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Sample records for parenteral solutions supplemented

  1. Compatibility considerations in parenteral nutrient solutions.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, P W; Vanderveen, T W

    1984-05-01

    Information on compatibility of nutrients and drugs with parenteral nutrient (PN) solutions is reviewed and evaluated. Precipitation of calcium phosphate when calcium and phosphate salts are added can be affected by pH, amino acid concentration, amino acid product, temperature, sequence of additives, specific salt used, and time since admixture; precipitate formation can occur gradually over 24 hours. Insulin is chemically stable in PN solutions, but adsorption to the infusion system can cause decreased availability. Poor delivery of vitamin A via PN solutions has been reported. The sodium bisulfite content of amino acid injections may cause degradation of thiamine, but studies simulating clinical use are needed. Folic acid stability in PN solutions has been demonstrated, and phytonadione appears to be stable. Drug administration via PN solutions may be advantageous when fluid intake is restricted or peripheral vein access is limited and in home PN therapy. Summarized are results of studies involving heparin, cimetidine hydrochloride, aminophylline, amphotericin B, iron dextran, hydrochloric acid, corticosteroids, narcotics, metoclopramide, digoxin, and fluorouracil. Many antibiotics are probably stable, especially when administered by co-infusion rather than by direct mixture in the PN solution container. When lipids are mixed in the same container with amino acid-dextrose solutions, compatibility and stability of electrolytes, vitamins, and trace elements must be reassessed. Practical research is needed, and availability of additives should be studied in specific patient populations and for specific PN formulations. Valid conclusions are dependent on careful study design. PMID:6328980

  2. A review of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, R J; Northup, S J; Thomas, J A

    1984-10-01

    The chemical formation, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and certain other decomposition products found in parenteral solutions are reviewed. Heat sterilization-induced hexose decomposition to furan derivatives is promoted at low pH. Based upon infusion studies with rats and dogs, HMF does not appear to be acutely toxic at concentrations ordinarily encountered in parenteral infusion solutions (e.g., 10 mg/liter). Dosages of parenterally administered HMF exceeding 75 mg/kg body wt have led to some toxic effects, including increased activity of hepatic enzymes, altered serum-protein fractions, increased relative spleen weight, and hepatic fatty degeneration. Approximately 50% of parenterally administered HMF is oxidized and eliminated by the kidneys. From a clinical standpoint, the amount of HMF formed as a result of the heat sterilization of parenteral solutions containing hexoses does not seem to pose any significant toxicologic problem. PMID:6391997

  3. Quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry impurity profiling methods for the analysis of parenteral infusion solutions for amino acid supplementation containing L-alanyl-L-glutamine.

    PubMed

    Schiesel, Simone; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Leitner, Alexander; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2012-10-12

    Potential impurities in a parenteral infusion solution for amino acid supplementation containing alanylglutamine (AlaGln) and glycyltyrosine (GlyTyr) as peptide constituents have been determined. Such complex multicomponent pharmaceutical formulations with reactive ingredients may yield a multitude of impurities in stress testing samples. Thus, three stability indicating LC-ESI-MS/MS methods were developed for the establishment of quantitative impurity profiles employing a Chiralpak QN-AX and a Polysulfoethyl A stationary phase in HILIC mode as well as a Gemini C18 stationary phase in gradient RPLC mode. The primary goal was to separate isobaric compounds (stereoisomers, constitutional isomers, retro-peptides) and to provide quantitative data of impurities identified in stressed nutritional infusion solutions. The optimized methods were calibrated by standard addition in the samples and validated according to ICH guidelines. The methods were then applied for the analysis of stressed sample solutions stored under different conditions. Major peptide impurities found in concentrations above the qualification threshold in stressed solutions stored at 40 °C for 6 months comprised cyclo(AlaGln) 808 μg/mL, pyroGluAla 122 μg/mL, AlaGlu 117 μg/mL, cycloGlyTyr 60 μg/mL, AlaGln epimers (DL+LD) 38 μg/mL, and TyrGly 27 μg/mL. A number of impurities above the reporting threshold were also detected including AlaAlaGln 18 μg/mL, cyclo(AlaGlu) 16 μg/mL, AlaGlu(AlaGln) 17 μg/mL, and AlaGlu(His) 12 μg/mL. The study showed that bioactive peptides may be formed in amino acid infusion solutions by condensation of amino acids and a careful control of these impurities is mandatory. PMID:22305362

  4. Colorimetric determination of tobramycin in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, V

    1988-06-01

    A colorimetric method based on a reaction between tobramycin and alkaline copper sulphate solution has been proposed to quantify tobramycin in injections. The excipients present and normal saline did not interfere with the assay procedure. A tobramycin sample which was decomposed using either sulphuric acid or sodium hydroxide solution indicated fairly good stability on both sides of the pH scale. PMID:3209627

  5. Effect of parenteral amino acid supplementation in preterm low birth weight newborn.

    PubMed

    Alo, D; Shahidullah, M; Mannan, M A; Noor, K

    2010-07-01

    This interventional study was done to determine the effect of parenteral amino acid supplementation on weight change, biochemical effect and incidence of sepsis in preterm low birth weight newborns during their hospital stay. It was carried out during the period of June 2006-May 2007 in the Newborn unit of a tertiary care hospital of Bangladesh. Sixty preterm (28-34weeks), low birth weight (1000-1800g) AGA (appropriate for gestational age) newborns were enrolled within 24 hours of birth. Intervention and control newborns were matched in terms of birth weight and gestational age. Samples were volunteers. Parenteral amino acid (5%) supplementation in addition to usual nutritional management until enteral feeding reached three fourth of total calorie intake. Usual nutritional management was 10% intravenous dextrose and subsequent enteral feeding. Main outcome measured with weight change, biochemical effect and incidence of sepsis. Weight change was observed by two parameters such as mean percentage of maximum postnatal weight loss and mean days to reach birth weight, both were significantly lower in intervention than control group (p<0.05). Biochemical effect of parenteral amino acid supplementation investigated in this study has been shown to have no effect. There was no difference in incidence of sepsis between intervention and control group (p>0.05). Improved nutritional supplementation with parenteral amino acids resulted in better growth as evident by lesser degree of weight loss and earlier regaining of birth weight in the early neonatal period. Biochemical parameters are not affected by parenteral amino acid supplementation. PMID:20639832

  6. Selected ultratrace elements in total parenteral nutrition solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, Y.N.; Shuler, T.R.; Nielsen, F.H.; Flombaum, C.; Farkouh, S.A.; Shike, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Ultratrace elements are potentially essential (eg. boron, molybdenum, nickel, and vanadium) or toxic (eg, aluminum and cadmium) in humans. Long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN) patients can inadvertently receive significant amounts of ultratrace elements present as contaminants in TPN solutions. We determined the intake of selected ultratrace elements from a standard TPN solution and compared it with the amount reported to be absorbed from food in normal subjects. Contamination of TPN solutions with ultratrace elements was widespread and variable. The daily intakes of Mo, Ni, V. and Cd from this contamination were comparable to the amounts reported to be absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract in normal subjects. Al intake was high; B intake was low, approximately 10% of the amount absorbed by normal subjects. Thus, TPN solutions are contaminated with significant amounts of ultratrace elements. The biological significance of the intravenous infusion of these ultratrace elements is unclear and requires further investigation, particularly in home TPN patients.

  7. The interaction of dopexamine with various drugs and excipients in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Rosario, R; Utamura, T; Perrin, J H

    1988-11-01

    The interaction of dopexamine hydrochloride with various excipients and other drugs in parenteral solutions has been investigated by microcalorimetry. The interaction with heparin sodium, in particular, is significant. The interaction is strongest in parenterals containing glucose and is eliminated in normal saline. Divalent cations are more effective than monovalent ones in eliminating the reaction, which is apparently ionic in nature. PMID:2907551

  8. Timing of (supplemental) parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) is used in a step-up approach when full enteral support is contraindicated or fails to reach caloric targets. Recent nutrition guidelines present divergent advices regarding timing of SPN in critically ill patients ranging from early SPN (<48 h after admission; EPN) to postponing initiation of SPN until day 8 after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission (LPN). This systematic review summarizes results of prospective studies among adult ICU patients addressing the best timing of (supplemental) parenteral nutrition (S)PN. A structured PubMed search was conducted to identify eligible articles. Articles were screened and selected using predetermined criteria and appraised for relevance and validity. After critical appraisal, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and two prospective observational studies remained. One RCT found a higher percentage of alive discharge from the ICU at day 8 in the LPN group compared to EPN group (p = 0.007) but no differences in ICU and in-hospital mortality. None of the other RCTs found differences in ICU or in-hospital mortality rates. Contradicting or divergent results on other secondary outcomes were found for ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, infection rates, nutrition targets, duration of mechanical ventilation, glucose control, duration of renal replacement therapy, muscle wasting and fat loss. Although the heterogeneity in quality and design of relevant studies precludes firm conclusions, it is reasonable to assume that in adult critically ill patients, there are no clinically relevant benefits of EPN compared with LPN with respect to morbidity or mortality end points, when full enteral support is contraindicated or fails to reach caloric targets. However, considering that infectious morbidity and resolution of organ failure may be negatively affected through mechanisms not yet clearly understood and acquisition costs of parenteral nutrition are higher, the early

  9. Impact of glutathione supplementation of parenteral nutrition on hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Elremaly, Wesam; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Rouleau, Thérèse; Lavoie, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background The oxidation of the methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) by the combined impact of peroxides contaminating parenteral nutrition (PN) and oxidized redox potential of glutathione is suspected to explain its inhibition observed in animals. A modification of MAT activity is suspected to be at origin of the PN-associated liver disease as observed in newborns. We hypothesized that the correction of redox potential of glutathione by adding glutathione in PN protects the MAT activity. Aim To investigate whether the addition of glutathione to PN can reverse the inhibition of MAT observed in animal on PN. Methods Three days old guinea pigs received through a jugular vein catheter 2 series of solutions. First with methionine supplement, (1) Sham (no infusion); (2) PN: amino acids, dextrose, lipids and vitamins; (3) PN-GSSG: PN+10 μM GSSG. Second without methionine, (4) D: dextrose; (5) D+180 μM ascorbylperoxide; (6) D+350 μM H2O2. Four days later, liver was sampled for determination of redox potential of glutathione and MAT activity in the presence or absence of 1 mM DTT. Data were compared by ANOVA, p<0.05. Results MAT activity was 45±4% lower in animal infused with PN and 23±7% with peroxides generated in PN. The inhibition by peroxides was associated with oxidized redox potential and was reversible by DTT. Correction of redox potential (PN+GSSG) or DTT was without effect on the inhibition of MAT by PN. The slope of the linear relation between MAT activity and redox potential was two fold lower in animal infused with PN than in others groups. Conclusion The present study suggests that prevention of peroxide generation in PN and/or correction of the redox potential by adding glutathione in PN are not sufficient, at least in newborn guinea pigs, to restore normal MAT activity. PMID:26722840

  10. Glutamine-supplemented tube feedings versus total parenteral nutrition in children receiving intensive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ford, C; Whitlock, J A; Pietsch, J B

    1997-04-01

    Although enteral nutrition is generally advocated in the care of children with cancer, those patients receiving intensive chemotherapy alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantation often require total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Two patients are presented illustrating some differences between enteral and parenteral feedings in children receiving intensive chemotherapy. Nasogastric glutamine-supplemented tube feedings were well tolerated both in the hospital and at home. The cost of care for the enterally supported child was less than one third of the TPN-supported child. Although TPN appears to be beneficial in some patients with cancer, it is expensive and is associated with several significant disadvantages. Among these are an increased incidence of both gram-positive and gram-negative infections and an increased incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Enteral nutrition is less costly than TPN and maintains the structural and functional integrity of the intestinal mucosa. The addition of certain substrates such as glutamine, arginine and omega-3 fatty acids may improve the body's immune response as well. We hypothesize that early glutamine supplemented tube feedings in children receiving intensive chemotherapy alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantation will result in improved nutrition with fewer infections and lower cost than TPN-supplemented patients. In addition, a shorter hospital stay and improved quality of life are anticipated. PMID:9144976

  11. Glutamine-Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition and Probiotics in Four Adult Autoimmune Enteropathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Ying; Zhou, Yi-Quan; Lu, Li-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Qi; Wu, Ying-Jie; Cai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition (PN) and probiotics in adult autoimmune enteropathy (AIE) patients. Four adult AIE patients were identified from April 2006 to January 2012. Clinical and nutritional data were obtained from the patients' medical records. Glutamine-supplemented PN started immediately when the AIE diagnosis was confirmed. The total PN duration was 351 days. According to the PN prescription, the average caloric intake ranged from 20 to 25 kcal/kg/day, and the protein intake ranged from 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg/day. Alanyl-glutamine (20 g/day) was administered to AIE patients for 4 weeks followed by a 2-week break, and this treatment schedule was repeated when PN lasted for more than 6 weeks. Body weight gain and an increased serum albumin level were achieved after PN, and defecation frequency and quality also improved. Each patient received oral supplements, 250 mL of Ensure and two probiotics capsules (each capsule containing 0.5×108 colonies) three times a day when enteral nutrition started. Three AIE patients were successfully weaned off PN, and one patient died of pneumonia. Glutamine-supplemented PN and probiotics show promise in managing patients with AIE and related malnutrition. PMID:24827631

  12. Supplemental Parenteral Nutrition Is the Key to Prevent Energy Deficits in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Taku; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Pichard, Claude

    2016-08-01

    This review emphasizes the role of a timely supplemental parenteral nutrition (PN) for critically ill patients. It contradicts the recommendations of current guidelines to avoid the use of PN, as it is associated with risk. Critical illness results in severe metabolic stress. During the early phase, inflammatory cytokines and mediators induce catabolism to meet the increased body energy demands by endogenous sources. This response is not suppressed by exogenous energy administration, and the early use of PN to reach the energy target leads to overfeeding. On the other hand, early and progressive enteral nutrition (EN) is less likely to cause overfeeding because of variable gastrointestinal tolerance, a factor frequently associated with significant energy deficit. Recent studies demonstrate that adequate feeding is beneficial during and after the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Supplemental PN allows for timely adequate feeding, if sufficient precautions are taken to avoid overfeeding. Indirect calorimetry can precisely define the adequate energy prescription. Our pragmatic approach is to start early EN to progressively test the gut tolerance and add supplemental PN on day 3 or 4 after ICU admission, only if EN does not meet the measured energy target. We believe that supplemental PN plays a pivotal role in the achievement of adequate feeding in critically ill patients with intolerance to EN and does not cause harm if overfeeding is avoided by careful prescription, ideally based on energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry. PMID:27256992

  13. System for creating on site, remote from a sterile environment, parenteral solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Mike (Inventor); Scharf, Mike (Inventor); Packard, Jeff (Inventor); Kipp, Jim (Inventor); Dudar, Tom (Inventor); Owens, Jim (Inventor); Bindokas, Al (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a system and method for creating on site, remote from a sterile environment, parenteral solutions in large volume parenteral containers for intravenous administration to a patient. In an embodiment, this system comprises an empty large volume container including at least one port for accessing an interior of the container. The port includes a sterilizing filter for sterilizing a fluid fed through the port into the container. A second container is provided including a solute and having means for coupling the second container to the large volume container and thereby providing fluid communication therebetween allowing the solute to be received within the interior of the container. A sterile water source is also provided including means for placing the sterile water source in fluid communication with the port and allowing water to flow from the sterile water source into the interior of the container. This allows the solute, and sterile water that has been fed through the filter, to create a parenteral solution in the large volume parenteral container.

  14. System for creating at a site, remote from a sterile environment, a parenteral solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Mike (Inventor); Finley, Mike (Inventor); Veillon, Joe (Inventor); Kipp, Jim (Inventor); Dudar, Tom (Inventor); Owens, Jim (Inventor); Ogle, Jim (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a container, system, and method for creating parenteral solutions at a site, remote from sterile environments. The system includes a flexible container that is empty except for a prepackaged amount of a solute that is housed in the interior of the container. The container includes at least one port and a sterilizing filter in communication with an interior of the port. The container is so constructed and arranged that a fluid flow path is created from the port through the filter and into the interior of the container. A sterile water source including means for establishing fluid flow from the sterile water source into the port is provided. Accordingly, sterile water can flow from the sterile water source through the filter into the container where it is mixed with the solute to create a parenteral solution that can then be infused into a patient. A method and container are also provided.

  15. Toxicity potential of compounds found in parenteral solutions with rubber stoppers

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, J.W. )

    1992-03-01

    Leached stopper components found in parenteral solutions produced by several manufacturers were identified and quantitated. Their toxicity potential was determined by comparing the types and quantities of the leached components with known toxicity levels and/or harmful effects. Toxicity potentials for benzaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, cyclohexanone, ethylbenzene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene are listed. Breakdown products of dextrose (furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural), which may also have harmful effects, were quantitated.

  16. Pleural effusion with parenteral nutrition solution: an unusual complication of an "appropriately" placed umbilical venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Pabalan, Maria Janina U; Wynn, Ralph J; Reynolds, Anne Marie; Ryan, Rita M; Youssfi, Mostafa; Manja, Veena; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2007-11-01

    Pleural effusion is not an uncommon complication of percutaneous intravenous catheters in neonates. Umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) are associated with pleural effusion following abnormal placement in the left atrium or pulmonary veins due to venous obstruction. We report for the first time a case of right-sided pleural effusion with parenteral nutrition solution following a UVC that appeared to be positioned appropriately in the inferior vena cava. PMID:17972230

  17. Effect of phosphate buffer concentration on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, C A; Smith, G M; Pflug, I J

    1978-09-01

    The effect of various quantities of Butterfield phosphate buffer added to four parenteral solutions on the survival of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated at 121 degrees C was determined. The effect of the addition of phosphate buffer on spore survival varied with the parenteral solution. Spore survival was increased or decreased, depending upon the composition of the parenteral solution and the buffer concentration. The results obtained in these experiments attest to the fact that environmental factors, including the type of ions present and ionic concentration, affect the heat destruction rate of B. stearothermophilus spores. Therefore, the sterilization requirements of a product such as a parenteral solution may be affected by small changes in formulation. PMID:727778

  18. Effect of phosphate buffer concentration on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, C A; Smith, G M; Pflug, I J

    1978-01-01

    The effect of various quantities of Butterfield phosphate buffer added to four parenteral solutions on the survival of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated at 121 degrees C was determined. The effect of the addition of phosphate buffer on spore survival varied with the parenteral solution. Spore survival was increased or decreased, depending upon the composition of the parenteral solution and the buffer concentration. The results obtained in these experiments attest to the fact that environmental factors, including the type of ions present and ionic concentration, affect the heat destruction rate of B. stearothermophilus spores. Therefore, the sterilization requirements of a product such as a parenteral solution may be affected by small changes in formulation. PMID:727778

  19. Effect of parenterally l-arginine supplementation on the respiratory distress syndrome in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Cansever, Murat; Akin, Mustafa Ali; Akcakus, Mustafa; Ozcan, Alper; Gunes, Tamer; Ozturk, Adnan; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2016-07-01

    l-Arginine (l-Arg) is the precursor of nitric oxide which plays an important role on pulmonary circulation and pulmonary vascular tone. Earlier studies suggested that l-Arg levels in preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were low due to its consumption and l-Arg supplementation may reduce the severity of RDS. Our aim was detect the effect of the parenterally l-Arg supplementation on RDS severity. The subjects were chosen between preterm newborns (gestational age <34 weeks) (n = 30). Twenty of the subjects were diagnosed with permaturity and RDS, and 10 of the subjects were healthy preterm newborns. Ten of the subjects was taken l-Arg (1.5 mmol/kg/d) in addition to routine RDS treatment and assumed as "Group 1". In this group, daily l-Arg supplementation was started end of the first day, and continued at end of fifth day. The others of the subjects diagnosed with RDS was take routine RDS treatment and assumed as "Group 2". Healthy preterm newbors assumed as "Group 3". Blood collections for l-Arg levels via tandem mass spectrometry were made in first day and repeated on the seventh days. Oxygenation index was used to determine severity of RDS. l-Arg consentrations in Group 1 were 8.7 ± 4.1 μM/L and 11.9 ± 5.0 μM/L in first and seventh day, respectively. l-Arg consentrations were 12.6±4.5 μM/Land 10.9 ± 5.4 μM/L in Group 2 and 8.6 ± 5.1 μM/L and 9.4 ± 4.1 μM/L in Group 3. There is no correlation between l-Arg concentrations and OI also duration of the mechanical ventilation of the subjects in patient groups (Group 1 and 2). PMID:26365434

  20. [Levels of contaminant zinc in solutions routinely used in rehydration and/or parenteral feeding].

    PubMed

    Hering, S E; Cupo, P; Trivelato, T M; Ottoboni, M A; Franco, L M

    1986-01-01

    With the objective to evaluate the zinc needs of children submitted to rehydration and/or parenteral nutrition, the content of contaminating zinc was determined in intravenous solutions utilized at University Hospital of Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. Zinc was measured in 40 bottles containing deionized water and submitted to the routine treatment for industrialization of serum for parenteral use, according to the standards of the University Hospital of Ribeirão Preto, Industrial Pharmacy. The effect of the sealing material employed (polished red stopper and unpolished black stopper) was observed, as well as time of contact between the solutions and rubber stoppers and latex slides, and the method of bottle conditioning (vertical or horizontal position) which permits contact of the solutions with the rubber stoppers. The gluco-saline solutions prepared in our Hospital and stored in glass bottles with unpolished black rubber stoppers and latex slide showed substantial zinc levels (1,220 to 4,860 micrograms/ml, n = 30). The same solutions kept in glass vials or plastic bottles were zinc free. The highest zinc levels were observed in the amino acid solutions placed in sealed bottles with unpolished black rubber stoppers (11,690 to 24,310 micrograms/ml, n = 20). It is important to be aware of these contaminating zinc levels to provide proper treatment involving this micronutrient. PMID:3098212

  1. Determination of solute-polymer interaction properties and their application to parenteral product container compatibility evaluations.

    PubMed

    Kenley, R A; Jenke, D R

    1990-09-01

    Kinetic and thermodynamic interaction properties between dialkyl phthalate test compounds and a polyolefin polymer were examined via a permeation-cell experimental design. Disappearance and appearance rates of solute in the receptor and donor solutions, as well as the equilibrium composition of the test system, are used to determine sorption and diffusion coefficients and the solute/polymer equilibrium binding constant. Sorption rate constants and diffusion coefficients exhibit Arrenhius-type behavior. The binding constants obtained correlate well with the solute's octanol-water partition coefficient. The kinetic and thermodynamic data generated combine with proposed interaction models to identify solute/polymer interactions (binding and leaching) pertinent to evaluating container/solution compatibility for parenteral products. PMID:2235889

  2. Assessment of vitamin and trace element supplementation in severely burned patients undergoing long-term parenteral and enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Perro, G; Bourdarias, B; Cutillas, M; Higueret, D; Sanchez, R; Iron, A

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of an oral supplement of vitamins and trace elements during a longterm artificial parenteral and enteral nutrition was investigated for 3 months in patients with extensive burns. Thirty severely burned patients (22 male, 8 female, age 41 +/- 18 years, range 23-59 years, 33 +/- 12% total body surface area burn, 22% +/- 8 full thickness burn surface area) were included. Every 10 days, from day 10 until day 90, we determined serum levels of: *vitamins B1, B12, A, E, *folic acid, *copper, zinc, iron, *transferrin, albumin, prealbumin, total proteins, *fibronectin, retinol binding protein (RBP), *calcium, *phosphorus, *triglycerides, *total cholesterol, *C reactive protein (CRP), *erythrocyte folic acid. The mean daily nutritional support was 60 Kcals and 0.4 g N per kg of body weight, 70% enterally and 30% parenterally administered, with enteral vitamin and trace element supplementation. On day 10, there was a decrease of the serum level of 19/20 parameters. For 8 parameters (vitamin A, total cholesterol, iron, transferrin, fibronectin, phosphorus, RBP, total proteins), the level was lower than usual. Between day 10 and day 20, a significant normalization of 6 of them was noted, the average levels of transferrin and iron remaining below normal values until day 50. There was a significant decrease in C-reactive protein levels, however above normal limits. No deficiency in vitamins or trace elements was found. Cyclic variations of serum levels occurred which may be more related to volemic, hydroelectrolytic, endocrine and inflammatory disorders than to nutritional problems. PMID:16843945

  3. Effect of Ginkgo leaf parenteral solution on blood and cochlea antioxidant and immunity indexes in OM rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiandong; Su, Yu; Chen, Aiting; Yuan, Hu; Liu, Liangfa; Wu, Wenming

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development and progression of otitis media (OM). In this study, we investigated the effect of Ginkgo leaf parenteral solution on blood and cochlea antioxidant and immunity indexs in OM rats. In OM model rats, blood and cochlea malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels were significantly increased, whereas antioxidant enzymes activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione reductase (GR)) were significantly decreased compared with normal rats. Treatment with Ginkgo leaf parenteral solution restored the altered parameters in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that Ginkgo leaf parenteral solution confers protection against oxidative injuries in OM rats by increasing activities of antioxidants and immunity, suggesting a potential drug for the prevention and therapy of OM. PMID:22173336

  4. Capillary GC analysis of compounds leached into parenteral solutions packaged in plastic bags

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    A number of investigators have reported finding the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate in plasma, urine, and parenteral solutions. These findings have been associated with the use of polyvinyl chloride packaging materials. Capillary gas chromatography--mass spectrometry, packed column gas chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography were used for the analyses. The screening procedure described herein accurately and quantitatively analyzes the plasticizers di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and dibutylphthalate and some of the degradation products plus 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol and cyclohexanone. Liquid--liquid extraction followed by capillary gas chromatography is used. Linear regression analysis of standard solutions gives correlation coefficients from 0.99963 to 0.99989 for six compounds. Recoveries for these compounds vary from 84.9% to 114% with relative standard deviations ranging from 2.51% to 6.33%.

  5. Parenteral approaches in malabsorption: Home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2016-04-01

    Severe malabsorption of fluids and nutrients leads to intestinal failure (IF) where intravenous supplementation of nutrients and fluids is necessary to maintain health and/or growth. Long-term treatment of IF implies the start of intravenous support in the outpatient setting (home parenteral nutrition, HPN). Although HPN has proven lifesaving for many patients for more than four decades this strategy remains associated with complications that compromise the quality of life. Many problems relate to the presence of the venous access device and concern infections or vascular occlusion due to thrombosis. Patient training remains key to prevent these complications. Also metabolic problems may arise that involve liver function or composition or bone mineralization. While intestinal transplantation remains inferior to HPN as alternative treatment strategy in terms of survival, promising developments include the introduction of hormones that promote intestinal adaptation, mixed lipid emulsions that decrease liver problems and catheter lock solutions that prevent infections. PMID:27086893

  6. Parenteral Nutrition Supplementation in Biliary Atresia Patients Listed for Liver Transplantation”

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Jillian S; Sundaram, Shikha S; Pan, Zhaoxing; Sokol, Ronald J

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of parenteral nutrition (PN) on outcomes in biliary atresia (BA) patients listed for liver transplantation (LTx). Study Design We retrospectively reviewed charts of all BA patients from 1990 through 2010 at our institution, s/p hepatoportoenterostomy, ≤ 36 months old, and listed for LTx. Initiation of PN was based on clinical indications. Results 25 PN and 22 non-PN subjects (74% female) were studied. Median PN initiation age was 7.7 months, mean duration 86 days, and mean PN energy supplied 77 kcal/kg/day. Prior to PN, triceps skinfold thickness (TSF) and mid-arm circumference (MAC) Z-scores were decreasing. After PN, TSF (p=0.003) and MAC (p<0.0001) improved significantly. The PN group had lower MAC and TSF than non-PN at time of LTx listing. Between listing and LTx, MAC and TSF improved in PN and worsened in non-PN such that both groups had the same Z-scores at LTx. PN group had a higher incidence of GI bleeding and ascites pre-LTx, but there was no difference in pre-LTx bacteremia, and post-LTx days in ICU and patient or graft survival. Conclusions PN improves nutritional status in malnourished BA patients awaiting LTx, which is associated with post-LTx outcomes comparable to those not requiring PN. PMID:21987426

  7. Moist-heat sterilization and the chemical stability of heat-labile parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, L C; Parasrampuria, J; Bommireddi, A; Pec, E; Dudleston, A; Mayoral, J

    1998-01-01

    The impact of moist-heat sterilization (autoclaving) on the chemical stability of parenteral solutions was examined using two heat-labile products, clindamycin phosphate and succinylcholine chloride injections, as examples. A nonisothermal kinetic model was used to predict the extent of product degradation during autoclaving. The predicted results were found to be in close agreement with the experimental data. For the same peak temperature, a greater loss of product was shown by using a cycle with a higher F0. On the other hand, a higher peak-temperature cycle resulted in less product degradation for the same F0 value. The benefit of a high-temperature cycle was further illustrated by the fact that less chemical degradation for both products was produced by a 122 degrees C cycle with an F0 of 11 as compared to that which occurred during a 116.5 degrees C cycle with an F0 of 8. Although clindamycin phosphate was found to be highly unstable during a conventional autoclaving process, predicted data indicate that a UHT (Ultra-High Temperature) process may be used to sterilize this product with acceptable degradation. PMID:15605602

  8. Evaluation of official instrumental methods for the determination of particulate matter contamination in large volume parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Montanari, L; Pavanetto, F; Conti, B; Ponci, R; Grassi, M

    1986-11-01

    The distribution pattern of particle contamination in nine different types of LV parenteral solutions and the possibility of correlating the counts made with two official instruments (Coulter Counter and HIAC) were studied. Two hundred containers of LV parenteral solutions (corresponding to 40 batches) produced in Italy, were sampled. Each bottle was submitted to HIAC and Coulter Counter countings, for particle sizes ranging between 2 and 25 micron. For about 50% of the products, the two straight lines that represent the distribution of particle contamination obtained with the two methods did not cross-over within the studied size range, the Coulter Counter counts always proving higher than the HIAC ones. In the other cases, the cross-over point of the two lines occurred at varying size levels. Statistical analysis of the results pointed to a relationship between the contamination values obtained with the two counting methods for sizes ranging between 2 and 5 micron, but there was no correlation for sizes equal to, or higher than, 10 micron. From the maximum contamination levels established by the BP and the FU IX for the HIAC method, the corresponding values were calculated for the Coulter Counter method. Similarly the values were calculated the HIAC method based on the maximum values set for the Coulter Counter. PMID:2879006

  9. Stability-indicating HPLC method for the determination of the stability of oxytocin parenteral solutions prepared in polyolefin bags.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, G; Sayre, B E; Prettyman, T

    2012-02-01

    Oxytocin is very commonly used in clinical settings and is a nonapeptide hormone that stimulates the contraction of uterine smooth muscles. In this study the stability of extemporaneously compounded oxytocin solutions was investigated in polyolefin bags. The sterile preparations of oxytocin were compounded to the strength of 0.02 U/mL in accordance with United States Pharmacopeia (USP) <797> standards. In order to carry out the stability testing of these parenteral products, the solutions were stored under three different temperature conditions of -20°C (frozen), 2-6°C (refrigerated), and 22-25°C (room temperature). Three solutions from each temperature were withdrawn and were assessed for stability on days 0, 7, 15, 21, and 30 as per the USP guidelines. The assay of oxytocin was examined by an HPLC method at each time point. No precipitation, cloudiness or color change was observed during this study at all temperatures. The assay content by HPLC revealed that oxytocin retains greater than at least 90% of the initial concentrations for 21 days. There was no significant change in pH and absorbance values for 21 days under all the conditions of storage. Oxytocin parenteral solutions in the final concentration of 0.02 U/mL and diluted in normal saline are stable for at least 30 days under frozen and refrigerated conditions for 30 days. At the room temperature, the oxytocin solutions were stable for at least 21 days. The stability analysis results show that the shelf-life of 21 days observed in this study was far better than their recommended expiration dates. PMID:22460429

  10. The Technical and Financial Effects of Parenteral Supplementation with Selenium and Vitamin E during Late Pregnancy and the Early Lactation Period on the Productivity of Dairy Cattle.

    PubMed

    Bayril, T; Yildiz, A S; Akdemir, F; Yalcin, C; Köse, M; Yilmaz, O

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of parenteral selenium (Se) and vitamin E supplementation on economic impact, milk yield, and some reproductive parameters in high-yield dairy cows in the dry period and in those at the beginning of lactation. At the beginning of the dry period, cows (n = 323) were randomly divided into three groups as follows: Treatment 1 (T1), Treatment 2 (T2), and Control (C). Cows in group T1 received this preparation 21 days before calving and on calving day, and cows in group T2 received it only on calving day. The cows in the control group did not receive this preparation. Supplementation with Se increased Se serum levels of cows treated at calving day (p<0.05). Differences in milk yield at all weeks and the electrical conductivity values at the 8th and 12th weeks were significant (p<0.05). Supplementation with Se and Vitamin E decreased the incidence of metritis, the number of services per conception and the service period, but had no effects on the incidence of retained fetal membrane. A partial budgeting analysis indicated that Se supplementation was economically profitable; cows in group T1 averaged 240.6$ per cow, those in group T2 averaged 224.6$ per cow. Supplementation with Se and Vitamin E has been found to increase serum Se levels, milk yield, and has positive effects on udder health by decreasing milk conductivity values and incidence of sub-clinical mastitis. PMID:26104521

  11. The Technical and Financial Effects of Parenteral Supplementation with Selenium and Vitamin E during Late Pregnancy and the Early Lactation Period on the Productivity of Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bayril, T.; Yildiz, A. S.; Akdemir, F.; Yalcin, C.; Köse, M.; Yilmaz, O.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of parenteral selenium (Se) and vitamin E supplementation on economic impact, milk yield, and some reproductive parameters in high-yield dairy cows in the dry period and in those at the beginning of lactation. At the beginning of the dry period, cows (n = 323) were randomly divided into three groups as follows: Treatment 1 (T1), Treatment 2 (T2), and Control (C). Cows in group T1 received this preparation 21 days before calving and on calving day, and cows in group T2 received it only on calving day. The cows in the control group did not receive this preparation. Supplementation with Se increased Se serum levels of cows treated at calving day (p<0.05). Differences in milk yield at all weeks and the electrical conductivity values at the 8th and 12th weeks were significant (p<0.05). Supplementation with Se and Vitamin E decreased the incidence of metritis, the number of services per conception and the service period, but had no effects on the incidence of retained fetal membrane. A partial budgeting analysis indicated that Se supplementation was economically profitable; cows in group T1 averaged 240.6$ per cow, those in group T2 averaged 224.6$ per cow. Supplementation with Se and Vitamin E has been found to increase serum Se levels, milk yield, and has positive effects on udder health by decreasing milk conductivity values and incidence of sub-clinical mastitis. PMID:26104521

  12. Parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Pichard, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a technique of nutritional support, which consists of intravenous administration of macronutrients (glucose, amino acids, and triglycerides), micronutrients (vitamins and trace elements), water, and electrolytes. Early studies indicate that the use of total PN was associated with increased mortality and infectious morbidity. These detrimental effects of PN were related to hyperglycemia and overfeeding at a period when PN was administered according to the principle that the higher calories the patients received, the better their outcome would be. Enteral nutrition (EN) then replaced PN as the gold standard of nutritional care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, EN alone is frequently associated with insufficient energy coverage, and subsequent protein-energy deficit is correlated with a worse clinical outcome. Infectious and metabolic complications of PN could be prevented if PN is used by a trained team using a validated protocol, only when indicated, not within the first 2 days following ICU admission, and limited through the time. In addition, energy delivery has to be matched to the energy target, and adapted glucose control should be obtained. In patients with significant energy deficit (>40%), the combination of PN and EN, i.e. supplemental PN, from day 4 of the ICU stay, could improve the clinical outcome of ICU patients as compared with EN alone. Therefore, PN should be integrated in the management of ICU patients with the aim of prevent the worsening of energy deficits, allowing the preservation of lean body mass loss, and reducing the risk of undernutrition-related complications. PMID:23075587

  13. Parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Inayet, N; Neild, P

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, parenteral nutrition has been recognised as an invaluable and potentially lifesaving tool in the physician's arsenal in the management of patients with intestinal failure or inaccessibility; however, it may also be associated with a number of potentially life-threatening complications. A recent NCEPOD report (2010) identified a number of inadequacies in the overall provision and management of parenteral nutrition and recommendations were made with the aim of improving clinical practice in the future. This paper focuses on the practical aspects relating to parenteral nutrition for adults, including important concepts, such as patient selection, as well as general management. We also explore the various pitfalls and potential complications and how these may be minimised. PMID:25874831

  14. Multiparametric Flow System for the Automated Determination of Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, and Magnesium in Large-Volume Parenteral Solutions and Concentrated Hemodialysis Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pistón, Mariela; Dol, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    A multiparametric flow system based on multicommutation and binary sampling has been designed for the automated determination of sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium in large-volume parenteral solutions and hemodialysis concentrated solutions. The goal was to obtain a computer-controlled system capable of determining the four metals without extensive modifications. The system involved the use of five solenoid valves under software control, allowing the establishment of the appropriate flow conditions for each analyte, that is, sample size, dilution, reagent addition, and so forth. Detection was carried out by either flame atomic emission spectrometry (sodium, potassium) or flame atomic absorption spectrometry (calcium, magnesium). The influence of several operating parameters was studied. Validation was carried out by analyzing artificial samples. Figures of merit obtained include linearity, accuracy, precision, and sampling frequency. Linearity was satisfactory: sodium, r 2 >0.999 ( 0.5 – 3.5 g/L), potassium, r 2 >0.996 (50–150 mg/L), calcium, r 2 >0.999 (30–120 mg/L), and magnesium, r 2 >0.999 (20–40 mg/L). Precision ( s r , %, n=5 ) was better than 2.1 %, and accuracy (evaluated through recovery assays) was in the range of 99.8 %– 101.0 % (sodium), 100.8 – 102.5 % (potassium), 97.3 %– 101.3 % (calcium), and 97.1 %– 99.8 % (magnesium). Sampling frequencies ( h −1 ) were 70 (sodium), 75 (potassium), 70 (calcium), and 58 (magnesium). According to the results obtained, the use of an automated multiparametric system based on multicommutation offers several advantages for the quality control of large-volume parenteral solutions and hemodialysis concentrated solutions. PMID:17671619

  15. Cloud point extraction of vanadium in parenteral solutions using a nonionic surfactant (PONPE 5.0) and determination by flow injection-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wuilloud, Gustavo M; de Wuilloud, Jorgelina C A; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G; Silva, Maria F; Olsina, Roberto A; Martinez, Luis D

    2002-10-16

    A preconcentration and determination methodology for vanadium at trace levels in parenteral solutions was developed. Cloud point extraction was successfully employed for the preconcentration of vanadium prior to inductively coupled plasma atomic optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) coupled to a flow injection (FI) system. The vanadium was extracted as vanadium-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol [V-(5-Br-PADAP)] complex, at pH 3.7 mediated by micelles of the nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene (5.0) nonylphenol (PONPE 5.0). The extracted surfactant-rich phase (100 mul) was mixed with 100 mul of ethanol and this final volume injected into ICP-OES for the vanadium determination. Under these conditions, the 50 ml sample solution preconcentration allowed raising an enrichment factor of 250-fold; however, it was possible to obtain a theoretical enrichment factor of 500-fold. The lower limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 16 ng l(-1). The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 2.0 mug l(-1) V level was 2.3% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated with the peak heights. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for vanadium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 50 mug l(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of vanadium in parenteral solution samples. PMID:18968790

  16. Parenteral drug products containing aluminum as an ingredient or a contaminant: Response to Food and Drug Administration notice of intent and request for information. ASCN/A. S. P. E. N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Aluminum remains a significant contaminant of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions and may be elevated in bone, urine, and plasma of infants receiving TPN. Aluminum accumulation in tissues of uremic patients and adult TPN patients has been associated with low-turnover bone disease. Furthermore, aluminum has also been linked with encephalopathy and anemia in uremic patients and with hepatic cholestasis in experimental animals. Because of the toxic effects of aluminum, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently published a notice of intent to set an upper limit of 25 micrograms/L for aluminum in large-volume parenterals and to require manufacturers of small-volume parenterals, such as calcium and phosphate salts, to measure aluminum content and note this content on the package label. The ASCN/A.S.P.E.N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions supports these intentions and further urges the FDA to require that cumulative aluminum intake in terms of safe, unsafe, and toxic quantities of aluminum per kilogram be made known to physicians and pharmacists preparing the TPN solutions, to ensure that manufacturers use appropriate control procedures in aluminum measurements, and to employ a standard unit of aluminum measurement.

  17. Glutamine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Wernerman, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous glutamine supplementation is standard care when parenteral nutrition is given for critical illness. There are data of a reduced mortality when glutamine supplementation is given. In addition, standard commercial products for parenteral nutrition do not contain any glutamine due to glutamine instability in aqueous solutions. For the majority of critical ill patients who are fed enterally, the available evidence is insufficient to recommend glutamine supplementation. Standard formulation of enteral nutrition contains some glutamine: 2-4 g/L. However, this dose is insufficient to normalize glutamine plasma concentration.Plasma concentration of glutamine is low in many patients with critical illness and a low level is an independent risk factor for mortality. A low plasma glutamine concentration is the best indicator of glutamine depletion. Data are emerging about how the endogenous production of glutamine is regulated. We know that skeletal muscle is the major producer of glutamine and that a part of the profound depletion of skeletal muscle seen in critical illness is a reflection of the need to produce glutamine.Glutamine is utilized in rapidly dividing cells in the splanchnic area. Quantitatively most glutamine is oxidized, but the availability of glutamine in surplus is important for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides and necessary for cell division and protein synthesis. More knowledge about the regulation of the endogenous production of glutamine is needed to outline better guidelines for glutamine supplementation in the future. PMID:21906372

  18. Evaluation of a simple method for visual detection of microprecipitates in blends of parenteral drug solutions using a focused (tyndall) light beam.

    PubMed

    Veggeland, Turid; Brandl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The formation of microprecipitates (sub visible particles) is a critical factor when blending parenteral drug solutions prior to or during intravenous administration to a patient. In cases where compatibility is not documented, analytical screening of such mixtures for physical incompatibility would give a safer foundation for secure administration of such blends to patients. The aim of this article is to report our experiences with visual screening using a focused (Tyndall) light beam for the detection of micro precipitates within blends of drug solutions, a method which may be used in any hospital pharmacy without use of advanced analytical instrumentation. A selection of clinically applied drug solutions was tested for precipitation upon blending in a proportion of 1:1. In order to reduce potential background particle burden, the solutions were filtered through 0.2 micrometer pore size filters prior to mixing. To detect potential precipitation, the solutions were visually inspected using two different types of focused light beams, a 75-watt white, focused light source and a HeNe pocket laser-pointer, for light scattering. For comparison, a light obscuration particle counter test was performed as described in the European Pharmacopeia. An experimental set-up is described, and a detailed protocol is suggested for a method able to detect micro precipitates in drug solution blends by using focused (Tyndall) light. The performance of this method for selected blends is reported in comparison to the Pharmacopeial light obscuration particle count test. Despite the fact that visual inspection using Tyndall light is a simple and low-cost method, it was found sensitive for detecting minute amounts of sub visible particles with detection sensitivity close to the light obscuration particle counting limits stated by the European Pharmacopeia. In cases where an electronic particle counter is not accessible, a sensitive warning signal may be obtained from this approach

  19. 78 FR 40474 - Sustaining Power Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sustaining Power Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding, of Sustaining Power Solutions LLC's application for...

  20. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses the gastrointestinal tract. Fluids are given into a vein to ... babies. It can provide a better level of nutrition than regular intravenous (IV) feedings, which provide only ...

  1. Total parenteral nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) will help you or your child get nutrition from a special formula through a vein in the ... you can also eat and drink while getting nutrition from TPN. Your nurse will teach you how ...

  2. The effect of oral and parenteral vitamin D supplementation in the elderly: a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Sakalli, Hakan; Arslan, Didem; Yucel, Ahmet Eftal

    2012-08-01

    Hypovitaminosis D in the elderly causes falls and fractures as a result of impaired neuromuscular functions and also may be a reason for nonspecific musculosceletal pain. The aim of this study is to investigate the benefits of a single dose per os or parenterally administrated vitamin D on increasing the quality of life and functional mobility and decreasing the pain in the elderly. The community-dwelling elderly subjects over 65 years age were included in the study. The subjects were given 300.000 IU Vitamin D via per os and parenteral route and assessed after 4 weeks. The serum creatinine, calcium, phosphorous, ALT, ALP, 24-h urine calcium excretion, PTH, and vitamin D levels, as well as VAS (visual analog scale) for pain assessment, functional mobility with TUG (timed up and go test) and quality of life with SF-36 before and after the treatment were evaluated. The serum vitamin D levels were measured by the RIA method. The subjects were divided into four groups each consisting of 30 subjects. The 1st group took i.m. vitamin D, the 2nd group took i.m. placebo, the 3rd group took p.o. vitamin D, and the 4th group took p.o. placebo. The mean age of all the participants was 70.1 ± 4.3 years. There was no difference in the age and gender between the groups (P > 0.05). After treatment, the PTH level of first group was decreased (P = 0.0001) and the vitamin D level increased (P = 0.0001) significantly. In the third group, the PTH level of first group was decreased (P = 0.0001) and the vitamin D level increased (P = 0.004) and the 24-h calcium excretion in urine (P = 0.015) increased significantly. When the pain, the functional mobility, and the quality of life were evaluated, in the first group, the TUG (P = 0.0001) and the VAS (P = 0.0001) decreased significantly, whereas the SF-36 subtitles: physical functioning (P = 0.0001), role physical (0.006), bodily pain (P = 0.0001), general health (P = 0.007), social functioning (P = 0.05), and mental health (P = 0

  3. Dietary supplements in the Department of Defense: possible solutions to optimizing force readiness.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Stephen; Stavinoha, Trisha; Hite, Linda; Costa, Janelle; Dilly, George; Deuster, Patricia A

    2012-12-01

    Dietary supplement use is common among military service members; approximately 17 to 20% report using high-risk weight-loss, performance-enhancing, and bodybuilding supplements. To date, no overarching policy or program has been approved or implemented to inform service members or educate health care providers on the potential adverse consequences of using multiple combinations of supplements or the pros and cons of supplements per se. A review of regulations, concerns, and possible solutions is provided. Importantly, the role of third-party certification and education is emphasized. PMID:23397690

  4. Iodine Deficiency in a Parenteral Nutrition-Dependent Adolescent With Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Melissa; Williamson, Nila; Davis, Cheryl; Kanyu Hsu, Evelyn; Javid, Patrick J; Horslen, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Routine supplementation of iodine in parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions is not current practice in the United States. In this case study, we describe an incidental finding of goiter in a long-term PN-dependent adolescent. With increased iodine screening, we then identified additional patients with undetectable urinary iodine concentrations in our population of children with short bowel receiving long-term PN. We hypothesize that 2 practice changes are possibly reducing iodine provision to long-term PN-dependent patients: transition to alcohol-based skin preparations and lipid minimization. PMID:25261415

  5. Modular Building Supplement: A Quick, Quality Solution for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodmiller, Brian D.; Schendell, Derek G.

    2003-01-01

    This supplement presents three articles on modular construction that look at: "Fast Track Expansion for a New Jersey School" (involving a modular addition); "Precast Construction Helps Schools Meet Attendance Boom" (precast concrete components are quick, durable, and flexible); and "Airing HVAC Concerns" (poor indoor air quality in prefabricated…

  6. Vitamin K in parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Martin J

    2009-11-01

    Vitamin K (as phylloquinone and menaquinones) is an essential cofactor for the conversion of peptide-bound glutamate to gamma-carboxy glutamic acid (Gla) residues in a number of specialized Gla-containing proteins. The only unequivocal deficiency outcome is a bleeding syndrome caused by an inability to synthesize active coagulation factors II, VII, IX, and X, although there is growing evidence for roles for vitamin K in bone and vascular health. An adult daily intake of about 100 microg of phylloquinone is recommended for the maintenance of hemostasis. Traditional coagulation tests for assessing vitamin K status are nonspecific and insensitive. Better tests include measurements of circulating vitamin K and inactive proteins such as undercarboxylated forms of factor II and osteocalcin to assess tissue and functional status, respectively. Common risk factors for vitamin K deficiency in the hospitalized patient include inadequate dietary intakes, malabsorption syndromes (especially owing to cholestatic liver disease), antibiotic therapy, and renal insufficiency. Pregnant women and their newborns present a special risk category because of poor placental transport and low concentrations of vitamin K in breast milk. Since 2000, the Food and Drug Administration has mandated that adult parenteral preparations should provide a supplemental amount of 150 microg phylloquinone per day in addition to that present naturally, in variable amounts, in the lipid emulsion. Although this supplemental daily amount is probably beneficial in preventing vitamin K deficiency, it may be excessive for patients taking vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, and jeopardize their anticoagulant control. Natural forms of vitamin K have no proven toxicity. PMID:19874942

  7. Parenteral nutrition: never say never

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes the benefits of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients, when prescribed for relevant indications, in adequate quantities, and in due time. Critically ill patients are at risk of energy deficit during their ICU stay, a condition which leads to unfavorable outcomes, due to hypercatabolism secondary to the stress response and the difficulty to optimize feeding. Indirect calorimetry is recommended to define the energy target, since no single predictive equation accurately estimates energy expenditure. Energy metabolism is intimately associated with protein metabolism. Recent evidence calls for adequate protein provision, but there is no accurate method to estimate the protein requirements, and recommendations are probably suboptimal. Enteral nutrition (EN) is the preferred route of feeding, but gastrointestinal intolerance limits its efficacy and PN allows for full coverage of energy needs. Seven recent articles concerning PN for critically ill patients were identified and carefully reviewed for the clinical and scientific relevance of their conclusions. One article addressed the unfavorable effects of early PN, although this result should be more correctly regarded as a consequence of glucose load and hypercaloric feeding. The six other articles were either in favor of PN or concluded that there was no difference in the outcome compared with EN. Hypercaloric feeding was not observed in these studies. Hypocaloric feeding led to unfavorable outcomes. This further demonstrates the beneficial effects of an early and adequate feeding with full EN, or in case of failure of EN with exclusive or supplemental PN. EN is the first choice for critically ill patients, but difficulties providing optimal nutrition through exclusive EN are frequently encountered. In cases of insufficient EN, individualized supplemental PN should be administered to reduce the infection rate and the duration of mechanical ventilation. PN is a safe therapeutic option

  8. Protective effect of polysaccharides on the stability of parenteral emulsions.

    PubMed

    Chai, Guihong; Sun, Feng; Shi, Jianli; Tian, Bin; Tang, Xing

    2013-05-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of two polysaccharides (dextran, hydroxyethyl starch) on the stability of parenteral emulsions. All parenteral emulsions were prepared by high-pressure homogenization. The influence of polysaccharides concentration was studied. The stabilities of autoclaving sterilization, centrifugation and freeze-thawing process were investigated extensively. Following the addition of polysaccharides, the stabilities of the parenteral emulsions were improved. A high-concentration polysaccharides solution (13%, w/v) produced better protection than a low one (1.3%, w/v), especially during freeze-thawing process. The protective mechanisms of polysaccharides were attributed to increasing systematic viscosity, non-frozen water absorbed by polysaccharides, formation of a linear bead-like structure and thicker mixed emulsifier film. Overall, polysaccharides can offer greatly increased protection for parenteral emulsions, and represent a novel protective strategy for improving the stability of this delivery system. PMID:22583006

  9. Design Solutions: Supplement to the Curriculum Guide for Art in the Secondary Schools. Field Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    Intended to clarify the elements and principles of design as stated in the "Curriculum Guide for Art in the Secondary Schools," this illustrated supplement presents 15 design units with step-by-step instructions for clarifying design problems and providing solutions. Each unit is presented in three stages, each of which is a complete lesson in…

  10. Metabolic acidosis during parenteral nutrition: Pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Zikou, Xanthi; Koulouras, Vasilis; Katopodis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with metabolic complications including metabolic acidosis (MA), one of the main disorders of acid-base balance. The main causes involved in the appearance of MA during TPN administration are the metabolism of cationic amino acids and amino acids containing sulfuric acid (exogenous addition), the titratable acidity of the infused parenteral solution, the addition of acidificant agents (hydrochloric acid, acetic acid), thiamine deficiency, disruption of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways and D-fructose administration. Moreover, hypophosphatemia that appears during TPN therapy contributes significantly to the maintenance of MA. This review describes in a comprehensive way the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the appearance of MA induced by intravenous administration of TPN products most commonly used in critically ill-patients. PMID:25983433

  11. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  12. Hazards of parenteral treatment: do particles count?

    PubMed Central

    Puntis, J W; Wilkins, K M; Ball, P A; Rushton, D I; Booth, I W

    1992-01-01

    After prolonged parenteral nutrition a 12 month old infant died with pulmonary hypertension and granulomatous pulmonary arteritis. A review of necropsy findings in 41 infants who had been fed parenterally showed that two of these also had pulmonary artery granulomata, while none of 32 control patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome had similar findings. Particulate contaminants have been implicated in the pathogenesis of such lesions and these were quantified in amino acid/dextrose solutions and fat emulsions using automated particle counting and optical microscope counting respectively. Parenteral feed infusions compounded for a 3000 g infant according to standard nutritional regimens were found to include approximately 37,000 particles between 2 and 100 microns in size in one day's feed, of which 80% were derived from the fat emulsion. In-line end filtration of intravenous infusions may reduce the risk of particle associated complications. A suitable particle filter is required for use with lipid. Images p1476-a PMID:1489228

  13. Compatibility: drugs and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Talita Muniz Maloni; Ferraresi, Andressa de Abreu

    2016-03-01

    Objective Standardization and systematization of data to provide quick access to compatibility of leading injectable drugs used in hospitals for parenteral nutrition. Methods We selected 55 injectable drugs analyzed individually with two types of parenteral nutrition: 2-in-1 and 3-in-1. The following variables were considered: active ingredient, compatibility of drugs with the parenteral nutrition with or without lipids, and maximum drug concentration after dilution for the drugs compatible with parenteral nutrition. Drugs were classified as compatible, incompatible and untested. Results After analysis, relevant information to the product's compatibility with parental nutrition was summarized in a table. Conclusion Systematization of compatibility data provided quick and easy access, and enabled standardizing pharmacists work. PMID:27074235

  14. Thiamine Deficiency in a Developed Country: Acute Lactic Acidosis in Two Neonates Due to Unsupplemented Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Guglielmo; Mondì, Vito; Piersigilli, Fiammetta; Capolupo, Irma; Pannone, Veronica; Vici, Carlo Dionisi; Rizzo, Cristiano; Dotta, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin implicated in several metabolic processes. Its deficiency, due to prolonged parenteral nutrition without adequate vitamin supplementation, can lead to multiorgan failure characterized by cardiovascular impairment and metabolic acidosis refractory to bicarbonate administration. Only thiamine administration allows the remission of symptoms. We report 2 preterm infants with acute thiamine deficiency due to prolonged parenteral nutrition without adequate vitamin supplementation. PMID:25591974

  15. Supplemental Report: Technetium-99 On-Line Monitoring by Beta Counting for Hanford Supernate Waste Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, R.A.

    2000-08-23

    SRTC is investigating approaches for near-real-time monitoring of 99Tc at selected points in the proposed pretreatment process for Hanford supernate waste solutions. The desired monitoring points include both the feed to and decontaminated product from a technetium-removal column. A Cs-removal column precedes technetium decontamination in the proposed process. Our earlier report (Ref. 1) showed that a simple flow-through beta counting system can easily meet 99Tc detection limit goals for solutions that do not contain interfering radionuclides; however, concentrations of residual interferences were too high in process solutions at the desired monitoring points. That is, technetium can not be measured without additional purification. In this supplement, ADS evaluated ion exchange cartridges to remove radionuclides that interfere with 99Tc beta measurements. Tests on radioactive standard solutions and on Hanford Envelope B (AZ-102) pretreated process solutions show that 99Tc passes through the cation removal cartridge to an on-line beta counter, and that interfering radionuclides were nearly totally removed. Envelope B solutions included both the process's Cs-removed feed to the Tc-removal column and product from the column. Analyses of these solutions before and after the cation exchange cartridge show that the concentration of the primary interference, 137Cs, was reduced to about 1/250th of the feed concentration.

  16. Total Parenteral Nutrition-Induced Cholestasis: Prevention and Management.

    PubMed

    Beath, Sue V; Kelly, Deirdre A

    2016-02-01

    When cholestasis occurs in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition, it is the result of many pathogenic pathways converging on the hepatic acinus. The result may be a temporary rise in liver function tests. The resulting fibrosis, portal hypertension, and jaundice are hallmarks of type 3 intestinal-associated liver disease to which children are more susceptible than adults. The key to prevention is in identifying high-risk scenarios, meticulous monitoring, and personalized prescription of parenteral nutrition solutions combined with an active approach in reducing the impact of inflammatory events when they occur by prompt use of antibiotics and line locks. PMID:26593297

  17. Parenteral opioids for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Campbell, David C

    2003-09-01

    Labor pain relief is an important aspect of women's health that has historically been neglected. Epidural analgesia is the only consistently effective method of labor pain relief and has recently undergone substantial improvements to address the concerns of both parturients and obstetric care providers. With increased physician awareness, these recent advances are becoming more widely accepted and routinely available for all laboring parturients. Unfortunately, an increasing number of women are presenting to maternity wards with an absolute contraindication to epidural labor analgesia. The present review will provide an outline of the recent developments in parenteral analgesic options which complement modern epidural analgesic techniques. Protocols for the initiation of "state-of-the-art" parenteral analgesic techniques are provided as a guide to facilitate effective, modern, parenteral labor analgesia. PMID:12972743

  18. Improved preservation of warm ischemic livers by hypothermic machine perfusion with supplemented University of Wisconsin solution.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shailendra; Lee, Sang Ho; Korneszczuk, Katarzyna; Culberson, Catherine R; Southard, James H; Berthiaume, François; Zhang, Jian X; Clemens, Mark G; Lee, Charles Y

    2008-01-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) has the potential to improve recovery and preservation of Donation after Cardiac Death (DCD) livers, including uncontrolled DCD livers. However, current perfusion solutions lack the needed substrates to improve energy recovery and minimize hepatic injury, if warm ischemic time (WIT) is extended. This proof-of-concept study tested the hypothesis that the University of Wisconsin (UW) solution supplemented with anaplerotic substrates, calcium chloride, thromboxane A2 inhibitor, and antioxidants could improve HMP preservation and minimize reperfusion injury of warm ischemic livers. Preflushed rat livers subjected to 60 min WIT were preserved for 5 h with standard UW or supplemented UW (SUW) solution. Post preservation hepatic functions and viability were assessed during isolated perfusion with Krebs-Henseleit solution. Livers preserved with SUW showed significantly (p < .001) improved recovery of tissue ATP levels (micromol/g liver), 2.06 +/- 0.10 (mean +/- SE), as compared to the UW group, 0.70 +/- 0.10, and the level was 80% of that of fresh control livers (2.60 +/- 0.13). At the end of 1 h of rewarming, lactate dehydrogenase (U/L) in the perfusate was significantly (p < .05) lower in the SUW group (429 +/- 58) as compared to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) (781 +/- 12) and the UW group (1151 +/- 83). Bile production (microg/min/g liver) was significantly (p < .05) higher in the SUW group (280 +/- 13) as compared to the IR (224 +/- 24) and the UW group (114 +/- 14). The tissue edema formation assessed by tissue wet-dry ratio was significantly (p < .05) higher in UW group. Histology showed well-preserved hepatic structure in the SUW group. In conclusion, this study suggests that HMP with SUW solution has the potential to restore and preserve livers with extended WIT. PMID:18340625

  19. Minimizing systemic infection during complete parenteral alimentation of small infants

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A regimen of parenteral alimentation for infants was designed to eliminate as many factors responsible for infection as possible. The most important features of the feeding regimen were as follows. (1) Infants were fed via indwelling silastic catheters inserted into the superior vena cava or the right atrium by a cutdown operation. (2) The parenteral feeding was fat free to simplify the administration system. Y connectors and 2- or 3-way taps were avoided. (3) Extreme care was taken of junctions within the infusion system. Only certain members of the hospital staff were allowed to break such junctions, e.g. during the changing of packs of solution or of the giving sets. These junctions were sprayed with antibacterial aerosols. (4) The hypertonic solutions of nutrients were prepared in plastic packs, which do not require ventilation. The infusion system was therefore not contaminated by the entry of unsterile outside air. (5) The infused solutions were passed through 0·22 μm millipore filters before entering the patient's blood stream. There was an infection rate of 9% which was less than the 25 to 45% infection rate previously reported during parenteral feeding through indwelling venous catheters, and is also less than that associated with ventriculoatrial shunts for hydrocephalus. There was no case of systemic candidiasis, which is the most frequent and most serious infection associated with parenteral feeding. PMID:4206445

  20. 77 FR 28594 - Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC's application for...

  1. 77 FR 64980 - Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC's application for...

  2. 78 FR 75560 - Green Current Solutions, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Green Current Solutions, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding, of Green Current Solutions, LLC's application for market-based...

  3. Biodegradable microspheres for parenteral delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V R; Trehan, A

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, emphasis is being laid to development of controlled release dosage forms. Interest in this technology has increased steadily over the past few years. Although oral administration of drugs is a widely accepted route of drug delivery, bioavailability of drug often varies as a result of gastrointestinal absorption, degradation by first-pass effect, and hostile environment of gastrointestinal tract. Transdermal administration for percutaneous absorption of drug is limited by the impermeable nature of the stratum corneum. Ocular and nasal delivery is also unfavorable because of degradation by enzymes present in eye tissues and nasal mucosa. Hence, the parenteral route is the most viable approach in such cases. Of the various ways of achieving long-term parenteral drug delivery, biodegradable microspheres are one of the better means of controlling the release of drug over a long time. Because of the lipidic nature of liposomes, problems such as limited physical stability and difficulty of freeze-drying are encountered. Similarly, for emulsions, stability on long-term basis and in suspensions, rheological changes during filling, injecting, and storage poses limitation. Also, in all these systems, the release rate cannot be tailored to the needs of the patient. Parenteral controlled-release formulations based on biodegradable microspheres can overcome these problems and can control the release of drug over a predetermined time span, usually in the order of days to weeks to months. Various FDA-approved controlled-release parenteral formulations based on these biodegradable microspheres are available on the market, including Lupron Depot Nutropin Depot and Zoladex. This review covers various molecules encapsulated in biodegradable microspheres for parenteral delivery. PMID:16566705

  4. Metabolic bone disease and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Cynthia; Seidner, Douglas L

    2004-08-01

    Metabolic bone disease (MBD) is abnormal bone metabolism and includes the common disorders of osteoporosis and osteomalacia, which can develop in patients receiving long-term parenteral nutrition (PN). Patients who require long-term PN have significant gastrointestinal failure and malabsorption, which is generally caused by severe inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal ischemia, or malignancy. The exact cause of MBD in long-term PN patients is unknown, but its origin is thought to be multifactorial, with factors including underlying disease, effect of medications used to treat this disease (eg, corticosteroids), and various components of the PN solution. Caring for patients on long-term PN requires routine assessment and monitoring for MBD. Appropriate adjustments of the PN solution can help reduce the risk for developing PN-associated MBD and in some instances improve bone mineral density. Recent developments in pharmacologic treatment for osteoporosis show promise for patients with MBD receiving PN. PMID:15245704

  5. Do surface active parenteral formulations cause inflammation?

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Lars; Engblom, Johan; Lanbeck, Peter; Wahlgren, Marie

    2015-04-30

    Local irritation and inflammation at the site of administration are a common side effect following administration of parenteral formulations. Biological effects of surface (interfacial) activity in solutions are less well investigated than effects caused by other physico-chemical parameters such as pH and osmolality. The interfacial activity in different systems, including human plasma, typical amphiphilic substances with fundamental biological relevance such as free fatty acids, anesthetic depot formulations and six different antibiotics was measured. The relative interfacial pressure, and/or concentration of active substance, required to obtain 50% of the maximal attainable effect in terms of interfacial pressure were calculated. The aim was to test the hypothesis that these parameters would allow comparison to biological effects reported in in vivo studies on the investigated substances. The highest interfacial activity was found in a triglyceride/plasma system. Among the antibiotic tested, the highest interfacial activities were found in erythromycin and dicloxacillin, which is in accordance with previous clinical findings of a high tendency of infusion phlebitis and cell toxicity. Independently of investigated system, biological effects were minimal below a 15% relative increase of interfacial activity. Above 35-45% the effects were severe. Interfacial activity in parenteral formulations may well cause damages to tissues followed by inflammation. PMID:25708007

  6. [Insulin therapy and parenteral nutrition in intensive care: practical aspects].

    PubMed

    Limonta, A; Gastaldi, G; Heidegger, C P; Pichard, C

    2015-03-25

    Critically ill patients are hypercatabolic due to stress and inflammation. This condition induces hyperglycemia. Muscle wasting is intense during critical illness. Its prevention is essential. This is possible by early and appropriate nutritional support. Preserving the function of the gastrointestinal tract with enteral nutrition is the gold standard. However, when targeted protein-caloric intake is not met through enteral nutrition within the first three days in the intensive care unit (ICU), supplemental parenteral nutrition is administered to reduce morbidity and mortality. In addition, in order to limit metabolic imbalance and reduce mortality, glycemic control using insulin therapy is mandatory. This article reviews the current understanding of parenteral nutrition and insulin therapy in ICU patients, and provides the decision model applied in our institution. PMID:26027204

  7. Hydroxypropyl cellulose as an option for supplementation of cryoprotectant solutions for embryo vitrification in human assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Mori, Chiemi; Yabuuchi, Akiko; Ezoe, Kenji; Murata, Nana; Takayama, Yuko; Okimura, Tadashi; Uchiyama, Kazuo; Takakura, Kei; Abe, Hiroyuki; Wada, Keiko; Okuno, Takashi; Kobayashi, Tamotsu; Kato, Keiichi

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) was investigated as a replacement for serum substitute supplement (SSS) for use in cryoprotectant solutions for embryo vitrification. Mouse blastocysts from inbred (n = 1056), hybrid (n = 128) strains, and 121 vitrified blastocysts donated by infertile patients (n = 102) were used. Mouse and human blastocysts, with or without zona pellucida, were vitrified and warmed in either 1% or 5% HPC or in 5% or 20% SSS-supplemented media using the Cryotop (Kitazato BioPharma Co. Ltd, Fuji, Japan) method, and the survival and oxygen consumption rates were assessed. Viscosity of each vitrification solution was compared. Survival rates of mouse hybrid blastocysts and human zona pellucida-intact blastocysts were comparable among the groups. Mouse and human zona pellucida-free blastocysts, which normally exhibit poor cryoresistance, showed significantly higher survival rates in 5% HPC than 5% SSS (P < 0.05). The 5% HPC-supplemented vitrification solution showed a significantly higher viscosity (P < 0.05). The blastocysts were easily detached from the Cryotop strip during warming when HPC-supplemented vitrification solution was used. The oxygen consumption rates were similar between non-vitrified and 5% HPC groups. The results suggest possible use of HPC for supplementation of cryoprotectant solutions and provide useful information to improve vitrification protocols. PMID:25892497

  8. [Clinical importance of hypocaloric parenteral feeding].

    PubMed

    Behrendt, W; Kunitz, O; Kauhl, W; Lade, R

    1994-01-01

    Hypocaloric parenteral nutrition (HPN) is mainly and frequently used in surgical medicine since it allows a reliable and standardized supply of nutrients. Ready-mix solutions which are suitable for peripheral venous nutrition generally contain about 50 g carbohydrates (glucose and/or xylitol), 25 g amino acids and electrolytes per liter. The osmolarity of the solutions averages between 600 and 800 mosmol/l. HPN has two distinct advantages: firstly the minimal effects on carbohydrate metabolism and secondly the good improvement in nitrogen balance. If 2 g/kg and day glucose are administered, even postoperatively, the mean blood sugar levels are only just above the normal range and an amino acid dosage of 1 g/kg and day, compared with liquid substitution alone or the administration of small amounts of carbohydrates, leads to an approximately 60% improvement in postoperative N-balance. Experience gained with HPN in surgical medicine to date permits the following recommendation: 1. HPN should not be used after small and moderate interventions with short nutritional abstinence; it is not necessary to administer nutrients in such cases. 2. HPN may be used after moderate to serious surgical interventions; e.g. after gastrointestinal resections in the case of elective surgery on patients with a normal nutritional status. However, studies have yet to prove the clinical efficacy of HPN, e.g. as evidenced by shorter hospitalization or a reduced perioperative morbidity or mortality, although this reservation equally applies to the routinely administered complete parenteral or enteral nutrition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7975956

  9. A Call to Action to Bring Safer Parenteral Micronutrient Products to the U.S. Market.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Vincent W; Borum, Peggy; Buchman, Alan; Fessler, Theresa A; Howard, Lyn; Shenkin, Alan; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-08-01

    The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) started an intensive review of commercially available parenteral vitamin and trace element (TE) products in 2009. The chief findings were that adult multi-TE products currently available in the United States (U.S.) provide potentially toxic amounts of manganese, copper, and chromium, and neonatal/pediatric multi-TE products provide potentially toxic amounts of manganese and chromium. The multivitamin products appeared safe and effective; however, a separate parenteral vitamin D product is needed for those patients on standard therapy who continue to be vitamin D depleted and are unresponsive to oral supplements. The review process also extended to parenteral choline and carnitine. Although choline and carnitine are not technically vitamins or trace elements, choline is an essential nutrient in all age groups, and carnitine is an essential nutrient in infants, according to the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. A parenteral choline product needs to be developed and available. Efforts are currently under way to engage the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the parenteral nutrient industry so A.S.P.E.N.'s recommendations can become a commercial reality. PMID:26113560

  10. [Review and prospect of parenteral nutrition support for burn patients in China].

    PubMed

    Deng, Shi-lin

    2008-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition support for burn injury in China began to develop in 1970s along with improvement in burn foundational research of burn injury and the marketing of parenteral nutrition solutions manufactured by Chinese amino acids pharmaceutical industry. Up to 1980s many kinds of parenteral nutrition products were used in clinical therapy, and they were proved to be effective and safe. Meanwhile the guide for parenteral nutrition support of China was drafted to ensure standardized administration. Some problems should be called for attention in present practice of parenteral nutrition support. First, immuno nutrients have been proved to possess synergistic effect on parenteral/enteral nutrition support. But for those critical patients in sepsis/MODS period, more attention should be paid to the use of immuno nutrients in time of administration and optimal dosage because of the complicate physiopathologic reactions. Secondly, the use of growth hormone has been proved to be effective for promoting healing in patients with burn in many cases. However, the indications of growth hormone should be strictly observed and the regime of a low dose and short course should be adopted 7 days after burn for ensuring safety. Thirdly, we should pay attention to the best path of giving nutrition, whether enteral or parenteral. Parenteral nutrition support should be adopted for critical burn patients in early period with intestinal dysfunction, and enteral nutrition support should be used when intestinal functions recover partially. For patients with burn hypermetabolism, the application of enteral and parenteral nutrition support is complimentary, and it is aptly called total nutrition. PMID:19103029

  11. Zinc: physiology, deficiency, and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Callum

    2015-06-01

    The essential trace element zinc (Zn) has a large number of physiologic roles, in particular being required for growth and functioning of the immune system. Adaptive mechanisms enable the body to maintain normal total body Zn status over a wide range of intakes, but deficiency can occur because of reduced absorption or increased gastrointestinal losses. Deficiency impairs physiologic processes, leading to clinical consequences that include failure to thrive, skin rash, and impaired wound healing. Mild deficiency that is not clinically overt may still cause nonspecific consequences, such as susceptibility to infection and poor growth. The plasma Zn concentration has poor sensitivity and specificity as a test of deficiency. Consequently, diagnosis of deficiency requires a combination of clinical assessment and biochemical tests. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) are susceptible to Zn deficiency and its consequences. Nutrition support teams should have a strategy for assessing Zn status and optimizing this by appropriate supplementation. Nutrition guidelines recommend generous Zn provision from the start of PN. This review covers the physiology of Zn, the consequences of its deficiency, and the assessment of its status, before discussing its role in PN. PMID:25681484

  12. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays. PMID:26734536

  13. Stability assessment of o/w parenteral nutrition emulsions in the presence of high glucose and calcium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Télessy, I G; Balogh, J; Turmezei, J; Dredán, J; Zelkó, R

    2011-09-10

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how the colloid stability features of o/w parenteral nutrition emulsions made with SMOFlipid (lipid emulsion based on soybean oil, medium chain triglycerides, olive oil and fish oil) will change in the presence of high concentration of calcium and glucose if usual micronutrients are also present, according to the needs of the clinical nutrition patient. Particle size analysis, zeta potential, dynamic surface tension measurements and light microscopic screening were carried out to evaluate the possible changes in the kinetic stability of the emulsions. Our results indicate that the higher glucose concentration of 15 or 20% could not compensate the emulsion-destabilizing effect of higher (5 mM) calcium concentration even in the presence of a modern fat emulsion. Therefore calcium demand of undernourished patient requiring 5 mM or higher final Ca²⁺ content in nutrient solution should be supplemented in another way. PMID:21636233

  14. Total parenteral nutrition caused Wernicke’s encephalopathy accompanied by wet beriberi

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ling; Cai, Xiao-Dong; Bao, Jian; Wu, Ai-Min; Tian, Qing; Lu, Zheng-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 17 Final Diagnosis: Wernicke’s encephalopathy Symptoms: Blurred vision • dizziness • nystygmus • tachycardia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Mistake in diagnosis Background: Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE) is an acute and life-threatening illness which is not only seen in alcoholics, but also in persons with poor nutrition lacking thiamine (vitamin B1). Case Report: Here, we presented a case of WE in a patient who received parenteral nutrition without complement of thiamine. Besides neuropsychiatric problems, she also manifested prominent cardiovascular abnormalities, which were consistent with wet beriberi. Conclusions: This case emphasizes the need for thiamine supplementation in prolonged total parenteral nutrition, and also highlights the awareness of WE in persons with parenteral nutrition lacking thiamine. More importantly, we call for attention to wet beriberi in such persons. PMID:24516692

  15. Parenteral nutrition in hospital pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Katoue, Maram Gamal; Al-Taweel, Dalal; Matar, Kamal Mohamed; Kombian, Samuel B

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content. Findings - Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols. Originality/value - This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs. PMID:27298063

  16. Pancreatic exocrine response to parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bivins, B A; Bell, R M; Rapp, R P; Toedebusch, W H

    1984-01-01

    Animal experimental data concerning pancreatic exocrine secretory response to parenteral nutrition is contradictory. We have studied the pancreatic exocrine output in a patient with a pure pancreatic fistula. In this patient, parenteral nutrition with hypertonic glucose, amino acids and fat emulsion was not associated with increases in fistula volume or protein output. Enteral protein and fat in this patient caused rapid increases in both fistula volume and protein output. This study supports the use of parenteral nutrition as a means of maintaining the pancreas at rest. PMID:6321813

  17. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  18. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  19. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  20. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  1. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  2. [Pulmonary complications during parenteral feeding via percutaneous silicon catheters].

    PubMed

    Closa, R M; Coroleu, W; Natal, A; Gómez-Papí, A; Ainsa Abos, E; Sánchez Galiana, A

    1998-07-01

    Percutaneous fine bore silicone central catheters are frequently used in sick full term newborns and in low birth weight premature infants; although their use has some risks. We report two cases of pleural effusion in two prematures of 34 and 33 weeks gestation and birth weight of 1,510 and 1,650 g, respectively; and one case neumonitis in a newborn of a 38 weeks gestation and 2,730 g birth weight. All of them have in common same initial clinical sign: increase mucus secretion of the upper airway a few hours after the beginning of parenteral nutrition using the type of catheter mentioned with the tip abnormally located in pulmonary artery. These complications are probably related to endothelial injury of very slow flow vessels due to the high osmolarity and low pH of the parenteral solutions used; which probably, in turn, produce thrombosis and vascular perforation, and/or extravasation. We suggest to suspect a pulmonary artery abnormally located catheter in patients receiving parenteral nutrition who increase upper airway mucus secretion. The rapid correction of the position would prevent major complications. PMID:12602026

  3. American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Continuing Education Certification Claim CE Credits Clinical Nutrition Week eLearning Center Professional Development Webinars Calendar of ... Guidelines Clinical Practice Library Standards Malnutrition Awareness Parenteral ... Resources Practice and Research Toolkits Online Store Research ...

  4. Parenteral nutrition: risks, complications, and management.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Patricia H; Gilbert, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving modality, but one that also carries risks for potentially life-threatening complications. Comprehensive management of patients receiving parenteral nutrition includes careful selection of candidates, individualizing formulas to meet patients' unique needs, monitoring response to therapy, and implementing strategies designed to avoid complications. Measures to mitigate the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections are particularly important. As with all complex therapies, a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach promotes optimal outcomes. PMID:22222292

  5. Basic rules of parenteral fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Oh, M S; Kim, H-J

    2002-01-01

    The following basic rules of parenteral fluid therapy are formulated with the aim of alleviating concern and confusion about i.v. fluid orders that are experienced by most physicians: Don't be generous with fluid; in determining the water intake, one must know the usual water output through the kidney, skin and lung; one must know the quantities of the electrolytes and nutrients that are being given, and know the initial volume of distribution (usually the ECF); one must know the aim of fluid therapy; one must not give and remove the same substance at the same time; one must be aware that hypertonic saline contains less water for a given amount of Na than isotonic saline; one must be familiar with different i.v. solutions and i.v. additives; one must be aware that the kidney does not manufacture water or electrolytes except for bicarbonate; for short-term fluid therapy, divalent ions (Ca, Mg, and P) do not need replacement; one should think about COP-wedge gradient in determining the type of fluid to be given. PMID:12401938

  6. [Total parenteral nutrition. History. Present time. Future].

    PubMed

    Wretlind, A; Szczygieł, B

    1998-04-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has been available for only 30 years. However, history in this field goes back more than 350 years with the first landmark being the description of general blood circulation by William Harvey in 1628. His discovery is the anatomical basis for intravenous infusions. Many investigations were performed during the following centuries showing that solutions containing electrolytes and glucose could be given intravenously in man. The accumulated knowledge of protein metabolism formed the basis for studies on intravenous nutrition with protein hydrolysates, peptides and amino acids. The observation in the late 30-s by Robert Elman that amino acids in the form of protein hydrolysate could be safely administered intravenously in man was the first major step toward TPN. During the following years, major efforts were made to find methods to prepare infusion solutions with a high energy content and low osmotic pressure. The most realistic alternative seemed to be fat in the form of an emulsion. Many studies of a large number of various fat emulsions were made however, all of these emulsions caused severe adverse reactions in man. The first safe fat emulsion, intralipid, was made available in the early 60s. This was the second major step toward TPN. It was then no problem to include vitamins, electrolytes and trace elements in the fat emulsions and the solutions of amino acids and glucose. A few years later it was shown that a central venous catheter could be used to administer the infusion fluid intravenously. Many clinical investigations and reports have shown that the newly developed intravenous nutritional regimens are adequate alternatives to the ordinary diet. In this way it has been possible to maintain or obtain a good nutritional condition in most situations when oral or tube feeding can not be used. TPN has been shown to be of very great clinical importance to prevent and treat starvation often related to high morbidity and mortality

  7. The parenteral toxicity of Cyclofem.

    PubMed

    Cookson, K M

    1994-04-01

    The intraperitoneal median lethal dose of Cyclofem [Cyclo-Provera, C-P; depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera, DMPA)+estradiol cypionate (EC)] in mice was greater than 2500 mg/kg. The subcutaneous median lethal dose in mice and rats was greater than 1000 mg/kg. The suspension containing 50 mg/ml DMPA and 10 mg/ml EC used in all toxicology studies was not irritating to rabbit muscle. Chronic parenteral toxicity studies of Cyclofem were conducted in mice, rats and monkeys for 18, 22 and 24 months, respectively. Monthly doses were 2.5, 7.5 and 25 mg/kg Cyclofem in all species, 25 mg/kg DMPA and 25 mg/kg EC. Cyclofem was nontoxic but produced hormonal effects in all species. Decreased survival noted in the rodent studies was likely due to excessive EC dose. Mammary gland adenocarcinomas and pituitary adenomas were increased in the chronic rat study. Literature indicates the tumors were likely the result of the excessive hormone dose and were specific to rodents. In monkeys, Cyclofem was nontoxic, hormonally active, and noncarcinogenic at all doses including 50 times the human dose. PMID:8013218

  8. Pediatric parenteral nutrition in India.

    PubMed

    Bhave, S; Bavdekar, A

    1999-01-01

    Nutritional support to patients in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units is critical not only to minimize negative nitrogen balance but also to promote growth and development. Continuous technological and logistical advances in the Western countries have improved the efficacy and reduced the complications of parenteral nutrition (PN) to the extent that despite the constraints of cost and infrastructure, PN is now fast growing in India. Although widespread availability is very much desired, it is important that the technique is developed with considerable expertise and used judiciously with full knowledge of its indications, limitations, dangers and benefits. Indications for PN include surgical conditions (short gut syndrome), very low birth weight infants (particularly with necrotizing enterocolitis and surgical anomalies), malabsorption syndromes, conditions requiring bowel rest (acute pancreatitis, severe ulcerative colitis and necrotizing enterocolitis) and several non-gastrointestinal indications (end stage liver disease, renal failure, multiple trauma and extensive burns). Provision of PN is associated with significant and sometimes life threatening complications. The possible complications are technical (thrombosis, perforation of vein, thrombophlebitis), infections, metabolic disturbances, hepatobiliary stenosis, cholestasis, fibrosis, cirrhosis or cholelithiasis and bone related complications like osteopenia and fractures. Meticulous monitoring is necessary not only to detect complications but also to document clinical benefit. PMID:11132460

  9. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9

    PubMed Central

    Jauch, K. W.; Schregel, W.; Stanga, Z.; Bischoff, S. C.; Braß, P.; Hartl, W.; Muehlebach, S.; Pscheidl, E.; Thul, P.; Volk, O.

    2009-01-01

    Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious). Long-term (>7–10 days) parenteral nutrition (PN) requires central venous access whereas for PN <3 weeks percutaneously inserted catheters and for PN >3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter) should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7–10 days), a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L) or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site. PMID:20049083

  10. The necessity of selenium substitution in total parenteral nutrition and artificial alimentation.

    PubMed

    Gramm, H J; Kopf, A; Brätter, P

    1995-03-01

    For the trace element selenium, in contrast to zinc, iron, copper, chromium, manganese and iodine, there is still no clear official recommendation with regard to routine substitution in artificial nutrition. An overview of the manifestations of selenium deficiency in humans during the period 1979-1995 shows that nutritive deficiencies are exclusively TPN-induced or the result of severe malnutrition. The pathology of TPN-induced selenium deficiency and the analytic assessment of selenium status are described. Patients undergoing long-term parenteral nutrition or suffering from an increased loss of intestinal secretions have to be characterized as being especially at risk for clinical selenium deficiency. The relationship of the serum selenium kinetics in pediatric and adult patients to the depletion of body compartments during the course of short-term and prolonged TPN is discussed. Because of the importance of the selenoproteins, the regularly occurring depletion during selenium-free TPN and the borderline supply of selenium in Germany the routine substitution of selenium in TPN is strongly recommended. The pharmaceutical industry should be encouraged to develop a trace element solution that includes selenium, so that the nutritive requirement of patients on TPN can be satisfied. Adequate intravenous dosage recommendations are based on maintenance of glutathione peroxidase homeostasis. The routine supplementation dosage may not meet the selenium requirements of intensive care patients under conditions of increased metabolic demands on their anti-oxidative system. PMID:8846151

  11. Evaluation of Bacillus oleronius as a Biological Indicator for Terminal Sterilization of Large-Volume Parenterals.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masamitsu; Fujifuru, Masato; Okada, Aki; Takai, Katsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Udagawa, Takeshi; Miyake, Makoto; Naruyama, Shintaro; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Goro; Yoden, Hikaru; Aoki, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the production of large-volume parenterals in Japan, equipment and devices such as tanks, pipework, and filters used in production processes are exhaustively cleaned and sterilized, and the cleanliness of water for injection, drug materials, packaging materials, and manufacturing areas is well controlled. In this environment, the bioburden is relatively low, and less heat resistant compared with microorganisms frequently used as biological indicators such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 7953) and Bacillus subtilis 5230 (ATCC 35021). Consequently, the majority of large-volume parenteral solutions in Japan are manufactured under low-heat sterilization conditions of F0 <2 min, so that loss of clarity of solutions and formation of degradation products of constituents are minimized. Bacillus oleronius (ATCC 700005) is listed as a biological indicator in "Guidance on the Manufacture of Sterile Pharmaceutical Products Produced by Terminal Sterilization" (guidance in Japan, issued in 2012). In this study, we investigated whether B. oleronius is an appropriate biological indicator of the efficacy of low-heat, moist-heat sterilization of large-volume parenterals. Specifically, we investigated the spore-forming ability of this microorganism in various cultivation media and measured the D-values and z-values as parameters of heat resistance. The D-values and z-values changed depending on the constituents of large-volume parenteral products. Also, the spores from B. oleronius showed a moist-heat resistance that was similar to or greater than many of the spore-forming organisms isolated from Japanese parenteral manufacturing processes. Taken together, these results indicate that B. oleronius is suitable as a biological indicator for sterility assurance of large-volume parenteral solutions subjected to low-heat, moist-heat terminal sterilization. PMID:26889054

  12. Manganese in Human Parenteral Nutrition: Considerations for Toxicity and Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Dinamene; Batoreu, Camila; Mateus, Luisa; dos Santos, AP Marreilha; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The iatrogenic risks associated with excessive Mn administration in parenteral nutrition (PN) patients are well documented. Hypermanganesemia and neurotoxicity are associated with the duration of Mn supplementation, Mn dosage, as well as pathological conditions, such as anemia or cholestasis. Recent PN guidelines recommend the biomonitoring of patients if they receive Mn in their PN longer than 30 days. The data in the literature are conflicting about the method for assessing Mn stores in humans as a definitive biomarker of Mn exposure or induced-neurotoxicity has yet to be identified. The biomonitoring of Mn relies on the analysis of whole blood Mn (WB Mn) levels, which are highly variable among human population and are not strictly correlated with Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Alterations in dopaminergic (DAergic) and catecholaminergic metabolism have been studied as predictive biomarkers of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Given these limitations, this review addresses various approaches for biomonitoring Mn exposure and neurotoxic risk. PMID:24184781

  13. Marchiafava: Bignami Disease Treated with Parenteral Thiamine

    PubMed Central

    Nemlekar, Saumitra Shankar; Mehta, Ritambhara Yeshwant; Dave, Kamlesh Rushikray; Shah, Nilima Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Marchiafava - Bignami disease is rare sequelae of chronic alcohol use. We present a case with transient ischemic attack like presentation and its management with parenteral thiamine. A 53 year old male with history of country liquor use since 32 years was brought to hospital with acute onset of delirium & mild weakness involving motor functions of left side of the body, non-reactive planters and exaggerated tendon reflexes on left side. The MRI showed bilateral hyper intense signal on T2W and FLAIR images & Hypo intense lesion on T1W images involving body, genu and splenium of corpus callosum. The features are suggestive of Marchiafava - Bignami Disease. There have been few guidelines for management of MBD and literature supports use of parenteral thiamine 500mg leading to remission of symptoms and symptomatic improvement. It is advisable to use parenteral thiamine in all cases as it overlaps management of other co-morbidities of chronic alcoholism. PMID:27114628

  14. Marchiafava: Bignami Disease Treated with Parenteral Thiamine.

    PubMed

    Nemlekar, Saumitra Shankar; Mehta, Ritambhara Yeshwant; Dave, Kamlesh Rushikray; Shah, Nilima Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Marchiafava - Bignami disease is rare sequelae of chronic alcohol use. We present a case with transient ischemic attack like presentation and its management with parenteral thiamine. A 53 year old male with history of country liquor use since 32 years was brought to hospital with acute onset of delirium & mild weakness involving motor functions of left side of the body, non-reactive planters and exaggerated tendon reflexes on left side. The MRI showed bilateral hyper intense signal on T2W and FLAIR images & Hypo intense lesion on T1W images involving body, genu and splenium of corpus callosum. The features are suggestive of Marchiafava - Bignami Disease. There have been few guidelines for management of MBD and literature supports use of parenteral thiamine 500mg leading to remission of symptoms and symptomatic improvement. It is advisable to use parenteral thiamine in all cases as it overlaps management of other co-morbidities of chronic alcoholism. PMID:27114628

  15. GLP-2 Prevents Intestinal Mucosal Atrophy and Improves Tissue Antioxidant Capacity in a Mouse Model of Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Qiucheng; Bi, Jingcheng; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Wu, Chao; Tian, Feng; Gao, Xuejin; Wan, Xiao; Zheng, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on mucosal atrophy and intestinal antioxidant capacity in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Male mice (6–8 weeks old) were divided into three groups (n = 8 for each group): a control group fed a standard laboratory chow diet, and experimental TPN (received standard TPN solution) and TPN + GLP-2 groups (received TPN supplemented with 60 µg/day of GLP-2 for 5 days). Mice in the TPN group had lower body weight and reduced intestinal length, villus height, and crypt depth compared to the control group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 supplementation increased all parameters compared to TPN only (all p < 0.05). Intestinal total superoxide dismutase activity and reduced-glutathione level in the TPN + GLP-2 group were also higher relative to the TPN group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 administration significantly upregulated proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and increased glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) abundance. Compared with the control and TPN + GLP-2 groups, intestinal cleaved caspase-3 was increased in the TPN group (all p < 0.05). This study shows GLP-2 reduces TPN-associated intestinal atrophy and improves tissue antioxidant capacity. This effect may be dependent on enhanced epithelial cell proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and upregulated GRP78 expression. PMID:26761030

  16. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  17. Pharmaceutical Point of View on Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Stawny, M.; Olijarczyk, R.; Jaroszkiewicz, E.; Jelińska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition—a form of administering nutrients, electrolytes, trace elements, vitamins, and water—is a widely used mode of therapy applied in many diseases, in patients of different ages both at home and in hospital. The success of nutritional therapy depends chiefly on proper determination of the patient's energetic and electrolytic needs as well as preparation and administration of a safe nutritional mixture. As a parenterally administered drug, it is expected to be microbiologically and physicochemically stable, with all of the components compatible with each other. It is very difficult to obtain a stable nutritional mixture due to the fact that it is a complex, two-phase drug. Also, the risk of incompatibility between mixture components and packaging should be taken into consideration and possibly eliminated. Since parenteral nutrition is a part of therapy, simultaneous use of drugs may cause pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as those with the pharmaceutical phase. The aim of this paper is to discuss such aspects of parenteral nutrition as mixture stability, methodology, and methods for determining the stability of nutritional mixtures and drugs added to them. PMID:24453847

  18. PARENTERAL NUTRITION INDICATIONS, ADMINISTRATION, AND MONITORING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) can be lifesaving or life threatening, depending on when and how it is used. In infants and children who are unable to meet their nutritional requirements over extended periods, it can prevent death from malnutrition. On the other hand, if appropriate attention is not paid ...

  19. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    PubMed Central

    Druml, W.; Kierdorf, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    Partial EN (enteral nutrition) should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition) may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF) and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully). In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN) should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks) or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out. PMID:20049069

  20. Stability-Indicating HPLC-UV Method for Vitamin D3 Determination in Solutions, Nutritional Supplements and Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Temova, Žane; Roškar, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A simple and fast high-performance liquid chromatography method with UV detection for determination of vitamin D3 in stability studies as well as in solutions, nutritional supplements and pharmaceuticals was developed. Successful separation of vitamin D3 from its degradation products was achieved on a Gemini C18 100 × 3.0 mm column using a mixture of acetonitrile and water (99:1, v/v) as а mobile phase. The method was successfully validated according to the ICH guidelines. The described reversed-phase HPLC method is favorable compared with other published HPLC-UV methods because of its stability-indicating nature, short run time (3.3 min) and wide analytical range with outstanding linearity, accuracy and precision. The method was further applied for quantification of vitamin D3 in selected liquid and solid nutritional supplements and prescription medicines, confirming its suitability for routine analysis. Degradation products, formed under stress conditions (hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis and thermal degradation), were additionally elucidated by suitable equipment (LC-DAD-MS) to confirm the stability-indicating nature of the developed method. PMID:27048642

  1. Controversies in the Mechanism of Total Parenteral Nutrition Induced Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jain Ajay; Teckman, Jeffery H.

    2015-01-01

    Over 30,000 patients are permanently dependent on Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) for survival with several folds higher requiring TPN for a prolonged duration. Unfortunately, it can cause potentially fatal complications. TPN infusion results in impairment of gut mucosal integrity, enhanced inflammation, increased cytokine expression and trans-mucosal bacterial permeation. It also causes endotoxin associated down regulation of bile acid transporters and Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD), which includes steatosis, disrupted glucose metabolism, disrupted lipid metabolism, cholestasis and liver failure. Despite multiple theories, its etiology and pathophysiology remains elusive and is likely multifactorial. An important cause for TPN related pathologies appears to be a disruption in the normal enterohepatic circulation due to a lack of feeding during such therapy. This is further validated by the fact that in clinical settings, once cholestasis sets in, its reversal occurs when a patient is receiving a major portion of calories enterally. There are several other postulated mechanisms including gut bacterial permeation predisposing to endotoxin associated down regulation of bile acid transporters. An additional potential mechanism includes toxicity of the TPN solution itself, such as lipid mediated hepatic toxicity. Prematurity, leading to a poor development of bile acid regulating nuclear receptors and transporters has also been implicated as a causative factor. This review presents the current controversies and research into mechanisms of TPN associated injury. PMID:27417369

  2. Effects of Formulation Variables and Storage Conditions on Light Protected Vitamin B12 Mixed Parenteral Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this research the effect of vitamin B1 and B6 on cyanocobalamin stability in commercial light protected parenteral formulations and upon adding stabilizing agents will be investigated and best formulation composition and proper storage condition will be introduced. Methods: In this research some additives such as co solvents and tonicity adjusters, surfactants, antioxidants and chelating agents as well as buffer solutions, were used to improve the stability of the parenteral mixed formulations of B12 in the presence of other B vitamins (B1 and B6). Screening tests and accelerated stability tests were performed according to ICH guidelines Q1A (R2). Results: Shelf life evaluation revealed the best formulation and the proper storage condition. The results indicated the first kinetic models for all tested formulations and the optimum pH value was determined to be 5.8. There was no evidence of B12 loss when mixed with B1 and B6 in a medical syringe at room temperature for maximum of 8 hours. Conclusion: It is necessary to formulate vitamin B12 mixed parenteral solutions using proper phosphate buffers (pH=5.8) and to indicate “Store in refrigerator” on the mixed parenteral formulations of vitamin B12 with other B vitamins, which has not been expressed on the label of tested Brand formulations at the time of this study. PMID:25436187

  3. Hyaluronic Acid (800 kDa) Supplementation of University of Wisconsin Solution Improves Viability of Osteochondral Grafts and Reduces Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression during Cold Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takuya; Uchida, Kentaro; Onuma, Kenji; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Takano, Shotaro; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Fujimaki, Hisako; Miyagi, Masayuki; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondral allografting is a promising option for the treatment of large cartilage defects. However, because the cell viability of osteochondral tissues (OCTs) gradually reduces during storage at 4°C, methods for maintaining the cell viability of fresh OCTs are needed to improve transplantation outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether the supplementation of preservation solution with one of three different molecular weight forms of hyaluronic acid (HA) improved the viability of rat OCTs during long-term cold storage. The supplementation of University of Wisconsin (UW) solution with 800 kDa significantly improved the cell viability of OCT after 14 days at 4°C compared to nonsupplemented UW solution. In contrast, UW solution supplemented with either 1900 or 6000 kDa HA did not markedly improve the cell viability of the OCT. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 9 were significantly decreased in OCT stored in UW solution supplemented with 800 kDa HA. Although further studies in human OCT are warranted, these findings demonstrate that the use of 800 kDa HA in place of serum may be a suitable approach for the long-term preservation of osteochondral allografts designated for the repair of large cartilage defects in the clinical setting. PMID:26199955

  4. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10-15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  5. In-vitro detection of mannan and galactomannan in components of total parenteral nutrition (TPN).

    PubMed

    Knoth, H; Maywald, D; Walter, W

    2016-05-01

    Detection of Candida mannan and Aspergillus galactomannan in serum with the Platelia enzyme immunoassay is applied for diagnosing invasive fungal infections. High risk patients for invasive fungal infections are often receiving parenteral nutrition. It is important to know whether false-positive Platelia test results occur during total parenteral nutrition. Studies to false-positivity in intravenous feeding solutions lack so that we start an in-vitro investigation. We used two different enzyme immunoassays to test the feeding solutions. We tested infusions (n = 19) which are applied for the production of individual parenteral nutrition in the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus Dresden. We used the Platelia Aspergillus EIA to analyse the Aspergillus antigen galactomannan in the solutions. In addition, the Platelia Candida Ag plus was used to determine the concentration of the Candida antigen mannan. In summary, four solutions (21%) showed measurable concentrations of the Candida mannan. They were considered positive with a concentration > 0.125 ng/ ml mannan (Tracitrans infant, calcium gluconate solution) and borderline with a concentration between 0.0625 and 0.125 ng/ml mannan (Tracitrans plus, SMOFlipid). None of the analysed infusions contained the Aspergillus galactomannan. In conclusion, further investigations on the topic are necessary to determine their in-vivo impact. A positive Platelia test result can simulate the presence of invasive fungal infections. As a consequence the patient may be treated with expensive, systemic antimycotics with a high risk of adverse events. Therefore a definite diagnosis is important. PMID:27348965

  6. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using /sup 15/N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats.

  7. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  8. Effects of glutamine-containing total parenteral nutrition on phagocytic activity and anabolic hormone response in rats undergoing gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Hsien; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Chen, Soul-Chin; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of glutamine (Gln)-containing parenteral nutrition on phagocytic activity and to elucidate the possible roles of Gln in the secretion of anabolic hormones and nitrogen balance in rats undergoing a gastrectomy. METHODS: Rats with an internal jugular catheter were divided into 2 experimental groups and received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The TPN solutions were isonitrogenous and identical in nutrient compositions except for differences in amino acid content. One group received conventional TPN (control), and in the other group, 25% of the total amino acid nitrogen was replaced with Gln. After receiving TPN for 3 d, one-third of the rats in each experimental group were sacrificed as the baseline group. The remaining rats underwent a partial gastrectomy and were killed 1 and 3 d, respectively, after surgery. Plasma, peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF), and urine samples were collected for further analysis. RESULTS: The Gln group had fewer nitrogen losses 1 and 2 d after surgery (d1, 16.6±242.5 vs -233.4±205.9 mg/d, d2, 31.8±238.8 vs -253.4±184.6 mg/d, P<0.05). There were no differences in plasma growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels between the 2 groups before or after surgery. The phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was higher in the Gln group than in the control group 1 d after surgery (A 1185±931 vs 323±201, P<0.05). There were no differences in the phagocytic activities of blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils between the 2 groups at the baseline or on the postoperative days. No significant differences in interleukin-1β or interleukin-6 concentrations in PLF were observed between the 2 groups. However, tumor necrosis factor-α level in PLF was significantly lower in the Gln group than in the control group on postoperative d 3. CONCLUSION: TPN supplemented with Gln can improve the nitrogen balance, and enhance macrophage phagocytic activity at the site of injury. However, Gln supplementation has no

  9. Early combined parenteral and enteral nutrition for pancreaticoduodenectomy – Retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Pascal; Keller, Daniel; Steimer, Johannes; Gmür, Emanuel; Haller, Alois; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Rühlin, Maya; Gelpke, Hans; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Suggested guidelines for nutritional support after pancreaticoduodenectomy are still controversial. Recent evidence suggests that combining enteral nutrition (EN) with parenteral nutrition (PN) improves outcome. For ten years, patients have been treated with Early Combined Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ECPEN) after PD. The aim of this study was to report on rationale, safety, effectiveness and outcome associated with this method. Methods Consecutive PD performed between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Early EN and PN was standardized and started immediately after surgery. EN was increased to 40 ml/h (1 kcal/ml) over 24 h, while PN was supplemented based on a daily energy target of 25 kcal/kg. Standard enteral and parenteral products were used. Results Sixty-nine patients were nutritionally supplemented according to ECPEN. The median coverage of kcal per patients related to the total caloric requirements during the entire hospitalization (nutrition balance) was 93.4% (range: 100%–69.3%). The nutritional balance in patients with needle catheter jejunostomy (NCJ) was significantly higher than in the group with nasojejunal tube (97.1% vs. 91.6%; p < 0.0001). Mortality rate was 5.8%, while major complications (Clavien-Dindo 3–5) occurred in 21.7% of patients. Neither the presence of preoperative malnutrition nor the application of preoperative immunonutrition was associated with postoperative clinical outcome. Conclusion This is the first European study of ECPEN after PD. ECPEN is safe and, especially in combination with NCJ, provides comprehensive coverage of caloric requirements during the postoperative phase. Clinical controlled trials are needed to investigate potential benefits of complete energy supplementation during the early postoperative phase after PD. PMID:26955477

  10. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  11. Response of preterm infants to aluminum in parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Koo, W W; Kaplan, L A; Krug-Wispe, S K; Succop, P; Bendon, R

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five preterm infants with birth weights (BW) 540 to 2280 g (20 with birth weight less than 1500 g) and gestational ages 24 to 37 weeks, were studied to determine the response to 2 levels of aluminum (Al) loading from currently unavoidable contamination of various components of parenteral nutrition (PN) solution. High Al loading group (H) received solutions with measured Al content of 306 +/- 16 micrograms/liter and low A1 loading group (L) received solutions with 144 +/- 16 micrograms A1/liter. Urine Al:Creatinine (Al:Cr) ratios (micrograms:mg) became elevated and significantly higher in H (1.6 +/- 0.38 vs 0.5 +/- 0.1, p less than 0.05) at the third sampling point (mean 19 days). Serum Al concentrations were highest at onset in both groups and stabilized with study but remained consistently higher than the normal median of 18 micrograms/liter. Calculated urine Al excretion were consistently low and were 34 +/- 6% vs 28 +/- 5% in the H and L groups, respectively. One infant in the L group who died 39 days after termination of above study showed the presence of A1 in bone trabeculae and the presence of excessive unmineralized osteoid along the trabeculae. We conclude that small preterm infants are able to increase urine Al excretion with increased Al load. However urine Al excretion is incomplete with bone deposition of Al and persistently elevated serum Al concentrations. PMID:2514293

  12. The Updated Bottom Up Solution applied to mass spectrometry of soybean oil in a dietary supplement gelcap.

    PubMed

    Byrdwell, William Craig

    2015-07-01

    Among the goals of lipidomics applied to triacylglycerols (TAGs) is identification of molecular species, degree and location of unsaturation, and positions of fatty acyl chains (i.e., identification of regioisomers). Toward those ends, we define one, two, and three "Critical Ratios" for Types I, II, and III TAGs that provided different aspects of the desired information. Critical Ratio 1, [MH](+)/Σ[DAG](+), is correlated to the degree of unsaturation ([MH](+) is the protonated molecule and Σ[DAG](+) is the sum of diacylglycerol-like ions, [DAG](+)); Critical Ratio 2, [AA](+)/[AB](+) for Type II TAGs ("ABA/AAB/BAA") and [AC](+)/([AB](+)+[BC](+)) for Type III TAGs ("ABC/CBA/BAC/CAB/ACB/BCA"), is correlated to identification of regioisomers; and Critical Ratio 3, [BC](+)/[AB](+), provides information about those [DAG](+) from Type III TAGs. Furthermore, Critical Ratios are used in the Updated Bottom Up Solution (UBUS) to reproduce the mass spectra of TAGs by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry applied to analysis of soybean oil in a dietary supplement gelcap. We present a new model for the [MH](+)/Σ[DAG](+) ratio, quantify regioisomers using the [AA](+)/[AB](+) ratio, and describe trends for [BC](+)/[AB](+) that have never been reported before. The UBUS is also applied to other classes of molecules, i.e., vitamin D and DAGs. The amount of vitamin D3 in the gelcap fell from 2011 ± 22 when received to 1689 ± 33 just prior to expiration. The Critical Ratios constitute a compact data set that can provide structural information and also act as a library of mass spectra. PMID:25855147

  13. Parenteral nutrition product shortages: impact on safety.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Beverly

    2012-03-01

    The drug shortage crisis continues in the United States and threatens the integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain and compromises patient care, especially patients requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy. The number of new drug shortages has increased rapidly over the past 5 years, with the most significant increase in sterile injectable products. The most common reason for a shortage of a sterile injectable medication is a product quality issue. Two surveys of healthcare professionals have assessed the impact of drug shortages on patient safety. Participants in one survey reported over 1000 medication errors or patient adverse events as the result of shortages. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition also conducted a survey of healthcare professionals regarding PN product shortages and the associated patient care implications. Safety risks were reported throughout the entire PN process, from procurement of PN products to patient outcomes. Providing PN therapy during product shortages requires vigilance and continuous assessment of the entire PN process to optimize patient care quality and avoid patient harm. PMID:22282871

  14. Ketorolac: a parenteral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Resman-Targoff, B H

    1990-11-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine is a pyrrolo-pyrrole nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) with potent analgesic effects when administered intramuscularly for the treatment of acute pain. Ketorolac is well absorbed and has a rapid onset of action. Maximum plasma concentrations are achieved in 45-50 minutes and peak analgesic effects in about one to two hours following intramuscular injection. Ketorolac is more than 99 percent bound to plasma proteins and has a mean apparent volume of distribution of 0.11-0.25 L/kg. About 91 percent of a dose is excreted in urine, mostly as inactive metabolites, and approximately 6 percent is eliminated in feces. The elimination half-life, approximately four to six hours, increases in elderly patients and those with renal impairment. Its analgesic effectiveness was similar or superior to that of morphine, meperidine, or pentazocine in single-dose studies of patients with postoperative pain or renal colic and greater than that of placebo in patients with chronic cancer pain. The adverse effects are generally mild to moderate, self-limiting, and similar to those seen with other prostaglandin inhibitors. Ketorolac has a reversible inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. It can cause dose-related gastric ulcerations, even when administered parenterally. Ketorolac is a promising parenteral alternative to oral NSAIDs and a nonnarcotic alternative to opioid analgesics. Additional multiple-dose studies are needed to more clearly define its place in therapy. PMID:2275236

  15. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silica normal phase column and an isocratic, n-hexane:1,4 dioxane (98:2) mobile phase. An optimized protocol was used to report vitamin E homolog concentrations in soybean oil-based (Intralipid®, Ivelip®, Lipofundin® N, Liposyn® III, and Liposyn® II), medium- and long-chain fatty acid-based (Lipofundin®, MCT and Structolipid®), olive oil-based (ClinOleic®), and fish oil-based (Omegaven®) and mixture of these oils-based (SMOFlipid®, Lipidem®) commercial parenteral lipid emulsions. Total content of all vitamin E homologs varied greatly between different emulsions, ranging from 57.9 to 383.9 µg/mL. Tocopherols (α, β, γ, δ) were the predominant vitamin E homologs for all emulsions, with tocotrienol content < 0.3%. In all of the soybean emulsions, except for Lipofundin® N, the predominant vitamin E homolog was γ-tocopherol, which ranged from 57–156 µg/mL. ClinOleic® predominantly contained α-tocopherol (32 µg/mL), whereas α-tocopherol content in Omegaven® was higher than most of the other lipid emulsions (230 µg/mL). Practical applications The information on the types and quantity of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions will be extremely useful to physicians and healthcare personnel in selecting appropriate lipid emulsions that are exclusively used in patients with inadequate gastrointestinal function, including hospitalized and critically ill patients. Some emulsions may require vitamin E supplementation in order to meet minimal human requirements

  16. Alteration of erythrocyte lipid composition following total parenteral nutrition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Innis, S M

    1989-01-01

    Rats were infused continuously for 7 days with a complete total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solution in which 27.5% total calories were given as a parenteral lipid emulsion containing soybean oil (Liposyn) or safflower oil (Intralipid) emulsified with egg phospholipid (PL). Compared to sham-operated rats fed chow, the erythrocyte membranes from rats given TPN with lipid emulsion had increased cholesterol and PL but normal molar cholesterol:PL ratios. The fatty acid changes in sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine, in particular, suggested replacement of endogenous PL with the exogenous egg PL infused with the emulsion. The changes in membrane lipid composition were accompanied by greater resistance of the cells from rats given TPN to osmotic lysis in vitro. PMID:2494367

  17. Wernicke's encephalopathy after total parenteral nutrition in patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, In Seub; Seok, Hyeri; Eun, Yeong Hee; Lee, You-Bin; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies in Crohn's disease (CD) patients are not uncommon and usually result in a combination of reduced dietary intake, disease-related malabsorption, and a catabolic state. Decreased serum thiamine levels are often reported in patients with CD. Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe form of thiamine deficiency that can cause serious neurologic complications. Although WE is known to occur frequently in alcoholics, a number of non-alcoholic causes have also been reported. Here, we report two cases of non-alcoholic WE that developed in two severely malnourished CD patients who were supported by prolonged total parenteral nutrition without thiamine supplementation. These patients complained of sudden-onset ophthalmopathy, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging allowed definitive diagnosis for WE despite poor sensitivity. The intravenous administration of thiamine alleviated the symptoms of WE dramatically. We emphasize the importance of thiamine supplementation for malnourished patients even if they are not alcoholics, especially in those with CD. PMID:27175122

  18. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    PubMed

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. PMID:27317615

  19. Compartment syndrome due to extravasation of peripheral parenteral nutrition: extravasation injury of parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Park, Huee Jin; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Hyuk Jin; Jeong, Eui Cheol; Kim, Kee Won

    2015-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare but devastating condition that can result in permanent neuromuscular or soft tissue injuries. Extravasation injuries, among the iatrogenic causes of compartment syndrome, occur under a wide variety of circumstances in the inpatient setting. Total parenteral nutrition via a peripheral route is an effective alternative for the management of critically ill children who do not obtain adequate nutrition via the oral route. However, there is an inherent risk of extravasation, which can cause compartment syndrome, especially when detected at a later stage. Herein, we report a rare case of compartment syndrome and skin necrosis due to extravasation, requiring emergency fasciotomy and skin graft in a 7-month-old boy who was treated with peripheral parenteral nutrition via a pressurized infusion pump. Although we cannot estimate the exact time at which extravasation occurred, the extent and degree of the wound suggest that the ischemic insult was prolonged, lasting for several hours. Pediatric clinicians and medical teams should carefully examine the site of insertion of the intravenous catheter, especially in patients receiving parenteral nutrition via a peripheral intravenous catheter with a pressurized infusion pump. PMID:26692883

  20. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  1. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  2. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  3. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  4. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  5. Development of pancreas storage solutions: Initial screening of cytoprotective supplements for β-cell survival and metabolic status after hypothermic storage.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lia H; Taylor, Michael J; Brockbank, Kelvin G M

    2013-02-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is one of the leading causes of death world-wide. Donor-derived pancreas and Islet of Langerhans transplantation are potential cures; however, postmortem ischemia impacts islet quality. The murine βt3 cell line was employed as a model to study cell viability and proliferation after hypothermic storage by comparing Belzer's Machine Perfusion Solution with Unisol™ Solution. The objective was to determine which of these solutions provided the best base line support for βt3 cells and to screen potential cytoprotective additives to the solutions. Initial βt3 cell viability was similar in the two storage solutions; however, better proliferation was observed after storage in Unisol Solution. The caspase inhibitor, Q-VD-OPH, and α-tocopherol improved viability in both storage solutions, suggesting that apoptotic pathways may be responsible for cell death during hypothermic storage of βt3 cells. Analysis of apoptosis markers, caspase activity, and DNA laddering showed a reduction in apoptosis when these additives were included. The effects of Q-VD-OPH and α-tocopherol were also synergistic when employed together during either hypothermic exposure, post-hypothermic physiologic incubation, or combinations of hypothermic exposure and physiologic incubation. These results suggest that both supplements should be included in pancreas hypothermic storage solutions and in islet culture media during post-isolation culture prior to transplantation. PMID:24845250

  6. Insulin Resistance and Body Weight: Recent Human Studies Documenting the Benefits of Supplemental Chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essentiality of chromium for humans was confirmed more than three decades ago with the studies showing that patients on total parenteral nutritrion (TPN) developed severe diabetic-like symptoms that could be reversed by the addition of chromium to their parenteral nutrition solutions. Since the...

  7. Effect of fasting and parenteral alimentation on PIPIDA scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T.; McClain, C.J.; Shafer, R.B.

    1983-08-01

    Ten patients were prospectively studied using 99mTc-PIPIDA imaging to evaluate the effects of fasting and parenteral alimentation on gallbladder function. Three of ten patients had initial nonvisualization of the gallbladder for up to 2 hr, yet had normal visualization on repeat imaging performed after resumption of oral intake or after parenteral alimentation was discontinued. 99mTc-PIPIDA imaging should be interpreted with caution in patients fitting into either of these groups.

  8. Evaluation of physicochemical incompatibilities during parenteral drug administration in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gikic, M; Di Paolo, E R; Pannatier, A; Cotting, J

    2000-06-01

    Patients in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) often receive numerous medications by the parenteral route. Frequently two or more drugs are delivered simultaneously through the same line and the risk of physicochemical incompatibilities is thus important. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify prospectively the combinations of injectable drugs administered in the PICU of our university hospital and 2) to analyze them according to information found in the literature. The data were collected by a pharmacist over a 30-day period and classified in three categories: compatible, incompatible and undocumented. Nineteen patients were included in the study with a median age of 3.2 years. The mean number (+/- SD) of injectable drugs per patient and per day was 6.5 (+/- 2.8), for a total of 26 drugs and 7 solutes. 64 combinations of drugs were observed with 2 (31.3%), 3 (45.3%), 4 (10.9%) or 5 (12.5%) drugs. 81 drug-drug and 94 drug-solute combinations were recorded. Among these, 151 (86.3%) were compatible, 6 (3.4%) incompatible and 18 (10.3%) undocumented. The incompatibilities included furosemide (Lasix), a drug in alkaline solution and Vamina-Glucose, a total parenteral nutrition solution. No clinical consequences resulting from drug incompatibilities were shown in this study. We suggest that in vitro compatibility tests on standard drug combinations, as well as a training program for nurses on drug incompatibility problems would sensitively increase the security of parenteral drug administration. PMID:11028261

  9. Metabolic bone disease in home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    McCullough, M L; Hsu, N

    1987-07-01

    Home total parenteral nutrition (HTPN) is in its infancy but has proved to be lifesaving for patients unable to manage on enteral nutrition alone. However, this mode of nutrition therapy is not without problems. Aside from mechanical and other metabolic complications, a peculiar metabolic bone disease has been reported to occur in some HTPN recipients. The disease, characterized by abnormalities in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, often results in osteomalacia, bone pain, and fractures. Reports of approximately 50 cases of metabolic bone disease have been published by centers in the United States and Canada. Factors that have been implicated as possible causes include infusion of excess vitamin D, aluminum, calcium, protein, or glucose; cyclic vs. continuous TPN administration; and the patient's previous nutritional state. Although removal of vitamin D or aluminum from the TPN solution and discontinuation of TPN altogether have been associated with improvement in symptoms, histology, and laboratory values, no single factor has been identified as the cause of this troubling phenomenon. PMID:3110249

  10. Parenteral nutrition in neonatology--to standardize or individualize?

    PubMed

    Riskin, Arieh; Shiff, Yaakov; Shamir, Raanan

    2006-09-01

    Premature very low birth weight (< 1500 g) infants comprise one of the largest groups receiving parenteral nutrition. PN should be optimized to answer their high nutritional requirements and suit their metabolic status, but should also be validated pharmaceutically. PN can be provided as a standard, usually commercial, formulation, representing the average needs of a large group of patients. Alternatively, an individualized PN compound adapted to the patient's needs can be prescribed and prepared, usually on a daily basis. The main advantage of individually prescribed PN is that it is tailored to suit a specific patient, thereby assuring the best possible nutrition and biochemical control. Batch-produced standardized PN bags can be readily available as ward stocks in neonatal intensive care units, enabling initiation of early PN immediately after the delivery of a premature infant. Moreover, standard PN solutions incorporate expert nutritional knowledge and support. A combination of standardized PN bags, prepared under strict standardization criteria, for most neonates, with a small number of specifically tailored individualized PN formulations for those in need for them, could reduce pharmacy workload and costs and increase safety, while maintaining the desired clinical flexibility. For those in need of the individualized PN formulations, a computerized ordering system can save time, decrease prescription and compounding errors, and improve quality of nutritional care. PMID:17058418

  11. Parenteral Nutrition in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus undergoes extensive resection of the small bowel and right colon with a jejunostomy and colostomy because of mesenteric ischemia. In the surgical intensive care unit, severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome with possible sepsis develops. The patient is treated with volume resuscitation, vasopressor support, mechanical ventilation, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and intravenous insulin infusion. Low-dose tube feedings are initiated postoperatively through a nasogastric tube. However, these feedings are discontinued after the development of escalating vasopressor requirements, worsening abdominal distention, and increased gastric residual volume, along with an episode of emesis. The hospital nutritional-support service is consulted for feeding recommendations. A discussion with the patient's family reveals that during the previous 6 months, she lost approximately 15% of her usual body weight and decreased her food intake because of abdominal pain associated with eating. Her preoperative body weight was 51 kg (112 lb), or 90% of her ideal body weight. The physical examination reveals mild wasting of skeletal muscle and fat. Blood tests show hypomagnesemia, hypophosphatemia, and normal hepatic and renal function. Central venous parenteral nutrition is recommended. PMID:19741230

  12. Development and Evaluation of Artemether Parenteral Microemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Tayade, N. G.; Nagarsenker, Mangal S.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to develop a parenteral microemulsion delivering artemether, a hydrophobic antimalarial drug and to evaluate antimalarial activity of the microemulsion in comparison to the marketed oily injection of artemether (Larither®). The microemulsion was evaluated for various parameters such as globule size, ability to withstand centrifugation and freeze-thaw cycling and effect of sterilization method on the drug content and globule size. The in vivo antimalarial activity of the microemulsion was evaluated in P. berghei infected mice in comparison to the Larither;. The stability of the microemulsion was evaluated at 5º for 1 month. The microemulsion exhibited globule size of 113 nm and it could successfully withstand centrifugation and freeze-thaw cycling. The method of sterilization did not have any significant effect on the artemether content and globule size of the microemulsion. The microemulsion showed around 1.5-fold higher antimalarial activity and higher survival as compared to that of marketed artemether injection Larither® and it showed a good stability at the end of 1 month. PMID:21694999

  13. Solute-Filled Syringe For Formulating Intravenous Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Jim; Bindokas, AL; Dudar, Tom; Finley, Mike; Scharf, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Prefilled syringe contains premeasured amount of solute in powder or concentrate form used to deliver solute to sterile interior of large-volume parenteral (LVP) bag. Predetermined amount of sterile water also added to LVP bag through sterilizing filter, and mixed with contents of syringe, yielding sterile intravenous solution of specified concentration.

  14. Parenteral nutrition improves nutritional status, autonomic symptoms and quality of life in transthyretin amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Russo, Massimo; Vita, Gian Luca; Stancanelli, Claudia; Mazzeo, Anna; Vita, Giuseppe; Messina, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is an inherited amyloidosis, leading to death in about ten years in most cases due to cardiac failure or wasting syndrome. Previous studies showed that modified body mass index was related to time before death, duration of gastrointestinal disturbances, malabsorption and functional capacity. We report two patients in whom nutritional status worsened despite diet modification, hypercaloric supplement and two relevant therapeutic approaches such as liver transplant and tafamidis meglumine, respectively. The first patient, a 52-year-old lady carrying Thr49Ala mutation, had a disease duration of twelve years and had lost weight up to 35 kg because of daily diarrhea. The second patient, a 63-year-old man with Glu89Gln mutation and a disease duration of fifteen years, was in the New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification class III and his weight was 39 kg. In both cases, a peripherally inserted central catheter was placed for parenteral nutrition. It allowed to improve their nutritional status and clinical conditions, with body weight gains of 11 and 8 kg in a one year follow-up, respectively. Moreover, reduction of autonomic symptoms including postural hypotension, nausea and diarrhoea was recorded with ameliorated quality of life. Our experience suggests that parenteral nutrition may be useful in reducing complications and disabilities in TTR-FAP patients, even when all dietary adjustments have been ineffective. Reasonably, the improvement in nutritional status may prolong survival in TTR-FAP patients. PMID:27132122

  15. Early enteral nutrition vs parenteral nutrition following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Wen; Liu, Chang; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze and compare postoperative morbidity between patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and early enteral nutrition supplemented with parenteral nutrition (EEN + PN). METHODS: Three hundred and forty patients receiving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) from 2009 to 2013 at our center were enrolled retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups depending on postoperative nutrition support scheme: an EEN + PN group (n = 87) and a TPN group (n = 253). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters, pathological diagnosis, intraoperative information, and postoperative complications of the two groups were analyzed. RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in demographic characteristics, preoperative comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters or pathological findings (P > 0.05 for all). However, patients with EEN + PN following PD had a higher incidence of delayed gastric emptying (16.1% vs 6.7%, P = 0.016), pulmonary infection (10.3% vs 3.6%, P = 0.024), and probably intraperitoneal infection (18.4% vs 10.3%, P = 0.059), which might account for their longer nasogastric tube retention time (9 d vs 5 d, P = 0.006), postoperative hospital stay (25 d vs 20 d, P = 0.055) and higher hospitalization expenses (USD10397 vs USD8663.9, P = 0.008), compared to those with TPN. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that TPN might be safe and sufficient for patient recovery after PD. Postoperative EEN should only be performed scrupulously and selectively. PMID:27076767

  16. Flow and injection characteristics of pharmaceutical parenteral formulations using a micro-capillary rheometer.

    PubMed

    Allahham, Ayman; Stewart, Peter; Marriott, Jennifer; Mainwaring, David E

    2004-02-11

    A micro-capillary rheometer consisted of a fine needle with an internal diameter of 347 microm attached to a 1 ml removable-needle syringe within an Instron device that operated in compression mode to provide various crosshead speeds ranging from 150 to 950 mm min(-1) covering typical clinical injection rates, and that determined the resulting force on the plunger. The crosshead speed and the resulting force were used to calculate the shear rate and the shear stress respectively. These were used in standard capillary flow expressions together with an independent measurement of the wall frictional force and allowed the viscosity of parenteral Newtonian solutions and non-Newtonian suspensions to be measured quantitatively and their rheological behaviour in needles of clinical dimensions to be established. Commercial pharmaceutical parenteral formulations consisting of three oil-based solutions and three aqueous suspensions were chosen for this study. The net injection forces were also obtained and it was shown that both the oil-based solutions and the aqueous suspensions covered similar ranges. The viscosities for the parenteral solutions were determined from the slope of the linear regression (R(2)>0.97) between shear stress and shear rate and ranged between 0.029 and 0.060 Pas. For the aqueous suspensions examined, viscosities decreased from low shear rate to high shear rate, following a power-law model and indicating a pseudo plastic behaviour. Standardisation of the micro-capillary rheometer with Newtonian silicone oils calibrated with a Rheometrics Fluids Spectrometer showed viscosity values consistent between the rotational flow measurements and capillary flow measurements which were within 5% and showed very high degrees of reproducibility between replicate samples. This degree of reproducibility allowed differences in the contribution of the wall frictional force to the required plunger force for both the oil-based and aqueous parenteral formulations to be

  17. Comparison of the Efficacies of Parenteral Iron Sucrose and Oral Iron Sulfate for Anemic Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yoo Min; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Koh, Seong-Joon; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The optimal route for iron administration in anemic patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been determined. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of parenteral and oral iron therapy in IBD patients in Korea. Methods A retrospective multicenter study was performed. Patients who had been administered parenteral iron were matched to the controls with oral iron at a 1:1 ratio according to age, sex, and type of IBD. Results Patients that received parenteral iron exhibited increases in hemoglobin levels of ≥20% from the baseline at lower doses and in shorter durations (p=0.034 and p=0.046, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, parenteral iron therapy appeared to be more efficient than oral iron therapy, but this difference was not statistically significant (hazard ratio [HR], 1.552; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.844 to 2.851; p=0.157). Patients with ulcerative colitis responded better to iron therapy than those with Crohn’s disease (HR, 3.415; 95% CI, 1.808 to 6.450; p<0.001). Patients with an initial hemoglobin level of 10 g/dL or higher responded poorly to iron therapy (HR, 0.345; 95% CI, 0.177 to 0.671; p=0.002). Conclusions Parenteral iron therapy appears to be more efficient than oral iron therapy. Physicians should focus on the iron deficiency of IBD patients and consider parenteral iron supplements in appropriate patient groups. PMID:27021505

  18. [Septic pulmonary emboli caused by parenteral nutrition catheter infection].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, M; Itoi, K; Ariyasu, T; Yanagihara, K; Nasu, T

    1990-09-01

    A case of septic pulmonary emboli due to parenteral nutrition catheter infection was reported. Characteristic radiologic features were recognized. A 50-year-old man, who was receiving parenteral nutrition after total gastrectomy, consulted our department with complaints of fever and general malaise. A chest radiograph showed scattered ill-defined small peripheral nodules, which were not present before parenteral nutrition, and these nodules were quickly formed cavities + in 2nd day. He was suffering from high fever, hemo-sputum and dyspnea after removal of the parenteral nutrition catheter. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the tip of parenteral nutrition catheter and sputum cultures. Septic pulmonary emboli were diagnosed and antibiotic therapy was performed. Bacterial endocarditis and septic thrombophlebitis were ruled out. The multiple cavity nodules extended to involve the peripheral areas of the lung and invasive shadows appeared on the chest radiograph in 8th day. Then, the invasive shadows disappeared and the walls of the cavitary lesions became thinner. After 2 months, all cavitary lesions disappeared with only linear shadows remaining. PMID:2125088

  19. Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of a parenteral formulation of a novel antitumor agent, VNP40101M.

    PubMed

    Krishna, G; Hodnick, W F; Lang, W; Lin, X; Karra, S; Mao, J; Almassian, B

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and manufacture a stable parenteral formulation for Phase I clinical trials of VNP40101M (1,2-Bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-2-[(2-methylamino)carbonyl] hydrazine), a novel antitumor agent. The solubility and stability of the drug was determined. Solubility studies suggested that VNP40101M exhibited poor aqueous solubility but showed appreciable solubility in nonaqueous solvents. The aqueous solubility of the drug could not be increased by adjusting the pH. At a pH above 7, base-catalyzed decomposition of VNP40101M occurred. The low octanol-water partition coefficient of 0.75 suggested poor solubility in lipophilic solvents. Based on these preformulation observations, a parenteral formulation containing 10 mg/mL of VNP40101M was prepared in a solvent system consisting of 30% ethyl alcohol and 70% polyethylene glycol-300 (PEG-300). To minimize base-catalyzed hydrolytic degradation, citric acid at 0.6% concentration was included to acidify the formulation. Rubber closures, filter membranes, and liquid transfer tubing were selected on the basis of compatibility studies and absence of loss of drug due to adsorption of these components. The formulation was subjected to accelerated stability studies and dilution studies with large volume parenteral (LVP) solutions, normal saline, and 5% dextrose injection (D5W). The results of the dilution study indicated that the formulation could be diluted in these solutions up to 2 mg/mL for 8 hours without drug precipitation and degradation. Accelerated stability studies suggested that the product should be kept at 2 degrees C to 8 degrees C for long-term storage. The developed formulation was successfully scaled up and manufactured for use in clinical trials. PMID:14727873

  20. Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN) Complication Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... above baseline/normal temperature; chills, especially occurring with infusion; sweating; lethargy; body aches; urine spot checks may ... Fluids infused too fast; too little insulin in infusion solution if diabetic; improper mixture of HPN solution; ...

  1. Effect of total parenteral nutrition, systemic sepsis, and glutamine on gut mucosa in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, S.; Leskiw, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.; Bush, K. T.; Nagele, R. G.; Lanza-Jacoby, S.; Stein, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the combination of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and systemic sepsis on mucosal morphology and protein synthesis was investigated. Rats were given a standard TPN mixture consisting of glucose (216 kcal.kg-1.day-1), lipid (24 kcal.kg-1.day-1), and amino acids (1.5 g N.kg-1.day-1) for 5 days. On the 5th day the rats (n = 37) were randomized into four groups according to diet as follows: 1) control nonseptic on standard TPN, 2) control nonseptic on TPN with glutamine, 3) septic on standard TPN, and 4) septic with the TPN supplemented with glutamine. Twenty hours after the injection of Escherichia coli, the rats were given a 4-h constant infusion of [U-14C]leucine to determine the mucosal fractional protein synthesis rates. The following results were obtained. 1) Histological examination showed that systemic sepsis caused tissue damage to the ileum and jejunum. 2) Glutamine supplementation attenuated these changes. 3) There were no visible changes to the colon either from glutamine supplementation or sepsis. 4) Sepsis was associated with an increase in mucosal protein synthesis and decreased muscle synthesis. 5) Addition of glutamine to the TPN mix further increased protein synthesis in the intestinal mucosa of septic rats.

  2. Dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis in parenteral nutrition mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Le; Yang, Ill; Kong, Bo; Shen, Jianliang; Gorczyca, Ludwik; Memon, Naureen; Buckley, Brian T; Guo, Grace L

    2016-01-15

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) administration can lead to PN-associated liver diseases (PNALD). Although multiple risk factors have been identified for PNALD, to date, the roles of bile acids (BAs) and the pathways involved in BA homeostasis in the development and progression of PNALD are still unclear. We have established a mouse PN model with IV infusion of PN solution containing soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (SOLE). Our results showed that PN altered the expression of genes involved in a variety of liver functions at the mRNA levels. PN increased liver gene expression of Cyp7a1 and markedly decreased that of Cyp8b1, Cyp7b1, Bsep, and Shp. CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 are important for synthesizing the total amount of BAs and regulating the hydrophobicity of BAs, respectively. Consistently, both the levels and the percentages of primary BAs as well as total non-12α-OH BAs increased significantly in the serum of PN mice compared with saline controls, whereas liver BA profiles were largely similar. The expression of several key liver-X receptor-α (LXRα) target genes involved in lipid synthesis was also increased in PN mouse livers. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) has been shown to induce the expression of Cyp8b1 and Cyp7b1, as well as to suppress LXRα function. Western blot showed significantly reduced nuclear migration of RORα protein in PN mouse livers. This study shows that continuous PN infusion with SOLE in mice leads to dysregulation of BA homeostasis. Alterations of liver RORα signaling in PN mice may be one of the mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of PNALD. PMID:26564717

  3. Development of in vitro fertilized feline embryos in a modified Earle's balanced salt solution: influence of protein supplements and culture dishes on fertilization success and blastocyst formation.

    PubMed

    Kanda, M; Miyazaki, T; Kanda, M; Nakao, H; Tsutsui, T

    1998-04-01

    The effects of protein supplements and culture dish type on in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo development in culture were examined in the domestic cat. In Experiment I, follicular oocytes were fertilized and cultured in either 1) modified Earle's balanced salt solution, designated MK-1, supplemented with one of the following: 10% human serum (HS), 10% FCS or 0.4% BSA, or 2) Medium 199 (M-199) supplemented with 10% FCS. Fertilization rates were lower (P < 0.01) in MK-1 + BSA (74.4%), MK-1 + FCS (56.1%), and M-199 + FCS (51.4%) than in MK-1 + HS (94.7%). A greater (P < 0.01) percentage of blastocysts was obtained in MK-1 + HS (50.0%) than in other treatment groups (range, 4.3-17.2%). In Experiment II, the effect of dish type (tissue culture dish, TCD, versus suspension culture dish, SCD) on embryo development was evaluated in MK-1 supplemented with either HS or BSA. Significantly higher proportions of IVF-derived embryos developed to blastocysts at 120 and 144 hr post-insemination, respectively, when cultured in HS/SCD (47.2 and 71.7%) than in BSA/SCD (11.4 and 27.3%) or BSA/TCD (10.4 and 25.0%). At 120 hr post-insemination, there was a lower (P < 0.01) percentage of blastocysts in HS/TCD (22.2%) than in HS/SCD. In Experiment III, six embryos per cat were transferred to the uterine horns of 17 recipients at 144 hr after hCG treatment. Five of 7 recipients which received late morulae cultured in MK-1 + BSA (SCD) for 120 hr became pregnant (71.4%). Eight of 10 recipients which received early blastocysts cultured in MK-1 + HS (SCD) for 120 hr became pregnant (80.0%). We conclude that MK-1 containing HS is highly beneficial for overcoming the in vitro developmental block of IVF-derived feline embryos and increasing the success rate of IVF/ET. PMID:9592713

  4. Trace Element Supplementation Following Severe Burn Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurmis, Rochelle; Greenwood, John; Aromataris, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements have an important physiological role after severe burn injury with patients routinely receiving supplementation. Although commonly prescribed after burn injury, variation exists among supplement composition, frequency, and the dosage administered. This review aims to assess the effectiveness of trace element supplementation on clinically meaningful outcomes in patients who have sustained a severe burn injury. Supplementation of selenium, copper and zinc, either alone or combined, compared with placebo or standard treatment were eligible for inclusion. Predetermined primary outcome measures were mortality, length of stay, rate of wound healing, and complications. A comprehensive search strategy was undertaken. Methodological quality of eligible studies was appraised and relevant data extracted for meta-analysis. Eight studies met eligibility criteria for the review; four randomized controlled trials and four nonrandomized experimental trials, including a total of 398 participants with an age range of 6 to 67 years. Parenteral supplementation of combined trace elements was associated with a significant decrease in infectious episodes (weighted mean difference: -1.25 episodes, 95% confidence intervals: -1.70, -0.80; P < .00001). The results of this review indicate that the use of parentally administered combined trace elements after burn injury confer positive effects in decreasing infectious complications. Combined parenteral trace element supplementation and combined oral and parenteral zinc supplementation have potentially clinically significant findings on reducing length of stay. Oral zinc supplementation shows possible beneficial effects on mortality. Definitive studies are required to accurately define optimal trace element supplementation regimens, dosages, and routes after burn injury. PMID:26056754

  5. Selenite metabolism in total parenteral nutrition (TPN)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitrin, M.D.; Ting, B.T.G.; Hazell, T.; Janghorbani, M. )

    1989-02-01

    Patients on long-term TPN commonly receive selenite to prevent selenium (Se) deficiency. Little information is available concerning the effect of chronic selenite supplementation on Se metabolism. In this study, we have used {sup 74}Se to examine selenite metabolism in 2 home TPN patents, one on selenite and one on no supplementation. Afte rcollection of baseline blood and urine samples, 80 {mu}g of selenite enriched with {sup 74}Se was added to the TPN formula, and infused over 12 hrs. Daily urine output was collected for 10 d. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine the isotope ratios of {sup 74}Se to {sup 77}Se, and {sup 74}Se to {sup 82}Se (added in vitro and an internal standard) in urine. Cumulative {sup 74}Se retention and an apparent selenite exchangeable pool size were calculated using standard isotope dilution equations. The unsupplemented TPN patient had biochemical Se deficiency, with decreased plasma Se (1 ng/ml) urine Se (1 ug/d) and red cell and plasma glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px). Retention of {sup 74}Se was very high, 93% at 10 d, and the pool size was extremely low, 566 ug at 10 d. The supplemented patent had normal plasma and urine Se levels and plasma and red cell GSH-Px. {sup 74}Se retention was very poor, only 42% at 1 d and 38% at 10 d. The Se pool size increased rapidly over time, reaching 12000 ug at 10 d. In contrast, our previous studies in normal subjects consuming dietary orgaic Se showed a selenite retention of 85-90% at 1 d and 70-80% at 10 d, and a pool size of 6000-8000 ug at 10 day. Conclusions: 1. Using {sup 74}Se, differences in Se retention and pool size can easily be detected in Se deficient vs replete TPN patients 2. Chronic supplementation with selenite appears to result in decreased {sup 74}Se retention and an expanded selenite exchangeable pool in comparison with normals consuming dietary Se.

  6. Micronutrients in Parenteral Nutrition: Boron, Silicon, and Fluoride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (providing nutrients intravenously) is a life-saving treatment for patients with severe malabsorption of nutrients caused by intestinal failure, intestinal trauma (for example, gunshot or stab wounds), and intestinal removal. Metabolic bone disease characterized by min...

  7. Oral Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy Administration in a Homeless Population.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Whitney; Price, Connie; Knepper, Bryan; McLees, Margaret; Young, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is increasingly used to treat serious infections. Patients who identify themselves as homeless may receive OPAT less often, and little is known about their treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe challenges, treatment completion rates, and cost savings of OPAT in homeless patients discharged from a public safety-net hospital. PMID:26934162

  8. Gluconeogenesis continues in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the contribution of total gluconeogenesis, to glucose production in preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) providing glucose exceeding normal infant glucose turnover rate, eight infants (0.955 +/- 0.066 kg, 26.5 - 0.5 wks, 4-1 d) were studied while receiving routine ...

  9. Lipid emulsions – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 6

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, M.; Heller, A. R.; Koch, T.; Koletzko, B.; Kreymann, K. G.; Krohn, K.; Pscheidl, E.; Senkal, M.

    2009-01-01

    The infusion of lipid emulsions allows a high energy supply, facilitates the prevention of high glucose infusion rates and is indispensable for the supply with essential fatty acids. The administration of lipid emulsions is recommended within ≤7 days after starting PN (parenteral nutrition) to avoid deficiency of essential fatty acids. Low-fat PN with a high glucose intake increases the risk of hyperglycaemia. In parenterally fed patients with a tendency to hyperglycaemia, an increase in the lipid-glucose ratio should be considered. In critically ill patients the glucose infusion should not exceed 50% of energy intake. The use of lipid emulsions with a low phospholipid/triglyceride ratio is recommended and should be provided with the usual PN to prevent depletion of essential fatty acids, lower the risk of hyperglycaemia, and prevent hepatic steatosis. Biologically active vitamin E (α-tocopherol) should continuously be administered along with lipid emulsions to reduce lipid peroxidation. Parenteral lipids should provide about 25–40% of the parenteral non-protein energy supply. In certain situations (i.e. critically ill, respiratory insufficiency) a lipid intake of up to 50 or 60% of non-protein energy may be reasonable. The recommended daily dose for parenteral lipids in adults is 0.7–1.3 g triglycerides/kg body weight. Serum triglyceride concentrations should be monitored regularly with dosage reduction at levels >400 mg/dl (>4.6 mmol/l) and interruption of lipid infusion at levels >1000 mg/dl (>11.4 mmol/l). There is little evidence at this time that the choice of different available lipid emulsions affects clinical endpoints. PMID:20049078

  10. Complexities of particulate matter measurement in parenteral formulations of small-molecule amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Magali B; Waggener, Sara; Gole, Dilip; Jimidar, Ilias; Vermeersch, Hans; Ratanabanangkoon, Poe; Tinke, Arjen P; Almarsson, Örn

    2011-03-01

    Reconstituted parenteral solutions of three surface-active anti-infective small-molecule drugs and solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, a model surfactant) were studied to quantify the impact of sample preparation and handling on particle counts. Turbidimetry and light obscuration profiles were recorded as a function of agitation and shearing with and without the introduction of foam into the solutions. SDS solutions at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) show significantly greater sensitivity to shear and foam presence than SDS solution below the CMC: Values of >10 μm particles increased 8 fold over control (an unsheared sample) in the micellar solution vs. 4 fold particle count increase over control at a sub-micellar concentration. An even more significant increase in the ratio of particle count in sheared/unsheared solution is seen for >25 μm unit counts, due to the increased interference of foam with the measurement. Two commercial products, injection formulations of teicoplanin and cefotaxime sodium, as well as an investigational compound 1, showed an increase in scattering as a function of foam production. The impact of foaming was significant, resulting in an increase of turbidity and light obscuration measurements in all solutions. The results illustrate some of the challenges that are inherent to optically clear, homogeneous pharmaceutical injections containing compounds which have a tendency toward self-association and surfactant-like behavior. PMID:21234824

  11. Treatment of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease: The Role of Lipid Emulsions123

    PubMed Central

    Nandivada, Prathima; Carlson, Sarah J.; Chang, Melissa I.; Cowan, Eileen; Gura, Kathleen M.; Puder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for infants with intestinal failure. However, long-term parenteral nutrition carries the risk of progressive liver disease. Substantial data has implicated components of parenteral soybean oil in the pathogenesis of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). Elevated serum concentrations of phytosterols, an abundance of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a relative paucity of α-tocopherol have been associated with the risk of cholestasis and hepatic injury observed in PNALD. Currently available treatment strategies include the reduction of the dose of administered parenteral soybean oil and/or the replacement of parenteral soybean oil with alternative parenteral lipid emulsions. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the pathogenetic mechanisms associated with the development of PNALD and the data evaluating currently available treatment strategies. PMID:24228202

  12. Validation of doubly labeled water for measuring energy expenditure during parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Kushner, R.F.; Jones, P.J.

    1986-08-01

    The doubly labeled water method was compared with intake-balance for measuring energy expenditure in five patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Because parenteral solutions were isotopically different from local water, patients had to be placed on TPN at least 10 days before the metabolic period. Approximately 0.1 g 2H2O and 0.25 g H2(18)O per kg total body water were given orally. We collected saliva before, 3 h, and 4 h after the dose for measurement of total body water and urine before, 1 day, and 14 days after the dose for measurement of isotope eliminations. On day 14, total body weight was remeasured and change in body energy stores was calculated, assuming constant hydration. Intake was assessed from weights of TPN fluids plus dietary record for any oral intake. Energy expenditure from doubly labeled water (+/- SD) averaged 3 +/- 6% greater than intake-balance. Doubly labeled water method is a noninvasive, nonrestrictive method for measuring energy expenditure in patients receiving TPN.

  13. Development of a process using electron beam for a terminal sterilization for parenteral formulations of pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, D.; Delbar, N.; Hartmann, H.-J.; Gray, M.; Stickelmeyer, M.

    2004-09-01

    As pharmaceutical technology advances and sensitive drug formulations demand ever-greater stability, radiation processing is likely the only alternative that can be used to terminally sterilize thermo-labile pharmaceutical products intended for parenteral administration. To this end, a radiation process using e-beam technology has been developed. A key feature of this process is the elucidation of defined conditions of radiation processing in order to achieve the homogeneity of the absorbed dose inside a single vial and throughout a tray containing several vials. Results of several dosimetry studies, using e-beam technology, demonstrate the beneficial effects of the use of aluminum or stainless-steel plates to scatter the beam and therefore to obtain an excellent Dmax/ Dmin across all dose-monitoring positions within the vial and throughout a tray containing 260 vials filled with a dry powder or a tray containing approximately 30 vials filled with an aqueous solution. This ionizing radiation process can be directly applicable, at a manufacturing level, for a terminal sterilization of parenteral formulations of pharmaceuticals.

  14. Reduced serum levels of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D during long-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Klein, G L; Horst, R L; Norman, A W; Ament, M E; Slatopolsky, E; Coburn, J W

    1981-05-01

    Painful bone disease, characterized by patchy osteomalacia and inactive bone, can develop in patients treated with total parenteral nutrition for more than 3 months. Serum levels of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1 alpha, 25(OH)2D), 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured in seven adults and five children treated with parenteral nutrition for 9 to 60 months. Serum levels of 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D were markedly reduced, while levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were normal. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were normal or slightly increased, and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone levels were normal or low. Renal function was normal or minimally reduced. Skeletal symptoms disappeared and serum 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D levels rose to normal in one patient when nutrient infusions were discontinued for 6 weeks. Removal of calcium from the nutrient solution for 2 to 4 days was associated with no change in serum 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D in two patients. The cause of the reduction in serum levels of 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D and its role in the pathogenesis of bone disease in these patients remain uncertain. PMID:6786151

  15. New generation lipid emulsions prevent PNALD in chronic parenterally fed preterm pigs

    PubMed Central

    Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; Ng, Kenneth; Stoll, Barbara; Benight, Nancy; Chacko, Shaji; Kluijtmans, Leo A. J.; Kulik, Wim; Squires, E. James; Olutoye, Oluyinka; Schady, Deborah; Finegold, Milton L.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Burrin, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) in infants. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions can reverse PNALD, yet it is unknown if they can prevent PNALD. We studied preterm pigs administered TPN for 14 days with either 100% soybean oil (IL), 100% fish oil (OV), or a mixture of soybean oil, medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), olive oil, and fish oil (SL); a group was fed formula enterally (ENT). In TPN-fed pigs, serum direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and plasma bile acids increased after the 14 day treatment but were highest in IL pigs. All TPN pigs had suppressed hepatic expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), cholesterol 7-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), and plasma 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) concentrations, yet hepatic CYP7A1 protein abundance was increased only in the IL versus ENT group. Organic solute transporter alpha (OSTα) gene expression was the highest in the IL group and paralleled plasma bile acid levels. In cultured hepatocytes, bile acid-induced bile salt export pump (BSEP) expression was inhibited by phytosterol treatment. We show that TPN-fed pigs given soybean oil developed cholestasis and steatosis that was prevented with both OV and SL emulsions. Due to the presence of phytosterols in the SL emulsion, the differences in cholestasis and liver injury among lipid emulsion groups in vivo were weakly correlated with plasma and hepatic phytosterol content. PMID:24478031

  16. Parenteral trace element provision: recent clinical research and practical conclusions.

    PubMed

    Stehle, P; Stoffel-Wagner, B; Kuhn, K S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review (PubMed, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed and Cochrane, www.cochrane.org; last entry 31 December 2014) was to present data from recent clinical studies investigating parenteral trace element provision in adult patients and to draw conclusions for clinical practice. Important physiological functions in human metabolism are known for nine trace elements: selenium, zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, iron, molybdenum, iodine and fluoride. Lack of, or an insufficient supply of, these trace elements in nutrition therapy over a prolonged period is associated with trace element deprivation, which may lead to a deterioration of existing clinical symptoms and/or the development of characteristic malnutrition syndromes. Therefore, all parenteral nutrition prescriptions should include a daily dose of trace elements. To avoid trace element deprivation or imbalances, physiological doses are recommended. PMID:27049031

  17. Long-term parenteral nutrition: problems with venous access.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, A S; Gertner, D J; Wood, S; Phillips, R K; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1990-01-01

    Long-term parenteral nutrition requires central venous access, often difficult in patients who have had several central venous catheterizations. Therapy may be complicated by thrombosis and sepsis which may further compromise central access. We report five cases illustrating such difficulties and suggest that these patients be referred early to specialist centres where experienced catheter insertion and management results in a greatly reduced incidence of complications. PMID:2116522

  18. Parenteral and enteral nutrition: borderline substances.

    PubMed

    Hopley, P J

    1981-01-01

    The application of medicinal product legislation to products which have a possible dual function as drugs and as foods or cosmetics has been described. The approach of the Family Practitioner Services under the NHS is to allow for as much professional debate as possible over the indeterminate ground between food and drugs. The role of the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances in this context is briefly mentioned. Finally, some practical problems which arise in hospital practise have been described and for the solution the emphasis is upon the multi-disciplinary team approach. PMID:6947663

  19. Evaluation of a new amino acid source for use in parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, M D; O'Neill, J A; Meng, H C; Stahlman, M H

    1977-01-01

    Ninety-two patients, ranging from two days to 92 years of age, received parenteral nutrition using a new synthetic amino acid solution designed to provide optimal nitrogen retention and obviate metabolic complications. Weight gain and positive nitrogen balance were produced in the majority of patients. Hyperchloremic acidosis and hypophosphatemia did not occur. Hyperammonemia in infants was avoided with the exception of occasional, transient, asymptomatic elevations of blood ammonia in low birth weight infants. It was suspected that an inadequate nonprotein calorie/gram of nitrogen ratio may have been employed in these infants. Blood ammonia levels declined from initial levels in 80% of adult patient. Nitrogen retention was directly proportional to the supply of nonprotein calories. PMID:402123

  20. Supplementing monosodium glutamate to partial enteral nutrition slows gastric emptying in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that free glutamate may play a functional role in modulating gastroduodenal motor function. We hypothesized that supplementing monosodium glutamate (MSG) to partial enteral nutrition stimulates gastric emptying in preterm pigs. Ten-day-old preterm, parenterally fed pigs re...

  1. Glutamine supplementation, citrulline production, and de novo arginine synthesis: Is there a relation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We would like to comment on the recent publications by Buijs et al. The authors hypothesized that a parenteral supplement of glutamine stimulates citrulline formation and enhances de novo arginine synthesis. To test this hypothesis, they conducted an experiment with stable isotopes in patients under...

  2. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, herbs, and many other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, and energy bars. Supplements do not have to go through the testing that drugs do. Some ...

  3. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, herbs, and many other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, ... possible Tell your health care provider about any dietary supplements you use Do not take a bigger dose ...

  4. [Maltodextrin in a 13% solution as a supplement in the first 4 days of life in breast-fed mature newborn infants. Effect on drinking behavior, weight curve, blood picture, blood glucose and bilirubin].

    PubMed

    Rosegger, H

    1986-05-16

    200 mature healthy newborn infants (birthweight 3382 +/- 377 g) were randomly divided into 2 groups of 100 each: all were breast fed according to the guidelines recommended by 'La Leche League'. If possible breast feeding was commenced in the delivery room. When breast feeds did not suffice infants of group A were supplemented ad libitum with a fully adapted formula (67 kcal/dl), those of group B with a 13% maltodextrine solution (52 kcal, 160 mOsm/l). Total fluid intake was similar in both groups. Group A took less supplementary feeds on day 2, the caloric uptake, however, was not different from that of group B. On day 4 group A had a somewhat higher caloric uptake due to supplementation, whereas group B needed less supplementation but had a higher intake of breast milk. On day 5 all babies were entirely breast fed. No supplementation was handed over to the mothers for at home use. The frequency of breast meals and supplementary meals was almost equal for both groups, as were sucking activity, appetite and degree of saturation. 18.6% of the infants in both groups had no need for any supplementary feeding at all. Temperature, stools, weight loss, blood glucose and bilirubin (taken on day 4 simultaneously with the Guthrie test) were almost identical. The red blood cell count showed slightly higher values in group A. Supplementation with fully adapted formula was not advantageous over supplementation with 13% maltodextrine solution. The latter was, indeed, tolerated well in all cases and satisfied all infants who remained hungry after being breast fed; additional early exposure to cow-milk protein was, thus, avoided in all these cases. PMID:3727591

  5. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: Small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn’s disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  6. n-3 fatty acid-enriched parenteral nutrition regimens in elective surgical and ICU patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies and a meta-analysis in surgical patients indicate that supplementing parenteral nutrition regimens with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), is associated with improved laboratory and clinical outcomes in the setting of hyper-inflammatory conditions. Refined or synthetic fish oils are commonly used as a source of EPA and DHA. The objective of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate n-3 PUFA-enriched parenteral nutrition regimens in elective surgical and intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Methods Medline was searched for randomized controlled trials comparing n-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions with standard non-enriched lipid emulsions (i.e. soybean oil, MCT/LCT or olive/soybean oil emulsions) in surgical and ICU patients receiving parenteral nutrition. Extracted data were pooled by means of both random and fixed effects models, and subgroup analyses were carried forward to compare findings in ICU versus non-ICU patients. Results A total of 23 studies (n = 1502 patients: n = 762 admitted to the ICU) were included. No statistically significant difference in mortality rate was found between patients receiving n-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions and those receiving standard lipid emulsions (RR= 0.89; 0.59, 1.33), possibly reflecting a relatively low underlying mortality risk. However, n-3 PUFA-enriched emulsions are associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in the infection rate (RR =0.61; 0.45, 0.84) and the lengths of stay, both in the ICU (-1.92; -3.27, -0.58) and in hospital overall (-3.29; -5.13, -1.45). Other beneficial effects included reduced markers of inflammation, improved lung gas exchange, liver function, antioxidant status and fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids, and a trend towards less impairment of kidney function. Conclusions These results confirm and extend previous findings, indicating that n-3 PUFAs

  7. Parenteral use of medium-chain triglycerides: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, H; Pastores, S M; Katz, D P; Kvetan, V

    1996-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the clinical use of intravenous fat emulsions for the nutritional support of hospitalized patients has become routine. During this time long-chain triglycerides (LCT) derived from soybean and/or safflower oils were the exclusive lipid source for these emulsions, providing both a safe calorically dense alternative to dextrose and essential fatty acids needed for biologic membranes and the maintenance of immune function. During the past decade, the availability of novel experimental triglycerides for parenteral use has generated interest in the use of these substrates for nutritional and metabolic support. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), long advocated as a superior substrate for parenteral use, possess many unique physiochemical and metabolic properties that make them theoretically advantageous over their LCT counterparts. Although not yet approved in the United States, preparations containing MCT have been widely available in Europe. Intravenous MCT preparations, either as physical mixtures or structured lipids, have been used clinically in patients with immunosuppresion, critical illness, liver and pulmonary disease and in premature infants. Despite great promise, the clinical data comparing the efficacy of MCT-based lipid emulsions to their LCT counterparts has been equivocal. This may be due in part to the limited nature of the published clinical trials. Measures of efficacy for parenteral or enteral nutritional products has taken on new meaning, in light of the reported experience using immunomodulatory nutrients. Current concerns about cost of medical care and resource use warrant careful deliberation about the utility of any new and expensive therapy. Until clinical data can fulfill expectations derived from animal studies, it is difficult to advocate the general use of MCT-based lipid emulsions. Future clinical studies with MCT-based emulsions should have clear outcome objectives sufficient to prove their theorized metabolic

  8. Inflammatory Response Using Different Lipid Parenteral Nutrition Formulas in Children After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baena-Gómez, María Auxiliadora; de la Torre-Aguilar, María José; Aguilera-García, Concepción María; Olza, Josune; Pérez-Navero, Juan Luis; Gil-Campos, Mercedes

    2016-07-01

    Nutritional support is an integral part of the supportive care of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) emulsions in parenteral nutrition (PN) may modify the inflammatory response. The purpose of this study is to compare plasma cytokine levels in children after HSCT using an n-3 FA-containing lipid emulsion (LE) and a soybean oil-based formulation in PN. A randomized double-blind controlled trial was conducted on 14 children following HSCT. Children were randomized to receive either a fish oil or a soybean oil LE. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, on Day 10 and after completion of PN to analyze plasma interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), 2 (IL-2), 6 (IL-6), 8 (IL-8), 10 (IL-10), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). After 10 days of PN, there were no significant changes in interleukins levels when comparing the two groups or time points (baseline vs. Day 10 of PN). In children requiring PN >21 days, IL-10 and TNF-α levels (P ≤ 0.05) were lower in the fish-oil-containing LE group. Fish oil- and soybean oil-supplemented PN administered for at least 10 days does not cause inflammatory changes. Prolonged PN based on fish oil LE may modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:27270245

  9. Parenteral opioids for maternal pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Roz; Smith, Lesley A; Burns, Ethel; Mori, Rintaro; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenteral opioids are used for pain relief in labour in many countries throughout the world. Objectives To assess the acceptability, effectiveness and safety of different types, doses and modes of administration of parenteral opioids given to women in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials examining the use of intramuscular or intravenous opioids (including patient controlled analgesia) for women in labour. We looked at studies comparing an opioid with another opioid, placebo, other non-pharmacological interventions (TENS) or inhaled analgesia. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, collected data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We included 57 studies involving more than 7000 women that compared an opioid with placebo, another opioid administered intramuscularly or intravenously or compared with TENS to the back. The 57 studies reported on 29 different comparisons, and for many outcomes only one study contributed data. Overall, the evidence was of poor quality regarding the analgesic effect of opioids, satisfaction with analgesia, adverse effects and harm to women and babies. There were few statistically significant results. Many of the studies had small sample sizes, and low statistical power. Overall findings indicated that parenteral opioids provided some pain relief and moderate satisfaction with analgesia in labour, although up to two-thirds of women who received opioids reported moderate or severe pain and/or poor or moderate pain relief one or two hours after administration. Opioid drugs were associated with maternal nausea, vomiting and drowsiness, although different opioid drugs were associated with different adverse effects. There was no clear evidence of adverse effects of opioids on the newborn. We

  10. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, Vanessa J

    2006-06-01

    There are essentially 3 types of hepatobiliary disorders associated with parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy: steatosis, cholestasis, and gallbladder sludge/stones. Reported prevalence rates of PN-associated liver disease (PNALD) vary greatly, and there are distinct differences between adult and pediatric patients. Various etiologic factors have been evaluated for significance in contributing to PNALD, including enteral feeding history, septic events, bacterial overgrowth, length of intestinal resection, and prematurity/low birth weight. Etiologic factors specifically related to the PN formulation or nutrient intake have also been evaluated, including excessive calorie intake, dextrose-to-lipid ratio, amino acid dose, taurine deficiency, IV fat emulsion (IVFE) dose, carnitine deficiency, choline deficiency, and continuous vs cyclic infusion. Minor increases in serum aminotransferase concentrations are relatively common in patients receiving PN therapy and generally require no intervention. The primary indicator of cholestasis is a serum conjugated bilirubin >2 mg/dL. When a patient receiving PN develops liver complications, it is necessary to rule out all treatable causes and minimize other risk factors. All potential hepatotoxic medications and herbal supplements should be eliminated. Modifications to the PN regimen that may be helpful include reduction of calories, reduction of IVFE dose to <1 g/kg/d, supplementation of taurine in the infant, and use of cyclic infusion. Initiation of even small amounts of enteral nutrition and use of ursodiol may be beneficial in stimulating bile flow. In the long-term PN patient with severe and progressive liver disease, intestinal or liver transplantation may be the only remaining treatment option. PMID:16772545

  11. Mechanisms of disease: update on the molecular etiology and fundamentals of parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since its introduction into clinical practice in the 1970s, parenteral nutrition has revolutionized the care of premature neonates. Serum transaminase and bilirubin levels are commonly elevated in infants on parenteral nutrition, but their normalization is typical in the setting of short-term admini...

  12. Enteral obeticholic acid prevents hepatic cholestasis in total parenteral nutrition-fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a vital support for neonatal infants with congenital or acquired gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and requiring small bowel resection. An adverse outcome associated with prolonged TPN use is parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis (PNAC). We previously showed t...

  13. Hepatic transcriptomic profiles of preterm piglets nourished by enteral and parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving nutritional support for more than half a million premature and hospitalized infants in the U.S. annually. Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the U....

  14. Evaluation of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy at a Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Emily Sydnor; Kendall, Brian; Orlando, Patricia; Perez, Christian; De Amorim, Marina; Samore, Matthew; Pavia, Andrew T; Hersh, Adam L

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center to identify opportunities for antimicrobial stewardship intervention. A definite or possible modification would have been recommended in 60% of courses. Forty-one percent of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy courses were potentially avoidable, including 22% involving infectious diseases consultation. PMID:26006046

  15. Erosive oesophagitis revealing acute zinc deficiency during parenteral nutrition. A case report.

    PubMed

    Amoussou-Guenou, D; Boland, B; Rousseau, C; Lambert, M; Marbaix, E; Bourlond, J; Stein, F

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of acute zinc deficiency which occurred during parenteral nutrition in a patient with anorexia nervosa and which was characterized by a painful erosive oesophagitis preceding the typical oro-cutaneous symptoms. We also discuss the interpretation of plasma and urine zinc levels, the predisposing role of total parenteral alimentation and the specific therapeutic implications. PMID:2518587

  16. Aggressive parenteral nutrition in sick very low birth weight babies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tagare, Amit; Walawalkar, Meenal; Vaidya, Umesh

    2013-10-01

    Survival of preterm neonates in developing world has improved. Developing countries lag behind in nutritional management in NICU especially parenteral nutrition (PN). This randomized controlled trial was done to evaluate the effect of aggressive parenteral nutrition on nitrogen retention of sick VLBW and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies. From September 2009 to February 2010, total 34 babies were randomized to receive aggressive parenteral nutrition (APN)(n=17) or standard parenteral nutrition (SPN) (n=17). The average daily total and PN calory intake of babies in APN group was significantly higher during first week. APN was well-tolerated; however, nitrogen retention was not significantly higher in APN group. Aggressive parenteral nutrition in sick VLBW babies is feasible in developing world, though it did not improve nitrogen retention in first week of life. PMID:23798635

  17. Gall bladder contractility in neonates: effects of parenteral and enteral feeding.

    PubMed Central

    Jawaheer, G.; Pierro, A.; Lloyd, D. A.; Shaw, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The gall bladder size was measured in 30 newborn infants: 18 had been fed parenterally and 12 enterally. The two groups were comparable for gestational age, birthweight, postnatal age and study weight. Exclusion criteria were haemodynamic instability, septicaemia, abdominal disease and opioid treatment. Gall bladder size was measured at 15 minute intervals for 90 minutes using real-time ultrasonography and the volume calculated using the ellipsoid method. Parenterally fed infants had further measurements at 120, 150, and 360 minutes. The gall bladder was significantly larger in parenterally fed infants than in enterally fed infants (p = 0.0001). In enterally fed infants a 50% reduction in gall bladder volume was observed 15 minutes after starting the feed with a return to baseline volume by 90 minutes. In parenterally fed infants there was no gall bladder contraction. Such information may give insight into the pathophysiology of hepato-biliary complications during parenteral nutrition in infants. PMID:7796240

  18. Nitrogen sparing by 2-ketoisocaproate in parenterally fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Matthews, D.E.; Walser, M. )

    1990-11-01

    In rats receiving total parenteral nutrition with or without sodium 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC; 2.48 g.kg-1.day-1), L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine and (1-{sup 14}C)KIC were constantly infused for 6 h. CO{sub 2} production, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} enrichment, urinary urea nitrogen (N) plus ammonia N and total urinary N were measured. Whole body protein synthesis (S) was calculated in non-KIC-infused rats and also in unfed rats infused with (1-{sup 14}C)leucine from fractional oxidation of labeled leucine (1-F), where F is fractional utilization for protein synthesis, and urea N plus ammonia N excretion (C) as S = C x F/(1-F). Addition of KIC caused a significant reduction in N excretion and a significant improvement in N balance. Fractional oxidation of labeled KIC increased, whereas fractional utilization of labeled KIC for protein synthesis decreased, but the extent of incorporation of infused KIC into newly synthesized protein (as leucine) amounted to at least 40% of the total rate of leucine incorporation into newly synthesized whole body protein. We conclude that addition of KIC spares N in parenterally fed rats and becomes a major source of leucine for protein synthesis.

  19. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Clinical Response to Parenteral Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Malkasian, Kay L.; Marshall, John R.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The bacteriology of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and clinical response to parenteral doxycycline were evaluated in 30 patients. Only 3 of 21 cul-de-sac cultures from PID patients were sterile, whereas all 8 normal control subjects yielded negative results (P< 0.005). Poor correlation was observed between cervical and cul-de-sac cultures. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, isolated from the cervix in 17 patients (57%), was recovered from the cul-de-sac only once. Streptococcus, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, coliforms, and other organisms normally present in the vagina were the predominant isolates recovered from the cul-de-sac. Parenteral doxycycline resulted in rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (within 48 h) in 20 of 27 evaluable patients (74%). In five others, signs and symptoms of infection abated within 4 days. The remaining two patients failed to respond; in both cases, adnexal masses developed during doxycycline therapy. Gonococci were eradicated from the cervix in all but one patient who, nevertheless, had a rapid defervescence of symptoms. There was no clear-cut correlation between the clinical response and in vitro susceptibility of cul-de-sac isolates to doxycycline. These data confirm the usefulness of broad-spectrum antibiotics in acute PID. Culdocentesis is a reliable means of obtaining material for the bacteriological diagnosis of acute PID; however, the pathogenetic role and relative importance of gonococci and various other bacteria in acute PID need to be clarified further. PMID:1169908

  20. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  1. Antimicrobial preservative use in parenteral products: past and present.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Brian K; Ni, Alex; Hu, Binghua; Shi, Li

    2007-12-01

    The following review provides a comprehensive summary of antimicrobial preservatives that are commonly used in licensed parenteral products to date. The information reviewed includes the general properties of the preservatives, the doses and frequency of their use, the classes of the preserved products (peptide, protein, vaccine, and small molecule products), the interactions with other formulation components, and the criteria commonly used for their selection in parental product formulations. It was revealed that phenol and benzyl alcohol are the two most common antimicrobial preservatives used in peptide and protein products, while phenoxyethanol is the most frequently used preservative in vaccines. Benzyl alcohol or a combination of methylparaben and propylparaben are generally found in small molecule parenteral formulations. The key criteria for antimicrobial preservative selection are the preservative's dose, antimicrobial functionality, and effect on the active ingredient. Additionally, the use of spectroscopic techniques (circular dicroism (CD) and fluorescence) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were identified as common techniques used in evaluating an antimicrobial preservative for its impact on the conformational stability of peptide, protein, and vaccine antigens. The future use of preservatives is also discussed, including antimicrobial agents such as peptides, and regulatory requirements for antimicrobial effectiveness testing. PMID:17722087

  2. Tocol emulsions for drug solubilization and parenteral delivery.

    PubMed

    Constantinides, Panayiotis P; Tustian, Alex; Kessler, Dean R

    2004-05-01

    Tocols represent a family of tocopherols, tocotrienols, and their derivatives, and are fundamentally derived from the simplest tocopherol, 6-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-phytylchroman, which is referred to as "tocol". The most common tocol is D-alpha-tocopherol, also known as vitamin E. Tocols can be excellent solvents for water insoluble drugs and are compatible with other cosolvents, oils and surfactants. This review highlights the major developments in the use of tocols in parenteral emulsions for drug delivery, with a focus on drug solubilization, physicochemical properties, and biopharmaceutical applications. Tocol emulsions offer an appealing alternative for the parenteral administration of poorly soluble drugs, including major chemotherapeutics such as paclitaxel. Data will be presented on solubilization of paclitaxel, a key chemotherapeutic agent, and its corresponding formulation development, toxicity, efficacy and pharmacokinetic studies in animal models and humans. The breadth of the utility of tocol-based emulsions will be discussed and examples of specific therapeutic drugs and applications will be provided. As these formulations progress further in the clinic, the therapeutic utility of tocol emulsions is anticipated to expand. PMID:15109767

  3. Parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Bizari, Letícia; da Silva Santos, Andressa Feijó; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a severe malabsorption disorder, and prolonged parenteral nutrition is essential for survival in some cases. Among the undesirable effects of long-term parenteral nutrition is an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to measure the serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and transforming growth factor beta, in patients with short bowel syndrome on cyclic parenteral nutrition and patients who had previously received but no longer require parenteral nutrition. The study was cross-sectional and observational. Three groups were studied as follows: Parenteral nutrition group, 9 patients with short bowel syndrome that receive cyclic parenteral nutrition; Oral nutrition group, 10 patients with the same syndrome who had been weaned off parenteral nutrition for at least 1 year prior to the study; Control group, 13 healthy adults, matched for age and sex to parenteral and oral groups. The following data were collected: age, tobacco use, drug therapies, dietary intake, body weight, height, blood collection. All interleukins were significantly higher in the parenteral group compared with the control group as follows: interleukin-6: 22 ± 19 vs 1.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P= .0002; transforming growth factor β: 854 ± 204 vs 607 ± 280 pg/mL, P= .04; interleukin-10: 8 ± 37 vs 0.6 ± 4, P= .03; tumor necrosis factor α: 20 ± 8 vs 8 ± 4 pg/mL, P< .0001. We concluded that parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27267135

  4. Dietary supplements in sport.

    PubMed

    Burke, L M; Read, R S

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the dietary practices of athletes report that nutritional supplements are commonly used. Supplementation practices vary between sports and individual athletes; however, there is evidence that at least some athletes use a large number of supplements concurrently, often in doses that are very high in comparison with normal dietary intakes. In exploring supplementation practices we propose a classification system separating the supplements into dietary supplements and nutritional erogogenic aids. The dietary supplement is characterised as a product which can be used to address physiological or nutritional issues arising in sport. It may provide a convenient or practical means of consuming special nutrient requirements for exercise, or it may be used to prevent/reverse nutritional deficiencies that commonly occur among athletes. The basis of the dietary supplement is an understanding of nutritional requirements and physiological effects of exercise. When the supplement is used to successfully meet a physiological/nutritional goal arising in sport it may be demonstrated to improve sports performance. While there is some interest in refining the composition or formulation of some dietary supplements, the real interest belongs to the use or application of the supplement; i.e. educating athletes to understand and achieve their nutritional needs in a specific sports situation. The sports drink (carbohydrate-electrolyte replacement drink) is a well known example of a dietary supplement. Scientific attitudes towards the sports drink have changed over the past 20 years. Initial caution that carbohydrate-electrolyte fluids compromise gastric emptying during exercise has now been shown to be unjustified. Numerous studies have shown that 5 to 10% solutions of glucose, glucose polymers (maltodextrins) and other simple sugars all have suitable gastric emptying characteristics for the delivery of fluid and moderate amounts of carbohydrate substrate. The optimal

  5. Dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Ron J; King, Doug S; Lea, Trevor

    2004-01-01

    For the athlete training hard, nutritional supplements are often seen as promoting adaptations to training, allowing more consistent and intensive training by promoting recovery between training sessions, reducing interruptions to training because of illness or injury, and enhancing competitive performance. Surveys show that the prevalence of supplement use is widespread among sportsmen and women, but the use of few of these products is supported by a sound research base and some may even be harmful to the athlete. Special sports foods, including energy bars and sports drinks, have a real role to play, and some protein supplements and meal replacements may also be useful in some circumstances. Where there is a demonstrated deficiency of an essential nutrient, an increased intake from food or from supplementation may help, but many athletes ignore the need for caution in supplement use and take supplements in doses that are not necessary or may even be harmful. Some supplements do offer the prospect of improved performance; these include creatine, caffeine, bicarbonate and, perhaps, a very few others. There is no evidence that prohormones such as androstenedione are effective in enhancing muscle mass or strength, and these prohormones may result in negative health consequences, as well as positive drug tests. Contamination of supplements that may cause an athlete to fail a doping test is widespread. PMID:14971436

  6. Acute effects of enteral leucine supplementation of a low protein diet on muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs parenterally infused with insulin and amino acids (AA), particularly leucine. We hypothesized that enteral Leu supplementation of a low protein diets in neonatal pigs will acutely in...

  7. Bag For Formulating And Dispersing Intravenous Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipp, Jim; Owens, Jim; Scharf, Mike; Finley, Mike; Dudar, Tom; Veillon, Joe; Ogle, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Large-volume parenteral (LVP) bag in which predetermined amount of sterile solution formulated by combining premeasured, prepackaged amount of sterile solute with predetermined amount of water. Bag designed to hold predetermined amount, typically 1 L, of sterile solution. Sterility of solution maintained during mixing by passing water into bag through sterilizing filter. System used in field or hospitals not having proper sterile facilities, and in field research.

  8. Glutamine supplementation in sick children: is it beneficial?

    PubMed

    Mok, Elise; Hankard, Régis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a critical appraisal of the literature on Glutamine (Gln) supplementation in various conditions or illnesses that affect children, from neonates to adolescents. First, a general overview of the proposed mechanisms for the beneficial effects of Gln is provided, and subsequently clinical studies are discussed. Despite safety, studies are conflicting, partly due to different effects of enteral and parenteral Gln supplementation. Further insufficient evidence is available on the benefits of Gln supplementation in pediatric patients. This includes premature infants, infants with gastrointestinal disease, children with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome, malnutrition/diarrhea, cancer, severe burns/trauma, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, methodological issues have been noted in some studies. Further mechanistic data is needed along with large randomized controlled trials in select populations of sick children, who may eventually benefit from supplemental Gln. PMID:22175008

  9. Glutamine Supplementation in Sick Children: Is It Beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Elise; Hankard, Régis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a critical appraisal of the literature on Glutamine (Gln) supplementation in various conditions or illnesses that affect children, from neonates to adolescents. First, a general overview of the proposed mechanisms for the beneficial effects of Gln is provided, and subsequently clinical studies are discussed. Despite safety, studies are conflicting, partly due to different effects of enteral and parenteral Gln supplementation. Further insufficient evidence is available on the benefits of Gln supplementation in pediatric patients. This includes premature infants, infants with gastrointestinal disease, children with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome, malnutrition/diarrhea, cancer, severe burns/trauma, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, methodological issues have been noted in some studies. Further mechanistic data is needed along with large randomized controlled trials in select populations of sick children, who may eventually benefit from supplemental Gln. PMID:22175008

  10. Polyethylene glycols in oral and parenteral formulations--A critical review.

    PubMed

    Gullapalli, Rampurna P; Mazzitelli, Carolyn L

    2015-12-30

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are frequently employed as vehicles in oral and parenteral dosage forms. PEGs have low toxicity, are miscible with aqueous fluids in all proportions, and dissolve many poorly aqueous soluble compounds. Compounds with poor aqueous solubility and resulting poor bioavailability and considerable individual variability in the absorption were shown to provide exceptionally high bioavailability and reduced inter-subject variability in plasma concentrations when dosed as solutions or suspensions in PEGs. The advantages offered by PEGs, however, are not without potential challenges that must also be considered and which are the focus of this review. First, PEGs often may have high solubilizing power for some poorly aqueous soluble compounds, the high affinity of these vehicles for water can potentially lead to precipitation of the dissolved compounds when the formulations encounter an aqueous environment in vitro or in vivo, resulting in reduced bioavailability of the compounds. Second, PEGs, due to the presence of hydroxyl groups in their structures, are reactive with compounds dissolved within, resulting in the formation of degradation products. Third, PEGs, due to the presence of recurring ether groups in their polymer chains, are also inherently susceptible to autooxidative reactions, resulting in the formation of highly reactive products, which degrade several compounds formulated with PEGs. The objective is to review the applications and limitations of PEGs in pharmaceutical dosage forms and discuss solutions to mitigate challenges that may potentially arise from their use. PMID:26581774

  11. [Spontaneous reporting system data analysis of parenterally administered Shenmai].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Xin; Xiang, Yong-Yang; Xie, Yan-Ming; Shen, Hao; Ai, Qing-Hua

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous reporting system (SRS) datais currently an important source of monitoring and finding ADRs signals throughout the world. This method can promptly and effectively discover ADR signals, thus preventing and avoiding ADRs effectively. Parenterally administered Shenmai has the functions of benefiting vital energy, nourishing Yin and generating body fluids, and activating the pulse. Clinically it is used in various diseases including shock, coronary heart disease, viral myocarditis, chronic pulmonary heart disease, and granulocytopenia. The large, national SRS database of ADRs needs effective evaluation methods. We report on the use of Bayesian confidence propagation neural network method (BCPNN) and proportional reporting ration (PRR) with propensity score to control for confounding variables. Early warning signs of an ADR are, a feeling of suffocation (difficulty exhaling), anaphylactoid reactions and flushing. Furthermore, relevant relationships between the different factors is analysed by association rules (AR). It is found that there is a close relationship between past history of ADRs, a family history of ADRs and itching. PMID:24471317

  12. A review of parenteral sustained-release naltrexone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, J.L.; Kincl, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ideal naltrexone sustained-release delivery system should be easy to inject or implant, not cause adverse tissue reaction, release the drug at a relatively constant rate for at least 30 days, and biodegrade within a short time afterwards. Mechanisms which can be used for sustaining drug release include reducing solubility and surface area, coating, encapsulation and microencapsulation, complexation, binding and hydrophilic gelation. Drug release from such systems is controlled by diffusion through a barrier/film, diffusion from a monolithic device, erosion of the surface, hydrolysis, ion exchange, biodegradation, or a combination of these. Injectable systems would seem to be ultimately preferred because of the ease of administration and handling, while the implantable devices may find first use in man since they are easily removable, should that be necessary. Maintaining particulate-free products and sterilization methods are two problems with all parenteral dosage forms. Production must be particularly well controlled and validated.

  13. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Oral Bacampicillin and Parenteral Ampicillin

    PubMed Central

    Bergan, Tom

    1978-01-01

    Bacampicillin is a new oral prodrug which is rapidly converted to ampicillin during absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. High serum peaks of ampicillin are obtained. Bacampicillin orally was compared pharmacokinetically with parenteral ampicillin (intravenously and intramuscularly). A cross-over study on healthy volunteers showed that ampicillin concentrations after equimolar doses of bacampicillin orally and ampicillin intramuscularly were of the same order. The mean of the individual peak values (regardless of time of occurrence) after a dose of 800 mg of bacampicillin was 13.1 ± 3.8 μg/ml. Absorption rates of the two doses were similar, as were their distribution volumes (approximately 25% of the body weight). Bioavailability was 87% for bacampicillin, compared to 71% for ampicillin. PMID:677863

  14. [HIV infection and parenteral virus hepatitis in the Krasnodar territory].

    PubMed

    Larin, F I; Lebedev, V V; Red'ko, A N

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of the morbidity dynamics of HIV infection, hepatitis B and C in the Krasnodar territory for 1996-2003 is presented. The tendency of strengthening direct correlation between age-dependent rates in these groups of diseases has been established. The correlation coefficient (rxy) is at present +0.851 (HIV infection-virus hepatitis B) and +0.892 (HIV infection-virus hepatitis C). The highest levels of primary morbidity are registered in persons aged 20-39 years. The established epidemiological parallels between HIV infection and parenteral hepatitis require the development of the unified strategy of the prophylaxis of these diseases on the federal and regional levels. PMID:16028521

  15. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  16. Nepali Supplements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC.

    This volume is intended as a supplement to Nepali language instruction. It contains songs, numerals, dialogues in Devanagari script, a Nepali-English, English-Nepali glossary, and an English-Nepali surveyor technical glossary. (AM)

  17. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... take these supplements off the market. The Federal Trade Commission looks into reports of ads that might ... 504-5414 http://fnic.nal.usda.gov Federal Trade Commission 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20580 ...

  18. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... are not intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure diseases. Do not take supplements instead of your ... Partners Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy ...

  19. Validating hyperbilirubinemia and gut mucosal atrophy with a novel ultramobile ambulatory total parenteral nutrition piglet model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) provides all nutrition intravenously. Although TPN therapy has grown enormously, it causes significant complications, including gut and hepatic dysfunction. Current models use animal tethering which is unlike ambulatory human TPN delivery and is cost prohibitive. We ...

  20. Tissue plasminogen activator in the treatment of superior vena caval thrombosis associated with parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, G. R.; Allen, K.; Pennington, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Two patients, one of whom was pregnant, developed superior vena caval thrombosis while receiving central parenteral nutrition. They were successfully treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2115160

  1. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy.

  2. Home parenteral nutrition in management of patients with severe radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lavery, I.C.; Steiger, E.; Fazio, V.W.

    1980-03-01

    Five patients who would have been unable to survive because of intestinal complications of radiation therapy were able to lead an otherwise normal life with the use of parenteral nutrition administered at home. One patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after 14 months. Another patient died as the result of a totally avoidable pharmaceutical error after 2 1/2 years. The remaining three are still disease free without morbidity relating to the parenteral nutrition.

  3. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly

  4. Parenteral buprenorphine-naloxone abuse is a major cause of fatal buprenorphine-related poisoning.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Margareeta; Heikman, Pertti; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-10-10

    Buprenorphine (BPN) medication for opioid maintenance treatment in Finland consists predominantly of buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX). Both BPN and BNX are associated with diversion, abuse and non-medically supervised use worldwide. Our purpose was to estimate the proportion of BNX to all BPN-related fatalities. The material consisted of 225 deceased drug abusers in Finland from January 2010 to June 2011 with a positive BPN and/or norbuprenorphine (NOR) and/or naloxone (NX) finding in urine. The data were divided into three groups based on the urine NX and BPN concentrations. The "Parenteral BNX" group (>100 μg/l NX) was presumed to consist of injecting or snorting BNX abusers and the "Parenteral BPN" group (>50 μg/l BPN, 0 μg/l NX) of injecting or snorting BPN abusers, while the "Other BNX or BPN" group (≤100 μg/l NX, or ≤50 μg/l BPN combined with 0 μg/l NX) was presumed to consist of mainly sublingual BNX or BPN users. In 12.4% of cases the NX urine concentration was higher than the threshold 100 μg/l. In fatal BPN poisonings, the proportion of parenteral BNX was 28.4%. In the "Parenteral BNX", "Parenteral BPN" and "Other BNX or BPN" groups, the proportion of fatal BPN poisonings was 67.9, 31.0 and 22.6%, respectively. BNX abuse can be fatal. Among the 225 BPN-related fatalities, parenteral abuse of BNX was shown to be common (12.4%) and BNX poisoning was the underlying cause of death in 8.4%. Parenteral BNX caused fatal BPN poisoning proportionally more often than parenteral BPN. PMID:24053859

  5. Development of parenteral formulations and evaluation of the biological activity of the trypanocide drug benznidazole.

    PubMed

    Lamas, María C; Villaggi, Luciano; Nocito, Isabel; Bassani, Georgina; Leonardi, Darío; Pascutti, Fernanda; Serra, Esteban; Salomón, Claudio J

    2006-01-13

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major public health problem in Latin America. According to the World Health Organization, around 20 million people are infected and another 40 million are at risk of acquiring the disease. One of the drugs most frequently used for the treatment of Chagas disease is benznidazole (BZL). It is practically insoluble in water (0.4 mg/ml), which precludes the preparation of liquid dosage forms, in particular, parenteral formulations. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate the solubilization of BZL at two pH values using various cosolvents such as ethyl alcohol, propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 400, benzyl alcohol, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (Transcutol) and surfactants such as polysorbates (Tween) 40 and 80, and sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT). Solvent systems based on PEG 400, with the addition ethyl alcohol and/or potassium biphthalate buffer solution, increased the BZL solubility up to 10 mg/ml. These alcoholic vehicles showed no toxicity against parasite when assayed at 1%. Physical and chemical stability studies showed that the formulations were stable for at least 1.5 years. In agreement with the biological activity results, the selected formulations are suitable for further clinical studies. Moreover, increasing the aqueous solubility of BZL reduced the problems in vitro testing techniques and bioassays leading to more reliable results and/or reproducibility. PMID:16293378

  6. Role of carbonic anhydrase in bone - Partial inhibition of disuse atrophy of bone by parenteral acetazolamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The effectiveness of orally and subcutaneously administered acetazolamide sodium in preventing denervation-induced bone loss in rats is examined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with acetazolamide either orally by incorporation of 0.2, 0.5, or 1.5 percent concentrations in their diet for 15 days, or subcutaneously by either injection of 0.5 ml/rat of a solution containing either 20 or 100 mg/ml of the drug twice daily for 15 days or by continuous infusion of 5, 50, 500, or 1000 mg/ml of acetazolamide sodium for 8 days using an osmotic minipump. The effects of acetazolamide on body weight, food consumption, and plasma calcium content are evaluated. It is observed that parenteral administration is equally effective as oral administration in partially preventing denervation-induced bone mass changes. The data reveal that approximately 50 percent protection occurs with daily doses of 1094, 129, and 8 mg/kg body weight for the oral, subcutaneous injection, and subcutaneous infusion methods, respectively.

  7. Metabolic bone disease associated with total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Klein, G L; Coburn, J W

    1984-01-01

    Patients receiving long-term treatment with total parenteral nutrition often develop bony abnormalities characterized by patchy osteomalacia and low bone turnover. The patients present evidence of physiologic hypoparathyroidism, although low levels of iPTH cannot entirely explain the osteomalacia. Abnormally low serum levels of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D have been demonstrated, but the significance of these reduced levels in the pathogenesis of the bone lesions is not defined. Aluminum has been detected in large quantities in the plasma, urine, and bone of some patients treated with TPN, and there is mounting evidence that aluminum may be associated with skeletal pathology, particularly osteomalacia. There is, however, no clear documentation that aluminum accumulation produces the skeletal lesions observed, although it could be a contributing factor. There has been the unusual empiric observation that the removal of vitamin D2 from the infusate is associated with a decrease in the quantity of unmineralized osteoid in TPN patients. A possible role of vitamin D2 in producing osteomalacia is not easy to understand since normal serum levels of 25(OH)-D2, the circulating form of vitamin D2, have been reported. The long-term consequences of intravenous nutritional support for many aspects of metabolism remain unknown. Administration into the systemic circulation of predetermined quantities of calcium and phosphorus via a route that bypasses their passage across the intestinal mucosa, the portal system and the liver may have adverse consequences. It is possible that bypassing homeostatic mechanisms may affect bone formation and metabolism or lead to alterations in vitamin D sterols. Alternatively, a deficiency of an essential trace metal or the accumulation of a toxic trace substance could be responsible for the bony abnormalities. Much remains to be clarified concerning calcium homeostasis and bone disease during total parenteral nutrition. Among various possible factors, it

  8. Quality of life in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, P; Langholz, E; Mortensen, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Quality of life is an important determinant of the effectiveness of health technologies, but it has rarely been assessed in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN).
PATIENTS/METHODS—The non-disease specific sickness impact profile (SIP) and the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) were used on a cohort of 49 patients receiving HPN, and the results compared with those for 36 non-HPN patients with either anatomical (<200 cm) or functional (faecal energy excretion >2.0 MJ/day (~488 kcal/day)) short bowel.
RESULTS—In the HPN patients the SIP scores were worse (higher) overall (17 (13)% v 8 (9)%) and with regard to physical (13 (15)% v 5 (8)%) and psychosocial (14 (12)% v 9 (11)%) dimensions and independent categories (20 (12)% v 9 (8)%) compared with the non-HPN patients (means (SD); all p<0.001). The IBDQ scores were worse (lower) in the HPN patients overall (5.0 (4.3-5.7) v 5.6 (4.8-6.2)) and with regard to systemic symptoms (3.8 (2.8-5.4) v 5.2 (3.9-5.9)) and emotional (5.3 (4.4-6.2) v 5.8 (5.4-6.4)) and social (4.3 (3.4-5.5) v 4.8 (4.5-5.8)) function (median (25-75%); all p<0.05), but only tended to be worse with regard to bowel symptoms (5.2 (4.8-6.1) v 5.7 (4.9-6.4), p = 0.08). HPN also reduced quality of life in patients with a stoma, whereas a stoma did not reduce quality of life among the non-HPN patients. Female HPN patients and HPN patients older than 45 scored worse.
CONCLUSION—Quality of life is reduced in patients on HPN compared with those with anatomical or functional short bowel not receiving HPN, and compares with that reported for patients with chronic renal failure treated by dialysis.


Keywords: parenteral nutrition; quality of life; sickness impact profile; inflammatory bowel disease PMID:10323888

  9. Technology Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this project by Building Science Corporation was to evaluate the humidity control performance of new single family high performance homes, and compare the interior conditions and mechanical systems operation between two distinct groups of houses: homes with a supplemental dehumidifier installed in addition to HVAC system, and homes without any supplemental dehumidification. The subjects of the study were 10 single-family new construction homes in New Orleans, LA. Data logging equipment was installed at each home in 2012, and interior conditions and various end-use loads were monitored for one year. In terms of averages, the homes with dehumidifiers are limiting elevated levels of humidity in the living space; however, there was significant variation in humidity control between individual houses. An analysis of the equipment operation did not show a clear correlation between energy use and humidity levels. In general, no single explanatory variable appears to provide a consistent understanding of the humidity control in each house. Indoor humidity is likely due to all of the factors we have examined, and the specifics of how they are used by each occupant.

  10. Current status in outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a practical view.

    PubMed

    Candel, F J; Julián-Jiménez, A; González-Del Castillo, J

    2016-04-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs are a current and widely spread trend in clinical practice because of it´s a cost-effective option, it´s associated with a greater comfort for the patient, a lower risk of nosocomial complications and an important cost saving for the health care system. OPAT is used for treating a wide range of infections, including skin and soft tissue infections, osteoarticular infections, bacteraemia, endocarditis and complex intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections, even in presence of multiresistant microorganisms. Correct choice of antimicrobial agent and adequate patient selection are crucial for reaching therapeutic success and avoiding readmissions, treatment prolongation or treatment-related toxicity. The optimal antimicrobial for OPAT must be highly effective, have a long half-life and an adequate spectrum of action. Ceftriaxone and teicoplanin are currently the most prescribed antibiotics for OPAT, though daptomycin and ertapenem are also on the rise, due to their high efficiency, safety and wide spectrum of action. Antibiotics that are stable at room temperature can be administered through a continuous perfusion, though self-administration is preferable although it requires training of the patient or the caregiver. Factors that are most frequently associated with OPAT failure include advanced age, recent hospitalization and isolation of multiresistant microorganisms. PMID:27014770

  11. Development and characterization of voriconazole loaded nanoparticles for parenteral delivery.

    PubMed

    Füredi, Petra; Kovács, Kristóf; Ludányi, Krisztina; Antal, István; Klebovich, Imre

    2016-08-20

    Human serum albumin (HSA) has attracted the most attention in the last decades as a new nanocarrier system of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) due to its biocompatibility and high binding capacity to hydrophobic drugs. Voriconazole (VCZ), an antifungal agent with low water solubility, was selected to produce albumin based nanoparticles using nanoparticle albumin-bound technology (nab™-technology). Aim of our study was to study the development process of VCZ-loaded nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery, such as homogenizing pressure, homogenizing cycle number and drug loading capacity. The main characters of nanoparticles such as particle size distribution and polydispersity index (PDI) were determined by dynamic light scattering. Six homogenization cycles at 1800bar were ensured the acceptable PDI value (lower than 0.3) of the VCZ content nanoparticles. Optimized formulation process produced 81.2±1nm average particle size which meets the requirements of intravenous administration. Furthermore, the encapsulated concentration of VCZ was 69.7±4.2% and the water solubility was over 2 times greater than the API itself which were determined by the developed HPLC method. The in vivo release behavior can be predicted from our applied in vitro dissolution study. Almost 50% of VCZ was liberated from the nanoparticles in the first 60min. PMID:27291972

  12. Parenteral Lipid Tolerance and Adverse Effects: Fat Chance for Trouble?

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2015-09-01

    Lipid emulsions (LEs) are indispensable sources of fuel calories and (essential) fatty acids (FAs) in modern parenteral nutrition formulations. The use of LE, however, also remains associated with the development of adverse effects. Intolerance for LE mostly becomes apparent upon the development of patient complaints or disturbed blood function tests, mainly of the liver. These issues may be associated with the composition, stability, or the infusion rate of the emulsion. Also, altered balances of (anti)oxidants or the presence or absence of protective or toxic bioactive agents such as phytosterols and tocopherol in LE may lead to complications, especially in already vulnerable patients with an inflammatory condition. While the oldest available LEs are based on pure soybean oil (SO-LE), rich in the proinflammatory ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid, more recent next-generation LEs where alternative FA sources such as olive and fish oil (partially) replace soybean oil to lower the content of linoleic acid seem safe and effective. Especially LEs containing fish oil (FO-LE) have less proinflammatory characteristics that promise to convey beneficial effects on immune system and organ functions, although much of the available evidence awaits more robust clinical validation. PMID:26177663

  13. Safe Handling of Parenteral Cytotoxics: Recommendations for Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Green, Esther; Johnston, Mary; Trudeau, Maureen; Schwartz, Lisa; Poirier, Susan; Macartney, Gail; Milliken, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a set of recommendations for the safe handling of parenteral cytotoxics in health care facilities in Ontario, Canada. Methods: Systematic reviews were conducted to assemble evidence on risks to health care staff who prepare or administer cytotoxic drugs for cancer care and on closed systems for handling these drugs. Recent guidelines on safe handling of hazardous drugs were also reviewed. A multidisciplinary expert panel used an ethical framework to interpret this evidence and develop a set of recommendations to guide oncology practice in Ontario. Practitioners were surveyed and asked to provide input for the final set of recommendations. Results: Available evidence on risks associated with handling cytotoxic drugs is of poor quality, but it suggests that health care workers exposed to cytotoxic agents may be at increased risk for miscarriages. There is general agreement across guideline development groups in North America, Europe, and Australia concerning recommendations related to policies and procedures for handling cytotoxic drugs, use of personal protective equipment, and standards for ventilated cabinets, syringes and intravenous sets, transport and labeling, and education and training of staff. Limited evidence from poor-quality studies suggests that closed systems may reduce surface contamination with hazardous drugs during preparation. Conclusion: A set of recommendations was formulated by the expert panel and approved by practitioners surveyed across Ontario. PMID:20856737

  14. Fatty Acids as Therapeutic Auxiliaries for Oral and Parenteral Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Michael J.; Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Guley, Patrick C.; Cho, Moo J.

    2012-01-01

    Many drugs have decreased therapeutic activity due to issues with absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. The co-formulation or covalent attachment of drugs with fatty acids has demonstrated some capacity to overcome these issues by improving intestinal permeability, slowing clearance and binding serum proteins for selective tissue uptake and metabolism. For orally administered drugs, albeit at low level of availability, the presence of fatty acids and triglycerides in the intestinal lumen may promote intestinal uptake of small hydrophilic molecules. Small lipophilic drugs or acylated hydrophilic drugs also show increased lymphatic uptake and enhanced passive diffusional uptake. Fatty acid conjugation of small and large proteins or peptides have exhibited protracted plasma half-lives, site-specific delivery and sustained release upon parenteral administration. These improvements are most likely due to associations with lipid-binding serum proteins, namely albumin, LDL and HDL. These molecular interactions, although not fully characterized, could provide the ability of using the endogenous carrier systems for improving therapeutic outcomes. PMID:22921839

  15. Home Parenteral Nutrition: Fat Emulsions and Potential Complications.

    PubMed

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Salonen, Bradley R; Bonnes, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Since the first intravenous nutrition support attempt with olive oil in the 17th century, intravenous fat emulsions (IVFEs) have evolved to become an integral component in the management of patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). IVFEs serve as a calorie source and provide essential fatty acids (linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) in patients unable to achieve adequate intake of these fatty acids through alternative means. However, IVFE use is also associated with multiple complications, including increased infection risk, liver disease, and systemic proinflammatory states. In the United States, most IVFEs are composed of 100% soybean oil; internationally multiple alternative IVFEs (using fish oil, olive oil, and long- and medium-chain triglycerides) are available or being developed. The hope is that these IVFEs will prevent, or decrease the risk of, some of the HPN-associated complications. The goal of this article is to review how IVFEs came into use, their composition and metabolism, options for IVFE delivery in HPN, benefits and risks of IVFE use, and strategies to minimize the risks associated with IVFE use in HPN patients. PMID:27533943

  16. Nutritional intake of gut failure patients on home parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    DiCecco, S.; Nelson, J.; Burnes, J.; Fleming, C.R.

    1987-11-01

    Nutrient intake patterns were analyzed in 23 patients with gut failure who were receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). All patients had stable weights without changes in intravenous calories or protein for 3 consecutive months. Our objectives were to assess oral intake of calories, carbohydrates, fat, and protein, to examine relationships between oral nutrient intakes and disease categories, and to compare oral and intravenous intakes to calculated resting energy expenditure (REE). Two patterns of oral nutrient intake were identified among the patients. Patients with short bowel syndrome, regardless of the underlying disease, consumed calories by mouth that clearly exceeded calculated resting energy expenditure (short bowel, non-Crohn's, 170% of REE; short bowel, Crohn's, 200 of REE); however, calories approximating the REE had to be given via HPN, suggesting that efficiency of absorption was at a very low level. Patients with diffuse gut diseases (radiation enteritis or pseudo-obstruction syndromes) had very low intakes of oral nutrients. The distribution of oral calories among carbohydrate, protein, and fat did not differ among the disease categories.

  17. Severe Refractory Coeliac Disease with Response Only to Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Mehta, Ravi; Mohamed, Salma; Mohamed, Zameer; Arnold, Jayantha

    2014-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is characterised by recurrent or persistent malabsorptive symptoms and villous atrophy, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet for at least 6 months and where other causes of malabsorption including malignancy have been excluded. There is limited evidence and guidance on the effective management of these patients. We describe a case of severe RCD in our hospital, with symptoms controlled effectively only by total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This 68-year-old woman initially presented to the clinic with persistent non-bloody diarrhoea and vomiting. A diagnosis of coeliac disease was confirmed with a positive tissue transglutaminase assay and histology. A strict gluten-free diet was ineffective and she represented 6 months later with 13 kg weight loss (16.7%), ongoing abdominal pain and diarrhoea, with bowels opening 16 times a day. She was oedematous, had an albumin of 12 g/l and required hospital admission. She was treated for pancreatic insufficiency and presumptively for small bowel bacterial overgrowth with no resolution of symptoms. We ruled out infectious causes and investigated for small bowel malignancy; all results were negative. Small bowel enteroscopy showed ulcerative jejunitis. She was given 5 days of TPN, following which her symptoms improved and albumin normalised. This was sustained with symptom resolution and weight gain seen at follow-up. TPN successfully and rapidly induced remission in this case. Thus, a short period of TPN should be considered as a potential component of management in patients with severe RCD. PMID:25473387

  18. Innovative Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Therapy for Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hau D.; Fallon, Erica M.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Malkan, Alpin D.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Children with intestinal failure suffer from insufficient intestinal length or function, making them dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for growth and survival. PN and its components are associated with many complications ranging from simple electrolyte abnormalities to life-threatening PN-associated liver disease, which is also called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (ILALD). From a nutrition perspective, the ultimate goal is to provide adequate caloric requirements and make the transition from PN to full enteral Nutrition (EN) successful. Upon review of the literature, we have summarized the most effective and innovative PN and EN therapies for this patient population. Antibiotic-coated catheters and antibiotic or ethanol locks can be implemented, as they appear effective in reducing catheter-related infection and thus further reduce the risk of IFALD. Lipid emulsions should be given judiciously. The use of an omega-3 fatty acid-based formulation should be considered in patients who develop IFALD. Trophic feeding is important for intestinal adaptation, and EN should be initiated early to help wean patients from PN. Long term management of children with IF continues to be an emerging field. We have entered uncharted territory as more children survive complications of IF, including IFALD. Careful monitoring and individualized management to ensure maintenance of growth with avoidance of complications are the keys to successful patient outcomes. PMID:20123271

  19. Should pediatric parenteral nutrition be individualized?☆

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento; Nogueira, Roberto José Negrão; Saron, Margareth Lopes Galvão; Lima, Alexandre Esteves Souza; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations are commonly individualized, since their standardization appears inadequate for the pediatric population. This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional state and the reasons for PN individualization in pediatric patients using PN, hospitalized in a tertiary hospital in Campinas, São Paulo. METHODS: This longitudinal study comprised patients using PN followed by up to 67 days. Nutritional status was classified according to the criteria established by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2006) and WHO (2007). The levels of the following elements in blood were analyzed: sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, chloride, magnesium, inorganic phosphorus, and triglycerides (TGL). Among the criteria for individualization, the following were considered undeniable: significant reduction in blood levels of potassium (<3mEq/L), sodium (<125mEq/L), magnesium (<1mEq/L), phosphorus (<1.5mEq/L), ionic calcium (<1mmol), and chloride (<90mEq/L), or any value above the references. RESULTS: Twelve pediatric patients aged 1 month to 15 years were studied (49 individualizations). Most patients were classified as malnourished. It was observed that 74/254 (29.2%) of examinations demanded individualized PN for indubitable reasons. CONCLUSION: The nutritional state of patients was considered critical in most cases. Thus, the individualization performed in the beginning of PN for energy protein adequacy was indispensable. In addition, the individualized PN was indispensable in at least 29.2% of PN for correction of alterations found in biochemical parameters. PMID:25510996

  20. Sports Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... specialist. The doc will be able to offer alternatives to supplements based on your body and sport. Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD Date reviewed: January 2015 previous 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Sports Center Energy Drinks and Food Bars: Power or Hype? A ...

  1. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the human body. It helps build and protect your teeth ... absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from sunlight exposure to your skin and from your diet. Ask your provider whether ...

  2. Leucine supplementation of a low-protein meal increases skeletal muscle and visceral tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by stimulating mTOR-dependent translation initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs parenterally infused with amino acids. Leucine appears to be the most effective single amino acid to trigger these effects. To examine the response to enteral leucine supplementation...

  3. Fish oil-based lipid emulsion: current updates on a promising novel therapy for the management of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Gohel, Tushar; Deen, Omer J.; DeChicco, Robert; Shatnawei, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterized by loss of enteral function to absorb necessary nutrients and water to sustain life. Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a lifesaving therapeutic modality for patients with intestinal failure. Lifelong PN is also needed for patients who have short bowel syndrome due to extensive resection or a dysmotility disorder with malabsorption. However, prolonged PN is associated with short-term and long-term complications. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is one of the long-term complications associated with the use of an intravenous lipid emulsion to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency in these patients. PNALD affects 30–60% of the adult population on long-term PN. Further, PNALD is one of the indications for isolated liver or combined liver and intestinal transplantation. There is no consensus on how to manage PNALD, but fish oil-based lipid emulsion (FOBLE) has been suggested to play an important role both in its prevention and reversal. There is significant improvement in liver function in those who received FOBLE as lipid supplement compared with those who received soy-based lipid emulsion. Studies have also demonstrated that FOBLE reverses hepatic steatosis and reduces markers of inflammation in patients on long-term PN. Future prospective studies with larger sample sizes are needed to further strengthen the positive role of FOBLE in PNALD. PMID:25858884

  4. Vitamin E in new-generation lipid emulsions protects against parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in parenteral nutrition-fed preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E composition of soy and fish oil lipi...

  5. Comparison of early enteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis with prebiotic fiber supplementation versus standard enteral solution: A prospective randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Karakan, Tarkan; Ergun, Meltem; Dogan, Ibrahim; Cindoruk, Mehmet; Unal, Selahattin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the beneficial effects of early enteral nutrition (EN) with prebiotic fiber supplementation in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Thirty consecutive patients with severe AP, who required stoppage of oral feeding for 48 h, were randomly assigned to nasojejunal EN with or without prebiotics. APACHE II score, Balthazar’s CT score and CRP were assessed daily during the study period. RESULTS: The median duration of hospital stay was shorter in the study group [10 ± 4 (8-14) d vs 15 ± 6 (7-26) d] (P < 0.05). The median value of days in intensive care unit was also similar in both groups [6 ± 2 (5-8) d vs 6 ± 2 (5-7) d]. The median duration of EN was 8 ± 4 (6-12) d vs 10 ± 4 (6-13) d in the study and control groups, respectively (P > 0.05). Deaths occurred in 6 patients (20%), 2 in the study group and 4 in the control group. The mean duration of APACHE II normalization (APACHE II score < 8) was shorter in the study group than in the control group (4 ± 2 d vs 6.5 ± 3 d, P < 0.05). The mean duration of CRP normalization was also shorter in the study group than in the control group (7 ± 2 d vs 10 ± 3 d, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Nasojejunal EN with prebiotic fiber supplementation in severe AP improves hospital stay, duration nutrition therapy, acute phase response and overall complications compared to standard EN therapy. PMID:17569144

  6. Parenteral nutrition support: Beyond gut feeling? Quality control study of parenteral nutrition practices in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Shankar, Bhuvaneshwari; Ranganathan, Lakshmi; Daphnee, D. K.; Bharadwaj, Adithya; Venkataraman, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteral nutrition (EN) is preferred over parenteral nutrition (PN) in hospitalized patients based on International consensus guidelines. Practice patterns of PN in developing countries have not been documented. Objectives: To assess practice pattern and quality of PN support in a tertiary hospital setting in Chennai, India. Methods: Retrospective record review of patients admitted between February 2010 and February 2012. Results: About 351,008 patients were admitted to the hospital in the study period of whom 29,484 (8.4%) required nutritional support. About 70 patients (0.24%) received PN, of whom 54 (0.18%) received PN for at least three days. Common indications for PN were major gastrointestinal surgery (55.6%), intolerance to EN (25.9%), pancreatitis (5.6%), and gastrointestinal obstruction (3.7%). Conclusions: The proportion of patients receiving PN was very low. Quality issues were identified relating to appropriateness of indication and calories and proteins delivered. This study helps to introspect and improve the quality of nutrition support. PMID:26955215

  7. Nucleic acid labeling with ( sup 3 H)orotic acid and nucleotide profile in rats in protein deprivation, enteral and parenteral essential amino acid administration, and 5-fluorouracil treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, B.; el Hag, I.A.; Andersson, M.; Christensson, P.I.; Stenram, U. )

    1990-09-01

    Rats were fed a 0% casein diet for 1 week, with or without enteral or parenteral administration of essential amino acids, or a 25% casein diet, in one group supplemented with 5-fluorouracil treatment. Ninety minutes before sacrifice the rats were given a tracer of (3H)orotic acid. Incorporation into the acid soluble fraction, RNA, and DNA was determined in liver, small intestine, bone marrow, and kidney. Nucleotide profile was examined in liver and intestine. Protein deficiency caused inter alia a decrease in body weight; a decrease in RNA/DNA ratio and an increase in the specific RNA labeling in liver and kidney; an altered nucleotide profile in the liver; an increase in the nucleotide/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios and a decrease in the specific labeling of the acid soluble fraction, RNA, and DNA in the bone marrow. These changes were prevented to the same extent by giving essential amino acids, either orally or intravenously. The minor changes in intestinal nucleotide profile in protein deprivation were prevented to a slightly larger extent by amino acids orally than parenterally. 5-Fluorouracil treatment gave a decrease in the RNA/DNA ratio in the liver and kidney but an increase in the nucleotide/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios in the bone marrow. Nucleotide profiles were unaltered. The amount of DNA per gram of tissue decreased in bone marrow and increased in kidney. Parenteral administration per se resulted in almost no changes.

  8. 100 patient-years of ambulatory home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Dudrick, S J; O'Donnell, J J; Englert, D M; Matheny, R G; Blume, E R; Nutt, R E; Hickey, M S; Barroso, A O

    1984-01-01

    More than 100 patient-years' experience has been acquired in the treatment of 133 patients with ambulatory home total parenteral nutrition (TPN) between May 1974 and December 1983. Indications for chronic or permanent home TPN include short bowel syndrome, malabsorption, scleroderma, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide syndrome. Indications for acute or temporary home TPN include Crohn's disease, malignancies, gastrointestinal fistulas, ulcerative colitis, anorexia nervosa, and numerous other disorders. Eighty-two patients in the acute group were treated primarily with percutaneously placed standard subclavian catheters and 51 patients in the chronic group have been treated thus far with implanted silicone rubber, Dacron-cuffed catheters for a cumulative total of 38,939 patient days. Of the 125 implanted catheters, 115 were placed in the superior vena cava and ten in the inferior vena cava for an average duration of 250 catheter-days, the longest single catheter remaining in situ for more than 8 1/2 years. Catheter-related sepsis occurred 33 times with the implanted catheters, or once every 2.6 catheter-years. One hundred and fourteen temporary catheters were placed percutaneously in the superior vena cava via a subclavian vein for an average duration of 68 days, the longest single catheter remaining in situ for 213 days. Catheter-related sepsis occurred seven times, equivalent to one episode per 3 catheter-years. Total catheter-related complications were quite infrequent and were directly related to duration of catheterization. They included venous thrombosis (12), clotted catheter (11), catheter failure or rupture (8), catheter compression (5) and inadvertent catheter removal (4). Twenty-six catheters were repaired or spliced in situ when the external segment was accidentally damaged or deteriorated secondary to long-term material fatigue. One remarkable patient has been maintained exclusively by TPN originally as an inpatient and subsequently as an outpatient

  9. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Cheng; Dai, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Li-Ming; Xie, Yi-Bin; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Li, Guo-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients. However, studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients. Methods: This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types, whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period. All patients had blood glucose (BG) values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion. The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG. Results: The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age, gender, family cancer history and blood types. There were six cancer types: Hepatic carcinoma (HC, 21.8%), rectal carcinoma (17.3%), colon carcinoma (CC, 14.7%), gastric carcinoma (29.8%), pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%), and duodenal carcinoma (DC, 4.8%). The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups. No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found; however, the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious. With increasing BG values, DC, HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals, as well as in the nondiabetic group. BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group. Other factors did not impact BG values, including gender, body mass index, and TPN infusion duration time. Conclusions: When tumor patients are treated with TPN, BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors, besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients. Special BG control is needed for DC, HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. If BG overtly increases, positive measurements are needed to control BG values. The

  10. Haemodynamic effects of parenteral vs. enteral paracetamol in critically ill patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S J; Moran, J L; Williams, P J; Burns, K; Rowland, A; Miners, J O; Peake, S L

    2016-10-01

    Paracetamol is a commonly used drug in the intensive care unit. There have been reports in the literature of an association with significant hypotension, a potentially important interaction for labile critically ill patients. Route of administration may influence the incidence of hypotension. This single-centre, prospective, open-label, randomised, parallel-arm, active-control trial was designed to determine the incidence of hypotension following the administration of paracetamol to critically ill patients. Fifty adult patients receiving paracetamol for analgesia or pyrexia were randomly assigned to receive either the parenteral or enteral formulation of the drug. Paracetamol concentrations were measured at baseline and at multiple time points over 24 h. The maximal plasma paracetamol concentration was significantly different between routes; 156 vs. 73 micromol.l(-1) [p = 0.0005] following the first dose of parenteral or enteral paracetamol, respectively. Sixteen hypotensive events occurred in 12 patients: parenteral n = 12; enteral n = 4. The incident rate ratio for parenteral vs. enteral paracetamol was 2.94 (95% CI 0.97-8.92; p = 0.06). The incidence of hypotension associated with paracetamol administration is higher than previously reported and tends to be more frequent with parenteral paracetamol. PMID:27611038

  11. Parenteral nutrition in adult inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts: assessment of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2006-04-01

    Malnutrition is a common comorbidity that places inpatients at risk of complications, infections, long length of stay, higher costs, and increased mortality. Thus, nutrition support has become an important therapeutic adjunctive to the care of these patients. For patients unable to feed themselves, nutrition can be delivered via the parenteral or enteral routes. The formulations used to deliver nutrients and the route of nutrient delivery, absorption, and processing differ substantially between parenteral and enteral nutrition. Over the past two decades, many randomised clinical trials have assessed the effects of parenteral versus enteral nutrition on outcomes (ie, complications, infections, length of stay, costs, mortality) in diverse inpatient populations. From a search of medical publications, studies were selected that assessed important clinical outcomes of parenteral versus enteral feeding or intravenous fluids in patients with trauma/burn injuries, surgery, cancer, pancreatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, critical illness, liver failure, acute renal failure, and organ transplantation. Our goal was to determine the optimum route of feeding in these patient groups. The available evidence lends support to the use of enteral over parenteral feeding in inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts. PMID:16581410

  12. Characterization and protective efficacy in an animal model of a novel truncated rotavirus VP8 subunit parenteral vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Xue, Miaoge; Yu, Linqi; Che, Yaojian; Lin, Haijun; Zeng, Yuanjun; Fang, Mujin; Li, Tingdong; Ge, Shengxiang; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-05-21

    The cell-attachment protein VP8* of rotavirus is a potential candidate parenteral vaccine. However, the yield of full-length VP8 protein (VP8*, residues 1-231) expressed in Escherichia coli was low, and a truncated VP8 protein (ΔVP8*, residues 65-231) cannot elicit efficient protective immunity in a mouse model. In this study, tow novel truncated VP8 proteins, VP8-1 (residues 26-231) and VP8-2 (residues 51-231), were expressed in E. coli and evaluated for immunogenicity and protective efficacy, compared with VP8* and ΔVP8*. As well as ΔVP8*, the protein VP8-1 and VP8-2 were successfully expressed in high yield and purified in homogeneous dimeric forms, while the protein VP8* was expressed with lower yield and prone to aggregation and degradation in solution. Although the immunogenicity of the protein VP8*, VP8-1, VP8-2 and ΔVP8* was comparable, immunization of VP8* and VP8-1 elicited significantly higher neutralizing antibody titers than that of VP8-2 and ΔVP8* in mice. Furthermore, when assessed using a mouse maternal antibody model, the efficacy of VP8-1 to protect against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in pups was comparable to that of VP8*, both were dramatically higher than that of VP8-2 and ΔVP8*. Taken together, the novel truncated protein VP8-1, with increased yield, improved homogeneity and high protective efficacy, is a viable candidate for further development of a parenterally administrated prophylactic vaccine against rotavirus infection. PMID:25882173

  13. Time history solution program, L225 (TEV126). Volume 2: Supplemental system design and maintenance document. [for airplane dynamic response using frequency response data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornallyay, A.; Clemmons, R. E.; Kroll, R. I.

    1979-01-01

    The time history solution program L225 (TEV126) is described. The program calculates the time responses of a linear system by convoluting the impulsive response functions with the time dependent excitation. The convolution is performed as a multiplication in the frequency domain. Fast Fourier transform techniques are used to transform the product back into the time domain to obtain response time histories. The design and structure of the program is presented.

  14. Aluminum in parenteral products: Overview of chemistry concerns and regulatory actions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoiberg, C.P.

    1989-05-01

    In the May 23, 1985 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Sedman et al. reported that many drug products that are routinely administered in parenteral therapy contain aluminum. From a manufacturing and control perspective, the Agency had obtained considerable information and data regarding (1) sources of aluminum contamination, (2) types of parenteral drug products containing aluminum, and (3) assay methodologies. Currently, in the review of drug applications in DSDDP, applicants are being requested to incorporate aluminum monitoring into their stability protocols and to implement, where possible, changes that will reduce aluminum contamination. Since acceptable analytical procedures are available and the aluminum contaminate is believed to be harmful to certain patient populations receiving parenteral therapy, the Agency is considering actions resulting in the imposition of regulatory controls.

  15. [Technical specifications for rational clinical use of parenterally administered Chinese medicine (draft version for comments)].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-Ming; Li, Ming-Quan; Zhang, Yun-Ling; Ma, Rong; Xian, Shao-Xiang; Liu, Jian; Li, Su-Yun; Zhao, Yu-Bin

    2013-09-01

    The regulations on basic clinical use of parenterally administered Chinese medicine, issued jointly in 2008, by the ministry of health (MOH), China food and drug administration (SFDA) and the state administration of traditional Chinese medicine (SATCM). Integrating actual clinical practice, these presented doctors and nurses with detailed specifications for the safe use of parenterally administered Chinese medicine. The regulations emphasize the use of Chinese medicine pattern differentiation, use in strict accordance with instructions, and they prohibit use combined with other medicines. The emphasis of the regulations are practicality and operability, and provide meaningful guidance to doctors and nurses for the rational and safe use of parenterally administered Chinese medicine, to reduce adverse reactions/adverse events caused by improper use. PMID:24471306

  16. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Razieh; Ferdosian, Farzad; Shajari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist. PMID:26401146

  17. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article

    PubMed Central

    FALLAH, Razieh; FERDOSIAN, Farzad; SHAJARI, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist. PMID:26401146

  18. An assessment of techniques for evaluating the physical stability of parenteral emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Kirsch, Lee E

    2003-01-01

    The physical stability of the parenteral emulsions is a key product quality issue. The purpose of this study is to develop, prepare and characterize model phospholipid emulsions and to critically evaluate various physical stability-indicating methods. Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were prepared using 20% (w/w) medium chain triglycerides (MCT) or soybean oil in 2.21% (w/w) aqueous glycerin solutions emulsified with 0.1 to 1.8 % (w/w) lecithin. The reproducibility of emulsion preparation was determined by measuring the volume-based mean droplet diameter using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and zeta potential using electrophoretic light scattering. Evaluation of stability-indicating methods was conducted by comparing the mean droplet growth rate of a thermally-stressed emulsion using PCS, a light obscuration particle counter (HIAC, equipped with a laser diode sensor) and a droplet image analyzer interfaced with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using osmium tetraoxide fixation. Emulsions with identical compositions and preparation properties had reproducible mean droplet diameter and initial zeta potential values with RSD < 5.0%. Upon the application of thermal stress, the volume-based diameter increased linearly with time for all three sizing techniques (PCS, HIAC, and TEM). The droplet growth rates estimated using PCS and TEM were nearly identical. PCS is a sufficiently accurate technique for measuring emulsion stability and is less time-consuming than TEM. The HIAC technique only measured the size of droplets with diameters larger than about 1 micron, which was considerably greater than the mean droplet diameter as determined by PCS and microscopic image analysis (TEM). Moreover, the growth rate obtained using HIAC was much greater than the rates estimated by PCS and TEM; therefore the HIAC technique was not an accurate measure of the physical stability of the thermally stressed emulsions. PMID:14558703

  19. Parenteral nutrition in the management of a dog with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis and severe protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, I F; Miller, E; Twedt, D C

    1999-01-01

    Management of lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis in a dog with whipworm infestation, hypoproteinemia, and ascites is described. Short-term parenteral nutrition hastened normalization of serum proteins, resolution of diarrhea, and weight gain. A description of the potential benefits, limitations, and possible complications of parenteral nutrition in refractory inflammatory bowel disease is given. PMID:10572669

  20. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  1. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  2. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  3. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  4. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  5. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  6. Parenteral Nutrition Suppresses the Bactericidal Response of the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Jiro; Pierre, Joseph F; Heneghan, Aaron F; Tsao, Francis HC; Sano, Yoshifumi; Jonker, Mark A; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    Background Parenteral nutrition (PN) increases infectious risk in critically ill patients compared with enteral feeding. Previously, we demonstrated that PN feeding suppresses the concentration of the Paneth cell antimicrobial protein secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) in the gut lumen. sPLA2 and other Paneth cell proteins are released in response to bacterial components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and they modulate the intestinal microbiome. Since the Paneth cell protein sPLA2 was suppressed with PN feeding, we hypothesized PN would diminish the responsiveness of the small bowel to LPS through reduced secretions and as a result exhibit less bactericidal activity. Methods The distal ileum was harvested from ICR mice, washed, and randomized for incubation with LPS (0, 1, or 10 μg/mL). Culture supernatant was collected and sPLA2 Activity was measured. Bactericidal activity of the ileum segment secretions was assessed against P. aeruginosa with and without a sPLA2 inhibitor at two concentrations, 100nM and 1μM. ICR mice were randomized to Chow or PN for 5 days. Tissue was collected for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and ileal segments were incubated with LPS (0 or 10 μg/mL). sPLA2 activity and bactericidal activity were measured in secretions from ileal segments. Results The ileal segments responded to 10 ug/mL LPS with significantly greater sPLA2 activity and bactericidal activity. The bactericidal activity of secretions from LPS stimulated tissue was suppressed 50% and 70%, respectively, with the addition of the sPLA2-inhibitor. Chow displayed greater sPLA2 in the Paneth cell granules and secreted higher levels of sPLA2 than PN before and after LPS. Accordingly, media collected from Chow was more bactericidal than PN. IHC confirmed a reduction in Paneth cell granules after PN. Conclusions This work demonstrates that ileal segments secrete bactericidal secretions after LPS exposure and the inhibition of the Paneth cell antimicrobial protein sPLA2 significantly

  7. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations – an Australasian group consensus 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors. PMID:24548745

  8. Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated AqueousSolutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the PitzerIon-Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel , Carl

    2006-12-15

    In this report, we present: -- The Pitzer ion-interactiontheory and models -- Input file requirements for using the TOUGHREACTPitzer ion-interaction model and associated databases -- Run-time errormessages -- Verification test cases and application examples. For themain code structure, features, overall solution methods, description ofinput/output files for parameters other than those specific to theimplemented Pitzer model, and error messages, see the TOUGHREACT User'sGuide (Xu et al., 2005). The TOUGHREACT Pitzer version runs on aDEC-alpha architecture CPU, under OSF1 V5.1, with Compaq Digital FortranCompiler. The compiler run-time libraries are required for execution aswell as compilation. The code also runs on Intel Pentium IV andhigher-version CPU-based machines with Compaq Visual Fortran Compiler orIntel Fortran Compiler (integrated with the Microsoft DevelopmentEnvironment). The minimum hardware configuration should include 1 GB RAMand 1 GB (2 GB recommended) of available disk space.

  9. Effects of glutamine supplementation on splenocyte cytokine mRNA expression in rats with septic peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Sung-Ling; Lai, Yu-Ni; Shang, Huey-Fang; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Chen, Wei-Jao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of glutamine (GLN)-enriched diets before and GLN-containing total parenteral nutrition (TPN) after sepsis or both on the secretion of cytokines and their mRNA expression levels in splenocytes of rats with septic peritonitis. METHODS: Rats were assigned to a control group and 4 experimental groups. The control group and experimental groups 1 and 2 were fed a semipurified diet, while experimental groups 3 and 4 had part of the casein replaced by GLN which provided 25% of the total nitrogen. After rats were fed with these diets for 10 d, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), whereas the control group underwent a sham operation, at the same time, an internal jugular vein was cannulated. All rats were maintained on TPN for 3 d. The control group and experimental groups 1 and 3 were infused with conventional TPN, while the TPN in experimental groups 2 and 4 was supplemented with GLN, providing 25% of the total nitrogen in the TPN solution. All rats were kiued 3 d after sham operation or CLP to examine their splenocyte subpopulation distribution and cytokine expression levels. RESULTS: Most cytokines could not be detected in plasma except for IL-10. No difference in plasma IL-10 was observed among the 5 groups. The IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and TNF-α mRNA expression levels in splenocytes were significantly higher in experimental groups 2 and 4 than in the control group and group 1. The mRNA expression of IFN-γ was significantly higher in the GLN-supplemented groups than in the control group and experimental group 1. The proportion of CD45Ra+ was increased, while those of CD3+ and CD4+ were decreased in experimental group 1 after CLP was performed. There were no differences in spleen CD3+ lymphocyte distributions between the control and GLN-supplemented groups. CONCLUSION: GLN supplementation can maintain T-lymphocyte populations in the spleen and significantly enhance the mRNA expression levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and TNF

  10. Comparison of Intradialytic Parenteral Nutrition with Glucose or Amino Acid Mixtures in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; Qin, Dan-Ping; Tan, Rong-Shao; Zhong, Xiao-Shi; Zhou, Dao-Yuan; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Xuan; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Many long-term maintenance hemodialysis patients have symptoms of protein-energy wasting caused by malnutrition. Each session of hemodialysis removes about 10 to 12 g of amino acids and 200 to 480 kcal of energy. Patients receiving hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease may be undernourished for energy, protein consumption, or both. Non-diabetic hemodialysis patients were randomized to three treatment groups: oral supplementation, oral supplementation plus high-concentration glucose solution (250 mL containing 50% glucose) and these two interventions plus 8.5% amino acids solution. The post-treatment energy status of the glucose group was significantly higher than its baseline level, whereas the control group’s status was significantly lower. The glucose group had significantly higher concentrations of asparagine, glutamine, glycine, alanine, and lysine after treatment. All treatment groups had significantly increased hemoglobin levels but significantly decreased transferrin levels after treatment compared to baseline. After treatment, the amino acid group had significantly higher albumin level compared to the glucose group (p = 0.001) and significantly higher prealbumin level compared to the control group (p = 0.017). In conclusion, long-term intervention with high-concentration glucose solution at each hemodialysis session is a simple and cheap method that replenished energy stores lost during hemodialysis of non-diabetic patients. PMID:27271658