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  1. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses the gastrointestinal tract. Fluids are given into a vein to ... babies. It can provide a better level of nutrition than regular intravenous (IV) feedings, which provide only ...

  2. Total parenteral nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) will help you or your child get nutrition from a special formula through a vein in the ... you can also eat and drink while getting nutrition from TPN. Your nurse will teach you how ...

  3. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using /sup 15/N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats.

  4. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  5. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  6. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  7. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  8. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  9. [Total parenteral nutrition. History. Present time. Future].

    PubMed

    Wretlind, A; Szczygieł, B

    1998-04-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has been available for only 30 years. However, history in this field goes back more than 350 years with the first landmark being the description of general blood circulation by William Harvey in 1628. His discovery is the anatomical basis for intravenous infusions. Many investigations were performed during the following centuries showing that solutions containing electrolytes and glucose could be given intravenously in man. The accumulated knowledge of protein metabolism formed the basis for studies on intravenous nutrition with protein hydrolysates, peptides and amino acids. The observation in the late 30-s by Robert Elman that amino acids in the form of protein hydrolysate could be safely administered intravenously in man was the first major step toward TPN. During the following years, major efforts were made to find methods to prepare infusion solutions with a high energy content and low osmotic pressure. The most realistic alternative seemed to be fat in the form of an emulsion. Many studies of a large number of various fat emulsions were made however, all of these emulsions caused severe adverse reactions in man. The first safe fat emulsion, intralipid, was made available in the early 60s. This was the second major step toward TPN. It was then no problem to include vitamins, electrolytes and trace elements in the fat emulsions and the solutions of amino acids and glucose. A few years later it was shown that a central venous catheter could be used to administer the infusion fluid intravenously. Many clinical investigations and reports have shown that the newly developed intravenous nutritional regimens are adequate alternatives to the ordinary diet. In this way it has been possible to maintain or obtain a good nutritional condition in most situations when oral or tube feeding can not be used. TPN has been shown to be of very great clinical importance to prevent and treat starvation often related to high morbidity and mortality

  10. Gluconeogenesis continues in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the contribution of total gluconeogenesis, to glucose production in preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) providing glucose exceeding normal infant glucose turnover rate, eight infants (0.955 +/- 0.066 kg, 26.5 - 0.5 wks, 4-1 d) were studied while receiving routine ...

  11. Total Parenteral Nutrition-Induced Cholestasis: Prevention and Management.

    PubMed

    Beath, Sue V; Kelly, Deirdre A

    2016-02-01

    When cholestasis occurs in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition, it is the result of many pathogenic pathways converging on the hepatic acinus. The result may be a temporary rise in liver function tests. The resulting fibrosis, portal hypertension, and jaundice are hallmarks of type 3 intestinal-associated liver disease to which children are more susceptible than adults. The key to prevention is in identifying high-risk scenarios, meticulous monitoring, and personalized prescription of parenteral nutrition solutions combined with an active approach in reducing the impact of inflammatory events when they occur by prompt use of antibiotics and line locks. PMID:26593297

  12. Controversies in the Mechanism of Total Parenteral Nutrition Induced Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jain Ajay; Teckman, Jeffery H.

    2015-01-01

    Over 30,000 patients are permanently dependent on Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) for survival with several folds higher requiring TPN for a prolonged duration. Unfortunately, it can cause potentially fatal complications. TPN infusion results in impairment of gut mucosal integrity, enhanced inflammation, increased cytokine expression and trans-mucosal bacterial permeation. It also causes endotoxin associated down regulation of bile acid transporters and Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD), which includes steatosis, disrupted glucose metabolism, disrupted lipid metabolism, cholestasis and liver failure. Despite multiple theories, its etiology and pathophysiology remains elusive and is likely multifactorial. An important cause for TPN related pathologies appears to be a disruption in the normal enterohepatic circulation due to a lack of feeding during such therapy. This is further validated by the fact that in clinical settings, once cholestasis sets in, its reversal occurs when a patient is receiving a major portion of calories enterally. There are several other postulated mechanisms including gut bacterial permeation predisposing to endotoxin associated down regulation of bile acid transporters. An additional potential mechanism includes toxicity of the TPN solution itself, such as lipid mediated hepatic toxicity. Prematurity, leading to a poor development of bile acid regulating nuclear receptors and transporters has also been implicated as a causative factor. This review presents the current controversies and research into mechanisms of TPN associated injury. PMID:27417369

  13. Selected ultratrace elements in total parenteral nutrition solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, Y.N.; Shuler, T.R.; Nielsen, F.H.; Flombaum, C.; Farkouh, S.A.; Shike, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Ultratrace elements are potentially essential (eg. boron, molybdenum, nickel, and vanadium) or toxic (eg, aluminum and cadmium) in humans. Long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN) patients can inadvertently receive significant amounts of ultratrace elements present as contaminants in TPN solutions. We determined the intake of selected ultratrace elements from a standard TPN solution and compared it with the amount reported to be absorbed from food in normal subjects. Contamination of TPN solutions with ultratrace elements was widespread and variable. The daily intakes of Mo, Ni, V. and Cd from this contamination were comparable to the amounts reported to be absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract in normal subjects. Al intake was high; B intake was low, approximately 10% of the amount absorbed by normal subjects. Thus, TPN solutions are contaminated with significant amounts of ultratrace elements. The biological significance of the intravenous infusion of these ultratrace elements is unclear and requires further investigation, particularly in home TPN patients.

  14. Metabolic bone disease associated with total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Klein, G L; Coburn, J W

    1984-01-01

    Patients receiving long-term treatment with total parenteral nutrition often develop bony abnormalities characterized by patchy osteomalacia and low bone turnover. The patients present evidence of physiologic hypoparathyroidism, although low levels of iPTH cannot entirely explain the osteomalacia. Abnormally low serum levels of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D have been demonstrated, but the significance of these reduced levels in the pathogenesis of the bone lesions is not defined. Aluminum has been detected in large quantities in the plasma, urine, and bone of some patients treated with TPN, and there is mounting evidence that aluminum may be associated with skeletal pathology, particularly osteomalacia. There is, however, no clear documentation that aluminum accumulation produces the skeletal lesions observed, although it could be a contributing factor. There has been the unusual empiric observation that the removal of vitamin D2 from the infusate is associated with a decrease in the quantity of unmineralized osteoid in TPN patients. A possible role of vitamin D2 in producing osteomalacia is not easy to understand since normal serum levels of 25(OH)-D2, the circulating form of vitamin D2, have been reported. The long-term consequences of intravenous nutritional support for many aspects of metabolism remain unknown. Administration into the systemic circulation of predetermined quantities of calcium and phosphorus via a route that bypasses their passage across the intestinal mucosa, the portal system and the liver may have adverse consequences. It is possible that bypassing homeostatic mechanisms may affect bone formation and metabolism or lead to alterations in vitamin D sterols. Alternatively, a deficiency of an essential trace metal or the accumulation of a toxic trace substance could be responsible for the bony abnormalities. Much remains to be clarified concerning calcium homeostasis and bone disease during total parenteral nutrition. Among various possible factors, it

  15. Metabolic bone disease in home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    McCullough, M L; Hsu, N

    1987-07-01

    Home total parenteral nutrition (HTPN) is in its infancy but has proved to be lifesaving for patients unable to manage on enteral nutrition alone. However, this mode of nutrition therapy is not without problems. Aside from mechanical and other metabolic complications, a peculiar metabolic bone disease has been reported to occur in some HTPN recipients. The disease, characterized by abnormalities in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, often results in osteomalacia, bone pain, and fractures. Reports of approximately 50 cases of metabolic bone disease have been published by centers in the United States and Canada. Factors that have been implicated as possible causes include infusion of excess vitamin D, aluminum, calcium, protein, or glucose; cyclic vs. continuous TPN administration; and the patient's previous nutritional state. Although removal of vitamin D or aluminum from the TPN solution and discontinuation of TPN altogether have been associated with improvement in symptoms, histology, and laboratory values, no single factor has been identified as the cause of this troubling phenomenon. PMID:3110249

  16. Enteral obeticholic acid prevents hepatic cholestasis in total parenteral nutrition-fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a vital support for neonatal infants with congenital or acquired gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and requiring small bowel resection. An adverse outcome associated with prolonged TPN use is parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis (PNAC). We previously showed t...

  17. 100 patient-years of ambulatory home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Dudrick, S J; O'Donnell, J J; Englert, D M; Matheny, R G; Blume, E R; Nutt, R E; Hickey, M S; Barroso, A O

    1984-01-01

    More than 100 patient-years' experience has been acquired in the treatment of 133 patients with ambulatory home total parenteral nutrition (TPN) between May 1974 and December 1983. Indications for chronic or permanent home TPN include short bowel syndrome, malabsorption, scleroderma, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide syndrome. Indications for acute or temporary home TPN include Crohn's disease, malignancies, gastrointestinal fistulas, ulcerative colitis, anorexia nervosa, and numerous other disorders. Eighty-two patients in the acute group were treated primarily with percutaneously placed standard subclavian catheters and 51 patients in the chronic group have been treated thus far with implanted silicone rubber, Dacron-cuffed catheters for a cumulative total of 38,939 patient days. Of the 125 implanted catheters, 115 were placed in the superior vena cava and ten in the inferior vena cava for an average duration of 250 catheter-days, the longest single catheter remaining in situ for more than 8 1/2 years. Catheter-related sepsis occurred 33 times with the implanted catheters, or once every 2.6 catheter-years. One hundred and fourteen temporary catheters were placed percutaneously in the superior vena cava via a subclavian vein for an average duration of 68 days, the longest single catheter remaining in situ for 213 days. Catheter-related sepsis occurred seven times, equivalent to one episode per 3 catheter-years. Total catheter-related complications were quite infrequent and were directly related to duration of catheterization. They included venous thrombosis (12), clotted catheter (11), catheter failure or rupture (8), catheter compression (5) and inadvertent catheter removal (4). Twenty-six catheters were repaired or spliced in situ when the external segment was accidentally damaged or deteriorated secondary to long-term material fatigue. One remarkable patient has been maintained exclusively by TPN originally as an inpatient and subsequently as an outpatient

  18. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Cheng; Dai, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Li-Ming; Xie, Yi-Bin; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Li, Guo-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients. However, studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients. Methods: This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types, whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period. All patients had blood glucose (BG) values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion. The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG. Results: The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age, gender, family cancer history and blood types. There were six cancer types: Hepatic carcinoma (HC, 21.8%), rectal carcinoma (17.3%), colon carcinoma (CC, 14.7%), gastric carcinoma (29.8%), pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%), and duodenal carcinoma (DC, 4.8%). The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups. No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found; however, the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious. With increasing BG values, DC, HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals, as well as in the nondiabetic group. BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group. Other factors did not impact BG values, including gender, body mass index, and TPN infusion duration time. Conclusions: When tumor patients are treated with TPN, BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors, besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients. Special BG control is needed for DC, HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. If BG overtly increases, positive measurements are needed to control BG values. The

  19. Validating hyperbilirubinemia and gut mucosal atrophy with a novel ultramobile ambulatory total parenteral nutrition piglet model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) provides all nutrition intravenously. Although TPN therapy has grown enormously, it causes significant complications, including gut and hepatic dysfunction. Current models use animal tethering which is unlike ambulatory human TPN delivery and is cost prohibitive. We ...

  20. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy.

  1. Total parenteral nutrition caused Wernicke’s encephalopathy accompanied by wet beriberi

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ling; Cai, Xiao-Dong; Bao, Jian; Wu, Ai-Min; Tian, Qing; Lu, Zheng-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 17 Final Diagnosis: Wernicke’s encephalopathy Symptoms: Blurred vision • dizziness • nystygmus • tachycardia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Mistake in diagnosis Background: Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE) is an acute and life-threatening illness which is not only seen in alcoholics, but also in persons with poor nutrition lacking thiamine (vitamin B1). Case Report: Here, we presented a case of WE in a patient who received parenteral nutrition without complement of thiamine. Besides neuropsychiatric problems, she also manifested prominent cardiovascular abnormalities, which were consistent with wet beriberi. Conclusions: This case emphasizes the need for thiamine supplementation in prolonged total parenteral nutrition, and also highlights the awareness of WE in persons with parenteral nutrition lacking thiamine. More importantly, we call for attention to wet beriberi in such persons. PMID:24516692

  2. Enteral obeticholic acid promotes intestinal growth in total parenteral nutrition fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal atrophy is an adverse outcome associated with prolonged total parenteral nutrition (PN) partly due to disruption of normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. Previously we showed that enteral treatment with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a dual agonist for the nuclear receptor, farne...

  3. Total parenteral nutrition induces liver steatosis and apoptosis in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) induces a high rate of liver disease in infants, yet the pathogenesis remains elusive. We used neonatal piglets as an animal model to assess early events leading to TPN-mediated liver injury. Newborn piglets (n = 7) were nourished for 7 d on TPN or enteral nutrition ...

  4. Alteration of erythrocyte lipid composition following total parenteral nutrition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Innis, S M

    1989-01-01

    Rats were infused continuously for 7 days with a complete total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solution in which 27.5% total calories were given as a parenteral lipid emulsion containing soybean oil (Liposyn) or safflower oil (Intralipid) emulsified with egg phospholipid (PL). Compared to sham-operated rats fed chow, the erythrocyte membranes from rats given TPN with lipid emulsion had increased cholesterol and PL but normal molar cholesterol:PL ratios. The fatty acid changes in sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine, in particular, suggested replacement of endogenous PL with the exogenous egg PL infused with the emulsion. The changes in membrane lipid composition were accompanied by greater resistance of the cells from rats given TPN to osmotic lysis in vitro. PMID:2494367

  5. Severe lactic acidosis and multiorgan failure due to thiamine deficiency during total parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ramsi, Musaab; Mowbray, Claire; Hartman, Gary; Pageler, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    A 16-year-old perioperative paediatric patient presented with refractory lactic acidosis and multiorgan failure due to thiamine-deficient total parenteral nutrition during a recent national multivitamin shortage. Urgent empiric administration of intravenous thiamine resulted in prompt recovery from this life-threatening condition. Despite readily available treatment, a high index of suspicion is required to prevent cardiovascular collapse and mortality. PMID:24895398

  6. INFUSION RATE OF GLUCOSE IS THE MAJOR PREDICTOR OF HYEPRGLYCEMIA IN VERY PREMATURE INFANTS RECEIVING TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Hyperglycemia is frequently occurring in very premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. In adult intensive care patients, hyperglycemia has been associated with increased mortality. Although no such data are available in premature infants, it is conceivable that nutritional...

  7. PLASMA CHOLINE IN NORMAL NEWBORNS, INFANTS, TODDLERS, AND IN VERY-LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT NEONATES REQUIRING TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Choline deficiency is associated with hepatic abnormalities in adult volunteers and patients administered total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Preliminary investigation has suggested that plasma-free choline concentration (PFCh) is greater in neonatal animals, including humans, than in adults. The aims...

  8. In-vitro detection of mannan and galactomannan in components of total parenteral nutrition (TPN).

    PubMed

    Knoth, H; Maywald, D; Walter, W

    2016-05-01

    Detection of Candida mannan and Aspergillus galactomannan in serum with the Platelia enzyme immunoassay is applied for diagnosing invasive fungal infections. High risk patients for invasive fungal infections are often receiving parenteral nutrition. It is important to know whether false-positive Platelia test results occur during total parenteral nutrition. Studies to false-positivity in intravenous feeding solutions lack so that we start an in-vitro investigation. We used two different enzyme immunoassays to test the feeding solutions. We tested infusions (n = 19) which are applied for the production of individual parenteral nutrition in the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus Dresden. We used the Platelia Aspergillus EIA to analyse the Aspergillus antigen galactomannan in the solutions. In addition, the Platelia Candida Ag plus was used to determine the concentration of the Candida antigen mannan. In summary, four solutions (21%) showed measurable concentrations of the Candida mannan. They were considered positive with a concentration > 0.125 ng/ ml mannan (Tracitrans infant, calcium gluconate solution) and borderline with a concentration between 0.0625 and 0.125 ng/ml mannan (Tracitrans plus, SMOFlipid). None of the analysed infusions contained the Aspergillus galactomannan. In conclusion, further investigations on the topic are necessary to determine their in-vivo impact. A positive Platelia test result can simulate the presence of invasive fungal infections. As a consequence the patient may be treated with expensive, systemic antimycotics with a high risk of adverse events. Therefore a definite diagnosis is important. PMID:27348965

  9. Oral Rehydration Therapy and Feeding Replaces Total Parenteral Nutrition: A Clinical Vignette.

    PubMed

    Wright, Scott Mitchell; Noon, Muhammad Jawad; Greenough, William Bates

    2016-02-01

    A 27-year-old patient with spina bifida and a high output loss of water and electrolytes from her ileostomy was successfully liberated from dependency on total parenteral nutrition and intravenous fluid and electrolyte replacement by the use of a rice-based oral rehydration therapy (ORT). This allowed her to return home to the care of her mother. We suggest that ORT can be effective in the context of modern high-technology settings, as well as in resource-poor situations. PMID:25982236

  10. Right atrial thrombus associated with subclavian catheter developed due to total parenteral nutrition application

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Nursel; Basarici, Ibrahim; Erbasan, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization as a frequent routine clinical procedure may have significant complications. Mechanical complications may occur during catheter placement, whereas thromboembolic and infectious complications can be seen during follow-up. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) associated central venous catheterizations may result in early mechanical complications and thrombotic and infectious complications in the long term. This paper describes a patient diagnosed as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy requiring long-term central venous catheterization for TPN implementation, who had an infected thrombus on the catheter tip resected by cardiac surgery. PMID:27212985

  11. Carnitine levels in skeletal muscle of malnourished patients before and after total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Sandstedt, S; Larsson, J; Cederblad, G

    1986-11-01

    Carnitine is necessary for the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the mitochondrial membrane. Carnitine is derived from the diet and from endogenous synthesis from lysine and methionine. About 98% of the body's carnitine pool is located in skeletal muscle tissue. Skeletal muscle carnitine levels were determined in two groups of malnourished patients, eight patients with anorexia nervosa with a weight loss of 32.4% +/- 1.8 (mean +/- SEM) and six surgical patients with major gastrointestinal disorders and a weight loss of 15.2% +/- 2.7. Their hepatic and kidney functions were normal. On admission, the muscle carnitine levels were 16.9 +/- 4.0 mumol/g dry weight (mean +/- SD) for the surgical patients and 20.8 +/- 5.0 mumol/g dry weight for the anorexia nervosa patients, which corresponded to carnitine levels seen in healthy subjects. No statistical significance was found between the two groups. Total parenteral nutrition was given to the surgical patients for 2 weeks and to the anorexia nervosa patients for 3-5 weeks. No statistical difference in muscle carnitine levels was found in either group after nutritional support. These malnourished patients had no decreased muscle carnitine levels on admission and maintained them during several weeks of total parenteral nutrition. PMID:16831776

  12. Glutamine-supplemented tube feedings versus total parenteral nutrition in children receiving intensive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ford, C; Whitlock, J A; Pietsch, J B

    1997-04-01

    Although enteral nutrition is generally advocated in the care of children with cancer, those patients receiving intensive chemotherapy alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantation often require total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Two patients are presented illustrating some differences between enteral and parenteral feedings in children receiving intensive chemotherapy. Nasogastric glutamine-supplemented tube feedings were well tolerated both in the hospital and at home. The cost of care for the enterally supported child was less than one third of the TPN-supported child. Although TPN appears to be beneficial in some patients with cancer, it is expensive and is associated with several significant disadvantages. Among these are an increased incidence of both gram-positive and gram-negative infections and an increased incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Enteral nutrition is less costly than TPN and maintains the structural and functional integrity of the intestinal mucosa. The addition of certain substrates such as glutamine, arginine and omega-3 fatty acids may improve the body's immune response as well. We hypothesize that early glutamine supplemented tube feedings in children receiving intensive chemotherapy alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantation will result in improved nutrition with fewer infections and lower cost than TPN-supplemented patients. In addition, a shorter hospital stay and improved quality of life are anticipated. PMID:9144976

  13. Reduced serum levels of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D during long-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Klein, G L; Horst, R L; Norman, A W; Ament, M E; Slatopolsky, E; Coburn, J W

    1981-05-01

    Painful bone disease, characterized by patchy osteomalacia and inactive bone, can develop in patients treated with total parenteral nutrition for more than 3 months. Serum levels of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1 alpha, 25(OH)2D), 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured in seven adults and five children treated with parenteral nutrition for 9 to 60 months. Serum levels of 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D were markedly reduced, while levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were normal. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were normal or slightly increased, and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone levels were normal or low. Renal function was normal or minimally reduced. Skeletal symptoms disappeared and serum 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D levels rose to normal in one patient when nutrient infusions were discontinued for 6 weeks. Removal of calcium from the nutrient solution for 2 to 4 days was associated with no change in serum 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D in two patients. The cause of the reduction in serum levels of 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D and its role in the pathogenesis of bone disease in these patients remain uncertain. PMID:6786151

  14. Wernicke's encephalopathy after total parenteral nutrition in patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, In Seub; Seok, Hyeri; Eun, Yeong Hee; Lee, You-Bin; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies in Crohn's disease (CD) patients are not uncommon and usually result in a combination of reduced dietary intake, disease-related malabsorption, and a catabolic state. Decreased serum thiamine levels are often reported in patients with CD. Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe form of thiamine deficiency that can cause serious neurologic complications. Although WE is known to occur frequently in alcoholics, a number of non-alcoholic causes have also been reported. Here, we report two cases of non-alcoholic WE that developed in two severely malnourished CD patients who were supported by prolonged total parenteral nutrition without thiamine supplementation. These patients complained of sudden-onset ophthalmopathy, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging allowed definitive diagnosis for WE despite poor sensitivity. The intravenous administration of thiamine alleviated the symptoms of WE dramatically. We emphasize the importance of thiamine supplementation for malnourished patients even if they are not alcoholics, especially in those with CD. PMID:27175122

  15. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Weidong; Feng, Yongjia; Holst, Jens J.; Hartmann, Bolette; Yang, Hua; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Small intestine luminal nutrient sensing may be crucial for modulating physiological functions. However, its mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We used a model of enteral nutrient deprivation, or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), resulting in intestinal mucosal atrophy and decreased epithelial barrier function (EBF). We examined how a single amino acid, glutamate (GLM), modulates intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) growth and EBF. Controls were chow-fed mice, T1 receptor-3 (T1R3)-knockout (KO) mice, and treatment with the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-5 antagonist MTEP. TPN significantly changed the amount of T1Rs, GLM receptors, and transporters, and GLM prevented these changes. GLM significantly prevented TPN-associated intestinal atrophy (2.5-fold increase in IEC proliferation) and was dependent on up-regulation of the protein kinase pAkt, but independent of T1R3 and mGluR5 signaling. GLM led to a loss of EBF with TPN (60% increase in FITC-dextran permeability, 40% decline in transepithelial resistance); via T1R3, it protected EBF, whereas mGluR5 was associated with EBF loss. GLM led to a decline in circulating glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) during TPN. The decline was regulated by T1R3 and mGluR5, suggesting a novel negative regulator pathway for IEC proliferation not previously described. Loss of luminal nutrients with TPN administration may widely affect intestinal taste sensing. GLM has previously unrecognized actions on IEC growth and EBF. Restoring luminal sensing via GLM could be a strategy for patients on TPN.—Xiao, W., Feng, Y., Holst, J. J., Hartmann, B., Yang, H., Teitelbaum, D. H. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition. PMID:24497581

  16. Validating hyperbilirubinemia and gut mucosal atrophy with a novel ultramobile ambulatory total parenteral nutrition piglet model.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ajay K; Wen, Joy X; Arora, Sumit; Blomenkamp, Keith S; Rodrigues, Jonathan; Blaufuss, Timothy A; Liou, Victor; Burrin, Douglas G; Long, John P; Teckman, Jeffery H

    2015-02-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) provides all nutrition intravenously. Although TPN therapy has grown enormously, it causes significant complications, including gut and hepatic dysfunction. Current models use animal tethering which is unlike ambulatory human TPN delivery and is cost prohibitive. We hypothesize that using ultramobile infusion pumps, TPN can be delivered cost-effectively, resulting in classical gut and hepatic injury, and we thus aim to establish a new model system. Neonatal pigs (n=8) were implanted with jugular vein and duodenal catheters. Animals were fitted in dual-pocket jackets. An ultramobile ambulatory pump was placed in one pocket and connected to the jugular vein or duodenal catheter. Isocaloric TPN or swine formula was placed in the other pocket. Rigorous Wifi-based video and scheduled monitoring was performed. After 14days, the animals were euthanized. The mean (±SD) daily weight gain (in grams) for enteral-fed control (EN) vs TPN animals was 102.4±10.8 and 91.03±12.1 respectively (P<.05). Total parenteral nutrition resulted in significant conjugated bilirubin elevation and hepatomegaly. Mean (±SD) serum conjugated bilirubin (in μmol/L) was 1.5±0.7 for EN and 6.3±2.8 for TPN (P<.05). Marked gut atrophy was noted with TPN. The mean (±SD) gut weight as a percent of body weight was 4.30±0.26 for EN and 2.62±0.48 for TPN (P<.05). Surgical sites healed well. All animals remained completely mobile. We thus established that TPN can be successfully delivered using ultramobile pumps and believe that this remains the first such description of an ambulatory piglet TPN model system. In addition to cholestasis and gut atrophy, classical TPN-induced injury was documented. PMID:25649660

  17. Gluconeogenesis is not regulated by either glucose or insulin in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine potential factors regulating gluconeogenesis (GNG) in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. Seven infants (birth weight, 0.824 +/- 0.068 kg; gestational age, 25.4 +/- 0.5 weeks; postnatal age, 3.3 +/- 0.2 days) were studied for 11 hou...

  18. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Radpay, Rojan; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. Materials and Methods: 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. Results: We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (p<0.005) indicating improved nutritional status in each groups. Conclusion: This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress. PMID:27403176

  19. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) at home: prototype high-tech home care nursing.

    PubMed

    Davis, J H

    1996-01-01

    Current economic and demographic trends in the United States indicate the demand for complex treatments, such as infusion therapies at home, will continue to escalate. In light of the increasingly acute and autonomous nature of home health practice, examination of home care nursing process affecting patient care outcomes is crucial. This study explored the cognitive, technical, and interpersonal components included in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) home care nursing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate psychometrically the Schmele Instrument to Measure the Process of Nursing Practice in Home Health (SIMP-H) so that it may be used to examine high-tech home care nursing process. Home visits must be observed to identify the specific cognitive, technical, and interpersonal components included in high-tech home care nursing that are important for patient care outcomes. This study captured high-tech home care nursing process on videotape, which provided a medium for evaluating interobserver reliability for the SIMP-H. Results revealed an interobserver reliability coefficient of .72. PMID:9025400

  20. Role of parenteral iron in transfusion requirements after total hip replacement. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Naveira, E; Seara, J; Palmer, J H; Cuenca, J; García-Erce, J A

    2006-04-01

    An important percentage of patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) receive allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) to avoid the risks of acute anaemia. However, concerns about the risks of ABT have led to the search for alternatives, such as stimulation of erythropoiesis. We prospectively investigated the effect of postoperative administration of 300 mg of intravenous iron sucrose on ABT requirements in THR patients (group 2; n = 24). A previous series of 22 THR patients served as the control group (group 1). All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, using the same implant, and a set of clinical data was gathered. No adverse reactions to iron administration were observed. The group-given iron showed a trend to a lower transfusion rate (46 vs. 73%; P = 0.067) and lower transfusion index (0.96 vs. 1.68 units/patient; P = 0.038). Moreover, amongst the non-transfused patients, admission haemoglobin levels were lower in those coming from the iron group than those from the control group (12.7 +/- 0.9 vs. 14.0 +/- 1.2 g dL(-1), respectively; P = 0.017). Postoperative parenteral iron administration could be a safe and effective way to reduce ABT requirements in the THR patients. A large, randomized controlled trial to confirm these results is warranted. PMID:16623920

  1. Proteomic analysis of plasma from rats following total parenteral nutrition-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jai-Jen; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-11-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is provided as the primary nitrogen source to manage patients with intestinal failure who were not able to sustain themselves on enteral feeds. The most common complication of long-term TPN use is hepatitis. A proteomic approach was used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in the plasma of rats following TPN-related acute liver injury. Six male rats were randomly assigned to either the saline infusion control group or the TPN infusion group. Our results demonstrate that TPN infusion in rats resulted in hepatic dysfunction and hepatocyte apoptosis. Five proteins that were differentially expressed between TPN infusion and normal rats were determined and validated in vivo. Fascinatingly, the proteomic differential displays, downregulated proteins included peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), alpha-1-antiproteinase (A1AT), and fibrinogen gamma chain (FIBG), which were involved in oxidative stress, inflammatory respondence and cells apoptosis. After TPN infusion, two protein spots showed increased expression, namely, the glucagon receptor (GLR) protein and apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), which may mediate the effects of TPN administration on glycogen and lipid metabolism. In this study, proteomic analysis suggested TPN-related acute liver injury could be involved in limiting cellular protection mechanisms against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. On the basis of the results, we also give molecular evidences replying TPN-related hepatitis. PMID:26314240

  2. Effect of total parenteral nutrition, systemic sepsis, and glutamine on gut mucosa in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, S.; Leskiw, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.; Bush, K. T.; Nagele, R. G.; Lanza-Jacoby, S.; Stein, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the combination of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and systemic sepsis on mucosal morphology and protein synthesis was investigated. Rats were given a standard TPN mixture consisting of glucose (216 kcal.kg-1.day-1), lipid (24 kcal.kg-1.day-1), and amino acids (1.5 g N.kg-1.day-1) for 5 days. On the 5th day the rats (n = 37) were randomized into four groups according to diet as follows: 1) control nonseptic on standard TPN, 2) control nonseptic on TPN with glutamine, 3) septic on standard TPN, and 4) septic with the TPN supplemented with glutamine. Twenty hours after the injection of Escherichia coli, the rats were given a 4-h constant infusion of [U-14C]leucine to determine the mucosal fractional protein synthesis rates. The following results were obtained. 1) Histological examination showed that systemic sepsis caused tissue damage to the ileum and jejunum. 2) Glutamine supplementation attenuated these changes. 3) There were no visible changes to the colon either from glutamine supplementation or sepsis. 4) Sepsis was associated with an increase in mucosal protein synthesis and decreased muscle synthesis. 5) Addition of glutamine to the TPN mix further increased protein synthesis in the intestinal mucosa of septic rats.

  3. [Total parenteral nutrition and dialysis. Complementary importance in the therapy of acute renal insufficiency in aortic surgery].

    PubMed

    Trazzi, R; MArtello, L; Selva, S; Vaghi, G M

    1981-11-01

    The acute renal insufficiency (A.R.I.) consequent on surgical pathology of the aorta is in the Milan School, one of the most important postoperative complications and requires the use of total parenteral feeding (T.P.F.). Parenteral infusion of AAe and hypertonic glucose in patients with A.R.I. has given positive results, not only insofar as it improves the general nutritional state, but also because it facilitates recovery of renal function and improves survival. Reutilisation of endogenous nitrogen gives a synthesis of structural proteins to the benefit of metabolic homoeostasis and the patient's clinical condition. On the basis of recent nephrology studies on uraemic toxicity, the therapeutic problem of A.R.I. in surgical patients has been examined: early peritoneal dialysis associated with T.P.F. and the combination, in the postoperative stage, of parenteral feeding and periodic peritoneal dialysis. The average duration of this treatment has been personally found to be about 8-18 days. The example is given of a clinical case of A.R.I. in a patient operated by aneurysmectomy for rupture of an aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. PMID:6801545

  4. Canadian home total parenteral nutrition registry: Preliminary data on the patient population

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Maitreyi; Gramlich, Leah; Whittaker, Scott; Allard, Johane P

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term administration of home total parenteral nutrition (HTPN) has permitted patients with chronic intestinal failure to survive for prolonged periods of time. However, HTPN is associated with numerous complications, all of which increase morbidity and mortality. In Canada, a comprehensive review of the HTPN population has never been performed. OBJECTIVES: To report on the demographics, current HTPN practice and related complications in the Canadian HTPN population. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. Five HTPN programs in Canada participated. Patients’ data were entered by the programs’ TPN team into a Web site-based registry. A unique confidential record was created for each patient. Data were then downloaded into a Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corp, USA) spreadsheet and imported into SPSS (SPSS Inc, USA) for statistical analysis. RESULTS: One hundred fifty patients were entered into the registry (37.9% men and 62.1% women). The mean (± SD) age was 53.0±14 years and the duration requiring HTPN was 70.1±78.1 months. The mean body mass index before the onset of HTPN was 19.8±5.0 kg/m2. The primary indication for HTPN was short bowel syndrome (60%) secondary to Crohn’s disease (51.1%), followed by mesenteric ischemia (23.9%). Complications: over one year, 62.7% of patients were hospitalized at least once, with 44% of hospitalizations related to TPN. In addition, 28.6% of patients had at least one catheter sepsis (double-lumen more than single-lumen; P=0.025) and 50% had at least one catheter change. Abnormal liver enzymes were documented in 27.4% of patients and metabolic bone disease in 60% of patients, and the mean Karnofsky score was 63. CONCLUSIONS: In the present population sample, the data suggest that HTPN is associated with significant complications and health care utilization. These results support the use of a Canadian HTPN registry to better define the HTPN population, and to monitor complications for quality assurance and

  5. A Rare Case of Central Pontine Myelinolysis in Overcorrection of Hyponatremia with Total Parenteral Nutrition in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Janga, Kalyana C.; Khan, Tazleem; Khorolsky, Ciril; Greenberg, Sheldon; Persaud, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old high risk pregnant female presented with hyponatremia from multiple causes and was treated with total parenteral nutrition. She developed acute hypernatremia due to the stage of pregnancy and other comorbidities. All the mechanisms of hyponatremia and hypernatremia were summarized here in our case report. This case has picture (graph) representation of parameters that led to changes in serum sodium and radiological findings of central pontine myelinolysis on MRI. In conclusion we present a complicated case serum sodium changes during pregnancy and pathophysiological effects on serum sodium changes during pregnancy. PMID:26798530

  6. Educational outcomes associated with providing a comprehensive guidelines program about nursing care of preterm neonates receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Al-Rafay, Safy S; Al-Sharkawy, Sabah S

    2012-05-01

    Poor understanding or practice of Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) causes devastating complications. Therefore, good Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nursing care for preterm neonates and close monitoring of complications is essential for successful TPN therapy. The study was conducted in NICU at Ain Shams University Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, using a quasi-experimental research design with prepost intervention assessments. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire sheet and an observation checklist (prepost format) and developed a comprehensive guidelines program about nursing care of TPN of preterm neonates. Results revealed that the program had a significant positive impact on nurses' knowledge and practice outcomes. PMID:21828243

  7. A Rare Case of Central Pontine Myelinolysis in Overcorrection of Hyponatremia with Total Parenteral Nutrition in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Janga, Kalyana C; Khan, Tazleem; Khorolsky, Ciril; Greenberg, Sheldon; Persaud, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old high risk pregnant female presented with hyponatremia from multiple causes and was treated with total parenteral nutrition. She developed acute hypernatremia due to the stage of pregnancy and other comorbidities. All the mechanisms of hyponatremia and hypernatremia were summarized here in our case report. This case has picture (graph) representation of parameters that led to changes in serum sodium and radiological findings of central pontine myelinolysis on MRI. In conclusion we present a complicated case serum sodium changes during pregnancy and pathophysiological effects on serum sodium changes during pregnancy. PMID:26798530

  8. A nutrition support team led by general surgeons decreases inappropriate use of total parenteral nutrition on a surgical service.

    PubMed

    Saalwachter, A R; Evans, H L; Willcutts, K F; O'Donnell, K B; Radigan, A E; McElearney, S T; Smith, R L; Chong, T W; Schirmer, B D; Pruett, T L; Sawyer, R G

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to decrease the number of inappropriate orders for total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in surgical patients. From February 1999 through November 2000 and between July 2001 and June 2002, the surgeon-guided adult nutrition support team (NST) at a university hospital monitored new TPN orders for appropriateness and specific indication. In April 1999, the NST was given authority to discontinue inappropriate TPN orders. Indications, based on the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standards, included short gut, severe pancreatitis, severe malnutrition/catabolism with inability to enterally feed > or =5 days, inability to enterally feed >50 per cent of nutritional needs > or =9 days, enterocutaneous fistula, intra-abdominal leak, bowel obstruction, chylothorax, ischemic bowel, hemodynamic instability, massive gastrointestinal bleed, and lack of abdominal wall integrity. The number of inappropriate TPN orders declined from 62/194 (32.0%) in the first 11 months of the study to 22/168 (13.1%) in the second 11 months (P < 0.0001). This number further declined to 17/215 (7.9%) in the final 12 months of data collection, but compared to the second 11 months, this decrease was not statistically significant (P = 0.1347). The involvement of a surgical NST was associated with a reduction in inappropriate TPN orders without a change in overall use. PMID:15663055

  9. Successful Combined Treatment with Total Parenteral Nutrition Fluid Extravasation Injuries in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ky Young; Lee, Soo Jung; Burm, Jin Sik

    2007-01-01

    Extravasation injuries in the neonatal intensive care unit are not rare during parenteral hyperalimentation. There have been many different methods of management. We report five premature infants with wounds of hyperalimentation fluid extravasation managed by the antibacterial ointment (Terramycin ophthalmic ointment™) and sesame oil and a antiinflammatory herbal mixture (MEBO™). The mean gestational age of patients was 31+2 weeks (range, 28+4 to 35+6 weeks), and the mean weight at extravasation was 1,930 g (range, 1,140 to 2,680 g). Extravasation occurred within the mean of 32 days (range, 17 to 50 days). The method of dressing was application of a thick layer of this mixture covered by vaseline and wet gauze renewed at an interval of 8-12 hr after irrigating the wounds thoroughly with normal saline. The mean duration of dressing was 30 days (range, 20-50 days). The wounds had healed completely leaving a small size of contracture without functional abnormality. We conclude that this therapy may be considered for an alternative treatment and warrants clinical trials for the confirmation of the local management of extravasation injury. PMID:17596679

  10. The necessity of selenium substitution in total parenteral nutrition and artificial alimentation.

    PubMed

    Gramm, H J; Kopf, A; Brätter, P

    1995-03-01

    For the trace element selenium, in contrast to zinc, iron, copper, chromium, manganese and iodine, there is still no clear official recommendation with regard to routine substitution in artificial nutrition. An overview of the manifestations of selenium deficiency in humans during the period 1979-1995 shows that nutritive deficiencies are exclusively TPN-induced or the result of severe malnutrition. The pathology of TPN-induced selenium deficiency and the analytic assessment of selenium status are described. Patients undergoing long-term parenteral nutrition or suffering from an increased loss of intestinal secretions have to be characterized as being especially at risk for clinical selenium deficiency. The relationship of the serum selenium kinetics in pediatric and adult patients to the depletion of body compartments during the course of short-term and prolonged TPN is discussed. Because of the importance of the selenoproteins, the regularly occurring depletion during selenium-free TPN and the borderline supply of selenium in Germany the routine substitution of selenium in TPN is strongly recommended. The pharmaceutical industry should be encouraged to develop a trace element solution that includes selenium, so that the nutritive requirement of patients on TPN can be satisfied. Adequate intravenous dosage recommendations are based on maintenance of glutathione peroxidase homeostasis. The routine supplementation dosage may not meet the selenium requirements of intensive care patients under conditions of increased metabolic demands on their anti-oxidative system. PMID:8846151

  11. Bone metabolism in very preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: do intravenous fat emulsions have an impact?

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kayla M; Pereira-da-Silva, Luis; Tou, Janet C; Ziegler, Jane; Brunetti, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Very preterm infants (<32 weeks' gestation) are at high risk for impaired skeletal development because of factors that limit the provision of extrauterine nutrients. Cumulative net deficiencies of calcium, phosphorus, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (ARA) are evident in these infants after prolonged administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This is significant because minerals as well as metabolites of DHA and ARA are important modulators of bone cell differentiation, lengthening of bone, and bone matrix deposition. Furthermore, diets containing only precursors of DHA and ARA result in suboptimal skeletal growth. With the emergence of new intravenous lipid emulsions, it is important to understand the impact of fatty acids on bone metabolism in the third trimester in order to optimize the provision of TPN in very preterm infants. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current evidence regarding intravenous lipid emulsions and bone metabolism in very preterm infants receiving prolonged TPN and to identify areas of research needed. PMID:26518033

  12. An exclusive human milk-based diet in extremely premature infants reduces the probability of remaining on total parenteral nutrition: A reanalysis of the data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that an exclusively human-milk-based diet is beneficial for extremely premature infants who are at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). However, no significant difference in the other primary study endpoint, the length of time on total parenteral nutrition (TPN), was fo...

  13. GLP-2 Prevents Intestinal Mucosal Atrophy and Improves Tissue Antioxidant Capacity in a Mouse Model of Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Qiucheng; Bi, Jingcheng; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Wu, Chao; Tian, Feng; Gao, Xuejin; Wan, Xiao; Zheng, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on mucosal atrophy and intestinal antioxidant capacity in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Male mice (6–8 weeks old) were divided into three groups (n = 8 for each group): a control group fed a standard laboratory chow diet, and experimental TPN (received standard TPN solution) and TPN + GLP-2 groups (received TPN supplemented with 60 µg/day of GLP-2 for 5 days). Mice in the TPN group had lower body weight and reduced intestinal length, villus height, and crypt depth compared to the control group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 supplementation increased all parameters compared to TPN only (all p < 0.05). Intestinal total superoxide dismutase activity and reduced-glutathione level in the TPN + GLP-2 group were also higher relative to the TPN group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 administration significantly upregulated proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and increased glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) abundance. Compared with the control and TPN + GLP-2 groups, intestinal cleaved caspase-3 was increased in the TPN group (all p < 0.05). This study shows GLP-2 reduces TPN-associated intestinal atrophy and improves tissue antioxidant capacity. This effect may be dependent on enhanced epithelial cell proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and upregulated GRP78 expression. PMID:26761030

  14. Effects of glutamine-containing total parenteral nutrition on phagocytic activity and anabolic hormone response in rats undergoing gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Hsien; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Chen, Soul-Chin; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of glutamine (Gln)-containing parenteral nutrition on phagocytic activity and to elucidate the possible roles of Gln in the secretion of anabolic hormones and nitrogen balance in rats undergoing a gastrectomy. METHODS: Rats with an internal jugular catheter were divided into 2 experimental groups and received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The TPN solutions were isonitrogenous and identical in nutrient compositions except for differences in amino acid content. One group received conventional TPN (control), and in the other group, 25% of the total amino acid nitrogen was replaced with Gln. After receiving TPN for 3 d, one-third of the rats in each experimental group were sacrificed as the baseline group. The remaining rats underwent a partial gastrectomy and were killed 1 and 3 d, respectively, after surgery. Plasma, peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF), and urine samples were collected for further analysis. RESULTS: The Gln group had fewer nitrogen losses 1 and 2 d after surgery (d1, 16.6±242.5 vs -233.4±205.9 mg/d, d2, 31.8±238.8 vs -253.4±184.6 mg/d, P<0.05). There were no differences in plasma growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels between the 2 groups before or after surgery. The phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was higher in the Gln group than in the control group 1 d after surgery (A 1185±931 vs 323±201, P<0.05). There were no differences in the phagocytic activities of blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils between the 2 groups at the baseline or on the postoperative days. No significant differences in interleukin-1β or interleukin-6 concentrations in PLF were observed between the 2 groups. However, tumor necrosis factor-α level in PLF was significantly lower in the Gln group than in the control group on postoperative d 3. CONCLUSION: TPN supplemented with Gln can improve the nitrogen balance, and enhance macrophage phagocytic activity at the site of injury. However, Gln supplementation has no

  15. Persistent left superior vena cava: A possible contraindication to chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    IOVINO, FRANCESCO; AURIEMMA, PASQUALE PIO; VISCOVO, LUCA DEL; SCAGLIARINI, SARA; DI NAPOLI, MARILENA; DE VITA, FERDINANDO

    2012-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is the most common thoracic venous anomaly. Awareness of this condition may be useful when placement of left-side transvenous subclavian or internal jugular catheters is required. This anomaly may be detected only by chest radiograph following placement of the catheter. The primary endpoints of this study were to analyze the prevalence of PLSVC, measurement of its diameters and the outcome of cancer patients with this anomaly undergoing placement of a long term catheter for nutrition and chemotherapy at the Department of Surgery, of the Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. A total of 600 consecutive adult patients with hematological or solid tumors admitted to our surgery department for implantation of a central venous catheter (CVC) were considered. The CVC was routinely implanted in the left internal jugular vein under ultrasound guidance. Four cases of PLSVC (0.6% of patients) were observed and confirmed using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In all cases, the CVC was not removed. Three patients underwent chemotherapy and one patient was subjected to total parenteral nutrition. In the three patients undergoing chemotherapy, dynamic ECG and echocardiography were performed at the end of the treatment. No disturbances of the cardiac rhythm or thrombosis were detected, and heart ejection fraction (EF) was not affected. In conclusion, although PLSVC may be a risky condition, no complications occurred in our study. Thus, PLSVC should not be regarded as a strict contraindication to infusion of chemotherapy or hyperosmolar nutritional solutions. However, further research is needed to confirm our data. PMID:23205097

  16. Cost-effectiveness of employing a total parenteral nutrition surveillance nurse for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Fraher, M H; Collins, C J; Bourke, J; Phelan, D; Lynch, M

    2009-10-01

    The cost of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is substantial in terms of morbidity, mortality and financial resources. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a recognised risk factor for CRBSI. In 1997, an intravenous nutrition nurse was promoted to TPN surveillance clinical nurse manager (CNM) and quarterly infection audit meetings were introduced to monitor trends in CRBSI. Data were prospectively collected over a 15-year period using specific TPN records in a 535-bed tertiary acute university hospital. A total of 20 439 CVC-days and 307 CRBSIs were recorded. Mean number of infections before, and after, the introduction of a dedicated TPN surveillance CNM were compared. Mean CRBSI per 1000 catheter-days+/-SD was 20.5+/-6.34 prior to 1997 and 14.64+/-7.81 after 1997, representing a mean reduction of 5.84 CRBSIs per 1000 catheter-days (95% CI: -4.92 to 16.60; P=0.05). Mean number of CRBSIs per year+/-SD was 28.3+/-4.93 prior to 1997 and 18.5+/-7.37 after 1997, representing a mean decrease of 9.8 infections per year (95% CI: 0.01 to 19.66; P<0.05). The savings made by preventing 9.8 infections per year were calculated from data on bed-days obtained from the hospital finance office. The cost in hospital days saved per annum was euro135,000. Introduction of a TPN surveillance CNM saved the hospital at least euro78,300 per annum and led to a significant decrease in CRBSIs in TPN patients. PMID:19709776

  17. Are additional trace elements necessary in total parenteral nutrition for patients with esophageal cancer receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy?

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Yasunori; Kono, Tsuguaki; Uesato, Masaya; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Fujishiro, Takeshi; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Endo, Satoshi; Toyozumi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2012-12-01

    It is known that cisplatin induces the excretion of zinc from the urine and thereby reduces its serum concentration. However, the fluctuation of these trace elements during or after cisplatin-based chemotherapy has not been evaluated. To answer this question, we performed a clinical study in esophageal cancer patients undergoing cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Eighteen patients with esophageal cancer who were not able to swallow food or water orally due to complete stenosis of the esophagus were evaluated. The patients were divided into a control group [total parenteral nutrition (TPN) alone for 28 days, ten cases] and an intervention group (TPN with additional trace elements for 28 days, eight cases). The serum concentrations of zinc, iron, copper, manganese, triiodothyronin (T3), and thyroxin (T4), as alternative indicators of iodine, were measured on days 0, 14, and 28 of treatment, and statistically analyzed on day 28. In the control group, the serum concentration of copper was significantly decreased from 135.4 (day 0) to 122.1 μg/ml (day 14), and finally to 110.6 μg/ml (day 28, p = 0.015). The concentration of manganese was also significantly decreased from 1.34 (day 0) to 1.17 μg/ml (day 14) and finally to 1.20 (day 28, p = 0.049). The levels of zinc, iron, T3, and T4 were not significantly changed. In the intervention group, the supplementation with trace elements successfully prevented these decreases in their concentrations. TPN with supplementary trace elements is preferable and recommended for patients who are undergoing chemotherapy in order to maintain the patients' nutrient homeostasis. PMID:23054866

  18. Total Parenteral Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... DirectoryNotFoundException: Could not find a part of the path 'C:\\Web\\SafeMedXMLFiles\\'. at System.IO.__Error.WinIOError( ... String maybeFullPath) at System.IO.FileStream.Init(String path, FileMode mode, FileAccess access, Int32 rights, Boolean useRights, ...

  19. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    MedlinePlus

    IV fluids - infants; TPN - infants; Intravenous fluids - infants; Hyperalimentation - infants ... vitamins, minerals, and often lipids (fats) into an infant's vein. TPN can be lifesaving for very small ...

  20. Total parenteral nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... hands thoroughly with an antibacterial soap before TPN infusion. Turn on the water, wet hands and wrists ... pump according to the supplier's instructions. Before the infusion, unclamp the line and flush with saline. Twist ...

  1. Parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Inayet, N; Neild, P

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, parenteral nutrition has been recognised as an invaluable and potentially lifesaving tool in the physician's arsenal in the management of patients with intestinal failure or inaccessibility; however, it may also be associated with a number of potentially life-threatening complications. A recent NCEPOD report (2010) identified a number of inadequacies in the overall provision and management of parenteral nutrition and recommendations were made with the aim of improving clinical practice in the future. This paper focuses on the practical aspects relating to parenteral nutrition for adults, including important concepts, such as patient selection, as well as general management. We also explore the various pitfalls and potential complications and how these may be minimised. PMID:25874831

  2. Parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Pichard, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a technique of nutritional support, which consists of intravenous administration of macronutrients (glucose, amino acids, and triglycerides), micronutrients (vitamins and trace elements), water, and electrolytes. Early studies indicate that the use of total PN was associated with increased mortality and infectious morbidity. These detrimental effects of PN were related to hyperglycemia and overfeeding at a period when PN was administered according to the principle that the higher calories the patients received, the better their outcome would be. Enteral nutrition (EN) then replaced PN as the gold standard of nutritional care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, EN alone is frequently associated with insufficient energy coverage, and subsequent protein-energy deficit is correlated with a worse clinical outcome. Infectious and metabolic complications of PN could be prevented if PN is used by a trained team using a validated protocol, only when indicated, not within the first 2 days following ICU admission, and limited through the time. In addition, energy delivery has to be matched to the energy target, and adapted glucose control should be obtained. In patients with significant energy deficit (>40%), the combination of PN and EN, i.e. supplemental PN, from day 4 of the ICU stay, could improve the clinical outcome of ICU patients as compared with EN alone. Therefore, PN should be integrated in the management of ICU patients with the aim of prevent the worsening of energy deficits, allowing the preservation of lean body mass loss, and reducing the risk of undernutrition-related complications. PMID:23075587

  3. The effects of long-term total parenteral nutrition on gut mucosal immunity in children with short bowel syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Beyhan

    2005-01-01

    Background Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is defined as the malabsorptive state that often follows massive resection of the small intestine. Most cases originate in the newborn period and result from congenital anomalies. It is associated with a high morbidity, is potentially lethal and often requires months, sometimes years, in the hospital and home on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Long-term survival without parenteral nutrition depends upon establishing enteral nutrition and the process of intestinal adaptation through which the remaining small bowel gradually increases its absorptive capacity. The purpose of this article is to perform a descriptive systematic review of the published articles on the effects of TPN on the intestinal immune system investigating whether long-term TPN induces bacterial translocation, decreases secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA), impairs intestinal immunity, and changes mucosal architecture in children with SBS. Methods The databases of OVID, such as MEDLINE and CINAHL, Cochran Library, and Evidence-Based Medicine were searched for articles published from 1990 to 2001. Search terms were total parenteral nutrition, children, bacterial translocation, small bowel syndrome, short gut syndrome, intestinal immunity, gut permeability, sepsis, hyperglycemia, immunonutrition, glutamine, enteral tube feeding, and systematic reviews. The goal was to include all clinical studies conducted in children directly addressing the effects of TPN on gut immunity. Results A total of 13 studies were identified. These 13 studies included a total of 414 infants and children between the ages approximately 4 months to 17 years old, and 16 healthy adults as controls; and they varied in design and were conducted in several disciplines. The results were integrated into common themes. Five themes were identified: 1) sepsis, 2) impaired immune functions: In vitro studies, 3) mortality, 4) villous atrophy, 5) duration of dependency on TPN after bowel resection

  4. Randomized trial of total parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: metabolic effects of varying glucose-lipid ratios as the energy source.

    PubMed

    Baker, J P; Detsky, A S; Stewart, S; Whitwell, J; Marliss, E B; Jeejeebhoy, K N

    1984-07-01

    We studied 20 critically ill patients receiving ventilatory support to determine both their metabolic requirements and the effect of providing energy substrate regimens containing different lipid to glucose calorie ratios on whole-body protein economy. The measurements used included indirect calorimetry, substrate hormone profile, and whole body protein turnover by [14C]leucine. Measurements were done while patients were receiving all their nonprotein calories as dextrose ( D100 ) and were compared with results obtained when they received all their nonprotein calories as a combination of dextrose and lipid in a calorie ratio either of 3:1 ( D75 ) or 1:3 ( D25 ). To maintain euglycemia, exogenous insulin was infused by attending physicians not cognizant of the total parenteral nutrition regimen used. Energy expenditure before receiving total parenteral nutrition was only 4.6% above basal, and did not rise significantly during any of the regimens. The insulin infusion rate, plasma insulin, CO2 production, and serum lactate were significantly higher with D100 than with D25 , but not with D75 . Correspondingly, plasma free fatty acids were significantly lower with D100 when compared with D25 but not with D75 . Despite this, there were no significant differences in whole-body protein synthesis, breakdown, or net synthesis (synthesis - breakdown) and, in general, the patients in all groups were close to zero protein balance. These data suggest that critically ill patients are not severely hypermetabolic, and that they can maintain protein balance with a modest excess of calories while using a wide range of fuel mixtures. PMID:6427057

  5. Total-body protein turnover in parenterally fed neonates: effects of energy source studied by using [15N]glycine and [1-13C]leucine.

    PubMed

    Pencharz, P; Beesley, J; Sauer, P; Van Aerde, J; Canagarayar, U; Renner, J; McVey, M; Wesson, D; Swyer, P

    1989-12-01

    The effects of nonprotein energy source (ie, glucose only vs glucose and lipid) on nitrogen retention and total-body protein turnover were studied in 20 parenterally fed newborn infants. All infants received approximately 3 g amino acids and 80-90 kcal.kg body wt.d. Total-body protein synthesis was estimated by using three constant-infusion, end-product methods: enrichment of urinary urea and ammonia in response to a [15N]glycine label and exhaled carbon dioxide enrichment in response to a [1-13C]leucine label. No differences were seen in nitrogen retention between the two energy sources. The estimate of total-body protein turnover obtained from the 13C label was similar to that obtained with the [15N]urea label. No differences in turnover rates were observed between the two diet groups. Use of the glucose-plus-lipid fuel system enhanced energy storage and the reutilization of amino acid for protein synthesis. PMID:2512806

  6. Interactions between zinc, essential fatty acids and prostaglandins: relevance to acrodermatitis enteropathica, total parenteral nutrition, the glucagonoma syndrome, diabetes, anorexia nervosa and sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Horrobin, D F; Cunnane, S C

    1980-03-01

    Many of the features of zinc deficiency and of essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency are similar in both animals and humans. The two agents interact in various ways. EFAs are important in zinc absorption, probably after conversion to prostaglandins (PGs). Zinc seems necessary for at least two stages in EFA metabolism, the conversion of linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid, and the mobilisation of dihomogammalinolenic acid (DGLA) for the synthesis of 1 series PGs. Zinc may also be important in the conversion of DGLA to arachidonic acid and in arachidonic acid mobilisation for 2 series PG formation. These interactions shed considerable light on a number of clinical syndromes, including acrodermatitis enteropathica, total parenteral nutrition, diabetes mellitus, the glucagonoma syndrome and sickle cell anaemia. There is substantial evidence to suggest that anorexia nervosa is due to a combined deficiency of zinc and EFAs. Understanding of the roles of zinc and EFAs in these various clinical situations is likely to lead to improved therapy. PMID:6253772

  7. Nutritional support of bone marrow transplant recipients: a prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing total parenteral nutrition to an enteral feeding program.

    PubMed

    Szeluga, D J; Stuart, R K; Brookmeyer, R; Utermohlen, V; Santos, G W

    1987-06-15

    Although standard supportive care for bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients includes total parenteral nutrition (TPN), it has not been shown that this is the most appropriate method of nutritional support. To determine whether current BMT recipients require TPN during the early recovery period, we conducted a prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing TPN and an individualized enteral feeding program (counseling, high protein snacks and/or tube feeding). Nutritional assessment included measurement of serum proteins, anthropometry, and body composition analysis. For the latter, total body water and extracellular fluid were measured by standard radioisotope dilution techniques and used to quantitate body cell mass and body fat plus extracellular solids (FAT + ECS). In 27 TPN patients, body composition 28 days after BMT, expressed as a percentage of baseline, was body cell mass, 100%, extracellular fluid, 108%, FAT + ECS, 108%, and in 30 enteral feeding program patients, was body cell mass, 93%, extracellular fluid, 104%, and FAT + ECS, 94%. Only the difference in FAT + ECS was statistically significant (p less than 0.01). Compared to the enteral feeding program, TPN was associated with more days of diuretic use, more frequent hyperglycemia, and more frequent catheter removal (prompted by catheter-related complications), but less frequent hypomagnesemia. There were no significant differences in the rate of hematopoietic recovery, length of hospitalization, or survival, but nutrition-related costs were 2.3 times greater in the TPN group. We conclude that TPN is not clearly superior to individualized enteral feeding and recommend that TPN be reserved for BMT patients who demonstrate intolerance to enteral feeding. PMID:3107808

  8. Plasma ceruloplasmin and total copper levels in burned children receiving parenteral copper: Effect of dose and burn severity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.; Chowanski, Z.; Leffell, M.; Stoker, T.; Lydon, M.; Harmatz, P. Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst )

    1991-03-15

    The response to injury includes an acute-phase stimulation of plasma ceruloplasmin (CP). Patients recovering from nonburn trauma respond to copper (Cu) supplementation by increasing CP. However, plasma CP has been observed to decrease following moderate to severe burn injury, despite adequate enteral provision of Cu. The authors delivered intravenous Cu via TPN to 10 burned children daily at LOW dose or at HIGH dose during the first 3 weeks of recovery. Plasma CP and total Cu (tot Cu) were measured and nonceruloplasmin' Cu (nonCP-Cu) was calculated assuming 3 ug Cu/mg CP. All patients had low CP (range 6-25 mg/dl, normal = 27-37 mg/dl). The HIGH dose raised both CP and tot Cu without increasing non CP-Cu without increasing nonCp-Cu. CP explained 32% of the tot Cu variance while dose and CP explained 84%. Tot Cu was negatively correlated with % BSA burned. They also observed that this relationship does not hold for burns exceeding 95% BSA. These results are consistent with observations for enteral Cu in burns. They show that CP is responsive to dose in burns and suggest at least 20ug/kg as an appropriate daily Cu dose in TPN for burns.

  9. Anti-tumor effect of L-methionine-deprived total parenteral nutrition with 5-fluorouracil administration on Yoshida sarcoma-bearing rats.

    PubMed Central

    Goseki, N; Endo, M; Onodera, T; Kosaki, G

    1991-01-01

    L-methionine-deprived total parenteral nutrition (methionine-deprived TPN), infusing amino acid solution devoid of L-methionine and L-cysteine by the method of TPN as an only protein source, showed enhancement of the effect of several anti-cancer agents. In this study the combined effect of the methionine-deprived TPN with administration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was examined in Yoshida Sarcoma (YS)-bearing rats, from aspects of effects on the tumor metastasis and the host animal's life span, in the following four groups treated with: methionine-deprived TPN with administration of 5-FU, methionine-deprived TPN without administration of 5-FU, L-methionine-contained TPN plus 5-FU, and L-methionine-contained TPN without 5-FU. In the first experiment, TPN was continued for 8 days in the four groups, and the anti-cancer effect of methionine-deprived TPN and administration of 5-FU based on both the growth of the primary tumor at the implanted site and the tumor metastasis was studied from the view point of pathologic findings of animals killed immediately after these treatments. In experiment 2 the survival period was examined after these treatments for 10 days with subsequent oral feeding until death. The results were as follows: proliferation of YS, transplanted subcutaneously, was markedly suppressed; particularly hematogenous metastasis, characteristic in YS, was prominently blunted then obtained an apparent longer survival period in rats treated with the methionine-deprived TPN with administration of 5-FU. PMID:1905913

  10. Encephalopathy in megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome patients on long-term total parenteral nutrition possibly due to selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hirato, Junko; Nakazato, Yoichi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Yamada, Ami; Suzuki, Norio; Kuroiwa, Minoru; Takahashi, Atsushi; Matsuyama, Shiro; Asayama, Kohtaro

    2003-09-01

    This report concerns two patients (female, 9 and 6 years) who were diagnosed with megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS). Although they exceeded the usual life expectancy of patients diagnosed with MMIHS because of total parenteral nutrition (TPN), they demonstrated progressive neurological deficits and showed histopathological features in the brain. Both patients were diagnosed with MMIHS in the neonatal period and were fed by TPN. The first patient developed visual and gait disturbances at the age of 7 years. Two months later, she developed dysarthria and muscular weakness, and could not maintain her posture. The level of serum selenium was extremely low. The second patient developed flexion and spasticity of the extremities followed by decorticate posture at the age of 3 years. Both patients died of sepsis. The brain weights of the two cases were 880 g and 715 g. In both cases, severe neuronal loss and gliosis were present in the medial convolutions of the occipital lobe, including the visual cortex. The postcentral gyrus and temporal transverse gyrus were also involved. In addition, extensive loss of Purkinje cells and granular neurons, and gliosis were observed in the cerebellum. We measured the selenium content of the brains and livers using the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry method. Selenium was not detected in either brain, although the livers of both cases contained a low level of selenium. On immunohistochemical examination of the anti-oxidative enzymes, histiocyte-macrophage lineage cells in MMIHS cases, including microglia and Kupffer cells, showed only a weak reaction for glutathione peroxidase, of which selenium is an essential component. However, the cells in the control cases were strongly positive. In cases of MMIHS and methylmercury intoxication, the brain features similar lesions, in both their topographical and histopathological aspects. We considered that the brain lesions of the MMIHS patients mainly

  11. Parenteral approaches in malabsorption: Home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2016-04-01

    Severe malabsorption of fluids and nutrients leads to intestinal failure (IF) where intravenous supplementation of nutrients and fluids is necessary to maintain health and/or growth. Long-term treatment of IF implies the start of intravenous support in the outpatient setting (home parenteral nutrition, HPN). Although HPN has proven lifesaving for many patients for more than four decades this strategy remains associated with complications that compromise the quality of life. Many problems relate to the presence of the venous access device and concern infections or vascular occlusion due to thrombosis. Patient training remains key to prevent these complications. Also metabolic problems may arise that involve liver function or composition or bone mineralization. While intestinal transplantation remains inferior to HPN as alternative treatment strategy in terms of survival, promising developments include the introduction of hormones that promote intestinal adaptation, mixed lipid emulsions that decrease liver problems and catheter lock solutions that prevent infections. PMID:27086893

  12. Parenteral nutrition in hospital pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Katoue, Maram Gamal; Al-Taweel, Dalal; Matar, Kamal Mohamed; Kombian, Samuel B

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content. Findings - Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols. Originality/value - This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs. PMID:27298063

  13. [Total parenteral nutrition in critical patients. The metabolic-nutritional aspects and effects on immune function of 2 different isocaloric-isonitrogenous regimens].

    PubMed

    Da Pont, M C; Pezzana, A; Demagistris, A; Balzola, F; Cassader, M; Boggio Bertinet, D; Balzola, F

    1994-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare, in a randomized short-term study the effects on some parameters evaluating lipid metabolism, nutritional status and immune function of two different patients. Particularly, the influence of the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of a fat emulsion on above-mentioned parameters was evaluated. The two regimens (G and GL) were isocaloric (about 30 kcal.kg-1.d-1 non protein energy) and isonitrogenous (about 0.27 g.kg-1.d-1 nitrogen); the only difference was the source of non-protein calories administered. Regimen G consisted of glucose-based TPN (100% of non-protein energy as glucose) whereas, in regimen GL (glucose-lipid-based TPN), the 55% of non-protein caloric supply was given as glucose and 45% as lipids. 9 of the patients were randomly assigned to receive regimen GL (group GL) and 8 to receive regimen G (group G). TPN was delivered through a central vein catheter for 8 days; during this period no hepatic or metabolic complications have been observed. Clinical and laboratory tests were performed at day 0 (enrollment), at day 4 (after 4 days of TPN) and at day 8 (at the end of TPN). Both regimens of TPN were able to induce an improvement of the nutritional status and serum prealbumin (TBPA) significantly increased in all patients (p < 0.05). The results of the immune measurements showed that no significant change in immune function during the administration of either regimen occurred. However, in group GL, we observed a slight, non significant change in the percentage numbers of T-cells subpopulations that resulted in a decrease in the ratio of helper to suppressor T-cells (H:S). Serum lipids and lipoprotein profile didn't change significantly in group GL. On the contrary, in group G, we observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of HDL cholesterol (p < 0.05), LDL cholesterol and apo A1 (p < 0.01) while total cholesterol remained unchanged; a non significant rise in serum triglyceride also occurred, These results

  14. Metabolic acidosis during parenteral nutrition: Pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Zikou, Xanthi; Koulouras, Vasilis; Katopodis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with metabolic complications including metabolic acidosis (MA), one of the main disorders of acid-base balance. The main causes involved in the appearance of MA during TPN administration are the metabolism of cationic amino acids and amino acids containing sulfuric acid (exogenous addition), the titratable acidity of the infused parenteral solution, the addition of acidificant agents (hydrochloric acid, acetic acid), thiamine deficiency, disruption of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways and D-fructose administration. Moreover, hypophosphatemia that appears during TPN therapy contributes significantly to the maintenance of MA. This review describes in a comprehensive way the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the appearance of MA induced by intravenous administration of TPN products most commonly used in critically ill-patients. PMID:25983433

  15. Selenite metabolism in total parenteral nutrition (TPN)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitrin, M.D.; Ting, B.T.G.; Hazell, T.; Janghorbani, M. )

    1989-02-01

    Patients on long-term TPN commonly receive selenite to prevent selenium (Se) deficiency. Little information is available concerning the effect of chronic selenite supplementation on Se metabolism. In this study, we have used {sup 74}Se to examine selenite metabolism in 2 home TPN patents, one on selenite and one on no supplementation. Afte rcollection of baseline blood and urine samples, 80 {mu}g of selenite enriched with {sup 74}Se was added to the TPN formula, and infused over 12 hrs. Daily urine output was collected for 10 d. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine the isotope ratios of {sup 74}Se to {sup 77}Se, and {sup 74}Se to {sup 82}Se (added in vitro and an internal standard) in urine. Cumulative {sup 74}Se retention and an apparent selenite exchangeable pool size were calculated using standard isotope dilution equations. The unsupplemented TPN patient had biochemical Se deficiency, with decreased plasma Se (1 ng/ml) urine Se (1 ug/d) and red cell and plasma glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px). Retention of {sup 74}Se was very high, 93% at 10 d, and the pool size was extremely low, 566 ug at 10 d. The supplemented patent had normal plasma and urine Se levels and plasma and red cell GSH-Px. {sup 74}Se retention was very poor, only 42% at 1 d and 38% at 10 d. The Se pool size increased rapidly over time, reaching 12000 ug at 10 d. In contrast, our previous studies in normal subjects consuming dietary orgaic Se showed a selenite retention of 85-90% at 1 d and 70-80% at 10 d, and a pool size of 6000-8000 ug at 10 day. Conclusions: 1. Using {sup 74}Se, differences in Se retention and pool size can easily be detected in Se deficient vs replete TPN patients 2. Chronic supplementation with selenite appears to result in decreased {sup 74}Se retention and an expanded selenite exchangeable pool in comparison with normals consuming dietary Se.

  16. Compatibility: drugs and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Talita Muniz Maloni; Ferraresi, Andressa de Abreu

    2016-03-01

    Objective Standardization and systematization of data to provide quick access to compatibility of leading injectable drugs used in hospitals for parenteral nutrition. Methods We selected 55 injectable drugs analyzed individually with two types of parenteral nutrition: 2-in-1 and 3-in-1. The following variables were considered: active ingredient, compatibility of drugs with the parenteral nutrition with or without lipids, and maximum drug concentration after dilution for the drugs compatible with parenteral nutrition. Drugs were classified as compatible, incompatible and untested. Results After analysis, relevant information to the product's compatibility with parental nutrition was summarized in a table. Conclusion Systematization of compatibility data provided quick and easy access, and enabled standardizing pharmacists work. PMID:27074235

  17. Erosive oesophagitis revealing acute zinc deficiency during parenteral nutrition. A case report.

    PubMed

    Amoussou-Guenou, D; Boland, B; Rousseau, C; Lambert, M; Marbaix, E; Bourlond, J; Stein, F

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of acute zinc deficiency which occurred during parenteral nutrition in a patient with anorexia nervosa and which was characterized by a painful erosive oesophagitis preceding the typical oro-cutaneous symptoms. We also discuss the interpretation of plasma and urine zinc levels, the predisposing role of total parenteral alimentation and the specific therapeutic implications. PMID:2518587

  18. Parenteral opioids for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Campbell, David C

    2003-09-01

    Labor pain relief is an important aspect of women's health that has historically been neglected. Epidural analgesia is the only consistently effective method of labor pain relief and has recently undergone substantial improvements to address the concerns of both parturients and obstetric care providers. With increased physician awareness, these recent advances are becoming more widely accepted and routinely available for all laboring parturients. Unfortunately, an increasing number of women are presenting to maternity wards with an absolute contraindication to epidural labor analgesia. The present review will provide an outline of the recent developments in parenteral analgesic options which complement modern epidural analgesic techniques. Protocols for the initiation of "state-of-the-art" parenteral analgesic techniques are provided as a guide to facilitate effective, modern, parenteral labor analgesia. PMID:12972743

  19. Aggressive parenteral nutrition in sick very low birth weight babies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tagare, Amit; Walawalkar, Meenal; Vaidya, Umesh

    2013-10-01

    Survival of preterm neonates in developing world has improved. Developing countries lag behind in nutritional management in NICU especially parenteral nutrition (PN). This randomized controlled trial was done to evaluate the effect of aggressive parenteral nutrition on nitrogen retention of sick VLBW and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies. From September 2009 to February 2010, total 34 babies were randomized to receive aggressive parenteral nutrition (APN)(n=17) or standard parenteral nutrition (SPN) (n=17). The average daily total and PN calory intake of babies in APN group was significantly higher during first week. APN was well-tolerated; however, nitrogen retention was not significantly higher in APN group. Aggressive parenteral nutrition in sick VLBW babies is feasible in developing world, though it did not improve nitrogen retention in first week of life. PMID:23798635

  20. [Septic pulmonary emboli caused by parenteral nutrition catheter infection].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, M; Itoi, K; Ariyasu, T; Yanagihara, K; Nasu, T

    1990-09-01

    A case of septic pulmonary emboli due to parenteral nutrition catheter infection was reported. Characteristic radiologic features were recognized. A 50-year-old man, who was receiving parenteral nutrition after total gastrectomy, consulted our department with complaints of fever and general malaise. A chest radiograph showed scattered ill-defined small peripheral nodules, which were not present before parenteral nutrition, and these nodules were quickly formed cavities + in 2nd day. He was suffering from high fever, hemo-sputum and dyspnea after removal of the parenteral nutrition catheter. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the tip of parenteral nutrition catheter and sputum cultures. Septic pulmonary emboli were diagnosed and antibiotic therapy was performed. Bacterial endocarditis and septic thrombophlebitis were ruled out. The multiple cavity nodules extended to involve the peripheral areas of the lung and invasive shadows appeared on the chest radiograph in 8th day. Then, the invasive shadows disappeared and the walls of the cavitary lesions became thinner. After 2 months, all cavitary lesions disappeared with only linear shadows remaining. PMID:2125088

  1. Compartment syndrome due to extravasation of peripheral parenteral nutrition: extravasation injury of parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Park, Huee Jin; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Hyuk Jin; Jeong, Eui Cheol; Kim, Kee Won

    2015-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare but devastating condition that can result in permanent neuromuscular or soft tissue injuries. Extravasation injuries, among the iatrogenic causes of compartment syndrome, occur under a wide variety of circumstances in the inpatient setting. Total parenteral nutrition via a peripheral route is an effective alternative for the management of critically ill children who do not obtain adequate nutrition via the oral route. However, there is an inherent risk of extravasation, which can cause compartment syndrome, especially when detected at a later stage. Herein, we report a rare case of compartment syndrome and skin necrosis due to extravasation, requiring emergency fasciotomy and skin graft in a 7-month-old boy who was treated with peripheral parenteral nutrition via a pressurized infusion pump. Although we cannot estimate the exact time at which extravasation occurred, the extent and degree of the wound suggest that the ischemic insult was prolonged, lasting for several hours. Pediatric clinicians and medical teams should carefully examine the site of insertion of the intravenous catheter, especially in patients receiving parenteral nutrition via a peripheral intravenous catheter with a pressurized infusion pump. PMID:26692883

  2. Biodegradable microspheres for parenteral delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V R; Trehan, A

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, emphasis is being laid to development of controlled release dosage forms. Interest in this technology has increased steadily over the past few years. Although oral administration of drugs is a widely accepted route of drug delivery, bioavailability of drug often varies as a result of gastrointestinal absorption, degradation by first-pass effect, and hostile environment of gastrointestinal tract. Transdermal administration for percutaneous absorption of drug is limited by the impermeable nature of the stratum corneum. Ocular and nasal delivery is also unfavorable because of degradation by enzymes present in eye tissues and nasal mucosa. Hence, the parenteral route is the most viable approach in such cases. Of the various ways of achieving long-term parenteral drug delivery, biodegradable microspheres are one of the better means of controlling the release of drug over a long time. Because of the lipidic nature of liposomes, problems such as limited physical stability and difficulty of freeze-drying are encountered. Similarly, for emulsions, stability on long-term basis and in suspensions, rheological changes during filling, injecting, and storage poses limitation. Also, in all these systems, the release rate cannot be tailored to the needs of the patient. Parenteral controlled-release formulations based on biodegradable microspheres can overcome these problems and can control the release of drug over a predetermined time span, usually in the order of days to weeks to months. Various FDA-approved controlled-release parenteral formulations based on these biodegradable microspheres are available on the market, including Lupron Depot Nutropin Depot and Zoladex. This review covers various molecules encapsulated in biodegradable microspheres for parenteral delivery. PMID:16566705

  3. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  4. Home parenteral nutrition in management of patients with severe radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lavery, I.C.; Steiger, E.; Fazio, V.W.

    1980-03-01

    Five patients who would have been unable to survive because of intestinal complications of radiation therapy were able to lead an otherwise normal life with the use of parenteral nutrition administered at home. One patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after 14 months. Another patient died as the result of a totally avoidable pharmaceutical error after 2 1/2 years. The remaining three are still disease free without morbidity relating to the parenteral nutrition.

  5. [Review and prospect of parenteral nutrition support for burn patients in China].

    PubMed

    Deng, Shi-lin

    2008-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition support for burn injury in China began to develop in 1970s along with improvement in burn foundational research of burn injury and the marketing of parenteral nutrition solutions manufactured by Chinese amino acids pharmaceutical industry. Up to 1980s many kinds of parenteral nutrition products were used in clinical therapy, and they were proved to be effective and safe. Meanwhile the guide for parenteral nutrition support of China was drafted to ensure standardized administration. Some problems should be called for attention in present practice of parenteral nutrition support. First, immuno nutrients have been proved to possess synergistic effect on parenteral/enteral nutrition support. But for those critical patients in sepsis/MODS period, more attention should be paid to the use of immuno nutrients in time of administration and optimal dosage because of the complicate physiopathologic reactions. Secondly, the use of growth hormone has been proved to be effective for promoting healing in patients with burn in many cases. However, the indications of growth hormone should be strictly observed and the regime of a low dose and short course should be adopted 7 days after burn for ensuring safety. Thirdly, we should pay attention to the best path of giving nutrition, whether enteral or parenteral. Parenteral nutrition support should be adopted for critical burn patients in early period with intestinal dysfunction, and enteral nutrition support should be used when intestinal functions recover partially. For patients with burn hypermetabolism, the application of enteral and parenteral nutrition support is complimentary, and it is aptly called total nutrition. PMID:19103029

  6. Pancreatic exocrine response to parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bivins, B A; Bell, R M; Rapp, R P; Toedebusch, W H

    1984-01-01

    Animal experimental data concerning pancreatic exocrine secretory response to parenteral nutrition is contradictory. We have studied the pancreatic exocrine output in a patient with a pure pancreatic fistula. In this patient, parenteral nutrition with hypertonic glucose, amino acids and fat emulsion was not associated with increases in fistula volume or protein output. Enteral protein and fat in this patient caused rapid increases in both fistula volume and protein output. This study supports the use of parenteral nutrition as a means of maintaining the pancreas at rest. PMID:6321813

  7. American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Continuing Education Certification Claim CE Credits Clinical Nutrition Week eLearning Center Professional Development Webinars Calendar of ... Guidelines Clinical Practice Library Standards Malnutrition Awareness Parenteral ... Resources Practice and Research Toolkits Online Store Research ...

  8. Parenteral nutrition: risks, complications, and management.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Patricia H; Gilbert, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving modality, but one that also carries risks for potentially life-threatening complications. Comprehensive management of patients receiving parenteral nutrition includes careful selection of candidates, individualizing formulas to meet patients' unique needs, monitoring response to therapy, and implementing strategies designed to avoid complications. Measures to mitigate the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections are particularly important. As with all complex therapies, a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach promotes optimal outcomes. PMID:22222292

  9. Zinc: physiology, deficiency, and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Callum

    2015-06-01

    The essential trace element zinc (Zn) has a large number of physiologic roles, in particular being required for growth and functioning of the immune system. Adaptive mechanisms enable the body to maintain normal total body Zn status over a wide range of intakes, but deficiency can occur because of reduced absorption or increased gastrointestinal losses. Deficiency impairs physiologic processes, leading to clinical consequences that include failure to thrive, skin rash, and impaired wound healing. Mild deficiency that is not clinically overt may still cause nonspecific consequences, such as susceptibility to infection and poor growth. The plasma Zn concentration has poor sensitivity and specificity as a test of deficiency. Consequently, diagnosis of deficiency requires a combination of clinical assessment and biochemical tests. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) are susceptible to Zn deficiency and its consequences. Nutrition support teams should have a strategy for assessing Zn status and optimizing this by appropriate supplementation. Nutrition guidelines recommend generous Zn provision from the start of PN. This review covers the physiology of Zn, the consequences of its deficiency, and the assessment of its status, before discussing its role in PN. PMID:25681484

  10. The parenteral toxicity of Cyclofem.

    PubMed

    Cookson, K M

    1994-04-01

    The intraperitoneal median lethal dose of Cyclofem [Cyclo-Provera, C-P; depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera, DMPA)+estradiol cypionate (EC)] in mice was greater than 2500 mg/kg. The subcutaneous median lethal dose in mice and rats was greater than 1000 mg/kg. The suspension containing 50 mg/ml DMPA and 10 mg/ml EC used in all toxicology studies was not irritating to rabbit muscle. Chronic parenteral toxicity studies of Cyclofem were conducted in mice, rats and monkeys for 18, 22 and 24 months, respectively. Monthly doses were 2.5, 7.5 and 25 mg/kg Cyclofem in all species, 25 mg/kg DMPA and 25 mg/kg EC. Cyclofem was nontoxic but produced hormonal effects in all species. Decreased survival noted in the rodent studies was likely due to excessive EC dose. Mammary gland adenocarcinomas and pituitary adenomas were increased in the chronic rat study. Literature indicates the tumors were likely the result of the excessive hormone dose and were specific to rodents. In monkeys, Cyclofem was nontoxic, hormonally active, and noncarcinogenic at all doses including 50 times the human dose. PMID:8013218

  11. Pediatric parenteral nutrition in India.

    PubMed

    Bhave, S; Bavdekar, A

    1999-01-01

    Nutritional support to patients in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units is critical not only to minimize negative nitrogen balance but also to promote growth and development. Continuous technological and logistical advances in the Western countries have improved the efficacy and reduced the complications of parenteral nutrition (PN) to the extent that despite the constraints of cost and infrastructure, PN is now fast growing in India. Although widespread availability is very much desired, it is important that the technique is developed with considerable expertise and used judiciously with full knowledge of its indications, limitations, dangers and benefits. Indications for PN include surgical conditions (short gut syndrome), very low birth weight infants (particularly with necrotizing enterocolitis and surgical anomalies), malabsorption syndromes, conditions requiring bowel rest (acute pancreatitis, severe ulcerative colitis and necrotizing enterocolitis) and several non-gastrointestinal indications (end stage liver disease, renal failure, multiple trauma and extensive burns). Provision of PN is associated with significant and sometimes life threatening complications. The possible complications are technical (thrombosis, perforation of vein, thrombophlebitis), infections, metabolic disturbances, hepatobiliary stenosis, cholestasis, fibrosis, cirrhosis or cholelithiasis and bone related complications like osteopenia and fractures. Meticulous monitoring is necessary not only to detect complications but also to document clinical benefit. PMID:11132460

  12. Vitamin K in parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Martin J

    2009-11-01

    Vitamin K (as phylloquinone and menaquinones) is an essential cofactor for the conversion of peptide-bound glutamate to gamma-carboxy glutamic acid (Gla) residues in a number of specialized Gla-containing proteins. The only unequivocal deficiency outcome is a bleeding syndrome caused by an inability to synthesize active coagulation factors II, VII, IX, and X, although there is growing evidence for roles for vitamin K in bone and vascular health. An adult daily intake of about 100 microg of phylloquinone is recommended for the maintenance of hemostasis. Traditional coagulation tests for assessing vitamin K status are nonspecific and insensitive. Better tests include measurements of circulating vitamin K and inactive proteins such as undercarboxylated forms of factor II and osteocalcin to assess tissue and functional status, respectively. Common risk factors for vitamin K deficiency in the hospitalized patient include inadequate dietary intakes, malabsorption syndromes (especially owing to cholestatic liver disease), antibiotic therapy, and renal insufficiency. Pregnant women and their newborns present a special risk category because of poor placental transport and low concentrations of vitamin K in breast milk. Since 2000, the Food and Drug Administration has mandated that adult parenteral preparations should provide a supplemental amount of 150 microg phylloquinone per day in addition to that present naturally, in variable amounts, in the lipid emulsion. Although this supplemental daily amount is probably beneficial in preventing vitamin K deficiency, it may be excessive for patients taking vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, and jeopardize their anticoagulant control. Natural forms of vitamin K have no proven toxicity. PMID:19874942

  13. Parenteral nutrition: never say never

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes the benefits of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients, when prescribed for relevant indications, in adequate quantities, and in due time. Critically ill patients are at risk of energy deficit during their ICU stay, a condition which leads to unfavorable outcomes, due to hypercatabolism secondary to the stress response and the difficulty to optimize feeding. Indirect calorimetry is recommended to define the energy target, since no single predictive equation accurately estimates energy expenditure. Energy metabolism is intimately associated with protein metabolism. Recent evidence calls for adequate protein provision, but there is no accurate method to estimate the protein requirements, and recommendations are probably suboptimal. Enteral nutrition (EN) is the preferred route of feeding, but gastrointestinal intolerance limits its efficacy and PN allows for full coverage of energy needs. Seven recent articles concerning PN for critically ill patients were identified and carefully reviewed for the clinical and scientific relevance of their conclusions. One article addressed the unfavorable effects of early PN, although this result should be more correctly regarded as a consequence of glucose load and hypercaloric feeding. The six other articles were either in favor of PN or concluded that there was no difference in the outcome compared with EN. Hypercaloric feeding was not observed in these studies. Hypocaloric feeding led to unfavorable outcomes. This further demonstrates the beneficial effects of an early and adequate feeding with full EN, or in case of failure of EN with exclusive or supplemental PN. EN is the first choice for critically ill patients, but difficulties providing optimal nutrition through exclusive EN are frequently encountered. In cases of insufficient EN, individualized supplemental PN should be administered to reduce the infection rate and the duration of mechanical ventilation. PN is a safe therapeutic option

  14. Marchiafava: Bignami Disease Treated with Parenteral Thiamine

    PubMed Central

    Nemlekar, Saumitra Shankar; Mehta, Ritambhara Yeshwant; Dave, Kamlesh Rushikray; Shah, Nilima Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Marchiafava - Bignami disease is rare sequelae of chronic alcohol use. We present a case with transient ischemic attack like presentation and its management with parenteral thiamine. A 53 year old male with history of country liquor use since 32 years was brought to hospital with acute onset of delirium & mild weakness involving motor functions of left side of the body, non-reactive planters and exaggerated tendon reflexes on left side. The MRI showed bilateral hyper intense signal on T2W and FLAIR images & Hypo intense lesion on T1W images involving body, genu and splenium of corpus callosum. The features are suggestive of Marchiafava - Bignami Disease. There have been few guidelines for management of MBD and literature supports use of parenteral thiamine 500mg leading to remission of symptoms and symptomatic improvement. It is advisable to use parenteral thiamine in all cases as it overlaps management of other co-morbidities of chronic alcoholism. PMID:27114628

  15. Marchiafava: Bignami Disease Treated with Parenteral Thiamine.

    PubMed

    Nemlekar, Saumitra Shankar; Mehta, Ritambhara Yeshwant; Dave, Kamlesh Rushikray; Shah, Nilima Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Marchiafava - Bignami disease is rare sequelae of chronic alcohol use. We present a case with transient ischemic attack like presentation and its management with parenteral thiamine. A 53 year old male with history of country liquor use since 32 years was brought to hospital with acute onset of delirium & mild weakness involving motor functions of left side of the body, non-reactive planters and exaggerated tendon reflexes on left side. The MRI showed bilateral hyper intense signal on T2W and FLAIR images & Hypo intense lesion on T1W images involving body, genu and splenium of corpus callosum. The features are suggestive of Marchiafava - Bignami Disease. There have been few guidelines for management of MBD and literature supports use of parenteral thiamine 500mg leading to remission of symptoms and symptomatic improvement. It is advisable to use parenteral thiamine in all cases as it overlaps management of other co-morbidities of chronic alcoholism. PMID:27114628

  16. Nitrogen sparing by 2-ketoisocaproate in parenterally fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Matthews, D.E.; Walser, M. )

    1990-11-01

    In rats receiving total parenteral nutrition with or without sodium 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC; 2.48 g.kg-1.day-1), L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine and (1-{sup 14}C)KIC were constantly infused for 6 h. CO{sub 2} production, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} enrichment, urinary urea nitrogen (N) plus ammonia N and total urinary N were measured. Whole body protein synthesis (S) was calculated in non-KIC-infused rats and also in unfed rats infused with (1-{sup 14}C)leucine from fractional oxidation of labeled leucine (1-F), where F is fractional utilization for protein synthesis, and urea N plus ammonia N excretion (C) as S = C x F/(1-F). Addition of KIC caused a significant reduction in N excretion and a significant improvement in N balance. Fractional oxidation of labeled KIC increased, whereas fractional utilization of labeled KIC for protein synthesis decreased, but the extent of incorporation of infused KIC into newly synthesized protein (as leucine) amounted to at least 40% of the total rate of leucine incorporation into newly synthesized whole body protein. We conclude that addition of KIC spares N in parenterally fed rats and becomes a major source of leucine for protein synthesis.

  17. Effect of parenteral amino acid supplementation in preterm low birth weight newborn.

    PubMed

    Alo, D; Shahidullah, M; Mannan, M A; Noor, K

    2010-07-01

    This interventional study was done to determine the effect of parenteral amino acid supplementation on weight change, biochemical effect and incidence of sepsis in preterm low birth weight newborns during their hospital stay. It was carried out during the period of June 2006-May 2007 in the Newborn unit of a tertiary care hospital of Bangladesh. Sixty preterm (28-34weeks), low birth weight (1000-1800g) AGA (appropriate for gestational age) newborns were enrolled within 24 hours of birth. Intervention and control newborns were matched in terms of birth weight and gestational age. Samples were volunteers. Parenteral amino acid (5%) supplementation in addition to usual nutritional management until enteral feeding reached three fourth of total calorie intake. Usual nutritional management was 10% intravenous dextrose and subsequent enteral feeding. Main outcome measured with weight change, biochemical effect and incidence of sepsis. Weight change was observed by two parameters such as mean percentage of maximum postnatal weight loss and mean days to reach birth weight, both were significantly lower in intervention than control group (p<0.05). Biochemical effect of parenteral amino acid supplementation investigated in this study has been shown to have no effect. There was no difference in incidence of sepsis between intervention and control group (p>0.05). Improved nutritional supplementation with parenteral amino acids resulted in better growth as evident by lesser degree of weight loss and earlier regaining of birth weight in the early neonatal period. Biochemical parameters are not affected by parenteral amino acid supplementation. PMID:20639832

  18. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  19. Chronic parenteral nutrition induces hepatic inflammation, steatosis and insulin resistance in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prematurity and overfeeding in infants are associated with insulin resistance in childhood and may increase the risk of adult disease. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a major source of infant nutrition support and may influence neonatal metabolic function. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that...

  20. Pharmaceutical Point of View on Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Stawny, M.; Olijarczyk, R.; Jaroszkiewicz, E.; Jelińska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition—a form of administering nutrients, electrolytes, trace elements, vitamins, and water—is a widely used mode of therapy applied in many diseases, in patients of different ages both at home and in hospital. The success of nutritional therapy depends chiefly on proper determination of the patient's energetic and electrolytic needs as well as preparation and administration of a safe nutritional mixture. As a parenterally administered drug, it is expected to be microbiologically and physicochemically stable, with all of the components compatible with each other. It is very difficult to obtain a stable nutritional mixture due to the fact that it is a complex, two-phase drug. Also, the risk of incompatibility between mixture components and packaging should be taken into consideration and possibly eliminated. Since parenteral nutrition is a part of therapy, simultaneous use of drugs may cause pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as those with the pharmaceutical phase. The aim of this paper is to discuss such aspects of parenteral nutrition as mixture stability, methodology, and methods for determining the stability of nutritional mixtures and drugs added to them. PMID:24453847

  1. PARENTERAL NUTRITION INDICATIONS, ADMINISTRATION, AND MONITORING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) can be lifesaving or life threatening, depending on when and how it is used. In infants and children who are unable to meet their nutritional requirements over extended periods, it can prevent death from malnutrition. On the other hand, if appropriate attention is not paid ...

  2. Relevamiento total del hemisferio sur celeste en la frecuencia de 1420 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bava, J. A.; Colomb, F. R.; Hurrel, E.; Larrarte, J. J.; Sanz, A. J.; Testori, J. C.; Reich, P.; Reich, W.; Wielebinski, R.

    En el presente artículo se describe el relevamiento del cielo en el Hemisferio Sur Celeste en la frecuencia de 1420 MHz para declinaciones δ<= -19o realizado con la Antena II de 30 metros de diámetro del IAR. Este relevamiento posee igual sensibilidad (3xr.m.s=50 mK) que el realizado en el Hemisferio Norte con el radiotelescopio de 25 metros de Stockert de la Universidad de Bonn, operado por el Max-Planck Institute für Radioastronomie ( Reich W., 1982, A&ASS 48, 219; Reich P. and Reich W., 1986, A&ASS 63, 205). Con los datos obtenidos por ambos radiotelescopios se posee una base de datos de todo el cielo en esta frecuencia. En esta publicación presentamos los detalles del sistema receptor, técnicas de observación y reducción de datos, calibración y discusión de los errores en los resultados.

  3. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10-15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  4. Hazards of parenteral treatment: do particles count?

    PubMed Central

    Puntis, J W; Wilkins, K M; Ball, P A; Rushton, D I; Booth, I W

    1992-01-01

    After prolonged parenteral nutrition a 12 month old infant died with pulmonary hypertension and granulomatous pulmonary arteritis. A review of necropsy findings in 41 infants who had been fed parenterally showed that two of these also had pulmonary artery granulomata, while none of 32 control patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome had similar findings. Particulate contaminants have been implicated in the pathogenesis of such lesions and these were quantified in amino acid/dextrose solutions and fat emulsions using automated particle counting and optical microscope counting respectively. Parenteral feed infusions compounded for a 3000 g infant according to standard nutritional regimens were found to include approximately 37,000 particles between 2 and 100 microns in size in one day's feed, of which 80% were derived from the fat emulsion. In-line end filtration of intravenous infusions may reduce the risk of particle associated complications. A suitable particle filter is required for use with lipid. Images p1476-a PMID:1489228

  5. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  6. Early Post Operative Enteral Versus Parenteral Feeding after Esophageal Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi Mashhadi, Mohammad Taghi; Bagheri, Reza; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Zilaee, Marzie; Rezaei, Reza; Maddah, Ghodratollah; Majidi, Mohamad Reza; Bahadornia, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients is reported to be high. In particular, patients with esophageal cancer are prone to malnutrition, due to preoperative digestive system dysfunctions and short-term non-oral feeding postoperatively. Selection of an appropriate method for feeding in the postoperative period is important in these patients. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 40 patients with esophageal cancer who had undergone esophagectomy between September 2008 and October 2009 were randomly assigned into either enteral feeding or parenteral feeding groups, with the same calorie intake in each group. The level of serum total protein, albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, C3, C4 and hs-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), as well as the rate of surgical complications, restoration of bowel movements and cost was assessed in each group. Results: Our results showed that there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of serum albumin, prealbumin or transferrin. However, C3 and C4 levels were significantly higher in the enteral feeding group compared with the parenteral group, while hs-CRP level was significantly lower in the enteral feeding group. Bowel movements were restored sooner and costs of treatment were lower in the enteral group. Postoperative complications did not differ significantly between the groups. There was one death in the parenteral group 10 days after surgery due to myocardial infarction. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that enteral feeding can be used effectively in the first days after surgery, with few early complications and similar nutritional outcomes compared with the parenteral method. Enteral feeding was associated with reduced inflammation and was associated with an improvement in immunological responses, quicker return of bowel movements, and reduced costs in comparison with parenteral feeding. PMID:26568935

  7. Growth and hepatic composition in the guinea pig after long-term parenteral hyperalimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.J.H.; Redmond, D.; Baggs, R.B.; Schecter, A.; Gasiewicz, T.A.

    1986-08-01

    This study examined the feasibility of maintaining male Hartley guinea pigs on long-term hyperalimentation. Data from animals fed ad libitum, but infused with 0.9% saline, indicated that there was minimal effect from catheter implantation, sepsis, or the infusion of large volumes of fluid. This group compared with animals fed and watered ad libitum demonstrated a nearly identical growth rate serum chemistry, tissue weights, and hepatic composition and morphology. Animals infused with a total parenteral diet demonstrated growth rates of 4.06 +/- 1.46 g/day for up to 25 days. Loss of infused animals was due in varying degrees to sepsis, mechanical failure, improper placement of the cannula, loss of patency, and death from unknown causes. Morphological analysis of animals fed by total parenteral nutrition revealed an altered distribution and increased size of lipid droplets in hepatic parenchymal and Kupffer cells and glycogen accumulation by the parenchymal cells. Decreased hepatic content of total protein and lipid, as well as cytochrome P450, was also observed. Similarly, serum values of triglyceride were decreased in animals fed by the total parenteral diet. This study indicated that the guinea pig fed by hyperalimentation may be a useful animal model for a number of clinical and basic research applications.

  8. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  9. A review of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, R J; Northup, S J; Thomas, J A

    1984-10-01

    The chemical formation, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and certain other decomposition products found in parenteral solutions are reviewed. Heat sterilization-induced hexose decomposition to furan derivatives is promoted at low pH. Based upon infusion studies with rats and dogs, HMF does not appear to be acutely toxic at concentrations ordinarily encountered in parenteral infusion solutions (e.g., 10 mg/liter). Dosages of parenterally administered HMF exceeding 75 mg/kg body wt have led to some toxic effects, including increased activity of hepatic enzymes, altered serum-protein fractions, increased relative spleen weight, and hepatic fatty degeneration. Approximately 50% of parenterally administered HMF is oxidized and eliminated by the kidneys. From a clinical standpoint, the amount of HMF formed as a result of the heat sterilization of parenteral solutions containing hexoses does not seem to pose any significant toxicologic problem. PMID:6391997

  10. Do surface active parenteral formulations cause inflammation?

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Lars; Engblom, Johan; Lanbeck, Peter; Wahlgren, Marie

    2015-04-30

    Local irritation and inflammation at the site of administration are a common side effect following administration of parenteral formulations. Biological effects of surface (interfacial) activity in solutions are less well investigated than effects caused by other physico-chemical parameters such as pH and osmolality. The interfacial activity in different systems, including human plasma, typical amphiphilic substances with fundamental biological relevance such as free fatty acids, anesthetic depot formulations and six different antibiotics was measured. The relative interfacial pressure, and/or concentration of active substance, required to obtain 50% of the maximal attainable effect in terms of interfacial pressure were calculated. The aim was to test the hypothesis that these parameters would allow comparison to biological effects reported in in vivo studies on the investigated substances. The highest interfacial activity was found in a triglyceride/plasma system. Among the antibiotic tested, the highest interfacial activities were found in erythromycin and dicloxacillin, which is in accordance with previous clinical findings of a high tendency of infusion phlebitis and cell toxicity. Independently of investigated system, biological effects were minimal below a 15% relative increase of interfacial activity. Above 35-45% the effects were severe. Interfacial activity in parenteral formulations may well cause damages to tissues followed by inflammation. PMID:25708007

  11. Parenteral nutrition product shortages: impact on safety.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Beverly

    2012-03-01

    The drug shortage crisis continues in the United States and threatens the integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain and compromises patient care, especially patients requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy. The number of new drug shortages has increased rapidly over the past 5 years, with the most significant increase in sterile injectable products. The most common reason for a shortage of a sterile injectable medication is a product quality issue. Two surveys of healthcare professionals have assessed the impact of drug shortages on patient safety. Participants in one survey reported over 1000 medication errors or patient adverse events as the result of shortages. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition also conducted a survey of healthcare professionals regarding PN product shortages and the associated patient care implications. Safety risks were reported throughout the entire PN process, from procurement of PN products to patient outcomes. Providing PN therapy during product shortages requires vigilance and continuous assessment of the entire PN process to optimize patient care quality and avoid patient harm. PMID:22282871

  12. Ketorolac: a parenteral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Resman-Targoff, B H

    1990-11-01

    Ketorolac tromethamine is a pyrrolo-pyrrole nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) with potent analgesic effects when administered intramuscularly for the treatment of acute pain. Ketorolac is well absorbed and has a rapid onset of action. Maximum plasma concentrations are achieved in 45-50 minutes and peak analgesic effects in about one to two hours following intramuscular injection. Ketorolac is more than 99 percent bound to plasma proteins and has a mean apparent volume of distribution of 0.11-0.25 L/kg. About 91 percent of a dose is excreted in urine, mostly as inactive metabolites, and approximately 6 percent is eliminated in feces. The elimination half-life, approximately four to six hours, increases in elderly patients and those with renal impairment. Its analgesic effectiveness was similar or superior to that of morphine, meperidine, or pentazocine in single-dose studies of patients with postoperative pain or renal colic and greater than that of placebo in patients with chronic cancer pain. The adverse effects are generally mild to moderate, self-limiting, and similar to those seen with other prostaglandin inhibitors. Ketorolac has a reversible inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. It can cause dose-related gastric ulcerations, even when administered parenterally. Ketorolac is a promising parenteral alternative to oral NSAIDs and a nonnarcotic alternative to opioid analgesics. Additional multiple-dose studies are needed to more clearly define its place in therapy. PMID:2275236

  13. Enteral feeding induces diet-dependent mucosal dysfunction, bacterial overgrowth and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm parenterally-fed pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preterm neonates have an immature gut and metabolism and may benefit from a period of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral food introduction. Conversely, delayed enteral feeding may inhibit gut maturation and sensitize to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal mass and NEC lesions we...

  14. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    PubMed

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. PMID:27317615

  15. Metabolic bone disease and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Cynthia; Seidner, Douglas L

    2004-08-01

    Metabolic bone disease (MBD) is abnormal bone metabolism and includes the common disorders of osteoporosis and osteomalacia, which can develop in patients receiving long-term parenteral nutrition (PN). Patients who require long-term PN have significant gastrointestinal failure and malabsorption, which is generally caused by severe inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal ischemia, or malignancy. The exact cause of MBD in long-term PN patients is unknown, but its origin is thought to be multifactorial, with factors including underlying disease, effect of medications used to treat this disease (eg, corticosteroids), and various components of the PN solution. Caring for patients on long-term PN requires routine assessment and monitoring for MBD. Appropriate adjustments of the PN solution can help reduce the risk for developing PN-associated MBD and in some instances improve bone mineral density. Recent developments in pharmacologic treatment for osteoporosis show promise for patients with MBD receiving PN. PMID:15245704

  16. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  17. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  18. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  19. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  20. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  1. [Clinical importance of hypocaloric parenteral feeding].

    PubMed

    Behrendt, W; Kunitz, O; Kauhl, W; Lade, R

    1994-01-01

    Hypocaloric parenteral nutrition (HPN) is mainly and frequently used in surgical medicine since it allows a reliable and standardized supply of nutrients. Ready-mix solutions which are suitable for peripheral venous nutrition generally contain about 50 g carbohydrates (glucose and/or xylitol), 25 g amino acids and electrolytes per liter. The osmolarity of the solutions averages between 600 and 800 mosmol/l. HPN has two distinct advantages: firstly the minimal effects on carbohydrate metabolism and secondly the good improvement in nitrogen balance. If 2 g/kg and day glucose are administered, even postoperatively, the mean blood sugar levels are only just above the normal range and an amino acid dosage of 1 g/kg and day, compared with liquid substitution alone or the administration of small amounts of carbohydrates, leads to an approximately 60% improvement in postoperative N-balance. Experience gained with HPN in surgical medicine to date permits the following recommendation: 1. HPN should not be used after small and moderate interventions with short nutritional abstinence; it is not necessary to administer nutrients in such cases. 2. HPN may be used after moderate to serious surgical interventions; e.g. after gastrointestinal resections in the case of elective surgery on patients with a normal nutritional status. However, studies have yet to prove the clinical efficacy of HPN, e.g. as evidenced by shorter hospitalization or a reduced perioperative morbidity or mortality, although this reservation equally applies to the routinely administered complete parenteral or enteral nutrition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7975956

  2. Protective effect of polysaccharides on the stability of parenteral emulsions.

    PubMed

    Chai, Guihong; Sun, Feng; Shi, Jianli; Tian, Bin; Tang, Xing

    2013-05-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of two polysaccharides (dextran, hydroxyethyl starch) on the stability of parenteral emulsions. All parenteral emulsions were prepared by high-pressure homogenization. The influence of polysaccharides concentration was studied. The stabilities of autoclaving sterilization, centrifugation and freeze-thawing process were investigated extensively. Following the addition of polysaccharides, the stabilities of the parenteral emulsions were improved. A high-concentration polysaccharides solution (13%, w/v) produced better protection than a low one (1.3%, w/v), especially during freeze-thawing process. The protective mechanisms of polysaccharides were attributed to increasing systematic viscosity, non-frozen water absorbed by polysaccharides, formation of a linear bead-like structure and thicker mixed emulsifier film. Overall, polysaccharides can offer greatly increased protection for parenteral emulsions, and represent a novel protective strategy for improving the stability of this delivery system. PMID:22583006

  3. Effect of fasting and parenteral alimentation on PIPIDA scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T.; McClain, C.J.; Shafer, R.B.

    1983-08-01

    Ten patients were prospectively studied using 99mTc-PIPIDA imaging to evaluate the effects of fasting and parenteral alimentation on gallbladder function. Three of ten patients had initial nonvisualization of the gallbladder for up to 2 hr, yet had normal visualization on repeat imaging performed after resumption of oral intake or after parenteral alimentation was discontinued. 99mTc-PIPIDA imaging should be interpreted with caution in patients fitting into either of these groups.

  4. Coverage of pilot parenteral vaccination campaign against canine rabies in N'Djaména, Chad.

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, U.; Mindekem, R.; Yémadji, N.; Vounatsou, P.; Kaninga, Y.; Ndoutamia, A. G.; Zinsstag, J.

    2003-01-01

    Canine rabies, and thus human exposure to rabies, can be controlled through mass vaccination of the animal reservoir if dog owners are willing to cooperate. Inaccessible, ownerless dogs, however, reduce the vaccination coverage achieved in parenteral campaigns. This study aimed to estimate the vaccination coverage in dogs in three study zones of N'Djaména, Chad, after a pilot free parenteral mass vaccination campaign against rabies. We used a capture-mark-recapture approach for population estimates, with a Bayesian, Markov chain, Monte Carlo method to estimate the total number of owned dogs, and the ratio of ownerless to owned dogs to calculate vaccination coverage. When we took into account ownerless dogs, the vaccination coverage in the dog populations was 87% (95% confidence interval (CI), 84-89%) in study zone I, 71% (95% CI, 64-76%) in zone II, and 64% (95% CI, 58-71%) in zone III. The proportions of ownerless dogs to owned dogs were 1.1% (95% CI, 0-3.1%), 7.6% (95% CI, 0.7-16.5%), and 10.6% (95% CI, 1.6-19.1%) in the three study zones, respectively. Vaccination coverage in the three populations of owned dogs was 88% (95% CI, 84-92%) in zone I, 76% (95% CI, 71-81%) in zone II, and 70% (95% CI, 66-76%) in zone III. Participation of dog owners in the free campaign was high, and the number of inaccessible ownerless dogs was low. High levels of vaccination coverage could be achieved with parenteral mass vaccination. Regular parenteral vaccination campaigns to cover all of N'Djaména should be considered as an ethical way of preventing human rabies when post-exposure treatment is of limited availability and high in cost. PMID:14758434

  5. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silica normal phase column and an isocratic, n-hexane:1,4 dioxane (98:2) mobile phase. An optimized protocol was used to report vitamin E homolog concentrations in soybean oil-based (Intralipid®, Ivelip®, Lipofundin® N, Liposyn® III, and Liposyn® II), medium- and long-chain fatty acid-based (Lipofundin®, MCT and Structolipid®), olive oil-based (ClinOleic®), and fish oil-based (Omegaven®) and mixture of these oils-based (SMOFlipid®, Lipidem®) commercial parenteral lipid emulsions. Total content of all vitamin E homologs varied greatly between different emulsions, ranging from 57.9 to 383.9 µg/mL. Tocopherols (α, β, γ, δ) were the predominant vitamin E homologs for all emulsions, with tocotrienol content < 0.3%. In all of the soybean emulsions, except for Lipofundin® N, the predominant vitamin E homolog was γ-tocopherol, which ranged from 57–156 µg/mL. ClinOleic® predominantly contained α-tocopherol (32 µg/mL), whereas α-tocopherol content in Omegaven® was higher than most of the other lipid emulsions (230 µg/mL). Practical applications The information on the types and quantity of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions will be extremely useful to physicians and healthcare personnel in selecting appropriate lipid emulsions that are exclusively used in patients with inadequate gastrointestinal function, including hospitalized and critically ill patients. Some emulsions may require vitamin E supplementation in order to meet minimal human requirements

  6. Severe Refractory Coeliac Disease with Response Only to Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Mehta, Ravi; Mohamed, Salma; Mohamed, Zameer; Arnold, Jayantha

    2014-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is characterised by recurrent or persistent malabsorptive symptoms and villous atrophy, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet for at least 6 months and where other causes of malabsorption including malignancy have been excluded. There is limited evidence and guidance on the effective management of these patients. We describe a case of severe RCD in our hospital, with symptoms controlled effectively only by total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This 68-year-old woman initially presented to the clinic with persistent non-bloody diarrhoea and vomiting. A diagnosis of coeliac disease was confirmed with a positive tissue transglutaminase assay and histology. A strict gluten-free diet was ineffective and she represented 6 months later with 13 kg weight loss (16.7%), ongoing abdominal pain and diarrhoea, with bowels opening 16 times a day. She was oedematous, had an albumin of 12 g/l and required hospital admission. She was treated for pancreatic insufficiency and presumptively for small bowel bacterial overgrowth with no resolution of symptoms. We ruled out infectious causes and investigated for small bowel malignancy; all results were negative. Small bowel enteroscopy showed ulcerative jejunitis. She was given 5 days of TPN, following which her symptoms improved and albumin normalised. This was sustained with symptom resolution and weight gain seen at follow-up. TPN successfully and rapidly induced remission in this case. Thus, a short period of TPN should be considered as a potential component of management in patients with severe RCD. PMID:25473387

  7. Parenteral Nutrition in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus undergoes extensive resection of the small bowel and right colon with a jejunostomy and colostomy because of mesenteric ischemia. In the surgical intensive care unit, severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome with possible sepsis develops. The patient is treated with volume resuscitation, vasopressor support, mechanical ventilation, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and intravenous insulin infusion. Low-dose tube feedings are initiated postoperatively through a nasogastric tube. However, these feedings are discontinued after the development of escalating vasopressor requirements, worsening abdominal distention, and increased gastric residual volume, along with an episode of emesis. The hospital nutritional-support service is consulted for feeding recommendations. A discussion with the patient's family reveals that during the previous 6 months, she lost approximately 15% of her usual body weight and decreased her food intake because of abdominal pain associated with eating. Her preoperative body weight was 51 kg (112 lb), or 90% of her ideal body weight. The physical examination reveals mild wasting of skeletal muscle and fat. Blood tests show hypomagnesemia, hypophosphatemia, and normal hepatic and renal function. Central venous parenteral nutrition is recommended. PMID:19741230

  8. Basic rules of parenteral fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Oh, M S; Kim, H-J

    2002-01-01

    The following basic rules of parenteral fluid therapy are formulated with the aim of alleviating concern and confusion about i.v. fluid orders that are experienced by most physicians: Don't be generous with fluid; in determining the water intake, one must know the usual water output through the kidney, skin and lung; one must know the quantities of the electrolytes and nutrients that are being given, and know the initial volume of distribution (usually the ECF); one must know the aim of fluid therapy; one must not give and remove the same substance at the same time; one must be aware that hypertonic saline contains less water for a given amount of Na than isotonic saline; one must be familiar with different i.v. solutions and i.v. additives; one must be aware that the kidney does not manufacture water or electrolytes except for bicarbonate; for short-term fluid therapy, divalent ions (Ca, Mg, and P) do not need replacement; one should think about COP-wedge gradient in determining the type of fluid to be given. PMID:12401938

  9. Development and Evaluation of Artemether Parenteral Microemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Tayade, N. G.; Nagarsenker, Mangal S.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to develop a parenteral microemulsion delivering artemether, a hydrophobic antimalarial drug and to evaluate antimalarial activity of the microemulsion in comparison to the marketed oily injection of artemether (Larither®). The microemulsion was evaluated for various parameters such as globule size, ability to withstand centrifugation and freeze-thaw cycling and effect of sterilization method on the drug content and globule size. The in vivo antimalarial activity of the microemulsion was evaluated in P. berghei infected mice in comparison to the Larither;. The stability of the microemulsion was evaluated at 5º for 1 month. The microemulsion exhibited globule size of 113 nm and it could successfully withstand centrifugation and freeze-thaw cycling. The method of sterilization did not have any significant effect on the artemether content and globule size of the microemulsion. The microemulsion showed around 1.5-fold higher antimalarial activity and higher survival as compared to that of marketed artemether injection Larither® and it showed a good stability at the end of 1 month. PMID:21694999

  10. Compatibility considerations in parenteral nutrient solutions.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, P W; Vanderveen, T W

    1984-05-01

    Information on compatibility of nutrients and drugs with parenteral nutrient (PN) solutions is reviewed and evaluated. Precipitation of calcium phosphate when calcium and phosphate salts are added can be affected by pH, amino acid concentration, amino acid product, temperature, sequence of additives, specific salt used, and time since admixture; precipitate formation can occur gradually over 24 hours. Insulin is chemically stable in PN solutions, but adsorption to the infusion system can cause decreased availability. Poor delivery of vitamin A via PN solutions has been reported. The sodium bisulfite content of amino acid injections may cause degradation of thiamine, but studies simulating clinical use are needed. Folic acid stability in PN solutions has been demonstrated, and phytonadione appears to be stable. Drug administration via PN solutions may be advantageous when fluid intake is restricted or peripheral vein access is limited and in home PN therapy. Summarized are results of studies involving heparin, cimetidine hydrochloride, aminophylline, amphotericin B, iron dextran, hydrochloric acid, corticosteroids, narcotics, metoclopramide, digoxin, and fluorouracil. Many antibiotics are probably stable, especially when administered by co-infusion rather than by direct mixture in the PN solution container. When lipids are mixed in the same container with amino acid-dextrose solutions, compatibility and stability of electrolytes, vitamins, and trace elements must be reassessed. Practical research is needed, and availability of additives should be studied in specific patient populations and for specific PN formulations. Valid conclusions are dependent on careful study design. PMID:6328980

  11. Validation of doubly labeled water for measuring energy expenditure during parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Kushner, R.F.; Jones, P.J.

    1986-08-01

    The doubly labeled water method was compared with intake-balance for measuring energy expenditure in five patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Because parenteral solutions were isotopically different from local water, patients had to be placed on TPN at least 10 days before the metabolic period. Approximately 0.1 g 2H2O and 0.25 g H2(18)O per kg total body water were given orally. We collected saliva before, 3 h, and 4 h after the dose for measurement of total body water and urine before, 1 day, and 14 days after the dose for measurement of isotope eliminations. On day 14, total body weight was remeasured and change in body energy stores was calculated, assuming constant hydration. Intake was assessed from weights of TPN fluids plus dietary record for any oral intake. Energy expenditure from doubly labeled water (+/- SD) averaged 3 +/- 6% greater than intake-balance. Doubly labeled water method is a noninvasive, nonrestrictive method for measuring energy expenditure in patients receiving TPN.

  12. Dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis in parenteral nutrition mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Le; Yang, Ill; Kong, Bo; Shen, Jianliang; Gorczyca, Ludwik; Memon, Naureen; Buckley, Brian T; Guo, Grace L

    2016-01-15

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) administration can lead to PN-associated liver diseases (PNALD). Although multiple risk factors have been identified for PNALD, to date, the roles of bile acids (BAs) and the pathways involved in BA homeostasis in the development and progression of PNALD are still unclear. We have established a mouse PN model with IV infusion of PN solution containing soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (SOLE). Our results showed that PN altered the expression of genes involved in a variety of liver functions at the mRNA levels. PN increased liver gene expression of Cyp7a1 and markedly decreased that of Cyp8b1, Cyp7b1, Bsep, and Shp. CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 are important for synthesizing the total amount of BAs and regulating the hydrophobicity of BAs, respectively. Consistently, both the levels and the percentages of primary BAs as well as total non-12α-OH BAs increased significantly in the serum of PN mice compared with saline controls, whereas liver BA profiles were largely similar. The expression of several key liver-X receptor-α (LXRα) target genes involved in lipid synthesis was also increased in PN mouse livers. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) has been shown to induce the expression of Cyp8b1 and Cyp7b1, as well as to suppress LXRα function. Western blot showed significantly reduced nuclear migration of RORα protein in PN mouse livers. This study shows that continuous PN infusion with SOLE in mice leads to dysregulation of BA homeostasis. Alterations of liver RORα signaling in PN mice may be one of the mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of PNALD. PMID:26564717

  13. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  14. Evaluation of physicochemical incompatibilities during parenteral drug administration in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gikic, M; Di Paolo, E R; Pannatier, A; Cotting, J

    2000-06-01

    Patients in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) often receive numerous medications by the parenteral route. Frequently two or more drugs are delivered simultaneously through the same line and the risk of physicochemical incompatibilities is thus important. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify prospectively the combinations of injectable drugs administered in the PICU of our university hospital and 2) to analyze them according to information found in the literature. The data were collected by a pharmacist over a 30-day period and classified in three categories: compatible, incompatible and undocumented. Nineteen patients were included in the study with a median age of 3.2 years. The mean number (+/- SD) of injectable drugs per patient and per day was 6.5 (+/- 2.8), for a total of 26 drugs and 7 solutes. 64 combinations of drugs were observed with 2 (31.3%), 3 (45.3%), 4 (10.9%) or 5 (12.5%) drugs. 81 drug-drug and 94 drug-solute combinations were recorded. Among these, 151 (86.3%) were compatible, 6 (3.4%) incompatible and 18 (10.3%) undocumented. The incompatibilities included furosemide (Lasix), a drug in alkaline solution and Vamina-Glucose, a total parenteral nutrition solution. No clinical consequences resulting from drug incompatibilities were shown in this study. We suggest that in vitro compatibility tests on standard drug combinations, as well as a training program for nurses on drug incompatibility problems would sensitively increase the security of parenteral drug administration. PMID:11028261

  15. Enteral versus parenteral feeding. Effects on septic morbidity after blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Kudsk, K A; Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Minard, G; Tolley, E A; Poret, H A; Kuhl, M R; Brown, R O

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the importance of route of nutrient administration on septic complications after blunt and penetrating trauma, 98 patients with an abdominal trauma index of at least 15 were randomized to either enteral or parenteral feeding within 24 hours of injury. Septic morbidity was defined as pneumonia, intra-abdominal abscess, empyema, line sepsis, or fasciitis with wound dehiscence. Patients were fed formulas with almost identical amounts of fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Two patients died early in the study. The enteral group sustained significantly fewer pneumonias (11.8% versus total parenteral nutrition 31.%, p less than 0.02), intra-abdominal abscess (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and line sepsis (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and sustained significantly fewer infections per patient (p less than 0.03), as well as significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.05). Although there were no differences in infection rates in patients with injury severity score less than 20 or abdominal trauma index less than or equal to 24, there were significantly fewer infections in patients with an injury severity score greater than 20 (p less than 0.002) and abdominal trauma index greater than 24 (p less than 0.005). Enteral feeding produced significantly fewer infections in the penetrating group (p less than 0.05) and barely missed the statistical significance in the blunt-injured patients (p = 0.08). In the subpopulation of patients requiring more than 20 units of blood, sustaining an abdominal trauma index greater than 40 or requiring reoperation within 72 hours, there were significantly fewer infections per patient (p = 0.03) and significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.01). There is a significantly lower incidence of septic morbidity in patients fed enterally after blunt and penetrating trauma, with most of the significant changes occurring in the

  16. Parenteral nutrition combined with rice soup can be a safe and effective intervention for congenital chylous ascites.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Yan, Weihui; Lu, Lina; Tao, Yijing; Lu, Wei; Chen, Yingwei; Tang, Qingya; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Congenital chylous ascites in the neonatal period is a rare entity. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), medium chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet, octreotide and repeated paracentesis are regarded as appropriate medical treatment for congenital chylous ascites, and surgery is recommended when conservative therapy has failed. We present two cases in which ascites were confirmed via an abdominal sonogram and diagnostic paracentesis. In our clinical experience, rice soup combined with PN can be a safe and effective intervention. PMID:27440699

  17. Tissue-specific accumulation of hepatic zinc metallothionein following parenteral iron loading

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    The synthesis in various tissues of the unique metal-binding protein, metallothionein, can be influenced by the administration of certain trace elements. Zinc and cadmium, both of which bind to metallothionein, are most widely recognized as potent inducers. Preliminary results in our laboratory suggested that iron loading causes a marked accumulation of hepatic zinc metallothionein. In this report the effects of parenteral iron administration on metallothionein concentration in various tissues are presented. Male chicks (300-350 g) received (ip) either a single injection (+1 Fe) of iron (10 mg Fe/kg, as FeCl/sub 3/), two injections (+2 Fe) given 24-hr apart, three injections (+3 Fe) each given 24-hr apart, or an equivalent volume of 0.9% saline (control). Twenty-four hours following the final injection, chicks were killed and tissues analyzed for cytoplasmic zinc and metallothionein (Zn-MT). The parenteral administration of ferric iron, FeCl/sub 3/, resulted in a marked tissue-specific accumulation of zinc as metallothionein. In chicks given +2 Fe, hepatic Zn-MT increased more than 10-fold with a third injection (+3 Fe) causing no further change. The concentration of Zn-MT in renal and pancreatic tissue was unaffected by iron loading. An increase in hepatic Zn-MT was evident prior to detectable changes in total hepatic iron. The administration of other ferrous iron compounds at a similar rate produced comparable changes in hepatic Zn-MT. Feeding excess dietary iron, however, had no effect on liver Zn-MT levels even though similar hepatic iron concentrations were attained. Results indicated that parenteral administration, but not feeding, of various iron compounds causes a marked increase in zinc metallothionein, specifically in liver tissue.

  18. [Analysis of adverse reactions and pharmacovigilance research to parenterally administered shuxuening].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Yang; Xie, Yan-Ming; Shen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    Parenterally administered Shuxuening is a commonly used Chinese medicine. There is a need to understand the characteristics of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to it. 9 601 ADR cases reports were collected from the national adverse drug reaction monitoring center reported between January, 2005 and December, 2012. These included 326 serious ADR cases, accounting for 3.93% of the total. It was found that ADR reports increased annually from 2005, reaching a peak in the third quarter of 2009. The number of ADR cases reports were greatest in the third quarter of each year. ADRs in patients aged 60-74, accounted for 3 348 (34.87%) of all cases. 9 391(97.81%) cases were administered by intravenous infusion. In 8 431 cases, the dosage was in accordance with instructions. 61.61% ADR cases occurred on first administration. The ten most frequent symptoms were, rashes, itching, dizziness, palpitations, chills, allergic reactions, shortness of breath, nausea, phlebitis and vomiting. Systemic damage mainly affected the skin and its accessories damage, or the nervous system damage. Through the use of proportional reporting ratio (PRR) and Bayesian confidence propagation neural network (BCPNN) and propensity score applying generalized boosted models (GBM) to control for 17 confounding factors, analysis of the 10 kinds of ADRs found that for the ADR signals of dizziness, palpitations, phlebitis, and vomiting, BCPNN found that dizziness and phlebitis were early warning signals. This research found that in the 60-89 age group, higher dosages of parenterally administered Shuxuening gave rise to more phlebitis. This study provides important information for parenterally administered Shuxuening research, and guidance for its risk management. PMID:24471322

  19. Early combined parenteral and enteral nutrition for pancreaticoduodenectomy – Retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Pascal; Keller, Daniel; Steimer, Johannes; Gmür, Emanuel; Haller, Alois; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Rühlin, Maya; Gelpke, Hans; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Suggested guidelines for nutritional support after pancreaticoduodenectomy are still controversial. Recent evidence suggests that combining enteral nutrition (EN) with parenteral nutrition (PN) improves outcome. For ten years, patients have been treated with Early Combined Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ECPEN) after PD. The aim of this study was to report on rationale, safety, effectiveness and outcome associated with this method. Methods Consecutive PD performed between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Early EN and PN was standardized and started immediately after surgery. EN was increased to 40 ml/h (1 kcal/ml) over 24 h, while PN was supplemented based on a daily energy target of 25 kcal/kg. Standard enteral and parenteral products were used. Results Sixty-nine patients were nutritionally supplemented according to ECPEN. The median coverage of kcal per patients related to the total caloric requirements during the entire hospitalization (nutrition balance) was 93.4% (range: 100%–69.3%). The nutritional balance in patients with needle catheter jejunostomy (NCJ) was significantly higher than in the group with nasojejunal tube (97.1% vs. 91.6%; p < 0.0001). Mortality rate was 5.8%, while major complications (Clavien-Dindo 3–5) occurred in 21.7% of patients. Neither the presence of preoperative malnutrition nor the application of preoperative immunonutrition was associated with postoperative clinical outcome. Conclusion This is the first European study of ECPEN after PD. ECPEN is safe and, especially in combination with NCJ, provides comprehensive coverage of caloric requirements during the postoperative phase. Clinical controlled trials are needed to investigate potential benefits of complete energy supplementation during the early postoperative phase after PD. PMID:26955477

  20. Micronutrients in Parenteral Nutrition: Boron, Silicon, and Fluoride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (providing nutrients intravenously) is a life-saving treatment for patients with severe malabsorption of nutrients caused by intestinal failure, intestinal trauma (for example, gunshot or stab wounds), and intestinal removal. Metabolic bone disease characterized by min...

  1. Oral Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy Administration in a Homeless Population.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Whitney; Price, Connie; Knepper, Bryan; McLees, Margaret; Young, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is increasingly used to treat serious infections. Patients who identify themselves as homeless may receive OPAT less often, and little is known about their treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe challenges, treatment completion rates, and cost savings of OPAT in homeless patients discharged from a public safety-net hospital. PMID:26934162

  2. Minimizing systemic infection during complete parenteral alimentation of small infants

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A regimen of parenteral alimentation for infants was designed to eliminate as many factors responsible for infection as possible. The most important features of the feeding regimen were as follows. (1) Infants were fed via indwelling silastic catheters inserted into the superior vena cava or the right atrium by a cutdown operation. (2) The parenteral feeding was fat free to simplify the administration system. Y connectors and 2- or 3-way taps were avoided. (3) Extreme care was taken of junctions within the infusion system. Only certain members of the hospital staff were allowed to break such junctions, e.g. during the changing of packs of solution or of the giving sets. These junctions were sprayed with antibacterial aerosols. (4) The hypertonic solutions of nutrients were prepared in plastic packs, which do not require ventilation. The infusion system was therefore not contaminated by the entry of unsterile outside air. (5) The infused solutions were passed through 0·22 μm millipore filters before entering the patient's blood stream. There was an infection rate of 9% which was less than the 25 to 45% infection rate previously reported during parenteral feeding through indwelling venous catheters, and is also less than that associated with ventriculoatrial shunts for hydrocephalus. There was no case of systemic candidiasis, which is the most frequent and most serious infection associated with parenteral feeding. PMID:4206445

  3. Lipid emulsions – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 6

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, M.; Heller, A. R.; Koch, T.; Koletzko, B.; Kreymann, K. G.; Krohn, K.; Pscheidl, E.; Senkal, M.

    2009-01-01

    The infusion of lipid emulsions allows a high energy supply, facilitates the prevention of high glucose infusion rates and is indispensable for the supply with essential fatty acids. The administration of lipid emulsions is recommended within ≤7 days after starting PN (parenteral nutrition) to avoid deficiency of essential fatty acids. Low-fat PN with a high glucose intake increases the risk of hyperglycaemia. In parenterally fed patients with a tendency to hyperglycaemia, an increase in the lipid-glucose ratio should be considered. In critically ill patients the glucose infusion should not exceed 50% of energy intake. The use of lipid emulsions with a low phospholipid/triglyceride ratio is recommended and should be provided with the usual PN to prevent depletion of essential fatty acids, lower the risk of hyperglycaemia, and prevent hepatic steatosis. Biologically active vitamin E (α-tocopherol) should continuously be administered along with lipid emulsions to reduce lipid peroxidation. Parenteral lipids should provide about 25–40% of the parenteral non-protein energy supply. In certain situations (i.e. critically ill, respiratory insufficiency) a lipid intake of up to 50 or 60% of non-protein energy may be reasonable. The recommended daily dose for parenteral lipids in adults is 0.7–1.3 g triglycerides/kg body weight. Serum triglyceride concentrations should be monitored regularly with dosage reduction at levels >400 mg/dl (>4.6 mmol/l) and interruption of lipid infusion at levels >1000 mg/dl (>11.4 mmol/l). There is little evidence at this time that the choice of different available lipid emulsions affects clinical endpoints. PMID:20049078

  4. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. PMID:27110237

  5. Treatment of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease: The Role of Lipid Emulsions123

    PubMed Central

    Nandivada, Prathima; Carlson, Sarah J.; Chang, Melissa I.; Cowan, Eileen; Gura, Kathleen M.; Puder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for infants with intestinal failure. However, long-term parenteral nutrition carries the risk of progressive liver disease. Substantial data has implicated components of parenteral soybean oil in the pathogenesis of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). Elevated serum concentrations of phytosterols, an abundance of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a relative paucity of α-tocopherol have been associated with the risk of cholestasis and hepatic injury observed in PNALD. Currently available treatment strategies include the reduction of the dose of administered parenteral soybean oil and/or the replacement of parenteral soybean oil with alternative parenteral lipid emulsions. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the pathogenetic mechanisms associated with the development of PNALD and the data evaluating currently available treatment strategies. PMID:24228202

  6. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    PubMed Central

    Druml, W.; Kierdorf, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    Partial EN (enteral nutrition) should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition) may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF) and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully). In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN) should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks) or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out. PMID:20049069

  7. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9

    PubMed Central

    Jauch, K. W.; Schregel, W.; Stanga, Z.; Bischoff, S. C.; Braß, P.; Hartl, W.; Muehlebach, S.; Pscheidl, E.; Thul, P.; Volk, O.

    2009-01-01

    Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious). Long-term (>7–10 days) parenteral nutrition (PN) requires central venous access whereas for PN <3 weeks percutaneously inserted catheters and for PN >3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter) should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7–10 days), a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L) or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site. PMID:20049083

  8. New generation lipid emulsions prevent PNALD in chronic parenterally fed preterm pigs

    PubMed Central

    Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; Ng, Kenneth; Stoll, Barbara; Benight, Nancy; Chacko, Shaji; Kluijtmans, Leo A. J.; Kulik, Wim; Squires, E. James; Olutoye, Oluyinka; Schady, Deborah; Finegold, Milton L.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Burrin, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) in infants. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions can reverse PNALD, yet it is unknown if they can prevent PNALD. We studied preterm pigs administered TPN for 14 days with either 100% soybean oil (IL), 100% fish oil (OV), or a mixture of soybean oil, medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), olive oil, and fish oil (SL); a group was fed formula enterally (ENT). In TPN-fed pigs, serum direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and plasma bile acids increased after the 14 day treatment but were highest in IL pigs. All TPN pigs had suppressed hepatic expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), cholesterol 7-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), and plasma 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) concentrations, yet hepatic CYP7A1 protein abundance was increased only in the IL versus ENT group. Organic solute transporter alpha (OSTα) gene expression was the highest in the IL group and paralleled plasma bile acid levels. In cultured hepatocytes, bile acid-induced bile salt export pump (BSEP) expression was inhibited by phytosterol treatment. We show that TPN-fed pigs given soybean oil developed cholestasis and steatosis that was prevented with both OV and SL emulsions. Due to the presence of phytosterols in the SL emulsion, the differences in cholestasis and liver injury among lipid emulsion groups in vivo were weakly correlated with plasma and hepatic phytosterol content. PMID:24478031

  9. Early enteral nutrition vs parenteral nutrition following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Wen; Liu, Chang; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze and compare postoperative morbidity between patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and early enteral nutrition supplemented with parenteral nutrition (EEN + PN). METHODS: Three hundred and forty patients receiving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) from 2009 to 2013 at our center were enrolled retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups depending on postoperative nutrition support scheme: an EEN + PN group (n = 87) and a TPN group (n = 253). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters, pathological diagnosis, intraoperative information, and postoperative complications of the two groups were analyzed. RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in demographic characteristics, preoperative comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters or pathological findings (P > 0.05 for all). However, patients with EEN + PN following PD had a higher incidence of delayed gastric emptying (16.1% vs 6.7%, P = 0.016), pulmonary infection (10.3% vs 3.6%, P = 0.024), and probably intraperitoneal infection (18.4% vs 10.3%, P = 0.059), which might account for their longer nasogastric tube retention time (9 d vs 5 d, P = 0.006), postoperative hospital stay (25 d vs 20 d, P = 0.055) and higher hospitalization expenses (USD10397 vs USD8663.9, P = 0.008), compared to those with TPN. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that TPN might be safe and sufficient for patient recovery after PD. Postoperative EEN should only be performed scrupulously and selectively. PMID:27076767

  10. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Samah; Abdulkarim, Somaya; Elhennawy, Hazem; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Al Ansari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS), with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation) score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31) out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute tonsillopharyngitis after starting the OPAT service clinic and that 301 bed days were saved through this treatment. Conclusion This study showed that the management of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone in the OPAT clinic is safe, clinically effective, and cost effective, with low rates of complications/readmissions and high levels of patient

  11. [Insulin therapy and parenteral nutrition in intensive care: practical aspects].

    PubMed

    Limonta, A; Gastaldi, G; Heidegger, C P; Pichard, C

    2015-03-25

    Critically ill patients are hypercatabolic due to stress and inflammation. This condition induces hyperglycemia. Muscle wasting is intense during critical illness. Its prevention is essential. This is possible by early and appropriate nutritional support. Preserving the function of the gastrointestinal tract with enteral nutrition is the gold standard. However, when targeted protein-caloric intake is not met through enteral nutrition within the first three days in the intensive care unit (ICU), supplemental parenteral nutrition is administered to reduce morbidity and mortality. In addition, in order to limit metabolic imbalance and reduce mortality, glycemic control using insulin therapy is mandatory. This article reviews the current understanding of parenteral nutrition and insulin therapy in ICU patients, and provides the decision model applied in our institution. PMID:26027204

  12. Parenteral trace element provision: recent clinical research and practical conclusions.

    PubMed

    Stehle, P; Stoffel-Wagner, B; Kuhn, K S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review (PubMed, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed and Cochrane, www.cochrane.org; last entry 31 December 2014) was to present data from recent clinical studies investigating parenteral trace element provision in adult patients and to draw conclusions for clinical practice. Important physiological functions in human metabolism are known for nine trace elements: selenium, zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, iron, molybdenum, iodine and fluoride. Lack of, or an insufficient supply of, these trace elements in nutrition therapy over a prolonged period is associated with trace element deprivation, which may lead to a deterioration of existing clinical symptoms and/or the development of characteristic malnutrition syndromes. Therefore, all parenteral nutrition prescriptions should include a daily dose of trace elements. To avoid trace element deprivation or imbalances, physiological doses are recommended. PMID:27049031

  13. Long-term parenteral nutrition: problems with venous access.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, A S; Gertner, D J; Wood, S; Phillips, R K; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1990-01-01

    Long-term parenteral nutrition requires central venous access, often difficult in patients who have had several central venous catheterizations. Therapy may be complicated by thrombosis and sepsis which may further compromise central access. We report five cases illustrating such difficulties and suggest that these patients be referred early to specialist centres where experienced catheter insertion and management results in a greatly reduced incidence of complications. PMID:2116522

  14. [Pulmonary complications during parenteral feeding via percutaneous silicon catheters].

    PubMed

    Closa, R M; Coroleu, W; Natal, A; Gómez-Papí, A; Ainsa Abos, E; Sánchez Galiana, A

    1998-07-01

    Percutaneous fine bore silicone central catheters are frequently used in sick full term newborns and in low birth weight premature infants; although their use has some risks. We report two cases of pleural effusion in two prematures of 34 and 33 weeks gestation and birth weight of 1,510 and 1,650 g, respectively; and one case neumonitis in a newborn of a 38 weeks gestation and 2,730 g birth weight. All of them have in common same initial clinical sign: increase mucus secretion of the upper airway a few hours after the beginning of parenteral nutrition using the type of catheter mentioned with the tip abnormally located in pulmonary artery. These complications are probably related to endothelial injury of very slow flow vessels due to the high osmolarity and low pH of the parenteral solutions used; which probably, in turn, produce thrombosis and vascular perforation, and/or extravasation. We suggest to suspect a pulmonary artery abnormally located catheter in patients receiving parenteral nutrition who increase upper airway mucus secretion. The rapid correction of the position would prevent major complications. PMID:12602026

  15. Assessment of vitamin and trace element supplementation in severely burned patients undergoing long-term parenteral and enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Perro, G; Bourdarias, B; Cutillas, M; Higueret, D; Sanchez, R; Iron, A

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of an oral supplement of vitamins and trace elements during a longterm artificial parenteral and enteral nutrition was investigated for 3 months in patients with extensive burns. Thirty severely burned patients (22 male, 8 female, age 41 +/- 18 years, range 23-59 years, 33 +/- 12% total body surface area burn, 22% +/- 8 full thickness burn surface area) were included. Every 10 days, from day 10 until day 90, we determined serum levels of: *vitamins B1, B12, A, E, *folic acid, *copper, zinc, iron, *transferrin, albumin, prealbumin, total proteins, *fibronectin, retinol binding protein (RBP), *calcium, *phosphorus, *triglycerides, *total cholesterol, *C reactive protein (CRP), *erythrocyte folic acid. The mean daily nutritional support was 60 Kcals and 0.4 g N per kg of body weight, 70% enterally and 30% parenterally administered, with enteral vitamin and trace element supplementation. On day 10, there was a decrease of the serum level of 19/20 parameters. For 8 parameters (vitamin A, total cholesterol, iron, transferrin, fibronectin, phosphorus, RBP, total proteins), the level was lower than usual. Between day 10 and day 20, a significant normalization of 6 of them was noted, the average levels of transferrin and iron remaining below normal values until day 50. There was a significant decrease in C-reactive protein levels, however above normal limits. No deficiency in vitamins or trace elements was found. Cyclic variations of serum levels occurred which may be more related to volemic, hydroelectrolytic, endocrine and inflammatory disorders than to nutritional problems. PMID:16843945

  16. Mucosal but Not Parenteral Immunization with Purified Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Virus-Like Particles Induces Neutralizing Titers of Antibodies throughout the Estrous Cycle of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Roden, Richard; Balmelli, Carole; Potts, Alexandra; Schiller, John; De Grandi, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    We have recently shown that nasal immunization of anesthetized mice with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) virus-like particles (VLPs) is highly effective at inducing both neutralizing immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG in genital secretions, while parenteral immunization induced only neutralizing IgG. Our data also demonstrated that both isotypes are similarly neutralizing according to an in vitro pseudotyped neutralization assay. However, it is known that various amounts of IgA and IgG are produced in genital secretions along the estrous cycle. Therefore, we have investigated how this variation influences the amount of HPV16 neutralizing antibodies induced after immunization with VLPs. We have compared parenteral and nasal protocols of vaccination with daily samplings of genital secretions of mice. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis showed that total IgA and IgG inversely varied along the estrous cycle, with the largest amounts of IgA in proestrus-estrus and the largest amount of IgG in diestrus. This resulted in HPV16 neutralizing titers of IgG only being achieved during diestrus upon parenteral immunization. In contrast, nasal vaccination induced neutralizing titers of IgA plus IgG throughout the estrous cycle, as confirmed by in vitro pseudotyped neutralization assays. Our data suggest that mucosal immunization might be more efficient than parenteral immunization at inducing continuous protection of the female genital tract. PMID:10516071

  17. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: Small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn’s disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  18. Auditing the effect of experience and change on home parenteral nutrition related complications.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D A; Richards, J; Pennington, C R

    1994-12-01

    A prospective record of all patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in Tayside since 1980 has been used to audit the effect of experience and specific policy changes on HPN related complications. Total HPN related complications fell significantly over the years from 1.59 complications per treatment year during the initial 5 years of HPN experience to the current rate of 0.36 complications per treatment year. Specific policy changes, such as modification of the glucose concentration of feed, could also be shown to produce a significant benefit in the reduction of complications. Increasing experience with HPN results in a fall in complication rates, however, continuous audit of HPN is essential to determine the effect of policy changes on complication rates. PMID:16843411

  19. Parenteral use of medium-chain triglycerides: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, H; Pastores, S M; Katz, D P; Kvetan, V

    1996-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the clinical use of intravenous fat emulsions for the nutritional support of hospitalized patients has become routine. During this time long-chain triglycerides (LCT) derived from soybean and/or safflower oils were the exclusive lipid source for these emulsions, providing both a safe calorically dense alternative to dextrose and essential fatty acids needed for biologic membranes and the maintenance of immune function. During the past decade, the availability of novel experimental triglycerides for parenteral use has generated interest in the use of these substrates for nutritional and metabolic support. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), long advocated as a superior substrate for parenteral use, possess many unique physiochemical and metabolic properties that make them theoretically advantageous over their LCT counterparts. Although not yet approved in the United States, preparations containing MCT have been widely available in Europe. Intravenous MCT preparations, either as physical mixtures or structured lipids, have been used clinically in patients with immunosuppresion, critical illness, liver and pulmonary disease and in premature infants. Despite great promise, the clinical data comparing the efficacy of MCT-based lipid emulsions to their LCT counterparts has been equivocal. This may be due in part to the limited nature of the published clinical trials. Measures of efficacy for parenteral or enteral nutritional products has taken on new meaning, in light of the reported experience using immunomodulatory nutrients. Current concerns about cost of medical care and resource use warrant careful deliberation about the utility of any new and expensive therapy. Until clinical data can fulfill expectations derived from animal studies, it is difficult to advocate the general use of MCT-based lipid emulsions. Future clinical studies with MCT-based emulsions should have clear outcome objectives sufficient to prove their theorized metabolic

  20. Parenteral opioids for maternal pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Roz; Smith, Lesley A; Burns, Ethel; Mori, Rintaro; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenteral opioids are used for pain relief in labour in many countries throughout the world. Objectives To assess the acceptability, effectiveness and safety of different types, doses and modes of administration of parenteral opioids given to women in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials examining the use of intramuscular or intravenous opioids (including patient controlled analgesia) for women in labour. We looked at studies comparing an opioid with another opioid, placebo, other non-pharmacological interventions (TENS) or inhaled analgesia. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, collected data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We included 57 studies involving more than 7000 women that compared an opioid with placebo, another opioid administered intramuscularly or intravenously or compared with TENS to the back. The 57 studies reported on 29 different comparisons, and for many outcomes only one study contributed data. Overall, the evidence was of poor quality regarding the analgesic effect of opioids, satisfaction with analgesia, adverse effects and harm to women and babies. There were few statistically significant results. Many of the studies had small sample sizes, and low statistical power. Overall findings indicated that parenteral opioids provided some pain relief and moderate satisfaction with analgesia in labour, although up to two-thirds of women who received opioids reported moderate or severe pain and/or poor or moderate pain relief one or two hours after administration. Opioid drugs were associated with maternal nausea, vomiting and drowsiness, although different opioid drugs were associated with different adverse effects. There was no clear evidence of adverse effects of opioids on the newborn. We

  1. Transition from parenteral to enteral nutrition induces immediate diet-dependent gut histological and immunological responses in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Jayda; Sangild, Per T; Jensen, Tim K; Siggers, Richard H; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Støy, Ann Cathrine F; Jensen, Bent B; Thymann, Thomas; Bering, Stine B; Boye, Mette

    2011-09-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants develops very rapidly from a mild intolerance to enteral feeding into intestinal mucosal hemorrhage, inflammation, and necrosis. We hypothesized that immediate feeding-induced gut responses precede later clinical NEC symptoms in preterm pigs. Fifty-six preterm pigs were fed total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 48 h followed by enteral feeding for 0, 8, 17, or 34 h with either colostrum (Colos, n = 20) or formula (Form, n = 31). Macroscopic NEC lesions were detected in Form pigs throughout the enteral feeding period (20/31, 65%), whereas most Colos pigs remained protected (1/20, 5%). Just 8 h of formula feeding induced histopathological lesions, as evidenced by capillary stasis and necrosis, epithelial degeneration, edema, and mucosal hemorrhage. These immediate formula-induced changes were paralleled by decreased digestive enzyme activities (lactase and dipeptidylpeptidase IV), increased nutrient fermentation, and altered expression of innate immune defense genes such as interleukins (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-18), nitric oxide synthetase, tight junction proteins (claudins), Toll-like receptors (TLR-4), and TNF-α. In contrast, the first hours of colostrum feeding induced no histopathological lesions, increased maltase activity, and induced changes in gene expressions related to tissue development. Total bacterial density was high after 2 days of parenteral feeding and was not significantly affected by diet (colostrum, formula) or length of enteral feeding (8-34 h), except that a few bacterial groups (Clostridium, Enterococcus, Streptococcus species) increased with time. We conclude that a switch from parenteral to enteral nutrition rapidly induces diet-dependent histopathological, functional, and proinflammatory insults to the immature intestine. Great care is required when introducing enteral feeds to TPN-fed preterm infants, particularly when using formula, because early feeding-induced insults may predispose to NEC

  2. The interaction of dopexamine with various drugs and excipients in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Rosario, R; Utamura, T; Perrin, J H

    1988-11-01

    The interaction of dopexamine hydrochloride with various excipients and other drugs in parenteral solutions has been investigated by microcalorimetry. The interaction with heparin sodium, in particular, is significant. The interaction is strongest in parenterals containing glucose and is eliminated in normal saline. Divalent cations are more effective than monovalent ones in eliminating the reaction, which is apparently ionic in nature. PMID:2907551

  3. Mechanisms of disease: update on the molecular etiology and fundamentals of parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since its introduction into clinical practice in the 1970s, parenteral nutrition has revolutionized the care of premature neonates. Serum transaminase and bilirubin levels are commonly elevated in infants on parenteral nutrition, but their normalization is typical in the setting of short-term admini...

  4. Hepatic transcriptomic profiles of preterm piglets nourished by enteral and parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving nutritional support for more than half a million premature and hospitalized infants in the U.S. annually. Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the U....

  5. Evaluation of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy at a Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Emily Sydnor; Kendall, Brian; Orlando, Patricia; Perez, Christian; De Amorim, Marina; Samore, Matthew; Pavia, Andrew T; Hersh, Adam L

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center to identify opportunities for antimicrobial stewardship intervention. A definite or possible modification would have been recommended in 60% of courses. Forty-one percent of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy courses were potentially avoidable, including 22% involving infectious diseases consultation. PMID:26006046

  6. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for orthopedic infections - a successful public healthcare experience in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba; Felix, Cassia da Silva; Carvalho, Vladimir Cordeiro de; Giovani, Arlete Mazzini; Reis, Rosangela Suarti Dos; Beraldo, Marisa; Albuquerque, Edmir Peralta; Ferreira, Walter Cintra; Silva, Jorge Dos Santos; Lima, Ana Lucia Lei

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of orthopedic infections usually requires prolonged antimicrobial therapy, ranging from 14 days up to 6 months. Nowadays, rising levels of antimicrobial resistance demands parenteral therapy for many patients. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is a modality that allows treatment out of hospital in these situations. In Brazil, where a public universal healthcare system allows full coverage for all citizens, implantation and dissemination of OPAT programs would be beneficial for patients and for the system, because it would allow a better allocation of health resources. The Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da USP (IOT) started, in July 2013, a partnership with municipal health authorities in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in order to initiate an OPAT program in which patients discharged from that hospital would be able to continue antimicrobial therapy at primary care facilities. When necessary, patients could also receive their therapy at the day-hospital located at IOT. Primary care nursing and physician staff were trained about antimicrobial infusion and peripherally inserted central catheter manipulation. An OPAT specific antimicrobial protocol was designed and a special reference and counter-reference organized. As a result, 450 primary healthcare professionals were trained. In the first year of this program, 116 patients were discharged for OPAT. Chronic and acute osteomyelitis were most frequent diagnosis. Teicoplanin, ertapenem and tigecycline were the most used drugs. Duration of treatment varied from 10 to 180 days (average 101, median 42). Total sum of days in OPAT regimen was 11,698. Only 3 patients presented adverse effects. Partnership between services of different levels of complexity allowed implantation of a safe and effective public healthcare OPAT program for treatment of orthopedic infections. This program can serve as a model for developing similar strategies in other regions

  7. Retrospective Evaluation of Parenteral Nutrition in Alpacas: 22 Cases (2002–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Clore, E.R.S.; Freeman, L.M.; Bedenice, D.; Buffington, C.A. Tony; Anderson, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Parenteral nutrition is an important method of nutritional support in hospitalized animals, but minimal information has been published on its use in camelids. Hypothesis/Objectives The purpose of this study was to characterize the use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in alpacas, evaluate the formulations used, and determine potential complications. Animals Twenty-two alpacas hospitalized at the Tufts Cummings School for Veterinary Medicine (site 1: n = 8) and the Ohio State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (site 2: n = 14). Methods A retrospective analysis of all alpacas that received TPN between 2002 and 2008 was performed to assess clinical indications, clinical and clinicopathologic data, and outcome. Results The most common underlying diseases in animals receiving TPN were gastrointestinal dysfunction (n = 16), hepatic disease (n = 2), and neoplasia (n = 2). Several metabolic abnormalities were identified in animals (n = 20/22) before TPN was initiated, including lipemia (n = 12/22), hyperglycemia (11/22), and hypokalemia (n = 11/22). Median age was significantly lower for site 1 cases (0.1 years; range, 0.01–11.0) compared with those from site 2 (4.9 years; range, 0.1–13.7; P = .03). Animals at site 2 also had a longer duration of hospitalization (P = .01) and TPN administration (P = .004), as well as higher survival rate (P < .02). Twenty-one of 22 alpacas developed at least 1 complication during TPN administration. Metabolic complications were most prevalent (n = 21/22) and included hyperglycemia (n = 8/21), lipemia (n = 7/21), hypokalemia (n = 3/21), and refeeding syndrome (n = 3/21). Conclusions and Clinical Importance TPN is a feasible method of nutritional support for alpacas when enteral feeding is not possible. Prospective studies are warranted to determine optimal TPN formulations for alpacas. PMID:21418323

  8. Gall bladder contractility in neonates: effects of parenteral and enteral feeding.

    PubMed Central

    Jawaheer, G.; Pierro, A.; Lloyd, D. A.; Shaw, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The gall bladder size was measured in 30 newborn infants: 18 had been fed parenterally and 12 enterally. The two groups were comparable for gestational age, birthweight, postnatal age and study weight. Exclusion criteria were haemodynamic instability, septicaemia, abdominal disease and opioid treatment. Gall bladder size was measured at 15 minute intervals for 90 minutes using real-time ultrasonography and the volume calculated using the ellipsoid method. Parenterally fed infants had further measurements at 120, 150, and 360 minutes. The gall bladder was significantly larger in parenterally fed infants than in enterally fed infants (p = 0.0001). In enterally fed infants a 50% reduction in gall bladder volume was observed 15 minutes after starting the feed with a return to baseline volume by 90 minutes. In parenterally fed infants there was no gall bladder contraction. Such information may give insight into the pathophysiology of hepato-biliary complications during parenteral nutrition in infants. PMID:7796240

  9. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Clinical Response to Parenteral Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Malkasian, Kay L.; Marshall, John R.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The bacteriology of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and clinical response to parenteral doxycycline were evaluated in 30 patients. Only 3 of 21 cul-de-sac cultures from PID patients were sterile, whereas all 8 normal control subjects yielded negative results (P< 0.005). Poor correlation was observed between cervical and cul-de-sac cultures. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, isolated from the cervix in 17 patients (57%), was recovered from the cul-de-sac only once. Streptococcus, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, coliforms, and other organisms normally present in the vagina were the predominant isolates recovered from the cul-de-sac. Parenteral doxycycline resulted in rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (within 48 h) in 20 of 27 evaluable patients (74%). In five others, signs and symptoms of infection abated within 4 days. The remaining two patients failed to respond; in both cases, adnexal masses developed during doxycycline therapy. Gonococci were eradicated from the cervix in all but one patient who, nevertheless, had a rapid defervescence of symptoms. There was no clear-cut correlation between the clinical response and in vitro susceptibility of cul-de-sac isolates to doxycycline. These data confirm the usefulness of broad-spectrum antibiotics in acute PID. Culdocentesis is a reliable means of obtaining material for the bacteriological diagnosis of acute PID; however, the pathogenetic role and relative importance of gonococci and various other bacteria in acute PID need to be clarified further. PMID:1169908

  10. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  11. Antimicrobial preservative use in parenteral products: past and present.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Brian K; Ni, Alex; Hu, Binghua; Shi, Li

    2007-12-01

    The following review provides a comprehensive summary of antimicrobial preservatives that are commonly used in licensed parenteral products to date. The information reviewed includes the general properties of the preservatives, the doses and frequency of their use, the classes of the preserved products (peptide, protein, vaccine, and small molecule products), the interactions with other formulation components, and the criteria commonly used for their selection in parental product formulations. It was revealed that phenol and benzyl alcohol are the two most common antimicrobial preservatives used in peptide and protein products, while phenoxyethanol is the most frequently used preservative in vaccines. Benzyl alcohol or a combination of methylparaben and propylparaben are generally found in small molecule parenteral formulations. The key criteria for antimicrobial preservative selection are the preservative's dose, antimicrobial functionality, and effect on the active ingredient. Additionally, the use of spectroscopic techniques (circular dicroism (CD) and fluorescence) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were identified as common techniques used in evaluating an antimicrobial preservative for its impact on the conformational stability of peptide, protein, and vaccine antigens. The future use of preservatives is also discussed, including antimicrobial agents such as peptides, and regulatory requirements for antimicrobial effectiveness testing. PMID:17722087

  12. Tocol emulsions for drug solubilization and parenteral delivery.

    PubMed

    Constantinides, Panayiotis P; Tustian, Alex; Kessler, Dean R

    2004-05-01

    Tocols represent a family of tocopherols, tocotrienols, and their derivatives, and are fundamentally derived from the simplest tocopherol, 6-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-phytylchroman, which is referred to as "tocol". The most common tocol is D-alpha-tocopherol, also known as vitamin E. Tocols can be excellent solvents for water insoluble drugs and are compatible with other cosolvents, oils and surfactants. This review highlights the major developments in the use of tocols in parenteral emulsions for drug delivery, with a focus on drug solubilization, physicochemical properties, and biopharmaceutical applications. Tocol emulsions offer an appealing alternative for the parenteral administration of poorly soluble drugs, including major chemotherapeutics such as paclitaxel. Data will be presented on solubilization of paclitaxel, a key chemotherapeutic agent, and its corresponding formulation development, toxicity, efficacy and pharmacokinetic studies in animal models and humans. The breadth of the utility of tocol-based emulsions will be discussed and examples of specific therapeutic drugs and applications will be provided. As these formulations progress further in the clinic, the therapeutic utility of tocol emulsions is anticipated to expand. PMID:15109767

  13. Parenteral drug products containing aluminum as an ingredient or a contaminant: Response to Food and Drug Administration notice of intent and request for information. ASCN/A. S. P. E. N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Aluminum remains a significant contaminant of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions and may be elevated in bone, urine, and plasma of infants receiving TPN. Aluminum accumulation in tissues of uremic patients and adult TPN patients has been associated with low-turnover bone disease. Furthermore, aluminum has also been linked with encephalopathy and anemia in uremic patients and with hepatic cholestasis in experimental animals. Because of the toxic effects of aluminum, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently published a notice of intent to set an upper limit of 25 micrograms/L for aluminum in large-volume parenterals and to require manufacturers of small-volume parenterals, such as calcium and phosphate salts, to measure aluminum content and note this content on the package label. The ASCN/A.S.P.E.N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions supports these intentions and further urges the FDA to require that cumulative aluminum intake in terms of safe, unsafe, and toxic quantities of aluminum per kilogram be made known to physicians and pharmacists preparing the TPN solutions, to ensure that manufacturers use appropriate control procedures in aluminum measurements, and to employ a standard unit of aluminum measurement.

  14. Parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Bizari, Letícia; da Silva Santos, Andressa Feijó; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a severe malabsorption disorder, and prolonged parenteral nutrition is essential for survival in some cases. Among the undesirable effects of long-term parenteral nutrition is an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to measure the serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and transforming growth factor beta, in patients with short bowel syndrome on cyclic parenteral nutrition and patients who had previously received but no longer require parenteral nutrition. The study was cross-sectional and observational. Three groups were studied as follows: Parenteral nutrition group, 9 patients with short bowel syndrome that receive cyclic parenteral nutrition; Oral nutrition group, 10 patients with the same syndrome who had been weaned off parenteral nutrition for at least 1 year prior to the study; Control group, 13 healthy adults, matched for age and sex to parenteral and oral groups. The following data were collected: age, tobacco use, drug therapies, dietary intake, body weight, height, blood collection. All interleukins were significantly higher in the parenteral group compared with the control group as follows: interleukin-6: 22 ± 19 vs 1.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P= .0002; transforming growth factor β: 854 ± 204 vs 607 ± 280 pg/mL, P= .04; interleukin-10: 8 ± 37 vs 0.6 ± 4, P= .03; tumor necrosis factor α: 20 ± 8 vs 8 ± 4 pg/mL, P< .0001. We concluded that parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27267135

  15. [Spontaneous reporting system data analysis of parenterally administered Shenmai].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Xin; Xiang, Yong-Yang; Xie, Yan-Ming; Shen, Hao; Ai, Qing-Hua

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous reporting system (SRS) datais currently an important source of monitoring and finding ADRs signals throughout the world. This method can promptly and effectively discover ADR signals, thus preventing and avoiding ADRs effectively. Parenterally administered Shenmai has the functions of benefiting vital energy, nourishing Yin and generating body fluids, and activating the pulse. Clinically it is used in various diseases including shock, coronary heart disease, viral myocarditis, chronic pulmonary heart disease, and granulocytopenia. The large, national SRS database of ADRs needs effective evaluation methods. We report on the use of Bayesian confidence propagation neural network method (BCPNN) and proportional reporting ration (PRR) with propensity score to control for confounding variables. Early warning signs of an ADR are, a feeling of suffocation (difficulty exhaling), anaphylactoid reactions and flushing. Furthermore, relevant relationships between the different factors is analysed by association rules (AR). It is found that there is a close relationship between past history of ADRs, a family history of ADRs and itching. PMID:24471317

  16. A review of parenteral sustained-release naltrexone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, J.L.; Kincl, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ideal naltrexone sustained-release delivery system should be easy to inject or implant, not cause adverse tissue reaction, release the drug at a relatively constant rate for at least 30 days, and biodegrade within a short time afterwards. Mechanisms which can be used for sustaining drug release include reducing solubility and surface area, coating, encapsulation and microencapsulation, complexation, binding and hydrophilic gelation. Drug release from such systems is controlled by diffusion through a barrier/film, diffusion from a monolithic device, erosion of the surface, hydrolysis, ion exchange, biodegradation, or a combination of these. Injectable systems would seem to be ultimately preferred because of the ease of administration and handling, while the implantable devices may find first use in man since they are easily removable, should that be necessary. Maintaining particulate-free products and sterilization methods are two problems with all parenteral dosage forms. Production must be particularly well controlled and validated.

  17. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Oral Bacampicillin and Parenteral Ampicillin

    PubMed Central

    Bergan, Tom

    1978-01-01

    Bacampicillin is a new oral prodrug which is rapidly converted to ampicillin during absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. High serum peaks of ampicillin are obtained. Bacampicillin orally was compared pharmacokinetically with parenteral ampicillin (intravenously and intramuscularly). A cross-over study on healthy volunteers showed that ampicillin concentrations after equimolar doses of bacampicillin orally and ampicillin intramuscularly were of the same order. The mean of the individual peak values (regardless of time of occurrence) after a dose of 800 mg of bacampicillin was 13.1 ± 3.8 μg/ml. Absorption rates of the two doses were similar, as were their distribution volumes (approximately 25% of the body weight). Bioavailability was 87% for bacampicillin, compared to 71% for ampicillin. PMID:677863

  18. [HIV infection and parenteral virus hepatitis in the Krasnodar territory].

    PubMed

    Larin, F I; Lebedev, V V; Red'ko, A N

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of the morbidity dynamics of HIV infection, hepatitis B and C in the Krasnodar territory for 1996-2003 is presented. The tendency of strengthening direct correlation between age-dependent rates in these groups of diseases has been established. The correlation coefficient (rxy) is at present +0.851 (HIV infection-virus hepatitis B) and +0.892 (HIV infection-virus hepatitis C). The highest levels of primary morbidity are registered in persons aged 20-39 years. The established epidemiological parallels between HIV infection and parenteral hepatitis require the development of the unified strategy of the prophylaxis of these diseases on the federal and regional levels. PMID:16028521

  19. Manganese in Human Parenteral Nutrition: Considerations for Toxicity and Biomonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Dinamene; Batoreu, Camila; Mateus, Luisa; dos Santos, AP Marreilha; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The iatrogenic risks associated with excessive Mn administration in parenteral nutrition (PN) patients are well documented. Hypermanganesemia and neurotoxicity are associated with the duration of Mn supplementation, Mn dosage, as well as pathological conditions, such as anemia or cholestasis. Recent PN guidelines recommend the biomonitoring of patients if they receive Mn in their PN longer than 30 days. The data in the literature are conflicting about the method for assessing Mn stores in humans as a definitive biomarker of Mn exposure or induced-neurotoxicity has yet to be identified. The biomonitoring of Mn relies on the analysis of whole blood Mn (WB Mn) levels, which are highly variable among human population and are not strictly correlated with Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Alterations in dopaminergic (DAergic) and catecholaminergic metabolism have been studied as predictive biomarkers of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Given these limitations, this review addresses various approaches for biomonitoring Mn exposure and neurotoxic risk. PMID:24184781

  20. n-3 fatty acid-enriched parenteral nutrition regimens in elective surgical and ICU patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies and a meta-analysis in surgical patients indicate that supplementing parenteral nutrition regimens with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), is associated with improved laboratory and clinical outcomes in the setting of hyper-inflammatory conditions. Refined or synthetic fish oils are commonly used as a source of EPA and DHA. The objective of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate n-3 PUFA-enriched parenteral nutrition regimens in elective surgical and intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Methods Medline was searched for randomized controlled trials comparing n-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions with standard non-enriched lipid emulsions (i.e. soybean oil, MCT/LCT or olive/soybean oil emulsions) in surgical and ICU patients receiving parenteral nutrition. Extracted data were pooled by means of both random and fixed effects models, and subgroup analyses were carried forward to compare findings in ICU versus non-ICU patients. Results A total of 23 studies (n = 1502 patients: n = 762 admitted to the ICU) were included. No statistically significant difference in mortality rate was found between patients receiving n-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions and those receiving standard lipid emulsions (RR= 0.89; 0.59, 1.33), possibly reflecting a relatively low underlying mortality risk. However, n-3 PUFA-enriched emulsions are associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in the infection rate (RR =0.61; 0.45, 0.84) and the lengths of stay, both in the ICU (-1.92; -3.27, -0.58) and in hospital overall (-3.29; -5.13, -1.45). Other beneficial effects included reduced markers of inflammation, improved lung gas exchange, liver function, antioxidant status and fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids, and a trend towards less impairment of kidney function. Conclusions These results confirm and extend previous findings, indicating that n-3 PUFAs

  1. [Research on early warning signals of adverse drug reactions to parenterally administered xiyanping based on spontaneous reporting system (SRS) data].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Fei; Xiang, Yong-Yang; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2013-09-01

    This article focused on early warning signals regarding the safety of parenterally administered Xiyanping. The study data was obtained from reports made between 2005-2012 from the national spontaneous reporting system (SRS). Proportion reporting ratio (PRR) and Bayesian confidence propagation neural network (BCPNN) algorithms were used to analyse: erythra, pruritus, anaphylactoid reactions and shiver with cold, these 4 adverse drug reactions had a total count of more than 500 events. The article found that Xiyanping's incidence rate of erythra was higher than for background-drugs in every year and in every season. Pruritus was an early warning signal in the second season of 2009, and anaphylactoid reaction was an early warning signal in the fourth season of 2011 and in the second season of 2012. There was however no early warning signal indicated by shiver with cold. This data indicates that erythra maybe an adverse drug reactions to parenterally administered Xiyanping, and if the incidence rate of pruritus and anaphylactoid reaction rises attention should be paid to its safety. PMID:24471321

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator in the treatment of superior vena caval thrombosis associated with parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, G. R.; Allen, K.; Pennington, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Two patients, one of whom was pregnant, developed superior vena caval thrombosis while receiving central parenteral nutrition. They were successfully treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2115160

  3. Oral treprostinil for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients transitioned from parenteral or inhaled prostacyclins: case series and treatment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Taylor; Simon, Marc A.; Ishizawar, David C.; Mathier, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral treprostinil (TRE) is a prostacylin approved for the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Few data exist to guide the use of oral TRE as a replacement for parenteral or inhaled prostacyclins. Therefore, the purpose of this report was to describe our experience with oral TRE to transition patients from parenteral or inhaled TRE. We describe a case series of patients admitted for a 4-day hospital stay to transition from parenteral or inhaled TRE. Appropriate criteria for transition included stable patients with improved symptoms/functional capacity, patients who could not tolerate intravenous prostacyclin due to infection or subcutaneous prostacyclin due to pain, and patient preference for transition. The dosing protocol for transition is described. A total of 9 patients generally representative of a typical PAH demographic and background medical therapy were included. Patients were initiated at either 0.5 or 1 mg 3 times daily and discharged on a median dose of 8 mg 3 times daily. Our protocol resulted in 6 of 9 patients who successfully transitioned at a median follow-up of 47 weeks. Two patients had to return to their previous prostacyclin therapy based on the presence of clinical worsening and adverse events (n = 1) and adverse events alone (n = 1). Another patient discontinued therapy due to plans for hospice care. Oral TRE may serve an important role in prostacyclin transitions in carefully selected, stable patients who receive background oral therapy for PAH. PMID:27162621

  4. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly

  5. Parenteral buprenorphine-naloxone abuse is a major cause of fatal buprenorphine-related poisoning.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Margareeta; Heikman, Pertti; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-10-10

    Buprenorphine (BPN) medication for opioid maintenance treatment in Finland consists predominantly of buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX). Both BPN and BNX are associated with diversion, abuse and non-medically supervised use worldwide. Our purpose was to estimate the proportion of BNX to all BPN-related fatalities. The material consisted of 225 deceased drug abusers in Finland from January 2010 to June 2011 with a positive BPN and/or norbuprenorphine (NOR) and/or naloxone (NX) finding in urine. The data were divided into three groups based on the urine NX and BPN concentrations. The "Parenteral BNX" group (>100 μg/l NX) was presumed to consist of injecting or snorting BNX abusers and the "Parenteral BPN" group (>50 μg/l BPN, 0 μg/l NX) of injecting or snorting BPN abusers, while the "Other BNX or BPN" group (≤100 μg/l NX, or ≤50 μg/l BPN combined with 0 μg/l NX) was presumed to consist of mainly sublingual BNX or BPN users. In 12.4% of cases the NX urine concentration was higher than the threshold 100 μg/l. In fatal BPN poisonings, the proportion of parenteral BNX was 28.4%. In the "Parenteral BNX", "Parenteral BPN" and "Other BNX or BPN" groups, the proportion of fatal BPN poisonings was 67.9, 31.0 and 22.6%, respectively. BNX abuse can be fatal. Among the 225 BPN-related fatalities, parenteral abuse of BNX was shown to be common (12.4%) and BNX poisoning was the underlying cause of death in 8.4%. Parenteral BNX caused fatal BPN poisoning proportionally more often than parenteral BPN. PMID:24053859

  6. A Call to Action to Bring Safer Parenteral Micronutrient Products to the U.S. Market.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Vincent W; Borum, Peggy; Buchman, Alan; Fessler, Theresa A; Howard, Lyn; Shenkin, Alan; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-08-01

    The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) started an intensive review of commercially available parenteral vitamin and trace element (TE) products in 2009. The chief findings were that adult multi-TE products currently available in the United States (U.S.) provide potentially toxic amounts of manganese, copper, and chromium, and neonatal/pediatric multi-TE products provide potentially toxic amounts of manganese and chromium. The multivitamin products appeared safe and effective; however, a separate parenteral vitamin D product is needed for those patients on standard therapy who continue to be vitamin D depleted and are unresponsive to oral supplements. The review process also extended to parenteral choline and carnitine. Although choline and carnitine are not technically vitamins or trace elements, choline is an essential nutrient in all age groups, and carnitine is an essential nutrient in infants, according to the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. A parenteral choline product needs to be developed and available. Efforts are currently under way to engage the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the parenteral nutrient industry so A.S.P.E.N.'s recommendations can become a commercial reality. PMID:26113560

  7. Quality of life in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, P; Langholz, E; Mortensen, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Quality of life is an important determinant of the effectiveness of health technologies, but it has rarely been assessed in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN).
PATIENTS/METHODS—The non-disease specific sickness impact profile (SIP) and the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) were used on a cohort of 49 patients receiving HPN, and the results compared with those for 36 non-HPN patients with either anatomical (<200 cm) or functional (faecal energy excretion >2.0 MJ/day (~488 kcal/day)) short bowel.
RESULTS—In the HPN patients the SIP scores were worse (higher) overall (17 (13)% v 8 (9)%) and with regard to physical (13 (15)% v 5 (8)%) and psychosocial (14 (12)% v 9 (11)%) dimensions and independent categories (20 (12)% v 9 (8)%) compared with the non-HPN patients (means (SD); all p<0.001). The IBDQ scores were worse (lower) in the HPN patients overall (5.0 (4.3-5.7) v 5.6 (4.8-6.2)) and with regard to systemic symptoms (3.8 (2.8-5.4) v 5.2 (3.9-5.9)) and emotional (5.3 (4.4-6.2) v 5.8 (5.4-6.4)) and social (4.3 (3.4-5.5) v 4.8 (4.5-5.8)) function (median (25-75%); all p<0.05), but only tended to be worse with regard to bowel symptoms (5.2 (4.8-6.1) v 5.7 (4.9-6.4), p = 0.08). HPN also reduced quality of life in patients with a stoma, whereas a stoma did not reduce quality of life among the non-HPN patients. Female HPN patients and HPN patients older than 45 scored worse.
CONCLUSION—Quality of life is reduced in patients on HPN compared with those with anatomical or functional short bowel not receiving HPN, and compares with that reported for patients with chronic renal failure treated by dialysis.


Keywords: parenteral nutrition; quality of life; sickness impact profile; inflammatory bowel disease PMID:10323888

  8. Response of layer and broiler strain chickens to parenteral administration of a live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine.

    PubMed

    Groves, Peter J; Sharpe, Sue M; Cox, Julian M

    2015-07-01

    Responses to the parenteral administration of a live aroA deletion Salmonella serovar Typhimurium vaccine given to three brown egg layer strains and two broiler strains were studied. Twenty-five birds of each strain were reared together in floor pens to 6 weeks of age and then moved as individual strains to new floor pens and injected with 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) per bird of the vaccine bacteria intramuscularly or subcutaneously, 10(6) CFU per bird subcutaneously, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) subcutaneously as a vaccination control. Three birds of one layer strain were injected intramuscularly with 0.5mg/ bird S. Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evaluate whether response was similar for vaccine and endotoxin. Birds were weighed, and rectal temperatures recorded at the time of injection, then observed over 24 hours. Rectal temperatures were measured and blood samples collected for serum IL-6 assay at 3 hours post injection (PI). At 12 hours PI blood samples were drawn for analyses for plasma phosphorus (P), glucose (Glu), cholesterol (Cho), aspartate transaminase (AST), total protein (Ptn) and creatinine kinase (CK). Blood was sampled 14 days PI and tested for serum antibody to S. Typhimurium. Vaccination resulted in significant seroconversion by 14 days PI in all strains compared to the controls. The three layer strains exhibited a clinical malaise, evident within 90 minutes of injection, lasting for 12 hours, with complete recovery by 24 hours PI. Only the 10(8) CFU dose given subcutaneously produced an increase in rectal temperature 3 hours PI. Vaccination had no effect on IL-6 or Ptn. All vaccine doses increased P and the higher dose by either route decreased Cho in all bird strains. The 10(8) vaccine dose increased Glu and intramuscular injection markedly elevated CK only in the layer strains. The response was not completely congruous with that to LPS alone. The results highlight the need for consideration of differences in response of

  9. Amino acid dosing in parenteral nutrition for very low birth weight preterm neonates: an outcome assessment.

    PubMed

    Kamarudin, Nor Aini; Manan, Mohamed Mansor; Zulkifly, Hanis Hanum; Neoh, Chin Fen; Ali, Salmiah Mohd; Ming, Long Chiau

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of parenteral nutrition (PN) administration of amino acids (AA) on physical changes among very low birth weight infants in a local hospital setting in Malaysia. A retrospective study was carried out at a hospital in Malaysia. Records of neonates prescribed PN in the neonatal unit in 2012 were screened for eligibility. A total of 199 premature neonates received PN support in the year 2012 and, of these, 100 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The median value of AA intake on the first day of PN was 2.00 (<28 weeks group); 1.00 (28-31 weeks group) and 0.75 (>31 weeks group). Neonates in the <28 weeks group were more likely to receive AA at an earlier time and higher initial dose compared with the other age groups. The study also found that there was no statistically significant difference in the dose of AA on the first day of PN administration and that the significant variations in nutritional parameters among the subjects did not lead to differences in physical outcomes. This study identified that when PN is provided in the local hospital setting, it is likely that the current nutritional practices are inadequate to achieve the standard growth recommendations. Our findings call for a need to optimize AA and calorie intake since growth restriction is a morbidity which will affect the infants' growth and development. Current prescriptions for PN in this hospital need to be reviewed in order to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26965762

  10. Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy in a renal transplant population: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jade; Hossain, Mohammad Ayaz; Morsy, Mohamed; Ghazanfar, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is a well-established method in medical specialties. Its use in renal transplant recipients has not been thoroughly explored. No guidelines within this patient subset exist. This study describes OPAT outcomes within a UK teaching hospital renal transplant population. Renal function, mapped by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and clinical response to infection were collected retrospectively. A total of 635 antimicrobial episodes were administered to nine renal transplant patients over 12 discrete OPAT courses during the study period. Eleven of 12 OPAT courses (91.67%) produced a clinical improvement in infection. One course was terminated due to immunosuppressive-related neutropenia. No patient required admission due to failure of OPAT or adverse events. There was no significant change in graft function throughout the OPAT courses compared with baseline renal function (ANOVA, P = 0.06). One minor line infection was reported. This was treated conservatively and did not interrupt the OPAT. OPAT is safe and clinically effective in our renal transplant recipients with no significant deterioration in eGFR. The incidence of adverse events, specifically line complications, was lower in our population than those reported in the literature. Future work should develop OPAT guidelines designed for transplant recipients to outline the degree of monitoring required. PMID:26586048

  11. [Parenteral S-adenosylmethionine compared to placebos in the treatment of alcoholic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Diaz Belmont, A; Dominguez Henkel, R; Uribe Ancira, F

    1996-01-01

    The improvements in the knowledge of the action of ethanol over the hepatic cell, its direct action over the cell, and the intracytoplasmatic structures membranes, point out the possibilities of use of sulfo-adenosil-L-metionina (SAMe); as an util drug inn the treatment of the altered metilation reactions, that take place in those membranes, facilitating their physiological functions. The primary end point in this study was to demonstrate the therapeutic worth os SAMe, by parenteral route in 45 patients with alcoholic liver disease, which were determined by clinical laboratory and hepatic function test, label qith 32 points or more of the discriminatory function index. Divided into two groups, placebo-SAMe, randomized, double blind. As well as total plasmatic and reduced glutation and lipoperoxidation index, indirect form as malondehaldehyde. Were determined at the first visit anf after 8 and 15 days of treatment. Comparing the results of both groups there were a significative favorable results for the group treatment with SAMe and this confirms the utility of this drug in the treatment of patients with alcoholic liver disease with a discriminatory function index (Maddrey index), of 32 points or more. PMID:8679834

  12. Influence of parenteral nutrition on phospholipid metabolism in posttraumatic rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, S; Gasser, H; Redl, H; Strohmaier, W; Schlag, G

    1986-01-01

    In the current investigation, we studied two groups of rats--one group supplied exogenous phospholipid precursors (carbohydrate plus fat emulsion group) and the other given only calories (carbohydrate group)--to evaluate the effects on surfactant composition by normocaloric alimentation, using a hypovolemic-traumatic shock model. The total phospholipid (PHL) contents of lung tissue were similar in both groups. However, we found differences in the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine fraction (DPPC--the most important component of surfactant material) in both lung tissue and lavage fluid. With lipid emulsion, there was an increased fraction of saturated lecithins (mainly DPPC) both in lung tissue and lavage fluid, similar to former studies with hypocaloric alimentation. In this model, those findings suggest that the PHL pattern does not depend on the quantity of caloric supply, but, rather, on the infusion composition. The enhanced DPPC content is further reflected in improved surfactant status: lipid in parenteral nutrition (PN) may exert a direct salutary effect on lung mechanics. PMID:3099005

  13. Glutamine-Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition and Probiotics in Four Adult Autoimmune Enteropathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Ying; Zhou, Yi-Quan; Lu, Li-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Qi; Wu, Ying-Jie; Cai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition (PN) and probiotics in adult autoimmune enteropathy (AIE) patients. Four adult AIE patients were identified from April 2006 to January 2012. Clinical and nutritional data were obtained from the patients' medical records. Glutamine-supplemented PN started immediately when the AIE diagnosis was confirmed. The total PN duration was 351 days. According to the PN prescription, the average caloric intake ranged from 20 to 25 kcal/kg/day, and the protein intake ranged from 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg/day. Alanyl-glutamine (20 g/day) was administered to AIE patients for 4 weeks followed by a 2-week break, and this treatment schedule was repeated when PN lasted for more than 6 weeks. Body weight gain and an increased serum albumin level were achieved after PN, and defecation frequency and quality also improved. Each patient received oral supplements, 250 mL of Ensure and two probiotics capsules (each capsule containing 0.5×108 colonies) three times a day when enteral nutrition started. Three AIE patients were successfully weaned off PN, and one patient died of pneumonia. Glutamine-supplemented PN and probiotics show promise in managing patients with AIE and related malnutrition. PMID:24827631

  14. Oral and parenteral immunization of chickens (Gallus gallus) against West Nile virus with recombinant envelope protein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassbinder-Orth, C. A.; Hofmeister, E.K.; Weeks-Levy, C.; Karasov, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes morbidity and mortality in humans, horses, and in more than 315 bird species in North America. Currently approved WNV vaccines are designed for parenteral administration and, as yet, no effective oral WNV vaccines have been developed. WNV envelope (E) protein is a highly antigenic protein that elicits the majority of virus-neutralizing antibodies during a WNV immune response. Leghorn chickens were given three vaccinations (each 2 wk apart) of E protein orally (20 ??g or 100 ??g/dose), of E protein intramuscularly (IM, 20 ??g/dose), or of adjuvant only (control group) followed by a WNV challenge. Viremias were measured post-WNV infection, and three new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed for quantifying IgM, IgY, and IgA-mediated immune response of birds following WNV infection. WNV viremia levels were significantly lower in the IM group than in both oral groups and the control group. Total WNV E protein-specific IgY production was significantly greater, and WNV nonstructural 1-specific IgY was significantly less, in the IM group compared to all other treatment groups. The results of this study indicate that IM vaccination of chickens with E protein is protective against WNV infection and results in a significantly different antibody production profile as compared to both orally vaccinated and nonvaccinated birds. ?? 2009 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  15. Medical intelligence in Sweden. Vitamin B12: oral compared with parenteral?

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, M; Norberg, B; Hultdin, J; Sandstrom, H; Westman, G; Lokk, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Sweden is the only country in which oral high dose vitamin B12 has gained widespread use in the treatment of deficiency states. Objective: The aim of the study was to describe prescribing patterns and sales statistics of vitamin B12 tablets and injections in Sweden 1990–2000. Design, setting, and sources: Official statistics of cobalamin prescriptions and sales were used. Results: The use of vitamin B12 increased in Sweden 1990–2000, mainly because of an increase in the use of oral high dose vitamin B12 therapy. The experience, in statistical terms a "total investigation", comprised 1 000 000 patient years for tablets and 750 000 patient years for injections. During 2000, 13% of residents aged 70 and over were treated with vitamin B12, two of three with the tablet preparation. Most patients in Sweden requiring vitamin B12 therapy have transferred from parenteral to oral high dose vitamin B12 since 1964, when the oral preparation was introduced. Conclusion: The findings suggest that many patients in other post-industrial societies may also be suitable for oral vitamin B12 treatment. PMID:15749797

  16. Current status in outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a practical view.

    PubMed

    Candel, F J; Julián-Jiménez, A; González-Del Castillo, J

    2016-04-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs are a current and widely spread trend in clinical practice because of it´s a cost-effective option, it´s associated with a greater comfort for the patient, a lower risk of nosocomial complications and an important cost saving for the health care system. OPAT is used for treating a wide range of infections, including skin and soft tissue infections, osteoarticular infections, bacteraemia, endocarditis and complex intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections, even in presence of multiresistant microorganisms. Correct choice of antimicrobial agent and adequate patient selection are crucial for reaching therapeutic success and avoiding readmissions, treatment prolongation or treatment-related toxicity. The optimal antimicrobial for OPAT must be highly effective, have a long half-life and an adequate spectrum of action. Ceftriaxone and teicoplanin are currently the most prescribed antibiotics for OPAT, though daptomycin and ertapenem are also on the rise, due to their high efficiency, safety and wide spectrum of action. Antibiotics that are stable at room temperature can be administered through a continuous perfusion, though self-administration is preferable although it requires training of the patient or the caregiver. Factors that are most frequently associated with OPAT failure include advanced age, recent hospitalization and isolation of multiresistant microorganisms. PMID:27014770

  17. Development and characterization of voriconazole loaded nanoparticles for parenteral delivery.

    PubMed

    Füredi, Petra; Kovács, Kristóf; Ludányi, Krisztina; Antal, István; Klebovich, Imre

    2016-08-20

    Human serum albumin (HSA) has attracted the most attention in the last decades as a new nanocarrier system of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) due to its biocompatibility and high binding capacity to hydrophobic drugs. Voriconazole (VCZ), an antifungal agent with low water solubility, was selected to produce albumin based nanoparticles using nanoparticle albumin-bound technology (nab™-technology). Aim of our study was to study the development process of VCZ-loaded nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery, such as homogenizing pressure, homogenizing cycle number and drug loading capacity. The main characters of nanoparticles such as particle size distribution and polydispersity index (PDI) were determined by dynamic light scattering. Six homogenization cycles at 1800bar were ensured the acceptable PDI value (lower than 0.3) of the VCZ content nanoparticles. Optimized formulation process produced 81.2±1nm average particle size which meets the requirements of intravenous administration. Furthermore, the encapsulated concentration of VCZ was 69.7±4.2% and the water solubility was over 2 times greater than the API itself which were determined by the developed HPLC method. The in vivo release behavior can be predicted from our applied in vitro dissolution study. Almost 50% of VCZ was liberated from the nanoparticles in the first 60min. PMID:27291972

  18. Parenteral Lipid Tolerance and Adverse Effects: Fat Chance for Trouble?

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2015-09-01

    Lipid emulsions (LEs) are indispensable sources of fuel calories and (essential) fatty acids (FAs) in modern parenteral nutrition formulations. The use of LE, however, also remains associated with the development of adverse effects. Intolerance for LE mostly becomes apparent upon the development of patient complaints or disturbed blood function tests, mainly of the liver. These issues may be associated with the composition, stability, or the infusion rate of the emulsion. Also, altered balances of (anti)oxidants or the presence or absence of protective or toxic bioactive agents such as phytosterols and tocopherol in LE may lead to complications, especially in already vulnerable patients with an inflammatory condition. While the oldest available LEs are based on pure soybean oil (SO-LE), rich in the proinflammatory ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid, more recent next-generation LEs where alternative FA sources such as olive and fish oil (partially) replace soybean oil to lower the content of linoleic acid seem safe and effective. Especially LEs containing fish oil (FO-LE) have less proinflammatory characteristics that promise to convey beneficial effects on immune system and organ functions, although much of the available evidence awaits more robust clinical validation. PMID:26177663

  19. Safe Handling of Parenteral Cytotoxics: Recommendations for Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Green, Esther; Johnston, Mary; Trudeau, Maureen; Schwartz, Lisa; Poirier, Susan; Macartney, Gail; Milliken, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a set of recommendations for the safe handling of parenteral cytotoxics in health care facilities in Ontario, Canada. Methods: Systematic reviews were conducted to assemble evidence on risks to health care staff who prepare or administer cytotoxic drugs for cancer care and on closed systems for handling these drugs. Recent guidelines on safe handling of hazardous drugs were also reviewed. A multidisciplinary expert panel used an ethical framework to interpret this evidence and develop a set of recommendations to guide oncology practice in Ontario. Practitioners were surveyed and asked to provide input for the final set of recommendations. Results: Available evidence on risks associated with handling cytotoxic drugs is of poor quality, but it suggests that health care workers exposed to cytotoxic agents may be at increased risk for miscarriages. There is general agreement across guideline development groups in North America, Europe, and Australia concerning recommendations related to policies and procedures for handling cytotoxic drugs, use of personal protective equipment, and standards for ventilated cabinets, syringes and intravenous sets, transport and labeling, and education and training of staff. Limited evidence from poor-quality studies suggests that closed systems may reduce surface contamination with hazardous drugs during preparation. Conclusion: A set of recommendations was formulated by the expert panel and approved by practitioners surveyed across Ontario. PMID:20856737

  20. Fatty Acids as Therapeutic Auxiliaries for Oral and Parenteral Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Michael J.; Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Guley, Patrick C.; Cho, Moo J.

    2012-01-01

    Many drugs have decreased therapeutic activity due to issues with absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. The co-formulation or covalent attachment of drugs with fatty acids has demonstrated some capacity to overcome these issues by improving intestinal permeability, slowing clearance and binding serum proteins for selective tissue uptake and metabolism. For orally administered drugs, albeit at low level of availability, the presence of fatty acids and triglycerides in the intestinal lumen may promote intestinal uptake of small hydrophilic molecules. Small lipophilic drugs or acylated hydrophilic drugs also show increased lymphatic uptake and enhanced passive diffusional uptake. Fatty acid conjugation of small and large proteins or peptides have exhibited protracted plasma half-lives, site-specific delivery and sustained release upon parenteral administration. These improvements are most likely due to associations with lipid-binding serum proteins, namely albumin, LDL and HDL. These molecular interactions, although not fully characterized, could provide the ability of using the endogenous carrier systems for improving therapeutic outcomes. PMID:22921839

  1. Response of preterm infants to aluminum in parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Koo, W W; Kaplan, L A; Krug-Wispe, S K; Succop, P; Bendon, R

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five preterm infants with birth weights (BW) 540 to 2280 g (20 with birth weight less than 1500 g) and gestational ages 24 to 37 weeks, were studied to determine the response to 2 levels of aluminum (Al) loading from currently unavoidable contamination of various components of parenteral nutrition (PN) solution. High Al loading group (H) received solutions with measured Al content of 306 +/- 16 micrograms/liter and low A1 loading group (L) received solutions with 144 +/- 16 micrograms A1/liter. Urine Al:Creatinine (Al:Cr) ratios (micrograms:mg) became elevated and significantly higher in H (1.6 +/- 0.38 vs 0.5 +/- 0.1, p less than 0.05) at the third sampling point (mean 19 days). Serum Al concentrations were highest at onset in both groups and stabilized with study but remained consistently higher than the normal median of 18 micrograms/liter. Calculated urine Al excretion were consistently low and were 34 +/- 6% vs 28 +/- 5% in the H and L groups, respectively. One infant in the L group who died 39 days after termination of above study showed the presence of A1 in bone trabeculae and the presence of excessive unmineralized osteoid along the trabeculae. We conclude that small preterm infants are able to increase urine Al excretion with increased Al load. However urine Al excretion is incomplete with bone deposition of Al and persistently elevated serum Al concentrations. PMID:2514293

  2. Home Parenteral Nutrition: Fat Emulsions and Potential Complications.

    PubMed

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Salonen, Bradley R; Bonnes, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Since the first intravenous nutrition support attempt with olive oil in the 17th century, intravenous fat emulsions (IVFEs) have evolved to become an integral component in the management of patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). IVFEs serve as a calorie source and provide essential fatty acids (linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) in patients unable to achieve adequate intake of these fatty acids through alternative means. However, IVFE use is also associated with multiple complications, including increased infection risk, liver disease, and systemic proinflammatory states. In the United States, most IVFEs are composed of 100% soybean oil; internationally multiple alternative IVFEs (using fish oil, olive oil, and long- and medium-chain triglycerides) are available or being developed. The hope is that these IVFEs will prevent, or decrease the risk of, some of the HPN-associated complications. The goal of this article is to review how IVFEs came into use, their composition and metabolism, options for IVFE delivery in HPN, benefits and risks of IVFE use, and strategies to minimize the risks associated with IVFE use in HPN patients. PMID:27533943

  3. Nutritional intake of gut failure patients on home parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    DiCecco, S.; Nelson, J.; Burnes, J.; Fleming, C.R.

    1987-11-01

    Nutrient intake patterns were analyzed in 23 patients with gut failure who were receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). All patients had stable weights without changes in intravenous calories or protein for 3 consecutive months. Our objectives were to assess oral intake of calories, carbohydrates, fat, and protein, to examine relationships between oral nutrient intakes and disease categories, and to compare oral and intravenous intakes to calculated resting energy expenditure (REE). Two patterns of oral nutrient intake were identified among the patients. Patients with short bowel syndrome, regardless of the underlying disease, consumed calories by mouth that clearly exceeded calculated resting energy expenditure (short bowel, non-Crohn's, 170% of REE; short bowel, Crohn's, 200 of REE); however, calories approximating the REE had to be given via HPN, suggesting that efficiency of absorption was at a very low level. Patients with diffuse gut diseases (radiation enteritis or pseudo-obstruction syndromes) had very low intakes of oral nutrients. The distribution of oral calories among carbohydrate, protein, and fat did not differ among the disease categories.

  4. Parenteral nutrition in neonatology--to standardize or individualize?

    PubMed

    Riskin, Arieh; Shiff, Yaakov; Shamir, Raanan

    2006-09-01

    Premature very low birth weight (< 1500 g) infants comprise one of the largest groups receiving parenteral nutrition. PN should be optimized to answer their high nutritional requirements and suit their metabolic status, but should also be validated pharmaceutically. PN can be provided as a standard, usually commercial, formulation, representing the average needs of a large group of patients. Alternatively, an individualized PN compound adapted to the patient's needs can be prescribed and prepared, usually on a daily basis. The main advantage of individually prescribed PN is that it is tailored to suit a specific patient, thereby assuring the best possible nutrition and biochemical control. Batch-produced standardized PN bags can be readily available as ward stocks in neonatal intensive care units, enabling initiation of early PN immediately after the delivery of a premature infant. Moreover, standard PN solutions incorporate expert nutritional knowledge and support. A combination of standardized PN bags, prepared under strict standardization criteria, for most neonates, with a small number of specifically tailored individualized PN formulations for those in need for them, could reduce pharmacy workload and costs and increase safety, while maintaining the desired clinical flexibility. For those in need of the individualized PN formulations, a computerized ordering system can save time, decrease prescription and compounding errors, and improve quality of nutritional care. PMID:17058418

  5. Innovative Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Therapy for Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hau D.; Fallon, Erica M.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Malkan, Alpin D.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Children with intestinal failure suffer from insufficient intestinal length or function, making them dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for growth and survival. PN and its components are associated with many complications ranging from simple electrolyte abnormalities to life-threatening PN-associated liver disease, which is also called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (ILALD). From a nutrition perspective, the ultimate goal is to provide adequate caloric requirements and make the transition from PN to full enteral Nutrition (EN) successful. Upon review of the literature, we have summarized the most effective and innovative PN and EN therapies for this patient population. Antibiotic-coated catheters and antibiotic or ethanol locks can be implemented, as they appear effective in reducing catheter-related infection and thus further reduce the risk of IFALD. Lipid emulsions should be given judiciously. The use of an omega-3 fatty acid-based formulation should be considered in patients who develop IFALD. Trophic feeding is important for intestinal adaptation, and EN should be initiated early to help wean patients from PN. Long term management of children with IF continues to be an emerging field. We have entered uncharted territory as more children survive complications of IF, including IFALD. Careful monitoring and individualized management to ensure maintenance of growth with avoidance of complications are the keys to successful patient outcomes. PMID:20123271

  6. Should pediatric parenteral nutrition be individualized?☆

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento; Nogueira, Roberto José Negrão; Saron, Margareth Lopes Galvão; Lima, Alexandre Esteves Souza; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations are commonly individualized, since their standardization appears inadequate for the pediatric population. This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional state and the reasons for PN individualization in pediatric patients using PN, hospitalized in a tertiary hospital in Campinas, São Paulo. METHODS: This longitudinal study comprised patients using PN followed by up to 67 days. Nutritional status was classified according to the criteria established by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2006) and WHO (2007). The levels of the following elements in blood were analyzed: sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, chloride, magnesium, inorganic phosphorus, and triglycerides (TGL). Among the criteria for individualization, the following were considered undeniable: significant reduction in blood levels of potassium (<3mEq/L), sodium (<125mEq/L), magnesium (<1mEq/L), phosphorus (<1.5mEq/L), ionic calcium (<1mmol), and chloride (<90mEq/L), or any value above the references. RESULTS: Twelve pediatric patients aged 1 month to 15 years were studied (49 individualizations). Most patients were classified as malnourished. It was observed that 74/254 (29.2%) of examinations demanded individualized PN for indubitable reasons. CONCLUSION: The nutritional state of patients was considered critical in most cases. Thus, the individualization performed in the beginning of PN for energy protein adequacy was indispensable. In addition, the individualized PN was indispensable in at least 29.2% of PN for correction of alterations found in biochemical parameters. PMID:25510996

  7. Vitamin E in new-generation lipid emulsions protects against parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in parenteral nutrition-fed preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E composition of soy and fish oil lipi...

  8. Parenteral nutrition support: Beyond gut feeling? Quality control study of parenteral nutrition practices in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Shankar, Bhuvaneshwari; Ranganathan, Lakshmi; Daphnee, D. K.; Bharadwaj, Adithya; Venkataraman, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteral nutrition (EN) is preferred over parenteral nutrition (PN) in hospitalized patients based on International consensus guidelines. Practice patterns of PN in developing countries have not been documented. Objectives: To assess practice pattern and quality of PN support in a tertiary hospital setting in Chennai, India. Methods: Retrospective record review of patients admitted between February 2010 and February 2012. Results: About 351,008 patients were admitted to the hospital in the study period of whom 29,484 (8.4%) required nutritional support. About 70 patients (0.24%) received PN, of whom 54 (0.18%) received PN for at least three days. Common indications for PN were major gastrointestinal surgery (55.6%), intolerance to EN (25.9%), pancreatitis (5.6%), and gastrointestinal obstruction (3.7%). Conclusions: The proportion of patients receiving PN was very low. Quality issues were identified relating to appropriateness of indication and calories and proteins delivered. This study helps to introspect and improve the quality of nutrition support. PMID:26955215

  9. Patient-reported outcomes of parenteral somatostatin analogue injections in 195 patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Christian J; Karavitaki, Niki; Störmann, Sylvère; Trainer, Peter J; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Droste, Michael; Korbonits, Márta; Feldmann, Berit; Zopf, Kathrin; Sanderson, Violet Fazal; Schwicker, David; Gelbaum, Dana; Haviv, Asi; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-acting somatostatin analogues delivered parenterally are the most widely used medical treatment in acromegaly. This patient-reported outcomes survey was designed to assess the impact of chronic injections on subjects with acromegaly. Methods The survey was conducted in nine pituitary centres in Germany, UK and The Netherlands. The questionnaire was developed by endocrinologists and covered aspects of acromegaly symptoms, injection-related manifestations, emotional and daily life impact, treatment satisfaction and unmet medical needs. Results In total, 195 patients participated, of which 112 (57%) were on octreotide (Sandostatin LAR) and 83 (43%) on lanreotide (Somatuline Depot). The majority (>70%) of patients reported acromegaly symptoms despite treatment. A total of 52% of patients reported that their symptoms worsen towards the end of the dosing interval. Administration site pain lasting up to a week following injection was the most frequently reported injection-related symptom (70% of patients). Other injection site reactions included nodules (38%), swelling (28%), bruising (16%), scar tissue (8%) and inflammation (7%). Injection burden was similar between octreotide and lanreotide. Only a minority of patients received injections at home (17%) and 5% were self-injecting. Over a third of patients indicated a feeling of loss of independence due to the injections, and 16% reported repeated work loss days. Despite the physical, emotional and daily life impact of injections, patients were satisfied with their treatment, yet reported that modifications that would offer major improvement over current care would be ‘avoiding injections’ and ‘better symptom control’. Conclusion Lifelong injections of long-acting somatostatin analogues have significant burden on the functioning, well-being and daily lives of patients with acromegaly. PMID:26744896

  10. Haemodynamic effects of parenteral vs. enteral paracetamol in critically ill patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S J; Moran, J L; Williams, P J; Burns, K; Rowland, A; Miners, J O; Peake, S L

    2016-10-01

    Paracetamol is a commonly used drug in the intensive care unit. There have been reports in the literature of an association with significant hypotension, a potentially important interaction for labile critically ill patients. Route of administration may influence the incidence of hypotension. This single-centre, prospective, open-label, randomised, parallel-arm, active-control trial was designed to determine the incidence of hypotension following the administration of paracetamol to critically ill patients. Fifty adult patients receiving paracetamol for analgesia or pyrexia were randomly assigned to receive either the parenteral or enteral formulation of the drug. Paracetamol concentrations were measured at baseline and at multiple time points over 24 h. The maximal plasma paracetamol concentration was significantly different between routes; 156 vs. 73 micromol.l(-1) [p = 0.0005] following the first dose of parenteral or enteral paracetamol, respectively. Sixteen hypotensive events occurred in 12 patients: parenteral n = 12; enteral n = 4. The incident rate ratio for parenteral vs. enteral paracetamol was 2.94 (95% CI 0.97-8.92; p = 0.06). The incidence of hypotension associated with paracetamol administration is higher than previously reported and tends to be more frequent with parenteral paracetamol. PMID:27611038

  11. Parenteral nutrition in adult inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts: assessment of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2006-04-01

    Malnutrition is a common comorbidity that places inpatients at risk of complications, infections, long length of stay, higher costs, and increased mortality. Thus, nutrition support has become an important therapeutic adjunctive to the care of these patients. For patients unable to feed themselves, nutrition can be delivered via the parenteral or enteral routes. The formulations used to deliver nutrients and the route of nutrient delivery, absorption, and processing differ substantially between parenteral and enteral nutrition. Over the past two decades, many randomised clinical trials have assessed the effects of parenteral versus enteral nutrition on outcomes (ie, complications, infections, length of stay, costs, mortality) in diverse inpatient populations. From a search of medical publications, studies were selected that assessed important clinical outcomes of parenteral versus enteral feeding or intravenous fluids in patients with trauma/burn injuries, surgery, cancer, pancreatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, critical illness, liver failure, acute renal failure, and organ transplantation. Our goal was to determine the optimum route of feeding in these patient groups. The available evidence lends support to the use of enteral over parenteral feeding in inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts. PMID:16581410

  12. Aluminum in parenteral products: Overview of chemistry concerns and regulatory actions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoiberg, C.P.

    1989-05-01

    In the May 23, 1985 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Sedman et al. reported that many drug products that are routinely administered in parenteral therapy contain aluminum. From a manufacturing and control perspective, the Agency had obtained considerable information and data regarding (1) sources of aluminum contamination, (2) types of parenteral drug products containing aluminum, and (3) assay methodologies. Currently, in the review of drug applications in DSDDP, applicants are being requested to incorporate aluminum monitoring into their stability protocols and to implement, where possible, changes that will reduce aluminum contamination. Since acceptable analytical procedures are available and the aluminum contaminate is believed to be harmful to certain patient populations receiving parenteral therapy, the Agency is considering actions resulting in the imposition of regulatory controls.

  13. [Technical specifications for rational clinical use of parenterally administered Chinese medicine (draft version for comments)].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-Ming; Li, Ming-Quan; Zhang, Yun-Ling; Ma, Rong; Xian, Shao-Xiang; Liu, Jian; Li, Su-Yun; Zhao, Yu-Bin

    2013-09-01

    The regulations on basic clinical use of parenterally administered Chinese medicine, issued jointly in 2008, by the ministry of health (MOH), China food and drug administration (SFDA) and the state administration of traditional Chinese medicine (SATCM). Integrating actual clinical practice, these presented doctors and nurses with detailed specifications for the safe use of parenterally administered Chinese medicine. The regulations emphasize the use of Chinese medicine pattern differentiation, use in strict accordance with instructions, and they prohibit use combined with other medicines. The emphasis of the regulations are practicality and operability, and provide meaningful guidance to doctors and nurses for the rational and safe use of parenterally administered Chinese medicine, to reduce adverse reactions/adverse events caused by improper use. PMID:24471306

  14. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Razieh; Ferdosian, Farzad; Shajari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist. PMID:26401146

  15. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article

    PubMed Central

    FALLAH, Razieh; FERDOSIAN, Farzad; SHAJARI, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist. PMID:26401146

  16. Evaluation of Bacillus oleronius as a Biological Indicator for Terminal Sterilization of Large-Volume Parenterals.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masamitsu; Fujifuru, Masato; Okada, Aki; Takai, Katsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Udagawa, Takeshi; Miyake, Makoto; Naruyama, Shintaro; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Goro; Yoden, Hikaru; Aoki, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the production of large-volume parenterals in Japan, equipment and devices such as tanks, pipework, and filters used in production processes are exhaustively cleaned and sterilized, and the cleanliness of water for injection, drug materials, packaging materials, and manufacturing areas is well controlled. In this environment, the bioburden is relatively low, and less heat resistant compared with microorganisms frequently used as biological indicators such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 7953) and Bacillus subtilis 5230 (ATCC 35021). Consequently, the majority of large-volume parenteral solutions in Japan are manufactured under low-heat sterilization conditions of F0 <2 min, so that loss of clarity of solutions and formation of degradation products of constituents are minimized. Bacillus oleronius (ATCC 700005) is listed as a biological indicator in "Guidance on the Manufacture of Sterile Pharmaceutical Products Produced by Terminal Sterilization" (guidance in Japan, issued in 2012). In this study, we investigated whether B. oleronius is an appropriate biological indicator of the efficacy of low-heat, moist-heat sterilization of large-volume parenterals. Specifically, we investigated the spore-forming ability of this microorganism in various cultivation media and measured the D-values and z-values as parameters of heat resistance. The D-values and z-values changed depending on the constituents of large-volume parenteral products. Also, the spores from B. oleronius showed a moist-heat resistance that was similar to or greater than many of the spore-forming organisms isolated from Japanese parenteral manufacturing processes. Taken together, these results indicate that B. oleronius is suitable as a biological indicator for sterility assurance of large-volume parenteral solutions subjected to low-heat, moist-heat terminal sterilization. PMID:26889054

  17. Parenteral nutrition in the management of a dog with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis and severe protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, I F; Miller, E; Twedt, D C

    1999-01-01

    Management of lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis in a dog with whipworm infestation, hypoproteinemia, and ascites is described. Short-term parenteral nutrition hastened normalization of serum proteins, resolution of diarrhea, and weight gain. A description of the potential benefits, limitations, and possible complications of parenteral nutrition in refractory inflammatory bowel disease is given. PMID:10572669

  18. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  19. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  20. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  1. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  2. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.396 Training for the parenteral administration...

  3. Preoperative overnight parenteral nutrition (TPN) improves skeletal muscle protein metabolism indicated by microarray algorithm analyses in a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Engström, Cecilia; Lundholm, Kent

    2016-06-01

    Loss of muscle mass is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Uncertainties of treatment efficiency by short-term artificial nutrition remain, specifically improvement of protein balance in skeletal muscles. In this study, algorithmic microarray analysis was applied to map cellular changes related to muscle protein metabolism in human skeletal muscle tissue during provision of overnight preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Twenty-two patients (11/group) scheduled for upper GI surgery due to malignant or benign disease received a continuous peripheral all-in-one TPN infusion (30 kcal/kg/day, 0.16 gN/kg/day) or saline infusion for 12 h prior operation. Biopsies from the rectus abdominis muscle were taken at the start of operation for isolation of muscle RNA RNA expression microarray analyses were performed with Agilent Sureprint G3, 8 × 60K arrays using one-color labeling. 447 mRNAs were differently expressed between study and control patients (P < 0.1). mRNAs related to ribosomal biogenesis, mRNA processing, and translation were upregulated during overnight nutrition; particularly anabolic signaling S6K1 (P < 0.01-0.1). Transcripts of genes associated with lysosomal degradation showed consistently lower expression during TPN while mRNAs for ubiquitin-mediated degradation of proteins as well as transcripts related to intracellular signaling pathways, PI3 kinase/MAPkinase, were either increased or decreased. In conclusion, muscle mRNA alterations during overnight standard TPN infusions at constant rate altered mRNAs associated with mTOR signaling; increased initiation of protein translation; and suppressed autophagy/lysosomal degradation of proteins. This indicates that overnight preoperative parenteral nutrition is effective to promote muscle protein metabolism. PMID:27273879

  4. Parenteral Nutrition Suppresses the Bactericidal Response of the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Jiro; Pierre, Joseph F; Heneghan, Aaron F; Tsao, Francis HC; Sano, Yoshifumi; Jonker, Mark A; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    Background Parenteral nutrition (PN) increases infectious risk in critically ill patients compared with enteral feeding. Previously, we demonstrated that PN feeding suppresses the concentration of the Paneth cell antimicrobial protein secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) in the gut lumen. sPLA2 and other Paneth cell proteins are released in response to bacterial components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and they modulate the intestinal microbiome. Since the Paneth cell protein sPLA2 was suppressed with PN feeding, we hypothesized PN would diminish the responsiveness of the small bowel to LPS through reduced secretions and as a result exhibit less bactericidal activity. Methods The distal ileum was harvested from ICR mice, washed, and randomized for incubation with LPS (0, 1, or 10 μg/mL). Culture supernatant was collected and sPLA2 Activity was measured. Bactericidal activity of the ileum segment secretions was assessed against P. aeruginosa with and without a sPLA2 inhibitor at two concentrations, 100nM and 1μM. ICR mice were randomized to Chow or PN for 5 days. Tissue was collected for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and ileal segments were incubated with LPS (0 or 10 μg/mL). sPLA2 activity and bactericidal activity were measured in secretions from ileal segments. Results The ileal segments responded to 10 ug/mL LPS with significantly greater sPLA2 activity and bactericidal activity. The bactericidal activity of secretions from LPS stimulated tissue was suppressed 50% and 70%, respectively, with the addition of the sPLA2-inhibitor. Chow displayed greater sPLA2 in the Paneth cell granules and secreted higher levels of sPLA2 than PN before and after LPS. Accordingly, media collected from Chow was more bactericidal than PN. IHC confirmed a reduction in Paneth cell granules after PN. Conclusions This work demonstrates that ileal segments secrete bactericidal secretions after LPS exposure and the inhibition of the Paneth cell antimicrobial protein sPLA2 significantly

  5. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations – an Australasian group consensus 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors. PMID:24548745

  6. New Strategy to Reduce Hypertriglyceridemia During Parenteral Nutrition While Maintaining Energy Intake.

    PubMed

    Mateu-de Antonio, Javier; Florit-Sureda, Marta

    2014-09-11

    Background: Hypertriglyceridemia is a frequent metabolic complication associated with fat administration in parenteral nutrition (PN). No clear guidelines have been published on how to proceed once hypertriglyceridemia has been detected. A new strategy could be to substitute the initial fat emulsion with another emulsion with faster clearance. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness in reducing triglyceridemia values, maintaining the caloric intake, and improving nutrition parameters in patients who had moderate hypertriglyceridemia during PN when an olive oil-based fat emulsion (OOFE) was substituted with a multiple-source oil fat emulsion (MOFE). We also assessed the safety of this substitution in hepatic and glycemic profiles. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective, observational study that included 38 adult patients to whom OOFE in PN was substituted with MOFE when moderate hypertriglyceridemia (≥250-400 mg/dL) was detected. Results: Triglyceridemia values decreased in 36 (94.7%) patients. The mean reduction was 71 (88-22) mg/dL. Fat load was slightly reduced after substitution (-0.14 [-0.23 to 0] g/kg/d; P < .001), but total caloric intake increased from 22.5 (19.7-25.1) to 23.1 (19.8-26.8) kcal/kg/d (P = .053). After substitution, nutrition parameters improved, liver parameters remained unchanged, and insulin requirements increased. Conclusion: The substitution of OOFE with MOFE in patients with moderate hypertriglyceridemia during PN resulted in a reduction in triglyceridemia values of about 70 mg/dL. That allowed maintaining the caloric intake and improved nutrition parameters without affecting the hepatic profile. For some patients, insulin requirements increased moderately. (JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. XXXX;xx:xx-xx). PMID:25214551

  7. Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications in Children Receiving Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT).

    PubMed

    Kovacich, Amanda; Tamma, Pranita D; Advani, Sonali; Popoola, Victor O; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Gosey, Leslie; Milstone, Aaron M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify the frequency of and risk factors associated with complications necessitating removal of the peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in patients receiving outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) and to determine the appropriateness of OPAT in children with OPAT-related complications. METHODS A retrospective cohort of children who had a PICC inserted at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013, and were discharged from the hospital on OPAT was assembled. RESULTS A total of 1,465 PICCs were used to provide antibiotic therapy for 955 children after hospital discharge. Among these, 117 PICCs (8%) required removal due to a complication (4.6 of 1,000 catheter days). Children discharged to a long-term care facility were at increased risk of adverse PICC events (incidence risk ratio [IRR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79-6.17). For children receiving OPAT, age of the child (adjusted IRR [aIRR], 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), noncentral PICC tip location (aIRR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.66-4.82), and public insurance (aIRR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10-2.40) were associated with adverse PICC events. In addition, 34 patients (32%) with adverse events may not have required intravenous antibiotics at the time of hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS Of children discharged with PICCs on OPAT during the study period, 8% developed a complication necessitating PICC removal. Children discharged to a long-term care facility had an increased rate of complication compared with children who were discharged home. With improved education regarding appropriate duration of antibiotic therapy and situations in which early conversion to enteral therapy should be considered, PICC-related complications may have been avoided in 32% of children. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):420-424. PMID:26961677

  8. Prospective study of the aetiology of infusion phlebitis and line failure during peripheral parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    May, J; Murchan, P; MacFie, J; Sedman, P; Donat, R; Palmer, D; Mitchell, C J

    1996-08-01

    Four techniques of administering peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) were examined prospectively to investigate the role of mechanical trauma in the development of infusion phlebitis. Patients in group 1 (n = 15) were fed via a standard 18-G Teflon cannula which was removed on completion of the infusion and was rotated to the contralateral arm every day. Group 2 patients (n = 15) had a similar catheter sited in each forearm simultaneously, with rotation of the side of infusion each day. Patients in group 3 (n = 17) had a 15-cm Silastic rubber catheter inserted into a forearm vein and a standard cannula sited in the contralateral forearm, with alternation of infusion each day. Those in group 4 (n = 13) had a fine-bore 23-G silicone catheter sited in one arm only. Patients in groups 1, 2 and 3 were fed over 12-h cycles and those in group 4 for a 24-h continuous cycle. A total of 408 patient-days of PPN were given. Mean duration of PPN in groups 1-4 was 7.5, 9, 5.5 and 5 days respectively. Infusion phlebitis was not recorded in patients who had a daily change of cannula (group 1), but occurred in four patients in group 2, eight in group 3 and eight in group 4. Phlebitis scores were 0, 9, 15 and 12 for groups 1-4 respectively. Severe phlebitis and line occlusion occurred more frequently in patients with a 15-cm catheter (group 3) and in those fed continuously over 24 h (group 4). These results suggest that mechanical trauma is an important factor in the aetiology of infusion phlebitis. This can be minimized by reducing the time for which the vein wall is exposed to nutrient infusion and by reducing the amount of prosthetic material within the vein. PMID:8869311

  9. Costs of Multidisciplinary Parenteral Nutrition Care Provided at a Distance via Mobile Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heejung; Spaulding, Ryan; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Yadrich, Donna; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Gilroy, Richard; Smith, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Determining the costs of healthcare delivery is a key step for providing efficient nutrition-based care. This analysis tabulates the costs of delivering home parenteral nutrition (HPN) interventions and clinical assessments through encrypted mobile technologies to increase patients’ access to healthcare providers, reduce their travel expenses, and allow early detection of infection and other complications. Methods A traditional cost-accounting method was used to tabulate all expenses related to mobile distance HPN clinic appointments, including (1) personnel time of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals, (2) supply of HPN intervention materials, and (3) equipment, connection, and delivery expenses. Results A total of 20 mobile distance clinic appointments were conducted for an average of 56 minutes each with 45 patients who required HPN infusion care. The initial setup costs included mobile tablet devices, 4G data plans, and personnel's time as well as intervention materials. The initial costs were on average $916.64 per patient, while the follow-up clinic appointments required $361.63 a month, with these costs continuing to decline as the equipment was used by multiple patients more frequently over time. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with cost savings in travel expenses and rated the quality of care comparable to traditional in-person examinations. Conclusion This study provides important aspects of the initial cost tabulation for visual assessment for HPN appointments. These findings will be used to generate a decision algorithm for scheduling mobile distance clinic appointments intermittent with in-person visits to determine how to lower costs of nutrition assessments. To maximize the cost benefits, clinical trials must continue to collect clinical outcomes. PMID:25245253

  10. Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Cholestasis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ah-Young; Lim, Ryoung-Kyoung; Han, Young-Mi; Park, Kyung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Parenteral nutrition (PN)-associated cholestasis (PNAC) is one of the most common complications in very low birth weight infants (VLBWIs). The aim of this study is to evaluate the risk factors of PNAC in VBLWIs. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 322 VLBWIs admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital from July 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013. We excluded 72 dead infants; 6 infants were transferred to another hospital, and 57 infants were transferred to our hospital at 2 weeks after birth. The infants were divided into the cholestasis and the non-cholestasis groups. PNAC was defined as a direct bilirubin level of ≥2.0 mg/dL in infants administered with PN for ≥2 weeks. Results A total of 187 VLBWI were enrolled in this study; of these, 46 infants developed PNAC. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors of PNAC in VLBWI were longer duration of antimicrobial use (odds ratio [OR] 4.49, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4.42-4.58), longer duration of PN (OR 2.68, 95% CI 2.41-3.00), long-term lack of enteral nutrition (OR 2.89, 95% CI 2.43-3.37), occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis (OR 2.40, 95% CI 2.16-2.83), and gastrointestinal operation (OR 2.19, 95% CI 2.03-2.58). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that shorter PN, aggressive enteral nutrition, and appropriate antimicrobial use are important strategies in preventing PNAC. PMID:27066450

  11. Magnetic resonance venography to assess thrombus resolution with edoxaban monotherapy versus parenteral anticoagulation/warfarin for symptomatic deep vein thrombosis: A multicenter feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gregory; Mani, Venkatesh; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Grosso, Michael A; Mercuri, Michele; Lanz, Hans J; Schussler, Steven; Hsu, Ching; Chinigo, Amy; Ritchie, Bruce; Nadar, Venkatesh; Cannon, Kevin; Pullman, John; Concha, Mauricio; Schul, Marlin; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of magnetic resonance venography (MRV) for measuring change in thrombus volume with a novel anticoagulation regimen versus standard anticoagulation in patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has not been assessed. Our aim was to study the feasibility of MRV to measure change in thrombus volume in patients with acute symptomatic objectively confirmed proximal DVT in an open-label multicenter trial (edoxaban Thrombus Reduction Imaging Study, eTRIS). We randomized patients in a 2:1 allocation ratio to edoxaban 90 mg/day for 10 days followed by 60 mg/day versus parenteral anticoagulation bridging to warfarin for 3 months. The primary efficacy outcome was a surrogate end point of the relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14-21. A total of 85 eligible patients from 26 study sites were randomized to edoxaban monotherapy (n=56) versus parenteral anticoagulation as a 'bridge' to warfarin (n=29). The mean relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14-21 was similar in patients treated with edoxaban and parenteral anticoagulation as a 'bridge' to warfarin (-50.1% vs -58.9%; 95% confidence interval of treatment difference, -12.7%, 30.2%). However, thrombus extension was observed in eight patients in the edoxaban monotherapy group and in none in the warfarin group. Rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism (3.6% vs 3.6%, p=0.45) and clinically relevant non-major bleeding (5.4% vs 7.1%, p=0.34) were also similar. No major bleeds occurred in either on-treatment group during the study period. In conclusion, MRV can assess change in thrombus volume in patients with acute DVT randomized to two different anticoagulant regimens.ClinicalTrials.gov IDENTIFIER NCT01662908: INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG IND APPLICATION EDOXABAN IND # 63266. PMID:27165711

  12. Magnetic resonance venography to assess thrombus resolution with edoxaban monotherapy versus parenteral anticoagulation/warfarin for symptomatic deep vein thrombosis: A multicenter feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Mani, Venkatesh; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Grosso, Michael A; Mercuri, Michele; Lanz, Hans J; Schussler, Steven; Hsu, Ching; Chinigo, Amy; Ritchie, Bruce; Nadar, Venkatesh; Cannon, Kevin; Pullman, John; Concha, Mauricio; Schul, Marlin; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of magnetic resonance venography (MRV) for measuring change in thrombus volume with a novel anticoagulation regimen versus standard anticoagulation in patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has not been assessed. Our aim was to study the feasibility of MRV to measure change in thrombus volume in patients with acute symptomatic objectively confirmed proximal DVT in an open-label multicenter trial (edoxaban Thrombus Reduction Imaging Study, eTRIS). We randomized patients in a 2:1 allocation ratio to edoxaban 90 mg/day for 10 days followed by 60 mg/day versus parenteral anticoagulation bridging to warfarin for 3 months. The primary efficacy outcome was a surrogate end point of the relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14–21. A total of 85 eligible patients from 26 study sites were randomized to edoxaban monotherapy (n=56) versus parenteral anticoagulation as a ‘bridge’ to warfarin (n=29). The mean relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14–21 was similar in patients treated with edoxaban and parenteral anticoagulation as a ‘bridge’ to warfarin (−50.1% vs −58.9%; 95% confidence interval of treatment difference, −12.7%, 30.2%). However, thrombus extension was observed in eight patients in the edoxaban monotherapy group and in none in the warfarin group. Rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism (3.6% vs 3.6%, p=0.45) and clinically relevant non-major bleeding (5.4% vs 7.1%, p=0.34) were also similar. No major bleeds occurred in either on-treatment group during the study period. In conclusion, MRV can assess change in thrombus volume in patients with acute DVT randomized to two different anticoagulant regimens. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01662908 Investigational New Drug (IND) Application: Edoxaban IND # 63266 PMID:27165711

  13. Continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition induces metabolic dysfunction in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that parenteral nutrition (PN) compared with formula feeding results in hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in neonatal pigs. The current aim was to test whether the route of feeding (intravenous [IV] vs enteral) rather than other feeding modalities (diet, pattern) had cont...

  14. 76 FR 50741 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug.... Written requests are to be sent to Division of Freedom of Information (ELEM-1029), Food and...

  15. Course and outcome of parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (TPN-Chol) leads to significant morbidity and mortality. To assess the safety and effectiveness of potential interventions, it is necessary to evaluate the natural history of TPN-Chol. This retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the typical course...

  16. Persistence of an adverse metabolic phenotype in parenterally fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutritional environment during fetal and neonatal life is a key determinant affecting the risk for adult-onset diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. We previously showed that chronic parenteral (PN) compared to enteral (EN) nutrition in neonatal pigs for two weeks leads to increased glucose in...

  17. Parenteral antiretroviral formulations are still urgently needed: a case report and commentary.

    PubMed

    Odongo, Fatuma Catherine Atieno

    2015-05-01

    This case report highlights a challenging clinical dilemma to administer antiretroviral therapy in a critically-ill human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who presented with multiple opportunistic infections and a non-functional gastrointestinal tract. The need for parenteral antiretroviral drug options is discussed and investigational drugs are briefly reviewed. PMID:24890687

  18. Effects of Formulation Variables and Storage Conditions on Light Protected Vitamin B12 Mixed Parenteral Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this research the effect of vitamin B1 and B6 on cyanocobalamin stability in commercial light protected parenteral formulations and upon adding stabilizing agents will be investigated and best formulation composition and proper storage condition will be introduced. Methods: In this research some additives such as co solvents and tonicity adjusters, surfactants, antioxidants and chelating agents as well as buffer solutions, were used to improve the stability of the parenteral mixed formulations of B12 in the presence of other B vitamins (B1 and B6). Screening tests and accelerated stability tests were performed according to ICH guidelines Q1A (R2). Results: Shelf life evaluation revealed the best formulation and the proper storage condition. The results indicated the first kinetic models for all tested formulations and the optimum pH value was determined to be 5.8. There was no evidence of B12 loss when mixed with B1 and B6 in a medical syringe at room temperature for maximum of 8 hours. Conclusion: It is necessary to formulate vitamin B12 mixed parenteral solutions using proper phosphate buffers (pH=5.8) and to indicate “Store in refrigerator” on the mixed parenteral formulations of vitamin B12 with other B vitamins, which has not been expressed on the label of tested Brand formulations at the time of this study. PMID:25436187

  19. System for creating on site, remote from a sterile environment, parenteral solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Mike (Inventor); Scharf, Mike (Inventor); Packard, Jeff (Inventor); Kipp, Jim (Inventor); Dudar, Tom (Inventor); Owens, Jim (Inventor); Bindokas, Al (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a system and method for creating on site, remote from a sterile environment, parenteral solutions in large volume parenteral containers for intravenous administration to a patient. In an embodiment, this system comprises an empty large volume container including at least one port for accessing an interior of the container. The port includes a sterilizing filter for sterilizing a fluid fed through the port into the container. A second container is provided including a solute and having means for coupling the second container to the large volume container and thereby providing fluid communication therebetween allowing the solute to be received within the interior of the container. A sterile water source is also provided including means for placing the sterile water source in fluid communication with the port and allowing water to flow from the sterile water source into the interior of the container. This allows the solute, and sterile water that has been fed through the filter, to create a parenteral solution in the large volume parenteral container.

  20. Impact of parenteral lipid emulsions on metabolomic phenotype in preterm TPN-fed piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy for hospitalized neonates. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the US, but new generation emulsions include Omegaven (OV) and SMOFlipid (SL). There are no studies describing the metabolit...

  1. Impact of parenteral lipid emulsions on the metabolomic phenotype in preterm TPN-fed piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy for hospitalized neonates. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the U.S, but new generation emulsions include Omegaven (OV) and SMOFlipid (SL). There are no studies describing the metaboli...

  2. Chronic parenteral nutrition reduces lean tissue growth and induces insulin resistance in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most very low birthweight infants receive their nutrition parenterally prior to achieving full enteral feedings. Recent studies indicate that infants born less than 32 weeks gestation showed evidence of insulin resistance at 4 to 10 years. However, there is little information regarding the effect of...

  3. Gastrointestinal safety and therapeutic efficacy of parenterally administered phosphatidylcholine-associated indomethacin in rodent model systems

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberger, LM; Romero, JJ; Dial, EJ

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is limited in its enteral or parenteral use by side effects of gastroduodenal bleeding and ulceration. We have investigated the ability of phosphatidylcholine associated with indomethacin to form a therapeutically effective drug (INDO-PC) with reduced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for parenteral use. Experimental approach Rats were treated acutely by intravenous or chronically with subcutaneous injection of vehicle, indomethacin or INDO-PC using three related protocols. We then evaluated the following properties of these parenterally administered test drugs: (i) GI toxicity (luminal and faecal haemoglobin; intestinal perforations and adhesions; and haematocrit); (ii) bioavailability (plasma indomethacin); and (iii) therapeutic efficacy (analgesia from sensitivity to pressure; anti-inflammatory from ankle thickness; cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibition from synovial fluid prostaglandin E2 concentration) in rats with adjuvant-induced joint inflammation. Key results Acute and chronic dosing with INDO-PC produced less GI bleeding and intestinal injury than indomethacin alone, whereas the bioavailability, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and COX inhibitory activity of INDO-PC were comparable to indomethacin. Conclusions and implications The chemical association of phosphatidylcholine with indomethacin appears to markedly reduce the GI toxicity of the NSAID while providing equivalent therapeutic efficacy in a parenteral INDO-PC formulation. PMID:19366347

  4. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  5. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  6. Parenteral and mucosal prime-boost immunization strategies in mice with hepatitis B surface antigen and CpG DNA.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, Michael J; Weeratna, Risini D; Payette, Paul J; Davis, Heather L

    2002-02-18

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG ODN) are potent adjuvants to protein antigens administered by parenteral or mucosal routes to BALB/c mice. To date, there have been no studies using combined parenteral/mucosal approaches with CpG DNA as adjuvant. In this study we evaluated different parenteral prime-mucosal boost and mucosal prime-parenteral boost strategies using hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) alone or with different adjuvants: aluminum hydroxide (alum), cholera toxin (CT), CpG ODN. In addition, since CpG ODN has previously been shown to act synergistically with other adjuvants after parenteral or mucosal delivery, we also evaluated adjuvant combinations: alum+CpG ODN and CT+CpG ODN. The effects of adjuvant and administration strategy on systemic and mucosal humoral responses were measured, as well as cell-mediated immune responses (cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity). These results were compared to parenteral only or mucosal only strategies. Our findings demonstrate that parenteral immunization can prime for mucosal responses even when different lymph nodes were being targeted. HBsAg-specific immune responses (IgG in plasma, cytotoxic T lymphocytes) induced by parenteral prime could all be significantly enhanced by mucosal boosting and despite the fact that intramuscular immunization alone could not induce mucosal IgA, it could prime for a subsequent mucosal boost. In addition, the presence of adjuvant at time of boosting could influence the nature of subsequent immune responses (Th1 vs. Th2). Mice primed intranasally could have their systemic immune responses boosted with a parenteral administration and it was also possible to enhance mucosal responses induced by intranasal prime with an intramuscular boost. PMID:11934561

  7. Errors in administration of parenteral drugs in intensive care units: multinational prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Capuzzo, Maurizia; Guidet, Bertrand; Moreno, Rui; Metnitz, Barbara; Bauer, Peter; Metnitz, Philipp

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess on a multinational level the frequency, characteristics, contributing factors, and preventive measures of administration errors in parenteral medication in intensive care units. Design Observational, prospective, 24 hour cross sectional study with self reporting by staff. Setting 113 intensive care units in 27 countries. Participants 1328 adults in intensive care. Main outcome measures Number of errors; impact of errors; distribution of error characteristics; distribution of contributing and preventive factors. Results 861 errors affecting 441 patients were reported: 74.5 (95% confidence interval 69.5 to 79.4) events per 100 patient days. Three quarters of the errors were classified as errors of omission. Twelve patients (0.9% of the study population) experienced permanent harm or died because of medication errors at the administration stage. In a multiple logistic regression with patients as the unit of analysis, odds ratios for the occurrence of at least one parenteral medication error were raised for number of organ failures (odds ratio per increase of one organ failure: 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.34); use of any intravenous medication (yes v no: 2.73, 1.39 to 5.36); number of parenteral administrations (per increase of one parenteral administration: 1.06, 1.04 to 1.08); typical interventions in patients in intensive care (yes v no: 1.50, 1.14 to 1.96); larger intensive care unit (per increase of one bed: 1.01, 1.00 to 1.02); number of patients per nurse (per increase of one patient: 1.30, 1.03 to 1.64); and occupancy rate (per 10% increase: 1.03, 1.00 to 1.05). Odds ratios for the occurrence of parenteral medication errors were decreased for presence of basic monitoring (yes v no: 0.19, 0.07 to 0.49); an existing critical incident reporting system (yes v no: 0.69, 0.53 to 0.90); an established routine of checks at nurses’ shift change (yes v no: 0.68, 0.52 to 0.90); and an increased ratio of patient turnover to the size of the

  8. Effect of phosphate buffer concentration on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, C A; Smith, G M; Pflug, I J

    1978-09-01

    The effect of various quantities of Butterfield phosphate buffer added to four parenteral solutions on the survival of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated at 121 degrees C was determined. The effect of the addition of phosphate buffer on spore survival varied with the parenteral solution. Spore survival was increased or decreased, depending upon the composition of the parenteral solution and the buffer concentration. The results obtained in these experiments attest to the fact that environmental factors, including the type of ions present and ionic concentration, affect the heat destruction rate of B. stearothermophilus spores. Therefore, the sterilization requirements of a product such as a parenteral solution may be affected by small changes in formulation. PMID:727778

  9. Effect of phosphate buffer concentration on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, C A; Smith, G M; Pflug, I J

    1978-01-01

    The effect of various quantities of Butterfield phosphate buffer added to four parenteral solutions on the survival of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated at 121 degrees C was determined. The effect of the addition of phosphate buffer on spore survival varied with the parenteral solution. Spore survival was increased or decreased, depending upon the composition of the parenteral solution and the buffer concentration. The results obtained in these experiments attest to the fact that environmental factors, including the type of ions present and ionic concentration, affect the heat destruction rate of B. stearothermophilus spores. Therefore, the sterilization requirements of a product such as a parenteral solution may be affected by small changes in formulation. PMID:727778

  10. Thiamine Deficiency in a Developed Country: Acute Lactic Acidosis in Two Neonates Due to Unsupplemented Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Guglielmo; Mondì, Vito; Piersigilli, Fiammetta; Capolupo, Irma; Pannone, Veronica; Vici, Carlo Dionisi; Rizzo, Cristiano; Dotta, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin implicated in several metabolic processes. Its deficiency, due to prolonged parenteral nutrition without adequate vitamin supplementation, can lead to multiorgan failure characterized by cardiovascular impairment and metabolic acidosis refractory to bicarbonate administration. Only thiamine administration allows the remission of symptoms. We report 2 preterm infants with acute thiamine deficiency due to prolonged parenteral nutrition without adequate vitamin supplementation. PMID:25591974