained 86 species-informative, genic, nuclear and mitochondrial SNP markers from 84 genes for analysis of 612 male individuals. We show that a disproportionately large number of sex-linked genes, as well as the mitochondria and nuclear genes with mitochondrial function, exhibit sharp clines at the boundaries between the hybrid and the parent species, suggesting a role for mito-nuclear and sex-linked incompatibilities in forming reproductive barriers. We suggest that genomic conflict via interactions between mitochondria and sex-linked genes with mitochondrial function (“mother's curse”) at one boundary and centromeric drive at the other may best explain our findings. Hybrid speciation in the Italian sparrow may therefore be influenced by mechanisms similar to those involved in non-hybrid speciation, but with the formation of two geographically separated species boundaries instead of one. Spanish sparrow alleles at some loci have spread north to form reproductive barriers with house sparrows, while house sparrow alleles at different loci, including some on the same chromosome, have spread in the opposite direction to form barriers against Spanish sparrows. PMID:24415954

  1. Allelic configuration and polysomic inheritance of highly variable microsatellites in tetraploid gynodioecious Thymus praecox agg.

    PubMed

    Landergott, Urs; Naciri, Yamama; Schneller, J Jakob; Holderegger, Rolf

    2006-08-01

    Polyploidy plays a pivotal role in plant evolution. However, polyploids with polysomic inheritance have hitherto been severely underrepresented in plant population genetic studies, mainly due to a lack of appropriate molecular genetic markers. Here we report the establishment and experimental validation of six fully informative microsatellite markers in tetraploid gynodioecious Thymus praecox agg. Sequence data of 150 microsatellite alleles and their flanking regions revealed high variation, which may be characteristic for polyploids with a reticulate evolutionary history. Understanding the patterns of mutation (indels and substitutions) in microsatellite flanking-sequences was a prerequisite for the development of co-dominant markers for fragment analyses. Allelic segregation patterns among progeny arrays from ten test crosses revealed tetrasomic inheritance in T. praecox agg. No evidence of frequent double reduction was detected. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based dosage effects allowed for precise assignment of allelic configuration at all six microsatellite loci. The quantification of allele copy numbers in PCR was verified by comparisons of observed and expected gametic allele frequencies and heterozygosities in test crosses. Our study illustrates how PCR based markers can provide reliable estimates of heterozygosity and, thus, powerful tools for breeding system and population genetic analyses in polyploid organisms. PMID:16786342

  2. Segregation of male-sterility alleles across a species boundary.

    PubMed

    Weller, S G; Sakai, A K; Culley, T M; Duong, L; Danielson, R E

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid zones may serve as bridges permitting gene flow between species, including alleles influencing the evolution of breeding systems. Using greenhouse crosses, we assessed the likelihood that a hybrid zone could serve as a conduit for transfer of nuclear male-sterility alleles between a gynodioecious species and a hermaphroditic species with very rare females in some populations. Segregation patterns in progeny of crosses between rare females of hermaphroditic Schiedea menziesii and hermaphroditic plants of gynodioecious Schiedea salicaria heterozygous at the male-sterility locus, and between female S. salicaria and hermaphroditic plants from the hybrid zone, were used to determine whether male-sterility was controlled at the same locus in the parental species and the hybrid zone. Segregations of females and hermaphrodites in approximately equal ratios from many of the crosses indicate that the same nuclear male-sterility allele occurs in the parent species and the hybrid zone. These rare male-sterility alleles in S. menziesii may result from gene flow from S. salicaria through the hybrid zone, presumably facilitated by wind pollination in S. salicaria. Alternatively, rare male-sterility alleles might result from a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii, or possibly de novo evolution of male sterility. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some species of Schiedea have probably evolved separate sexes independently, but not in the lineage containing S. salicaria and S. menziesii. High levels of selfing and expression of strong inbreeding depression in S. menziesii, which together should favour females in populations, argue against a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii. PMID:24417506

  3. Variations and Transmission of QTL Alleles for Yield and Fiber Qualities in Upland Cotton Cultivars Developed in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianzhen; Qian, Neng; Zhu, Xiefei; Chen, Hong; Wang, Sen; Mei, Hongxian; Zhang, Yuanming

    2013-01-01

    Cotton is the world’s leading cash crop, and genetic improvement of fiber yield and quality is the primary objective of cotton breeding program. In this study, we used various approaches to identify QTLs related to fiber yield and quality. Firstly, we constructed a four-way cross (4WC) mapping population with four base core cultivars, Stoneville 2B, Foster 6, Deltapine 15 and Zhongmiansuo No.7 (CRI 7), as parents in Chinese cotton breeding history and identified 83 QTLs for 11 agronomic and fiber quality traits. Secondly, association mapping of agronomical and fiber quality traits was based on 121 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using a general linear model (GLM). For this, 81 Gossypium hirsutum L. accessions including the four core parents and their derived cultivars were grown in seven diverse environments. Using these approaches, we successfully identified 180 QTLs significantly associated with agronomic and fiber quality traits. Among them were 66 QTLs that were identified via linkage disequilibrium (LD) and 4WC family-based linkage (FBL) mapping and by previously published family-based linkage (FBL) mapping in modern Chinese cotton cultivars. Twenty eight and 44 consistent QTLs were identified by 4WC and LD mapping, and by FBL and LD mapping methods, respectively. Furthermore, transmission and variation of QTL-alleles mapped by LD association in the three breeding periods revealed that some could be detected in almost all Chinese cotton cultivars, suggesting their stable transmission and some identified only in the four base cultivars and not in the modern cultivars, suggesting they were missed in conventional breeding. These results will be useful to conduct genomics-assisted breeding effectively using these existing and novel QTL alleles to improve yield and fiber qualities in cotton. PMID:23468939

  4. Genetic diversity analysis among collected purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) accessions using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Alam, M Amirul; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Arolu, Ibrahim Wasiu; Abdul Latif, M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships among 45 collected purslane accessions were evaluated using ISSR markers. The 28 primers gave a total of 167 bands, among which 163 were polymorphic (97.6%). The genetic diversity as estimated by Shannon's information index was 0.513, revealing a quite high level of genetic diversity in the germplasm. The average number of observed allele, effective allele, expected heterozygosity, polymorphic information content (PIC) and Nei's index were 5.96, 1.59, 0.43, 0.35 and 0.35, respectively. The UPGMA dendrogram based on Nei's genetic distance grouped the whole germplasm into 7 distinct clusters. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that 89% of total variation occurred within population, while 11% were found among populations. Based on the constructed dendrogram using ISSR markers those accessions that are far from each other by virtue of genetic origin and diversity index (like Ac1 and Ac42; Ac19 and Ac45; Ac9 and Ac23; Ac18 and A25; Ac24 and Ac18) are strongly recommended to select as parent for future breeding program to develop high yielding and stress tolerant purslane variety in contribution to global food security. PMID:25468001

  5. Considerations for marker-assisted selection in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) offers considerable promise but requires careful planning. Among the first DNA markers used for peanut improvement were wild species-derived alleles for nematode resistance, now being combined with the high-oleic trait. These are screened as qualitative traits. Thes...

  6. Allelic variability in the third intron of the fibroin light chain gene in Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J F; Bravo, J P; Zanatta, D B; Silva, J L C; Fernandez, M A

    2009-01-01

    Conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis is a useful method for identifying allele polymorphism; it provides co-dominant molecular markers. Using this method, we identified genetic variability in the third intron of the fibroin light chain gene, fib-L, in six Bombyx mori strains. Only Chinese C21A strain did not demonstrate allelic alterations, showing only homoduplex DNA molecules. We found distinct heteroduplex profiles in the Japanese HAA, M12B and M19-2 and the Chinese C25B and C24-2 strains. Analysis with restriction endonuclease fingerprinting conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis demonstrated the potential of this method for the identification of allelic variability in B. mori; this was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the different alleles. The main alteration was a 12-bp deletion in two alleles of the C24-2 strain and one allele of the HAA strain; this deletion results in specific heteroduplex DNA molecule profiles. PMID:19283686

  7. Concordance between parental origin of chromosome 13q loss and chromosome 6p duplication in sporadic retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, A.; Sapienza, C. (Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)); Hansen, M.; Strong, L. (M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Jones, P.A. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Hadjistilianou, D.; Mastrangelo, D. (Univ. of Siena (Italy)); Griegel, S.; Rajewsky, M.F. (Univ. of Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany)); Shields, J. (Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)) (and others)

    1994-02-01

    Two hypotheses are capable of explaining nonrandom loss of one parent's alleles at tumor suppressor loci in sporadic cases of several pediatric cancers, including retinoblastoma - namely, preferential germ-line mutation or chromosome imprinting. The authors have examined 74 cases of sporadic retinoblastoma for tumors in which at least two genetic events - loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 13q markers and formation of an isochromosome 6p - have occurred. Sixteen cases were found to contain both events. In 13 of 16 such tumors, the chromosomes 13q that were lost and chromosomes 6p that were duplicated are derived from the same parent. These data may be explained within the framework of the genome imprinting model but are not predicted by preferential germ-line mutation. 39 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Correlation between the individual heterozygosity of parents and their offspring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Mitton; W S F Schuster; E G Cothran; J C De Fries

    1993-01-01

    Specific formulations are derived for the correlation between the heterozygosity of a randomly mating parent and its offspring for a diallelic locus, and for the correlation when multiple loci are considered. The expected correlation is maximal, approaching r=0.50, when allelic frequencies are highly asymmetric, and it is zero when the allelic frequencies are equal to 0.50. Parent-offspring correlations, up to

  9. Marker-Assessed Retention of Wheat Chromatin in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) by Jointed Goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica) Backcross Derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. J. Kroiss; P. Tempalli; J. L. Hansen; M. I. Vales; O. Riera-Lizarazu; R. S. Zemetra; C. A. Mallory-Smith

    of wheat alleles in the BC1 generation. In the BC2 generation, 11 of that it would take only two backcrosses to jointed goat- the 14 markers fit the expected frequencies for the retention of wheat alleles. The markers not fitting the expected frequencies in both gener- grass for partial restoration of self-fertility and that A ations deviated in the direction

  10. Parents Helping Parents: Mutual Parenting Network Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkinson, Charles H.; Redmond, Robert F.

    Guidelines for mutual parenting are provided in this handbook. "Mutual parenting" means that everyone in the community shares the responsibility for the safety and well-being of the community's youngsters. Several topics are discussed in the 15 brief chapters of the handbook. Chapters 1 through 3 focus on the formation of a mutual parenting

  11. Parenting Perfectionism and Parental Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meghan A.; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J.; Kamp Dush, Claire M.

    2011-01-01

    The parental role is expected to be one of the most gratifying and rewarding roles in life. As expectations of parenting become ever higher, the implications of parenting perfectionism for parental adjustment warrant investigation. Using longitudinal data from 182 couples, this study examined the associations between societal- and self-oriented parenting perfectionism and new mothers’ and fathers’ parenting self-efficacy, stress, and satisfaction. For mothers, societal-oriented parenting perfectionism was associated with lower parenting self-efficacy, but self-oriented parenting perfectionism was associated with higher parenting satisfaction. For fathers, societal-oriented parenting perfectionism was associated with higher parenting stress, whereas higher levels of self-oriented parenting perfectionism were associated with higher parenting self-efficacy, lower parenting stress, and greater parenting satisfaction. These findings support the distinction between societal- and self-oriented perfectionism, extend research on perfectionism to interpersonal adjustment in the parenting domain, and provide the first evidence for the potential consequences of holding excessively high standards for parenting. PMID:22328797

  12. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of Chinese sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cultivars using Insertion-Deletion (InDel) and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sesame is an important and ancient oil crop in tropical and subtropical areas. China is one of the most important sesame producing countries with many germplasm accessions and excellent cultivars. Domestication and modern plant breeding have presumably narrowed the genetic basis of cultivated sesame. Several modern sesame cultivars were bred with a limited number of landrace cultivars in their pedigree. The genetic variation was subsequently reduced by genetic drift and selection. Characterization of genetic diversity of these cultivars by molecular markers is of great value to assist parental line selection and breeding strategy design. Results Three hundred and forty nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 79 insertion-deletion (InDel) markers were developed from cDNA library and reduced-representation sequencing of a sesame cultivar Zhongzhi 14, respectively. Combined with previously published SSR markers, 88 polymorphic markers were used to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, population structure, and allele distribution among 130 Chinese sesame accessions including 82 cultivars, 44 landraces and 4 wild germplasm accessions. A total of 325 alleles were detected, with the average gene diversity of 0.432. Model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of five subgroups belonging to two main groups, which were consistent with the results from principal coordinate analysis (PCA), phylogenetic clustering and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Several missing or unique alleles were identified from particular types, subgroups or families, even though they share one or both parental/progenitor lines. Conclusions This report presented a by far most comprehensive characterization of the molecular and genetic diversity of sesame cultivars in China. InDels are more polymorphic than SSRs, but their ability for deciphering genetic diversity compared to the later. Improved sesame cultivars have narrower genetic basis than landraces, reflecting the effect of genetic drift or selection during breeding processes. Comparative analysis of allele distribution revealed genetic divergence between improved cultivars and landraces, as well as between cultivars released in different years. These results will be useful for assessing cultivars and for marker-assisted breeding in sesame. PMID:24641723

  13. Association analysis of fiber quality traits and exploration of elite alleles in Upland cotton cultivars/accessions (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Cai, Caiping; Ye, Wenxue; Zhang, Tianzhen; Guo, Wangzhen

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the elite alleles and germplasm accessions related to fiber quality traits will accelerate the breeding of cotton for fiber quality improvement. In this study, 99 Gossypium hirsutum L. accessions with diverse origins were used to perform association analysis of fiber quality traits using 97 polymorphic microsatellite marker primer pairs. A total of 107 significant marker-trait associations were detected for three fiber quality traits under three different environments, with 70 detected in two or three environments and 37 detected in only one environment. Among the 70 significant marker-trait associations, 52.86% were reported previously, implying that these are stable loci for target traits. Furthermore, we detected a large number of elite alleles associated simultaneously with two or three traits. These elite alleles were mainly from accessions collected in China, introduced to China from the United States, or rare alleles with a frequency of less than 5%. No one cultivar contained more than half of the elite alleles, but 10 accessions were collected from China and the two introduced from the United States did contain more than half of these alleles. Therefore, there is great potential for mining elite alleles from germplasm accessions for use in fiber quality improvement in modern cotton breeding. PMID:24428209

  14. An allele-specific gene expression assay to test the functional basis of genetic associations.

    PubMed

    Paracchini, Silvia; Monaco, Anthony P; Knight, Julian C

    2010-01-01

    The number of significant genetic associations with common complex traits is constantly increasing. However, most of these associations have not been understood at molecular level. One of the mechanisms mediating the effect of DNA variants on phenotypes is gene expression, which has been shown to be particularly relevant for complex traits. This method tests in a cellular context the effect of specific DNA sequences on gene expression. The principle is to measure the relative abundance of transcripts arising from the two alleles of a gene, analysing cells which carry one copy of the DNA sequences associated with disease (the risk variants). Therefore, the cells used for this method should meet two fundamental genotypic requirements: they have to be heterozygous both for DNA risk variants and for DNA markers, typically coding polymorphisms, which can distinguish transcripts based on their chromosomal origin. DNA risk variants and DNA markers do not need to have the same allele frequency but the phase (haplotypic) relationship of the genetic markers needs to be understood. It is also important to choose cell types which express the gene of interest. This protocol refers specifically to the procedure adopted to extract nucleic acids from fibroblasts but the method is equally applicable to other cells types including primary cells. DNA and RNA are extracted from the selected cell lines and cDNA is generated. DNA and cDNA are analysed with a primer extension assay, designed to target the coding DNA markers. The primer extension assay is carried out using the MassARRAY (Sequenom) platform according to the manufacturer's specifications. Primer extension products are then analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Because the selected markers are heterozygous they will generate two peaks on the MS profiles. The area of each peak is proportional to the transcript abundance and can be measured with a function of the MassARRAY Typer software to generate an allelic ratio (allele 1: allele 2) calculation. The allelic ratio obtained for cDNA is normalized using that measured from genomic DNA, where the allelic ratio is expected to be 1:1 to correct for technical artifacts. Markers with a normalised allelic ratio significantly different to 1 indicate that the amount of transcript generated from the two chromosomes in the same cell is different, suggesting that the DNA variants associated with the phenotype have an effect on gene expression. Experimental controls should be used to confirm the results. PMID:21085102

  15. Molecular mapping of the mutant fap4(A24) allele for elevated palmitate concentration in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.] oil with an elevated palmitate concentration is useful for some food and industrial applications. The objective of this study was to map the genetic location of the fap4(A24) allele that controls an increase in palmitate concentration and to identify molecular marker...

  16. Maximum likelihood estimation of the frequency of null alleles at microsatellite loci

    E-print Network

    Kalinowski, Steven T

    Maximum likelihood estimation of the frequency of null alleles at microsatellite loci Steven T Microsatellite loci are the markers of choice for estimating evolutionary relationships between populations and genealogical relationships between individuals. When using microsatellite loci, however, care must be taken

  17. Always look on both sides: Phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily,...

  18. Multiple null alleles at a polymorphic SSR-locus in a large-scale population study: Structure and geographic distribution in chum salmon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymorphic DNA markers, e.g. mini- or microsatellite (SSR) loci, are often removed from data analyses if an excess of homozygosity, presumably an indication of null alleles, is observed. However, exclusion of such loci can reduce available information if multiple loci carry null alleles. Because nu...

  19. Allelic Analysis of Sheath Blight Resistance with Association Mapping in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A.; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r?=??0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice. PMID:22427867

  20. Allelic analysis of sheath blight resistance with association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r?=?-0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice. PMID:22427867

  1. Genetic analysis of apomixis in Citrus and Poncirus by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    García, R; Asíns, M J; Forner, J; Carbonell, E A

    1999-08-01

    Propagation of citrus rootstocks depends upon the production of clonal plants from nucellar seedlings. This makes apomixis one of the host important traits in breeding programs for citrus rootstocks. The genetic control of apomixis was studied in a 50-tree progeny derived from the cross C. volkameriana×P. trifoliata using 69 molecular markers and bulked segregant analysis. The proportion of nucellar seedlings was estimated by isoenzymatic analysis of 25 seedlings per tree for 2 consecutive years. The type of embryony (polyembryonic versus monoembryonic seeds) was also determined for fruit-yielding trees. Separate genetic maps for each parental species were developed. The integration and comparison of these maps could be accomplished using common multiallelic segregant loci. Differences in gene synteny between the two species-specific genetic maps were shown. Important distortions in the segregation of markers at several genomic regions, some of them also involving differences in the C-methylation pattern, have been observed, especially for the pollen parent. Analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) revealed the presence of six genomic positions (two in P. trifoliata and four in C. volkameriana) contributing individually up to 24% of the total variation for apomixis. Within the same species, QTLs with positive and negative allele effects were present, even in the same linkage group. One of the markers associated to apomixis (Apo2) is also associated to embryony type. Therefore, the genetic control of apomictic reproduction found in citrus (nucellar embryony) is quite complex compared to what has been reported for gametophytic apomixis. Molecular markers linked to QTLs governing apomixis will be useful to assist selection of future apomictic rootstocks for citrus varieties. PMID:22665185

  2. Microsatellite marker C04107 as a diagnostic marker for copper toxicosis in the Danish population of Bedlington terriers.

    PubMed

    Proschowsky, H F; Jepsen, B; Jensen, H E; Jensen, A L; Fredholm, M

    2000-01-01

    The linkage phase of marker C04107 was evaluated before implementation of the marker in a diagnostic test. Blood samples from 68 dogs were collected and genotyped by PCR. Two alleles were detected with sizes of 160 bp and 164 bp and allele frequencies of 0.45 and 0.55 respectively. Genotyping revealed that 35 dogs were heterozygous (51.5%), 22 dogs were homozygous for the normal allele (32.3%) and 11 dogs were homozygous for the disease allele (16.2%). Liver biopsies were taken from 14 selected dogs and the copper content was evaluated histologically. Biopsies from 8 dogs homozygous for the disease allele showed many copper granules along with single cell necrosis, haemosiderosis and cellular infiltration. In liver biopsies from 6 dogs genotyped to be heterozygous or homozygous for the normal allele, copper granules were absent or moderate in number and no lesions were present. The survey demonstrates that the linkage phase of marker C04107 in the Danish population of Bedlington terriers is similar to the linkage phase detected in other countries. Thus, the marker can be used in a diagnostic test for copper toxicosis in Denmark. PMID:11234968

  3. The isolation and characterization of a mutant allele at a new X-linked locus, mex , affecting NADP + -dependent enzymes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew R. Gromnicki; Michael M. Bentley

    1991-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutant alleles in a regulatory gene affecting NADP+-dependent enzymes are described. The locus,mex, is at position 26.5 ± 0.74 on the X chromosome ofDrosophila melanogaster. The newly isolated mutant allele,mex1, is recessive to either themex allele found in Oregon-R wild-type individuals or that found in thecm v parental stock in which the new mutants were

  4. The isolation and characterization of a mutant allele at a new X-linked locus, mex , affecting NADP + -dependent enzymes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew R. Gromnicki; Michael M. Bentley

    1991-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutant alleles in a regulatory gene affecting NADP+-dependent enzymes are described. The locus,mex, is at position 26.5 ± 0.74 on the X chromosome ofDrosophila melanogaster. The newly isolated mutant allele,mex\\u000a 1, is recessive to either themex allele found in Oregon-R wild-type individuals or that found in thecm v parental stock in which the new mutants

  5. Transgene- and locus-dependent imprinting reveals allele-specific chromosome conformations

    PubMed Central

    Lonfat, Nicolas; Montavon, Thomas; Jebb, David; Tschopp, Patrick; Nguyen Huynh, Thi Hanh; Zakany, Jozsef; Duboule, Denis

    2013-01-01

    When positioned into the integrin ?-6 gene, an Hoxd9lacZ reporter transgene displayed parental imprinting in mouse embryos. While the expression from the paternal allele was comparable with patterns seen for the same transgene when present at the neighboring HoxD locus, almost no signal was scored at this integration site when the transgene was inherited from the mother, although the Itga6 locus itself is not imprinted. The transgene exhibited maternal allele-specific DNA hypermethylation acquired during oogenesis, and its expression silencing was reversible on passage through the male germ line. Histone modifications also corresponded to profiles described at known imprinted loci. Chromosome conformation analyses revealed distinct chromatin microarchitectures, with a more compact structure characterizing the maternally inherited repressed allele. Such genetic analyses of well-characterized transgene insertions associated with a de novo-induced parental imprint may help us understand the molecular determinants of imprinting. PMID:23818637

  6. Always Look on Both Sides: Phylogenetic Information Conveyed by Simple Sequence Repeat Allele Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, Stéphanie; Gugerli, Felix; Barkley, Noelle A.; Maggia, Laurent; Cardi, Céline; Scotti, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily, mutations in the target sequences follow the stepwise mutation model (SMM). Generally speaking, PCR amplicon sizes are used as direct indicators of the number of SSR repeats composing an allele with the data analysis either ignoring the extent of allele size differences or assuming that there is a direct correlation between differences in amplicon size and evolutionary distance. However, without precisely knowing the kind and distribution of polymorphism within an allele (SSR and the associated flanking region (FR) sequences), it is hard to say what kind of evolutionary message is conveyed by such a synthetic descriptor of polymorphism as DNA amplicon size. In this study, we sequenced several SSR alleles in multiple populations of three divergent tree genera and disentangled the types of polymorphisms contained in each portion of the DNA amplicon containing an SSR. The patterns of diversity provided by amplicon size variation, SSR variation itself, insertions/deletions (indels), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) observed in the FRs were compared. Amplicon size variation largely reflected SSR repeat number. The amount of variation was as large in FRs as in the SSR itself. The former contributed significantly to the phylogenetic information and sometimes was the main source of differentiation among individuals and populations contained by FR and SSR regions of SSR markers. The presence of mutations occurring at different rates within a marker’s sequence offers the opportunity to analyse evolutionary events occurring on various timescales, but at the same time calls for caution in the interpretation of SSR marker data when the distribution of within-locus polymorphism is not known. PMID:22808236

  7. Efficient Simulation and Likelihood Methods for Non-neutral Multi-allele Models

    E-print Network

    Buzbas, Erkan

    of chromosomes in the population. Alleles are subject to a random parent-independent mutation process, in which numerous significant contributions to population genetics theory. As genetic data, in particular DNA to develop a likelihood method to estimate the population-genetic parameters using full DNA sequences. Now

  8. Wheat breeding assisted by markers: CIMMYT’s experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. M. William; R. Trethowan; E. M. Crosby-Galvan

    2007-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the characterization of loci controlling traits of importance using molecular markers.\\u000a A number of markers are currently available in wheat for genes of interest to the breeders. Markers can be used to better\\u000a characterize parental material, thereby improving the efficiency and effectiveness of parental selection for crossing and\\u000a to track genes in segregating progenies

  9. HLA-A*02 allele frequencies and haplotypic associations in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Park, M H; Whang, D H; Kang, S J; Han, K S

    2000-03-01

    We have investigated the frequencies of HLA-A*02 alleles and their haplotypic associations with HLA-B and -DRB1 loci in 439 healthy unrelated Koreans, including 214 parents from 107 families. All of the 227 samples (51.7%) typed as A2 by serology were analyzed for A*02 alleles using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-low ionic strength-single-strand conformation polymorphism (LIS-SSCP) method. A total of six different A*02 alleles were detected (A*02 allele frequency 29.6%): A*0201/9 (16.6%), *0203 (0.5%), *0206 (9.3%), *0207 (3.0%), and one each case of *0210 and *02 undetermined type. Two characteristic haplotypes showing the strongest linkage disequilibrium were A*0203-B38-DRB]*1502 and A*0207-B46-DRB1*0803. Besides these strong associations, significant two-locus associations (P<0.001) were observed for A*0201 with B61, DRB1*0901 and DRB1*1401, and for A*0206 with B48 and B61. HLA haplotypes carrying HLA-A2 showed a variable distribution of A*02 alleles, and all of the eight most common A2-B-DR haplotypes occurring at frequencies of > or =1% were variably associated with two different A*02 alleles. These results demonstrate that substantial heterogeneity is present in the distribution of HLA-A*02 alleles and related haplotypes in Koreans. PMID:10777100

  10. DNA Marker Transmission and Linkage Analysis in Populations Derived from a Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) x Erianthus arundinaceus Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-wen; Deng, Hai-hua; Liu, Rui; He, Hui-yi; Fu, Cheng; Chen, Yong-sheng; Liu, Fu-ye; Li, Qi-wei; Jackson, Phillip; Aitken, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Introgression of Erianthus arundinaceus has been the focus of several sugarcane breeding programs in the world, because the species has desirable traits such as high biomass production, vigour, ratooning ability and good resistance to environmental stresses and disease. In this study four genetic maps were constructed for two intergeneric populations. The first population (BC1) was generated from a cross between an Erianthus/Saccharum hybrid YC96-40 and a commercial sugarcane variety CP84-1198. The second population (BC2) was generated from a cross between YCE01-116, a progeny of the BC1 cross and NJ57-416, a commercial sugarcane cultivar. Markers across both populations were generated using 35 AFLP and 23 SSR primer pairs. A total of 756 and 728 polymorphic markers were scored in the BC1 and BC2 populations, respectively. In the BC1 population, a higher proportion of markers was derived from the Erianthus ancestor than those from the Saccharum ancestor Badila. In the BC2 population, both the number and proportion of markers derived from Erianthus were approximately half of those in the BC1 population. Linkage analysis led to the construction of 38, 57, 36 and 47 linkage groups (LGs) for YC96-40, CP84-1198, YCE01-116, and NJ57-416, encompassing 116, 174, 97 and 159 markers (including single dose, double dose and bi-parental markers), respectively. These LGs could be further placed into four, five, five and six homology groups (HGs), respectively, based on information from multi-allelic SSR markers and repulsion phase linkages detected between LGs. Analysis of repulsion phase linkage indicated that Erianthus behaved like a true autopolyploid. PMID:26053338

  11. DNA Marker Transmission and Linkage Analysis in Populations Derived from a Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) x Erianthus arundinaceus Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Wen; Lao, Fang-Ye; Chen, Xi-Wen; Deng, Hai-Hua; Liu, Rui; He, Hui-Yi; Fu, Cheng; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Fu-Ye; Li, Qi-Wei; Jackson, Phillip; Aitken, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Introgression of Erianthus arundinaceus has been the focus of several sugarcane breeding programs in the world, because the species has desirable traits such as high biomass production, vigour, ratooning ability and good resistance to environmental stresses and disease. In this study four genetic maps were constructed for two intergeneric populations. The first population (BC1) was generated from a cross between an Erianthus/Saccharum hybrid YC96-40 and a commercial sugarcane variety CP84-1198. The second population (BC2) was generated from a cross between YCE01-116, a progeny of the BC1 cross and NJ57-416, a commercial sugarcane cultivar. Markers across both populations were generated using 35 AFLP and 23 SSR primer pairs. A total of 756 and 728 polymorphic markers were scored in the BC1 and BC2 populations, respectively. In the BC1 population, a higher proportion of markers was derived from the Erianthus ancestor than those from the Saccharum ancestor Badila. In the BC2 population, both the number and proportion of markers derived from Erianthus were approximately half of those in the BC1 population. Linkage analysis led to the construction of 38, 57, 36 and 47 linkage groups (LGs) for YC96-40, CP84-1198, YCE01-116, and NJ57-416, encompassing 116, 174, 97 and 159 markers (including single dose, double dose and bi-parental markers), respectively. These LGs could be further placed into four, five, five and six homology groups (HGs), respectively, based on information from multi-allelic SSR markers and repulsion phase linkages detected between LGs. Analysis of repulsion phase linkage indicated that Erianthus behaved like a true autopolyploid. PMID:26053338

  12. Parent Involvement 

    E-print Network

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    To be successful, a 4-H program must have parent involvement. Although 4-H leaders and Extension agents may interest young people in becoming members, they need the parents' goodwill and support to keep them interested, enthusiastic and active. Here...

  13. Cost-effective genome-wide estimation of allele frequencies from pooled DNA in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New sequencing technologies have tremendously increased the number of known molecular markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) in a variety of species. Concurrently, improvements to genotyping technology have now made it possible to efficiently genotype large numbers of genome-wide distributed SNPs enabling genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, genotyping significant numbers of individuals with large number of SNPs remains prohibitively expensive for many research groups. A possible solution to this problem is to determine allele frequencies from pooled DNA samples, such ‘allelotyping’ has been presented as a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping and has become popular in human GWAS. In this article we have tested the effectiveness of DNA pooling to obtain accurate allele frequency estimates for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) populations using an Illumina SNP-chip. Results In total, 56 Atlantic salmon DNA pools from 14 populations were analyzed on an Atlantic salmon SNP-chip containing probes for 5568 SNP markers, 3928 of which were bi-allelic. We developed an efficient quality control filter which enables exclusion of loci showing high error rate and minor allele frequency (MAF) close to zero. After applying multiple quality control filters we obtained allele frequency estimates for 3631 bi-allelic loci. We observed high concordance (r > 0.99) between allele frequency estimates derived from individual genotyping and DNA pools. Our results also indicate that even relatively small DNA pools (35 individuals) can provide accurate allele frequency estimates for a given sample. Conclusions Despite of higher level of variation associated with array replicates compared to pool construction, we suggest that both sources of variation should be taken into account. This study demonstrates that DNA pooling allows fast and high-throughput determination of allele frequencies in Atlantic salmon enabling cost-efficient identification of informative markers for discrimination of populations at various geographical scales, as well as identification of loci controlling ecologically and economically important traits. PMID:23324082

  14. Identification of RAPD markers linked to digestive amylase genes using near isogenic lines of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ashwath, S K; Sreekumar, S; Toms, J T; Dandin, S B; Kamble, C K

    2010-01-01

    Digestive amylase has been identified as a useful marker for breeding in the silkwrom, Bombyx mori L (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), due to its wide genetic divergence, its role in better digestibility and robustness. The low yielding indigenous B. mori breeds of tropics like India are characterized by high activity amylase genes controlled by Amy d(iv) or d(v) alleles, while the high yielding breeds of temperate origin are endowed with 'null' type (Amy d(n)) with low activity. For improving the digestibility and survival of temperate breeds of Japanese origin, Near Isogenic Lines (NILs) were developed introgressing the Amy d(iv) and d(v) alleles from the Donor Parents (DPs) into the genetic background of the Recurrent Parents (RPs) with 'null' type of amylase, which showed significant improvement in viability of the NILs. With the objective to know whether the amylase gene itself may confer higher survival by improving digestibility or some other closely linked genes flanking the amylase locus is responsible for better viability of the NILs, RAPD profiles among six B. mori breeds comprising of the DPs, RPs, and NILs developed through introgression of Amy d(iv) or d(v) alleles were analysed using 27 sets of RAPD primers. Out of the 27 primers, six (OPA01, OPA06, OPA09, OPA15, OPAH03, and OPAH05) showed RAPD products linked to the amylase genes of the DPs introgressed in the NILs, which were absent in their respective RPs. Three amplicons of 1584 bp, 1904 bp, and 1232 bp were specific to Amy d(iv) allele and one amplified product of 1776 bp was found to be linked with the Amy d(v) allele. Interestingly, two PCR products of 2628 and 1375 bp were associated with both Amy d(iv) and d(v) alleles. The results are discussed in light of further characterization of these amplified products leading to identification of DNA sequences that may be responsible for better digestibility and higher survival in B. mori. PMID:20673069

  15. Prediction of deleterious human alleles.

    PubMed

    Sunyaev, S; Ramensky, V; Koch, I; Lathe, W; Kondrashov, A S; Bork, P

    2001-03-15

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute the bulk of human genetic variation, occurring with an average density of approximately 1/1000 nucleotides of a genotype. SNPs are either neutral allelic variants or are under selection of various strengths, and the impact of SNPs on fitness remains unknown. Identification of SNPs affecting human phenotype, especially leading to risks of complex disorders, is one of the key problems of medical genetics. SNPs in protein-coding regions that cause amino acid variants (non-synonymous cSNPs) are most likely to affect phenotypes. We have developed a straightforward and reliable method based on physical and comparative considerations that estimates the impact of an amino acid replacement on the three-dimensional structure and function of the protein. We estimate that approximately 20% of common human non-synonymous SNPs damage the protein. The average minor allele frequency of such SNPs in our data set was two times lower than that of benign non-synonymous SNPs. The average human genotype carries approximately 10(3) damaging non-synonymous SNPs that together cause a substantial reduction in fitness. PMID:11230178

  16. VNTR allele frequency distributions under the stepwise mutation model: A computer simulation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, M.D.; Jin, L.; Chakraborty, R.; Boerwinkle, E. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) are a class of highly informative and widely dispersed genetic markers. Despite their wide application in biological science, little is known about their mutational mechanisms or population dynamics. The objective of this work was to investigate four summary measures of VNTR allele frequency distributions: number of alleles, number of modes, range in allele size, and heterozygosity, using computer simulations of the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM). The authors estimated these measures and their probability distributions for a wide range of mutation rates and compared the simulation results with predictions from analytical formulations of the one-step SMM. The average heterozygosity from the simulations agreed with the analytical expectation under the SMM. The average number of alleles, however, was larger in the simulations than the analytical expectation of the SMM. The authors then compared simulation expectations with actual data reported in the literature. They used the sample size and observed heterozygosity to determine the expected value, 5th and 95th percentiles for the other three summary measures, allelic size range, number of modes and number of alleles. The loci analyzed were classified into three groups based on the size of the repeat unit: microsatellites (1-2 base pair (bp) repeat unit), short tandem repeats [(STR) 3-5 bp repeat unit], and minisatellites (15-70 bp repeat unit). In general, STR loci were most similar to the simulation results under the SMM for the three summary measures (number of alleles, number of modes and range in allele size), followed by the microsatellite loci and then by the minisatellite loci, which showed deviations in the direction of the infinite allele model (IAM). Based on these differences, it is hypothesized that these three classes of loci are subject to different mutational forces.

  17. Expression and loss of alleles in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts and stem cells carrying allelic fluorescent protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Jon S; Yin, Moying; Fischer, Jared M; Stringer, Saundra L; Stringer, James R

    2006-01-01

    Background Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) contributes to many cancers, but the rate at which these events occur in normal cells of the body is not clear. LOH would be detectable in diverse cell types in the body if this event were to confer an obvious cellular phenotype. Mice that carry two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles of a locus would seem to be a useful tool for addressing this issue because LOH would change a cell's phenotype from dichromatic to monochromatic. In addition, LOH caused by mitotic crossing over might be discernable in tissues because this event produces a pair of neighboring monochromatic cells that are different colors. Results As a step in assessing the utility of this approach, we derived primary embryonic fibroblast populations and embryonic stem cell lines from mice that carried two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles at the chromosome 6 locus, ROSA26. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) showed that the vast majority of cells in each line expressed the two marker proteins at similar levels, and that populations exhibited expression noise similar to that seen in bacteria and yeast. Cells with a monochromatic phenotype were present at frequencies on the order of 10-4 and appeared to be produced at a rate of approximately 10-5 variant cells per mitosis. 45 of 45 stably monochromatic ES cell clones exhibited loss of the expected allele at the ROSA26 locus. More than half of these clones retained heterozygosity at a locus between ROSA26 and the centromere. Other clones exhibited LOH near the centromere, but were disomic for chromosome 6. Conclusion Allelic fluorescent markers allowed LOH at the ROSA26 locus to be detected by FACS. LOH at this locus was usually not accompanied by LOH near the centromere, suggesting that mitotic recombination was the major cause of ROSA26 LOH. Dichromatic mouse embryonic cells provide a novel system for studying genetic/karyotypic stability and factors influencing expression from allelic genes. Similar approaches will allow these phenomena to be studied in tissues. PMID:17042952

  18. Frequencies of the Hereditary Hemochromatosis Allele in Different Populations. Comparison of Previous Phenotypic Methods and Novel Genotypic Methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nils Milman; Palle Pedersen; Torkil á Steig; Gitte Vedel Melsen

    2003-01-01

    Aim  The frequencies of the hereditary hemochromatosis allele were compared for different populations assessed by previous phenotypic\\u000a methods and the present genotypic methods.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  From a literature survey, the calculated hemochromatosis allele frequencies from 16 studies using phenotypic biochemical markers\\u000a (threshold levels for transferrin saturation [range, 46%–70%] and serum ferritin [range, 164–700 µg\\/L]) were compared with\\u000a allele frequencies of the Cys282Tyr mutation

  19. Genetic tools for allelic replacement in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Ashley R; Kang, Yun; Inamasu, Ken S; Son, Mike S; Vukovich, Joseph M; Hoang, Tung T

    2008-07-01

    Allelic replacement in the Burkholderia genus has been problematic due to the lack of appropriate counter-selectable and selectable markers. The counter-selectable marker sacB, commonly used in gram-negative bacteria, is nonselective on sucrose in many Burkholderia species. In addition, the use of antibiotic resistance markers of clinical importance for the selection of desirable genetic traits is prohibited in the United States for two potential bioterrorism agents, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Here, we engineered a mutated counter-selectable marker based on the B. pseudomallei PheS (the alpha-subunit of phenylalanyl tRNA synthase) protein and tested its effectiveness in three different Burkholderia species. The mutant PheS protein effectively killed 100% of the bacteria in the presence of 0.1% p-chlorophenylalanine. We assembled the mutant pheS on several allelic replacement vectors, in addition to constructing selectable markers based on tellurite (Tel(r)) and trimethoprim (Tp(r)) resistance that are excisable by flanking unique FLP recombination target (FRT) sequences. As a proof of concept, we utilized one of these gene replacement vectors (pBAKA) and the Tel(r)-FRT cassette to produce a chromosomal mutation in the Burkholderia thailandensis betBA operon, which codes for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase and choline dehydrogenase. Chromosomal resistance markers could be excised by the introduction of pFLP-AB5 (Tp(r)), which is one of two constructed flp-containing plasmids, pFLP-AB4 (Tel(r)) and pFLP-AB5 (Tp(r)). These flp-containing plasmids harbor the mutant pheS gene and allow self curing on media that contain p-chlorophenylalanine after Flp-FRT excision. The characterization of the Delta betBA::Tel(r)-FRT and Delta betBA::FRT mutants indicated a defect in growth with choline as a sole carbon source, while these mutants grew as well as the wild type with succinate and glucose as alternative carbon sources. PMID:18502918

  20. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in white-tailed deer 

    E-print Network

    DeWoody, James Andrew

    1994-01-01

    the repeat. of these seven loci, five amplified well and exhibited polymorphism in animals from a pedigreed herd of whitetail deer. All five markers show codominant Mendelian inheritance in the pedigreed families. Heterozygositites, allele frequencies...

  1. Chloroplast and nuclear DNA markers to characterize cultivated and spontaneous Ribes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabrizio de Mattia; Fabrizio Grassi; Serena Imazio; Massimo Labra

    2008-01-01

    Nine universal cpSSR markers were tested on a representative group of cultivated accessions and spontaneous ribes populations. All primer combinations, with the exception of ccmp8, underwent amplification. Monomorphic alleles were detected at the ccmp2, ccmp3, ccmp4, ccmp5, ccmp7, ccmp9 primer pairs. Two and four polymorphic alleles were observed at the ccmp6 and ccmp10 loci, respectively. These six alleles combined in

  2. Analyses of a multi-parent population derived from two diverse alfalfa germplasms: testcross evaluations and phenotype-DNA associations.

    PubMed

    Maureira-Butler, I J; Udall, J A; Osborn, T C

    2007-10-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the genetic variation present in the Medicago sativa subsp. sativa Peruvian and M. sativa subsp. falcata WISFAL germplasms could be used to improve forage yields when favorable alleles were recombined and used in hybrid combination with cultivated alfalfa. In this paper, we present testcross forage yield and fall growth data for two seasons of a C0 population generated after intermating the Peruvian x WISFAL population for several generations. In addition, we conducted marker-trait association analysis as an attempt to identify Peruvian and WISFAL genomics regions affecting the targeted traits. Five and seven genomic regions were found significantly associated with forage yield and fall growth, respectively. In the case of fall growth, alleles from both accessions were positively associated with plant height. However, more alleles from WISFAL were positively associated with forage yield than from Peruvian. WISFAL is known for its winter hardiness and genomic regions with large effects on winter survival may have masked the effect of forage yield from Peruvian. The fact that most of the genomic regions discovered in this study have been previously associated with traits involved in winter hardiness validates our findings and suggests that associations between DNA fragments and agronomic traits can be detected without the necessity of developing bi-parental mapping populations. PMID:17676305

  3. Alleles of the fibroin gene coding for proteins of different lengths.

    PubMed

    Sprague, K U; Roth, M B; Manning, R F; Gage, L P

    1979-06-01

    Bombyx mori silkworms producing fibroin proteins of different lengths have been analyzed genetically and shown to possess variant alleles of a single fibroin gene. The structures of two alleles have been compared by using restriction endonuclease sites inside and outsite the fibroin gene as physical markers. We find that fibroins distinguishable on the basis of length are encoded by genes with different internal structures and overall lengths. Our results strongly support the idea that rearrangements within the highly repetitive sequences of the fibroin gene are the result of unequal recombination, and can give rise to variant fibroin genes with altered coding lengths. PMID:455471

  4. Assessment of genetic diversity in broomcorn millet ( Panicum miliaceum L.) using SSR markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xingyu Hu; Jianfei Wang; Ping Lu; Hongsheng Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 118 accessions of broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.), collected from various ecological areas, wasanalyzed. Using 46 SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) polymorphic markers from rice, wheat, oat and barley, a total of 226 alleles werefound, which exhibited moderate level of diversity. The number of alleles per primer ranged from two to nine, with an average of 4.91.

  5. Development of simple sequence repeat markers for the soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed 24 simple sequence repeat markers for Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungal pathogen of soybean (Glycine max) and other legumes. All 24 of the loci were evaluated on 28 isolates of P. pachyrhizi. Twenty-one loci were polymorphic, with allelic diversity ranging from two to eight alleles, and...

  6. Isolation of microsatellite markers in the Emys orbicularis complex and development of multiplex PCR amplification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Pedall; H. Schäfer; U. Fritz; M. Wink

    2009-01-01

    We report the development of 15 new microsatellite markers for Emys orbicularis and Emys trinacris. A survey of 20 individuals showed that all loci are highly polymorphic with 3–14 alleles per locus. Additionally, 22 Glyptemys muhlenbergii primers were checked for cross-species amplification, with 14 being amplified successfully and polymorphic (2–14 alleles).\\u000a A set of eight markers was selected and combined

  7. Characterization of genetic resistance to helminths in goats using microsatellite genetic markers 

    E-print Network

    Kogi, Joseph Kan'gethe

    1994-01-01

    resistance 13 Genetic markers and selection for Haemonchus contortus resistance . . 13 The major histocompatibility complex . . . 15 Blood polymorphisms Restriction fragment length polymorphisms . . . 15 16 Variable number of tandem repeats 16... of alleles, allele frequency, heterozygosity (HET) and polymorphism information content (PIC) for microsatellites markers scored 6. The estimated gene order, recombination rates and Kosambi (cM) for the 37 loci linked with lod-scores & 2. 0 42 7. Number...

  8. Interspecific Backcross Mice Show Sex-Specific Differences in Allelic Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, L. D.; Alvord, W. G.; Bickmore, W. A.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    Transmission distortion is identified as a difference in transmission frequency of two alleles from the normal 1:1 Mendelian segregation in diploid organisms. Transmission distortion can extend over part or all of a chromosome. The recent development of interspecific mouse backcrosses has provided a powerful method for multilocus mapping of entire chromosomes in a single cross, and consequently for identifying distortions in allelic inheritance. We used an interspecific backcross of [(C57BL/6J X Mus spretus)F(1) X C57BL/6J] mice to map molecular loci to mouse chromosome 2 and had previously found that the distal region of the chromosome showed distortions in allelic inheritance. We now report the mapping of five loci (Actc-1, D2Hgu1, His-1, Hox-4.1 and Neb) to chromosome 2, which, in addition to the Abl, Ada, B2m, Bmp-2a, Hc, Emv-15, Fshb, Hck-1, Pax-1, Pck-1, Spna-2 and Vim loci previously mapped in our interspecific backcross, serve as markers to measure allelic inheritance along ~75% of mouse chromosome 2. Statistical analyses are used to identify and delimit chromosomal regions showing transmission distortion and to determine whether there are sex-specific differences in allelic inheritance. These studies provide evidence for sex-specific differences in allelic inheritance for chromosome 2 and suggest biological explanations for this form of transmission distortion. PMID:1916246

  9. Examining Two Sets of Introgression Lines in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Reveals Favorable Alleles that Improve Grain Zn and Fe Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xia; Cheng, Li-Rui; Xu, Jian-Long; Shi, Yu-Min; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    In the modern world, the grain mineral concentration (GMC) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) not only includes important micronutrient elements such as iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), but it also includes toxic heavy metal elements, especially cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). To date, the genetic mechanisms underlying the regulation of GMC, especially the genetic background and G × E effects of GMC, remain largely unknown. In this study, we adopted two sets of backcross introgression lines (BILs) derived from IR75862 (a Zn-dense rice variety) as the donor parent and two elite indica varieties, Ce258 and Zhongguangxiang1, as recurrent parents to detect QTL affecting GMC traits including Fe, Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations in two environments. We detected a total of 22 loci responsible for GMC traits, which are distributed on all 12 rice chromosomes except 5, 9 and 10. Six genetic overlap (GO) regions affecting multiple elements were found, in which most donor alleles had synergistic effects on GMC. Some toxic heavy metal-independent loci (such as qFe1, qFe2 and qZn12) and some regions that have opposite genetic effects on micronutrient (Fe and Zn) and heavy metal element (Pb) concentrations (such as GO-IV) may be useful for marker-assisted biofortification breeding in rice. We discuss three important points affecting biofortification breeding efforts in rice, including correlations between different GMC traits, the genetic background effect and the G × E effect. PMID:26161553

  10. Identification of repeat sequence heterogeneity at the polymorphic short tandem repeat locus HUMTH01[AATG][sub n] and reassignment of alleles in population analysis by using a locus-specific allelic ladder

    SciTech Connect

    Puers, C. (Institute for Forensic Medicine, Muenster (Germany)); Schumm, J.W. (Promega Corp., Madison, WI (United States)); Hammond, H.A.; Caskey, C.T.; Jin, L.

    1993-10-01

    An allelic ladder containing amplified sequences of seven alleles of the polymorphic human tyrosine hydroxylase locus, HUMTH01, was constructed and employed as a standard marker. Sequence analysis of each ladder component indicates that fragments differ by integral multiples of the AATG core repeat sequence characteristic of this locus. Individual alles are designated [open quotes]5[close quotes] through [open quotes]11,[close quotes] according to the number of complete reiterations of the core repeat contained within them. Comparison of the HUMTH01 allelic ladder with DNA samples amplified at this locus revealed core repeat length heterogeneity (i.e., deletions or insertions shorter than one core repeat) within the human population. In particular, a common allele was identified which migrates more quickly than allele 10, but more slowly than allele 9, on electrophoresis through a denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Sequence analysis of this allele, designated [open quotes]10-1,[close quotes] reveals lack of a single adenine normally present in the seventh copy of the AATG. The allelic ladder was used to reevaluate previously published population data. Results of testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population substructure were not altered significantly by these modifications. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. RAPD markers linked to microspore embryogenic ability in Brassica crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng-lan Zhang; Satoru Aoki; Yoshihito Takahata

    2003-01-01

    In order to identify the markers linked to microspore embryogenic ability in Brassica crops, RAPD segregation analyses were performed in a microspore-derived (MD) population and a F2 population derived from F1between ‘Ho Mei’ (high responsive parent in microspore embryogenesis) and ‘269’ (low responsive parent) in Chinese cabbage,\\u000a and between ‘Lisandra’ (high responsive parent) and ‘Kamikita’ (low responsive parent) in oil

  12. Association Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers with Agronomic Traits in Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yong; Liu, Hongmei; Xu, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    Tall fescue is widely used in temperate regions throughout the world as a dominant forage grass as well as a turfgrass, in pastoral and turf industry. However, the utilization of tall fescue was limited because of its leaf roughness, poor regeneration ability and poor stress resistance. New cultivars were desirable in modern pastoral industries exceed the potential of existing cultivars. Therefore, well understanding the agronomic traits and describing germplasms would help to overcome these constraints, and morphological evaluation of tall fescue germplasm is the key component in selecting rational parents for hybridization breeding. However, describing the morphological traits of tall fescue germplasm is costly and time-consuming. Fortunately, biotechnology approaches can supplement conventional breeding efforts for tall fescue improvement. Association mapping, as a powerful approach to identify association between agronomic traits and molecular markers has been widely used for enhancing the utilization, conservation and management of the tall fescue germplasms. Therefore, in the present research, 115 tall fescue accessions from different origins (25 accessions are cultivars; 31 accessions from America; 32 accessions from European; 7 accessions from Africa; 20 accessions from Asia), were evaluated for agronomic traits and genetic diversity with 90 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The panel displayed significant variation in spike count per plant (SCP) and spike weight (SW). However, BCS performed the lowest CV among all the observed agronomic traits. Three subpopulations were identified within the collections but no obvious relative kinship (K) was found. The GLM model was used to describe the association between SSR and agronomic traits. Fifty-one SSR markers associated with agronomic traits were observed. Twelve single-associated markers were associated with PH; six single-associated markers were associated with BCS; eight single-associated markers were associated with SW; five single-associated markers were associated with SC; seven single-associated markers were associated with SCP; three single-associated markers were associated with SL. Especially, we observed that the genetic variation of SW was explained 11.6 % by M37 marker. It is interesting to observe that nine markers (M1, M2, M35, M54 marker was associated with both BCS and SC; M3, M4 markers were associated with BCS, SW, and SC; M19 marker was associated with both pH and PD, M40 marker was associated with both SCP and SW; and M193 marker was associated with both PH and SL) were associated with more than two agronomic traits. Notably, Branch count per spike (BCS) was explained by four markers (M1, M2, M3, and M4) exceeding 10 %. These identified marker alleles associated with agronomic traits could provide important information and markers for molecular-assisted breeding that facilitate the breeding process in tall fescue. PMID:26186338

  13. Analysis of cosegregation of intragenic DNA sequence variations as markers of maternal cell contamination in prenatal diagnosis of ?-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Abdul V; Girisha, Katta M; Gopinath, Puthiya M; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2011-03-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of 3 HBB gene mutations causing ?-thalassemia and hemoglobin D Punjab segregated in a South Indian nuclear family is reported along with a method identified as control for maternal cell contamination (MCC). Amplicons of the HBB gene from genomic DNA obtained from the blood of a thalassemic first child (proband), both parents, and a chorionic villus sample of their second pregnancy were directly sequenced. A test for MCC was performed by genotyping polymorphic microsatellite markers (D21S11 and D21S1270) by quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) and capillary gel electrophoresis. The pedigree analysis showed proband as a compound heterozygote of NG_000007.3:g.70691G>C and NG_000007.3:g.72128T>C mutations; showed the father as a compound heterozygote of NG_000007.3:g.72128T>C and NG_000007.3:g.71938G>C mutations; and showed the mother as a heterozygous carrier of the NG_000007.3:g.70691G>C mutation. The fetus inherited a normal maternal allele and a mutant paternal allele NG_000007.3:g.72128T>C and was ascertained a carrier of ?-thalassemia. Analysis of cosegregation of 5 other single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the family, including NG_000007.3:g.70603T>C, NG_000007.3:g.71055G>C, NG_000007.3:g.71113T>G, NG_000007.3:g.72332G>A, and NG_000007.3:g.72334A>C, defined the disease allele haplotypes. QF-PCR showed no extra maternal alleles in the fetal sample. Prenatal diagnosis of mutations and an absence of MCC was confirmed by cosegregation of the SNPs, suggesting the utility of a panel of such polymorphisms that can serve to identify MCC quickly and reliably. PMID:21316031

  14. MICA and MICB microsatellite alleles in HLA extended haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, E; Dalfonso, S; Rolando, V; Fasano, M E; Praticò, L; Momigliano-Richiardi, P

    2001-10-01

    The present study is a contribution to the definition of the linkage disequilibrium relationship of MICA and MICB with adjacent loci and to the characterization of extended HLA haplotypes. These issues are of importance for the identification of disease associations and for a better definition of donor-recipient compatibility in bone-marrow grafts through the typing of haplospecific markers. The distribution of the five alleles of MICA and the 13 alleles of MICB microsatellites, located, respectively, in MICA transmembrane exon 5 and in MICB intron 1, was examined in 133 healthy Italian individuals previously typed for HLA class I, class II and complement loci and for the TNFa microsatellite. The MICB microsatellite was also analysed in 49 HTCLs for which MICA typing was already available. Very strong linkage disequilibria with HLA-B and TNFa were detected in the Italian population for both MICA and MICB microsatellite alleles, in spite of the high mutability rate of the larger MICB alleles. Some strong associations were also detected between MICB and DRB1. The strongest associations (P < 0.001, D' > 0.7) were those of MICA-A4 with HLA-B18, B27 and TNFa1, MICA-A5 with HLA-B35, B61 and B62, MICA-A5.1 with HLA-B7, B8, B13, B63 and MICB-CA24, MICA-A6 with HLA-B51, MICA-A9 with HLA-B39, B57 and TNFa2, MICB-CA14 with HLA-B14, B27 and TNFa1, MICB-CA15 with HLA-B52, TNFa4 and TNFa13, MICB-CA17 with HLA-B7 and TNFa11, MICB-CA18 with HLA-B13 and TNFa7, MICB-CA22 with HLA-B57, and MICB-CA24 with HLA-B8 and TNFa2. From pairwise associations in the random panel and results for the homozygous cell lines it was possible to deduce the MICA and MICB microsatellite alleles present in many of the well-known Caucasoid extended haplotypes. PMID:11881819

  15. Parentage and kinship studies in an obligate brood parasitic bird, the brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), using microsatellite DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Alderson, G W; Gibbs, H L; Sealy, S G

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that single-locus microsatellite DNA markers have the potential to unambiguously resolve parentage among individuals in natural populations where maternity is known. However, their power for determining parentage when neither parent is known is unclear. Here we investigate the usefulness of microsatellite DNA markers to determine parentage in a brood parasitic bird, the brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), where, for a given offspring, no a priori knowledge of either parent is available. Seven polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers isolated from brown-headed cowbirds and yellow warblers (Dendroica petechia) were used to genetically characterize an individually marked breeding population of male and female cowbirds at Delta Marsh, Manitoba. Forty-four males, 21 females, and 61 cowbird chicks were genotyped at seven loci using DNA amplified from blood and tissue samples. The mean exclusion probabilities pooled across all seven loci were 0.9964 for males and 0.9948 for females. Two null (non-amplifying) alleles at one locus were discovered and accounted for by constructing alternate nonoverlapping primer sets. Exclusion analyses performed using all individuals determined both paternity and maternity for 43 chicks and paternity only for 4 chicks. Another microsatellite locus was then used to determine paternity for three additional chicks. Relatedness analyses placed 12 of the 18 remaining chicks not assigned both maternity and paternity into four unique full sibling groups. Overall, 90.16% (55 of 61) of all offspring examined were placed into distinct parent/sibling groups, demonstrating that this marker set is extremely useful for parentage studies in this species. PMID:9987928

  16. Derivative Alleles of the Arabidopsis Gibberellin-Insensitive (gai) Mutation Confer a Wild-Type Phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, J; Harberd, NP

    1993-01-01

    The gai mutation of Arabidopsis confers a dwarf phenotype resembling that of mutants defective in gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis. However, gai mutant plants differ from GA biosynthesis mutants because they fail to respond to exogenous GAs and accumulate endogenous GA species to higher (rather than lower) levels than found in wild-type controls. The gai mutation, therefore, identifies a gene that modulates the response of plant cells to GA. We have mapped gai with respect to visible and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers from chromosome 1. To observe the phenotype exhibited by individuals potentially lacking wild-type (GAI) function, we have also isolated novel irradiation-induced derivative alleles of gai. When homozygous, these alleles confer a revertant phenotype that is indistinguishable from the wild type. gai is a semidominant mutation that exerts its effects either because it is a gain-of-function mutation or because it is a loss-of-function or reduced-function mutation. The genetic and physiological properties of the derivative alleles are considered with reference to these alternative modes of dominance of gai. Because these alleles are potential deletion or rearrangement mutations, together with the closely linked RFLP markers identified in the linkage mapping experiments, they provide useful resources for the isolation of the gai locus via a map-based cloning approach. PMID:12271067

  17. Heritable Individual-Specific and Allele-Specific Chromatin Signatures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    McDaniell, Ryan; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Song, Lingyun; Liu, Zheng; Boyle, Alan P.; Erdos, Michael R.; Scott, Laura J.; Morken, Mario A.; Kucera, Katerina S.; Battenhouse, Anna; Keefe, Damian; Collins, Francis S.; Willard, Huntington F.; Lieb, Jason D.; Furey, Terrence S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Birney, Ewan

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which variation in chromatin structure and transcription factor binding may influence gene expression, and thus underlie or contribute to variation in phenotype, is unknown. To address this question, we cataloged both individual-to-individual variation and differences between homologous chromosomes within the same individual (allele-specific variation) in chromatin structure and transcription factor binding in lymphoblastoid cells derived from individuals of geographically diverse ancestry. Ten percent of active chromatin sites were individual-specific; a similar proportion were allele-specific. Both individual-specific and allele-specific sites were commonly transmitted from parent to child, which suggests that they are heritable features of the human genome. Our study shows that heritable chromatin status and transcription factor binding differ as a result of genetic variation and may underlie phenotypic variation in humans. PMID:20299549

  18. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA). Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States). Dept. of Zoology

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  20. Characterization of Novel Parent-Specific Epigenetic Modifications Upstream of the Imprinted Mouse H19 Gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PIROSKA E. SZABO; GERD P. PFEIFER; JEFFREY R. MANN

    1998-01-01

    Genomic imprinting results in parent-specific monoallelic expression of a small number of genes in mam- mals. The identity of imprints is unknown, but much evidence points to a role for DNA methylation. The maternal alleles of the imprinted H19 gene are active and hypomethylated; the paternal alleles are inactive and hypermethylated. Roles for other epigenetic modifications are suggested by allele-specific

  1. Exploring the Distribution of Genetic Markers of Pharmacogenomics Relevance in Brazilian and Mexican Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz-Peña, Vania; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Roela, Rosimeire A.; Furuya-Mazzotti, Tatiane K.; Chammas, Roger; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; McLeod, Howard L.; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Studies of pharmacogenomics-related traits are increasingly being performed to identify loci that affect either drug response or susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the effect of the polymorphisms can differ in magnitude or be absent depending on the population being assessed. We used the Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array to characterize the distribution of polymorphisms of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) relevance in two samples from the most populous Latin American countries, Brazil and Mexico. The sample from Brazil included 268 individuals from the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, and was stratified into census categories. The sample from Mexico comprised 45 Native American Zapotecas and 224 self-identified Mestizo individuals from 5 states located in geographically distant regions in Mexico. We evaluated the admixture proportions in the Brazilian and Mexican samples using a panel of Ancestry Informative Markers extracted from the DMET array, which was validated with genome-wide data. A substantial variation in ancestral proportions across census categories in Brazil, and geographic regions in Mexico was identified. We evaluated the extent of genetic differentiation (measured as FST values) of the genetic markers of the DMET Plus array between the relevant parental populations. Although the average levels of genetic differentiation are low, there is a long tail of markers showing large frequency differences, including markers located in genes belonging to the Cytochrome P450, Solute Carrier (SLC) and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) families as well as other genes of PGx relevance such as ABCC8, ADH1A, CHST3, PON1, PPARD, PPARG, and VKORC1. We show how differences in admixture history may have an important impact in the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies at the population level. PMID:25419701

  2. Incorporating Allelic Variation for Reconstructing the Evolutionary History of Organisms from Multiple Genes: An Example from Rosa in North America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Joly; Anne Bruneau

    2006-01-01

    Allelic variation within individuals holds information regarding the relationships of organisms, which is expected to be particularly important for reconstructing the evolutionary history of closely related taxa. However, little effort has been committed to incorporate such information for reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms. Haplotype trees represent a solution when one nonrecombinant marker is considered, but there is no satisfying method

  3. Nuclear gene phylogeography using PHASE: dealing with unresolved genotypes, lost alleles, and systematic bias in parameter estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryan C Garrick; Paul Sunnucks; Rodney J Dyer

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A widely-used approach for screening nuclear DNA markers is to obtain sequence data and use bioinformatic algorithms to estimate which two alleles are present in heterozygous individuals. It is common practice to omit unresolved genotypes from downstream analyses, but the implications of this have not been investigated. We evaluated the haplotype reconstruction method implemented by PHASE in the context

  4. Modeling linkage disequilibrium in exact linkage computations: a comparison of first-order Markov approaches and the clustered-markers approach.

    PubMed

    Albers, Cornelis A; Kappen, Hilbert J

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that linkage disequilibrium (LD) between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers is widespread. Assuming linkage equilibrium has been shown to cause false positives in linkage studies where parental genotypes are not available. Therefore, linkage analysis methods that can deal with LD are required to accurately analyze SNP marker data sets. We compared three approaches to deal with LD between markers: 1) The clustered-markers approach implemented in the computer program MERLIN; 2) The standard hidden Markov model (HMM) multipoint model augmented with a first-order Markov model for the allele frequencies of the founders, in which we considered both a Bayesian and a maximum-likelihood implementation of this approach; 3) The 'independent' SNPs approach, i.e., removing SNPs from the data set until the remaining SNPs have low levels of LD.We evaluated these approaches on the Illumina 6K SNP data set of affected sib-pairs of Problem 2. We found that the first-order Markov model was able to account for most of the strong LD in this data set. The difference between the Bayesian and maximum- likelihood implementation was small. An advantage of the first-order Markov model is that it does not require the user to specify parameters. PMID:18466504

  5. Modeling linkage disequilibrium in exact linkage computations: a comparison of first-order Markov approaches and the clustered-markers approach

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Cornelis A; Kappen, Hilbert J

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that linkage disequilibrium (LD) between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers is widespread. Assuming linkage equilibrium has been shown to cause false positives in linkage studies where parental genotypes are not available. Therefore, linkage analysis methods that can deal with LD are required to accurately analyze SNP marker data sets. We compared three approaches to deal with LD between markers: 1) The clustered-markers approach implemented in the computer program MERLIN; 2) The standard hidden Markov model (HMM) multipoint model augmented with a first-order Markov model for the allele frequencies of the founders, in which we considered both a Bayesian and a maximum-likelihood implementation of this approach; 3) The 'independent' SNPs approach, i.e., removing SNPs from the data set until the remaining SNPs have low levels of LD. We evaluated these approaches on the Illumina 6K SNP data set of affected sib-pairs of Problem 2. We found that the first-order Markov model was able to account for most of the strong LD in this data set. The difference between the Bayesian and maximum- likelihood implementation was small. An advantage of the first-order Markov model is that it does not require the user to specify parameters. PMID:18466504

  6. PARENTING WORKSHOP SERIES Expecting Parents

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    PARENTING WORKSHOP SERIES Expecting Parents Learn how to navigate the UCI Disability leave process 200 Infant and Child First Aid and CPR Be Prepared. Learn and practice the proper techniques Lam. 12-1PM ARC Kitchen/Classroom. 680 California Ave. Adult First Aid and CPR Learn and practice

  7. A standardized microsatellite marker panel for parentage and kinship analyses in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Waldbieser, G C; Bosworth, B G

    2013-08-01

    This research was designed to produce a standardized set of microsatellite loci for parentage and kinship analyses in channel catfish, the leading species of US aquaculture. Three panels of five to six markers each were developed that contained a total of two dinucleotide-, eight trinucleotide- and seven tetranucleotide-microsatellite loci respectively. The loci had a range of nine to 31 alleles per locus in an outbred population. Based on the allele frequencies measured in commercial randomly bred broodstock, the combined probability of non-exclusion of an unrelated candidate parent pair was 5.36e-18. The combined probability of non-exclusion of unrelated identical genotypes was 2.58e-08. The microsatellite panels were validated by parentage and kinship evaluation in three populations. A total of 697 spawns were collected from matings of outbred broodstock over three spawning seasons, and parents were determined unambiguously for all but three spawns. Genotype analysis also enabled the identification of half-sibling and full-sibling families produced by pond spawning. In a second experiment, parentage was unambiguously determined in nine spawns from a population consisting of broodstock derived from only four families. A third experiment demonstrated that all but one of 374 individuals from 10 full-sibling families could be assigned to a family after coculture in an earthen pond for 1 year. The standardized microsatellite panels enable the development of pedigreed catfish populations and large-scale performance evaluations in common environments to support the genetic improvement of cultured catfish through selective breeding. PMID:23216371

  8. Analysis of some polymorphic markers of the CFTR gene in cystic fibrosis patients and healthy donors from the Moscow region

    SciTech Connect

    Amosenko, F.A.; Sazonova, M.A.; Kapranov, N.I.; Trubnikova, I.S.; Kalinin, V.N. [Institute for Human Genetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-04-01

    Allelic frequencies of three polymorphic markers in the CFTR gene were estimated on chromosomes derived from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and healthy donors from Moscow and the Moscow region. These polymorphic markers are tetranucleotide tandem repeats GATT in intron 6B, M470V in exon 10, and T854T in exon 14 (fragment A). Frequencies at allele 1 of the M470V marker, along with allele 2 of GATT and T854T, are two times higher for CF patients without {Delta}F508 mutation than for healthy donors, and there is linkage disequilibrium of these alleles of the polymorphic markers analyzed with the CF gene. Allele 1 of M470V and T854T markers, as well as allele 2 of the GATT marker (six repeats), are absolutely linked to mutation F508 of the CFTR gene. Using the polymorphic markers studied, family analysis of CF was carried out in two families. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. An improved MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry procedure and a novel DNA marker for identifying over-expressed Bx7 glutenin protein subunit in wheat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Islam, Shahidul; Ma, Junhong; Anwar, Masood; Chen, Jing; Yan, Yueming; Appels, Rudi; Ma, Wujun

    2014-12-01

    Wheat bread-making quality is mainly determined by glutenin proteins in the grain, which exist in a wide range of variable alleles with differential influence on processing attributes. A recently identified allele, Bx7 over-expression (Bx7(oe) ), has been showing highly significant positive effects on wheat dough strength over the normally expressed Bx7 allele. SDS-PAGE and normal RP-HPLC procedures failed to separate the two alleles. In the current study, an extensively optimised MALDI-TOF based procedure and a refined DNA based marker for efficiently differentiating Bx7(oe) from normal Bx7 allele were established. Results indicated that the MALDI-TOF procedure is cost effective, high throughput, and proven reliable, while the refined PCR marker only amplifies Bx7(oe) allele, a clear advantage over the previously developed codominant marker. PMID:25588305

  10. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  11. Allele frequency and its forensic application of STR Y27 in Korean males.

    PubMed

    Lee, S D; Lee, J B

    1996-10-01

    The allele frequency and mutation rate in a Short Tandem Repeat locus, Y27 were studied in 247 unrelated Korean males using polymerase chain reaction followed by high-resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a procedure called the amplification fragment length polymorphism technique. Six alleles were noted ranging from 190 bp to 210 bp. They existed as discrete bands with 4 bp discrepancy. Among which DY3(198 bp), DY4(202 bp) were common with the frequencies of 0.408, 0.356 respectively. Other alleles, DY1(190 bp, frequency 0.020), DY2(194 bp, frequency 0.121), DY5(206 bp, frequency 0.089), DY6(210 bp, frequency 0.004) were relatively uncommon. In a 78 subject father-son study with parenthood confirmed through other genetic studies, no case of mutation was noted. As the allele number was not as large as 6 and two alleles were dominant, the discrimination power in routine individual identification was thought to be low. But in selective cases such as father-son determination or sex determination, this locus could be a valuable genetic marker and we thought these results to be common for the Korean population. These results were also compared with that of other race. PMID:8934392

  12. Allele frequency and its forensic application of STR Y27 in Korean males.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. D.; Lee, J. B.

    1996-01-01

    The allele frequency and mutation rate in a Short Tandem Repeat locus, Y27 were studied in 247 unrelated Korean males using polymerase chain reaction followed by high-resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a procedure called the amplification fragment length polymorphism technique. Six alleles were noted ranging from 190 bp to 210 bp. They existed as discrete bands with 4 bp discrepancy. Among which DY3(198 bp), DY4(202 bp) were common with the frequencies of 0.408, 0.356 respectively. Other alleles, DY1(190 bp, frequency 0.020), DY2(194 bp, frequency 0.121), DY5(206 bp, frequency 0.089), DY6(210 bp, frequency 0.004) were relatively uncommon. In a 78 subject father-son study with parenthood confirmed through other genetic studies, no case of mutation was noted. As the allele number was not as large as 6 and two alleles were dominant, the discrimination power in routine individual identification was thought to be low. But in selective cases such as father-son determination or sex determination, this locus could be a valuable genetic marker and we thought these results to be common for the Korean population. These results were also compared with that of other race. PMID:8934392

  13. Marker Analysis of Quantitative Traits in Maize by ISSR–PCR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. P. Domenyuk; T. G. Verbitskaya; A. A. Belousov; Yu. M. Sivolap

    2002-01-01

    The segregating maize population (GK26 × Mo17)F2 has been used for identification of ISSR markers able to reveal a significant difference between alleles by a quantitative index. Confidence ranges have been determined for variation in 17 quantitative traits. Variations in the traits under study correlate with the inheritance of 16 marker loci have been found. The nature of these correlations

  14. A review on SNP and other types of molecular markers and their use in animal genetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Vignal; Denis Milan; Magali SanCristobal; André Eggen

    2002-01-01

    During the last ten years, the use of molecular markers, revealing polymorphism at the DNA level, has been playing an increasing part in animal genetics studies. Amongst others, the microsatellite DNA marker has been the most widely used, due to its easy use by simple PCR, followed by a denaturing gel electrophoresis for allele size determination, and to the high

  15. SSR Marker Analysis of Genetic Relationships within Hydrangea paniculata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity studies using 26 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers were conducted with 36 taxa of Hydrangea paniculata Sieb. The SSR loci were highly variable among the taxa, producing a mean of 5.8 alleles per locus. Three cultivars (Boskoop, Compact Grandiflora and Webb) were either identic...

  16. Consecutive Mutational Events in a TSHR Allele of Arab Families with Resistance to Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn; German, Alina; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Our laboratory identified six distinct inactivating TSHR gene mutations in Arab tribes living in Israel. We recently reported three nucleotide substitutions in exon 3 producing p.[L89L;Q90P] and one in exon 9 of the same allele producing p.P264S in Family A. Family B, reported herein, harbors the identical mutation in exon 3 only. We set to determine whether the mutations have common ancestral origin. Methods Coding regions of the TSHR were sequenced and flanking microsatellite markers spanning 5.3 cM were used for haplotyping. Results Two siblings of Family B were compound heterozygous for TSHR gene mutations. The paternal allele contained the exon 3 mutation and the maternal allele harbored a mutation in exon 10 (p.L653V). We investigated the possibility of a founder effect with subsequent mutational events for the presence of the same exon 3 mutation in different families. The haplotype of the allele harboring the exon 3 mutation in Family B was identical to that of Family A, also harboring the exon 9 mutation on the same allele, indicating that the latter occurred subsequently. The ancestral wild-type TSHR was present in Family B, suggesting that the mutation in exon 3 was also new in the history of that population. Conclusions It is more likely that two consecutive mutational events occurred on the ancestral wild-type allele instead of a recombination bringing exon 3 and exon 9 mutations together on the same allele. New mutational events contribute to the high prevalence of TSHR mutations in this population in addition to a founder effect and limited gene pool due to inbreeding. PMID:22313426

  17. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. (Nucleo de Genetica Medica de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. (Univ. of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  18. Association of human leukocyte antigen class II alleles with pemphigus vulgaris in a Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Tunca, Mustafa; Musabak, Ugur; Sagkan, Rah?an Ilikci; Koc, Erol; Akar, Ahmet

    2010-03-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a severe autoimmune blistering skin disorder that is strongly associated with major histocompatibility complex class II alleles. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) subtypes vary with racial/ethnic backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of HLA class II alleles and haplotypes with PV in Turkish patients. Twenty-five patients with PV and 113 healthy transplant donors were genotyped for HLA class II alleles. HLA DNA typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction/sequence specific primer method. The frequency of HLA DRB1*04 allele was 68.00% in patients compared to 30.97% in controls (P = 0.0012) and the frequency of HLA DRB1*14 allele was 32.00% in the patient group compared to 8.85% in the control group (P = 0.0054). Also, the frequency of HLA DRB1*04/DQB1*03 and HLA DRB1*14/DQB1*05 haplotypes in PV patients was significantly higher than controls (32.0% vs 6.2%, chi(2) = 28.142, P < 0.001; and 16% vs 2.7%, chi(2) = 15.143, P = 0.001, respectively). A preventive allele or haplotype for the manifestation of PV has not been identified in this study. Our findings suggest that HLA DRB1*04 and DRB1*14 alleles, and HLA DRB1*04/DQB1*03 and HLA DRB1*14/DQB1*05 haplotypes are genetic markers for general susceptibility to PV in the Turkish population. PMID:20507388

  19. MHC class II alleles and haplotypes in patients with pemphigus vulgaris from India.

    PubMed

    Delgado, J C; Yunis, D E; Bozón, M V; Salazar, M; Deulofeut, R; Turbay, D; Mehra, N K; Pasricha, J S; Raval, R S; Patel, H; Shah, B K; Bhol, K; Alper, C A; Ahmed, A R; Yunis, E J

    1996-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes characterized by an autoantibody response against a keratinocyte adhesion molecule, desmoglein 3, causing acantholysis and blister formation. We compared high resolution MHC class II alleles and haplotype frequencies (HLA-DRB, DQA1 and DQB1) in 37 patients with PV to 89 haplotypes of normal relatives from New Delhi and Ahmedabad. We found that PV patients had significantly increased frequencies of DRB1*1404 (P < 0.0001), DQA1*0101 (P = 0.001), and DQB1*0503 (P < 0.0001). These associations were due to the increased frequencies of the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1404, DRB3*0202, DQA1*0101, DQB1*0503 in patients compared to control haplotypes (p < 0.0001). Also, patients from Ahmedabad had a significant increase in HLA-DQB1*0302 (p = 0.03). An identical amino acid sequence (Leu-Leu-Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Ala-Glu), in positions 67-74 of the beta domain of DRB alleles is restricted to some DR14 alleles. Therefore, there are three possible explanations for class II allele involvement in autoantibody in PV patients with class II haplotypes marked by HLA-DR14. First, the class II alleles could be markers for an unidentified susceptibility gene in linkage disequilibrium with them. Second, the primary association could be with DQB1*0503 and the association with HLA-DR14 alleles would be the result of linkage disequilibrium. Third, the HLA-DRB1 locus susceptibility could involve a specific amino acid sequence in the third hypervariable region shared by several HLA-DR14 alleles. PMID:9008309

  20. STRait Razor: a length-based forensic STR allele-calling tool for use with second generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Warshauer, David H; Lin, David; Hari, Kumar; Jain, Ravi; Davis, Carey; Larue, Bobby; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the capability of second generation sequencing (SGS) to provide coverage of short tandem repeats (STRs) found within the human genome. However, there are relatively few bioinformatic software packages capable of detecting these markers in the raw sequence data. The extant STR-calling tools are sophisticated, but are not always applicable to the analysis of the STR loci commonly used in forensic analyses. STRait Razor is a newly developed Perl-based software tool that runs on the Linux/Unix operating system and is designed to detect forensically-relevant STR alleles in FASTQ sequence data, based on allelic length. It is capable of analyzing STR loci with repeat motifs ranging from simple to complex without the need for extensive allelic sequence data. STRait Razor is designed to interpret both single-end and paired-end data and relies on intelligent parallel processing to reduce analysis time. Users are presented with a number of customization options, including variable mismatch detection parameters, as well as the ability to easily allow for the detection of alleles at new loci. In its current state, the software detects alleles for 44 autosomal and Y-chromosome STR loci. The study described herein demonstrates that STRait Razor is capable of detecting STR alleles in data generated by multiple library preparation methods and two Illumina(®) sequencing instruments, with 100% concordance. The data also reveal noteworthy concepts related to the effect of different preparation chemistries and sequencing parameters on the bioinformatic detection of STR alleles. PMID:23768312

  1. A multicopy dinucleotide marker that maps close to the spinal muscular atrophy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Burghes, A.H.M.; Ingraham, S.E.; Kote-Jarai, Z.; Carpten, J.D.; DiDonato, C.J. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); McLean, M.; Surh, L. (Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)); Thompson, T.G.; McPherson, J.D. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)); Ikeda, J.E. (Tokhai Univ. School of Medicine, Isehara City (Japan)); Wirth, B. (Institute for Human Genetics, Bonn (Germany)) (and others)

    1994-05-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder resulting in loss of motor neurons. The interval containing the SMA gene has been defined by linkage analysis as 5qcen-D5S435-SMA-D5S557-5qter. The authors have isolated a new dinucleotide repeat marker, CATT1, that lies between these two closest markers. The marker CATT1 has 16 alleles and is highly polymorphic. The marker can have 1 to 4 (or more) copies per chromosome, giving rise to individuals with up to 8 (or more) alleles. All of the subloci map between the markers D5S557 and D5S435 and lie in close proximity to one another. The marker CATT1 is linked to the SMA gene with a lod score of Z[sub max] = 34.42 at [theta] = 0 and crosses all available recombinants. Certain alleles occurred more frequently in either the SMA or normal populations, indicating significant allelic association between CATT1 and the SMA locus. Haplotype analysis combining US and Canadian SMA families reveals that one haplotype group (VII) occurs significantly more frequently in the SMA population than in the normal. This confirms the allelic association of CATT1 with the SMA locus. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Multi-allelic phenotyping – A systematic approach for the simultaneous analysis of multiple induced mutations?

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Christopher M.; Scahill, Catherine; Fényes, Fruzsina; Kettleborough, Ross N.W.; Stemple, Derek L.; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish mutation project (ZMP) aims to generate a loss of function allele for every protein-coding gene, but importantly to also characterise the phenotypes of these alleles during the first five days of development. Such a large-scale screen requires a systematic approach both to identifying phenotypes, and also to linking those phenotypes to specific mutations. This phenotyping pipeline simultaneously assesses the consequences of multiple alleles in a two-step process. First, mutations that do not produce a visible phenotype during the first five days of development are identified, while a second round of phenotyping focuses on detailed analysis of those alleles that are suspected to cause a phenotype. Allele-specific PCR single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays are used to genotype F2 parents and individual F3 fry for mutations known to be present in the F1 founder. With this method specific phenotypes can be linked to induced mutations. In addition a method is described for cryopreserving sperm samples of mutagenised males and their subsequent use for in vitro fertilisation to generate F2 families for phenotyping. Ultimately this approach will lead to the functional annotation of the zebrafish genome, which will deepen our understanding of gene function in development and disease. PMID:23624102

  3. Allele-Biased Expression in Differentiating Human Neurons: Implications for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mingyan; Hrabovsky, Anastasia; Pedrosa, Erika; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Deyou; Lachman, Herbert M.

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic processes and imprinting, along with genetic factors, lead to monoallelic or allele-biased gene expression. Stochastic monoallelic expression fine-tunes information processing in immune cells and the olfactory system, and imprinting plays an important role in development. Recent studies suggest that both stochastic events and imprinting may be more widespread than previously considered. We are interested in allele-biased gene expression occurring in the brain because parent-of-origin effects suggestive of imprinting appear to play a role in the transmission of schizophrenia (SZ) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in some families. In addition, allele-biased expression could help explain monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance and reduced penetrance. The ability to study allele-biased expression in human neurons has been transformed with the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and next generation sequencing. Using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) we identified 801 genes in differentiating neurons that were expressed in an allele-biased manner. These included a number of putative SZ and ASD candidates, such as A2BP1 (RBFOX1), ERBB4, NLGN4X, NRG1, NRG3, NRXN1, and NLGN1. Overall, there was a modest enrichment for SZ and ASD candidate genes among those that showed evidence for allele-biased expression (chi-square, p?=?0.02). In addition to helping explain MZ twin discordance and reduced penetrance, the capacity to group many candidate genes affecting a variety of molecular and cellular pathways under a common regulatory process – allele-biased expression – could have therapeutic implications. PMID:22952857

  4. Seed fates in crop–wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  5. Initial frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis poplar in a field population of Chrysomela tremulae.

    PubMed Central

    Génissel, Anne; Augustin, Sylvie; Courtin, Claudine; Pilate, Gilles; Lorme, Philippe; Bourguet, Denis

    2003-01-01

    Globally, the estimated total area planted with transgenic plants producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins was 12 million hectares in 2001. The risk of target pests becoming resistant to these toxins has led to the implementation of resistance-management strategies. The efficiency and sustainability of these strategies, including the high-dose plus refuge strategy currently recommended for North American maize, depend on the initial frequency of resistance alleles. In this study, we estimated the initial frequencies of alleles conferring resistance to transgenic Bt poplars producing Cry3A in a natural population of the poplar pest Chrysomela tremulae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). We used the F(2) screen method developed for detecting resistance alleles in natural pest populations. At least three parents of the 270 lines tested were heterozygous for a major Bt resistance allele. We estimated mean resistance-allele frequency for the period 1999-2001 at 0.0037 (95% confidence interval = 0.00045-0.0080) with a detection probability of 90%. These results demonstrate that (i) the F(2) screen method can be used to detect major alleles conferring resistance to Bt-producing plants in insects and (ii) the initial frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bt toxin can be close to the highest theoretical values that are expected prior to the use of Bt plants if considering fitness costs and typical mutation rates. PMID:12737656

  6. Body for Parents (Girls)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Illness & disability Drugs, alcohol & smoking Your feelings Relationships Bullying Safety Your future Environmental health Skip section navigation ( ... parents Girls' feelings for parents Relationships for parents Bullying for parents Safety for parents The future for ...

  7. Linkage disequilibrium between alleles at highly polymorphic mini- and micro-satellite loci of Theileria parva isolated from cattle in three regions of Kenya

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. O. Odongo; C. A. L. Oura; P. R. Spooner; H. Kiara; D. Mburu; O. H. Hanotte; R. P. Bishop

    2006-01-01

    Theileria parva schizont-infected lymphocyte culture isolates from western, central and coastal Kenya were analysed for size polymorphism at 30 T. parva-specific variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci using a panel of mini- and micro-satellite markers. The mean number of alleles ranged from 3 to 11 at individual loci and 183 distinct alleles were observed in total, indicating high genetic diversity

  8. Parent role characteristics: Parents' perceptions of their parent role

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rose Anne Turiano

    2001-01-01

    Research has widely examined the various beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions held by parents. However, few have formally examined parents' perceptions of their role or the characteristics that encompass this role, even though many have argued that the job of parent is most difficult. This study utilized the Parent Role Questionnaire (PRQ), developed by Mowder in 1990, to examine how parents

  9. Identification of leaf rust resistance genes in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars using molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Yu. Urbanovich; S. V. Malyshev; T. V. Dolmatovich; N. A. Kartel

    2006-01-01

    A collection of 68 cultivars of common wheat has been screened for leaf rust resistance genes with the use of molecular markers.\\u000a Markers of genes Lr1, Lr9, Lr10, Lr19, Lr20, Lr21, Lr24, and Lr26 have been used. It has been suggested that allele Xgwm295 be used as a marker for identifying the Lr34 gene. The genes originating from Triticum aestivum

  10. Functional analysis of 11 novel GBA alleles

    PubMed Central

    Malini, Erika; Grossi, Serena; Deganuto, Marta; Rosano, Camillo; Parini, Rossella; Dominisini, Silvia; Cariati, Roberta; Zampieri, Stefania; Bembi, Bruno; Filocamo, Mirella; Dardis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder due to the deficiency of the acid ?-glucosidase, encoded by the GBA gene. In this study, we report the structural and functional characterization of 11 novel GBA alleles. Seven single missense alleles, P159S, N188I, E235K, P245T, W312S, S366R and W381C, and two alleles carrying in cis mutations, (N188S; G265R) and (E326K; D380N), were studied for enzyme activity in transiently transfected cells. All mutants were inactive except the P159S, which retained 15% of wild-type activity. To further characterize the alleles carrying two in cis mutations, we expressed constructs bearing singly each mutation. The presence of G265R or D380N mutations completely abolished enzyme activity, while N188S and E326K mutants retained 25 and 54% of wild-type activity, respectively. Two mutations, affecting the acceptor splice site of introns 5 (c.589-1G>A) and 9 (c.1389-1G>A), led to the synthesis of aberrant mRNA. Unpredictably, family studies showed that two alleles resulted from germline or ‘de novo' mutations. These results strengthen the importance of performing a complete and accurate molecular analysis of the GBA gene in order to avoid misleading conclusions and provide a comprehensive functional analysis of new GBA mutations. PMID:24022302

  11. Highly Informative Single-Copy Nuclear Microsatellite DNA Markers Developed Using an AFLP-SSR Approach in Black Spruce (Picea mariana) and Red Spruce (P. rubens)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yong-Zhong; Forneris, Natascha; Rajora, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea) and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana) and red spruce (Picea rubens) using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies. Principal Findings A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean?=?0.67) in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean?=?0.62) in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies. Significance The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce and other Picea species for various genetics, genomics, breeding, forensics, conservation studies and applications. PMID:25126846

  12. Molecular mapping and construction of SCAR markers of the strawberry Rpf1 resistance gene to Phytophthora fragariae and their use in breeding programmes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Haymes; Weg van de W. E; P. Arens; B. Vosman; A. P. M. den Nijs

    1998-01-01

    The commercial strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) resistance gene Rpfl conferring resistance to various isolates of Phytophthora fragariae, was mapped using 7 RAPD markers. A DNA fragment representing a RAPD marker linked to susceptibility was cloned, sequenced and converted into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Next, SCAR primers to the resistant allele (SCAR-R) were developed based upon a deletion

  13. Molecular mapping and construction of SCAR markers of the strawberry Rpf 1 resistance gene to Phytophthora fragariae and their use in breeding programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Haymes; Weg van de W. E; P. Arens; B. Vosman; Nijs den A. P. M

    1997-01-01

    The commercial strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) resistance gene Rpfl conferring resistance to various isolates of Phytophthora fragariae, was mapped using 7 RAPD markers. A DNA fragment representing a RAPD marker linked to susceptibility was cloned, sequenced and converted into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Next, SCAR primers to the resistant allele (SCAR-R) were developed based upon a deletion

  14. Evaluation in beef cattle of six deoxyribonucleic acid markers developed for dairy traits reveals an osteopontin polymorphism associated with postweaning growth.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA markers have been reported to be associated with variation in dairy production traits. The objectives of this study were to 1) estimate allele frequencies in U.S. beef cattle and 2) evaluate association of marker genotype with beef production traits. Several genetic markers have been assoc...

  15. Allelic association and extended haplotype analysis of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) candidate region in the French Candadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, L.R.; Prescott, G.; Rochette, C. [Ste-Justine Hospital, Quebec (Canada)]|[Univ. of Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    SMA is a common lower motor neuron disease characterized by progressive proximal limb and trunk muscle weakness. Despite the wide range in phenotypic severity, all three clinical types of childhood SMAs map to chromosome 5q11.2-5q13.3. The proximal (D5S557) flanking markers span about 1 Mb. We have previously demonstrated significant linkage disequilibrium between D5S125, D5S435, D5S351, JK53CA1/2 and SMA in the French Canadian population. We now present data for three new DNA markers mapping between D5S435 and D5S557 kindly provided to us by Drs. B. Wirth (A31), A. Burghes (Ag1) and A. MacKenzie (CATT-40G1). We identified 10 different A31 Alleles whose frequencies were similar for both normal and SMA chromosomes. Ag1 is a complex multi-allelic marker and specific primers amplified 1 (Class I), 2 or rarely 3 (Class II) alleles per chromosome. We observed significant association between Ag1 and SMA. For example, the 100 bp Ag1 fragment was typed on 20 of 73 SMA chromosomes and 0 of 74 normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). We also observed significant association between Ag1 Class genotypes and phenotypic severity. Class I chromosomes predominated in Type I SMA (p=.001) while Type II SMA individuals were generally heterozygous Class I/Class II (p=.001). Finally, we provide evidence for allelic association between Type I SMA and CATT-40G1, a tri-allelic sublocus of CATT-1. All of our Type I SMA chromosomes (n=20) carried a null allele compared to 40% of normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). Extended haplotype analyses indicated that > 19% of French Canadian SMA chromosomes appear to be ancestrally related to two unique haplotypes indicating their utility for linkage disequilibrium mapping.

  16. Intracellular Population Genetics: Evidence for Random Drift of Mitochondrial Allele Frequencies in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE and SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE

    PubMed Central

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M.; Birky, C. William; Lückemann, Gudrun; Wolf, Klaus

    1980-01-01

    We report evidence for random drift of mitochondrial allele frequencies in zygote clones of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Monofactorial and bifactorial crosses were done, using strains resistant or sensitive to erythromycin (alleles ER, ES), oligomycin (OR, OS), or diuron (DR, DS). The frequencies of resistant and sensitive cells (and thus the frequencies of the resistant and sensitive alleles) were determined for each of a number of clones of diploid cells arising from individual zygotes. Allele frequencies were extremely variable among these zygote clones; some clones were "uniparental," with mitochondrial alleles from only one parent present. These observations suggest random drift of the allele frequencies in the population of mitochondrial genes within an individual zygote and its diploid progeny. Drift would cease when all the cells in a clone become homoplasmic, due to segregation of the mitochondrial genomes during vegetative cell divisions. To test this, we delayed cell division (and hence segregation) for varying times by starving zygotes in order to give drift more time to operate. As predicted, delaying cell division resulted in an increase in the variance of allele frequencies among the zygote clones and an increase in the proportion of uniparental zygote clones. The changes in form of the allele frequency distributions resembled those seen during random drift in finite Mendelian populations. In bifactorial crosses, genotypes as well as individual alleles were fixed or lost in some zygote clones. However, the mean recombination frequency for a large number of clones did not increase when cell division was delayed. Several possible molecular mechanisms for intracellular random drift are discussed. PMID:7009322

  17. Characterization of AFLP markers in damselflies: prevalence of codominant markers and implications for population genetic applications.

    PubMed

    Wong, A; Forbes, M R; Smith, M L

    2001-08-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis is becoming increasingly popular as a method for generating molecular markers for population genetic applications. For practical considerations, it is generally assumed in population studies that AFLPs segregate as dominant markers, i.e., that present and absent are the only possible states of a given locus. We tested the assumption of dominance in natural populations of the damselfly Nehalennia irene (Hagen) (Odonata: Coenagrionidae). Electro-blotted AFLP products from 21 samples were probed with individual markers. Eleven markers were analyzed, of which two were monomorphic and nine were polymorphic. Only two of the polymorphic markers behaved in a strictly dominant manner. The remaining seven polymorphic markers displayed various degrees of codominance, with 2-10 visible alleles in the sample. Of the three markers displaying the highest degree of variability, two contained microsatellite repeat tracts. Our results suggest that the assumption of dominance is unfounded. As a result, AFLP analysis may be unsuitable for estimating several important population genetic parameters, including genetic diversity. PMID:11550904

  18. Evaluation of a 49 InDel Marker HID panel in two specific populations of South America and one population of Northern Africa.

    PubMed

    Moura-Neto, R S; Silva, R; Mello, I C; Nogueira, T; Al-Deib, A A; LaRue, B; King, J; Budowle, B

    2015-03-01

    The majority of STR loci are not ideal for the analysis of forensic samples with degraded and/or low template DNA. One alternative to overcome these limitations is the use of bi-allelic markers, which have low mutation rates and shorter amplicons. Human identification (HID) InDel marker panels have been described in several countries, including Brazil. The commercial kit available is, however, mostly suitable for Europeans, with lower discrimination power for other population groups. Recently, a combination of 49 InDel markers used in four different ethnic groups in the USA has been shown to be more informative than another panel from Portugal, already tested in a Rio de Janeiro sample. However, these 49 InDels have yet to be applied to other admixed or isolated populations. We assessed the efficiency of this panel in two urban admixed populations (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Tripoli, Libya) and one isolated Native Brazilian community. All markers are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) after the Bonferroni correction, and no Linkage disequilibrium was detected. Assuming loci independence and no substructure effect, cumulative RMP was 2.7×10(-18), 1.5×10(-20), and 4.5×10(-20) for Native Brazilian, Rio de Janeiro, and Tripoli populations, respectively. The overall Fst value was 0.05512. Rio de Janeiro and Tripoli showed similar admixture levels, however for Native Brazilians one parental cluster represented over 60 % of the total parental population. We conclude that this panel is suitable for HID on these urban populations, but is less efficient for the isolated group. PMID:25516412

  19. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGF?1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGF?1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5?32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  20. Imputation of microsatellite allele from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite (MS) markers have recently been used for parental verification and are still the international standard despite higher cost, error rate, and turnaround time compared with Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP)-based assays. Despite domestic and international interest from producers an...

  1. Total Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Richard Smith observes that being a parent, like so much else in our late-modern world, is required to become ever more efficient and effective, and is increasingly monitored by the agencies of the state, often with good reason given the many recorded instances of child abuse and cruelty. However, Smith goes on to argue, this begins…

  2. Catalogue of alleles of gliadin-coding loci in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Melnikova, N V; Kudryavtseva, A V; Kudryavtsev, A M

    2012-02-01

    Gliadins are seed storage proteins which are characterized by high intervarietal polymorphism and can be used as genetic markers. As a result of our work, a considerably extended catalogue of allelic variants of gliadin component blocks was compiled for durum wheat; 74 allelic variants for four gliadin-coding loci were identified for the first time. The extended catalogue includes a total of 131 allelic variants: 16 for locus Gli-A1(d), 19 for locus Gli-B1(d), 41 for locus Gli-A2(d), and 55 for locus Gli-B2(d). The electrophoretic pattern of the standard cultivar and a diagram are provided for every block identified. The number of alleles per family is quite small for loci Gli-A1(d) and Gli-B1(d) of durum wheat, as contrasted to loci Gli-A2(d) and Gli-B2(d) that are characterized by large families including many alleles. The presence of large block families determines a higher diversity of durum wheat for loci Gli-A2(d) and Gli-B2(d) as compared to Gli-A1(d) and Gli-B1(d). The catalogue of allelic variants of gliadin component blocks can be used by seed farmers to identify durum wheat cultivars and evaluate their purity; by breeders, to obtain homogenous cultivars and control the initial stages of selection; by gene bank experts, to preserve native varieties and the original biotypic composition of cultivars. PMID:21946233

  3. Template mixing: a method of enhancing detection and interpretation of codominant RAPD markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Davis; H. Yu; K. M. Haigis; P. J. McGowan

    1995-01-01

    Ten codominant RAPD markers, ranging in size from about 300 to about 1350 bp, were identified in mapping populations of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and diploid strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.). A distinguishing feature of all ten markers, and perhaps of codominant RAPD markers in general, was the presence in heterozygous individuals of a non-parental, heteroduplex band migrating more slowly than

  4. Detection of new HLA-DPB1 alleles generated by interallelic gene conversion using PCR amplification of DPB1 second exon sequences from sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, H.; Zangenberg, G.; Bugawan, T. [Roche Molecular Systems, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The rate at which allelic diversity at the HLA class I and class II loci evolves has been the subject of considerable controversy as have the mechanisms which generate new alleles. The patchwork pattern of polymorphism, particularly within the second exon of the HLA-DPB1 locus where the polymorphic sequence motifs are localized to 6 discrete regions, is consistent with the hypothesis that much of the allelic sequence variation may have been generated by segmental exchange (gene conversion). To measure the rate of new DPB1 variant generation, we have developed a strategy in which DPB1 second exon sequences are amplified from pools of FACS-sorted sperm (n=50) from a heterozygous sperm donor. Pools of sperm from these heterozygous individuals are amplified with an allele-specific primer for one allele and analyzed with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) complementary to the other allele. This screening procedure, which is capable of detecting a single variant molecule in a pool of parental alleles, allows the identification of new variants that have been generated by recombination and/or gene conversion between the two parental alleles. To control for potential PCR artifacts, the same screening procedure was carried out with mixtures of sperm from DPB1 *0301/*0301 and DPB1 *0401/ 0401 individuals. Pools containing putative new variants DPB1 alleles were analyzed further by cloning into M13 and sequencing the M13 clones. Our current estimate is that about 1/10,000 sperm from these heterozygous individuals represents a new DPB1 allele generated by micro-gene conversion within the second exon.

  5. Genetic Exchange of Fimbrial Alleles Exemplifies the Adaptive Virulence Strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jennifer E.; Abramian, Jared R.; Dao, Doan-Hieu V.; Rigney, Todd W.; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram–negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed “keystone” pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions. PMID:24626479

  6. Genetic exchange of fimbrial alleles exemplifies the adaptive virulence strategy of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jennifer E; Abramian, Jared R; Dao, Doan-Hieu V; Rigney, Todd W; Fritz, Jamie; Pham, Tan; Gay, Isabel; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Wang, Bing-yan; Zhang, Wenjian; Tribble, Gena D

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, a member of the human oral microbiome, and a proposed "keystone" pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the gingiva. P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species, and is able to exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. In this study, we investigate the role of horizontal DNA transfer as an adaptive process to modify behavior, using the major fimbriae as our model system, due to their critical role in mediating interactions with the host environment. We show that P. gingivalis is able to exchange fimbrial allele types I and IV into four distinct strain backgrounds via natural competence. In all recombinants, we detected a complete exchange of the entire fimA allele, and the rate of exchange varies between the different strain backgrounds. In addition, gene exchange within other regions of the fimbrial genetic locus was identified. To measure the biological implications of these allele swaps we compared three genotypes of fimA in an isogenic background, strain ATCC 33277. We demonstrate that exchange of fimbrial allele type results in profound phenotypic changes, including the quantity of fimbriae elaborated, membrane blebbing, auto-aggregation and other virulence-associated phenotypes. Replacement of the type I allele with either the type III or IV allele resulted in increased invasion of gingival fibroblast cells relative to the isogenic parent strain. While genetic variability is known to impact host-microbiome interactions, this is the first study to quantitatively assess the adaptive effect of exchanging genes within the pan genome cloud. This is significant as it presents a potential mechanism by which opportunistic pathogens may acquire the traits necessary to modify host-microbial interactions. PMID:24626479

  7. Parents' talk : multiple schemas and parenting practice

    E-print Network

    Sarda, Zoltan G.

    2012-01-01

    parenting behaviors and affects are twofold: Parents’ attachment style has profound effects on the child’effects on children’s development, research findings indicate a correlation between low self-efficacy and more authoritarian parenting styles,

  8. Allele loss in colorectal cancer at the Cowden disease/juvenile polyposis locus on 10q.

    PubMed

    Frayling, I M; Bodmer, W F; Tomlinson, I P

    1997-08-01

    The genes that are mutated in inherited cancer syndromes are often involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic cancers of the types that characterize those syndromes. In colorectal cancer such loci include the familial adenomatous polyposis (APC) gene and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (DNA mismatch repair) genes. Juvenile hamartomatous polyposis syndromes, which include Juvenile Polyposis and Cowden disease, also predispose to colorectal cancer. The gene for Cowden disease has recently been localized to chromosome 10q22-q23, and a juvenile polyposis locus, JP1, has been reported as mapping to the same location. We have studied up to 70 cases of sporadic colorectal cancer for allele loss at markers predominantly on the long arm of chromosome 10, including loci flanking the putative Cowden Disease/JP1 locus. Frequencies of allele loss of about 35% were found close to this locus, whereas low frequencies of allele loss were found elsewhere on 10q. Mutations at the putative Cowden Disease/JP1 locus may therefore be important in sporadic colorectal cancer and fine mapping of allele loss on 10q in sporadic colon cancers may help to refine the position of this gene. PMID:9242220

  9. Power of Genetic Association Studies in the Presence of Linkage Disequilibrium and Allelic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Sheila A.; Lewis, Cathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The calculation of the power and sample size required for association studies is essential, particularly for follow-up of genome-wide association studies, where much genotyping is required to replicate the original finding and identify the true disease susceptibility mutation. Methods In this paper, we derive equations for estimation of sample sizes for the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) and for case-control studies, in the presence of allelic heterogeneity and indirect association – where the genotyped tagging SNP is in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the true mutation. Using data from NOD2 and PTPN22, we show that the true sample sizes required to detect association may be incorrect when calculated under the assumption of a single mutation and complete LD with the genotyped marker. Results The true sample sizes may be lower when allelic heterogeneity acts in a recessive model across mutations, or increased when mutations lie on different alleles of a common tagging SNP. Conclusion Calculating power and sample size under a range of realistic models of LD and allelic heterogeneity is essential to ensure that association studies have sufficient power to detect mutations. PMID:18612206

  10. Population stratification and spurious allelic association

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lon R Cardon

    3-8 Considerable effort is being expended in attempts to detect genetic loci contributing to complex diseases. 9 Association and linkage studies comprise the two dominant strategies: association studies aim to find disease-predisposing alleles at the population level; and linkage studies focus on familial segregation. Although both strategies have compelling strengths, association analyses are more widely done and likely to spread

  11. Tetrasomic segregation for multiple alleles in alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Quiros, C F

    1982-05-01

    Evidence of tetrasomic inheritance in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. and M. falcata L., for multiple codominant alleles at three isozymic loci is reported in this study. The locus Prx-1 governing anodal peroxidase and the loci Lap-1 and Lap-2 governing anodal leucine-aminopeptidase were studied by starch gel electrophoresis in seedling root tissue or seeds. The progenies from several di-, tri- or tetra-allelic plants belong to the species M. sativa and M. falcata and their hybrids were studied for the segregation of the three genes. In all cases, tetrasomic inheritance of chromosomal-type segregation was observed. In another progeny resulting from the crossing of two plants involving four different alleles at locus Lap-2, tetrasomic segregation with the possible occurrence of double reduction was observed. This study presents direct evidence of autotetraploidy and the existence of tetra-allelic loci in alfalfa. It also supports the concept that the species M. sativa and M. falcata are genetically close enough to be considered biotypes of a common species. PMID:17246077

  12. Allele-specific binding of ZFP57 in the epigenetic regulation of imprinted and non-imprinted monoallelic expression

    E-print Network

    Strogantsev, Ruslan; Krueger, Felix; Yamazawa, Kazuki; Shi, Hui; Gould, Poppy; Goldman-Roberts, Megan; McEwen, Kirsten; Sun, Bowen; Pedersen, Roger; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.

    2015-05-30

    allele-specific alignment pipeline (ASAP) using ~20.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between BL6 and Cast genomes obtained from Biomart and Sanger mouse genome databases [24, 25] with an overall BL6/Cast read ratio close to one (Table 1... by ZFP57 in BC and Cast (brown line) in the CB line. ASAP – allele specific alignment pipeline devised to map genome – specific reads. b Total number of peaks identified as being biallelic, parental-origin specific (Maternal and Paternal) and strain...

  13. A powerful test of parent-of-origin effects for quantitative traits using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon where the same alleles have unequal transcriptions and thus contribute differently to a trait depending on their parent of origin. This mechanism has been found to affect a variety of human disorders. Although various methods for testing parent-of-origin effect...

  14. Many Parents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseng, Torleiv; Moxnes, John F.

    2015-06-01

    In all living species at most, two parents are needed in order to make an offspring. In this paper, we assume that N parents are needed, and we calculate the optimum N in terms of fitness using a simple probabilistic approach. The probability of finding an attractive partner is set to P. The probability that this partner gives increased fitness is set to 1- R. We show that the best number of partners is N = 2 for any value of R as long as 1/2 < P < 2/3. For P < 1/2, the most beneficial is N = 1 partner. As P increases, there exists an optimum number of partners N > 2.

  15. Allelic Imbalance Is a Prevalent and Tissue-Specific Feature of the Mouse Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Stefan F; Colognori, David; Beliveau, Brian J; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Payer, Bernhard; Yildirim, Eda; Wu, Chao-Ting; Lee, Jeannie T

    2015-06-01

    In mammals, several classes of monoallelic genes have been identified, including those subject to X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), genomic imprinting, and random monoallelic expression (RMAE). However, the extent to which these epigenetic phenomena are influenced by underlying genetic variation is unknown. Here we perform a systematic classification of allelic imbalance in mouse hybrids derived from reciprocal crosses of divergent strains. We observe that deviation from balanced biallelic expression is common, occurring in ?20% of the mouse transcriptome in a given tissue. Allelic imbalance attributed to genotypic variation is by far the most prevalent class and typically is tissue-specific. However, some genotype-based imbalance is maintained across tissues and is associated with greater genetic variation, especially in 5' and 3' termini of transcripts. We further identify novel random monoallelic and imprinted genes and find that genotype can modify penetrance of parental origin even in the setting of large imprinted regions. Examination of nascent transcripts in single cells from inbred parental strains reveals that genes showing genotype-based imbalance in hybrids can also exhibit monoallelic expression in isogenic backgrounds. This surprising observation may suggest a competition between alleles and/or reflect the combined impact of cis- and trans-acting variation on expression of a given gene. Our findings provide novel insights into gene regulation and may be relevant to human genetic variation and disease. PMID:25858912

  16. Murderous parents.

    PubMed

    Palermo, George B

    2002-04-01

    This article offers observations regarding some of the major manifestations of family violence, neonaticide, infanticide, and filicide with the purpose of aiding in the early identification of parents at risk. They are discussed within the past and present historical and cultural milieu. A brief review of pertinent literature is presented. Pertinent case studies from the forensic psychiatric practice of the author along with psychodynamic reflections are offered. PMID:12113159

  17. For Parents and Kids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A A A Listen En Español For Parents & Kids Diabetes is a disease that affects the whole ... balance between caring and hovering. Explore: For Parents & Kids Parent's Perspective Parents of children with diabetes share ...

  18. A novel hypomorphic Looptail allele at the planar cell polarity Vangl2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, Marie-Claude; Bosoi, Ciprian M.; Kharfallah, Fares; Reynolds, Annie; Drapeau, Pierre; Justice, Monica; Gros, Philippe; Kibar, Zoha

    2013-01-01

    Vangl2 forms part of the planar cell polarity signalling pathway and is the gene defective in the Looptail (Lp) mouse mutant. Two previously described alleles, Lp and Lpm1Jus, segregate in a semi-dominant fashion, with heterozygotes displaying the looped-tail appearance, while homozygotes show the neural tube defect called craniorachischisis. Here, we report a novel experimentally-induced allele, Lpm2Jus, that carries a missense mutation, R259L, in Vangl2. This mutation was specific to the Lp phenotype and absent from both parental strains and 28 other inbred strains. Notably, this mutation segregates in a recessive manner with all heterozygotes appearing normal and 47% of homozygotes showing a looped-tail. Homozygous Lpm2Jus embryos showed spina bifida in 12%. Lpm2Jus genetically interacts with Lp with 77% of compound heterozygotes displaying craniorachischisis. Vangl2R259L behaved like the wild-type allele in overexpression and morpholino knockdown/rescue assays in zebrafish embryos. These data suggest that Lpm2Jus represents a new hypomorphic allele of Lp. PMID:21404367

  19. Synchronous allelic expression at the glucosephosphate isomerase A and B loci in interspecific sunfish hybrids.

    PubMed

    Champion, M J; Whitt, G S

    1976-10-01

    Allelic isozymes of glucosephosphate isomerase at the Gpi-A and -B loci were separated by starch gel electrophoresis in the warmouth (Lepomis gulosus) and green sunfish (L. cyanellus). The specific tissue distributions and developmental expressions of the GPI-A2, -AB, and -B2 isozymes were not different between these two species. The synchrony of allelic expression in normal intraspecific sunfish crosses was demonstrated by means of an electrophoretic variant at the Gpi-B locus. In embryos formed from warmouth x green sunfish hybrid crosses, the paternal GPI-A2 isozymes were first expressed at the same time in both reciprocal hybrids, at 21-25 hr after fertilization. The maternal and paternal GPI-B subunits were synchronously expressed in reciprocal hybrids just for prior to hatching. The parental allelic isozymes at both loci shoed codominant expression in all tissues of the mature F1 hybrids. These results are consistent with the absence of allelic asynchrony and inhibition in interspecific hybrids formed from more evolutionarily related species. PMID:1008802

  20. Tracking human migrations by the analysis of the distribution of HLA alleles, lineages and haplotypes in closed and open populations

    PubMed Central

    Vina, Marcelo A. Fernandez; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Maiers, Martin; Klitz, William; Cano, Pedro; Mack, Steven; Single, Richard; Brautbar, Chaim; Israel, Shosahna; Raimondi, Eduardo; Khoriaty, Evelyne; Inati, Adlette; Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Thomson, Glenys; Stastny, Peter; Cao, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system shows extensive variation in the number and function of loci and the number of alleles present at any one locus. Allele distribution has been analysed in many populations through the course of several decades, and the implementation of molecular typing has significantly increased the level of diversity revealing that many serotypes have multiple functional variants. While the degree of diversity in many populations is equivalent and may result from functional polymorphism(s) in peptide presentation, homogeneous and heterogeneous populations present contrasting numbers of alleles and lineages at the loci with high-density expression products. In spite of these differences, the homozygosity levels are comparable in almost all of them. The balanced distribution of HLA alleles is consistent with overdominant selection. The genetic distances between outbred populations correlate with their geographical locations; the formal genetic distance measurements are larger than expected between inbred populations in the same region. The latter present many unique alleles grouped in a few lineages consistent with limited founder polymorphism in which any novel allele may have been positively selected to enlarge the communal peptide-binding repertoire of a given population. On the other hand, it has been observed that some alleles are found in multiple populations with distinctive haplotypic associations suggesting that convergent evolution events may have taken place as well. It appears that the HLA system has been under strong selection, probably owing to its fundamental role in varying immune responses. Therefore, allelic diversity in HLA should be analysed in conjunction with other genetic markers to accurately track the migrations of modern humans. PMID:22312049

  1. Exploitation of sulfonylurea resistance marker and non-homologous end joining mutants for functional analysis in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Y S; Cairns, T C; Chaudhari, Y K; Usher, J; Talbot, N J; Studholme, D J; Csukai, M; Haynes, K

    2015-06-01

    The lack of techniques for rapid assembly of gene deletion vectors, paucity of selectable marker genes available for genetic manipulation and low frequency of homologous recombination are major constraints in construction of gene deletion mutants in Zymoseptoria tritici. To address these issues, we have constructed ternary vectors for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of Z. tritici, which enable the single step assembly of multiple fragments via yeast recombinational cloning. The sulfonylurea resistance gene, which is a mutated allele of the Magnaporthe oryzae ILV2 gene, was established as a new dominant selectable marker for Z. tritici. To increase the frequency of homologous recombination, we have constructed Z. tritici strains deficient in the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double stranded break repair by inactivating the KU70 and KU80 genes. Targeted gene deletion frequency increased to more than 85% in both Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains, compared to ?10% seen in the wild type parental strain IPO323. The in vitro growth and in planta pathogenicity of the Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains were comparable to strain IPO323. Together these molecular tools add significantly to the platform available for genomic analysis through targeted gene deletion or promoter replacements and will facilitate large-scale functional characterization projects in Z. tritici. PMID:26092796

  2. QTL mapping and introgression of yield-related traits from Oryza glumaepatula to cultivated rice ( Oryza sativa) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Brondani, C.; Rangel, N.; Brondani, V.; Ferreira, E.

    2002-05-01

    Rice ( Oryza sativa) cultivar development currently faces the task of overcoming yield plateaus, which is difficult due to the narrow genetic base of breeding programs. Oryza glumaepatula is a diploid wild relative of cultivated rice, native to Central and South America, and is therefore a potential source of alleles of agronomic importance to rice breeding programs. We studied 11 agronomic traits in BC(2)F(2) families of the interspecific cross Oryza sativa x O. glumaepatula. Transgressive lines which are almost isogenic to the elite recurrent O. sativa parent were identified for most of these traits. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed by single-point and interval mapping using a molecular map based on 157 microsatellite and STS markers. Marker regions accounting for 14.5 to 72.9% of a phenotypic variation trait were identified in 9 of the 12 rice chromosomes. Positive QTL effects from O. glumaepatula were observed in chromosomal regions associated with tillering and panicle-number traits. PMID:12582630

  3. Exploitation of sulfonylurea resistance marker and non-homologous end joining mutants for functional analysis in Zymoseptoria tritici

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Y.S.; Cairns, T.C.; Chaudhari, Y.K.; Usher, J.; Talbot, N.J.; Studholme, D.J.; Csukai, M.; Haynes, K.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of techniques for rapid assembly of gene deletion vectors, paucity of selectable marker genes available for genetic manipulation and low frequency of homologous recombination are major constraints in construction of gene deletion mutants in Zymoseptoria tritici. To address these issues, we have constructed ternary vectors for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of Z. tritici, which enable the single step assembly of multiple fragments via yeast recombinational cloning. The sulfonylurea resistance gene, which is a mutated allele of the Magnaporthe oryzae ILV2 gene, was established as a new dominant selectable marker for Z. tritici. To increase the frequency of homologous recombination, we have constructed Z. tritici strains deficient in the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double stranded break repair by inactivating the KU70 and KU80 genes. Targeted gene deletion frequency increased to more than 85% in both Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains, compared to ?10% seen in the wild type parental strain IPO323. The in vitro growth and in planta pathogenicity of the Z. tritici ku70 and ku80 null strains were comparable to strain IPO323. Together these molecular tools add significantly to the platform available for genomic analysis through targeted gene deletion or promoter replacements and will facilitate large-scale functional characterization projects in Z. tritici. PMID:26092796

  4. Dominant hemimelia and En-1 on mouse chromosome 1 are not allelic.

    PubMed

    Higgins, M; Hill, R E; West, J D

    1992-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that En-1, a homeobox-containing gene, maps close to or at the Dh locus in the mouse. Since homeobox-containing genes are key genes in the control of development the close proximity of En-1 to the developmentally significant gene Dh raised the possibility that the Dh mutation represented a mutant allele of En-1. A genetic analysis involving En-1, Dh, and other chromosome 1 markers (Emv-17, ln and Pep-3) shows that although Dh and En-1 are closely linked they are separable by recombination (4/563). The likely gene order and recombination frequencies of these loci are: ln (5.2 +/- 0.9) Emv-17 (1.1 +/- 0.4) Dh (0.7 +/- 0.4) En-1 (3.0 +/- 0.7) Pep-3. This shows that Dh is not a mutant allele of En-1. PMID:1360439

  5. Development of microsatellite markers and characterization of simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) in rice ( Oryza sativa L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Panaud; X. Chen; S. R. McCouch

    1996-01-01

    Microsatellite markers containing simple sequence repeats (SSR) are a valuable tool for genetic analysis. Our objective is to augment the existing RFLP map of rice with simple sequence length polymorphisms (SSLP). In this study, we describe 20 new microsatellite markers that have been assigned to positions along the rice chromosomes, characterized for their allelic diversity in cultivated and wild rice,

  6. Marker-assisted selection to improve drought adaptation in maize: the backcross approach, perspectives, limitations, and alternatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Marcel Ribaut; Michel Ragot

    2006-01-01

    A number of different marker-assisted selection (MAS) approaches do exist for the improvement of polygenic traits. Results of a marker-assisted backcross (MABC) selection experiment aimed at improving grain yield under drought conditions in tropical maize are pre- sented and compared with alternative MAS strategies. The introgression of favourable alleles at five target regions involved in the expression of yield compo-

  7. DNA marker C04107 for copper toxicosis in a population of Bedlington terriers in the United Kingdom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. G. Holmes; M. E. Herrtage; E. J. Ryder; M. M. Binns

    1998-01-01

    The DNA microsatellite marker C04107, linked to the Bedlington terrier copper toxicosis locus, is used diagnostically in the USA to detect the disease allele. This marker has been typed in Bedlington terriers of known disease status in the United Kingdom, and it is concluded that it should be useful in eradicating the disease from the breed in the UK. The

  8. Transferability of microsatellite and sequence tagged site markers in Oryza species.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Claudio; Rangel, Paulo Hideo Nakano; Borba, Tereza Cristina Oliveira; Brondani, Rosana Pereira Vianello

    2003-01-01

    The genus Oryza comprises 22 species which are potentially useful as a source of genetic variability that can be introgressed into the worldwide cultivated rice, Oryza sativa. Molecular markers are useful tools for monitoring gene introgressions and for detecting polymorphism among species. In this study, cross-amplification was estimated among 28 accessions of 16 Oryza species, representing the genomes AA, BB, CC, BBCC and CCDD, using 59 microsatellite (OG, OS and RM series) and 15 STS (Sequence Tagged Sites) markers. All markers amplified at least one Oryza species, indicating different levels of transferability across species. Markers based on microsatellite sequences amplified 37 % of the accessions, with an average of 6.58 alleles per locus and an average polymorphism information content (PIC) of 70 %. For STS markers, the amplification level was 53.3 %, and the average number of alleles and PIC values were 1.6 and 10 %, respectively. These Results showed that although the STS markers detected a reduced level of genetic diversity, the transferability was higher, indicating that they can be used for genetic analysis when evaluating less genetically related species of Oryza. Among the microsatellite markers, an analysis of species with an AA genome showed that the OG markers produced the highest level of polymorphic loci (54.6 %), followed by RM markers (48 %). Highly polymorphic and transferable molecular markers in Oryza can be useful for exploiting the genetic resources of this genus, for detecting allelic variants in loci associated with important agronomic traits, and for monitoring alleles introgressed from wild relatives to cultivated rice. PMID:14641482

  9. Strong allelic association between Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome and D17S805

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, M.; Jagell, S.; Sillen, A. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Sjoegren-Larsson Syndrom (SLS) is characterized by congenital ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation. It is an autosomal recessive trait that has been described in many populations, but is particularly frequent in the northern part of Sweden. A defect in the enzyme fatty alcohol: NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAD) has been suggested, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Based on linkage analysis and allelic association, the disorder has now been mapped to chromosome 17. Meiotic recombinations suggests that the gene is flanked by D17S805 on the centromeric and D17S783 and D17S925 on the telomeric side. These three markers map to the same location in reference pedigrees. Strong allelic association (chi-square 60.28, p<0.0003) to D17S805 suggests that the mutation is located at a limited distance on the telomeric side of this marker. It is possible that the gene can be identified by functional complementation of SLS cells using YACs from this region. Alternatively, positional cloning should be possible in this presumable small area. The markers identified are close and informative enough to allow accurate genetic diagnosis.

  10. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1) and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6?cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90). In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY transcription factor previously associated with fire blight resistance. However, this QTL was not observed in the New Zealand or German populations. Conclusions The results suggest that the upper region of ‘Robusta 5’ linkage group 3 contains multiple genes contributing to fire blight resistance and that their contributions to resistance can vary depending upon pathogen virulence and other factors. Mapping markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes has proved a useful aid in defining these QTLs and developing markers for marker-assisted breeding of fire blight resistance. PMID:22471693

  11. Linkage analysis of affected sib pairs allowing for parent-of-origin effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Chieh; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I

    2005-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects, also known as genomic imprinting, exist for many mammalian genes. For imprinted genes the expression of an allele depends upon the sex of the transmitting parent. Here we have developed a method based on alleles that are shared identical by descent by affected sib pairs, that allows for parent-of-origin effects. Our method allows for sex-specific recombination rates, an important consideration in studying imprinted genes. We have also derived a tetrahedron for the true identical-by-descent frequencies accounting for parent-of-origin effects. Using this tetrahedron, we propose a robust generalized minmax test for linkage and discuss its properties in the presence of genomic imprinting. We have also performed power comparisons of various allele sharing tests and provide regions of the tetrahedron in which the different tests are optimal. We also provide useful strategies to determine the optimal tests to use while performing a genome scan. PMID:15638832

  12. Spatial proximity of homologous alleles and long noncoding RNAs regulate a switch in allelic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Kapsetaki, Manouela; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Town, Terrence; Flavell, Richard A.; Spilianakis, Charalampos G.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological processes rely on the regulation of total mRNA levels in a cell. In diploid organisms, the transcriptional activation of one or both alleles of a gene may involve trans-allelic interactions that provide a tight spatial and temporal level of gene expression regulation. The mechanisms underlying such interactions still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of murine macrophages rapidly resulted in the actin-mediated and transient homologous spatial proximity of Tnf? alleles, which was necessary for the mono- to biallelic switch in gene expression. We identified two new complementary long noncoding RNAs transcribed from the TNF? locus and showed that their knockdown had opposite effects in Tnf? spatial proximity and allelic expression. Moreover, the observed spatial proximity of Tnf? alleles depended on pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) and T-helper-inducing POZ-Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK). This study suggests a role for lncRNAs in the regulation of somatic homologous spatial proximity and allelic expression control necessary for fine-tuning mammalian immune responses. PMID:25770217

  13. Human immunoglobulin allotypes: previously unrecognized determinants and alleles defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zelaschi, D; Newby, C; Parsons, M; van West, B; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1983-01-01

    The highly polymorphic system of serologically defined genetic markers on human IgG heavy chains (Gm allotypes) is second only to the HLA complex in terms of the large number of determinants, alleles, and haplotypes that can be used for analyses of disease associations and other genetic studies. However, present typing methods are based on the use of anti-Gm antisera that are derived mainly from fortuitously immunized human donors, often requiring processing before use, and must be used in a hemagglutination-inhibition assay that cannot be used in typing for isoallotypic determinants (currently termed "non-markers"). In studies presented here, we describe an allotyping system that utilizes monoclonal antibodies in a "sandwich" modification of the solid-phase radioimmunoassay, which is capable of reliable quantitative typing of allotypic, isoallotypic, and isotypic immunoglobulin determinants. We show that these highly reproducible, easily disseminated, and essentially inexhaustible reagents can be used for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative Gm typing. Using this system we define two previously unrecognized Gm determinants, one of which, found to date only in Caucasians, is different from all known Gm markers and thus defines previously unrecognized alleles and haplotypes. The other determinant co-segregates with the conventional G3m(b1) marker but is distinct from that marker on serological grounds. The successful preparation of mouse monoclonal antibodies that detect human Gm allotypic differences and the development of an assay system capable of typing isoallotypic as well as allotypic determinants opens the way to further dissection and application of this rich genetic system. PMID:6190180

  14. Genic Microsatellite Markers in Brassica rapa: Development, Characterization, Mapping, and Their Utility in Other Cultivated and Wild Brassica Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Ramchiary, Nirala; Nguyen, Van Dan; Li, Xiaonan; Hong, Chang Pyo; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Choi, Su Ryun; Yu, Ge; Piao, Zhong Yun; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2011-01-01

    Genic microsatellite markers, also known as functional markers, are preferred over anonymous markers as they reveal the variation in transcribed genes among individuals. In this study, we developed a total of 707 expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeat markers (EST-SSRs) and used for development of a high-density integrated map using four individual mapping populations of B. rapa. This map contains a total of 1426 markers, consisting of 306 EST-SSRs, 153 intron polymorphic markers, 395 bacterial artificial chromosome-derived SSRs (BAC-SSRs), and 572 public SSRs and other markers covering a total distance of 1245.9 cM of the B. rapa genome. Analysis of allelic diversity in 24 B. rapa germplasm using 234 mapped EST-SSR markers showed amplification of 2 alleles by majority of EST-SSRs, although amplification of alleles ranging from 2 to 8 was found. Transferability analysis of 167 EST-SSRs in 35 species belonging to cultivated and wild brassica relatives showed 42.51% (Sysimprium leteum) to 100% (B. carinata, B. juncea, and B. napus) amplification. Our newly developed EST-SSRs and high-density linkage map based on highly transferable genic markers would facilitate the molecular mapping of quantitative trait loci and the positional cloning of specific genes, in addition to marker-assisted selection and comparative genomic studies of B. rapa with other related species. PMID:21768136

  15. Evaluation of Allele-Specific Somatic Changes of Genome-Wide Association Study Susceptibility Alleles in Human Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Madelyn M.; Hampel, Heather; Schulz, Nathan P.; Fernandez, Soledad; Wei, Lai; Zhou, Xiao-Ping; de la Chapelle, Albert; Toland, Amanda Ewart

    2012-01-01

    Background Tumors frequently exhibit loss of tumor suppressor genes or allelic gains of activated oncogenes. A significant proportion of cancer susceptibility loci in the mouse show somatic losses or gains consistent with the presence of a tumor susceptibility or resistance allele. Thus, allele-specific somatic gains or losses at loci may demarcate the presence of resistance or susceptibility alleles. The goal of this study was to determine if previously mapped susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer show evidence of allele-specific somatic events in colon tumors. Methods We performed quantitative genotyping of 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing statistically significant association with colorectal cancer in published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We genotyped 194 paired normal and colorectal tumor DNA samples and 296 paired validation samples to investigate these SNPs for allele-specific somatic gains and losses. We combined analysis of our data with published data for seven of these SNPs. Results No statistically significant evidence for allele-specific somatic selection was observed for the tested polymorphisms in the discovery set. The rs6983267 variant, which has shown preferential loss of the non-risk T allele and relative gain of the risk G allele in previous studies, favored relative gain of the G allele in the combined discovery and validation samples (corrected p-value?=?0.03). When we combined our data with published allele-specific imbalance data for this SNP, the G allele of rs6983267 showed statistically significant evidence of relative retention (p-value?=?2.06×10?4). Conclusions Our results suggest that the majority of variants identified as colon cancer susceptibility alleles through GWAS do not exhibit somatic allele-specific imbalance in colon tumors. Our data confirm previously published results showing allele-specific imbalance for rs6983267. These results indicate that allele-specific imbalance of cancer susceptibility alleles may not be a common phenomenon in colon cancer. PMID:22629442

  16. SSR marker-based analysis of genetic relatedness among sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) from breeding programs in China and other countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capillary electrophoresis-based molecular genotyping was conducted on 35 sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) and five clones of related wild species with 20 polymorphic SSR DNA markers. A total of 251 alleles were identified with 248 alleles displaying varying degrees of polymorphism and t...

  17. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E. (Cross Plains, WI); Pan, David (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  18. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  19. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (FST coefficients) to the present database ranged from FST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to FST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  20. Differential patterns of spatial divergence in microsatellite and allozyme alleles: further evidence for locus-specific selection in the acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Dufresne; E Bourget; L Bernatchez

    2002-01-01

    We compared patterns of genetic structure at potentially selected (two allozyme loci) and neutral molecular markers (six microsatellite loci) in the acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides from the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Our results confirmed the presence of a geographical shift in alleles MPI and GPI near the Miramichi River. In contrast, no significant patterns of population differentiation among samples located

  1. Comparison of allele frequencies of eight STR loci from Argentinian Amerindian and European populations.

    PubMed

    Sala, A; Penacino, G; Corach, D

    1998-10-01

    Eight STR systems (THO1, FABP, VWA, FES/FPS, HPRTB, F13A1, CSF1PO, and D6S366) were investigated in different ethnic groups of Argentina. Allele and genotype frequencies, power of exclusion, and discriminative power were investigated. Hardy-Weinberg expectations were calculated from heterozygosity levels. FST and G tests demonstrated that significant differences exist among the investigated populations for some of the eight STRs markers. The Wichi Indians are clearly separated from the Mapuche and Tehuelche, who in turn are closer to the European population, suggesting non-Amerindian admixture. PMID:9780520

  2. Correlation between the individual heterozygosity of parents and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Mitton, J B; Schuster, W S; Cothran, E G; De Fries, J C

    1993-07-01

    Specific formulations are derived for the correlation between the heterozygosity of a randomly mating parent and its offspring for a diallelic locus, and for the correlation when multiple loci are considered. The expected correlation is maximal, approaching r = 0.50, when allelic frequencies are highly asymmetric, and it is zero when the allelic frequencies are equal to 0.50. Parent-offspring correlations, up to a maximum of 0.50 for diallelic loci, indicate that levels of heterozygosity can respond to selection. Multilocus allozyme data from limber pine, Pinus flexilis, and from horses of standardbred and thoroughbred breeds are used to demonstrate correlations between a parent and its offspring. The Spearman rank correlation between the heterozygosity of a limber pine and the mean heterozygosity of her offspring is r = 0.45. Correlations in the horses range from r = 0.16 to 0.32. PMID:8360078

  3. Isolation and characterization of 21 microsatellite markers in the barn owl (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Burri, R; Antoniazza, S; Siverio, F; Klein, A; Roulin, A; Fumagalli, L

    2008-09-01

    We report 21 new polymorphic microsatellite markers in the European barn owl (Tyto alba). The polymorphism of the reported markers was evaluated in a population situated in western Switzerland and in another from Tenerife, Canary Islands. The number of alleles per locus varies between two and 31, and expected heterozygosity per population ranges from 0.16 to 0.95. All loci are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no linkage disequilibrium was detected. Two loci exhibit a null allele in the Tenerife population. PMID:21585946

  4. Effortful Control and Parenting: Associations with HPA Axis Reactivity in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryski, Katie R.; Dougherty, Lea R.; Dyson, Margaret W.; Olino, Thomas M.; Laptook, Rebecca S.; Klein, Daniel N.; Hayden, Elizabeth P.

    2013-01-01

    While activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is an adaptive response to stress, excessive HPA axis reactivity may be an important marker of childhood vulnerability to psychopathology. Parenting, including parent affect during parent-child interactions, may play an important role in shaping the developing HPA system; however,…

  5. Power of Daughter and Granddaughter Designs for Determining Linkage Between Marker Loci and Quantitative Trait Loci in Dairy Cattle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. I. Weller; Y. Kashi; M. Soller

    1990-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is considerable interest in bo- vine DNA-level polymorphic marker loci as a means of mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) of economic,importance in cattle. Progeny of a sire heterozygous for both a marker locus and a linked QTL, which,inherit different alleles for the marker, will have different trait means. Based on this, power to detect QTL, as , grandsire

  6. Quantification of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations in the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, J.F.; Rapaport, J.M.; Dryia, T.P. [Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    New germline mutations in the human retinoblastoma gene preferentially arise on a paternally derived allele. In nonhereditary retinoblastoma, the initial somatic mutation seems to have no such bias. The few previous reports of these phenomena included relatively few cases (less than a dozen new germline or initial somatic mutations), so that the magnitude of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations is not known. Knowledge of the magnitude of the bias is valuable for genetic counseling, since, for example, patients with new germline mutations who reproduce transmit risk for retinoblastoma according to the risk that the transmitted allele has a germline mutation. We sought to quantitate the paternal allele bias and to determine whether paternal age is a factor possibly accounting for it. We studied 311 families with retinoblastoma (261 simplex, 50 multiplex) that underwent clinical genetic testing and 5 informative families recruited from earlier research. Using RFLPs and polymorphic microsatellites in the retinoblastoma gene, we could determine the parental origin of 45 new germline mutations and 44 probable initial somatic mutations. Thirty-seven of the 45 new germline mutations, or 82%, arose on a paternal allele while only 24 of the 44 initial somatic mutations (55%) did so. Increased paternal age does not appear to account for the excess of new paternal germline mutations, since the average age of fathers of children with new germline mutations (29.4 years, n=26, incomplete records on 11) was not significantly different from the average age of fathers of children with maternal germline mutations or somatic initial mutations (29.8 years, n=35, incomplete records on 17).

  7. Development of microsatellite markers for Isodon longitubus (Lamiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tadashi; Yamashiro, Asuka; Dohzono, Ikumi; Maki, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Isodon longitubus to study the natural hybridization of the species and its congeners. • Methods and Results: A total of 10 primer sets were developed for I. longitubus. From the initial screening, all of 10 loci were polymorphic with five to 19 alleles per locus in the Mt. Ishizuchi population, whereas nine loci were polymorphic with two to 12 alleles per loci in the Toon population. Although one locus was monomorphic at one population, the observed and expected heterozygosity values estimated from 34 I. longitubus samples ranged from 0.273 to 1.000 and from 0.483 to 0.918, respectively. Six primer sets could amplify all three species examined in this study (I. inflexus, I. japonicus, and I. shikokianus). • Conclusions: The 10 microsatellite markers developed here will be useful in analyzing the population genetic structure of I. longitubus and in studying the natural hybridization between Isodon species. PMID:25202487

  8. EST-SSR markers from Heterodera glycines Ichinohe.

    PubMed

    Wang, H M; Zhao, H H; Zhao, C Z; Chu, D

    2014-10-01

    The soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines Ichinohe is a severe agricultural pest for which genetic resources are limited. In this study, 295 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified from 259 expressed sequenced tags (ESTs), Which were selected from 9,443 unigenes. The successful primer pairs were designed against six regions. In total, 30 alleles were identified from 30 individuals using the six markers, with an average of five alleles per locus (range, 4-7). The observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.074-0.900 and 0.266-0.775, respectively. Significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was found at three of the six loci. The EST-based SSR markers developed in this study may contribute to better understanding of the genetic structure of H. glycines populations. PMID:25720259

  9. DERIVED SNP ALLELES ARE USED MORE FREQUENTLY THAN ANCESTRAL ALLELES AS RISK-ASSOCIATED VARIANTS IN COMMON HUMAN DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    GORLOVA, OLGA Y.; YING, JUN; AMOS, CHRISTOPHER I.; SPITZ, MARGARET R.; PENG, BO; GORLOV, IVAN P.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary aspects of the genetic architecture of common human diseases remain enigmatic. The results of more than 200 genome-wide association studies published to date were compiled in a catalog (http://www.genome.gov/26525384/). We used cataloged data to determine whether derived (mutant) alleles are associated with higher risk of human disease more frequently than ancestral alleles. We placed all allelic variants into ten categories of population frequency (0%–100%) in 10% increments. We then analyzed the relationship between allelic frequency, evolutionary status of the polymorphic site (ancestral versus derived), and disease risk status (risk versus protection). Given the same population frequency, derived alleles are more likely to be risk associated than ancestral alleles, as are rarer alleles. The common interpretation of this association is that negative selection prevents fixation of the risk variants. However, disease stratification as early or late onset suggests that weak selection against risk-associated alleles is unlikely a major factor shaping genetic architecture of common diseases. Our results clearly suggest that the duration of existence of an allele in a population is more important. Alleles existing longer tend to show weaker linkage disequilibrium with neighboring alleles, including the causal alleles, and are less likely to tag a SNP-disease association. PMID:22809343

  10. Derived SNP alleles are used more frequently than ancestral alleles as risk-associated variants in common human diseases.

    PubMed

    Gorlova, Olga Y; Ying, Jun; Amos, Christopher I; Spitz, Margaret R; Peng, Bo; Gorlov, Ivan P

    2012-04-01

    Evolutionary aspects of the genetic architecture of common human diseases remain enigmatic. The results of more than 200 genome-wide association studies published to date were compiled in a catalog (). We used cataloged data to determine whether derived (mutant) alleles are associated with higher risk of human disease more frequently than ancestral alleles. We placed all allelic variants into ten categories of population frequency (0%-100%) in 10% increments. We then analyzed the relationship between allelic frequency, evolutionary status of the polymorphic site (ancestral versus derived), and disease risk status (risk versus protection). Given the same population frequency, derived alleles are more likely to be risk associated than ancestral alleles, as are rarer alleles. The common interpretation of this association is that negative selection prevents fixation of the risk variants. However, disease stratification as early or late onset suggests that weak selection against risk-associated alleles is unlikely a major factor shaping genetic architecture of common diseases. Our results clearly suggest that the duration of existence of an allele in a population is more important. Alleles existing longer tend to show weaker linkage disequilibrium with neighboring alleles, including the causal alleles, and are less likely to tag a SNP-disease association. PMID:22809343

  11. Parent to Parent Programs: Parent Preferences for Supports

    E-print Network

    Santelli, Betsy; Turnbull, Ann P.; Sergeant, Julie; Lerner, Esther P.; Marquis, Janet

    1996-01-01

    about the disability, finding and getting services, living with and caring for the child, and accessing community resources #0;y Other program supports—having group meetings for either emotional or educa- tional support. #0;y Contact local Parent...). A multi-site evaluation of Parent to Parent programs for parents of children with disabilities. Journal of Early Intervention, 22(3), 217-229. This research was conducted in collaboration with the Beach Center on Disability. It was funded...

  12. Identification of cattle carrying alleles associated with resistance and susceptibility to the Bovine Leukemia Virus progression by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Forletti, A; Juliarena, M A; Ceriani, C; Amadio, A F; Esteban, E; Gutiérrez, S E

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown a significant association between polymorphisms of the BoLA DRB3 gene and Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) infection profile. The presence of allele *1501 has been associated with high proviral load in peripheral blood while allele *0902 has been associated with low proviral load. The purpose of this study was to develop allele-specific real-time PCRs to identify cattle carrying alleles associated with resistance (BoLA DRB3*0902) or susceptibility (BoLA DRB3*1501) to the BLV progression. Specific primers were designed and differential amplification was carried out by real-time PCR and monitored by SYBR® Green dye in DNA samples from peripheral blood. Conditions were also adjusted for traditional PCR amplification (end point amplification). These methods are rapid, simple and suitable for high throughput screening, and could aid in marker-assisted selection of BLV-resistant and susceptible cattle. PMID:23958404

  13. Development of EST-based new SSR markers in seabuckthorn.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankit; Ghangal, Rajesh; Grover, Atul; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Sharma, Prakash C

    2010-12-01

    EST-based SSR markers were developed by screening a collection of 1584 clustered ESTs of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides). PCR primers were designed for the amplification of 30 microsatellite loci. Two to five allelic bands were displayed by nine primer pairs in H. rhamnoides genotypes and by eleven primer pairs in H. salicifolia genotypes. None of the thirty primer pairs detected polymorphism in H. tibetana genotypes. Considering the high polymorphism detected in the tested genotypes and their direct origin from the genic regions, these EST-SSR markers hold immense promise in seabuckthorn genome analysis, molecular breeding and population genetics. PMID:23572988

  14. Parental Influences on Adolescent Adjustment: Parenting Styles Versus Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Min; Daniels, M. Harry; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    The study identified distinct patterns of parental practices that differentially influence adolescent behavior using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey (NELS:88) database. Following Brenner and Fox's research model (1999), the cluster analysis was used to classify the four types of parental practices. The clusters of parenting practices…

  15. Development of EST-based new SSR markers in seabuckthorn

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ankit Jain; Rajesh Ghangal; Atul Grover; Saurabh Raghuvanshi; Prakash C. Sharma

    2010-01-01

    EST-based SSR markers were developed by screening a collection of 1584 clustered ESTs of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides). PCR primers were designed for the amplification of 30 microsatellite loci. Two to five allelic bands were displayed by\\u000a nine primer pairs in H. rhamnoides genotypes and by eleven primer pairs in H. salicifolia genotypes. None of the thirty primer pairs detected polymorphism

  16. Microsatellite markers for the praying mantid Ciulfina rentzi (Liturgusidae).

    PubMed

    Attard, Catherine R M; Holwell, Greg I; Schwartz, Tonia S; Umbers, Kate D L; Stow, Adam; Herberstein, Marie E; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2009-11-01

    Nine polymorphic microsatellite loci were characterized from an enrichment library of the Australian praying mantid Ciulfina rentzi, a group with a unique reproductive morphology and behaviour. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 16 and heterozygosity from 0.24 to 0.94. These markers are the first microsatellites developed for any praying mantid. They will be useful for paternity analysis and for population genetic studies in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Region of Australia. PMID:21564938

  17. Complex hybridization dynamics between golden-winged and blue-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera and Vermivora pinus) revealed by AFLP, microsatellite, intron and mtDNA markers.

    PubMed

    Vallender, R; Robertson, R J; Friesen, V L; Lovette, I J

    2007-05-01

    Blue-winged (Vermivora pinus) and golden-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) have an extensive mosaic hybrid zone in eastern North America. Over the past century, the general trajectory has been a rapid replacement of chrysoptera by pinus in a broad, northwardly moving area of contact. Previous mtDNA-based studies on these species' hybridization dynamics have yielded variable results: asymmetric and rapid introgression from pinus into chrysoptera in some areas and bidirectional maternal gene flow in others. To further explore the hybridization genetics of this otherwise well-studied complex, we surveyed variation in three nuclear DNA marker types--microsatellites, introns, and a panel of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs)--with the goal of generating a multilocus assay of hybrid introgression. All markers were first tested on birds from phenotypically and mitochondrially pure parental-type populations from outside the hybrid zone. Searches for private alleles and assignment test approaches found no combination of microsatellite or intron markers that could separate the parental populations, but seven AFLP characters exhibited significant frequency differences among them. We then used the AFLP markers to examine the extent and pattern of introgression in a population where pinus-phenotype individuals have recently invaded a region that previously supported only a chrysoptera-phenotype population. Despite the low frequency of phenotypic hybrids at this location, the AFLP data suggest that almost a third of the phenotypically pure chrysoptera have introgressed genotypes, indicating the presence of substantial cryptic hybridization in the history of this species. The evidence for extensive cryptic introgression, combined with the lack of differentiation at other nuclear loci, cautions against hybrid assessments based on single markers or on phenotypic traits that are likely to be determined by a small number of loci. Considered in concert, these results from four classes of molecular markers indicate that pinus and chrysoptera are surprisingly weakly differentiated and that far fewer genetically 'pure' populations of chrysoptera may exist than previously assumed, two findings with broad implications for the conservation of this rapidly declining taxon. PMID:17498229

  18. Further data on the microsatellite locus D12S67 in worldwide populations: an unusual distribution of D12S67 alleles in Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R J; Federle, L; Sofro, A S; Papiha, S S; Briceno, I; Bernal, J E

    2000-08-01

    We report the frequencies of alleles at the microsatellite locus D12S67 in 2 widely separated ethnic groups of the world: 2 populations from Sulawesi, an island in the Indonesian archipelago, and 5 Native American tribes of Colombia, South America. The allele frequencies in the Minihasans and Torajans of Sulawesi are similar to each other (but the modal class allele is different) and in general agreement with those reported in mainland Asian groups, but different from both Europeans and Chinese Han of Taiwan. The 5 Native American tribes (Arsario, Kogui, Ijka, Wayuu, and Coreguaje) display different allele frequencies from those seen in Sulawesi populations, in other groups from Europe and mainland Asia, and in Chinese Han of Taiwan. Native Americans exhibit a bimodal distribution of alleles, unlike other groups, with significant differences among the tribes. The Arsario and Kogui have no admixture with Europeans or Africans and are the most distinctive, while the Wayuu have the most admixture and show most similarity to other groups. The data suggest that nonadmixed Native Americans may be quite distinctive with respect to this marker. The most common allele varies across the 5 tribes, from 249 base pairs to 261 base pairs. All samples exhibit Hardy-Weinberg genotype proportions; heterozygosities are lowest in the 2 nonadmixed Native American tribes. Examination of all the available data indicates that some east Asian and southeast Asian groups are characterized by a high frequency of smaller sized D12S67 alleles, while other populations have a greater proportion of the larger sized alleles. The cumulative, though still highly restricted, population data on locus D12S67 demonstrate that it may be of considerable value in anthropological genetic studies of ethnic groups. Data are required on Native Americans outside Colombia before this marker can be used in admixture studies of this group. PMID:11048795

  19. Associations between frequencies of a susceptible TNF-alpha promoter allele and protective alpha-thalassaemias and malaria parasite incidence in Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Ubalee, R; Tsukahara, T; Kikuchi, M; Lum, J K; Dzodzomenyo, M; Kaneko, A; Hirayama, K

    2005-06-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the key cytokines that influence the pathology of microbial infections. The genetic susceptibility to severe forms of falciparum malaria is differentially associated with TNF-alpha promoter gene polymorphisms (TNFP alleles). In a previous study, we identified a TNFP-allele characterized by a C to T transition at position -857 (TNFP-D allele) as a marker for susceptibility to cerebral malaria in Myanmar. The frequencies of TNFP alleles on six islands of Vanuatu, Melanesia (South-west Pacific) were estimated to investigate whether malaria selection pressure on this susceptibility marker has influenced its prevalence. Within the archipelago of Vanuatu there is a decreasing cline of parasite incidence from North to South. Of the four alleles of the TNFP gene detected in Vanuatu, the TNFP-D allele frequencies were inversely correlated with the parasite incidence of islands; TNFP-D varied from 0.55 on the island with the lowest parasite incidence to 0.26 on the island with the highest parasite incidence (r = -0.855, P = 0.03). We also observed a significant correlation between the frequencies of alpha-thalassaemia alleles, thought to protect against malaria and parasite incidence in the same populations. These data are consistent with a previously reported correspondence between the frequencies of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and parasite incidences on the islands of Vanuatu (Kaneko et al. 1998) and indicate that the degree of malaria endemicity has influenced the allele frequencies of at least three loci that confer both susceptibility (TNFP-D) and protection (alpha-thalassaemias and G6PD deficiency). PMID:15941417

  20. Biased Gene Conversion Skews Allele Frequencies in Human Populations, Increasing the Disease Burden of Recessive Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ? 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications. PMID:25279983

  1. Association between molecular markers for beef tenderness and growth traits in Argentinian angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Pintos, D; Corva, P M

    2011-06-01

    Molecular markers for beef tenderness are classic examples of the contribution of genome technology to animal breeding through marker-assisted selection (MAS). Markers on the ?-calpain (CAPN1) and calpastatin (CAST) genes have been extensively evaluated for their association with tenderness. However, little is known about their potential effect on other economically important traits. In this work, the association of molecular markers for beef tenderness with growth traits was evaluated in Angus cattle of Argentina. Expected progeny differences were extracted from the 2008 Angus Sire Summary of Argentina. Information corresponding to 268 influential bulls that had been genotyped for two markers in CAPN1 and two markers in CAST was provided by the Argentine Angus Association. Genotype probabilities were assigned, by segregation analysis, to those bulls in the Sire Summary that had no marker information. Expected progeny differences of 1365 sires were regressed on the number of alleles favouring tenderness at each locus. There was a significant effect of markers on expected progeny differences of birth weight, weaning weight (direct), weight at 18 months and rib eye area. In general, there was a negative effect of alleles favouring tenderness on growth traits. These correlated responses should be taken into account when molecular markers are used in selection schemes that aim to improve beef tenderness. PMID:21554351

  2. Flow cytometry and FISH to investigate allele-specific replication timing and homologous association of imprinted chromosomes.

    PubMed

    LaSalle, J; Lalande, M

    2001-01-01

    Chromosome replication banding studies show that homologous regions on a pair of autosomes generally replicate at the same time in S phase (1). Izumikawa et al. first observed that this was not the case for the imprinted chromosomal region 15q11-q13 (2). This observation has been confirmed in other replication banding studies (3) as well by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) replication assay (4-9). The latter technique has also been used to observe DNA replication asynchrony in association with allelic inactivation of genes such as those encoding olfactory receptors and the cytokine, interleukin 2 (10,11). The latter genes are not imprinted but display random silencing of an allele in individual cells. In imprinted regions, DNA replication was generally observed to occur earlier on the paternal homologue (5,6,9,12,13). The patterns of allele-specific replication in the cells of Prader- Willi (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients, however, have generally been synchronous (5,6,14). Furthermore, an investigation of the kinetics of allele-specific replication timing in the GABRB3/A5 cluster on 15q11-13 revealed that cells from PWS and AS have lost the strict replication timing observed on the parental chromosomes of normal cells (12). These results suggested the requirement of a biparental contribution for the regulation of replication asynchrony and lead to the hypothesis that allelic cross-talk, perhaps via pairing of homologous chromosomes, might play a role in the imprinting process. PMID:12843450

  3. Toward fully automated genotyping: genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution.

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, M W; Lancia, G; Ng, S K

    1995-01-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA)n repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. PMID:7485172

  4. Characterization of fungus-specific microsatellite markers in the lichen fungus Usnea subfloridana (Parmeliaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Tõrra, Tiiu; Cornejo, Carolina; Cheenacharoen, Saran; Dal Grande, Francesco; Marmor, Liis; Scheidegger, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the haploid lichenized fungal species Usnea subfloridana to study its population subdivision and the species’ response to forest disturbance, fragmentation, and environmental pollution. • Methods and Results: We developed 14 polymorphic microsatellite markers using 454 pyrosequencing data of U. subfloridana. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 15, and Nei’s unbiased gene diversity averaged over nine markers without null alleles ranged from 0.64 to 0.67. Evaluation of the cross-species amplification in U. glabrescens and U. wasmuthii indicates that these markers are also informative in other Usnea species. • Conclusions: These markers will allow us to investigate the effects of forest management and environmental pollution on genetic population structure of U. subfloridana and closely related species. Moreover, they will help facilitate phylogeographic studies of U. subfloridana across the species’ distribution area in Europe. PMID:25202640

  5. Microsatellite DNA markers for delineating population structure and kinship among the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Henderson, A.P.; Bocetti, C.I.; Currie, D.; Wunderle, J.M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 23 microsatellite DNA markers for the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii), a Nearctic/Neotropical migrant passerine. This suite of markers revealed moderate to high levels of allelic diversity (averaging 7.7 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 72%). Genotypic frequencies at 22 of 23 (95%) markers conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and no linkage disequilibrium was observed in blood samples taken from 14 warblers found on the wintering grounds in the Bahamas archipelago. Multilocus genotypes resulting from this suite of markers should reduce the amount of resources required for initiating new genetic studies assessing breeding structure, parentage, demographics, and individual-level ecological interactions for D. kirtlandii. ?? 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Sophora microphylla (Fabaceae) microsatellite markers and their utility across the genus1

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, Megan L.; Houliston, Gary J.; Mitchell, Caroline M.; Heenan, Peter B.; Robertson, Alastair W.; Tate, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Genus-specific microsatellite markers were developed for Sophora for population genetic and systematic studies of the group in New Zealand, and potentially elsewhere in the geographic range. • Methods and Results: From sequencing a total genomic DNA library (using Roche 454), we identified and developed 29 polymorphic microsatellite markers for S. microphylla and S. chathamica. We tested 12 of these markers on 14 S. chathamica individuals and four S. microphylla populations. All loci amplified in both species and species-specific alleles occurred at seven loci. In S. microphylla populations, the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.000–0.960 and 0.000–0.908, respectively, with alleles per locus ranging from seven to 23. • Conclusions: The developed markers will be valuable in studies of phylogenetics, population structure, mating system, and selection of provenances for restoration projects. PMID:25202609

  7. Maternal-specific methylation of the human IGF2R gene is not accompanied by allele-specific transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Riesewijk, A.M.; Schepens, M.T.; Mariman, E.M. [Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [and others] [Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands); and others

    1996-01-15

    The human insulin-like growth factor type 2 receptor gene (IGF2R) is biallelically expressed in a variety of fetal and adult tissues. In contrast, the imprinted mouse Igf2r gene is expressed exclusively from the maternally inherited chromosome. The mouse gene contains two CpG islands that are methylated in a parent-specific manner. Methylation of the CpG island in the promoter region occurs on the repressed paternal gene copy. Methylation of the CpG island in intron 2 in specific for the active maternal allele and may represent the primary imprint. Here, we have analyzed the human IGF2R gene to investigate whether these motifs and their parent-of-origin-specific epigenetic modification have been conserved. As in the mouse, the human IGF2R gene was found to contain two CpG islands, one encompassing the transcription start site (CpG 1) and the other in the second intron (CpG 2). CpG 2 is hypermethylated on the maternal IGF2R allele. In contrast to the situation in the mouse, however, the human CpG 1 is completely unmethylated on both parental chromosomes. The human and mouse intronic CpG islands lack significant sequence homology, which suggests that DNA conformation plays a role in allele-specific methylation. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Diversity of alleles encoding HLA-B40: relative frequencies in united states populations and description of five novel alleles.

    PubMed

    Pimtanothai, N; Rizzuto, G A; Slack, R; Steiner, N K; Kosman, C A; Jones, P F; Koester, R; Ng, J; Hartzman, R J; Katovich Hurley, C

    2000-08-01

    The frequency of each B*40 allele was determined by DNA sequencing in four major United States populations: Caucasians, African Americans, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. Thirty-two individuals from each ethnic group, who were previously described serologically as B40, B60, or B61, were randomly selected out of a pool of 82,979 unrelated individuals for allele characterization. Out of nine different B*40 alleles identified in this study, B*4001 and B*4002 were the two most frequent B*40 alleles in all the population groups. B*4001 was the primary B*40 allele seen in Caucasians (83%) and African Americans (76%), while B*4002 was found in the majority of Hispanics (62%). The distributions of both alleles were comparable in the Asian/Pacific Islander population. These two alleles were the only B*40 alleles detected in Caucasians while four to five additional B*40 alleles were seen in the other population groups. The other B*40 alleles detected in this study included: B*4003 and B*4010 in Asian/Pacific Islanders; B*4012 and B*4016 in African Americans; and B*4004, B*4006, and B*4027 in Hispanics. Analysis revealed significant differences between Hispanics and all other groups as well as between African Americans and Asian/Pacific Islanders. This report also describes five novel B*40 alleles: B*4019, B*4020, B*4024, B*4027, and B*4028. PMID:10980391

  9. AlleleRetain: a program to assess management options for conserving allelic diversity in small, isolated populations.

    PubMed

    Weiser, E L; Grueber, C E; Jamieson, I G

    2012-11-01

    Preserving genetic health is an important aspect of species conservation. Allelic diversity is particularly important to conserve, as it provides capacity for adaptation and thus enables long-term population viability. Allele retention is difficult to predict beyond one generation for real populations with complex demography and life-history traits, so we developed a computer model to simulate allele retention in small populations. AlleleRetain is an individual-based model implemented in r and can be applied to assess management options for conserving allelic diversity in small populations of animals with overlapping generations. AlleleRetain remedies the limitations of similar existing software, and its source code is freely available for further modification. AlleleRetain and its supporting materials can be downloaded from https://sites.google.com/site/alleleretain/ or CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org). PMID:22925629

  10. A comparison of single nucleotide polymorphism and microsatellite markers for analysis of parentage and kinship in a cooperatively breeding bird.

    PubMed

    Weinman, Lucia R; Solomon, Joseph W; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2015-05-01

    The development of genetic markers has revolutionized molecular studies within and among populations. Although poly-allelic microsatellites are the most commonly used genetic marker for within-population studies of free-living animals, biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, have also emerged as a viable option for use in nonmodel systems. We describe a robust method of SNP discovery from the transcriptome of a nonmodel organism that resulted in more than 99% of the markers working successfully during genotyping. We then compare the use of 102 novel SNPs with 15 previously developed microsatellites for studies of parentage and kinship in cooperatively breeding superb starlings (Lamprotornis superbus) that live in highly kin-structured groups. For 95% of the offspring surveyed, SNPs and microsatellites identified the same genetic father, but only when behavioural information about the likely parents at a nest was included to aid in assignment. Moreover, when such behavioural information was available, the number of SNPs necessary for successful parentage assignment was reduced by half. However, in a few cases where candidate fathers were highly related, SNPs did a better job at assigning fathers than microsatellites. Despite high variation between individual pairwise relatedness values, microsatellites and SNPs performed equally well in kinship analyses. This study is the first to compare SNPs and microsatellites for analyses of parentage and relatedness in a species that lives in groups with a complex social and kin structure. It should also prove informative for those interested in developing SNP loci from transcriptome data when published genomes are unavailable. PMID:25224810

  11. Parent Academic Overview Student-Parent Orientation

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    resources and student academic programs · Assistance with policies and procedures · Act Academic Advising #12;Important Offices & Departments Admissions Financial AidParent Academic Overview Student-Parent Orientation Program University of California

  12. Construction of Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) Hal01 Locus Allelic Ladder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manali Patel

    2012-01-01

    Allelic ladders contain all the alleles at a given locus and since the components of the allelic ladder and the sample fragments have the same length and sequence, sizing is very accurate when conducted with an allelic ladder. Allelic ladders are therefore very useful in population genetics studies. For this study, an allelic ladder for the Bald Eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus,

  13. Characterization of 29 polymorphic artiodactyl microsatellite markers for the mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JULIEN MAINGUY; AMY S. LLEWELLYN; KIRSTY WORLEY; STEEVE D. COTE; DAVID W. COLTMAN

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of a cross-species amplification test of 156 bovine, ovine and cervid micro- satellite markers in a wild population of mountain goats, Oreamnos americanus , inhabiting Caw Ridge, Alberta, Canada. Twenty-nine markers were found to be low to moderately poly- morphic with between two to nine alleles per locus. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.14 to 0.85 for

  14. Involvement of the FGFR4 Arg388 allele in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Streit, Sylvia; Bange, Johannes; Fichtner, Alexander; Ihrler, Stephan; Issing, Wolfgang; Ullrich, Axel

    2004-08-20

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been implicated in various forms of human hyperproliferative disorders such as cancers of the cervix and bladder. We investigated the expression pattern of FGFR4 and the clinical significance of the recently identified Gly/Arg polymorphism (388) in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) of the oral cavity and the oropharynx. Sections from 104 paraffin-embedded tumors were analyzed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism-based method to determine the FGFR4 genotypes. Protein expression was investigated immunohistochemically and graded into a low, intermediate, or high degree of staining. FGFR4 expression was scored as high in 17, as intermediate in 59 and as low in 28 cases. The FGFR4 Arg388 allele was found in 59 tumors, 46 of them having heterozygous and 13 homozygous genotypes. High expression of the FGFR4 Arg388 allele was significantly associated with reduced overall survival (p = 0.032) and with an advanced tumor stage (p = 0.023), whereas expression of the FGFR4 Gly388 had no impact on disease progression. Our findings indicate that high expression of FGFR4 in connection with the Arg388 allele is associated with poor clinical outcome and support the significance of FGFR4 as a diagnostic marker and a target for therapeutic intervention in human HNSCC. PMID:15197773

  15. Parental Involvement to Parental Engagement: A Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Janet; Montgomery, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Based on the literature of the field, this article traces a continuum between parental involvement with schools, and parental engagement with children's learning. The article seeks to shed light on an area of confusion; previous research has shown that different stakeholder groups understand "parental engagement" in different ways.…

  16. Excluded Parents: The Deracialisation of Parental Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crozier, Gill

    2001-01-01

    Argues that parent involvement policies in British schools are flawed in their failure to recognize the ethnic diversity of parents and the institutional racism within the educational system. Suggests that deracialized parent involvement may in the long run contribute to widening the gap between the involved and the uninvolved, the achievers and…

  17. MAOA, Early Experiences of Harsh Parenting, Irritable Opposition, and Bullying-Victimization: A Moderated Indirect-Effects Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Yvonne M.; Kretschmer, Tina; Barker, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Harsh parenting and child characteristics such as opposition and aggression have been found to relate to bullying, victimization, and bullying-victimization, yet not all children display equal vulnerability to harsh parenting. The monoamine oxidase A gene ("MAOA"; "low-activity" variant) may be a key vulnerability allele as it…

  18. Constraints on allele size at microsatellite loci: Implications for genetic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauta, M.J.; Weissing, F.J. [Univ. of Groningen, Haren (Netherlands)

    1996-06-01

    Microsatellites are promising genetic markers for studying the demographic structure and phylogenetic history of populations. We present theoretical arguments indicating that the usefulness of microsatellite data for these purposes may be limited to a short time perspective and to relatively small populations. The evolution of selectively neutral markers is governed by the interaction of mutation and random genetic drift. Mutation pressure has the inherent tendency to shift different populations to the same distribution of alleles. Hence, mutation pressure is a homogenizing force, and population divergence is caused by random genetic drift. In case of allozymes or sequence data, the diversifying effect or drift is typically orders of magnitude larger than the homogenizing effect of mutation pressure. By a simple model, we demonstrate that the situation may be different for microsatellites where mutation rates are high and the range of alleles is limited. With the help of computer simulations, we investigate to what extent genetic distance measures applied to microsatellite data can nevertheless yield useful estimators for phylogenetic relationships or demographic parameters. We show that prediction based on microsatellite data are quite reliable in small populations, but that already in moderately sized populations the danger of misinterpretation is substantial. 22 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Maternal inheritance and chromosome 18 allele sharing in unilineal bipolar illness pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, E.S.; Badner, J.A.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D. [National Inst. of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others] [National Inst. of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); and others

    1996-04-09

    We have replicated the observation that there is excess maternal transmission of illness in a series of previously described unilineal Bipolar manic-depressive illness extended pedigrees. ({open_quotes}Transmission{close_quotes} is defined for any ill person in a pedigree when father or mother has a personal or immediate family history of major affective disorder.) We divided our pedigrees into exclusively maternal transmission (Mat) and mixed maternal-paternal transmission (in different pedigree branches) (Pat). Using affected sib-pair-analysis, linkage to a series of markers on chromosome 18p-cen was observed in the Pat but not the Mat pedigrees, with significantly greater identity by descent (IBD) at these markers in the Pat pedigrees. As compared with the pedigree series as a whole, the proportion of alleles IBD in the linkage region is much increased in the Pat pedigrees. As the sharing proportion of alleles in affected relative pairs increases, the number of such pairs needed to resolve the linkage region to a 1 cM interval becomes smaller. Genetic subdivision of an illness by clinical or pedigree configuration criteria may thus play an important role in discovery of disease susceptibility mutations. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Demography can favour female-advantageous alleles.

    PubMed

    Harts, Anna M F; Schwanz, Lisa E; Kokko, Hanna

    2014-09-01

    When female fecundity is relatively independent of male abundance, while male reproduction is proportional to female abundance, females have a larger effect on population dynamics than males (i.e. female demographic dominance). This population dynamic phenomenon might not appear to influence evolution, because male and female genomes still contribute equally much to the next generation. However, here we examine two evolutionary scenarios to provide a proof of principle that spatial structure can make female demographic dominance matter. Our two simulation models combine dispersal evolution with local adaptation subjected to intralocus sexual conflict and environmentally driven sex ratio biases, respectively. Both models have equilibria where one environment (without being intrinsically poorer) has so few reproductive females that trait evolution becomes disproportionately determined by those environments where females survive better (intralocus sexual conflict model), or where daughters are overproduced (environmental sex determination model). Surprisingly, however, the two facts that selection favours alleles that benefit females, and population growth is improved when female fitness is high, together do not imply that all measures of population performance are improved. The sex-specificity of the source-sink dynamics predicts that populations can evolve to fail to persist in habitats where alleles do poorly when expressed in females. PMID:25056617

  1. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  2. Genetic Anthropology of the Colorectal Cancer–Susceptibility Allele APC I1307K: Evidence of Genetic Drift within the Ashkenazim

    PubMed Central

    Niell, Bethany L.; Long, Jeffrey C.; Rennert, Gad; Gruber, Stephen B.

    2003-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) I1307K allele is found in 6% of the Ashkenazi Jewish population and in 1%–2% of Sephardi Jews; it confers a relative risk of 1.5–2.0 for colorectal cancer (CRC) on all carriers. Within the Ashkenazim, the existence of numerous high-prevalence mutations, including I1307K, has sparked controversy over whether genetic drift or selection is the underlying cause. For the present population-based case-control study of CRC in Israel, we tested whether selection has operated at I1307K. We also estimated the age of the I1307K allele, to understand its origin in the context of the Jewish diasporas and subsequent founder events. We genotyped 83 matched pairs, in which one or both members of the pair carried I1307K, at three microsatellites and two SNPs. Haplotypes were statistically constructed using PHASE software. Single-marker age estimates for I1307K were calculated using the approach described by Risch et al. A common progenitor haplotype spanned across APC I1307K from the centromeric marker D5S135 to the telomeric marker D5S346 and was observed in individuals of Ashkenazi, Sephardi, and Arab descent. The ancestor of modern I1307K alleles existed 87.9–118 generations ago (?2,200–2,950 years ago). This age estimate indicates that I1307K existed at about the time of the beginning of the Jewish diaspora, explaining its presence in non-Ashkenazi populations. Our data do not indicate that selection operated at I1307K (D5S346, P=.114; D5S135, P=.373), providing compelling evidence that the high frequency of disease-susceptibility alleles in the Ashkenazim is due to genetic drift, not selection. This research underscores the importance of the migratory patterns of ancestral populations in the ethnic and geographic distribution of APC I1307K. PMID:14624392

  3. CAPN1 markers in three Argentinean cattle breeds: report of a new InDel polymorphism within intron 17.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, P P; Caffaro, M E; Amadio, A F; Arias Mañotti, A; Poli, M A

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the genotype distribution and allelic frequencies of CAPN1 (Calcium activated neutral protease) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed taking advantage of the different genetic backgrounds provided by Hereford, Brahman and Braford cattle. We report a new insertion/deletion (InDel) polymorphism, consisting of a change of seven nucleotides for only one nucleotide (TCTGGGT ? C) within intron 17 of the CAPN1 gene. The segregation pattern of this polymorphism was analyzed together with the markers CAPN316, CAPN530 and CAPN4751 already described. The allele distribution of CAPN1 markers in the Braford crossbreed (3/8 Brahman 5/8 Hereford) is described for the first time. Four assays of allelic discrimination were designed: the tetra primer ARMS-PCR technique for genotyping the new InDel and the CAPN4751 marker, and a PCR-RFLP method for genotyping the markers CAPN316 and CAPN530. The genotypic and minor allele frequencies (MAFs) obtained showed that the InDel polymorphism does not provide redundant information to that already provided by the other CAPN1 markers and segregates differently between breeds, being a common SNP (MAF ? 0.05) in the herds with a high percentage of Bos indicus background. The high percentage of heterozygous individuals found in the Braford crossbreed for the markers assessed reveals enough genetic variation that could help to solve the tenderness problem of tropical-adapted cattle. PMID:20838904

  4. Functional association of CTCF with the insulator upstream of the H19 gene is parent of origin-specific and methylation-sensitive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chandrasekhar Kanduri; Vinod Pant; Dmitri Loukinov; Elena Pugacheva; Chen-Feng Qi; Alan Wolffe; Rolf Ohlsson; Victor V. Lobanenkov

    2000-01-01

    In mammals, a subset of genes inherit gametic marks that establish parent of origin-dependent expression patterns in the soma ([1] and references therein). The currently most extensively studied examples of this phenomenon, termed genomic imprinting, are the physically linked Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor II) and H19 genes, which are expressed mono-allelically from opposite parental alleles [1,2]. The repressed status of

  5. Using haplotypes for the prediction of allelic identity to fine-map QTL: characterization and properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous methods have been developed over the last decade to predict allelic identity at unobserved loci between pairs of chromosome segments along the genome. These loci are often unobserved positions tested for the presence of quantitative trait loci (QTL). The main objective of this study was to understand from a theoretical standpoint the relation between linkage disequilibrium (LD) and allelic identity prediction when using haplotypes for fine mapping of QTL. In addition, six allelic identity predictors (AIP) were also compared in this study to determine which one performed best in theory and application. Results A criterion based on a simple measure of matrix distance was used to study the relation between LD and allelic identity prediction when using haplotypes. The consistency of this criterion with the accuracy of QTL localization, another criterion commonly used to compare AIP, was evaluated on a set of real chromosomes. For this set of chromosomes, the criterion was consistent with the mapping accuracy of a simulated QTL with either low or high effect. As measured by the matrix distance, the best AIP for QTL mapping were those that best captured LD between a tested position and a QTL. Moreover the matrix distance between a tested position and a QTL was shown to decrease for some AIP when LD increased. However, the matrix distance for AIP with continuous predictions in the [0,1] interval was algebraically proven to decrease less rapidly up to a lower bound with increasing LD in the simplest situations, than the discrete predictor based on identity by state between haplotypes (IBS hap), for which there was no lower bound. The expected LD between haplotypes at a tested position and alleles at a QTL is a quantity that increases naturally when the tested position gets closer to the QTL. This behavior was demonstrated with pig and unrelated human chromosomes. Conclusions When the density of markers is high, and therefore LD between adjacent loci can be assumed to be high, the discrete predictor IBS hap is recommended since it predicts allele identity correctly when taking LD into account. PMID:25022866

  6. Selection for genetic markers in beef cattle reveals complex associations of thyroglobulin and casein1-S1 with carcass and meat traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic markers in casein (CSN1S1) and thyroglobulin (TG) genes have previously been associated with fat distribution in cattle. Determining the nature of these genetic associations (additive, recessive, or dominant) has been difficult because both markers have small minor allele frequencies in mos...

  7. Genotyping of Cryptosporidium parvum with microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Giovanni; Feng, Xiaochuan; Tanriverdi, Sultan

    2004-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis caused by Cryptosporidium parvum in the United States and other countries, as well as the emergence of cryptosporidiosis as a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in immunodeficient individuals, have raised the interest of the research community in this parasite. The genus Cryptosporidium, phylum Apicomplexa, comprises an undefined number of species, of which only C. parvum is of public health concern. Cryptosporidiosis is contracted through the ingestion of oocysts, the stage of the parasite produced in large numbers by infected hosts. Because the oocysts are small, typically about 5 microm in diameter, and lack species-specific morphological features, there is a need for molecular markers to distinguish between human-infectious C. parvum and other species that do not (or only infrequently) cause disease in humans. Genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium oocysts using restriction fragment length or sequence polymorphism has revealed host-associated genotypes, that are often referred to as species. In addition, C. parvum was found to include two genotypes, designated type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is almost exclusively found in humans, whereas type 2 infects humans and various mammalian hosts. The frequent occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in untreated surface water and the potential for contamination of drinking water have emphasized the need for molecular markers to track the source of oocysts within a watershed or water distribution system, and to discriminate between oocysts infectious to humans and nonpathogenic species. Genetic markers are also needed to study the taxonomy of Cryptosporidium. Several laboratories have identified microsatellites in the genome of C. parvum and have investigated the level of polymorphism at these loci. For instance, 10 alleles of marker 5B12 have been found to date among C. parvum isolates from various geographical and host origins. Multilocus haplotypes based on such markers are suitable for discriminating individual isolates of C. parvum. In an attempt to develop rapid and cost-effective methods for typing isolates of C. parvum, we have pursued two methods, a traditional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method followed by gel electrophoresis, and real-time PCR using SYBR Green I melting curve analysis for allele identification. PMID:15156029

  8. Genetic characterization of guava (psidium guajava l.) Germplasm in the United States using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity of thirty five Psidium guajava accessions maintained at the USDA, National Plants Germplasm System, Hilo, HI, was characterized using 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Diversity analysis detected a total of 178 alleles ranging from four to 16. The observed mean heterozygosit...

  9. Seventy microsatellite markers from Persea americana Miller (avocado) expressed sequence tags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for Persea americana Mill. were investigated to expand upon the number of informative microsatellite markers available for avocado. Seventy informative loci were discovered using twenty-four P. americana var. americana Mill. accessions. The number of alleles detected r...

  10. Establishment of codominant markers for rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single nucleotide length polymorphism (SNLP) was identified at the intron region of the Pi-ta gene to develop a codominant Pi-ta gene marker suitable for genotyping with an ABI automated machine. The DNA primer specific to the resistance Pi-ta allele was labeled with the blue dye as a forward pr...

  11. Establishment of codominant marker for rice blast resistance gene pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single nucleotide length polymorphism (SNLP) was identified at the intron region of the Pi-ta gene to develop a codominant Pi-ta gene marker suitable for genotyping with an ABI automated machine. The DNA primer specific to the resistance Pi-ta allele was labeled with the blue dye as a forward pr...

  12. Characterization of twelve microsatellite markers for the native redbud tree (Cercis canadensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight microsatellite DNA markers were developed for studies of gene flow in the redbud tree (Cercis canadensis), which is native to North America. The loci were unlinked and polymorphic in a sample of 22 individuals collected from a single population in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Allele number ranged fr...

  13. Characterization of microsatellite markers for plant-ants of the genus Crematogaster subgenus Decacrema

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HEIKE FELDHAAR; BRIGITTE FIALA; JURGEN GADAU

    2004-01-01

    We present primer sequences for five polymorphic microsatellite loci in ants of the genus Crematogaster subgenus Decacrema that live in obligate symbiosis with host plants of the euphorb genus Macaranga . Microsatellite loci were isolated with a highly efficient method of enrichment. The number of alleles ranged from 10 to 18 for Crematogaster morphospe- cies 2, for which these markers

  14. Identification of 24 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the double-crested cormorant ( Phalacrocorax auritus )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JENNIFER A. FIKE; TRAVIS L. DEVAULT; OLIN E. RHODES

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). The number of alleles ranged from two to 13 and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.032 to 0.871. The use of these loci should enable researchers and biologists to learn more about the population structure and ecology of this species.

  15. Identification of 24 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus).

    PubMed

    Fike, Jennifer A; Devault, Travis L; Rhodes, Olin E

    2009-07-01

    Twenty-four polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). The number of alleles ranged from two to 13 and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.032 to 0.871. The use of these loci should enable researchers and biologists to learn more about the population structure and ecology of this species. PMID:21564869

  16. Tumour markers: An overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Malati

    2007-01-01

    Tumor Markers comprise a wide spectrum of biomacromolecules synthesized in excess concentration by a wide variety of neoplastic\\u000a cells. The markers could be endogenous products of highly active metabolic malignant cells or the products of newly switched\\u000a on genes, which remained unexprssed in early life or newly acquired antigens at cellular and sub-cellular levels. The appearance\\u000a of tumor marker and

  17. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  18. Imputation of microsatellite alleles from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification across multiple Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite markers (MS) have traditionally been used for parental verification and are still the international standard in spite of their higher cost, error rate, and turnaround time compared with Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) -based assays. Despite domestic and international demands fr...

  19. Allelic loss on chromosome 18q as a prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Martínez-López; Albert Abad; Mariano Monzó; Isabel Ojanguren; Alex Pifarré; José Javier Sánchez; Cristina Martín; Rafael Rosell

    1998-01-01

    Background & Aims: Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 18q is frequent in colorectal cancer (CRC) and has been associated with poor prognosis in stage II tumors. This study investigated the frequency of LOH in sporadic CRC and its effect on patient prognosis. Methods: One hundred forty-four patients were screened for LOH at 18q by polymerase chain reaction using three

  20. Involving Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezada, Reyes L.; Diaz, Delia M.; Sanchez, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Describes barriers to Latino parent involvement in educational activities, factors to consider when involving Latino parents, and two examples of Latino involvement programs in California: Family Literacy Workshop at James Monroe Elementary School, Madera Unified School District, and Parents Take P.A.R.T. (Parent Assisted Reading Training) at…

  1. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  2. Codependency and Parenting Styles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith L. Fischer; Duane W. Crawford

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the association between the parent-child relationship (as perceived by late adolescent-early adult children) and the adolescent's codependency. College students 17through 22 years of age (N = 175) reported the parenting style of their mother and father (via ratings of perceived parental support and coercive control) and completed a scale assessing their own level of codependency. Parenting style

  3. Parents Teach Reading, Too.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Linda Mixon

    Parents and teachers need to be involved in teaching children to read and to enjoy reading. There are three planks in a platform that will help all parents become involved in their children's learning to read. First, parents must set the example. If they want their children to read, parents must read around them and to them. Secondly, they must…

  4. Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major histocompatibility complex class II? alleles of New World ranid frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play key roles in the vertebrate immune system. However, our understanding of the evolutionary processes and underlying genetic mechanisms shaping these genes is limited in many taxa, including amphibians, a group currently impacted by emerging infectious diseases. To further elucidate the evolution of the MHC in frogs (anurans) and develop tools for population genetics, we surveyed allelic diversity of the MHC class II ??1 domain in both genomic and complementary DNA of seven New World species in the genus Rana (Lithobates). To assign locus affiliation to our alleles, we used a "gene walking" technique to obtain intron 2 sequences that flanked MHC class II?? exon 2. Two distinct intron sequences were recovered, suggesting the presence of at least two class II?? loci in Rana. We designed a primer pair that successfully amplified an orthologous locus from all seven Rana species. In total, we recovered 13 alleles and documented trans-species polymorphism for four of the alleles. We also found quantitative evidence of selection acting on amino acid residues that are putatively involved in peptide binding and structural stability of the ??1 domain of anurans. Our results indicated that primer mismatch can result in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias, which influences the number of alleles that are recovered. Using a single locus may minimize PCR bias caused by primer mismatch, and the gene walking technique was an effective approach for generating single-copy orthologous markers necessary for future studies of MHC allelic variation in natural amphibian populations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Efficient simulation and likelihood methods for non-neutral multi-allele models.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Paul; Genz, Alan; Buzbas, Erkan Ozge

    2012-06-01

    Throughout the 1980s, Simon Tavaré made numerous significant contributions to population genetics theory. As genetic data, in particular DNA sequence, became more readily available, a need to connect population-genetic models to data became the central issue. The seminal work of Griffiths and Tavaré (1994a , 1994b , 1994c) was among the first to develop a likelihood method to estimate the population-genetic parameters using full DNA sequences. Now, we are in the genomics era where methods need to scale-up to handle massive data sets, and Tavaré has led the way to new approaches. However, performing statistical inference under non-neutral models has proved elusive. In tribute to Simon Tavaré, we present an article in spirit of his work that provides a computationally tractable method for simulating and analyzing data under a class of non-neutral population-genetic models. Computational methods for approximating likelihood functions and generating samples under a class of allele-frequency based non-neutral parent-independent mutation models were proposed by Donnelly, Nordborg, and Joyce (DNJ) (Donnelly et al., 2001). DNJ (2001) simulated samples of allele frequencies from non-neutral models using neutral models as auxiliary distribution in a rejection algorithm. However, patterns of allele frequencies produced by neutral models are dissimilar to patterns of allele frequencies produced by non-neutral models, making the rejection method inefficient. For example, in some cases the methods in DNJ (2001) require 10(9) rejections before a sample from the non-neutral model is accepted. Our method simulates samples directly from the distribution of non-neutral models, making simulation methods a practical tool to study the behavior of the likelihood and to perform inference on the strength of selection. PMID:22697240

  6. Diversity of alleles encoding HLA-B40: relative frequencies in United States populations and description of five novel alleles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nattiya Pimtanothai; Gabrielle A Rizzuto; Rebecca Slack; Noriko K Steiner; Carol A Kosman; Patrick F Jones; Ruth Koester; Jennifer Ng; Robert J Hartzman; Carolyn Katovich Hurley

    2000-01-01

    The frequency of each B?40 allele was determined by DNA sequencing in four major United States populations: Caucasians, African Americans, Asians\\/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. Thirty-two individuals from each ethnic group, who were previously described serologically as B40, B60, or B61, were randomly selected out of a pool of 82,979 unrelated individuals for allele characterization. Out of nine different B?40 alleles

  7. An analysis of linkage disequilibrium in the interleukin-1 gene cluster, using a novel grouping method for multiallelic markers.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, A; Camp, N J; Nicklin, M J; di Giovine, F S; Duff, G W

    1998-01-01

    In population- and family-based association studies, it is useful to have some knowledge of the patterns of linkage disequilibrium that exist between markers in candidate regions. When such studies are carried out with multiallelic markers, it is often convenient to group the alleles into a biallelic system, for analysis. In this study, we specifically examined the interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene cluster on chromosome 2, a region containing candidates for many inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Data were collected on eight markers, four of which were multiallelic. Using these data, we investigated the effect of three allele-grouping strategies, including a novel method, on the detection of linkage disequilibrium. The novel approach, termed the "delta method," measures the deviation from the expected haplotype frequencies under linkage equilibrium, for each allelic combination. This information is then used to group the alleles, in an attempt to avoid the grouping together of alleles at one locus that are in opposite disequilibrium with the same allele at the second locus. The estimate haplotype frequencies (EH) program was used to estimate haplotype frequencies and the disequilibrium measure. In our data it was found that the delta method compared well with the other two strategies. Using this method, we found that there was a reasonable correlation between disequilibrium and physical distance in the region (r=-.540, P=.001, one-tailed). We also identified a common, eight-locus haplotype of the IL-1 gene cluster. PMID:9545388

  8. Microsatellite markers for the hybridizing tiger swallowtails, Papilio glaucus and P. canadensis, and their applicability to historic specimens and congeneric species.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Carsten; Brown, Christian M; Hellmann, Jessica J

    2009-05-01

    We report the development of microsatellite markers for the sister species Papilio glaucus and P. canadensis (Papilionidae: Lepidoptera). All 16 markers displayed a high degree of variation in both species, ranging from eight to 24 alleles per locus. Substantial heterozygote deficits were observed for several loci, indicating the presence of null alleles. All markers were successfully used to genotype dried samples from a historical collection. Cross-species amplification with six additional Papilio species showed that most loci can be used to study genetic variation in other closely related species of tiger swallowtails. PMID:21564748

  9. Population genetic structure of Oryza sativa in East and Southeast Asia and the discovery of elite alleles for grain traits

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaojing; Giang Tran Thi, Thu; Mawuli Edzesi, Wisdom; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Qiangming; Liu, Erbao; Wang, Yang; Qiang, Sheng; Liu, Linglong; Hong, Delin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes of 532 rice (Oryza sativa L.) accessions collected from East and Southeast Asia and detected abundant genetic diversity within the population. We identified 6 subpopulations and found a tendency towards directional evolution in O. sativa from low to high latitudes, with levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the 6 subpopulations ranging from 10 to 30?cM. We then investigated the phenotypic data for grain length, grain width, grain thickness and 1,000-grain weight over 4 years. Using a genome-wide association analysis, we identified 17 marker-trait associations involving 14 SSR markers on 12 chromosome arms, and 8 of the 17 associations were novel. The elite alleles were mined based on the phenotypic effects of the detected quantitative trait loci (QTLs). These elite alleles could be used to improve target traits through optimal cross designs, with the expected results obtained by pyramiding or substituting the elite alleles per QTL (independent of possible epistatic effects). Together, these results provide an in-depth understanding of the genetic diversity pattern among rice-grain traits across a broad geographic scale, which has potential use in future research work, including studies related to germplasm conservation and molecular breeding by design. PMID:26059752

  10. Population genetic structure of Oryza sativa in East and Southeast Asia and the discovery of elite alleles for grain traits.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaojing; Giang Tran Thi, Thu; Mawuli Edzesi, Wisdom; Liang, Lijun; Liu, Qiangming; Liu, Erbao; Wang, Yang; Qiang, Sheng; Liu, Linglong; Hong, Delin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes of 532 rice (Oryza sativa L.) accessions collected from East and Southeast Asia and detected abundant genetic diversity within the population. We identified 6 subpopulations and found a tendency towards directional evolution in O. sativa from low to high latitudes, with levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the 6 subpopulations ranging from 10 to 30?cM. We then investigated the phenotypic data for grain length, grain width, grain thickness and 1,000-grain weight over 4 years. Using a genome-wide association analysis, we identified 17 marker-trait associations involving 14 SSR markers on 12 chromosome arms, and 8 of the 17 associations were novel. The elite alleles were mined based on the phenotypic effects of the detected quantitative trait loci (QTLs). These elite alleles could be used to improve target traits through optimal cross designs, with the expected results obtained by pyramiding or substituting the elite alleles per QTL (independent of possible epistatic effects). Together, these results provide an in-depth understanding of the genetic diversity pattern among rice-grain traits across a broad geographic scale, which has potential use in future research work, including studies related to germplasm conservation and molecular breeding by design. PMID:26059752

  11. Development of microsatellite markers for Carallia brachiata (Rhizophoraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Yinmeng; Xie, Hongxian; Qiao, Sitan; Yuan, Yang; Liu, Ying; Shi, Xianggang; Shu, Mi; Jin, Jianhua; Shi, Suhua; Tan, Fengxiao; Huang, Yelin

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Carallia brachiata to assess the genetic diversity and structure of this terrestrial species of the Rhizophoraceae. Methods and Results: Based on transcriptome data for C. brachiata, 40 primer pairs were initially designed and tested, of which 18 were successfully amplified and 11 were polymorphic. For these microsatellites, one to three alleles per locus were identified. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.727 and 0 to 0.520, respectively. In addition, all primers were successfully amplified in two congeners: C. pectinifolia and C. garciniifolia. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers described here will be useful in population genetic studies of C. brachiata and related species, suggesting that developing microsatellite markers from next-generation sequencing data can be efficient for genetic studies across this genus. PMID:25798345

  12. [Development of DNA-marker to sunflower broomrape resistance gene Or 3].

    PubMed

    Solodenko, A E; Sanalti?, A V; Tolmachev, V V; Vedmedeva, K V; Sivolap, Iu M

    2005-01-01

    Bulked segregant analysis and amplification of RTS loci were used for searching of DNA-markers to Or 3 gene that controls resistance of sunflower to broomrape. Polymorphic amplifyed fragments have been discovered which differentiate resistant and non-resistant parental lines and F2 plants. Linkage between codominant marker and locus Or 3 is defined. PMID:16398140

  13. MAPPING PHYSIOLOGICAL TRAITS IN CARICA PAPAYA USING MICROSATELLITE MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different varieties of papaya (Carica papaya L.) vary in the phenotypic expression of agronomically important traits. Genetic loci responsible for these differences can be mapped using DNA markers to genotype a segregating progeny population derived from a controlled cross between parents having dif...

  14. A PCR-based marker for a locus conferring the aroma in Myanmar rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Myint, Khin Myo; Arikit, Siwaret; Wanchana, Samart; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Vanavichit, Apichart

    2012-09-01

    Aromatic rice is an important commodity for international trade, which has encouraged the interest of rice breeders to identify the genetic control of rice aroma. The recessive Os2AP gene, which is located on chromosome 8, has been reported to be associated with rice aroma. The 8-bp deletion in exon 7 is an aromatic allele that is present in most aromatic accessions, including the most popular aromatic rice varieties, Jasmine and Basmati. However, other mutations associated with aroma have been detected, but the other mutations are less frequent. In this study, we report an aromatic allele, a 3-bp insertion in exon 13 of Os2AP, as a major allele found in aromatic rice varieties from Myanmar. The insertion is in frame and causes an additional tyrosine (Y) in the amino acid sequence. However, the mutation does not affect the expression of the Os2AP gene. A functional marker for detecting this allele was developed and tested in an aroma-segregating F(2) population. The aroma phenotypes and genotypes showed perfect co-segregation of this population. The marker was also used for screening a collection of aromatic rice varieties collected from different geographical sites of Myanmar. Twice as many aromatic Myanmar rice varieties containing the 3-bp insertion allele were found as the varieties containing the 8-bp deletion allele, which suggested that the 3-bp insertion allele originated in regions of Myanmar. PMID:22576235

  15. Genome-Wide Allelic Imbalance Analysis of Pediatric Gliomas by Single Nucleotide Polymorphic Allele Array

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kwong-Kwok Wong; Yvonne T. M. Tsang; Yi-Mieng Chang; Jack Su; Angela M. Di Francesco; Daniela Meco; Riccardo Riccardi; Laszlo Perlaky; Robert C. Dauser; Adekunle Adesina; Meenakshi Bhattacharjee; Murali Chintagumpala; Ching C. Lau

    2006-01-01

    Using single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) allele arrays, we analyzed 28 pediatric gliomas consisting of 14 high-grade gliomas and 14 low-grade gliomas. Most of the low-grade gliomas had no detectable loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in any of the 11,562 SNP loci; exceptions were two gangliogliomas (3q and 9p), one astrocytoma (6q), and two subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (16p and 21q). On

  16. Tyrosine hydroxylase TH01 9.3 allele in the occurrence of sudden infant death syndrome in Swiss Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Studer, Jacqueline; Bartsch, Christine; Haas, Cordula

    2014-11-01

    Catecholamines, especially noradrenalin, are essential in the control of respiration and arousal. Thus, an impaired production of these neurotransmitters may contribute to the occurrence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The first step of the noradrenergic synthesis pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The TH-encoding gene contains a tetrameric short tandem repeat in intron 1 (TH01), with allele 9.3 reported to be associated with SIDS in German infants. We investigated the allelic frequency of the TH01 marker in 171 Swiss SIDS infants and 500 healthy and gender-matched Caucasian adults. In our study population, the allelic frequency of the 9.3 allele is similarly distributed in SIDS cases and controls (27.2% vs. 25.6%; p-value = 0.562). Nevertheless, the TH-encoding gene is only one of several genes involved in the noradrenergic biosynthesis pathway. Therefore, further genetic investigations are required with focus on the whole noradrenergic signaling system. PMID:24975687

  17. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Development of microsatellite markers for the guava rust fungus, Puccinia psidii.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shaobin; Yang, Baojun; Alfenas, Acelino Couto

    2008-03-01

    We developed and characterized 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers present in the genome of the guava rust fungus, Puccinia psidii. The primers for these microsatellite markers were designed by sequencing clones from a genomic DNA library enriched for a simple sequence repeat (SSR) motif of (AG). All these 15 primer pairs successfully amplified DNA fragments from a sample of 22 P. psidii isolates, revealing a total of 71 alleles. The observed heterozygosity at the 15 loci ranged from 0.05 to 1.00. The SSR markers developed would be useful for population genetics study of the rust fungus. PMID:21585788

  18. DISCOURSE MARKERS IN WRITING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman DÜLGER

    Developing writing skills is an important and complex part of language learning. Literature on writing specifies in general terms that discourse markers constitute an indispensable component of writing quality. This study aimed at identifying the discourse marker usage of Turkish EFL learners. The study was conducted on 76 second grade students of Konya Selçuk University, Education Faculty, English Language Teaching

  19. Cotton Marker Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To address the lack of available molecular markers for cotton, Cotton Incorporated has spearheaded an initiative to create the Cotton Microsatellite Database (CMD), and several groups are actively involved in projects to generate, screen and map cotton molecular markers. CMD is a centralized databas...

  20. Development and mapping of a codominant SCAR marker linked to the andromonoecious gene of melon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. J. Noguera; J. Capel; J. I. Alvarez; R. Lozano

    2005-01-01

    Monoecy is an important goal for melon breeding because of the agronomic advantages it provides to parental lines in that they do not require hand emasculation to develop monoecious F 1 hybrids, the latter producing fruits of higher quality. Monoecious phenotype is conferred by the dominant allele of the andromonoecious ( a) gene, whereas recessive homozygous plants are andromonoecious. A

  1. Plastid markers in Carya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated 8 "universal" plastid primers and qualified 3 as polymorphic and informative within Carya. Pecans of known lineage and geographic origin, representatives of other Carya species and interspecific hybrids were profiled. In an analysis of 169 Carya accessions, 21 alleles were observed am...

  2. Parent Behavior Importance and Parent Behavior Frequency Questionnaires: Psychometric Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowder, Barbara A.; Sanders, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric characteristics of two parenting measures: the Parent Behavior Importance Questionnaire (PBIQ) and Parent Behavior Frequency Questionnaire (PBFQ). Both research questionnaires are based on the parent development theory (PDT) and offer parent as well as non-parent respondents the opportunity to rate 38 parenting

  3. Asynchronous replication of alleles in genomes carrying an extra autosome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aliza Amiel; Avital Korenstein; Elena Gaber; Lydia Avivi

    1999-01-01

    Transcriptional activity of genes appears to be highly related to their replication timing; alleles showing the common biallelic mode of expression replicate highly synchronously, whereas those with a monoallelic mode of expression replicate asynchronously. Here we used FISH to determine the level of synchronisation in replication timing of alleles in amniotic fluid cells derived from normal foetuses and from those

  4. Interpreting simple STR mixtures using allele peak areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Gill; R. Sparkes; R. Pinchin; T. Clayton; J. Whitaker; J. Buckleton

    1998-01-01

    Although existing statistical models can interpret mixtures qualitatively based upon the alleles present, the use of automated sequencers opens the opportunity to take account of quantitative aspects embodied by the peak area. One step in understanding simple mixtures consisting of just two donors is to estimate the mixture ratio. This is relatively easy to do when four-allele mixtures are evident

  5. cause of mortality. However, another hemoglobin allele C

    E-print Network

    Morgan, David

    the selected locus. Balancing selection, on the other hand, brings the favored allele to an intermediate-cell polymorphism may be evolutionarily short-lived. When alleles are maintained by balancing selection for a long determination (csd) locus that determines sex in a number of hymenoptera species. How is balancing selection

  6. Identification of a RAPD marker linked to sex determination in Pistacia vera using bulked segregant analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. I. Hormaza; L. Dollo; V. S. Polito

    1994-01-01

    The Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to amplify DNA segments, with the objective of finding markers linked to sex determination in the dioecious species, Pistacia vera. Progenies from two female parents pollinated by a common male parent were studied. Two bulks of DNA were made in each cross, one from males and one from females, by pooling

  7. Association mapping for frost tolerance using multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) population in faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Sallam, Ahmed; Martsch, Regina

    2015-08-01

    A multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) derived from 11 founder lines in faba bean was used in this study to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for frost tolerance traits using the association mapping method with 156 SNP markers. This MAGIC population consists of a set of 189 genotypes from the Göttingen Winter Bean Population. The association panel was tested in two different experiments, i.e. a frost and a hardening experiment. Six morphological traits, leaf fatty acid composition, relative water content in shoots were scored in this study. The genotypes presented a large genetic variation for all traits that were highly heritable after frost and after hardening. High phenotypic significant correlations were established between traits. The principal coordinates analysis resulted in no clear structure in the current population. Association mapping was performed using a general linear model and mixed linear model with kinship. A False discovery rate of 0.20 (and 0.05) was used to test the significance of marker-trait association. As a result, many putative QTLs for 13 morphological and physiological traits were detected using both models. The results reveal that QTL mapping by association analysis is a powerful method of detecting the alleles associated with frost tolerance in the winter faba bean which can be used in accelerating breeding programs. PMID:26041397

  8. Statistical Studies on Protein Polymorphism in Natural Populations. III. Distribution of Allele Frequencies and the Number of Alleles per Locus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Ranajit; Fuerst, Paul A.; Nei, Masatoshi

    1980-01-01

    With the aim of understanding the mechanism of maintenance of protein polymorphism, we have studied the properties of allele frequency distribution and the number of alleles per locus, using gene-frequency data from a wide range of organisms (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, Drosophila and non-Drosophila invertebrates) in which 20 or more loci with at least 100 genes were sampled. The observed distribution of allele frequencies was U-shaped in all of the 138 populations (mostly species or subspecies) examined and generally agreed with the theoretical distribution expected under the mutation-drift hypothesis, though there was a significant excess of rare alleles (gene frequency, 0 ? 0.05) in about a quarter of the populations. The agreement between the mutation-drift theory and observed data was quite satisfactory for the numbers of polymorphic (gene frequency, 0.05 ? 0.95) and monomorphic (0.95 ? 1.0) alleles.—The observed pattern of allele-frequency distribution was incompatible with the prediction from the overdominance hypothesis. The observed correlations of the numbers of rare alleles, polymorphic alleles and monomorphic alleles with heterozygosity were of the order of magnitude that was expected under the mutation-drift hypothesis. Our results did not support the view that intracistronic recombination is an important source of genetic variation. The total number of alleles per locus was positively correlated with molecular weight in most of the species examined, and the magnitude of the correlation was consistent with the theoretical prediction from mutation-drift hypothesis. The correlation between molecular weight and the number of alleles was generally higher than the correlation between molecular weight and heterozygosity, as expected. PMID:17249018

  9. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O.; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (`K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.

  10. A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Beghain, Johann; Langlois, Anne-Claire; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Duru, Valentine; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Lim, Pharath; Leang, Rithea; Duong, Socheat; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Chuor, Char Meng; Bout, Denis Mey; Ménard, Sandie; Rogers, William O; Genton, Blaise; Fandeur, Thierry; Miotto, Olivo; Ringwald, Pascal; Le Bras, Jacques; Berry, Antoine; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Fairhurst, Rick M; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain ('K13-propeller') with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread. PMID:24352242

  11. New microsatellite markers for Campanula pyramidalis (Campanulaceae) and cross-amplification in closely related species1

    PubMed Central

    Radosavljevi?, Ivan; Jakse, Jernej; Satovic, Zlatko; Javornik, Branka; Jankovi?, Ivana; Liber, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were identified and characterized to study the genetic diversity and structure, conservation status, taxonomy, and biogeography of subspecific taxa and populations of Campanula pyramidalis (Campanulaceae). Methods and Results: Eleven microsatellite markers were developed from genomic libraries enriched for di- and trinucleotide repeats. A total of 80 alleles were observed in the tested natural population. The number of alleles per locus, observed heterozygosity, and expected heterozygosity ranged from four to 13, 0.217 to 0.913, and 0.521 to 0.895, respectively. Conclusions: The new microsatellite markers will be useful for studying genetic diversity and structure as well as for better assessing the conservation status of subspecific taxa and populations of C. pyramidalis. Furthermore, a set of seven loci was successfully cross-amplified in C. secundiflora and C. versicolor and will be of great value for addressing unsolved taxonomic and biogeographic issues within the C. pyramidalis species complex. PMID:25798343

  12. Absence of the human CYP2C8*3 allele in Ugandan children exposed to Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Paganotti, Giacomo Maria; Cosentino, Valentina; Russo, Gianluca; Tabacchi, Francesca; Gramolelli, Silvia; Coluzzi, Mario; Romano, Rita

    2014-10-01

    Study of host pharmacogenetics can improve our knowledge of mechanisms of drug resistance selection and spread. This issue has recently been addressed with respect to chloroquine and amodiaquine in malaria endemic areas of West and East Africa. Here we report, from surveys performed in two different areas of Uganda, that the human CYP2C8*3 allele, which had been reported to be strongly associated with parasite drug resistance in Zanzibar, is absent, being a marker of genetic admixture of the Zanzibari population with a Caucasoid component. Moreover, a retrospective analysis of CYP2C8*2 and the Plasmodium falciparum drug resistant pfmdr1 86Y allele does not show any association, which may be related to the high level of drug resistance. PMID:25183026

  13. A set of novel microsatellite markers developed for Luculia yunnanensis (Rubiaceae), an endangered plant endemic to Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Wang, Lan; Wan, Youming; Li, Hongzhe; Li, Zhenghong; Liu, Xiuxian; Liang, Ning; Li, Wenjuan

    2012-01-01

    The genus Luculia Sweet contains about five species of small trees or shrubs and is a member of the family Rubiaceae (tribe Cinchoneae). Luculia yunnanensis is an endangered ornamental shrub endemic to southwest China. Only two natural populations of L. yunnanensis exist in the wild according to our field investigation. It can be inferred that L. yunnanensis is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild and an urgent conservation strategy is required. By using a modified biotin-sterptavidin capture method, 24 primer sets were identified in two wild populations. Of these primers, 11 displayed polymorphisms and 13 were monomorphic. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to four, values for observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.000 to 0.833 and from 0.431 to 0.771, with averages of 0.389 and 0.614, respectively. These markers will be useful for further investigation of conservation of resources, selecting parental types in cross-breeding, evolution of this species at the molecular level and related research in Luculia species. PMID:22312269

  14. A Set of Novel Microsatellite Markers Developed for Luculia yunnanensis (Rubiaceae), an Endangered Plant Endemic to Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hong; Wang, Lan; Wan, Youming; Li, Hongzhe; Li, Zhenghong; Liu, Xiuxian; Liang, Ning; Li, Wenjuan

    2012-01-01

    The genus Luculia Sweet contains about five species of small trees or shrubs and is a member of the family Rubiaceae (tribe Cinchoneae). Luculia yunnanensis is an endangered ornamental shrub endemic to southwest China. Only two natural populations of L. yunnanensis exist in the wild according to our field investigation. It can be inferred that L. yunnanensis is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild and an urgent conservation strategy is required. By using a modified biotin-sterptavidin capture method, 24 primer sets were identified in two wild populations. Of these primers, 11 displayed polymorphisms and 13 were monomorphic. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to four, values for observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.000 to 0.833 and from 0.431 to 0.771, with averages of 0.389 and 0.614, respectively. These markers will be useful for further investigation of conservation of resources, selecting parental types in cross-breeding, evolution of this species at the molecular level and related research in Luculia species. PMID:22312269

  15. Parent to Parent: Giftedness with a Twist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Christy D.

    2012-01-01

    Discovering that a child is gifted can be both exhilarating and daunting. Parents watch in amazement and awe as their 3-year-old reads a first-grade-level book flawlessly, or they might listen to their preschool child's distress over seeing a homeless person on the street. Parents observe as their 6-year-old dismantles a broken CD player and…

  16. Maternal Personality, Parenting Cognitions, and Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Haynes, O. Maurice

    2011-01-01

    A community sample of 262 European American mothers of firstborn 20-month-olds completed a personality inventory and measures of parenting cognitions (knowledge, self-perceptions, and reports about behavior) and was observed in interaction with their children from which measures of parenting practices (language, sensitivity, affection, and play)…

  17. Isolation and Characterization of 13 New Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers in the Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Common Bean) Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aihua; Ding, Yi; Hu, Zhenhua; Lin, Chufa; Wang, Shuzhen; Wang, Bingcai; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zhou, Guolin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 13 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated from the Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean) by using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequence COntaining Repeats (FIASCO) protocol. These markers revealed two to seven alleles, with an average of 3.64 alleles per locus. The polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.055 to 0.721 over 13 loci, with a mean value of 0.492, and 7 loci having PIC greater than 0.5. The expected heterozygosity (HE) and observed heterozygosity (HO) levels ranged from 0.057 to 0.814 and from 0.026 to 0.531, respectively. Cross-species amplification of the 13 prime pairs was performed in its related specie of Vigna unguiculata L. Seven out of all these markers showed cross-species transferability. These markers will be useful for future genetic diversity and population genetics studies for this agricultural specie and its related species. PMID:23109846

  18. Communication with Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipstone, Warwick

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the problems in communicating with parents and involving them in the development of their children and in the growth of their children's school. An experimental group, the Parent, Teacher, Governor Working Party (PTG), is described and evaluated. (RK)

  19. Parent's Firearm Safety Checklist

    MedlinePLUS

    Parent’s Firearm Safety Checklist IN YOUR HOME ? Before you buy a gun, consider less dangerous ways to keep your family ... window locks, dogs, etc. ? Don't buy a gun unless you have the necessary knowledge to use ...

  20. Questions about Biological Parents

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Questions About Biological Parents Article Body As you raise your adopted ... to her life—the fact that she has biological parents elsewhere—that may make it necessary for ...

  1. Growth & Development / Parental Care

    E-print Network

    Butler, Christopher J.

    Parental care Essential Minimal Nourishment Parents Self-feeding Egg size Ssmall (4-10%) Large (9-21%) Egg from insects) and calcium (from eggs or bones) Bird Protein (%) Lipid (%) Carbohydrates (%) Pigeon 23

  2. Multidimensionality of parental monitoring 

    E-print Network

    Secrest, Laura A

    2001-01-01

    This study explored the construct of parental monitoring and its relation to antisocial behavior in children. The factor structure of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire Poor Monitoring/Supervision Scale (Frick, 1991) was examined to determine...

  3. Learning about the X from our parents

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Alison S.; Shi, Min; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2015-01-01

    The X chromosome is generally understudied in association studies, in part because the analyst has had limited methodological options. For nuclear-family-based association studies, most current methods extend the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to the X chromosome. We present a new method to study association in case-parent triads: the parent-informed likelihood ratio test for the X chromosome (PIX-LRT). Our method enables estimation of relative risks and takes advantage of parental genotype information and the sex of the affected offspring to increase statistical power to detect an effect. Under a parental exchangeability assumption for the X, if case-parent triads are complete, the parents of affected offspring provide an independent replication sample for estimates based on transmission distortion to their affected offspring. For each offspring sex we combine the parent-level and the offspring-level information to form a likelihood ratio test statistic; we then combine the two to form a combined test statistic. Our method can estimate relative risks under different modes of inheritance or a more general co-dominant model. In triads with missing parental genotypes, the method accounts for missingness with the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. We calculate non-centrality parameters to assess the power gain and robustness of our method compared to alternative methods. We apply PIX-LRT to publically available data from an international consortium of genotyped families affected by the birth defect oral cleft and find a strong, internally-replicated signal for a SNP marker related to cleft lip with or without cleft palate. PMID:25713581

  4. Validation of SSR markers associated with rust (Uromyces fabae) resistance in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Rai, Rashmi; Singh, Brahma Deo; Chand, Ramesh; Srivastava, Chandra Prakash

    2015-04-01

    Pea rust is a devastating disease of peas especially in the sub-tropical regions of the world and greatly influenced by the environmental conditions during disease development. Molecular markers associated with pea rust resistance would be useful in marker assisted selection (MAS). Utility of molecular markers associated with the pea rust resistance were evaluated in 30 diverse pea genotypes using four SSR markers (AA446 and AA505 flanking the major QTL Qruf; AD146 and AA416 flanking the minor QTL, Qruf1). QTL, Qruf flanking markers were able to identify all the resistant genotypes when used together, except Pant P 31. While, SSR markers AD146 and AA416 flanking the minor QTL, Qruf1 were able to identify all the pea resistant genotypes used for validation, except for HUDP-11 by AD146 and Pant P 31 by AA416. Similarly, SSR markers AA446 and AA505 were able to identify all the susceptible pea genotypes, except IPFD 99-13, HFP 9415 and S- 143. SSR markers AD146 and AA416 were together able to identify all the pea susceptible genotypes used for validation, except KPMR 526, KPMR 632 and IPFD 99-13. On the basis of marker allele analysis it may be concluded that SSR markers (AA446, AA505, AD146 and AA416) can be used in MAS of pea rust resistance. PMID:25964717

  5. Genetic variation of microsatellite markers D1S117, D6S89, D11S35, APOC2, and D21S168 in the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, J J; Banchs, I; Volpini, V; Estivill, X

    1993-01-01

    We have used PCR amplification to analyse the allele frequency, distribution and heterozygosity of 5 microsatellite markers (D1S117, D6S89, D11S35, APOC2, and D21S168), in a sample of 100 unrelated Spanish individuals. The loci tested exhibit wide allelic variability having 7-17 alleles, PIC (polymorphic information content) between 0.79 and 0.86, and heterozygosity between 0.81 and 0.86. D1S117 and D21S168 have unimodal distribution, APOC2 has 4 common alleles which account for 71% of the total variation, D11S35 has a bimodal distribution and D6S89 is trimodal. The allelic distribution observed for each locus is in agreement with slippage and mispairing as the main mechanisms involved in the evolution of microsatellite alleles. Multiplex amplification of loci D6S89 and APOC2 was possible due to their non-overlapping allele sizes. The rapidity with which microsatellites can be analysed, and the accurate determination of alleles, make these markers very powerful tools for genetic typing. The information obtained for loci D1S117, D6S89, D11S35, APOC2, and D21S168, provides a basis for their use for DNA typing and paternity analysis in the Spanish population. PMID:8471544

  6. The Use of Multiple Markers in a Bayesian Method for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Uimari, P.; Thaller, G.; Hoeschele, I.

    1996-01-01

    Information on multiple linked genetic markers was used in a Bayesian method for the statistical mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL). Bayesian parameter estimation and hypothesis testing were implemented via Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms. Variables sampled were the augmented data (marker-QTL genotypes, polygenic effects), an indicator variable for linkage or nonlinkage, and the parameters. The parameter vector included allele frequencies at the markers and the QTL, map distances of the markers and the QTL, QTL substitution effect, and polygenic and residual variances. The criterion for QTL detection was the marginal posterior probability of a QTL being located on the chromosome carrying the markers. The method was evaluated empirically by analyzing simulated granddaughter designs consisting of 2000 sons, 20 related sires, and their ancestors. PMID:8844168

  7. Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers in Pulsatilla vulgaris (Ranunculaceae) using next-generation sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    DiLeo, Michelle F.; Graf, René; Holderegger, Rolf; Rico, Yessica; Wagner, Helene H.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: We developed novel microsatellite markers for the perennial plant Pulsatilla vulgaris (Ranunculaceae) to investigate the effects of fragmentation on gene flow in this imperiled species. Methods and Results: We identified microsatellites and developed primers based on 454 shotgun sequences. We identified 14 markers that were polymorphic and produced clean bands. Of these, eight could be analyzed as diploids. Genotyping of 97 individuals across two populations revealed these markers to be highly polymorphic with seven to 17 alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity from 0.41 to 0.83. Conclusions: The markers are highly informative and will be used to test if the reintroduction of shepherding in southern Germany improves genetic connectivity among fragmented populations of P. vulgaris. The combination of diploid and tetraploid markers presented here will be useful in resolving the polyploidization history of this and related species.

  8. Characterization of microsatellite markers for the vulnerable grassland forb Senecio macrocarpus (Asteraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Collin W.; James, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Development of microsatellite markers for the vulnerable forb Senecio macrocarpus was performed to begin an assessment of its population structure and breeding method to aid in the conservation of the species in Victoria, Australia. • Methods and Results: Fifteen microsatellite markers were developed for S. macrocarpus from 454 pyrosequencing. The markers were tested on 104 individuals from four populations. The markers produced between two and seven alleles per locus while the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.20 to 0.67 and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.00 to 1.00. The observed heterozygosity is suggestive that the populations may be apomictic. • Conclusions: The microsatellite markers developed for S. macrocarpus are intended to be used on future studies that aim to assess the population genetics and local breeding dynamics of the species with an emphasis on conservation. PMID:25202496

  9. Detection of quantitative trait loci in outbred populations with incomplete marker data.

    PubMed Central

    Bink, M C; Van Arendonk, J A

    1999-01-01

    Augmentation of marker genotypes for ungenotyped individuals is implemented in a Bayesian approach via the use of Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Marker data on relatives and phenotypes are combined to compute conditional posterior probabilities for marker genotypes of ungenotyped individuals. The presented procedure allows the analysis of complex pedigrees with ungenotyped individuals to detect segregating quantitative trait loci (QTL). Allelic effects at the QTL were assumed to follow a normal distribution with a covariance matrix based on known QTL position and identity by descent probabilities derived from flanking markers. The Bayesian approach estimates variance due to the single QTL, together with polygenic and residual variance. The method was empirically tested through analyzing simulated data from a complex granddaughter design. Ungenotyped dams were related to one or more sons or grandsires in the design. Heterozygosity of the marker loci and size of QTL were varied. Simulation results indicated a significant increase in power when ungenotyped dams were included in the analysis. PMID:9872977

  10. CGG allele size somatic mosaicism and methylation in FMR1 premutation alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, Dalyir I.; Mendoza-Morales, Guadalupe; Lo, Joyce; Cao, Ru; Hadd, Andrew; Latham, Gary J.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Hagerman, Randi; Tassone, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Background Greater than 200 CGG repeats in the 5?UTR of the FMR1 gene leads to epigenetic silencing and lack of the FMR1 protein, causing Fragile X Syndrome. Individuals carriers of a premutation (PM) allele with 55–200 CGG repeats are typically unmethylated and can present with clinical features defined as FMR1 associated conditions. Methods Blood samples from 17 male PM carriers were assessed clinically and molecularly by Southern Blot, Western Blot, PCR and QRT-PCR. Blood and brain tissue from additional 18 PM males were also similarly examined. Continuous outcomes were modeled using linear regression and binary outcomes were modeled using logistic regression. Results Methylated alleles were detected in different fractions of blood cells in all PM cases (n= 17). CGG repeat numbers correlated with percent of methylation and mRNA levels and, especially in the upper PM range, with greater number of clinical involvements. Inter/intra- tissue somatic instability and differences in percent methylation were observed between blood and fibroblasts (n=4) and also observed between blood and different brain regions in three of the 18 premutation cases examined. CGG repeat lengths in lymphocytes remained unchanged over a period of time ranging from 2–6 years, three cases for whom multiple samples were available. Conclusion In addition to CGG size instability, individuals with a PM expanded alleles can exhibit methylation and display more clinical features likely due to RNA toxicity and/or FMR1 silencing. The observed association between CGG repeat length and percent of methylation with the severity of the clinical phenotypes underscores the potential value of methylation in affected PM to further understand penetrance, inform diagnosis and to expand treatment options. PMID:24591415

  11. The Parent Loan Trap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Marian; Supiano, Beckie; Fuller, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    As the cost of college has spiraled ever upward and median family income has fallen, the loan program, called Parent PLUS, has become indispensable for increasing numbers of parents desperate to make their children's college plans work. Last year the government disbursed $10.6-billion in Parent PLUS loans to just under a million families. Even…

  12. Does parents’ money matter?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Shea

    2000-01-01

    This paper asks whether parents’ income per se has a positive impact on children’s abilities. Previous research has established that income is positively correlated across generations. This does not prove that parents’ money matters, however, since income is presumably correlated with ability. This paper estimates the impact of parents’ income by focusing on income variation due to factors – union,

  13. Parent's Journal. [Videotape Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    Parent's Journal is a set of 16 videotapes for parents of prenatal, infant, and toddler-age children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on the life stories and experiences of capable mothers and…

  14. Parental Engagement with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Joanna; Harbinson, Terence

    2010-01-01

    A programme of parental engagement with school science is described, in which parents and their children take part in scientific debate and practical science lessons. Three sessions, in biology, chemistry and physics, of this ongoing programme are described, through which parents have been able to support their children by learning science with…

  15. The parent connection.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, D M

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of parents as contributing members of their children's educational team. The effect of parental involvement on academic success is investigated from primary through secondary school levels. Research has repeatedly demonstrated the connection between family and achievement, and this paper supports the premise that parental involvement plays a critical role in children's academic success. PMID:2048485

  16. Parental Rights in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volz, Marlin M.

    Chapter 15 in a book on school law summarizes court decisions and legislation concerning the rights of parents in the education of children. On purely educational matters, the interest of the parent normally must yield to the dominant interest of the state. Parental arguments are strongest when they can sincerely rely upon religious beliefs that…

  17. The Teen Parent Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, H. Prentice, Jr.; Walker, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Pregnant teenagers and young parents often do not receive the quality of education available to other students. Most schools do not have a separate facility or program that deals with their special needs. Pregnant teens and teen parents should not be left behind. The Teen Parent Academy--a unique program in a predominantly Hispanic Texas border…

  18. Predicting Parent Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, William H.; And Others

    Because the factors which influence parent functioning have not been extensively researched, a study was conducted to determine the relationships among marital adjustment, child temperament, locus of control, and parent satisfaction. Participants included 93 volunteer couples who had at least one child at home. Parents averaged 35 years old and…

  19. Parenting: The Underdeveloped Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National PTA, Chicago, IL.

    This parent education curriculum contains a variety of materials designed to help local Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs) hold meetings for parents on child rearing. The materials help organizers plan meetings on topics such as dating, drugs, and careers. The unit contains a leader's guide, which contains a description of how to plan meetings,…

  20. Parent Involvement: Some Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde Park - Kenwood Community Conference, Chicago, IL. Child Care Task Force.

    The focus of this paper is on the immediate and long-range advantages of parent involvement, the definitions and implications of varying levels of parent involvement in child care center operations, and the general means by which a chosen level of involvement might be achieved. The advantages of parent involvement are discussed briefly in terms of…

  1. Parent Abuse: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennair, Nicola; Mellor, David

    2007-01-01

    A recent focus of research and clinical practice has been on the issue of abuse of parents by their children (parent abuse). This paper reviews the literature on this phenomenon. While parent abuse falls under the umbrella of family violence, it appears to be qualitatively different from other forms of intra-family abuse. Research has primarily…

  2. Distribution of genes associated with yield potential and water-saving in Chinese Zone II wheat detected by developed functional markers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenxian; Shi, Zhanliang; Zhang, Aimin; Guo, Jinkao

    2015-03-01

    Functional markers (FMs) developed from sequence polymorphisms are present in allelic variants of a functional gene at a locus and are directly associated with phenotypic variations. In this study, FM linked to Rht-B1, Rht-D1, TaCwi-A1, TaSus2-2B, TaGW2-6A and Dreb-B1 genes conferring to yield potential and water-saving were selected to analyse the distribution in 102 wheat varieties, most of which were authorized in the past decade and adapted to grow in Zone II of China. First, the semidwarfing genes Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b (mutant alleles) conferring to grain yield were analysed. The frequencies of favourable alleles Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b were 32.4 and 58.8%, respectively. Comparing with the previous report, the frequency of Rht-B1b among cultivars in this study is similar to the frequency among cultivars released in the 1990s, while the frequency of Rht-D1b is slightly lower than the previous report 63.9%. Twelve (11.8%) cultivars neither contained Rht-B1b nor Rht-D1b, while only Yumai 66 contained both semidwarfing genes. Linyuan8 and Xinong 928 are heterozygous at RhtB1 locus and Zhengmai 9023 is heterozygous at both RhtB1 and Rht-D1 loci. Second, the TaCwi-A1, TaSus2-2B and TaGW2-6A genes considered as candidate genes related to grain weight were detected. We found that the frequencies of the favourable alleles were 76.5, 56.9 and 69.6%, respectively. Among the 102 wheat varieties, 30 contained all the three favourable genes, 45 contained two of the three favourable genes and 27 contained only one. There are eight wheat varieties (7.8%) in hybrid state at the TaCWI-A1 locus. Third, the designed FM linked to water-saving gene Dreb-B1 were validated on 102 wheat varieties. The results showed that the haplotypes of 47 wheat varieties at the Dreb-B1 locus were same as that of Opata 85, and 55 wheat varieties showed the signal expected for W7984 (Opata 85 and W7984 are parents of the ITMI mapping population). This information will be useful for the wheat breeding programmes aiming at improving yield and water use efficiency in Shijiazhuang located in China Zone II. PMID:25846875

  3. Favorable alleles for stem water-soluble carbohydrates identified by association analysis contribute to grain weight under drought stress conditions in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyu; Zhang, Bin; Li, Runzhi; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian

    2015-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental constraint to crop distribution and productivity. Stem water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) buffer wheat grain yield against conditions unfavorable for photosynthesis during the grain filling stage. In this study, 262 winter wheat accessions and 209 genome-wide SSR markers were collected and used to undertake association analysis based on a mixed linear model (MLM). The WSC in different internodes at three growth stages and 1000-grain weight (TGW) were investigated under four environmental regimes (well-watered, drought stress during the whole growth period, and two levels of terminal drought stress imposed by chemical desiccation under the well-watered and drought stress during the whole growth period conditions). Under diverse drought stress conditions, WSC in lower internodes showed significant positive correlations with TGW, especially at the flowering stage under well-watered conditions and at grain filling under drought stress. Sixteen novel WSC-favorable alleles were identified, and five of them contributed to significantly higher TGW. In addition, pyramiding WSC favorable alleles was not only effective for obtaining accessions with higher WSC, but also for enhancing TGW under different water regimes. During the past fifty years of wheat breeding, WSC was selected incidentally. The average number of favorable WSC alleles increased from 1.13 in the pre-1960 period to 4.41 in the post-2000 period. The results indicate a high potential for using marker-assisted selection to pyramid WSC favorable alleles in improving WSC and TGW in wheat. PMID:25768726

  4. Nuclear gene phylogeography using PHASE: dealing with unresolved genotypes, lost alleles, and systematic bias in parameter estimation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A widely-used approach for screening nuclear DNA markers is to obtain sequence data and use bioinformatic algorithms to estimate which two alleles are present in heterozygous individuals. It is common practice to omit unresolved genotypes from downstream analyses, but the implications of this have not been investigated. We evaluated the haplotype reconstruction method implemented by PHASE in the context of phylogeographic applications. Empirical sequence datasets from five non-coding nuclear loci with gametic phase ascribed by molecular approaches were coupled with simulated datasets to investigate three key issues: (1) haplotype reconstruction error rates and the nature of inference errors, (2) dataset features and genotypic configurations that drive haplotype reconstruction uncertainty, and (3) impacts of omitting unresolved genotypes on levels of observed phylogenetic diversity and the accuracy of downstream phylogeographic analyses. Results We found that PHASE usually had very low false-positives (i.e., a low rate of confidently inferring haplotype pairs that were incorrect). The majority of genotypes that could not be resolved with high confidence included an allele occurring only once in a dataset, and genotypic configurations involving two low-frequency alleles were disproportionately represented in the pool of unresolved genotypes. The standard practice of omitting unresolved genotypes from downstream analyses can lead to considerable reductions in overall phylogenetic diversity that is skewed towards the loss of alleles with larger-than-average pairwise sequence divergences, and in turn, this causes systematic bias in estimates of important population genetic parameters. Conclusions A combination of experimental and computational approaches for resolving phase of segregating sites in phylogeographic applications is essential. We outline practical approaches to mitigating potential impacts of computational haplotype reconstruction on phylogeographic inferences. With targeted application of laboratory procedures that enable unambiguous phase determination via physical isolation of alleles from diploid PCR products, relatively little investment of time and effort is needed to overcome the observed biases. PMID:20429950

  5. A storage-protein marker associated with the suppressor of Pm8 for powdery mildew resistance in wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. X. Ren; R. A. McIntosh; P. J. Sharp; T. T. The

    1996-01-01

    A suppressor of resistance to powdery mildew conferred by Pm8 showed complete association with the presence of a storage-protein marker resolved by electrophoresis on SDS-PAGE gels. This marker was identified as the product of the gliadin allele Gli-A1a. The mildewresponse phenotypes of wheats possessing the 1BL.1RS translocation were completely predictable from electrophoretograms. The suppressor, designated SuPm8, was located on chromosome

  6. Allele frequencies of six STR loci in Argentine populations.

    PubMed

    Tourret, N; López Camelo, J; Vidal-Rioja, L

    1999-11-01

    Allele frequencies of six short tandem repeat (STR) loci were determined in a Caucasian urban sample of La Plata city and three Amerindian sample populations of Argentina. Allele frequencies showed differences between urbans and Amerindians, and among Amerindians as well. The degree of genetic differentiation of subpopulations was mainly due to the Amerindian contribution. Mapuche, Mocovi, and pooled Amerindian populations showed little evidence of HW disequilibrium, and association of alleles. In the urban sample, there is no evidence of population substructuring. Forensic probabilities of exclusion and matching showed high differences between the population groups. Finally, La Plata sample did not show differences with Caucasians from other geographic regions. PMID:10582366

  7. Role of GBSS allelic diversity in rice grain quality

    E-print Network

    Dobo, Macaire

    2009-05-15

    exons 1, 6 and 10) GAC-glab O. glaberrima version of GBSS GAC allele (Adenine in exon 12 & no transposon in intron 10) GAC-sat O. sativa version of GBSS GAC allele (Guanine in exons 12 & transposon in intron 10). This base is also found... in other O. sativa GBSS alleles at the same position. GAT Guanine, Adenine and Thymine (SNP in GBSS exons 1, 6 and 10) GCC Guanine, Cytosine and Cytosine (SNP in GBSS exons 1, 6 and 10) G#1;T or G/T Base change guanine to thymine...

  8. Rapid detection of autosomal aneuploidy using microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.N.; Teshima, I.E. [Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada); Winsor, E.J.T. [Toronto Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Trisomy occurs in at least 4% of all clinically recognized pregnancies, making it the most common type of chromosome abnormality in humans. The most commonly occurring trisomies are those of chromosomes 13, 18, 21 and aneuploidy of X and Y, accounting for about 0.3% of all newborns and a much higher percentage of conceptuses. In Canada, prenatal chromosome analysis by amniocentesis is offered to those women {ge} 35 years of age at the time of delivery or equivalent risk by maternal serum screen. We are developing a rapid molecular diagnostic test to detect the most common autosomal aneuploidies in prenatal and neonatal samples. The tests makes use of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat markers labeled with fluorescent tags which allow analysis on a GENESCANNER automated fragment analyzer (ABI). Multiple polymorphic markers have been selected on each of chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. At a given locus, trisomic fetuses/neonates will have either three alleles or two alleles with one allele having twice the intensity of the other. Unaffected individuals have two equal intensity alleles. We are conducting a blind study that will compare the detection efficiencies of FISH analysis on uncultured cells and the molecular method on confirmation amniotic fluid samples collected at the time of termination of affected fetuses. Results on cultured amniocytes from one such patient confirmed that trisomy 21 can be detected. FISH was not done on this sample. In addition, detection efficiency of the molecular method in whole blood samples from affected neonates is also being studied. To date, two such samples have been tested, one with trisomy 13 and one with trisomy 18, and both samples were diagnosed correctly. Preliminary results suggest that this method may provide a valuable tool for the rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy.

  9. Amodiaquine and Artemether-Lumefantrine Select Distinct Alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum mdr1 Gene in Tanzanian Children Treated for Uncomplicated Malaria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Humphreys; I. Merinopoulos; J. Ahmed; C. J. M. Whitty; T. K. Mutabingwa; C. J. Sutherland; R. L. Hallett

    2007-01-01

    The artemisinin-based combination therapies artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and amodiaquine (AQ) plus artesunate have been adopted for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in many African countries. Molecular markers of parasite resistance suitable for surveillance have not been established for any of the component drugs in either of these combinations. We assessed P. falciparum mdr1 (Pfmdr1) alleles present in 300 Tanzanian children presenting

  10. Allele frequencies of 15 autosomal STR loci in the southern Morocco population with phylogenetic structure among worldwide populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hicham El Ossmani; Jalal Talbi; Brahim Bouchrif; Abdelaziz Chafik

    2009-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using the AmpFl STR Identifiler kit was performed in a random sample of 204 unrelated individuals from the Arabic-speaking population of the southern Morocco. Allele frequencies of 15 STRs loci (D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, FGA, D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, D19S433, CSF1PO, TH01 and D3S1358) have been reported in this population. Markers D18S51, FGA,

  11. Accurate determination of allelic frequencies in mitochondrial DNA mixtures by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herbert Oberacher; Harald Niederstätter; Christian G. Huber; Walther Parson

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial locus 16519T\\/C was used as a model for the evaluation of the benefits of ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance\\u000a liquid chromatography on-line hyphenated to electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ICEMS assay) for the\\u000a determination of allelic frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms. This marker has gained interest in forensic science\\u000a owing to its ability to increase the discrimination power of mitochondrial

  12. Uneven segregation of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in Arabidopsis lyrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B ECHSGAARD; T. BATAILLON; M. H. SCHIERUP

    2004-01-01

    Self-incompatibility in Arabidopsis lyrata is sporophytically controlled by the multi-allelic S-locus. Self-incompatibility alleles (S-alleles) are under strong negative frequency dependent selection because pollen carrying common S-alleles have fewer mating opportunities. Population genetics theory predicts that deleterious alleles can accumulate if linked to the S-locus. This was tested by studying segregation of S-alleles in 11 large full sib families in A.

  13. Impact of Marker Ascertainment Bias on Genomic Selection Accuracy and Estimates of Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Heslot, Nicolas; Rutkoski, Jessica; Poland, Jesse; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Sorrells, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide molecular markers are often being used to evaluate genetic diversity in germplasm collections and for making genomic selections in breeding programs. To accurately predict phenotypes and assay genetic diversity, molecular markers should assay a representative sample of the polymorphisms in the population under study. Ascertainment bias arises when marker data is not obtained from a random sample of the polymorphisms in the population of interest. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) is rapidly emerging as a low-cost genotyping platform, even for the large, complex, and polyploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genome. With GBS, marker discovery and genotyping occur simultaneously, resulting in minimal ascertainment bias. The previous platform of choice for whole-genome genotyping in many species such as wheat was DArT (Diversity Array Technology) and has formed the basis of most of our knowledge about cereals genetic diversity. This study compared GBS and DArT marker platforms for measuring genetic diversity and genomic selection (GS) accuracy in elite U.S. soft winter wheat. From a set of 365 breeding lines, 38,412 single nucleotide polymorphism GBS markers were discovered and genotyped. The GBS SNPs gave a higher GS accuracy than 1,544 DArT markers on the same lines, despite 43.9% missing data. Using a bootstrap approach, we observed significantly more clustering of markers and ascertainment bias with DArT relative to GBS. The minor allele frequency distribution of GBS markers had a deficit of rare variants compared to DArT markers. Despite the ascertainment bias of the DArT markers, GS accuracy for three traits out of four was not significantly different when an equal number of markers were used for each platform. This suggests that the gain in accuracy observed using GBS compared to DArT markers was mainly due to a large increase in the number of markers available for the analysis. PMID:24040295

  14. Association and Validation of Yield-Favored Alleles in Chinese Cultivars of Common Wheat (Triticumaestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boqiao; Cheng, Xiaoming; Qin, Lin; Li, Tian; Shi, Weiping; Chang, Xiaoping; Jing, Ruilian; Yang, Wuyun; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueyong; Cheng, Shunhe

    2015-01-01

    Common wheat is one of the most important crops in China, which is the largest producer in the world. A set of 230 cultivars was used to identify yield-related loci by association mapping. This set was tested for seven yield-related traits, viz. plant height (PH), spike length (SL), spikelet number per spike (SNPS), kernel number per spike (KNPS), thousand-kernel weight (TKW), kernel weight per spike (KWPS), and sterile spikelet number (SSN) per plant in four environments. A total of 106 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers distributed on all 21 chromosomes were used to screen the set. Twenty-one and 19 of them were associated with KNPS and TKW, respectively. Association mapping detected 73 significant associations across 50 SSRs, and the phenotypic variation explained (R2) by the associations ranged from 1.54 to 23.93%. The associated loci were distributed on all chromosomes except 4A, 7A, and 7D. Significant and potentially new alleles were present on 8 chromosomes, namely1A, 1D, 2A, 2D, 3D, 4B, 5B, and 6B. Further analysis showed that genetic effects of associated loci were greatly influenced by association panels, and the R2 of crucial loci were lower in modern cultivars than in the mini core collection, probably caused by strong selection in wheat breeding. In order to confirm the results of association analysis, yield-related favorable alleles Xgwm135-1A138, Xgwm337-1D186, Xgwm102-2D144, and Xgwm132-6B128 were evaluated in a double haploid (DH) population derived from Hanxuan10 xLumai14.These favorable alleles that were validated in various populations might be valuable in breeding for high-yield. PMID:26067129

  15. Diagnostic value of a microsatellite DNA marker for copper toxicosis in West-European Bedlington terriers and incidence of the disease.

    PubMed

    Rothuizen, J; Ubbink, G J; van Zon, P; Teske, E; van den Ingh, T S; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, V

    1999-06-01

    Recently, linkage of a DNA microsatellite marker to inherited copper toxicosis has been reported in American Bedlington terrier families. Due to the fact that there is little exchange of breeding stock between the USA and Europe, it remains to be investigated whether in Europe the marker is informative and is linked with the disease. We have therefore examined the diagnostic value of the microsatellite marker in the European Bedlington. In 130 dogs at least one year of age (62 from The Netherlands, 35 from Belgium, and 33 from Germany) histo- or cytochemical staining of copper was done in liver biopsies. Based on liver histo- or cytochemistry, 51 dogs were obligate carriers, and 25 dogs had copper toxicosis. The inferred genotypes of these 76 dogs were compared with the marker genotypes. All dogs with the disease were homozygous for the 167 bp marker allele. All obligate carriers were heterozygotes with the 167 bp and a 163-bp alleles. All phenotypically healthy dogs were either homozygous for the 163 bp allele or heterozygous. Thus, the marker was in complete linkage disequilibrium with the putative copper toxicosis gene with the 167 bp allele in phase with the disease allele. The frequencies of the 167 bp and the 163 bp allele, respectively, were 0.33 and 0.67 in Dutch dogs, 0.31 and 0.69 in German dogs, and 0.57 and 0.43 in Belgian dogs. We have confirmed the utility of this marker for diagnosis of inherited copper toxicosis in European Bedlington terriers. PMID:10442980

  16. PARENTAL BONDING AND PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP AMONG TERTIARY STUDENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TAM CAI LIAN; YEOH SI HAN

    Parental bonding is an important predictor that gives a lot of insight into parent-child relationship. Studies have demonstrated the importance of parent child relationship for adjustment, ranging from attachment during infancy, indiscipline style during childhood and adolescence to parenting style during adulthood. This paper aims to investigate the relationship between parental bonding and parent-child relationship among tertiary level students in

  17. Parental Feeding Practices Predict Authoritative, Authoritarian, and Permissive Parenting Styles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Hubbs-Tait; Tay Seacord Kennedy; Melanie C. Page; Glade L. Topham; Amanda W. Harrist

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundOur goal was to identify how parental feeding practices from the nutrition literature link to general parenting styles from the child development literature to understand how to target parenting practices to increase effectiveness of interventions. Stand-alone parental feeding practices could be targeted independently. However, parental feeding practices linked to parenting styles require interventions treating underlying family dynamics as a whole.

  18. Parenting Beliefs, Parental Stress, and Social Support Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Respler-Herman, Melissa; Mowder, Barbara A.; Yasik, Anastasia E.; Shamah, Renee

    2012-01-01

    The present study built on prior research by examining the relationship of parental stress and social support to parenting beliefs and behaviors. A sample of 87 parents provided their views concerning the importance of parenting characteristics as well as their level of parental stress and perceived social support. These parents completed the…

  19. Replication of a rare protective allele in the noradrenaline transporter gene and ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X; Hawi, Z; Brookes, KJ; Anney, R; Bellgrove, M; Franke, B; Barry, E; Chen, W; Kuntsi, J; Banaschewski, T; Buitelaar, J; Ebstein, R; Fitzgerald, M; Miranda, A; Oades, RD; Roeyers, H; Rothenberger, A; Sergeant, J; Sonuga-Barke, E; Steinhausen, H-C; Faraone, SV; Gill, M

    2008-01-01

    Objective Replication is a key to resolving whether a reported genetic association represents a false positive finding or an actual genetic risk factor. In a previous study screening 51 candidate genes for association with ADHD in a multi-centre European sample (the IMAGE project), two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the norepinephrine transporter (SLC6A2) gene were found to be associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The same SNP alleles were also reported to be associated with ADHD in a separate study from the Massachusetts General Hospital in the US. Method Using two independent samples of ADHD DSM-IV combined subtype trios we attempted to replicate the reported associations with SNPs rs11568324 and rs3785143 in SLC6A2. Results Significant association of the two markers was not observed in the two independent replication samples. However, across all four datasets the overall evidence of association with ADHD was significant (for SNP rs11568324 P=0.0001; average odds ratio=0.33; for SNP rs3785143 P=0.008; average odds ratio=1.3). Conclusions The data were consistent for rs11568324, suggesting the existence of a rare allele conferring protection for ADHD within the SLC6A2 gene. Further investigations should focus on identifying the mechanisms underlying the protective effect. PMID:18937296

  20. Fine-mapping the POLL locus in Brahman cattle yields the diagnostic marker CSAFG29.

    PubMed

    Mariasegaram, Maxy; Harrison, Blair E; Bolton, Jennifer A; Tier, Bruce; Henshall, John M; Barendse, William; Prayaga, Kishore C

    2012-12-01

    The POLL locus has been mapped to the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 1 (BTA1) in both taurine breeds and taurine-indicine crosses in an interval of approximately 1 Mb. It has not yet been mapped in pure-bred zebu cattle. Despite several efforts, neither causative mutations in candidate genes nor a singular diagnostic DNA marker has been identified. In this study, we genotyped a total of 68 Brahman cattle and 20 Hereford cattle informative for the POLL locus for 33 DNA microsatellites, 16 of which we identified de novo from the bovine genome sequence, mapping the POLL locus to the region of the genes IFNAR2 and SYNJ1. The 303-bp allele of the new microsatellite, CSAFG29, showed strong association with the POLL allele. We then genotyped 855 Brahman cattle for CSAFG29 and confirmed the association between the 303-bp allele and POLL. To determine whether the same association was found in taurine breeds, we genotyped 334 animals of the Angus, Hereford and Limousin breeds and 376 animals of the Brangus, Droughtmaster and Santa Gertrudis composite taurine-zebu breeds. The association between the 303-bp allele and POLL was confirmed in these breeds; however, an additional allele (305 bp) was also associated but not fully predictive of POLL. Across the data, CSAFG29 was in sufficient linkage disequilibrium to the POLL allele in Australian Brahman cattle that it could potentially be used as a diagnostic marker in that breed, but this may not be the case in other breeds. Further, we provide confirmatory evidence that the scur phenotype generally occurs in animals that are heterozygous for the POLL allele. PMID:22497221

  1. Microsatellite marker isolation and development for the giant Pacific Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toussaint, Rebecca K.; Sage, G. Kevin; Talbot, Sandra L.; Scheel, David

    2012-01-01

    We isolated and developed 18 novel microsatellite markers for the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) and examined them for 31 individuals from Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. These loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 11 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 65%). Seven loci deviated from Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) due to heterozygote deficiency for the PWS population, although deviations were not observed for all these loci in other populations, suggesting the PWS population is not in mutation-drift equilibrium. These novel microsatellite loci yielded sufficient genetic diversity for potential use in population genetics, individual identification, and parentage studies.

  2. Characterization of microsatellite DNA markers for the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii: Primer note

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackler, J.C.; Van Den, Bussche, R. A.; Leslie, David M., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Two trinucleotide and seven tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated from an alligator snapping turtle Macrochelys temminckii. To assess the degree of variability in these nine microsatellite loci, we genotyped 174 individuals collected from eight river drainage basins in the southeastern USA. These markers revealed a moderate degree of allelic diversity (six to 16 alleles per locus) and observed heterozygosity (0.166-0.686). These polymorphic microsatellite loci provide powerful tools for population genetic studies for a species that is afforded some level of conservation protection in every state in which it occurs. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  3. Parental origin of the extra chromosome in Down's syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Magenis; K. M. Overton; J. Chamberlin; T. Brady; E. Lovrien

    1977-01-01

    Chromosome 21 fluorescent heteromorphisms were studied in 42 patients with Down's syndrome, their parents and their siblings. Included in this number are two instances of an aunt and niece affected with trisomy 21, and one of affected siblings. One case has a de novo 21\\/21 translocation. Blood group, red cell and serum protein markers were also studied for linkage, gene

  4. Limited usefulness of microsatellite markers from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae when applied to the closely related species Anopheles melas.

    PubMed

    Deitz, Kevin C; Reddy, Vamsi P; Reddy, Michael R; Satyanarayanah, Neha; Lindsey, Michael W; Overgaard, Hans J; Jawara, Musa; Caccone, Adalgisa; Slotman, Michel A

    2012-07-01

    Anopheles melas is a brackish water mosquito found in coastal West Africa where it is a dominant malaria vector locally. In order to facilitate genetic studies of this species, 45 microsatellite loci originally developed for Anopheles gambiae were sequenced in An. melas. Those that were suitable based on repeat number and flanking regions were examined in 2 natural populations from Equatorial Guinea. Only 15 loci were eventually deemed suitable as polymorphic markers in An. melas populations. These loci were screened in 4 populations from a wider geographic range. Heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.18 to 0.79, and 2.5-15 average alleles were observed per locus, yielding 13 highly polymorphic markers and 2 loci with lower variability. To examine the usefulness of microsatellite markers when applied in a sibling species, the original An. gambiae specific markers were used to amplify 5 loci in An. melas. Null alleles were found for 1 An. gambiae marker. We discuss the pitfalls of using microsatellite loci across closely related species and conclude that in addition to the problem of null alleles associated with this practice, many loci may prove to be of very limited use as polymorphic markers even when used in a sibling species. PMID:22593601

  5. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Uniparental genetic markers in South Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of uniparental systems in South Amerindians was undertaken. Variability in the Y-chromosome haplogroups were assessed in 68 populations and 1,814 individuals whereas that of Y-STR markers was assessed in 29 populations and 590 subjects. Variability in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup was examined in 108 populations and 6,697 persons, and sequencing studies used either the complete mtDNA genome or the highly variable segments 1 and 2. The diversity of the markers made it difficult to establish a general picture of Y-chromosome variability in the populations studied. However, haplogroup Q1a3a* was almost always the most prevalent whereas Q1a3* occurred equally in all regions, which suggested its prevalence among the early colonizers. The STR allele frequencies were used to derive a possible ancient Native American Q-clade chromosome haplotype and five of six STR loci showed significant geographic variation. Geographic and linguistic factors moderately influenced the mtDNA distributions (6% and 7%, respectively) and mtDNA haplogroups A and D correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with latitude. The data analyzed here provide rich material for understanding the biological history of South Amerindians and can serve as a basis for comparative studies involving other types of data, such as cultural data. PMID:22888284

  7. A powerful likelihood method for the analysis of linkage disequilibrium between trait loci and one or more polymorphic marker loci

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, J.D. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-01

    Historically, most methods for detecting linkage disequilibrium were designed for use with diallelic marker loci, for which the analysis is straightforward. With the advent of polymorphic markers with many alleles, the normal approach to their analysis has been either to extend the methodology for two-allele systems (leading to an increase in df and to a corresponding loss of power) or to select the allele believed to be associated and then collapse the other alleles, reducing, in a biased way, the locus to a diallelic system. I propose a likelihood-based approach to testing for linkage disequilibrium, an approach that becomes more conservative as the number of alleles increases, and as the number of markers considered jointly increases in a multipoint test for linkage disequilibrium, while maintaining high power. Properties of this method for detecting associations and fine mapping the location of disease traits are investigated. It is found to be, in general, more powerful than conventional methods, and it provides a tractable framework for the fine mapping of new disease loci. Application to the cystic fibrosis data of Kerem et al. is included to illustrate the method. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Generation of high frequency of novel alleles of the high molecular weight glutenin in somatic hybridization between bread wheat and tall wheatgrass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Liu, Shuwei; Xia, Guangmin

    2009-04-01

    Somatic hybridization between bread wheat and tall wheatgrass (Agropyron elongatum) has generated fertile introgression progenies with novel combinations of high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS). Most of these novel HMW-GS alleles were stably inherited. Sixteen HMW-GS sequences were PCR amplified from three introgression progeny lines and sequenced. The alignment of these sequences indicated that five, probably derived from point mutations of the parental genes, whereas eight likely represent the product of replication slippage. Three Glu-1Ay sequences appear to have lost the transposon presented in the parental gene. Two subunits carry an additional cysteine residue, which may be favorable to the quality of end-use product. We demonstrate that novel HMW-GS alleles can be rapidly generated via asymmetric somatic hybridization. PMID:19199095

  9. Numerical and exact solutions for continuum of alleles models.

    PubMed

    Waxman, D

    2003-03-01

    Two results are presented for problems involving alleles with a continuous range of effects. The first result is a simple yet highly accurate numerical method that determines the equilibrium distribution of allelic effects, moments of this distribution, and the mutational load. The numerical method is explicitly applied to the mutation-selection balance problem of stabilising selection. The second result is an exact solution for the distribution of allelic effects under weak stabilising selection for a particular distribution of mutant effects. The exact solution is shown to yield a distribution of allelic effects that, depending on the mutation rate, interpolates between the "House of Cards" approximation and the Gaussian approximation. The exact solution is also used to test the accuracy of the numerical method. PMID:12728334

  10. Effects of Favorable Alleles for Water-Soluble Carbohydrates at Grain Filling on Grain Weight under Drought and Heat Stresses in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoping; Li, Runzhi; Jing, Ruilian

    2014-01-01

    Drought, heat and other abiotic stresses during grain filling can result in reductions in grain weight. Conserved water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) at early grain filling play an important role in partial compensation of reduced carbon supply. A diverse population of 262 historical winter wheat accessions was used in the present study. There were significant correlations between 1000-grain weight (TGW) and four types of WSC, viz. (1) total WSC at the mid-grain filling stage (14 days after flowering) produced by leaves and non-leaf organs; (2) WSC contributed by current leaf assimilation during the mid-grain filling; (3) WSC in non-leaf organs at the mid-grain filling, excluding the current leaf assimilation; and (4) WSC used for respiration and remobilization during the mid-grain filling. Association and favorable allele analyses of 209 genome-wide SSR markers and the four types of WSC were conducted using a mixed linear model. Seven novel favorable WSC alleles exhibited positive individual contributions to TGW, which were verified under 16 environments. Dosage effects of pyramided favorable WSC alleles and significantly linear correlations between the number of favorable WSC alleles and TGW were observed. Our results suggested that pyramiding more favorable WSC alleles was effective for improving both WSC and grain weight in future wheat breeding programs. PMID:25036550

  11. Parasites and parallel divergence of the number of individual MHC alleles between sympatric three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus morphs in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Natsopoulou, M E; Pálsson, S; Ólafsdóttir, G Á

    2012-10-01

    Two pairs of sympatric three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus morphs and two single morph populations inhabiting mud and lava or rocky benthic habitats in four Icelandic lakes were screened for parasites and genotyped for MHC class IIB diversity. Parasitic infection differed consistently between G. aculeatus from different benthic habitats. Gasterosteus aculeatus from the lava or rocky habitats were more heavily infected in all lakes. A parallel pattern was also found in individual MHC allelic variation with lava G. aculeatus morphs exhibiting lower levels of variation than the mud morphs. Evidence for selective divergence in MHC allele number is ambiguous but supported by two findings in addition to the parallel pattern observed. MHC allele diversity was not consistent with diversity reported at neutral markers (microsatellites) and in Þingvallavatn the most common number of alleles in each morph was associated with lower infection levels. In the Þingvallavatn lava morph, lower infection levels by the two most common parasites, Schistocephalus solidus and Diplostomum baeri, were associated with different MHC allele numbers. PMID:23020569

  12. Distribution of MdACS3 null alleles in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) and its relevance to the fruit ripening characters

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Songling; Wang, Aide; Igarashi, Megumi; Kon, Tomoyuki; Fukasawa-Akada, Tomoko; Li, Tianzhong; Harada, Takeo; Hatsuyama, Yoshimichi

    2012-01-01

    Expression of MdACS3a, one of the ripening-related ACC synthase genes, plays a pivotal role in initiating the burst of ethylene production by MdACS1 in apple fruit. Although previous studies have demonstrated the presence of MdACS3a-null alleles through deficiency of transcription activity or loss of enzyme activity due to amino acid substitution, which may affect the storage properties of certain fruit cultivars, an overall picture of these null alleles in cultivars is still lacking. The present study investigated the distribution of null allelic genes in 103 cultivars and 172 breeding selections by using a simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker linked to them. The results indicated that both allelic genes were widely distributed throughout the examined cultivars and selections, some occurring as the null genotype, either homozygously or heterozygously, with each null allele. The implications of MdACS3a distribution results and the influence of its null allelotypes in fruit characters are discussed. PMID:23136513

  13. A mono-allelic bivalent chromatin domain controls tissue-specific imprinting at Grb10

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Lionel A; Chamberlain, Stormy; Sabourin, Jean-Charles; Henckel, Amandine; Magnuson, Terry; Hugnot, Jean-Philippe; Feil, Robert; Arnaud, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a developmental mechanism that mediates parent-of-origin-specific expression in a subset of genes. How the tissue specificity of imprinted gene expression is controlled remains poorly understood. As a model to address this question, we studied Grb10, a gene that displays brain-specific expression from the paternal chromosome. Here, we show in the mouse that the paternal promoter region is marked by allelic bivalent chromatin enriched in both H3K4me2 and H3K27me3, from early embryonic stages onwards. This is maintained in all somatic tissues, but brain. The bivalent domain is resolved upon neural commitment, during the developmental window in which paternal expression is activated. Our data indicate that bivalent chromatin, in combination with neuronal factors, controls the paternal expression of Grb10 in brain. This finding highlights a novel mechanism to control tissue-specific imprinting. PMID:18650936

  14. Precision of methods for calculating identity-by-descent matrices using multiple markers

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Anders Christian; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Windig, Jack J; Woolliams, John A

    2002-01-01

    A rapid, deterministic method (DET) based on a recursive algorithm and a stochastic method based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) for calculating identity-by-descent (IBD) matrices conditional on multiple markers were compared using stochastic simulation. Precision was measured by the mean squared error (MSE) of the relationship coefficients in predicting the true IBD relationships, relative to MSE obtained from using pedigree only. Comparisons were made when varying marker density, allele numbers, allele frequencies, and the size of full-sib families. The precision of DET was 75–99% relative to MCMC, but was not simply related to the informativeness of individual loci. For situations mimicking microsatellite markers or dense SNP, the precision of DET was ? 95% relative to MCMC. Relative precision declined for the SNP, but not microsatellites as marker density decreased. Full-sib family size did not affect the precision. The methods were tested in interval mapping and marker assisted selection, and the performance was very largely determined by the MSE. A multi-locus information index considering the type, number, and position of markers was developed to assess precision. It showed a marked empirical relationship with the observed precision for DET and MCMC and explained the complex relationship between relative precision and the informativeness of individual loci. PMID:12427386

  15. Highly Discriminatory Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Markers for Genotyping of Trichophyton interdigitale Strains

    PubMed Central

    Drira, Ines; Hadrich, Ines; Neji, Sourour; Mahfouth, Nedia; Trabelsi, Houaida; Sellami, Hayet; Makni, Fattouma

    2014-01-01

    Trichophyton interdigitale is the second most frequent cause of superficial fungal infections of various parts of the human body. Studying the population structure and genotype differentiation of T. interdigitale strains may lead to significant improvements in clinical practice. The present study aimed to develop and select suitable variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) markers for 92 clinical strains of T. interdigitale. On the basis of an analysis of four VNTR markers, four to eight distinct alleles were detected for each marker. The marker with the highest discriminatory power had eight alleles and a D value of 0.802. The combination of all four markers yielded a D value of 0.969 with 29 distinct multilocus genotypes. VNTR typing revealed the genetic diversity of the strains, identifying three populations according to their colonization sites. A correlation between phenotypic characteristics and multilocus genotypes was observed. Seven patients harbored T. interdigitale strains with different genotypes. Typing of clinical T. interdigitale samples by VNTR markers displayed excellent discriminatory power and 100% reproducibility. PMID:24989614

  16. Association Analysis of SSR Markers with Phenology, Grain, and Stover-Yield Related Traits in Pearl Millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.)

    PubMed Central

    Senapathy, Senthilvel; Chandra, Subhash; Muthiah, Arunachalam; Dhanapal, Arun Prabhu; Hash, Charles Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pearl millet is a staple food crop for millions of people living in the arid and semi-arid tropics. Molecular markers have been used to identify genomic regions linked to traits of interest by conventional QTL mapping and association analysis. Phenotypic recurrent selection is known to increase frequencies of favorable alleles and decrease those unfavorable for the traits under selection. This study was undertaken (i) to quantify the response to recurrent selection for phenotypic traits during breeding of the pearl millet open-pollinated cultivar “CO (Cu) 9” and its four immediate progenitor populations and (ii) to assess the ability of simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker alleles to identify genomic regions linked to grain and stover yield-related traits in these populations by association analysis. A total of 159 SSR alleles were detected across 34 selected single-copy SSR loci. SSR marker data revealed presence of subpopulations. Association analysis identified genomic regions associated with flowering time located on linkage group (LG) 6 and plant height on LG4, LG6, and LG7. Marker alleles on LG6 were associated with stover yield, and those on LG7 were associated with grain yield. Findings of this study would give an opportunity to develop marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or marker-assisted population improvement (MAPI) strategies to increase the rate of gain for pearl millet populations undergoing recurrent selection. PMID:24526909

  17. Robust Identification of Local Adaptation from Allele Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Torsten; Coop, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Comparing allele frequencies among populations that differ in environment has long been a tool for detecting loci involved in local adaptation. However, such analyses are complicated by an imperfect knowledge of population allele frequencies and neutral correlations of allele frequencies among populations due to shared population history and gene flow. Here we develop a set of methods to robustly test for unusual allele frequency patterns and correlations between environmental variables and allele frequencies while accounting for these complications based on a Bayesian model previously implemented in the software Bayenv. Using this model, we calculate a set of “standardized allele frequencies” that allows investigators to apply tests of their choice to multiple populations while accounting for sampling and covariance due to population history. We illustrate this first by showing that these standardized frequencies can be used to detect nonparametric correlations with environmental variables; these correlations are also less prone to spurious results due to outlier populations. We then demonstrate how these standardized allele frequencies can be used to construct a test to detect SNPs that deviate strongly from neutral population structure. This test is conceptually related to FST and is shown to be more powerful, as we account for population history. We also extend the model to next-generation sequencing of population pools—a cost-efficient way to estimate population allele frequencies, but one that introduces an additional level of sampling noise. The utility of these methods is demonstrated in simulations and by reanalyzing human SNP data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel populations and pooled next-generation sequencing data from Atlantic herring. An implementation of our method is available from http://gcbias.org. PMID:23821598

  18. Characterization of 215 simple sequence repeat markers in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.).

    PubMed

    Kubik, Christine; Honig, Joshua; Bonos, Stacy A

    2011-09-01

    Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) is a versatile, cross-pollinated, temperate and perennial turfgrass species. It occurs naturally in a wide variety of habitats and is also cultivated on golf courses, bowling greens and tennis courts worldwide. Isozymes and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) have been used to determine genetic diversity, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs) were used to construct a genetic linkage map of this species. In the current report, we developed and characterized 215 unique genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in creeping bentgrass. The SSRs reported here are the first available markers in creeping bentgrass to date. Eight hundred and eighteen alleles were amplified by 215 SSR loci, an average of 3.72 alleles per locus. Fifty-nine per cent of those alleles segregated in a 1:1 Mendelian fashion (P > 0.05). Twenty-two per cent had a distorted segregation ratio (P ? 0.05). These SSR markers will be useful for assessing genetic diversity in creeping bentgrass and will be important for the development of genetic linkage maps and identifying quantitative trait loci. These markers could enhance breeding programmes by improving the efficiency of selection techniques. PMID:21843299

  19. Somatic microsatellite variability as a predictive marker for colorectal cancer and liver cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Vaksman, Zalman; Garner, Harold R.

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites (MSTs) are short tandem repeated genetic motifs that comprise ~3% of the genome. MST instability (MSI), defined as acquired/lost primary alleles at a small subset of microsatellite loci (e.g. Bethesda markers), is a clinically relevant marker for colorectal cancer. However, these markers are not applicable to other types of cancers, specifically, for liver cancer which has a high mortality rate. Here we show that somatic MST variability (SMV), defined as the presence of additional, non-primary (aka minor) alleles at MST loci, is a complementary measure of MSI, and a genetic marker for colorectal and liver cancer. Re-analysis of Illumina sequenced exomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas indicates that SMV may distinguish a subpopulation of African American patients with colorectal cancer, which represents ~33% of the population in this study. Further, for liver cancer, a higher rate of SMV may be indicative of an earlier age of onset. The work presented here suggests that classical MSI should be expanded to include SMV, going beyond alterations of the primary alleles at a small number of microsatellite loci. This measure of SMV may represent a potential new diagnostic for a variety of cancers and may provide new information for colorectal cancer patients. PMID:25691061

  20. Allele frequencies of the new European Standard Set (ESS) loci in a population of Apulia (Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Piglionica, M; Baldassarra, S Lonero; Giardina, E; Tonino Marsella, L; Resta, N; Dell'Erba, A

    2013-02-01

    Allele frequencies of five miniSTRs loci (D1S1656, D2S441, D12S391, D10S1248 and D22S1045) included in the new European Standard Set (ESS) were calculated from a sample of 150 unrelated individuals from Apulia, a Region of Southern Italy. Two different PCR Amplification Kits were used, in order to evaluate the concordance of the genotypes. The results obtained with the two kits showed no differences in all genotype profiles. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was detected at either locus. Moreover genetic analysis using Fst estimation showed no evidence for differentiation at the five new loci between Apulia and Italian populations. The high levels of polymorphisms of the analyzed markers in the Apulian population allow to confirm that these markers are useful tools in paternity and forensic analysis from degraded DNA samples. PMID:23127759

  1. Regression Modeling of Allele Frequencies and Testing Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Schaid, Daniel J.; Sinnwell, Jason P.; Jenkins, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Tests for whether observed genotype proportions fit Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) are widely used in population genetics analyses, as well as to evaluate quality of genotype data. To date, all methods testing for HWE require subjects to be classified into discrete categories, yet it is becoming clear that the distribution of allele frequencies tends to be smooth over geographic regions. Methods To evaluate the HWE assumption, we develop new approaches to model allele frequencies as functions of covariates, and use these models to test whether there is residual correlation between the two alleles of subjects; lack of residual correlation supports the null hypothesis of HWE, but conditional on how the covariates influence the allele frequencies. Results By simulations, we illustrate that a simple statistical test of residual correlation of alleles adequately controls the Type-I error rate, while maintaining power that is comparable to standard tests for HWE. Conclusion Our approach can be implemented in standard software, enabling more flexible and powerful ways to evaluate the association of covariates with allele frequencies, and whether these associations “explain” departures from HWE when the covariates are ignored, opening new strategies to evaluate the quality of genotype data generated by next-generation sequencing assays. PMID:23328647

  2. MIF, MIF Alleles, and Prospects for Therapeutic Intervention in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an innate cytokine whose main actions include counter-regulating the immunosuppressive action of glucocorticoids and inhibiting activation-induced apoptosis. MIF is encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus and human genetic studies have shown significant relationships between high-expression MIF alleles, host inflammatory responses, and improved clinical outcome from infections. A recently completed candidate gene association study in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) indicates that individuals with a high-expression MIF allele have reduced incidence of SLE. Among patients with established disease however, those with end-organ complications have increased frequency of high-expression MIF alleles. Plasma MIF levels and Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulated MIF production also reflect the underlying MIF genotype. These data suggest that MIF exerts a dual influence on the immunopathogenesis of SLE: high-expression MIF alleles are associated with a reduced susceptibility to SLE, perhaps by enhancing clearance of autoimmunogenic pathogens; once SLE develops however, low-expression MIF alleles protect from ensuing inflammatory end-organ damage. These data thus provide an example of the potential evolutionary advantage of maintaining an autoimmunity susceptibility gene in the population in that high-expression MIF alleles may allow for a maximal anti-infective response despite risk of autoimmunity. These results also support the clinical feasibility of pharmacologic MIF antagonism as such therapies may be most effectively applied in those individuals who, on the basis of their genotype, manifest a MIF dependent form of autoimmunity. PMID:22968741

  3. ALEA: a toolbox for allele-specific epigenomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Younesy, Hamid; Möller, Torsten; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Cheng, Jeffrey B; Costello, Joseph F; Lorincz, Matthew C; Karimi, Mohammad M; Jones, Steven J M

    2014-01-21

    The assessment of expression and epigenomic status using sequencing based methods provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify and correlate allelic differences with epigenomic status. We present ALEA, a computational toolbox for allele-specific epigenomics analysis, which incorporates allelic variation data within existing resources, allowing for the identification of significant associations between epigenetic modifications and specific allelic variants in human and mouse cells. ALEA provides a customizable pipeline of command line tools for allele-specific analysis of next-generation sequencing data (ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, etc.) that takes the raw sequencing data and produces separate allelic tracks ready to be viewed on genome browsers. The pipeline has been validated using human and hybrid mouse ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data.Availability: The package, test data and usage instructions are available online at http://www.bcgsc.ca/platform/bioinfo/software/alea.Contact: mkarimi1@interchange.ubc.ca or sjones@bcgsc.ca SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24371156

  4. Genetic analysis of Candida albicans: identification of different isoleucine-valine, methionine, and arginine alleles by complementation.

    PubMed Central

    Kakar, S N; Magee, P T

    1982-01-01

    By using the spheroplast fusion technique as a tool for genetic analysis, we have demonstrated complementation among three of four isoleucine-valine mutants, two of three methionine mutants, and two arginine mutants of independent origin from two different Candida albicans isolates. The two adenine mutants derived from the same parent strain did not complement. Complementation resulted predominantly from heterokaryon formation and, in some cases, from heterozygote formation. In either case, most fusion products were unstable and showed nuclear as well as chromosomal segregation, in a few cases resulting in recombination of parental auxotrophic markers. However, some fusion products were fairly stable. PMID:7050083

  5. Determination of genetic relationships among shape Phaseolus vulgaris populations in a conical cross from RAPD marker analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yonghe Bai; T. E. Michaels; K. P. Pauls

    1998-01-01

    Random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to determine genetic relationships among Phaseolus vulgaris breeding populations. Genetic distances were calculated from the distribution of 317 RAPD markers among 8 parents, 10 individuals from 8 cycle-one populations, 10 individuals from 6 cycle-two populations and 10 individuals from 2 cycle-three populations of a conical cross. Genetic distances between populations and parents were

  6. Developing Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC) markers for population genetic studies in three Aedes disease vectors.

    PubMed

    White, Vanessa Linley; Endersby, Nancy Margaret; Chan, Janice; Hoffmann, Ary Anthony; Weeks, Andrew Raymond

    2015-03-01

    Aedes aegypti, Aedes notoscriptus, and Aedes albopictus are important vectors of many arboviruses implicated in human disease such as dengue fever. Genetic markers applied across vector species can provide important information on population structure, gene flow, insecticide resistance, and taxonomy, however, robust microsatellite markers have proven difficult to develop in these species and mosquitoes generally. Here we consider the utility and transferability of 15 Ribosome protein (Rp) Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC) markers for population genetic studies in these 3 Aedes species. Rp EPIC markers designed for Ae. aegypti also successfully amplified populations of the sister species, Ae. albopictus, as well as the distantly related species, Ae. notoscriptus. High SNP and good indel diversity in sequenced alleles plus support for amplification of the same regions across populations and species were additional benefits of these markers. These findings point to the general value of EPIC markers in mosquito population studies. PMID:24895297

  7. Molecular markers linked to the apple scab resistance gene Vbj derived from Malus baccata jackii.

    PubMed

    Gygax, M; Gianfranceschi, L; Liebhard, R; Kellerhals, M; Gessler, C; Patocchi, A

    2004-11-01

    Breeding for scab-resistant apple cultivars by pyramiding several resistance genes in the same genetic background is a promising way to control apple scab caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis. To achieve this goal, DNA markers linked to the genes of interest are required in order to select seedlings with the desired resistance allele combinations. For several apple scab resistance genes, molecular markers are already available; but until now, none existed for the apple scab resistance gene Vbj originating from the crab apple Malus baccata jackii. Using bulk segregant analysis, three RAPD markers linked to Vbj were first identified. These markers were transformed into more reliable sequence-characterised amplified region (SCAR) markers that proved to be co-dominant. In addition, three SSR markers and one SCAR were identified by comparing homologous linkage groups of existing genetic maps. Discarding plants showing genotype-phenotype incongruence (GPI plants) plants, a linkage map was calculated. Vbj mapped between the markers CH05e03 (SSR) and T6-SCAR, at 0.6 cM from CH05e03 and at 3.9 cM from T6-SCAR. Without the removal of the GPI plants, Vbj was placed 15 cM away from the closest markers. Problems and pitfalls due to GPI plants and the consequences for mapping the resistance gene accurately are discussed. Finally, the usefulness of co-dominant markers for pedigree analysis is also demonstrated. PMID:15365630

  8. [SSR markers linked with early stability in rice].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Jun; Ao, Guang-Hui; Wu, Xian-Jun; Li, Shi-Gui

    2005-08-01

    One hundred and thirty hybrids derived from the crosses between nine rice strains stabilized in early generation and seven cultivars (Oryza sativa L.). In their F2 populations, 32 uniform strains of different agronomic traits were observed. In the same combination of these uniform strains,there were strains segregating in the Mendelian manner. SSR markers analysis showed that F2 and F3 populations of the uniform strains and their F1 plants displayed the same markers indicating all the uniform strains were homozygous. All the marker bands of parents were simultaneously present on their progeny chromosomes, indicating that the uniform strains must true hybrid origin. The SSR markers of F2 population of segregating strains and their F1 plants showed that the segregating strains were heterzygosity. SSR marker band sites of RM276, RM258, RM248 and RM1 loci in most uniform strains presented at high frequencies bands site different from their parent's. We suggested that during the gamete formation,the genes that linked to ga-1, Rf and ga-8 mutated at certain frequency,and followed by a somatic meiosis of the fecundated zygote. Thus a haploid cell may develop into a homozygous embryo,and the F1 plant was homozygous and the progeny stabilized in early generation. PMID:16231739

  9. Estimation of the Genetic Diversity in Tetraploid Alfalfa Populations Based on RAPD Markers for Breeding Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Nagl, Nevena; Taski-Ajdukovic, Ksenija; Barac, Goran; Baburski, Aleksandar; Seccareccia, Ivana; Milic, Dragan; Katic, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Alfalfa is an autotetraploid, allogamous and heterozygous forage legume, whose varieties are synthetic populations. Due to the complex nature of the species, information about genetic diversity of germplasm used in any alfalfa breeding program is most beneficial. The genetic diversity of five alfalfa varieties, involved in progeny tests at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, was characterized based on RAPD markers. A total of 60 primers were screened, out of which 17 were selected for the analysis of genetic diversity. A total of 156 polymorphic bands were generated, with 10.6 bands per primer. Number and percentage of polymorphic loci, effective number of alleles, expected heterozygosity and Shannon’s information index were used to estimate genetic variation. Variety Zuzana had the highest values for all tested parameters, exhibiting the highest level of variation, whereas variety RSI 20 exhibited the lowest. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 88.39% of the total genetic variation was attributed to intra-varietal variance. The cluster analysis for individual samples and varieties revealed differences in their population structures: variety Zuzana showed a very high level of genetic variation, Banat and Ghareh were divided in subpopulations, while Pecy and RSI 20 were relatively uniform. Ways of exploiting the investigated germplasm in the breeding programs are suggested in this paper, depending on their population structure and diversity. The RAPD analysis shows potential to be applied in analysis of parental populations in semi-hybrid alfalfa breeding program in both, development of new homogenous germplasm, and identification of promising, complementary germplasm. PMID:21954370

  10. Genetic analysis of a local population of Oryza glumaepatula using SSR markers: implications for management and conservation programs.

    PubMed

    de Campos Vaz, Ana Rosa; de Oliveira Borba, Tereza Cristina; Brondani, Claudio; Rangel, Paulo Hideo Nakano; de Oliveira Camargo, Graziela Silvia; de Campos Telles, Mariana Pires; Filho, José Alexandre Felizola Diniz; Brondani, Rosana Pereira Vianello

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge of natural diversity and population structures of wild species, which might be related to cultivated species, is fundamental for conservation and breeding purposes. In this study, a genetic characterization of a large population of Oryza glumaepatula, occurring in a 10 km(2) area located at Tamengo Basin (Paraguay River, Brazil), was performed using SSR markers. This population is annually dragged from the river to permit navigation; one goal of this study was to examine the impact of this removal on genetic variability. From 18 polymorphic SSR markers, a total of 190 alleles were detected in a sample of 126 individuals, with an average of 10.3 alleles/locus, and a H(e) of 0.67. The five QTL-related markers showed an average H(e) value of 0.56, while the remaining 13 markers detected an average estimate of 0.70. An apparent outcrossing rate of 30%, a high proportion of alleles at low frequencies (56%), and the presence of exclusive alleles (9.5%) were found, with strong evidence of the establishment of individuals from different populations upstream in the Paraguay River. For conservation purposes, the river drag has no effect on the population. However, periodical seed collection from the Corumbá population can preserve part of the genetic variability present in upstream populations reducing the need for upriver collecting expeditions. PMID:19636802

  11. Evaluation of genetic diversity and pedigree within crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) cultivars using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity was estimated for 93 crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) cultivars (51 L. indica cultivars, 5 L. fauriei cultivars, and 37 interspecific hybrids) using 78 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. SSR loci were highly variable among the cultivars, detecting an average of 6.6 alleles per l...

  12. Efficient low-cost DNA extraction and multiplex fluorescent PCR method for marker-assisted selection in breeding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Frey; B. Frey; C. Sauer; M. Kellerhals

    2004-01-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is an increasingly important tool in current breeding efforts for improved crop plants and animal breeds. It enables detection of favourable alleles in early developmental stages and thus may result in substantial cost savings. Until now, however, the high costs of the required chemicals and materials, together with the still very labour-intensive methods, have been an obstacle

  13. Microsatellite DNA markers for assessing phylogeographic and population structure in Preble's meadow jumping mice (Zapus hudsonius preblei) and cross-amplification among neighbouring taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Young, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 14 tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA markers in Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei). The identified markers displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 4.9 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 55.1%). Genotypic and allelic frequencies in a collection of 30 individuals conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations and indicated no linkage disequilibrium. High levels of cross-amplification (95% overall) among neighbouring subspecies and two congeners (Zapus princeps and Zapus trinotatus) were observed. Multilocus genotypes resulting from these markers appear to provide ample genetic diversity for studies assessing individual- and population-level ecological interactions within Z. h. preblei and evolutionary relationships among neighbouring subspecies (Z. h. campestris, Z. h. intermedius, Z. h. pallidus and Z. h. luteus). ?? 2006 The Authors.

  14. Molecular analysis of Hurler syndrome in Druze and Muslim Arab patients in Israel: Multiple allelic mutations of the IDUA gene in a small geographic area

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, G. (Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel)); Moskowitz, S.M.; Tieu, P.T.; Matynia, A.; Neufeld, E.F. (Univ. of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The mutations underlying Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IH) in Druze and Muslim Israeli Arab patients have been characterized. Four alleles were identified, using a combination of (a) PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed RNA or genomic DNA segments, (b) cycle sequencing of PCR products, and (c) restriction-enzyme analysis. One allele has two amino acid substitutions, Gly[sub 409][yields]Arg in exon 9 and Ter[yields]Cys in exon 14. The other three alleles have mutations in exon 2 (Tyr[sub 64][yields]Ter), exon 7 (Gln[sub 310][yields]Ter), or exon 8 (Thr[sub 366][yields]Pro). Transfection of mutagenized cDNAs into Cos-1 cells showed that two missense mutations, Thr[sub 366][yields]Pro and Ter[yields]Cys, permitted the expression of only trace amounts of [alpha]-L-iduronidase activity, whereas Gly[sub 409][yields]Arg permitted the expression of 60% as much enzyme as did the normal cDNA. The nonsense mutations were associated with abnormalities of RNA processing: (1) both a very low level of mRNA and skipping of exon 2 for Tyr[sub 64][yields]Ter and (2) utilization of a cryptic splice site for Gln[sub 310][yields]Ter. In all instances, the probands were found homozygous, and the parents heterozygous, for the mutant alleles, as anticipated from the consanguinity in each family. The two-mutation allele was identified in a family from Gaza; the other three alleles were found in seven families, five of them Druze, residing in a very small area of northern Israel. Since such clustering suggests a classic founder effect, the presence of three mutant alleles of the IDUA gene was unexpected. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Transcriptome sequencing and marker development for four underutilized legumes1

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Combating threats to food and nutrition security in the context of climate change and global population increase is one of the highest priorities of major international organizations. Hundreds of species are grown on a small scale in some of the most drought/flood-prone regions of the world and as such may harbor some of the most environmentally tolerant crops (and alleles). • Methods and Results: In this study, transcriptomes were sequenced, assembled, and annotated for four underutilized legume crops. Microsatellite markers were identified in each species, as well as a conserved orthologous set of markers for cross-family phylogenetics and comparative mapping, which were ground-truthed on a panel of diverse legume germplasm. • Conclusions: An understanding of these underutilized legumes will inform crop selection and breeding by allowing the investigation of genetic variation and the genetic basis of adaptive traits to be established. PMID:25699221

  16. Comparison of SSR and SNP Markers in Estimation of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Indian Rice Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Sundeep; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Tyagi, R. K.; Singh, N. K.; Singh, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphic (SNP), the two most robust markers for identifying rice varieties were compared for assessment of genetic diversity and population structure. Total 375 varieties of rice from various regions of India archived at the Indian National GeneBank, NBPGR, New Delhi, were analyzed using thirty six genetic markers, each of hypervariable SSR (HvSSR) and SNP which were distributed across 12 rice chromosomes. A total of 80 alleles were amplified with the SSR markers with an average of 2.22 alleles per locus whereas, 72 alleles were amplified with SNP markers. Polymorphic information content (PIC) values for HvSSR ranged from 0.04 to 0.5 with an average of 0.25. In the case of SNP markers, PIC values ranged from 0.03 to 0.37 with an average of 0.23. Genetic relatedness among the varieties was studied; utilizing an unrooted tree all the genotypes were grouped into three major clusters with both SSR and SNP markers. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that maximum diversity was partitioned between and within individual level but not between populations. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) with SSR markers showed that genotypes were uniformly distributed across the two axes with 13.33% of cumulative variation whereas, in case of SNP markers varieties were grouped into three broad groups across two axes with 45.20% of cumulative variation. Population structure were tested using K values from 1 to 20, but there was no clear population structure, therefore Ln(PD) derived ?k was plotted against the K to determine the number of populations. In case of SSR maximum ?k was at K=5 whereas, in case of SNP maximum ?k was found at K=15, suggesting that resolution of population was higher with SNP markers, but SSR were more efficient for diversity analysis. PMID:24367635

  17. Imprinting of human H19: allele-specific CpG methylation, loss of the active allele in Wilms tumor, and potential for somatic allele switching.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Shields, T; Crenshaw, T; Hao, Y; Moulton, T; Tycko, B

    1993-01-01

    Genomic imprinting and monoallelic gene expression appear to play a role in human genetic disease and tumorigenesis. The human H19 gene, at chromosome 11p15, has previously been shown to be monoallelically expressed. Since CpG methylation has been implicated in imprinting, we analyzed methylation of H19 DNA. In fetal and adult organs the transcriptionally silent H19 allele was extensively hypermethylated through the entire gene and its promoter, and, consistent with a functional role for DNA methylation, expression of an H19 promoter-reporter construct was inhibited by in vitro methylation. Gynogenetic ovarian teratomas were found to contain only hypomethylated H19 DNA, suggesting that the expressed H19 allele might be maternal. This was confirmed by analysis of 11p15 polymorphisms in a patient with Wilms tumor. The tumor had lost the maternal 11p15, and H19 expression in the normal kidney was exclusively from this allele. Imprinting of human H19 appears to be susceptible to tissue-specific modulation in somatic development; in one individual, cerebellar cells were found to express only the otherwise silent allele. Implications of these findings for the role of DNA methylation in imprinting and for H19 as a candidate imprinted tumor-suppressor gene are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8391213

  18. Staphylococcus aureus clfB and spa alleles of the repeat regions are segregated into major phylogenetic lineages.

    PubMed

    Basset, Patrick; Hammer, Nevena Basic; Kuhn, Gerrit; Vogel, Valérie; Sakwinska, Olga; Blanc, Dominique S

    2009-09-01

    To reliably differentiate among Staphylococcus aureus isolates we recently developed the Double Locus Sequence Typing (DLST) based on the analysis of partial sequences of clfB and spa genes. This method is highly discriminatory and gives unambiguous definition of types. The highly clonal population structure of S. aureus suggests that isolates with identical clfB or spa alleles belong to the same clonal complex (CC) defined by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). To test this hypothesis as well as to investigate putative intra-CC genetic structure, we analyzed a total of 289 isolates (186 MSSA and 103 MRSA) with DLST-, spa- and MLST-typing. Among the 289 strains, 242 were clustered into 7 major MLST CCs, 40 into minor CCs and 7 were not grouped into CCs. A total of 205 DLST- and 129 spa-types were observed. With one exception, all DLST-clfB, DLST-spa and spa-type alleles were segregated into CCs. DLST-types sharing an identical allele (clfB or spa) were clustered using eBURST. Except for one strain, all isolates from each DLST cluster belonged to the same CC. However, using both DLST- and spa-typing we were not able to disclose a clear intra-CC structure. Nevertheless, the high diversity of these loci confirmed that they are good markers for local epidemiological investigations. PMID:19559820

  19. Parents Come to Class

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kelly Gooden

    2003-01-01

    Are you challenged to involve parents in your school's science curriculum? Ridgecrest Elementary School in Hyattsville, Maryland, tackled that issue and found a successful solution in an exciting program called "Playtime Is Science" (Sprung, Froschl, and Colon 1997). This program trains parent volunteers as "coteachers" to help classroom teachers facilitate learning in specific science units and also encourages parental participation in the school at all levels.

  20. Parent Abuse: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Kennair; David Mellor

    2007-01-01

    A recent focus of research and clinical practice has been on the issue of abuse of parents by their children (parent abuse).\\u000a This paper reviews the literature on this phenomenon. While parent abuse falls under the umbrella of family violence, it appears\\u000a to be qualitatively different from other forms of intra-family abuse. Research has primarily focused on prevalence rates and

  1. Allele-Specific Network Reveals Combinatorial Interaction That Transcends Small Effects in Psoriasis GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Climer, Sharlee; Templeton, Alan R.; Zhang, Weixiong

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of genetic markers have shown associations with various complex diseases, yet the “missing heritability” remains alarmingly elusive. Combinatorial interactions may account for a substantial portion of this missing heritability, but their discoveries have been impeded by computational complexity and genetic heterogeneity. We present BlocBuster, a novel systems-level approach that efficiently constructs genome-wide, allele-specific networks that accurately segregate homogenous combinations of genetic factors, tests the associations of these combinations with the given phenotype, and rigorously validates the results using a series of unbiased validation methods. BlocBuster employs a correlation measure that is customized for single nucleotide polymorphisms and returns a multi-faceted collection of values that captures genetic heterogeneity. We applied BlocBuster to analyze psoriasis, discovering a combinatorial pattern with an odds ratio of 3.64 and Bonferroni-corrected p-value of 5.01×10?16. This pattern was replicated in independent data, reflecting robustness of the method. In addition to improving prediction of disease susceptibility and broadening our understanding of the pathogenesis underlying psoriasis, these results demonstrate BlocBuster's potential for discovering combinatorial genetic associations within heterogeneous genome-wide data, thereby transcending the limiting “small effects” produced by individual markers examined in isolation. PMID:25233071

  2. Recycling parental sexual messages.

    PubMed

    Darling, C A; Hicks, M W

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore parent-child sexual communication by investigating the impact of direct and indirect parental messages on the sexual attitudes and sexual satisfaction of young adults. A survey research design was used to obtain data from undergraduate students attending a large Southern university. The findings indicate that both direct and indirect parental sexual messages are negative and restrictive and have a differential impact on sexual satisfaction and sexual attitudes. While sexual satisfaction was positive, sexual attitudes were found to be problematic, especially among females. Suggestions are given for approaches that family life educators and parents may use in order to recycle previous sexual messages. PMID:6631981

  3. High resolution mapping of candidate alleles for desiccation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster under selection.

    PubMed

    Telonis-Scott, Marina; Gane, Madeleine; DeGaris, Sarah; Sgrò, Carla M; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2012-05-01

    The ability to counter periods of low humidity is an important determinant of distribution range in Drosophila. Climate specialists with low physiological tolerance to desiccation stress are restricted to the tropics and may lack the ability to further increase resistance through evolution. Although the physiological adaptations to desiccation stress are well studied in Drosophila and other ectotherms, factors underlying evolutionary responses remain unknown because of a paucity of genetic data. We address this issue by mapping evolutionary shifts in D. melanogaster under selection for desiccation resistance. Genomic DNA from five independent replicate selected, and control lines were hybridized to high density Affymetrix Drosophila tiling arrays resulting in the detection of 691 single feature polymorphisms (SFPs) differing between the treatments. While randomly distributed throughout the genome, the SFPs formed specific clusters according to gene ontology. These included genes involved in ion transport and respiratory system development that provide candidates for evolutionary changes involving excretory and respiratory water balance. Changes to genes related to neuronal control of cell signaling, development, and gene regulation provide candidates to explore novel biological processes in stress resistance. Sequencing revealed the nucleotide shifts in a subset of the SFPs and highlighted larger regions of genomic diversity surrounding SFPs. The association between natural desiccation resistance and a 463-bp region of the 5' promoter region of the Dys gene undergoing allele frequency changes in response to selection in the experimental evolution lines was tested in an independent population from Coffs Harbour, Australia. The allele frequencies of 23 SNPs common to the two populations were inferred from the parents of the 10% most and 10% least resistant Coffs Harbour flies. The frequencies of the selected alleles were higher at all sites, with three sites significantly associated with the resistant Coffs Harbour flies. This study illustrates how rapid mapping can be used for discovering natural molecular variants associated with survival to low humidity and provides a wealth of candidate alleles to explore the genetic basis of physiological differences among resistant and susceptible Drosophila populations and species. PMID:22130970

  4. Characterization of disomic addition lines Brassica napus-Brassica nigra by isozyme, fatty acid, and RFLP markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Chevre; P. This; F. Eber; M. Deschamps; M. Renard; M. Delseny; C. F. Quiros

    1991-01-01

    Six Brassica napus — B. nigra disomic addition lines were characterized by isozyme, fatty acid, and RFLP markers. The markers were arranged in six synteny groups, representing six of the eight chromosomes present in the B. nigra genome. Synteny group 1 displayed high levels of linoleic and linolenic acids in the seeds of the B. nigra parent. Synteny group 3

  5. Late adolescent perceptions of parent religiosity and parenting processes.

    PubMed

    Snider, J Blake; Clements, Andrea; Vazsonyi, Alexander T

    2004-12-01

    The current investigation examined the relations between adolescent reports of parent religiosity and parenting processes, using both a dimensional and a typological conceptualization of parenting. Self-report data were collected from 357 late adolescents. Partial correlations indicated that parent religiosity was associated with both parenting dimensions and parenting styles in conceptually expected directions. Regression analyses provided evidence that the dimensional conceptualization of parenting explained additional variability in perceived parental religiosity above and beyond parenting style effects. Findings suggest that a dimensional conceptualization of parenting processes extends the literature on parent religiosity because it yields more nuanced information about how parental religiosity may be related to differentiated parenting behaviors. Potential therapeutic implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:15605980

  6. Microsatellite null alleles in parentage analysis EE Dakin and JC Avise

    E-print Network

    Avise, John

    is the presence of null alleles that fail to amplify to detected levels in the PCR assays. Here we examine 233 alleles, and we review how these purported nulls were detected and handled in the data analyses. We also the human ABO blood group system, wherein the O allele is a null allele that produces no phenotype (ie

  7. An Evaluation of Evolutionary Constraints on Microsatellite Loci Using Nd Alleles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tovi Lehmann; William A. Hawley

    1996-01-01

    A test to evaluate constraints on the evolution of single microsatellite loci is described. The test assumes that microsatellite alleles that share the same flanking sequence constitute a series of alleles with a common descent that is distinct from alleles with a mutation in the flanking sequence. Thus two or more different series of alleles at a given locus represent

  8. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 1: Children and Parenting. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with different types of parents and the forces that shape parenting, this volume, the first of five volumes on parenting, deals specifically with parent-child relationships throughout the lifespan and the parenting of children of different physical, behavioral, and intellectual needs. The volume consists of the following 14 chapters: (1)…

  9. Parenting Training for Intellectually Disabled Parents: A Cochrane Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coren, Esther; Thomae, Manuela; Hutchfield, Jemeela

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a Cochrane/Campbell systematic review of the evidence on the effect of parent training to support the parenting of parents with intellectual disabilities. Method: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing parent training interventions for parents with intellectual disability with usual care or with a control…

  10. Parenting Styles and Conceptions of Parental Authority during Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1995-01-01

    Reports of parenting styles were assessed in 100 mostly white, middle-class, 6th, 8th, and 10th graders and their parents. Adolescents viewed their parents as more permissive and more authoritarian than parents viewed themselves, whereas parents viewed themselves as more authoritative than did adolescents. Differences were primarily over the…

  11. Some Effects of Parent Education On Parents and Their Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary P. Endres; Merry J. Evans

    1968-01-01

    The effects of a parent education program on knowledge, atti tudes, and overt behavior of parents and self-concepts of their children were studied. Three randomized groups of fourth grade children and their respective parents comprised the experimental, placebo, and control groups. After the parents in the experimental group received parent education, several types of data were ob tained. Analyses of

  12. Family and Relationship Influences on Parenting Behaviors of Young Parents

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Trace; Murphy, Alexandrea; Lewis, Jessica; Divney, Anna; Albritton, Tashuna; Magriples, Urania; Gordon, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Assess the influence of relationship and family factors during pregnancy on parenting behavior 6 months postpartum among low-income young parents. Methods 434 young expectant couples were recruited from obstetrics clinics during pregnancy and followed 6-months postpartum. Using a series of general estimating equations to control for the correlated nature of the data, we assessed the influence of relationship factors (e.g., relationship satisfaction, attachment) and family factors (e.g., family functioning, family history) during pregnancy on parenting (e.g., parenting involvement, time spent caregiving, parenting experiences, and parenting sense of competence) 6 months postpartum controlling for covariates. Results Relationship functioning related to parenting involvement, caregiving, parenting experiences, and parenting sense of competence. In addition, several family factors related to parenting. Mother involvement during childhood was related to more parenting involvement, parenting positive experiences, and parenting sense of competence. History of being spanked as a child related to less time spent caregiving and less positive life change from being a parent. Further, gender significantly moderated the associations between relationship and family factors and parenting behavior. Male’ parenting behavior was more influenced by relationship and family factors than females. Conclusions This study suggests the importance of relationship and family contexts for parenting behaviors of young mothers and fathers, highlighting the potential utility of involving both young mothers and fathers in parenting programs, and developing interventions that focus on strengthening young parents’ romantic relationships and that address negative parenting experienced during childhood. PMID:24113495

  13. DNA marker C04107 for copper toxicosis in a population of Bedlington terriers in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Holmes, N G; Herrtage, M E; Ryder, E J; Binns, M M

    1998-04-01

    The DNA microsatellite marker C04107, linked to the Bedlington terrier copper toxicosis locus, is used diagnostically in the USA to detect the disease allele. This marker has been typed in Bedlington terriers of known disease status in the United Kingdom, and it is concluded that it should be useful in eradicating the disease from the breed in the UK. The marker also identified a dog which had been diagnosed on the basis of a liver biopsy as having the disease, as being unaffected; a second liver biopsy confirmed that the dog did not have copper toxicosis. PMID:9587195

  14. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  15. Underground Utilities Flag Markers

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    Underground Utilities Flag Markers CALL 3 WORK DAYS BEFORE DIGGING Diggers Hotline: 1-800-242-8511 RED - electric power lines, cables, conduit and light- ing cables YELLOW - gas, oil, steam, petroleum or deeper Do not allow water to accu- mulate Competent person must be on site and have authority to remedy

  16. Original article Microsatellite markers

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Microsatellite markers and management of brown trout Salmo trutta fario, Salmo trutta fario, dans le sud-ouest de la France. La truite commune peu- plant l'ouest des Pyrénées fish, and especially the brown trout (Salmo trutta fario L.), present some interesting biological

  17. Selection of high heterozygosity popcorn varieties in Brazil based on SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Eloi, I B O; Mangolin, C A; Scapim, C A; Gonçalves, C S; Machado, M F P S

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed genetic structure and diversity among eight populations of popcorn, using SSR loci as genetic markers. Our objectives were to select SSR loci that could be used to estimate genetic diversity within popcorn populations, and to analyze the genetic structure of promising populations with high levels of heterozygosity that could be used in breeding programs. Fifty-seven alleles (3.7 alleles per locus) were detected; the highest effective number of alleles (4.21) and the highest gene diversity (0.763) were found for the Umc2226 locus. A very high level of population differentiation was found (F(ST) = 0.3664), with F(ST) for each locus ranging from 0.1029 (Umc1664) to 0.6010 (Umc2350). This analysis allowed us to identify SSR loci with high levels of heterozygosity and heterozygous varieties, which could be selected for production of inbred lines and for developing new cultivars. PMID:22869541

  18. Megagametophyte-derived linkage maps of white spruce ( Picea glauca ) based on RAPD, SCAR and ESTP markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Gosselin; Y. Zhou; J. Bousquet; N. Isabel

    2002-01-01

    We have constructed linkage maps for two parents of white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss]. Haploid megagametophytes from 92 and 96 seeds of parents M2 and 80132, respectively, were analysed with RAPD, SCAR and ESTP markers. Fragments segregating in a 1:1 Mendelian ratio were classified and mapped using MAPMAKER, GMENDEL and JOINMAP. For M2, the analysis with JOINMAP resulted in

  19. RNA-Seq Using Two Populations Reveals Genes and Alleles Controlling Wood Traits and Growth in Eucalyptus nitens

    PubMed Central

    Thavamanikumar, Saravanan; Southerton, Simon; Thumma, Bala

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus nitens is a perennial forest tree species grown mainly for kraft pulp production in many parts of the world. Kraft pulp yield (KPY) is a key determinant of plantation profitability and increasing the KPY of trees grown in plantations is a major breeding objective. To speed up the breeding process, molecular markers that can predict KPY are desirable. To achieve this goal, we carried out RNA-Seq studies on trees at extremes of KPY in two different trials to identify genes and alleles whose expression correlated with KPY. KPY is positively correlated with growth measured as diameter at breast height (DBH) in both trials. In total, six RNA bulks from two treatments were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq platform. At 5% false discovery rate level, 3953 transcripts showed differential expression in the same direction in both trials; 2551 (65%) were down-regulated and 1402 (35%) were up-regulated in low KPY samples. The genes up-regulated in low KPY trees were largely involved in biotic and abiotic stress response reflecting the low growth among low KPY trees. Genes down-regulated in low KPY trees mainly belonged to gene categories involved in wood formation and growth. Differential allelic expression was observed in 2103 SNPs (in 1068 genes) and of these 640 SNPs (30%) occurred in 313 unique genes that were also differentially expressed. These SNPs may represent the cis-acting regulatory variants that influence total gene expression. In addition we also identified 196 genes which had Ka/Ks ratios greater than 1.5, suggesting that these genes are under positive selection. Candidate genes and alleles identified in this study will provide a valuable resource for future association studies aimed at identifying molecular markers for KPY and growth. PMID:24967893

  20. RNA-Seq using two populations reveals genes and alleles controlling wood traits and growth in Eucalyptus nitens.

    PubMed

    Thavamanikumar, Saravanan; Southerton, Simon; Thumma, Bala

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus nitens is a perennial forest tree species grown mainly for kraft pulp production in many parts of the world. Kraft pulp yield (KPY) is a key determinant of plantation profitability and increasing the KPY of trees grown in plantations is a major breeding objective. To speed up the breeding process, molecular markers that can predict KPY are desirable. To achieve this goal, we carried out RNA-Seq studies on trees at extremes of KPY in two different trials to identify genes and alleles whose expression correlated with KPY. KPY is positively correlated with growth measured as diameter at breast height (DBH) in both trials. In total, six RNA bulks from two treatments were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq platform. At 5% false discovery rate level, 3953 transcripts showed differential expression in the same direction in both trials; 2551 (65%) were down-regulated and 1402 (35%) were up-regulated in low KPY samples. The genes up-regulated in low KPY trees were largely involved in biotic and abiotic stress response reflecting the low growth among low KPY trees. Genes down-regulated in low KPY trees mainly belonged to gene categories involved in wood formation and growth. Differential allelic expression was observed in 2103 SNPs (in 1068 genes) and of these 640 SNPs (30%) occurred in 313 unique genes that were also differentially expressed. These SNPs may represent the cis-acting regulatory variants that influence total gene expression. In addition we also identified 196 genes which had Ka/Ks ratios greater than 1.5, suggesting that these genes are under positive selection. Candidate genes and alleles identified in this study will provide a valuable resource for future association studies aimed at identifying molecular markers for KPY and growth. PMID:24967893

  1. An allelic series for the chalcone synthase locus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Saslowsky, D E; Dana, C D; Winkel-Shirley, B

    2000-09-19

    Five new alleles of the Arabidopsis chalcone synthase (CHS) locus, tt4, have been characterized at the gene, protein, and end product levels as a genetic approach to understanding structure-function relationships in a key enzyme of plant secondary metabolism. Together with two previously described mutants, these tt4 lines represent one of the first allelic series for a central enzyme of the flavonoid pathway and include both null alleles and alleles with leaky, apparently temperature-sensitive, phenotypes. A variety of effects on accumulation of CHS protein and flavonoid glycosides were observed among these lines, including alterations in the apparent stability and activity of the enzyme. Assembly of the CHS homodimer also appeared to be impacted in several cases. A three-dimensional model of the Arabidopsis CHS protein, based on the recently determined structure for alfalfa CHS, predicts significant effects on protein structure or folding for several of the mutations. This allelic series should provide a useful genetic resource for ongoing studies of flavonoid enzyme structure, function, and subcellular organization. PMID:11024274

  2. Molecular evolution of alleles of the glycophorin A gene.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Hajime; Akane, Atsushi; Shiono, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Kento

    2002-03-01

    Highly-homologous Glycophorin A (GPA), B and E genes are triplicate genes, and involve many subtypes and minor antigens constructing the Miltenberger subsystem. These genes and most of the variants are hypothesized to arise by recombination, because hot spots are located in the gene sequences. By sequencing exons 1-7 and introns 1-3 of standard alleles of GPA gene, M and N alleles were classified into six variations: provisionally called MN*M101, M102, M201, M202, N101 and N102 in our previous study. Here we further investigated the sequences of introns 4-6 using GPA gene-specific primers and by DNA sequencing, and found eight, five and nine new nucleotide substitutions or deletions in introns 4, 5 and 6, respectively. Using the computer program PHYLIP 3.5, the phylogenetic trees were reconstructed. Phylogenetic analysis of the allele sequences revealed that M200s alleles arose from M101 after the separation of M101 and N101 and branched to M201 and M202 via the accumulation of point mutations. M102 and N102 alleles were estimated to generate via recombination between M101 and N101 occurred around the hot spot. The findings also suggested the existence of other GPA variants with normal antigenicity, and are quite useful in the forensic and anthropological fields. PMID:12935686

  3. Foster Parents’ Involvement in Authoritative Parenting and Interest in Future Parenting Training

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith A. King; Linda K. Kraemer; Amy L. Bernard; Rebecca A. Vidourek

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed 191 Southwest Ohio foster parents regarding their involvement in authoritative parenting and interest for additional\\u000a parenting education. Our results showed that most respondents reported using an authoritative parenting style and were interested\\u000a in receiving future training. Involvement in authoritative parenting differed significantly based on level of education and\\u000a number of years as a foster parent. Foster parents with

  4. Life Marker Chip consortium The Life Marker Chip (LMC)

    E-print Network

    Life Marker Chip consortium The Life Marker Chip (LMC) experiment on ExoMars 7th Appleton Space, Cranfield University #12;How to detect evidence of Life in on Mars? Photo: Karl Johaentges #12;ESA's ExoMars rover (CGI version 2010) Life Marker Chip Flight Model design (early 2010) Lateral flow immunoassay (e

  5. [Analysis of genetic diversity of Russian regional populations based on common STR markers used in DNA identification].

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    We conducted the first genetic analysis of a wide a range of rural Russian populations in European Russia with a panel of common DNA markers commonly used in criminalistics genetic identification. We examined a total of 647 samples from indigenous ethnic Russian populations in Arkhangelsk, Belgorod, Voronezh, Kursk, Rostov, Ryazan, and Orel regions. We employed a multiplex genotyping kit, COrDIS Plus, to genotype Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci, which included the genetic marker panel officially recommended for DNA identification in the Russian Federation, the United States, and the European Union. In the course of our study, we created a database of allelic frequencies, examined the distribution of alleles and genotypes in seven rural Russian populations, and defined the genetic relationships between these populations. We found that, although multidimensional analysis indicated a difference between the Northern gene pool and the rest of the Russian European populations, a pairwise comparison using 19 STR markers among all populations did not reveal significant differences. This is in concordance with previous studies, which examined up to 12 STR markers of urban Russian populations. Therefore, the database of allelic frequencies created in this study can be applied for forensic examinations and DNA identification among the ethnic Russian population over European Russia. We also noted a decrease in the levels of heterozygosity in the northern Russian population compared to ethnic populations in southern and central Russia, which is consistent with trends identified previously using classical gene markers and analysis of mitochondrial DNA. PMID:25715463

  6. Exploring genetic variability within lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and across related legumes using a newly developed set of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Sharma, Tilak R; Srivastava, Prem S; Abdin, M Z; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2014-09-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an economically important grain legume, yet the genetic and genomic resources remain largely uncharacterized and unexploited in this crop. Microsatellites have become markers of choice for crop improvement applications. Hence, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for lentil through the construction of genomic library enriched for GA/CT motifs. As a result 122 functional SSR primer pairs were developed from 151 microsatellite loci and validated in L. culinaris cv. Precoz. Thirty three SSR markers were utilized for the analysis of genetic relationships between cultivated and wild species of Lens and related legumes. A total of 123 alleles were amplified at 33 loci ranging from 2-5 alleles with an average of 3.73 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC) for all the loci ranged from 0.13 to 0.99 with an average of 0.66 per locus. Varied levels of cross genera transferability were obtained ranging from 69.70 % across Pisum sativum to 12.12 % across Vigna radiata. The UPGMA based dendrogram was able to establish the uniqueness of each genotype and grouped them into two major clusters clearly resolving the genetic relationships within lentil and related species. The new set of SSR markers reported here were efficient and highly polymorphic and would add to the existing repertoire of lentil SSR markers to be utilized in molecular breeding. Moreover, the improved knowledge about intra- and inter-specific genetic relationships would facilitate germplasm utilization for lentil improvement. PMID:24893599

  7. Polymorphic microsatellite markers for a wind-dispersed tropical tree species, Triplaris cumingiana (Polygonaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Na; Dick, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Novel microsatellite markers were characterized in the wind-dispersed and dioecious neotropical tree Triplaris cumingiana (Polygonaceae) for use in understanding the ecological processes and genetic impacts of pollen- and seed-mediated gene flow in tropical forests. • Methods and Results: Sixty-two microsatellite primer pairs were screened, from which 12 markers showing five or more alleles per locus (range 5–17) were tested on 47 individuals. Observed and expected heterozygosities averaged 0.692 and 0.731, respectively. Polymorphism information content was between 0.417 and 0.874. Linkage disequilibrium was observed in one of the 66 pairwise comparisons between loci. Two loci showed deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. An additional 14 markers exhibiting lower polymorphism were characterized on a smaller number of individuals. • Conclusions: These microsatellite markers have high levels of polymorphism and reproducibility and will be useful in studying gene flow and population structure in T. cumingiana. PMID:25225632

  8. Development of 12 chloroplast microsatellite markers in Vigna unguiculata (Fabaceae) and amplification in Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lei; Li, Yi; Guo, Rui; Wu, Hua; Hu, Zhihui; Chen, Chanyou

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Vigna unguiculata is an economically important legume, and the complexity of its variability and evolution needs to be further understood. Based on publicly available databases, we developed chloroplast microsatellite primers to investigate genetic diversity within V. unguiculata and its related species Phaseolus vulgaris. • Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 62 V. unguiculata individuals. The number of alleles per locus varied between two and four, the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.123 to 0.497, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.114 to 0.369. In cross-species amplifications, nine of these markers showed polymorphism in 29 P. vulgaris individuals. • Conclusions: The newly developed chloroplast microsatellite markers exhibit variation in V. unguiculata as well as their transferability in P. vulgaris. These markers can be used to investigate genetic diversity and evolution in V. unguiculata and P. vulgaris. PMID:25202608

  9. Isolation, characterization, and cross-transferability of microsatellite markers from the whitebacked planthopper (Sogatella furcifera).

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Li, G; He, G C; Zhu, L L; Qin, R; Jing, S L

    2014-01-01

    The whitebacked planthopper Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) is one of the most harmful pests of rice. In this study, 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed from S. furcifera genomic libraries using the fast isolation by amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeat protocols. Microsatellite polymorphism was investigated using 32 individuals from one natural population. These 18 simple sequence repeat markers showed a number of alleles that ranged from 3 to 15 and had observed and expected heterozygosities that ranged from 0.094 to 0.871 and from 0.148 to 0.924, respectively. The high cross-species transferability of these markers was evaluated in three other planthopper species: Nilaparvata lugens, N. muiri China, and N. bakeri (Muir). These microsatellite markers will provide powerful tools for population genetic and ecological studies of this pest and its related species in the future. PMID:25158251

  10. Simple sequence repeat markers for the endangered species Clianthus puniceus and C. maximus (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Houliston, Gary J.; Ramón-Laca, Ana; Jain, Reema; Mitchell, Caroline M.; Goeke, Dagmar F.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Clianthus puniceus using a shotgun sequencing library and tested for cross amplification in the closely related C. maximus to inform population management of these two endangered species. • Methods and Results: We constructed a shotgun sequencing library using a Roche 454 sequencer and searched the resulting data set for putative microsatellite regions. We optimized 12 of these regions to produce polymorphic markers for Clianthus. We tested these markers on four populations of C. maximus and on four C. puniceus individuals of known provenance. Alleles per locus ranged from two to nine, while observed and expected heterozygosities per locus ranged from 0.000 to 1.000 and 0.178 to 0.600, respectively. • Conclusions: These markers will be valuable for ongoing monitoring of the genetic variation in naturally occurring populations of Clianthus and for the selection of individuals for revegetation projects in the species’ former range. PMID:25606358

  11. Development and characterisation of nine polymorphic microsatellite markers for Tephrosia calophylla Bedd. (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Lakshmi, P.; Kumar, Devinder; Shaik, Jilani P.; Alanazi, Mohammed; Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan

    2014-01-01

    Tephrosia calophylla Bedd. (Fabaceae) is an endangered tropical plant endemic to southwestern Ghats, India. The objective of this study was to contribute to the characterisation of the diversity of this rare species, which is necessary for its future conservation. Accordingly, microsatellite markers were designed, and their ability to detect polymorphisms was determined. Nine microsatellite markers were developed using genomic libraries, and all of the markers were successfully amplified in 42 individuals. Three to nine alleles per locus were observed, and the heterozygosity of the loci ranged from 0.381 to 0.905. The nine newly developed polymorphic markers recognise a sufficient number of varying loci to perform further studies on the conservation and breeding of this medicinal cultivar. PMID:25737647

  12. Identification of molecular markers linked to adult plant leaf rust resistance gene Lr48 in wheat and detection of Lr48 in the Thatcher near-isogenic line with gene Lr25

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Samsampour; B. Maleki Zanjani; J. K. Pallavi; Anupam Singh; A. Charpe; S. K. Gupta; K. V. Prabhu

    2010-01-01

    The recessive adult plant resistance (APR) gene Lr48 in wheat was tagged with flanking random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Markers S336775 in coupling and S3450 in repulsion with Lr48 were identified in wheat line CSP44. Tests of these markers on available Thatcher near-isogenic lines (NILs) detected the\\u000a likely presence of Lr48 in TcLr25. A test of allelism of APR

  13. Chromosome 14 markers in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ollier, W; Thomson, W; Welch, S; de Lange, G G; Silman, A

    1988-01-01

    Phenotype frequencies for variants of the chromosome 14 markers, alpha 1 antitrypsin (protease inhibitor--Pi), and immunoglobulin heavy chain gene allotypes (Gm and Am) were examined in affected and unaffected members of multicase rheumatoid arthritis (RA) families and compared with published population data. Significantly higher frequencies of phenotypes containing Pi*Z and Pi*S were observed in unrelated index RA cases compared with UK population data. There was also a higher frequency of Pi*Z in family members without RA than in population controls but no such difference for the frequency of Pi*S. No difference in the frequency of PiM1M2 heterozygotes was seen between patients with RA and population controls. An examination of clinical data failed to show any relation between any particular feature of RA and positivity for Pi*Z or Pi*S. No significant differences in frequency of Gm phenotypes were observed between patients with RA and controls. Significant association was found, however, between Pi*Z and Gm phenotypes containing Gm(zax;g). These associations are interpreted as indicating linkage disequilibria between these alleles. No interactions between DR4 and either G1m(z), (a), or (x) allotypes were apparent in patients with RA. A significant association was seen in the index RA cases between DR4 and Pi phenotypes carrying Z or S alleles. Observations from this study provide evidence for the existence of a genetic component for RA susceptibility encoded on chromosome 14. An interactive effect of these genes with DR4 towards susceptibility appears likely. PMID:3264137

  14. Chromosome 14 markers in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ollier, W; Thomson, W; Welch, S; de Lange, G G; Silman, A

    1988-10-01

    Phenotype frequencies for variants of the chromosome 14 markers, alpha 1 antitrypsin (protease inhibitor--Pi), and immunoglobulin heavy chain gene allotypes (Gm and Am) were examined in affected and unaffected members of multicase rheumatoid arthritis (RA) families and compared with published population data. Significantly higher frequencies of phenotypes containing Pi*Z and Pi*S were observed in unrelated index RA cases compared with UK population data. There was also a higher frequency of Pi*Z in family members without RA than in population controls but no such difference for the frequency of Pi*S. No difference in the frequency of PiM1M2 heterozygotes was seen between patients with RA and population controls. An examination of clinical data failed to show any relation between any particular feature of RA and positivity for Pi*Z or Pi*S. No significant differences in frequency of Gm phenotypes were observed between patients with RA and controls. Significant association was found, however, between Pi*Z and Gm phenotypes containing Gm(zax;g). These associations are interpreted as indicating linkage disequilibria between these alleles. No interactions between DR4 and either G1m(z), (a), or (x) allotypes were apparent in patients with RA. A significant association was seen in the index RA cases between DR4 and Pi phenotypes carrying Z or S alleles. Observations from this study provide evidence for the existence of a genetic component for RA susceptibility encoded on chromosome 14. An interactive effect of these genes with DR4 towards susceptibility appears likely. PMID:3264137

  15. RNA-directed DNA methylation regulates parental genomic imprinting at several loci in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thiet Minh; Nakamura, Miyuki; Calarco, Joseph P.; Susaki, Daichi; Lim, Pei Qi; Kinoshita, Tetsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Martienssen, Robert A.; Berger, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    In mammals and plants, parental genomic imprinting restricts the expression of specific loci to one parental allele. Imprinting in mammals relies on sex-dependent de novo deposition of DNA methylation during gametogenesis but a comparable mechanism was not shown in plants. Rather, paternal silencing by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (MET1) and maternal activation by the DNA demethylase DEMETER (DME) cause maternal expression. However, genome-wide studies suggested other DNA methylation-dependent imprinting mechanisms. Here, we show that de novo RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) regulates imprinting at specific loci expressed in endosperm. RdDM in somatic tissues is required to silence expression of the paternal allele. By contrast, the repression of RdDM in female gametes participates with or without DME requirement in the activation of the maternal allele. The contrasted activity of DNA methylation between male and female gametes appears sufficient to prime imprinted maternal expression. After fertilization, MET1 maintains differential expression between the parental alleles. RdDM depends on small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The involvement of RdDM in imprinting supports the idea that sources of siRNAs such as transposons and de novo DNA methylation were recruited in a convergent manner in plants and mammals in the evolutionary process leading to selection of imprinted loci. PMID:23760956

  16. Genetic similarity among Tunisian olive cultivars and two unknown feral olive trees estimated through SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ayed, Rayda; Sans-Grout, Cinderella; Moreau, Fabienne; Grati-Kamoun, Naziha; Rebai, Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    We used eight informative microsatellite markers for fingerprinting and evaluation of genetic similarity among 15 Tunisian olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivars and two feral unknown trees named Soulela 1 and Soulela 2. Thirty-one alleles were revealed, and the number of alleles per SSR varied from 2 (UDO12) to 6 (GAPU71A). Cluster analysis grouped cultivars into three main clusters. The two unknown varieties could not be reliably classified into any of these cultivar groups. SSR analysis indicated the presence of three erroneous denominations of cultivars. We resolved two synonymy cases (Zalmati and Chemlali; Rkhami and Chetoui) and one case of homonymy (Chemlali Tataouine). Genetic analyses of DNA extracted from leaves, oils, and embryos of the two unknown cultivars and the two major Tunisian olive cultivars (Chemlali and Chetoui) were also studied. We conclude that the reliable identification of these two feral cultivars needs to be addressed by a larger set of markers. PMID:24535154

  17. Development of microsatellite markers to genetically differentiate populations of Octopus minor from Korea and China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kim, Yi-Kyung; Park, Jung-Youn; An, Chel-Min; Jun, Je-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Of the more than 300 octopus species, Octopus minor is one of the most popular and economically important species in Eastern Asia, including Korea, along with O. vulgaris, O. ocellatus, and O. aegina. We developed 19 microsatellite markers from Octopus minor and eight polymorphic markers were developed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationships among four octopus populations from Korea and three from China. The number of alleles per locus varied from 10 to 49, and allelic richness per locus ranged from 2 to 16.4 across all populations. The average allele number among the populations was 11.1, with a minimum of 8.3 and a maximum of 13.6. The mean allelic richness was 8.7 in all populations. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) test revealed significant deviation in 19 of the 56 single-locus sites, and null alleles were presumed in five of eight loci. The pairwise F ( ST ) values between populations from Korea and China differed significantly in all pairwise comparisons. The genetic distances between the China and Korea samples ranged from 0.161 to 0.454. The genetic distances among the populations from Korea ranged from 0.033 to 0.090, with an average of 0.062; those among populations from China ranged from 0.191 to 0.316, with an average of 0.254. The populations from Korea and China formed clearly separated into clusters via an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram. Furthermore, a population from muddy flats on the western coast of the Korean Peninsula and one from a rocky area on Jeju Island formed clearly separated subclusters. An assignment test based on the allele distribution discriminated between the Korean and Chinese origins with 96.9 % accuracy. PMID:22707143

  18. Exome sequencing can detect pathogenic mosaic mutations present at low allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Lise, Stefano; Harrison, Victoria; Stewart, Helen; Jayawant, Sandeep; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Deng, Alexander T; Murphy, Valerie Elizabeth; Sadighi Akha, Elham; Rimmer, Andy; Mathieson, Iain; Knight, Samantha J L; Kini, Usha; Taylor, Jenny C; Keays, David A

    2012-01-01

    The development of next generation sequencing (NGS) has radically transformed the scientific landscape, making it possible to sequence the exome of any given individual in a cost-effective way. The power of this approach has been demonstrated by a number of groups who have identified pathogenic mutations in small pedigrees that have been resistant to traditional genetic mapping. Recently it has become clear that exome sequencing has great potential with respect to sporadic disease and the identification of de novo mutations. This is highlighted by studies reporting whole-exome sequencing of patient-parental trios affected by learning disability, autism and schizophrenia. It is widely anticipated that the introduction of this technique into a clinical setting will revolutionise genetic diagnosis. However, the sensitivity of NGS exome sequencing is currently unclear. Here, we describe the exome sequencing of DNA samples from a patient with double cortex syndrome and her parents, resulting in the detection of a mosaic splicing mutation in LIS1. This variant was found at an allele frequency of just 18%, demonstrating that NGS methods have the capacity to identify pathogenic mosaic mutations present at a low level. PMID:22129557

  19. Parenting in the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnemuende, Carolyn

    2002-01-01

    Discusses parental guilt, fear, and lack of confidence eroding parents' ability to create a healthy balance between career and family. Maintains that the amount of time employed parents spend with children is not the problem, but that parental fatigue and stress spill into the home environment. Suggests ways parents can improve their confidence…

  20. Creative Approaches to Parenting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBord, Karen; Roseboro, Jacqueline D.; Wicker, Karen M.

    1998-01-01

    Two North Carolina projects used methods from the National Network for Family Resiliency's Parenting Evaluation Decision Framework. Parenting for Success for Hispanic Parents used focus group interviews and summative evaluation. Individualized education for Head Start parents used pre/posttests of parental self-esteem and child development…

  1. Child Abuse and Adolescent Parenting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracie O. Afifi

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent parents are commonly identified as an at-risk group in the child abuse literature. However, theoretical models specific to the area of child abuse and adolescent parenting are not well developed. This essay reviews established theories on child abuse, abusive parenting, and adolescent parenting to synthesize a proposed child abuse and adolescent parenting model. An ecological perspective is used to

  2. Analysis of genetic relationship in mutant silkworm strains of Bombyx mori using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Velu, Dhanikachalam; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M; Muthulakshmi, Murugiah; Sinha, Randhir K; Qadri, Syed M H

    2008-05-01

    Amplified inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers were used to determine genetic relationships among mutant silkworm strains of Bombyx mori. Fifteen ISSR primers containing simple sequence repeat (SSR) motifs were used in this study. A total of 113 markers were produced among 20 mutant strains, of which 73.45% were found to be polymorphic. In selected mutant genetic stocks, the average number of observed allele was (1.7080+/-0.4567), effective alleles (1.5194+/-0.3950) and genetic diversity (Ht) (0.2901+/-0.0415). The dendrogram produced using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA) and cluster analysis made using Nei's genetic distance resulted in the formation of one major group containing 6 groups separated 20 mutant silkworm strains. Therefore, ISSR amplification is a valuable method for determining the genetic variability among mutant silkworm strains. This efficient molecular marker would be useful for characterizing a considerable number of silkworm strains maintained at the germplasm center. PMID:18499073

  3. Exceptional Parent, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Rick, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document collects the 12 monthly issues of Volume 30 of "Exceptional Parent," a magazine focused on practical advice for parents of children with disabilities. Most issues include a focus topic as well as articles on other issues, columns, reviews, and letters. The issues focus on the following areas: (1) an extensive resource guide; (2)…

  4. Exceptional Parent, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Rick, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document collects the 12 monthly issues of Volume 31 of "Exceptional Parent," a magazine focused on practical advice for parents of children with disabilities. Most of the issues include a focus topic as well as articles on other issues, columns, reviews, and letters. These 12 issues concentrate on the following areas: (1) information…

  5. Learning Parenting in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackman, Sue

    1978-01-01

    Evaluates the Preschool Program for Parents of Young Children sponsored by the Cuyahoga Community College and implemented by the inmates of the Cleveland House of Correction, their children, and spouses. The thrust of the program is parent education and includes play sessions and discussion groups. (TP)

  6. Pinterest for Parent Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Routh, Brianna; Langworthy, Sara; Jastram, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    As more parents are using the Internet to answer their questions, Extension needs to provide practical, research-based resources in an accessible format. Pinterest is a platform that can be used by Extension educators to provide continued education and make reputable resources more discoverable for parents. Based on Knowles adult learning theory…

  7. Parents as Participating Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Linda; Swan, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that parental involvement in education is positively associated with student achievement, yet further efforts are needed to measure the effects of such programs systematically so as to inform the development of improved methods. Having parents help their children with mathematics can be problematic. Teachers may not…

  8. When Your Parents Fight

    MedlinePLUS

    ... other anymore. They might think it means their parents will get a divorce . But parents' arguments usually don't mean that they don't love each other or that they're getting a divorce. Most of the time the arguments are just ...

  9. Parent Involvement. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    What are some ways in which to get parents meaningfully involved in their child's high school? According to the research, the most successful programs are those that provide a variety of ways in which parents can be actively engaged in their child's academic life. Joyce Epstein, Director of the National Network of Partnership Schools, out of Johns…

  10. Parents as Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Michele P.

    2011-01-01

    Family involvement is a key ingredient of improving underperforming schools, but families are often unaware of how to get involved. To engage families in schools, an urban school district offers Parent University to teach family members how to become leaders in schools and advocates for their children. Parent University is one of Boston Public…

  11. Parents as Partners Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    In September 1990, three programs (Family Study Institute, Saturday School Programs, and Evening Programs) to strengthen and improve parent-school partnerships and enhance communication were instituted in a racially integrated school district in Cook County, Illinois. Evaluation findings showed that parental involvement significantly enhanced…

  12. Parental Engagement Pays Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Although data directly linking parental engagement with positive results is limited, administrators, teachers, and parent cite anecdotal evidence--and some numbers about test scores and attendance from individual schools--to affirm the effectiveness of engagement programs. Meanwhile, researchers are studying the keys to successful programs and…

  13. Getting Parents Involved.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Vickie; Finch, Patty A.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a parental involvement program in reading, writing, and human education. The project consists of caring for Clifford, a stuffed toy dog, on a rotated basis by first grade students. Books and pet care items accompany Clifford and provide an opportunity for parent and child to work together. (ML)

  14. Parent News Offline, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 4 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2002 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Middle College High Schools:…

  15. Grief, parenting, and schizophrenia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Davis; Cynthia L. Schultz

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that a child with schizophrenia represents an ongoing source of loss and grief for parents. The study aimed to (a) validate the presence of grief in mothers and fathers of children with schizophrenia, and (b)explore whether the hours of parental contact with the child influences the strength of grief reactions. The mean age (62 years) of the

  16. Getting Along with Parents

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or read a book out loud. If your parents are divorced, make the most of the time you do spend together. In between, talk on the phone (or video chat) and email each ... Many kids say they'd like their parents to help them when they're upset. But ...

  17. Building Relationships with Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullaj, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Communicating with parents may seem like one more task on top of an overwhelming workload, but creating a positive relationship with parents has many benefits for all involved. The author discusses the steps to creating these relationships and communicating with families.

  18. Parenting for Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Mary G.

    1996-01-01

    Responds to William Sears's article: "Attachment Parenting: A Style That Works" (PS 523 690). Claims that there are alternatives to "attachment parenting" based on the Montessori philosophy, pointing out that Sears's suggestion of sleeping with the baby and carrying the baby in a sling may easily become obstacles in the path of natural development…

  19. Temporal trends in prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance alleles over two decades of changing antimalarial policy in coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Okombo, John; Kamau, Alice W.; Marsh, Kevin; Sutherland, Colin J.; Ochola-Oyier, Lynette Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Molecular surveillance of drug resistance markers through time provides crucial information on genomic adaptations, especially in parasite populations exposed to changing drug pressures. To assess temporal trends of established genotypes associated with tolerance to clinically important antimalarials used in Kenya over the last two decades, we sequenced a region of the pfcrt locus encompassing codons 72–76 of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, full-length pfmdr1 – encoding multi-drug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein homolog (Pgh1) and pfdhfr encoding dihydrofolate reductase, in 485 archived Plasmodium falciparum positive blood samples collected in coastal Kenya at four different time points between 1995 and 2013. Microsatellite loci were also analyzed to compare the genetic backgrounds of parasite populations circulating before and after the withdrawal of chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. Our results reveal a significant increase in the prevalence of the pfcrt K76 wild-type allele between 1995 and 2013 from 38% to 81.7% (p < 0.0001). In contrast, we noted a significant decline in wild-type pfdhfr S108 allele (p < 0.0001) culminating in complete absence of this allele in 2013. We also observed a significant increase in the prevalence of the wild-type pfmdr1 N86/Y184/D1246 haplotype from 14.6% in 1995 to 66.0% in 2013 (p < 0.0001) and a corresponding decline of the mutant pfmdr1 86Y/184Y/1246Y allele from 36.4% to 0% in 19 years (p < 0.0001). We also show extensive genetic heterogeneity among the chloroquine-sensitive parasites before and after the withdrawal of the drug in contrast to a selective sweep around the triple mutant pfdhfr allele, leading to a mono-allelic population at this locus. These findings highlight the importance of continual surveillance and characterization of parasite genotypes as indicators of the therapeutic efficacy of antimalarials, particularly in the context of changes in malaria treatment policy. PMID:25516825

  20. Parental Divorce, Parental Religious Characteristics, and Religious Outcomes in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Uecker, Jeremy E.; Ellison, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Parental divorce has been linked to religious outcomes in adulthood. Previous research has not adequately accounted for parental religious characteristics or subsequent family context, namely whether one’s custodial parent remarries. Using pooled data from three waves of the General Social Survey, we examine the relationships among parental divorce, subsequent family structure, and religiosity in adulthood. Growing up in a single-parent family—but not a stepparent family—is positively associated with religious disaffiliation and religious switching and negatively associated with regular religious attendance. Accounting for parental religious characteristics, however, explains sizable proportions of these relationships. Accounting for parental religious affiliation and attendance, growing up with a single parent does not significantly affect religious attendance. Parental religiosity also moderates the relationship between growing up with a single parent and religious attendance: being raised in a single-parent home has a negative effect on religious attendance among adults who had two religiously involved parents. PMID:23357965