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Sample records for paresis

  1. Monocular elevation paresis and contralateral downgaze paresis from unilateral mesodiencephalic infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, G; Baumgartner, C; Schnider, P; Trattnig, S; Deecke, L; Mueller, C

    1996-01-01

    A 26 year old woman presented with monocular elevation paresis of the right eye, contralateral paresis of downward gaze, and subtle bilateral ptosis. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a unilateral embolic infarction restricted to the mesodiencephalic junction involving the left paramedian thalamus. Preserved vertical oculocephalic movements and intact Bell's phenomenon suggested a supranuclear lesion. This rare "crossed vertical gaze paresis" results from a lesion near the oculomotor nucleus affecting ipsilateral downward gaze and contralateral upward gaze fibres, originating in the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (riMLF). Images PMID:8778268

  2. Diagnosing limb paresis and paralysis in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, James Patrick; Rzechorzek, Nina; Scott, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Paresis and paralysis are uncommon problems in sheep but are likely to prompt farmers to seek veterinary advice. A thorough and logical approach can aid in determining the cause of the problem and highlighting the benefit of veterinary involvement. While this may not necessarily alter the prognosis for an individual animal, it can help in formulating preventive measures and avoid the costs – both in economic and in welfare terms – of misdirected treatment. Distinguishing between central and peripheral lesions is most important, as the relative prognoses are markedly different, and this can often be achieved with minimal equipment. This article describes an approach to performing a neurological examination of the ovine trunk and limbs, the ancillary tests available and the common and important causes of paresis and paralysis in sheep. PMID:26752801

  3. [Herpes zoster paresis. A review of the literature and case reports].

    PubMed

    Lyngberg, K K; Svensson, B H

    1990-04-23

    The incidence of paresis due to herpes zoster (HZ) infections are reported very differently in the literature with rates varying from 0.5 to 31%. Many of the paresis are presumed to be undiagnosed on account of topographic dissociation, variable periods from the cutaneous affection to the muscular involvement, masking of the paresis by pain, paresis of the intercostal and abdominal muscles which are not obvious and difficulties in correlating the visceral symptoms with a herpes zoster eruption. Paresis of the cranial nerves are easily diagnosed and 50% of all HZ paresis are diagnosed from this region. Early acyclovir treatment has improved the prognosis. Four cases of hypotonic herpes zoster paresis in immunocompetent persons are described and the diagnostic difficulties are discussed. PMID:2158682

  4. Herpes zoster segmental paresis in an immunocompromised breast cancer woman

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Shirvan; Mahdavi, Sadegh Baradaran; Mahmoudi, Farhad; Basiri, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an infectious disease with neurological complications caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus in dorsal root ganglia of spinal cord which is also known as “Shingles.” Suppression of immune system is the major predisposing factor for reactivation of latent virus. Disease is mainly characterized by rash, vesicles and pain along one or more dermatomes which are innervated from one or more spinal nerve roots. Complications may be present after a while despite of patient treatment. Motor involvement is included. Some previous studies showed segmental zoster paresis as a rare complication, a few weeks after first presentation, among immunocompetent individuals. We present post herpetic motor involvement of C5 and C6 in a 59-year-old woman who underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy due to breast cancer, manifesting left upper limb weakness and paresis, 6 months after left partial mastectomy. Segmental paresis of zoster virus should be considered as a cause of motor impairment in an immunocompromised person suffering from shingles. PMID:26436084

  5. A Rare Complication of Herpes Zoster: Segmental Zoster Paresis

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Chawla, Mayank; Kaushik, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a common presentation in both the community and emergency department; however segmental zoster paresis is a rare complication that can lead to misdiagnosis. We present a case of a 74-year-old Indian gentleman with a background of well controlled diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischaemic heart disease who presented with sudden right lower limb weakness. This was preceded by a 5-day history of paraesthesia starting in the right foot and ascending up the right lower limb. On examination, there was a characteristic vesicular rash in the L2/3 region with MRC grading 3/5 in the right hip flexors. The rest of the neurological examination was unremarkable. MRI of the spine did not show any evidence of spinal disease. The patient was initiated on IV acyclovir with improvement of the lower limb weakness to MRC grading 5/5 as the vesicles improved. This is an interesting case as it highlights a rare presentation of zoster: segmental motor paresis that recovered fully with resolution of the rash. It shows the importance of recognizing motor neuropathy as a complication of shingles as it has a very good prognosis with most patients regaining full motor function of the affected limb with treatment. PMID:27313622

  6. A Rare Complication of Herpes Zoster: Segmental Zoster Paresis.

    PubMed

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Chawla, Mayank; Kaushik, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a common presentation in both the community and emergency department; however segmental zoster paresis is a rare complication that can lead to misdiagnosis. We present a case of a 74-year-old Indian gentleman with a background of well controlled diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischaemic heart disease who presented with sudden right lower limb weakness. This was preceded by a 5-day history of paraesthesia starting in the right foot and ascending up the right lower limb. On examination, there was a characteristic vesicular rash in the L2/3 region with MRC grading 3/5 in the right hip flexors. The rest of the neurological examination was unremarkable. MRI of the spine did not show any evidence of spinal disease. The patient was initiated on IV acyclovir with improvement of the lower limb weakness to MRC grading 5/5 as the vesicles improved. This is an interesting case as it highlights a rare presentation of zoster: segmental motor paresis that recovered fully with resolution of the rash. It shows the importance of recognizing motor neuropathy as a complication of shingles as it has a very good prognosis with most patients regaining full motor function of the affected limb with treatment. PMID:27313622

  7. Vocal fold paresis in Shy-Drager syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanson, D G; Ludlow, C L; Bassich, C J

    1983-01-01

    Twelve patients with Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS) presenting symptoms of multiple nervous system atrophy and orthostatic hypotension were examined for laryngeal movement disorders and vocal impairment in speech. Vocal fold abductor paresis was found in 11 patients and was bilateral in 10. Speech task performance was recorded in SDS patients, Parkinson patients and age- and sex-matched controls. Trained listeners with inter-rated reliability greater than or equal to .85 judged each recording on 20 attributes while blind to speaker identity. SDS patients had a breathy and strained voice quality, reduced loudness, monopitch and monoloudness, imprecise consonants, variations in rate and rate-slowing, suggesting a flaccid type of dysarthria. In comparison with Parkinson patients, SDS patients had excess vocal hoarseness, intermittent glottal fry and a slow and deliberate speaking rate. Orthostatic hypotension, laryngeal stridor, hoarseness, intermittent glottal fry and slow speech rate were found to be discriminating symptoms of SDS. PMID:6824289

  8. An Unusual Case of Neuralgic Amyotrophy Presenting with Bilateral Phrenic Nerve and Vocal Cord Paresis

    PubMed Central

    Holtbernd, F.; Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, A. am; Duning, T.; Kemmling, A.; Ringelstein, E.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuralgic amyotrophy (brachial plexus neuropathy, brachial plexus neuritis, or Parsonage-Turner syndrome) is an uncommon inflammatory condition typically characterized by acute and severe shoulder pain followed by paresis with muscle weakness and atrophy of the upper limb or shoulder girdle. We report an unusual clinical manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy, namely bilateral phrenic nerve palsy with concomitant laryngeal paresis. Case Report A 55-year-old male presented with orthopnea and aphonia after an episode of bilateral shoulder pain preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Spirometry, chest X-ray and videolaryngoscopy revealed bilateral and simultaneous paresis of the diaphragm and the vocal cords. Clinical examination at admission and at the 2-month follow-up did not show upper limb weakness or atrophy, except for a mild atrophy of the right supraspinatus muscle. An electromyography of the upper limb muscles and nerve conduction studies did not reveal signs of denervation. Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid and an MRI of the neuraxis were unremarkable. After treatment with prednisolone, vocal cord function markedly improved within 8 weeks, whereas paresis of the diaphragm persisted. Conclusion Shoulder pain followed by diaphragmatic paralysis with dyspnea and hoarseness may be a manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy even if upper limb or shoulder girdle palsies are absent. PMID:21490716

  9. Prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following continuous interscalene brachial plexus block: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Byung-Gun; Jung, Jong Kwon; Kwon, Hee Uk; Yang, Chunwoo; Won, Jonghun

    2016-06-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block provides effective anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder surgery. One of the disadvantages of this technique is the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis, which can occur as a result of phrenic nerve block and can cause a decrease in the pulmonary function, limiting the use of the block in patients with reduced functional residual capacity or a preexisting pulmonary disease. However, it is generally transient and is resolved over the duration of the local anesthetic's action.We present a case of a patient who experienced prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block for the postoperative pain management of shoulder surgery, and suggest a mechanism that may have led to this adverse effect.Nerve injuries associated with peripheral nerve blocks may be caused by several mechanisms. Our findings suggest that perioperative nerve injuries can occur as a result of combined mechanical and chemical injuries. PMID:27310984

  10. Zoster paresis: asymptomatic MRI lesions far beyond the site of rash and focal weakness.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jean; Bert, Robert J; Gilden, Don

    2013-07-15

    We describe a patient with zoster paresis and an MRI that revealed extensive spinal cord lesions from the upper cervical to the lower thoracic spinal cord. Importantly, the patient reported considerable spontaneous improvement in strength 2-3 weeks after zoster. This report reveals a previously undescribed remarkable preponderance of MRI lesions far beyond the site of zoster rash and focal lower motor neuron weakness. PMID:23628467

  11. Use of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to prevent parturient paresis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Goff, J P; Horst, R L; Beitz, D C; Littledike, E T

    1988-05-01

    Forty-one aged Jersey cows were fed a high Ca diet prior to parturition to predispose them to parturient paresis. Twenty-one of the cows were treated with 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, a synthetic analogue of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, 7 d before the expected parturition. Treated cows received either 100 micrograms (n = 7) or 150 micrograms (n = 14) of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, intramuscularly at 7-d intervals until the cow calved. Incidence of parturient paresis among untreated animals was 85% (17/20). Injections of 100 micrograms of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 reduced the incidence of parturient paresis to 43% (3/7), whereas 150 micrograms injections of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 reduced the incidence of parturient paresis to 29% (4/14). Plasma concentrations of hydroxyproline were not elevated prior to parturition in 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-treated cows, indicating that treatment did not stimulate bone resorption and that the ability of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to prevent parturient paresis likely resides in its ability to stimulate intestinal Ca absorption prior to parturition. Further, cows treated with 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 that developed parturient paresis had lower than normal plasma concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, indicating that 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 treatment impairs the metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in response to hypocalcemia. These data suggest that injection of 24-F-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, delivered at 7-d intervals prior to parturition, can effectively reduce incidence of parturient paresis in dairy cows. PMID:3397418

  12. Ipsilateral hemiparesis and contralateral lower limb paresis caused by anterior cerebral artery territory infarct.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongfeng; Liu, Lan

    2016-07-01

    Ipsilateral hemiparesis is rare after a supratentorial stroke, and the role of reorganization in the motor areas of unaffected hemisphere is important for the rehabilitation of the stroke patients. In this study, we present a patient who had a subclinical remote infarct in the right pons developed ipsilateral hemiparesis and contralateral lower limb paresis caused by a new infarct in the left anterior cerebral artery territory. Our case suggests that the motor areas of the unaffected hemisphere might be reorganized after stroke, which is important for the rehabilitation of stroke patients. PMID:27356659

  13. Recurrent isolated abducens nerve paresis associated with persistent trigeminal artery variant.

    PubMed

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Mamada, Naomi; Shiigai, Masanari; Shimizu, Kotone; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Tamaoka, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We report a 74-year-old woman who presented with recurrent isolated abducens nerve paresis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the right abducens nerve was sandwiched between the right internal carotid artery and a persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) variant, which might have led to neurovascular compression of the abducens nerve, resulting in abducens nerve damage. Normal variants of PTA, which are cerebellar arteries originating from a precavernous portion of the internal carotid artery, must be carefully observed as such variants can potentially cause a neurovascular compression of the abducens nerve. PMID:22892506

  14. General paresis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: Decreased language ability (aphasia) Decreased motivation Impaired judgment Loss of ability to calculate Loss ... Treating primary syphilis and secondary syphilis infections will ... as limiting partners and using protection, may reduce the risk ...

  15. General paresis

    MedlinePlus

    ... those of dementia and may include: Memory problems Language problems, such as saying or writing words incorrectly Decreased mental function, such as problems thinking and with judgment Mood changes Personality changes, such ...

  16. [Efficacy of oral calcium and/or sodium phosphate in the prevention of parturient paresis in cows].

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Bryce, B; Liesegang, A; Hässig, M; Bleul, U

    2008-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of calcium chloride, sodium phosphate or a combination of these two substances administered orally immediately postpartum for the prevention of parturient paresis in cows. Thirty-two cows that had had parturient paresis at the previous calving, and in which serum biochemistry had shown hypocalcaemia and hypophosphataemia, were used in the study. The cows were transferred to the Department of Farm Animals, University of Zurich, five days before their expected due dates. On a randomized trial, the cows were given calcium chloride, sodium phosphate, both substances or no treatment (controls) via a stomach tube immediately postpartum and 12 hours later. The cows were monitored for 96 hours during which time blood was collected on a regular basis for the determination of total calcium, ionized calcium, inorganic phosphorus and magnesium concentrations. Of the 32 cows treated, 19 (59%) had parturient paresis and 13 (41%) did not. The incidence of parturient paresis did not differ significantly among the groups although there was a tendency for a lower incidence in cows treated with both calcium chloride and sodium phosphate. The various treatments had no apparent effect on serum calcium concentration. The concentration of inorganic phosphorus increased significantly in cows treated with sodium phosphate compared with the controls. The results of this study showed that cows treated with both calcium chloride and sodium phosphate orally tended to have a lower incidence of parturient paresis. Further investigation into multiple administrations of oral calcium chloride and sodium phosphate, started before parturition, for the prevention of parturient paresis is required. PMID:18714936

  17. Recurring hypocalcemia of bovine parturient paresis is associated with failure to produce 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

    PubMed

    Goff, J P; Reinhardt, T A; Horst, R L

    1989-07-01

    Parturient paresis (milk fever) is a hypocalcemic disorder caused by the onset of lactation in the dairy cow. In most cows a complete recovery follows a single iv calcium treatment to correct the acute hypocalcemia. However, about 20% of cows treated for parturient paresis experience recurring episodes of hypocalcemia (relapses) requiring further treatment. Analysis of plasma from 8 nonrelapsing parturient paretic and 11 relapsing parturient paretic cows revealed differences in plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D] concentrations before and during the development of hypocalcemia. In nonrelapsing cows, plasma 1,25-(OH)2D increased to 4- to 5-fold as plasma calcium concentrations declined during the first stage of parturient paresis. In relapsing cows, decreases in plasma calcium concentrations during the first stage of parturient paresis were accompanied by just a 2- to 2.5-fold increase in plasma 1,25-(OH)2D. Plasma 1,25-(OH)2D eventually increased 4- to 5-fold in the relapsing cows, but this response was delayed 24-48 h compared with the response in the nonrelapsing cows. Plasma PTH concentration profiles were similar in relapsing and nonrelapsing cows, suggesting that renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1 alpha-hydroxylase was temporarily refractory to stimulation by PTH in the relapsing cows. In both groups of cows recovery from parturient paresis began about 12-24 h after plasma 1,25-(OH)2D concentrations had increased 4- to 5-fold. These data imply that lack of production of 1,25-(OH)2D is an important factor in predisposing the cow to relapses of parturient paresis and is critical for recovery from the hypocalcemia associated with the onset of lactation. PMID:2737159

  18. Effect of intravenous calcium and oral sodium phosphate in cows with parturient paresis.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Dumelin, J; Siegwart, N; Bleul, U; Hässig, M

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether oral administration of sodium phosphate in conjunction with intravenous calcium is more efficaceous than intravenous calcium alone for the treatment of parturient paresis. Thirty cows with parturient paresis were examined and treated by the same veterinarian. The cows were divided randomly into two groups of 15 cows each. Cows in group A received 500 ml of a 40 per cent calcium borogluconate solution containing 15.65 g calcium gluconate and borogluconate, with a supplement of 6 per cent magnesium hypophosphite (9.85 g magnesium hypophosphite) intravenously over a period of approximately 15 min. Cows in group B received the same treatment as well as 350 g of monobasic sodium phosphate (70 g inorganic phosphate, NaH2PO4 2 H2O, Streuli) dissolved in 0.5 litres of distilled water orally via a stomach tube. After treatment, the heart rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, superficial body temperature, rumen motility, appetite and defecation of the cows were monitored every hour for eight h. The cows' attempts to rise and their ability to stand were also noted. Initially, the results of clinical examination and serum electrolyte analyses did not differ between the two groups of cows. Within one hour of treatment, stupor was not observed in any of the cows. The general demeanour after treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups. In both groups, the average rectal temperature increased within two hours of the initiation of treatment, from 38.0 +/- 0.95 degrees C to 38.5 +/- 0.40 degrees C. There was no significant difference in the recovery rate between the groups. Of the 30 cows, 22 (73.3 per cent) stood within eight hours of treatment (10 cows from group A and 12 cows from group B). The type of treatment did not affect the time required to stand: cows in group A stood within 47.3 +/- 44 minutes and cows in group B stood within 24.2 +/- 32 minutes after the start of treatment. Our findings do not

  19. Ascending paresis as presentation of an unusual association between necrotizing autoimmune myopathy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    García-Reynoso, Marco Julio; Veramendi-Espinoza, Liz Eliana; Ruiz-Garcia, Henry Jeison

    2014-01-01

    A 45 year-old man went to the emergency room due to disease duration of 15 days of insidious onset and progressive course. It began with symmetrical weakness and pain in feet and ankles that extends upward to the knees. Later, this progressed to paraparesis with Creatine phosphokinase levels of 44,270 U/L and respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation. Electromyography and muscle biopsy of quadriceps were made. The patient responded to corticotherapy in pulses and supporting management. The presentation of ascending paresis suggested the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. However, the degree of muscle involvement with rhabdomyolysis explains the neurological damage by itself. The biopsy revealed pathological criteria for necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM), as well as other clinical and laboratory evidence. Patient disease continued and reached criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the NAM and SLE association. PMID:23906548

  20. [Radiation-Induced Radiculopathy with Paresis of the Neck and Autochthonous Back Muscles with Additional Myopathy].

    PubMed

    Ellrichmann, G; Lukas, C; Adamietz, I A; Grunwald, C; Schneider-Gold, C; Gold, R

    2016-06-01

    Radiation-induced tissue damage is caused by ionizing radiation mainly affecting the skin, vascular, neuronal or muscle tissue. Early damages occur within weeks and months while late damages may occur months or even decades after radiation.Radiation-induced paresis of the spine or the trunk muscles with camptocormia or dropped-head syndrome are rare but have already been described as long-term sequelae after treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma. The differential diagnosis includes limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) or lysosomal storage diseases (e. g. Acid Maltase Deficiency). We present the case of a patient with long lasting diagnostics over many months due to different inconclusive results. PMID:27391986

  1. Early hemi-diaphragmatic plication through a video assisted mini-thoracotomy in postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Visouli, Aikaterini N.; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Christofis, Christos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Courcoutsakis, Nicolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    New symptom onset of respiratory distress without other cause, and new hemi-diaphragmatic elevation on chest radiography postcardiotomy, are usually adequate for the diagnosis of phrenic nerve paresis. The symptom severity varies (asymptomatic state to severe respiratory failure) depending on the degree of the lesion (paresis vs. paralysis), the laterality (unilateral or bilateral), the age, and the co-morbidity (respiratory, cardiac disease, morbid obesity, etc). Surgical treatment (hemi-diaphragmatic plication) is indicated only in the presence of symptoms. The established surgical treatment is plication of the affected hemidiaphragm which is generally considered safe and effective. Several techniques and approaches are employed for diaphragmatic plication (thoracotomy, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, video-assisted mini-thoracotomy, laparoscopic surgery). The timing of surgery depends on the severity and the progression of symptoms. In infants and young children with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis the clinical status is usually severe (failure to wean from mechanical ventilation), and early plication is indicated. Adults with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis usually suffer from chronic dyspnoea, and, in the absence of respiratory distress, conservative treatment is recommended for 6 months -2 years, since improvement is often observed. Nevertheless, earlier surgical treatment may be indicated in non-resolving respiratory failure. We present early (25th day postcardiotomy) right hemi-diaphragm plication, through a video assisted mini-thoracotomy in a high risk patient with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis and respiratory distress. Early surgery with minimal surgical trauma, short operative time, minimal blood loss and postoperative pain, led to fast rehabilitation and avoidance of prolonged hospitalization complications. The relevant literature is discussed. PMID:23304442

  2. Deficit in late-stage contingent negative variation provides evidence for disrupted movement preparation in patients with conversion paresis.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Rebekah L; Hyland, Brian I; Hammond-Tooke, Graeme D; Anson, J Greg

    2015-07-01

    Conversion paresis is the presence of unexplained weakness without detectable neuropathology that is not feigned. To examine the 'abnormal preparation' and 'disrupted execution' hypotheses proposed to explain the movement deficits in conversion paresis, electroencephalographic, electromyographic and kinematic measures were recorded during motor preparation and execution. Six patients with unilateral upper limb conversion weakness, 24 participants feigning weakness and 12 control participants performed a 2-choice precued reaction time task. Precues provided advance information about the responding hand or finger. Patients and feigners demonstrated similar diminished force, longer movement time and extended duration of muscle activity in their symptomatic limb. Patients showed significantly suppressed contingent negative variation (CNV) amplitudes, but only when the symptomatic limb was precued. Despite the similarity in performance measures, this CNV suppression was not seen in feigners. Diminished CNV for symptomatic hand precues may reflect engagement of an inhibitory mechanism suppressing cortical activity related to preparatory processes. PMID:25951783

  3. Neurocysticercosis presenting as a vertical one-and-a-half syndrome with associated contralesional horizontal gaze paresis.

    PubMed

    Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Deleu, Dirk; D'souza, Atlantic; Imam, Yahia Zakaria Bashier; Melikyan, Gayane

    2012-12-15

    We describe a patient presenting with vertical one-and-a-half syndrome and concomitant contralesional horizontal gaze paresis as the result of a solitary neurocysticercosis (NCC) lesion in the right midbrain extending into the thalamomesencephalic junction. The patient received an albendazole-dexamethasone course which resulted in resolution of his symptoms. The neuro-ophthalmological complications of NCC are reviewed and the clinical topography of the neuro-ophthalmological findings of this unusual observation are discussed. PMID:22982000

  4. Pulmonary adenocarcinoma with osseous metastasis and secondary paresis in a blue and gold macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Daniel V; Carpenter, James W; Schumacher, Loni L; Shumacher, Loni L; Moon, Rachel S

    2012-12-01

    A 16-yr-old female blue and gold macaw (Ara ararauna) was presented with an acute history of lethargy, inappetance, ataxia, and paralysis. The bird had rapidly progressed from a normal state to complete inability to perch or ambulate within a 48-hr period. Neurologic examination revealed bilateral hind limb paresis with upper motor neuron signs present in both legs and the vent. Radiographs identified multiple nodular soft-tissue opacities within the cranial coelomic cavity and a single nodule superimposed with the thoracic spine. The bird was euthanized and submitted for necropsy, which revealed a primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with multiple sites of osseous metastasis, including the vertebrae, and subsequent spinal cord compression. This is the first report of pulmonary adenocarcinoma in this species, although reports of similar tumors in other psittacines have been published. This report, along with others previously published, suggests that vertebral metastasis of primary pulmonary tumors may be more common in psittacine species than previously recognized and, as such, should be considered as a differential diagnosis in psittacine birds exhibiting signs of neurologic dysfunction attributed to a spinal cord lesion. PMID:23272361

  5. Incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis after peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasound guided interscalene brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Ghodki, Poonam Sachin; Singh, Noopur Dasmit

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: We compared interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) using peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) and ultrasound (US) techniques. The primary outcomes were the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis (HDP) and the duration of the block. Secondary outcomes were the block success rate, time to conduct the block, onset of sensory block, and dermatomal spread, postoperative pain by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), duration of postoperative analgesia and incidence of complications. Material and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, and observer-blinded study in 60 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy under block plus general anesthesia. ISBPB was performed with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine using either PNS (Group PNS, n = 30) or US (Group US, n = 30). Hemidiaphragmatic function, the primary outcome, was assessed by ultrasonographic evaluation of diaphragmatic movement and pulmonary function tests using a bedside spirometer (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate). General anesthesia was administered to all the patients for surgery. P < 0.05 test was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Twelve patients in Group PNS had HDP and none in Group US (P < 0.0001). PFTs were also significantly reduced in Group PNS (P < 0.0001). The time to conduct the block and sensory onset time both were less in Group US (P < 0.05). The groups did not differ in block success rate, duration of analgesia, and NRS. Other complications like incidence of Horner's syndrome and vascular puncture were comparable in both the groups. Conclusions: PNS guided ISBPB with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine is associated with a higher incidence of HDP as compared to US guided ISBPB. There is no significant difference in quality or duration of analgesia in the two groups.

  6. Role of contralesional hemisphere in paretic arm reaching in patients with severe arm paresis due to stroke: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sambit; Harrington, Rachael; Chan, Evan; Dromerick, Alexander W; Breceda, Erika Y; Harris-Love, Michelle

    2016-03-23

    Stroke is highly prevalent and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability among American adults. Impaired movement (i.e. paresis) of the stroke-affected arm is a major contributor to post-stroke disability, yet the mechanisms of upper extremity motor recovery are poorly understood, particularly in severely impaired patients who lack hand function. To address this problem, we examined the functional relevance of the contralesional hemisphere in paretic arm motor performance in individuals with severe arm paresis. Twelve individuals with severe stroke-induced arm paresis (Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment=17.1 ± 8.5; maximum score=66) participated in the study. Participants performed a reaching response time task with their paretic arm. At varying time intervals following a 'Go' cue, a pair of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses were delivered to contralesional hemisphere primary motor (M1) or dorsal pre-motor cortex (PMd) to momentarily disrupt the pattern of neural firing. Response time components and hand-path characteristics were compared across the 2 sites for trials with and without TMS disruption. There was no significant effect of TMS disruption on overall Response time or Reaction time, but Movement time was significantly longer (i.e. slower) with disruption of the contralesional hemisphere (p=0.015), regardless of which area was stimulated. Peak hand-path velocity and hand-path smoothness were also significantly lower (p=0.005 and p<0.0001, respectively) with TMS disruption of the contralesional hemisphere. The data from this study provide evidence supporting a functionally relevant role of contralesional hemisphere motor areas in paretic arm reaching movements in individuals with severe post-stroke arm impairment. PMID:26872851

  7. Differential diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome in a patient with acute paresis of the abducens and oculomotor nerves.

    PubMed

    Gutzeit, Andreas; Roos, Justus E; Portocarrero-Fäh, Bettina; Reischauer, Carolin; Claas, Lulian; Gassmann, Karin; Hergan, Klaus; Kos, Sebastian; Rodic, Biliana; Winkler, Kerstin; Karrer, Urs; Sartoretti-Schefer, Sabine

    2013-06-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is characterized by anaerobic septicemia, internal jugular vein thrombosis, and septic emboli associated with infections of the head and neck. We describe an unusual and clinically confusing case of a young woman with an acute paresis of the abducens nerve and partial paresis of the right oculomotor nerve. After an extensive imaging diagnostic procedure, we also documented a peritonsillar abscess and various types of thromboses in intracranial and extracranial veins. Furthermore, we found brain and lung abscesses, which led us to establish the diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome. Despite intensive anti-coagulation and antibiotic therapy, the patient developed a mycotic aneurysm in the right internal carotid artery directly adjacent to the previously thrombosed cavernous sinus. In summary, we were able to confirm that Lemierre's syndrome may occur in conjunction with uncharacteristic symptoms. Due to the sometimes confusing clinical symptoms as well as clinical and radiological specialties, we had to work on an interdisciplinary basis to minimize the delay prior to establishing the diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23730118

  8. Differential Diagnosis of Lemierre's Syndrome in a Patient with Acute Paresis of the Abducens and Oculomotor Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Justus E.; Portocarrero-Fäh, Bettina; Reischauer, Carolin; Claas, Lulian; Gassmann, Karin; Hergan, Klaus; Kos, Sebastian; Rodic, Biliana; Winkler, Kerstin; Karrer, Urs; Sartoretti-Schefer, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is characterized by anaerobic septicemia, internal jugular vein thrombosis, and septic emboli associated with infections of the head and neck. We describe an unusual and clinically confusing case of a young woman with an acute paresis of the abducens nerve and partial paresis of the right oculomotor nerve. After an extensive imaging diagnostic procedure, we also documented a peritonsillar abscess and various types of thromboses in intracranial and extracranial veins. Furthermore, we found brain and lung abscesses, which led us to establish the diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome. Despite intensive anti-coagulation and antibiotic therapy, the patient developed a mycotic aneurysm in the right internal carotid artery directly adjacent to the previously thrombosed cavernous sinus. In summary, we were able to confirm that Lemierre's syndrome may occur in conjunction with uncharacteristic symptoms. Due to the sometimes confusing clinical symptoms as well as clinical and radiological specialties, we had to work on an interdisciplinary basis to minimize the delay prior to establishing the diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23730118

  9. Julius Wagner-Jauregg and the legacy of malarial therapy for the treatment of general paresis of the insane.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Cynthia J

    2013-06-01

    Julius Wagner-Jauregg, a preeminent Austrian psychiatrist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1927 for the development of malaria therapy for the treatment of neurosyphilis, or general paresis of the insane. Despite being only one of three psychiatrists to win a Nobel Prize, he has faded from public consciousness and his name recognition pales in comparison to his contemporary and fellow Austrian, Sigmund Freud. This paper explores his contributions to the field of biological psychiatry and also touches upon reasons, such as the growing bioethics movement, his controversial affiliation with the Nazi Party, and the evolution of neurosyphilis, that explain why Wagner-Jauregg is not more widely celebrated for his contributions to the field of psychiatry, even though his malarial treatment could be considered the earliest triumph of biological psychiatry over psychoanalysis. PMID:23766744

  10. Julius Wagner-Jauregg and the Legacy of Malarial Therapy for the Treatment of General Paresis of the Insane

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Cynthia J.

    2013-01-01

    Julius Wagner-Jauregg, a preeminent Austrian psychiatrist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1927 for the development of malaria therapy for the treatment of neurosyphilis, or general paresis of the insane. Despite being only one of three psychiatrists to win a Nobel Prize, he has faded from public consciousness and his name recognition pales in comparison to his contemporary and fellow Austrian, Sigmund Freud. This paper explores his contributions to the field of biological psychiatry and also touches upon reasons, such as the growing bioethics movement, his controversial affiliation with the Nazi Party, and the evolution of neurosyphilis, that explain why Wagner-Jauregg is not more widely celebrated for his contributions to the field of psychiatry, even though his malarial treatment could be considered the earliest triumph of biological psychiatry over psychoanalysis. PMID:23766744

  11. Postherpetic pseudohernia: delayed onset of paresis of abdominal muscles due to herpes zoster causing an ipsilateral abdominal bulge.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shunsuke; Togawa, Yasuhiro; Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Postherpetic pseudohernia causes an abdominal bulge as well as an abdominal wall herniation. This disease is one of the neurological complications of herpes zoster and essentially consists of paresis of ipsilateral abdominal muscles. Postherpetic pseudohernia may be mistaken for abdominal wall herniation because it is not well known. We describe two cases presenting an abdominal bulge. The ipsilateral abdominal bulge appeared after recovery from abdominal zoster. Abdominal CT showed no evidence of a herniation or mass. We diagnosed a postherpetic pseudohernia. One of the patients recovered spontaneously 4 months after the onset, and the other partially recovered after 2 months. This disease can be expected to disappear spontaneously, unlike abdominal herniation requiring surgery. It has been reported that 79.3% of patients eventually recovered spontaneously. For surgeons and general practitioners, it is beneficial to keep this disease in mind when examining a patient presenting an abdominal bulge. PMID:27229900

  12. Herpes zoster motor neuropathy in a patient with previous motor paresis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; de la Puente Bujidos, Carlos; de Blas Beorlegui, Gema; López San Román, Antonio; Peña Arrebola, Andrés

    2013-04-01

    Motor involvement in herpes zoster is very infrequent, occurring in 3%-5% of cases, and it is caused by extension of the inflammatory process to the anterior horn motor neurons, with the subsequent development of segmental motor paralysis. The authors report a 37-yr-old woman with history of paresis in both lower limbs secondary to spinal cord atrophy associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease and immunosuppression caused by chronic corticosteroid and azathioprine treatment of ulcerative colitis, who developed worsening of her baseline residual muscle strength in the right lower limb shortly after herpes zoster eruption. Electromyography revealed acute denervation in territories corresponding to L3-L4 and moderate widespread axonal polyneuropathy affecting both lower limbs. The patient recovered her baseline muscle strength after this event. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of herpes zoster motor neuropathy in a patient with a previous motor sequel. PMID:23221673

  13. The role of dietary calcium concentration in the use of anionic salts to prevent parturient paresis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gelfert, Carl-Christian; Staufenbiel, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The role of dietary calcium concentration during the feeding of anionic salts (AS) was reviewed. Hypocalcaemia is still the major cause of parturient paresis in dairy cows. Feeding AS is an established method for preventing severe hypocalcaemia by activating the calcium metabolism in the last two to three weeks before parturition by inducing a metabolic acidosis. In compensation for this acidosis, the organism increases the concentrations of ionised Ca [Ca2+] in the blood. This increase leads to an increasing excretion of calcium via the urine, which is ensued by an increased calcium absorption in the intestine. The ongoing metabolic acidosis changed the flux of Ca. The size of the Ca pool, however, remained unchanged. As the calcium metabolism is activated by AS, it seems necessary to increase the amount of calcium that is fed to the cows. Several studies examined the impact of different dietary calcium concentrations on the acid-base balance and the calcium metabolism in cows fed anionic salts. The study designs vary concerning the amounts of calcium fed and the use of pregnant or non-pregnant cows. Only one study combined the feeding of AS with a very low amount of calcium, which fell below the daily requirements of pregnant cows in the last three weeks before parturition. In this study, the calcium balance post partum was better in the cows that were administered AS and a high calcium diet. In the other studies, the amount of calcium in the different experimental groups and the difference between the amounts of calcium fed varied greatly. As far as it was monitored in the studies, the calcium concentration of the diet did not have a significant impact on the degree of acidosis induced by AS. In pregnant cows, no significant differences in the calcium concentration in serum or urine occurred before parturition. Some of the researchers found a lower incidence of parturient paresis when cows were fed a combination of AS and a higher amount of calcium, but some

  14. 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 plus 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 reduces parturient paresis in dairy cows fed high dietary calcium.

    PubMed

    Hodnett, D W; Jorgensen, N A; Deluca, H F

    1992-02-01

    The effectiveness of a combination of 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 for reducing incidence of parturient paresis in aged Holstein cows was tested. Intramuscular injection of .5 mg of 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 plus 4 mg of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 increased plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations through parturition. Treatment with 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 plus 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 raised prepartum serum Ca approximately 2 mg/dl and prepartum serum P approximately 4 to 5 mg/dl higher than untreated controls. Both treated and control cows had approximately a 2-mg/dl decrease in serum Ca following parturition. The prepartum diet of alfalfa silage and hay was supplemented with a grain mixture supplying 100 g of Ca/d from ground limestone. Under these dietary conditions, incidence of parturient paresis was reduced from 33 to 8%. In a separate experiment, treatment with 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 plus 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 did not reduce incidence of parturient paresis when cows consumed mixed diets of different feed-stuff composition. Further experiments are required to determine specifically the factor or factors responsible for the difference in response to active vitamin D compound administration between the two experiments. Prepartum dietary Ca intake may be one such factor. PMID:1560144

  15. Splicing Defect in Mitochondrial Seryl-tRNA Synthetase Gene Causes Progressive Spastic Paresis Instead of HUPRA Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Linnankivi, Tarja; Neupane, Nirajan; Richter, Uwe; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are an important group of disease genes typically underlying either a disorder affecting an isolated tissue or a distinct syndrome. Missense mutations in the mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase gene, SARS2, have been identified in HUPRA syndrome (hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure in infancy, and alkalosis). We report here a homozygous splicing mutation in SARS2 in a patient with progressive spastic paresis. We show that the mutation leads to diminished levels of the synthetase in patient's fibroblasts. This has a destabilizing effect on the tRNASer(AGY) isoacceptor, but to a lesser degree than in HUPRA syndrome patients. tRNASer(UCN) is largely unaffected in both phenotypes. In conclusion, the level of tRNASer(AGY) instability may be a factor in determining tissue manifestation in patients with SARS2 mutations. This finding exemplifies the sensitivity of the nervous system to partially reduced aminoacylation, which is sufficient in other tissues to maintain respiratory chain function. PMID:27279129

  16. Homozygous HOXB1 loss-of-function mutation in a large family with hereditary congenital facial paresis.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Markus; Velleuer, Eunike; Schmidt-Jiménez, Leon F; Mayatepek, Ertan; Borkhardt, Arndt; Alawi, Malik; Kutsche, Kerstin; Kortüm, Fanny

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary congenital facial paresis (HCFP) belongs to the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders. HCFP is characterized by the isolated dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve and can be associated with hearing loss, strabismus, and orofacial anomalies. Möbius syndrome shares facial palsy with HCFP, but is additionally characterized by limited abduction of the eye(s). Genetic heterogeneity has been documented for HCFP as one locus mapped to chromosome 3q21-q22 (HCFP1) and a second to 10q21.3-q22.1 (HCFP2). The only known causative gene for HCFP is HOXB1 (17q21; HCFP3), encoding a homeodomain-containing transcription factor of the HOX gene family, which are master regulators of early developmental processes. The previously reported HOXB1 mutations change arginine 207 to another residue in the homeodomain and alter binding capacity of HOXB1 for transcriptional co-regulators and DNA. We performed whole exome sequencing in HCFP-affected individuals of a large consanguineous Moroccan family. The homozygous nonsense variant c.66C>G/p.(Tyr22*) in HOXB1 was identified in the four patients with HCFP and ear malformations, while healthy family members carried the mutation in the heterozygous state. This is the first disease-associated HOXB1 mutation with a likely loss-of-function effect suggesting that all HOXB1 variants reported so far also have severe impact on activity of this transcriptional regulator. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27144914

  17. A case of hemifacial paresis in a patient with Lyme neuroborreliosis treated with antibiotics in whom Borrelia meningitis developed.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hisao; Haratani, Koji; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Kakehi, Yoshiaki; Nagami, Shuhei; Katanami, Yuichi; Kawabata, Hiroki; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-28

    A 38-year-old man visited our hospital because of hemifacial paresis that developed 2 months after being bit by a tick. We diagnosed idiopathic peripheral facial palsy and gave the patient oral prednisolone and valacyclovir. Although the symptoms completely resolved in about 2 weeks, there was a risk of Lyme neuroborreliosis. The patient therefore received doxycycline (100 mg twice daily) and amoxicillin (1,000 mg 3 times daily) for 14 days. Two months later, he had symptoms of meningitis such as headache and fever accompanied by lymphocytic cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Viral meningitis was diagnosed and treated with parenteral acyclovir. The symptoms of meningitis improved. Tests for serum IgG antibodies against borrelia were positive. We gave the patient a diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis. The patient received intravenous ceftriaxone and had no relapse. It is a rare for meningitis to develop in a patient with cranial neuropathy who received doxycycline. Lyme neuroborreliosis is a rare disease in Japan. Care should therefore be exercised in the diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis and evaluation of the response to treatment. PMID:27356734

  18. [Delayed paresis of the femoral nerve after total hip arthroplasty associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP)].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Dürr, V; Weier, H; Zeiler, G; Winterholler, M

    2004-07-01

    Delayed lesions of the femoral or sciatic nerve are a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty. Several cases in association with cement edges, scar tissue, broken cerclages, deep hematoma, or reinforcement rings have been published. We report about a 62-year-old female who developed a pure motor paresis of the quadriceps muscle 2 weeks after total hip arthroplasty. After electrophysiological evaluation had revealed an isolated femoral nerve lesion, revision of the femoral nerve was performed. During operative revision no pathologic findings could be seen. One week later the patient developed paralysis of the left wrist and finger extensors after using crutches. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed several nerve conduction blocks in physiological entrapments and the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was established. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a rare disease with increased vulnerability of the peripheral nerve system with mostly reversible sensorimotor deficits. It should be taken into consideration in cases of atypical findings of compression syndromes of peripheral nerves or delayed neuropathy, e. g., after total hip arthroplasty. PMID:15083272

  19. [The Mysterious Paresis].

    PubMed

    Biskup, Ewelina; Necek, Magdalena; Changjin, Qu; Xue, Guanhua

    2016-04-27

    Internal jugular central venous line placement is a standardized and common clinical procedure. However, even the most skillful physician may face complications. Careful patient evaluation and detailed vascular anatomical knowledge can minimize the risk of iatrogenic injuries. Following a strict protocol in case of unsuccessful attempts of venous puncture helps to improve patient outcome. In this case report, we present a patient who suffered an unusual injury. Further, we discuss current treatment options for pseudoaneurysms. PMID:27120214

  20. Therapeutic synergism in the treatment of post-stroke arm paresis utilizing botulinum toxin, robotic therapy, and constraint-induced movement therapy.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Takashi; Amano, Satoru; Hanada, Keisuke; Umeji, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kayoko; Koyama, Tetsuo; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2014-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BtxA) injection, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), and robotic therapy (RT) each represent promising approaches to enhance arm motor recovery after stroke. To provide more effective treatment for a 50-year-old man with severe left spastic hemiparesis, we attempted to facilitate CIMT with adaptive approaches to extend the wrist and fingers using RT for 10 consecutive weeks after BtxA injection. This combined treatment resulted in substantial improvements in arm function and the amount of arm use in activities of daily living, and may be effective for stroke patients with severe arm paresis. However, we were unable to sufficiently prove the efficacy of combined treatment based only on a single case. To fully elucidate the efficacy of the combined approach for patients with severe hemiparesis after stroke, future studies of a larger number of patients are needed. PMID:24880058

  1. Use of a robotic device for the rehabilitation of severe upper limb paresis in subacute stroke: exploration of patient/robot interactions and the motor recovery process.

    PubMed

    Duret, Christophe; Courtial, Ophélie; Grosmaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Hutin, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    This pioneering observational study explored the interaction between subacute stroke inpatients and a rehabilitation robot during upper limb training. 25 stroke survivors (age 55 ± 17 years; time since stroke, 52 ± 21 days) with severe upper limb paresis carried out 16 sessions of robot-assisted shoulder/elbow training (InMotion 2.0, IMT, Inc., MA, USA) combined with standard therapy. The values of 3 patient/robot interaction parameters (a guidance parameter: Stiffness, a velocity-related parameter: Slottime, and Robotic Power) were compared between sessions 1 (S1), 4 (S4), 8 (S8), 12 (S12), and 16 (S16). Pre/post Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores were compared in 18 patients. Correlations between interaction parameters and clinical and kinematic outcome measures were evaluated. Slottime decreased at S8 (P = 0.003), while Guidance decreased at S12 (P = 0.008). Robotic Power tended to decrease until S16. FMA scores improved from S1 to S16 (+49%, P = 0.002). Changes in FMA score were correlated with the Stiffness parameter (R = 0.4, P = 0.003). Slottime was correlated with movement velocity. This novel approach demonstrated that a robotic device is a useful and reliable tool for the quantification of interaction parameters. Moreover, changes in these parameters were correlated with clinical and kinematic changes. These results suggested that robot-based recordings can provide new insights into the motor recovery process. PMID:25821804

  2. Use of a Robotic Device for the Rehabilitation of Severe Upper Limb Paresis in Subacute Stroke: Exploration of Patient/Robot Interactions and the Motor Recovery Process

    PubMed Central

    Courtial, Ophélie; Grosmaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Hutin, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    This pioneering observational study explored the interaction between subacute stroke inpatients and a rehabilitation robot during upper limb training. 25 stroke survivors (age 55 ± 17 years; time since stroke, 52 ± 21 days) with severe upper limb paresis carried out 16 sessions of robot-assisted shoulder/elbow training (InMotion 2.0, IMT, Inc., MA, USA) combined with standard therapy. The values of 3 patient/robot interaction parameters (a guidance parameter: Stiffness, a velocity-related parameter: Slottime, and Robotic Power) were compared between sessions 1 (S1), 4 (S4), 8 (S8), 12 (S12), and 16 (S16). Pre/post Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores were compared in 18 patients. Correlations between interaction parameters and clinical and kinematic outcome measures were evaluated. Slottime decreased at S8 (P = 0.003), while Guidance decreased at S12 (P = 0.008). Robotic Power tended to decrease until S16. FMA scores improved from S1 to S16 (+49%, P = 0.002). Changes in FMA score were correlated with the Stiffness parameter (R = 0.4, P = 0.003). Slottime was correlated with movement velocity. This novel approach demonstrated that a robotic device is a useful and reliable tool for the quantification of interaction parameters. Moreover, changes in these parameters were correlated with clinical and kinematic changes. These results suggested that robot-based recordings can provide new insights into the motor recovery process. PMID:25821804

  3. [Does the administration of derivatives of vitamin D to dairy cows in late pregnancy for the prevention of parturient paresis affect the maternal-fetal mineral metabolism?].

    PubMed

    Zepperitz, H; Grün, E

    1993-06-01

    Intramuscular injection of 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 (with or without 25-hydroxyvitamin D3) to highly pregnant dairy cows caused a significant increase of ionized calcium in blood and of total calcium and inorganic phosphate with a concomitant decrease of magnesium in blood plasma 3,5 +/- 1,9 days later (resp. 12-48 h a.p.). This brought about a higher Ca level at parturition preventing parturient paresis. The changes of maternal mineral and vitamin D status had no effect on the mineral concentrations of blood in newborn calves. However, the increase in calcium and phosphate concentrations in maternal blood after injection was accompanied by an increase of the minerals in the amniotic fluid reflecting their strong reciprocal exchange. On the other hand, the composition of allantoic fluid showed no significant changes. Therefore, analysis of both fetal fluids does not refer to disorders of fetal mineral metabolism. As a consequence, there seems to be no potential risk of intoxication after a prepartal injection of the substances to the mother for their offspring. PMID:8343105

  4. Could Local Dynamic Stability Serve as an Early Predictor of Falls in Patients with Moderate Neurological Gait Disorders? A Reliability and Comparison Study in Healthy Individuals and in Patients with Paresis of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Fabienne; Vuadens, Philippe; Deriaz, Olivier; Terrier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Falls while walking are frequent in patients with muscular dysfunction resulting from neurological disorders. Falls induce injuries that may lead to deconditioning and disabilities, which further increase the risk of falling. Therefore, an early gait stability index would be useful to evaluate patients in order to prevent the occurrence of future falls. Derived from chaos theory, local dynamic stability (LDS), defined by the maximal Lyapunov exponent, assesses the sensitivity of a dynamic system to small perturbations. LDS has already been used for fall risk prediction in elderly people. The aim of the present study was to provide information to facilitate future researches regarding gait stability in patients with neurological gait disorders. The main objectives were 1) to evaluate the intra-session repeatability of LDS in patients and 2) to assess the discriminative power of LDS to differentiate between healthy individuals and neurological patients. Eighty-three patients with mild to moderate neurological disorders associated with paresis of the lower extremities and 40 healthy controls participated in the study. The participants performed 2×30 s walking wearing a 3D accelerometer attached to the lower back, from which 2×35 steps were extracted. LDS was defined as the average exponential rate of divergence among trajectories in a reconstructed state-space that reflected the gait dynamics. LDS assessed along the medio-lateral axis offered the highest repeatability and discriminative power. Intra-session repeatability (intraclass correlation coefficient between the two repetitions) in the patients was 0.89 and the smallest detectable difference was 16%. LDS was substantially lower in the patients than in the controls (33% relative difference, standardized effect size 2.3). LDS measured in short over-ground walking tests seems sufficiently reliable. LDS exhibits good discriminative power to differentiate fall-prone individuals and opens up the possibility of

  5. Transient quadriceps paresis following cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, George A

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old man presented with bilateral thigh muscle paralysis several hours after intranasal cocaine use. His blood results showed a creatine kinase (CK) level of 3447 u/L and a normal renal function. He made a marked recovery in just 2 h following the intravenous normal saline 0.9%, and was able to walk. He was discharged home the next day. PMID:24395880

  6. [Bilateral vocal cord paresis after total thyroidectomy].

    PubMed

    Dralle, H; Neu, J; Musholt, T J; Nies, C

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old female patient complained of hoarseness and dyspnea under exertion following total thyroidectomy. Due to a faulty operating technique both nerves to the vocal cords were damaged. From the operation report it emerged that the dissection was carried out by protecting the border lamellae but the recurrent laryngeal nerve could not be found on both sides. This article presents the external expert opinion, the decision of the arbitration board and the assessment of the case by two specialist physicians. PMID:26683653

  7. From Paresis to PANDAS and PANS

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Management of bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis after thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sanapala, Anitha; Nagaraju, Male; Rao, Lella Nageswara; Nalluri, Koteswar

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is rare for benign thyroid lesions (0.2%). After extubation-stridor, respiratory distress, aphonia occurs due to the closure of the glottic aperture necessitating immediate intervention and emergency intubation or tracheostomy. Intra-operative identification and preservation of the RLN minimizes the risk of injury. It is customary to expect RLN problems after thyroid surgery especially if malignancy, big thyroid, distorted anatomical problems and difficult airway that can lead to intubation trauma. Soon after extubating, it is essential to the anesthetist to check the vocal cord movements on phonation and oropharyngeal reflexes competency. But this case is specially mentioned to convey the message that in spite of absence of above mentioned predisposing factors for complications and good recovery profile specific to thyroid, there can be unanticipated airway compromise that if not attended to immediately may cost patient's life. This is a case of postextubation stridor following subtotal thyroidectomy due to bilateral RLN damage and its management. PMID:26417137

  9. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Simoceli, Lucinda; Sguillar, Danilo Anunciatto; Santos, Henrique Mendes Paiva; Caputti, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective: The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation. Conclusion: Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations. PMID:25991947

  10. Using Laryngeal Electromyography to Differentiate Presbylarynges from Paresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stager, Sheila V.; Bielamowicz, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Differential diagnosis of patients over 64 years of age reporting hoarseness is challenging. Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) was used to determine the status of the recurrent and superior laryngeal nerves. The authors hypothesized that individuals with hoarseness but normal LEMG would have measures similar to those of patients from…

  11. Grey matter volumetric changes related to recovery from hand paresis after cortical sensorimotor stroke.

    PubMed

    Abela, E; Seiler, A; Missimer, J H; Federspiel, A; Hess, C W; Sturzenegger, M; Weder, B J; Wiest, R

    2015-09-01

    Preclinical studies using animal models have shown that grey matter plasticity in both perilesional and distant neural networks contributes to behavioural recovery of sensorimotor functions after ischaemic cortical stroke. Whether such morphological changes can be detected after human cortical stroke is not yet known, but this would be essential to better understand post-stroke brain architecture and its impact on recovery. Using serial behavioural and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements, we tracked recovery of dexterous hand function in 28 patients with ischaemic stroke involving the primary sensorimotor cortices. We were able to classify three recovery subgroups (fast, slow, and poor) using response feature analysis of individual recovery curves. To detect areas with significant longitudinal grey matter volume (GMV) change, we performed tensor-based morphometry of MRI data acquired in the subacute phase, i.e. after the stage compromised by acute oedema and inflammation. We found significant GMV expansion in the perilesional premotor cortex, ipsilesional mediodorsal thalamus, and caudate nucleus, and GMV contraction in the contralesional cerebellum. According to an interaction model, patients with fast recovery had more perilesional than subcortical expansion, whereas the contrary was true for patients with impaired recovery. Also, there were significant voxel-wise correlations between motor performance and ipsilesional GMV contraction in the posterior parietal lobes and expansion in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In sum, perilesional GMV expansion is associated with successful recovery after cortical stroke, possibly reflecting the restructuring of local cortical networks. Distant changes within the prefrontal-striato-thalamic network are related to impaired recovery, probably indicating higher demands on cognitive control of motor behaviour. PMID:24906703

  12. Lesions to Primary Sensory and Posterior Parietal Cortices Impair Recovery from Hand Paresis after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Abela, Eugenio; Missimer, John; Wiest, Roland; Federspiel, Andrea; Hess, Christian; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Weder, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuroanatomical determinants of motor skill recovery after stroke are still poorly understood. Although lesion load onto the corticospinal tract is known to affect recovery, less is known about the effect of lesions to cortical sensorimotor areas. Here, we test the hypothesis that lesions of somatosensory cortices interfere with the capacity to recover motor skills after stroke. Methods Standardized tests of motor skill and somatosensory functions were acquired longitudinally over nine months in 29 patients with stroke to the pre- and postcentral gyrus, including adjacent areas of the frontal, parietal and insular cortices. We derived the recovery trajectories of each patient for five motor subtest using least-squares curve fitting and objective model selection procedures for linear and exponential models. Patients were classified into subgroups based on their motor recovery models. Lesions were mapped onto diffusion weighted imaging scans and normalized into stereotaxic space using cost-function masking. To identify critical neuranatomical regions, voxel-wise subtractions were calculated between subgroup lesion maps. A probabilistic cytoarchitectonic atlas was used to quantify of lesion extent and location. Results Twenty-three patients with moderate to severe initial deficits showed exponential recovery trajectories for motor subtests that relied on precise distal movements. Those that retained a chronic motor deficit had lesions that extended to the center of the somatosensory cortex (area 2) and the intraparietal sulcus (areas hIP1, hIP2). Impaired recovery outcome correlated with lesion extent on this areas and somatosensory performance. The rate of recovery, however, depended on the lesion load onto the primary motor cortex (areas 4a, 4p). Conclusions Our findings support a critical role of uni-and multimodal somatosensory cortices in motor skill recovery. Whereas lesions to these areas influence recovery outcome, lesions to the primary motor cortex affect recovery dynamics. This points to a possible dissociation of neural substrates for different aspects of post-stroke recovery. PMID:22363604

  13. Superficial peroneal nerve paresis in a dancer caused by a midfoot ganglion: case report.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darrell; Dowling, Jamie; Rowan, Fiachra; Casey, Mary; O'Grady, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Ganglion cysts are common benign masses, usually occurring in the hands and feet. This report describes the case of a young female Irish dancer who presented with paresthesia of her foot due to a ganglion in near proximity to the superficial peroneal nerve. Midfoot ganglia in young girls engaged in Irish dance can limit their ability to participate. This pathology requires further epidemiological studies to investigate its prevalence. In the event of failed conservative management, surgical intervention to excise the cyst and decompress the nerve is an effective treatment to facilitate return to dancing. PMID:26045399

  14. Distal hereditary motor neuropathy with vocal cord paresis: from difficulty in choral singing to a molecular genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Gillian; Barwick, Katy E S; Hartley, Louise; McEntagart, Meriel; Crosby, Andrew H; Llewelyn, Gareth; Morris, Huw R

    2016-06-01

    Patients presenting with distal weakness can be a diagnostic challenge; the eventual diagnosis often depends upon accurate clinical phenotyping. We present a mother and daughter with a rare form of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7 in whom the diagnosis became apparent by initial difficulty in singing, from early vocal cord dysfunction. This rare neuropathy has now been identified in two apparently unrelated families in Wales. This family's clinical presentation is typical of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7, and they have the common truncating mutation in the SLC5A7 gene. Advances in genetic analysis of these rare conditions broaden our understanding of their potential molecular mechanisms and may allow more directed therapy. PMID:26786006

  15. Delayed onset of paresis in rats with experimental intramedullary spinal cord gliosarcoma following intratumoral administration of the paclitaxel delivery system OncoGel

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Betty M.; Hdeib, Alia; Caplan, Justin; Legnani, Federico G.; Fowers, Kirk D.; Brem, Henry; Jallo, George; Pradilla, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Object Treatment options for anaplastic or malignant intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) remain limited. Paclitaxel has potent cytotoxicity against experimental intracranial gliomas and could be beneficial in the treatment of IMSCTs, but poor CNS penetration and significant toxicity limit its use. Such limitations could be overcome with local intratumoral delivery. Paclitaxel has been previously incorporated into a biodegradable gel depot delivery system (OncoGel) and in this study the authors evaluated the safety of intramedullary injections of OncoGel in rats and its efficacy against an intramedullary rat gliosarcoma. Methods Safety of intramedullary OncoGel was tested in 12 Fischer-344 rats using OncoGel concentrations of 1.5 and 6.0 mg/ml (5 μl); median survival and functional motor scores (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan [BBB] scale) were compared with those obtained with placebo (ReGel) and medium-only injections. Efficacy of OncoGel was tested in 61 Fischer-344 rats implanted with an intramedullary injection of 9L gliosarcoma containing 100,000 cells in 5 μl of medium, and randomized to receive OncoGel administered on the same day (in 32 rats) or 5 days after tumor implantation (in 29 rats) using either 1.5 mg/ml or 3.0 mg/ml doses of paclitaxel. Median survival and BBB scores were compared with those of ReGel-treated and tumor-only rats. Animals were killed after the onset of deficits for histopathological analysis. Results OncoGel was safe for intramedullary injection in rats in doses up to 5 μl of 3.0 mg/ml of paclitaxel; a dose of 5 μl of 6.0 mg/ml caused rapid deterioration in BBB scores. OncoGel at concentrations of 1.5 mg/ml and 3.0 mg/ml paclitaxel given on both Day 0 and Day 5 prolonged median survival and preserved BBB scores compared with controls. OncoGel 1.5 mg/ml produced 62.5% long-term survivors when delivered on Day 0. A comparison between the 1.5 mg/ml and the 3.0 mg/ml doses showed higher median survival with the 1.5 mg/ml dose on Day 0, and no differences in median survival or BBB scores after treatment on Day 5. Conclusions OncoGel is safe for intramedullary injection in rats in doses up to 5 μl of 3.0 mg/ml, prolongs median survival, and increases functional motor scores in rats challenged with an intramedullary gliosarcoma at the doses tested. This study suggests that locally delivered chemotherapeutic agents could be of temporary benefit in the treatment of malignant IMSCTs under experimental settings. PMID:22208429

  16. Use of 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 in prevention of bovine parturient paresis. 8. Maternal and neonatal plasma calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D metabolites concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bar, A; Striem, S; Perlman, R; Sachs, M

    1988-10-01

    Thirteen Israeli Friesian cows (3.71 average calvings) in the second or later lactation, fed a daily diet containing 90 g of Ca and 50 g of P, were injected once intramuscularly with 700 micrograms 1 alpha-hydroxy-vitamin D3 in order to investigate its placental transfer and its subsequent metabolism in the neonate. The injection of the vitamin 96 to 24 h before calving slightly increased plasma Ca at parturition, whereas uninjected controls displayed a prominent hypo-calcemia. On the 10th and 20th d after calving, difference in the plasma Ca concentration of the two groups was not significant. At parturition, plasma parathyroid hormone concentration was significantly higher and plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D lower in the control than in the treated cows. At parturition the plasma concentrations of Ca, parathyroid hormone, hydroxyproline, and 24,25-hydroxyvitamin D were higher in the calves than in their dams. Plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were markedly higher and 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D was slightly higher in cows than in their offsprings. PMID:3204189

  17. Use of 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 to prevent bovine parturient paresis. VI. Concentrations of vitamin D metabolites and vitamin D3 equivalence in milk.

    PubMed

    Bar, A; Sachs, M; Perlman, R

    1986-11-01

    Concentration of vitamin D metabolites was determined in the milk of control and 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3-injected (700 micrograms) cows that calved 36 to 43 h after treatment. Milk samples were taken 60 h after calving. Concentrations of vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in milk of the control cows were 372 +/- 24, 264 +/- 68, 68 +/- 26, and 21 +/- 3 ng/L, respectively. Concentrations of vitamin D metabolites in the milk of the treated cows did not differ significantly from those of controls. Concentration of 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 in milk of treated cows was less than 20 ng/L. In a second experiment, cows were injected twice, at 72-h intervals, with 350 micrograms 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3. Milk was taken 60 h after parturition from cows that calved 37 to 60 h after the second injection. The vitamin D3 equivalence of the milk was 40 +/- 3 IU/L. Results indicate that injection of 700 micrograms 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 did not affect the concentration of vitamin D metabolites or the vitamin D3 equivalence of milk taken 60 h after calving. PMID:3027149

  18. The Efficacy of Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Using Transcranial Electrically Stimulated Muscle-evoked Potentials (TcE-MsEPs) for Predicting Postoperative Segmental Upper Extremity Motor Paresis After Cervical Laminoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Hideki; Izumi, Bunichiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Kazumi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Prospective study. Objective: To investigate the efficacy of transcranial electrically stimulated muscle-evoked potentials (TcE-MsEPs) for predicting postoperative segmental upper extremity palsy following cervical laminoplasty. Summary of Background Data: Postoperative segmental upper extremity palsy, especially in the deltoid and biceps (so-called C5 palsy), is the most common complication following cervical laminoplasty. Some papers have reported that postoperative C5 palsy cannot be predicted by TcE-MsEPs, although others have reported that it can be predicted. Methods: This study included 160 consecutive cases that underwent open-door laminoplasty, and TcE-MsEP monitoring was performed in the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, abductor digiti minimi, tibialis anterior, and abductor hallucis. A >50% decrease in the wave amplitude was defined as an alarm point. According to the monitoring alarm, interventions were performed, which include steroid administration, foraminotomies, etc. Results: Postoperative deltoid and biceps palsy occurred in 5 cases. Among the 155 cases without segmental upper extremity palsy, there were no monitoring alarms. Among the 5 deltoid and biceps palsy cases, 3 had significant wave amplitude decreases in the biceps during surgery, and palsy occurred when the patients awoke from anesthesia (acute type). In the other 2 cases in which the palsy occurred 2 days after the operation (delayed type), there were no significant wave decreases. In all of the cases, the palsy was completely resolved within 6 months. Discussion: The majority of C5 palsies have been reported to occur several days after surgery, but some of them have been reported to occur immediately after surgery. Our results demonstrated that TcE-MsEPs can predict the acute type, whereas the delayed type cannot be predicted. Conclusions: A >50% wave amplitude decrease in the biceps is useful to predict acute-type segmental upper extremity palsy. Further examination about the interventions for monitoring alarm will be essential for preventing palsy. PMID:26147699

  19. [Vocal cord paralysis--analysis of a cohort of 400 patients].

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Pickhard, A; Smith, E; Hansch, K; Weber, T; Hoffmann, T K; Brosch, S

    2015-02-01

    Vocal cord paralysis has diverse etiologies. In the present study, vocal chord paralysis caused by surgery/trauma was present in more than two thirds of the cases, followed by primary malignancy-associated paralysis. Thyroidectomy was the most common cause in bilateral paresis, especially if performed in recurrent or malignant disease. Voice therapy was promising in pa-tients with unilateral paresis and hoarseness as main symptom. Persistent dysphonia due to insufficiency of the glottic closure led to an operative glottis restricting procedure in only 6% of cases. In almost half the patients with dyspnea as the main symp-tom of bilateral vocal cord paresis, temporary tracheotomy or surgical glottis widening procedures had to be performed. The group of idiopathic and traumatic paresis patients showed the best spontaneous recovery within the first 12 months in comparison to primary malignancy-associated paralysis, which showed no recovery of the recurrens nerve. PMID:24676872

  20. Neurological Principles and Rehabilitation of Action Disorders: Common Clinical Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Sathian, K.; Buxbaum, Laurel J.; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Krakauer, John W.; Lang, Catherine E.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Fitzpatrick, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we use the CAP principles to consider the impact of common clinical problems on action. We focus on three major syndromes: paresis, apraxia and ataxia. We also review mechanisms that could account for spontaneous recovery, using what is known about the best studied clinical dysfunction, paresis, and also ataxia. Together, this and the previous paper lay the groundwork for the third paper in this series, which reviews the relevant rehabilitative interventions. PMID:21613535

  1. Herpetic Brachial Plexopathy: Application of Brachial Plexus Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound-Guided Corticosteroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Gil; Chung, Sun G

    2016-05-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly known as shingles, is an infectious viral disease characterized by painful, unilateral skin blisters occurring in specific sensory dermatomes. Motor paresis is reported in 0.5% to 5% of patients. Although the mechanism of zoster paresis is still unclear, the virus can spread from the dorsal root ganglia to the anterior horn cell or anterior spinal nerve roots. It rarely involves the brachial plexus. We report a case of brachial plexitis following herpes zoster infection in which pathological lesions were diagnosed using brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging and treated with ultrasound-guided perineural corticosteroid injection. PMID:26829085

  2. [Neurosyphilis and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroko; Ando, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of neurosyphilis has declined dramatically because of the availability of penicillin. However, in recent years there has been an increase in the occurence of neurosyphilis. General paresis, a form of parenchymatous neurosyphilis, causes dementia. Some of the symptoms include loss of memory, poor understanding and judgment, and behavioral changes. It is important to distinguish general paresis from neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, because with precise diagnosis and treatment, complete recovery is possible We describe epidemiological data, diagnosis and treatment of neurosyphilis as well as present our cases. PMID:27056849

  3. A randomised controlled trial comparing continuous supraclavicular and interscalene brachial plexus blockade for open rotator cuff surgery.

    PubMed

    Koh, W U; Kim, H J; Park, H S; Choi, W J; Yang, H S; Ro, Y J

    2016-06-01

    Continuous interscalene block is an approved modality for postoperative pain control, but it may cause hemidiaphragmatic paresis. In this study we aimed to determine whether continuous supraclavicular block would provide postoperative analgesia comparable to that of continuous interscalene block and reduce the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis. Patients scheduled for open rotator cuff repair were randomly allocated to receive continuous interscalene (n = 38) or supraclavicular block (n = 37). Both participants and assessing clinicians were blinded to the group allocation. The primary endpoint was the mean pain intensity 24 h after the surgery. Postoperative mean (SD) pain scores at 24 h were similar in the supraclavicular and interscalene groups (2.57 (1.71) vs 2.84 (1.75) respectively; p = 0.478). The incidence of complete or partial hemidiaphragmatic paresis was lower in the supraclavicular group at 1 h after admission to the postanaesthetic care unit and 24 h after the surgery [25 (68%) vs 38 (100%); p = 0.001 and 14 (38%) vs 27 (71%) respectively; p = 0.008]. Continuous supraclavicular block provided comparable analgesia compared with interscalene block with a reduced incidence of complete or partial hemidiaphragmatic paresis for 24 h following surgery. PMID:26954669

  4. Worster-Drought Syndrome: Poorly Recognized despite Severe and Persistent Difficulties with Feeding and Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Maria; Harris, Rebecca; Jolleff, Nicola; Price, Katie; Neville, Brian G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Worster-Drought syndrome (WDS), or congenital suprabulbar paresis, is a permanent movement disorder of the bulbar muscles causing persistent difficulties with swallowing, feeding, speech, and saliva control owing to a non-progressive disturbance in early brain development. As such, it falls within the cerebral palsies. The aim of this study…

  5. Botulism in 2 urban dogs

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Ane; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Blot, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    Two dogs from the same owner were referred for ascending weakness and paresis of 2 to 3 days duration. Electromyography and electroneurography determined that there were normal F-waves, decreased compound action potential, and decreased activity on repetitive nerve stimulation. These findings were valuable in diagnosing botulism in the dogs. PMID:21197207

  6. Gastroparesis in pregnancy: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Achong, N; Fagermo, N; Scott, K; D'emden, M

    2011-01-01

    Gastroparesis is a syndrome characterized by delayed gastric emptying in the absence of mechanical obstruction. The most common underlying aetiology is diabetes mellitus; however, many cases are idiopathic. Pregnancy per se is associated with gastrointestinal neuromuscular dysfunction; however, reports of gastroparesis arising during pregnancy are rare. We report a case of severe gastroparesis and proximal small bowel paresis presenting during pregnancy.

  7. Severe envenomation by the taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus)

    PubMed

    Southern, D A; Callanan, V I; Gordon, G S

    We describe cases of five patients with taipan envenomation which indicate that patients with paresis benefit from repeated doses of antivenom, even if given long after the bite, and that fresh frozen plasma should be given to correct coagulopathy that persists after reversal of neuromuscular blockade. We reiterate the importance of compression bandages. PMID:8985453

  8. [A rare complication of labor epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Vazin, Mojgan Hosseini

    2008-06-16

    This case describes a patient who developed a complete right hemiparesis with ptosis of eyelid, trigeminus and facial paresis following a routine epidural analgesia for labor. A subdural deposit of the local anaesthetic might be the cause of these symptoms. The pathogenesis of these symptoms as well as the diagnoses and treatment of the condition is discussed. PMID:18565319

  9. [Postvaccinal complication and medical malpractice law].

    PubMed

    Posa, A; Zierz, S

    2016-06-01

    The case report involves a 38-year-old female patient with muscular atrophy, paresis and sensory deficits in the right upper limb following several vaccinations. A legal dispute ensued over whether medical malpractice could have caused the neurological deficits. Medical malpractice could not be confirmed. Even vaccinations administered correctly can lead to neurological impairment. PMID:27483686

  10. Retroperitoneal abscesses in two western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Hahn, Alicia; D'Agostino, Jennifer; Cole, Gretchen A; Raines, Jan

    2014-03-01

    This report describes two cases of retroperitoneal abscesses in female western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Clinical symptoms included perivulvar discharge, lameness, hindlimb paresis, and general malaise. Retroperitoneal abscesses should be considered as part of a complete differential list in female gorillas with similar clinical signs. PMID:24712182

  11. Pufferfish poisoning: emergency diagnosis and management of mild human tetrodotoxication.

    PubMed

    Sims, J K; Ostman, D C

    1986-09-01

    A 45-year-old man ate the liver of the toxic pufferfish (Diodron hystrix) and developed mild tetrodotoxication consisting of hyperemesis, bradycardia, hypotension, generalized numbness, and a generalized paresis. He was treated with atropine, normal saline IV infusions, nasogastric suction, and oxygen, and he recovered after six days. PMID:3740600

  12. [A man with a crooked smile].

    PubMed

    Bechan, M A H Afzal; van Dortmont, Laura M C; Claes, J Franka H M

    2013-01-01

    A 51-year-old man had a paresis of the right side of the lower lip after carotic endarterectomy. The diagnosis was 'pressure neuropathy of the right ramus marginalis mandibulae' caused by the operation. This neuropathy is self limiting. PMID:24152368

  13. 16 CFR 1116.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... including coma and spinal cord injuries; (v) Paraplegia, quadriplegia, or permanent paralysis or paresis, to... January 1, 1993 and ends on December 31, 1994, and so forth. (b) Grievous bodily injury includes, but is not limited to, any of the following categories of injury: (1) Mutilation or...

  14. 16 CFR 1116.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... including coma and spinal cord injuries; (v) Paraplegia, quadriplegia, or permanent paralysis or paresis, to... January 1, 1993 and ends on December 31, 1994, and so forth. (b) Grievous bodily injury includes, but is not limited to, any of the following categories of injury: (1) Mutilation or...

  15. 16 CFR 1116.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... including coma and spinal cord injuries; (v) Paraplegia, quadriplegia, or permanent paralysis or paresis, to... January 1, 1993 and ends on December 31, 1994, and so forth. (b) Grievous bodily injury includes, but is not limited to, any of the following categories of injury: (1) Mutilation or...

  16. 16 CFR 1116.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... including coma and spinal cord injuries; (v) Paraplegia, quadriplegia, or permanent paralysis or paresis, to... January 1, 1993 and ends on December 31, 1994, and so forth. (b) Grievous bodily injury includes, but is not limited to, any of the following categories of injury: (1) Mutilation or...

  17. 16 CFR 1116.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... including coma and spinal cord injuries; (v) Paraplegia, quadriplegia, or permanent paralysis or paresis, to... January 1, 1993 and ends on December 31, 1994, and so forth. (b) Grievous bodily injury includes, but is not limited to, any of the following categories of injury: (1) Mutilation or...

  18. Partial oculomotor nerve palsy in a 7-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Israni, Anil; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Kumar, Atin; Gulati, Sheffali

    2016-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy can be due to varied causes that include diabetic neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, brainstem infarction, demyelinating conditions, and cerebral aneurysms. Among the aneurysmal causes of oculomotor nerve palsy, aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery has been observed to be the most common. Pupillary dysfunction is considered to be an important feature of aneurysmal oculomotor nerve paresis. A case of a 7-year-old boy with partial oculomotor nerve palsy with pupillary sparing is being reported here, the etiology of which is tortuous and ectatic distal internal carotid artery. This is a rare cause of oculomotor nerve paresis and to the best of our knowledge has not yet been reported in children. Ischemia rather than compression seems to be the most plausible cause in this case. PMID:27606031

  19. Partial oculomotor nerve palsy in a 7-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Israni, Anil; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Kumar, Atin; Gulati, Sheffali

    2016-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy can be due to varied causes that include diabetic neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, brainstem infarction, demyelinating conditions, and cerebral aneurysms. Among the aneurysmal causes of oculomotor nerve palsy, aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery has been observed to be the most common. Pupillary dysfunction is considered to be an important feature of aneurysmal oculomotor nerve paresis. A case of a 7-year-old boy with partial oculomotor nerve palsy with pupillary sparing is being reported here, the etiology of which is tortuous and ectatic distal internal carotid artery. This is a rare cause of oculomotor nerve paresis and to the best of our knowledge has not yet been reported in children. Ischemia rather than compression seems to be the most plausible cause in this case. PMID:27606031

  20. Surgery for a giant arteriovenous malformation without motor deterioration: preoperative transcranial magnetic stimulation in a non-cooperative patient.

    PubMed

    Kronenburg, Annick; van Doormaal, Tristan; van Eijsden, Pieter; van der Zwan, Albert; Leijten, Frans; Han, Kuo Sen

    2014-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive activation method that is increasingly used for motor mapping. Preoperative functional mapping in vascular surgery is not routinely performed; however, in cases of high-grade arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), it could play a role in preoperative decision making. A 16-year-old male was suffering from a giant, right-sided insular, Spetzler-Martin Grade V AVM. This patient's history included 3 hemorrhagic strokes in the past 3 years, resulting in Medical Research Council Grade 2-3 (proximal) and 2-4 (distal) paresis of the left side of the body and hydrocephalus requiring a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Preoperative TMS showed absent contralateral innervation of the remaining left-sided motor functions. Subsequently, the AVM was completely resected without any postoperative increase of the left-sided paresis. This case shows that TMS can support decision making in AVM treatment by mapping motor functions. PMID:24866824

  1. Nomenclature proposal to describe vocal fold motion impairment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Clark A; Mau, Ted; Remacle, Marc; Hess, Markus; Eckel, Hans E; Young, VyVy N; Hantzakos, Anastasios; Yung, Katherine C; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2016-08-01

    The terms used to describe vocal fold motion impairment are confusing and not standardized. This results in a failure to communicate accurately and to major limitations of interpreting research studies involving vocal fold impairment. We propose standard nomenclature for reporting vocal fold impairment. Overarching terms of vocal fold immobility and hypomobility are rigorously defined. This includes assessment techniques and inclusion and exclusion criteria for determining vocal fold immobility and hypomobility. In addition, criteria for use of the following terms have been outlined in detail: vocal fold paralysis, vocal fold paresis, vocal fold immobility/hypomobility associated with mechanical impairment of the crico-arytenoid joint and vocal fold immobility/hypomobility related to laryngeal malignant disease. This represents the first rigorously defined vocal fold motion impairment nomenclature system. This provides detailed definitions to the terms vocal fold paralysis and vocal fold paresis. PMID:26036851

  2. The misdiagnosis of conversion disorder in a psychiatric emergency service.

    PubMed

    Fishbain, D A; Goldberg, M

    1991-05-01

    During a 1-year period, 8400 patient presentations to a psychiatric emergency service were screened for the conversion symptom of extremity paresis/paralysis. Of 4220 unduplicated presentations, three patients had this complaint. These cases were reviewed and followed up. All had received a DSM-III diagnosis of conversion disorder, but in each case the patient's conversion symptom was attributed to organic disease. This had medicolegal consequences in one case and threatened legal consequences in the others. Although the frequency of this alleged conversion symptom was 0.07%, in reality it was 0.0%. Guidelines for the management of the alleged conversion symptom of paresis/paralysis are discussed. PMID:1855657

  3. Hereditary encephalomyelopathy and polyneuropathy in an Alaskan husky.

    PubMed

    Wakshlag, J J; de Lahunta, A

    2009-12-01

    An Alaskan husky puppy was examined for a neurologic disease which began at six weeks of age with generalised paresis that progressed resulting in recumbency by 18 weeks. Thoracic limbs primarily exhibited lower motor neuron signs that included distal muscle atrophy and persistent elbow and carpal flexion that resisted manual extension. Pelvic limb signs primarily exhibited upper motor neuron and general proprioceptive deficits, but also included lower motor neuron signs. Abnormal vocalisation suggested a laryngeal paresis. Histopathologic lesions included a diffuse axonopathy and secondary demyelination in the nerves of the limbs and larynx and a similar bilaterally symmetrical degeneration in the spinal cord white matter suggestive of a dying back axonopathy. In addition, a degenerative process was present in nuclei in the brain stem and cerebellum. Recognition of this disease through clinical and pathologic examination in other related Alaskan Huskies suggested an autosomal recessive inherited disorder. PMID:19954445

  4. [Post-polio syndrome - a case report].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam

    2015-07-01

    Post-polio syndrome occurs 30-40 years after polio virus infection. The main symptoms of PPS are slowly progressive muscle limbs paresis with muscle atrophy, joints pain, paresthesia. In 90% of patients the main symptom is fatigue that leads to physical and mental activity deterioration. The cause of disease remains unknown. Probably it is an effect of motoneurons damage during acute virus polio infection, their overloading and degeneration of remaining ones. In this study we described a case of man who developed PPS 36 years after Heine-Medin disease. The main symptom was intensification of right limb paresis and muscle atrophy. In electromyography there were damage features of muscle clinically affected and unaffected. Changes in lifestyle made possible to continue occupational activity. PMID:26277176

  5. Lincoln's craniofacial microsomia: three-dimensional laser scanning of 2 Lincoln life masks.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ronald S; Da Silveira, Adriana

    2007-08-01

    Examination of 2 life masks of Abraham Lincoln's face was performed by means of 3-dimensional laser surface scanning. This technique enabled documentation and analysis of Lincoln's facial contours and demonstrated his marked facial asymmetry, particularly evident in the smaller left superior orbital rim. This may have led to retroplacement of the trochlea on the left side, leading, in turn, to the mild superior oblique paresis that was manifested intermittently during adulthood. PMID:17698764

  6. Iatrogenic salt poisoning in captive sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Sileo, L.; Fleming, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Salt poisoning developed in captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) when sea salt was added to normal drinking water to produce a sodium chloride concentration of 1%. Two of 18 cranes died and 2 were euthanatized when moribund. Muscle weakness, paresis, dyspnea, and depression were observed. Brain and serum sodium, serum uric acid,:and plasma osmolality values were abnormally high. Lesions were those of visceral gout, renal tubular necrosis, nephrosis, and skeletal muscle.necrosis.

  7. [The cervical somatosensory evoked potential in lesions of the cortical efferents].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1990-03-01

    Cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials to median nerve stimulation were analysed in 20 patients with unilateral central paresis of the arm. Neither the configuration nor the latency and amplitude measures of the neck potential did reveal any association with pathological alterations of cortical efferents or with abnormal cortically evoked responses. Thus, also in this population the evaluation of cervical potentials can be done according to the known criteria. PMID:2110891

  8. Diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls in benign vocal fold diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bohlender, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    More than half of patients presenting with hoarseness show benign vocal fold changes. The clinician should be familiar with the anatomy, physiology and functional aspects of voice disorders and also the modern diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities in order to ensure an optimal and patient specific management. This review article focuses on the diagnostic and therapeutic limitations and difficulties of treatment of benign vocal fold tumors, the management and prevention of scarred vocal folds and the issue of unilateral vocal fold paresis. PMID:24403969

  9. [Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Frantchez, Victoria; Valiño, José; Carracelas, Analía; Dufrechou, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is characterized by attacks of generalized weakness associated to hypokalemia in patients with hyperthyroidism. We report a 25-year-old man with a history of spontaneously relapsing episodes of muscular weakness, who consulted for a rapidly evolving upper and lower limb paresis. Hypokalemia associated to a primary hyperthyroidism was detected. Treatment with antithyroid Drugs and potassium supplementation reverted symptoms and the episodes of acute muscular weakness did not reappear. PMID:21279257

  10. Monoparesis in association with feline pulmonary carcinoma: A literature review with 3 new cases

    PubMed Central

    van Stee, Lucinda; Boston, Sarah; Singh, Ameet; Park, Fiona; Richardson, Danielle; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony; Vince, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We describe 3 cases of cats that were presented with a sudden onset of monoparesis as a result of arterial thromboembolism without evidence of cardiovascular disease that were subsequently diagnosed with a primary pulmonary carcinoma. Arterial tumor thromboemboli due to pulmonary carcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of lameness or paresis in older cats. We theorize that large tumor emboli may obstruct peripheral arteries leading to acute monoparesis. PMID:25183892

  11. Schwannoma of Extraocular Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Wasim; Boggan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    An unusual case of schwannoma arising from the third cranial nerve in a thirteen year old male is reported. The patient presented with paresis of the right oculomotor nerve and ipsilateral hemiparesis. The clinical features of this case are discussed and the pertinent medical literature reviewed. ImagesFigure 1p220-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171175

  12. The effects of mirror therapy on arm and hand function in subacute stroke in patients.

    PubMed

    Radajewska, Alina; Opara, Józef A; Kucio, Cezary; Błaszczyszyn, Monika; Mehlich, Krzysztof; Szczygiel, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mirror therapy on arm and hand function in subacute stroke in patients. The study included 60 hemiparetic right-handed patients after ischemic stroke 8-10 weeks after onset. They underwent stationary comprehensive rehabilitation in the rehabilitation centre. They were divided into two randomly assigned groups: mirror (n=30) and control (n=30). For both groups, two subgroups were created: one that included patients with right arm paresis (n=15) and the other that included patients with left arm paresis (n=15). The mirror group received an additional intervention: training with a mirror for 5 days/week, 2 sessions/day, for 21 days. Each single session lasted for 15 min. The control group (n=30) underwent a conventional rehabilitation program without mirror therapy. To evaluate self-care in performing activities of daily living, the Functional Index 'Repty' was used. To evaluate hand and arm function, the Frenchay Arm Test and the Motor Status Score were used. Measurements were performed twice: before and after 21 days of applied rehabilitation. No significant improvement in hand and arm function in both subgroups in Frenchay Arm Test and Motor Status Score scales was observed. However, there was a significant improvement in self-care of activities of daily living in the right arm paresis subgroup in the mirror group measured using the Functional Index 'Repty'. Mirror therapy improves self-care of activities of daily living for patients with right arm paresis after stroke. PMID:23528388

  13. Multicentric neurofibromatosis with rectal prolapse in a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Rush, Elizabeth M; Ogburn, Anna L; Garner, Michael M

    2012-03-01

    An approximately 31-yr-old California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with a history of chronic visual impairment and corneal disease presented with slow onset, progressive neurologic deficits. Treatment for rear flipper paresis was not effective and the animal was euthanatized. Histopathologic findings included hepatocellular and biliary neoplasia, ocular amyloidosis, adrenal adenoma and pheochromocytoma, and spinal cord changes consistent with multicentric neurofibromatosis. This is the first documentation of these conditions in a California sea lion. PMID:22448517

  14. Effect of auditory constraints on motor performance depends on stage of recovery post-stroke.

    PubMed

    Aluru, Viswanath; Lu, Ying; Leung, Alan; Verghese, Joe; Raghavan, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop evidence-based rehabilitation protocols post-stroke, one must first reconcile the vast heterogeneity in the post-stroke population and develop protocols to facilitate motor learning in the various subgroups. The main purpose of this study is to show that auditory constraints interact with the stage of recovery post-stroke to influence motor learning. We characterized the stages of upper limb recovery using task-based kinematic measures in 20 subjects with chronic hemiparesis. We used a bimanual wrist extension task, performed with a custom-made wrist trainer, to facilitate learning of wrist extension in the paretic hand under four auditory conditions: (1) without auditory cueing; (2) to non-musical happy sounds; (3) to self-selected music; and (4) to a metronome beat set at a comfortable tempo. Two bimanual trials (15 s each) were followed by one unimanual trial with the paretic hand over six cycles under each condition. Clinical metrics, wrist and arm kinematics, and electromyographic activity were recorded. Hierarchical cluster analysis with the Mahalanobis metric based on baseline speed and extent of wrist movement stratified subjects into three distinct groups, which reflected their stage of recovery: spastic paresis, spastic co-contraction, and minimal paresis. In spastic paresis, the metronome beat increased wrist extension, but also increased muscle co-activation across the wrist. In contrast, in spastic co-contraction, no auditory stimulation increased wrist extension and reduced co-activation. In minimal paresis, wrist extension did not improve under any condition. The results suggest that auditory task constraints interact with stage of recovery during motor learning after stroke, perhaps due to recruitment of distinct neural substrates over the course of recovery. The findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms of progression of motor recovery and lay the foundation for personalized treatment algorithms post-stroke. PMID

  15. Ischemic Neuromyopathy Associated with Steel Pellet BB Shot Aortic Obstruction in a Cat.

    PubMed

    Langelier, K M

    1982-06-01

    An adult female calico cat was presented with clinical signs of posterior paresis. A steel pellet was seen radiographically lodged in the caudal aorta ventral to the fourth lumbar vertebra. Aortotomy was performed and the pellet was removed. Due to the severe spinal cord damage euthanasia was performed 25 days later. A discussion of the postmortem findings and similarities between this case and thromboembolic aortic obstruction follows. PMID:17422151

  16. Ischemic Neuromyopathy Associated with Steel Pellet BB Shot Aortic Obstruction in a Cat

    PubMed Central

    Langelier, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    An adult female calico cat was presented with clinical signs of posterior paresis. A steel pellet was seen radiographically lodged in the caudal aorta ventral to the fourth lumbar vertebra. Aortotomy was performed and the pellet was removed. Due to the severe spinal cord damage euthanasia was performed 25 days later. A discussion of the postmortem findings and similarities between this case and thromboembolic aortic obstruction follows. PMID:17422151

  17. Wallenberg's Syndrome: An Unusual Case of Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Aurora Loaeza-del; Barahona-Garrido, Josué; Criales, Sergio; Chang-Menéndez, Sergio; Torre, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with sudden-onset oropharyngeal dysphagia and vomiting of central etiology. Neurological evaluation showed uvula deviation to the left, paresis of the mid-right portion of the soft palate, lateralization of gaze to the right side, and dysphonia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an infarction in the left lateral medullary region, therefore the diagnosis of Wallenberg's syndrome was established. The neurological issues along with the dysphagia gradually improved and the patient was discharged. PMID:21487559

  18. Focal inhibitory seizure with prolonged deficit in adult Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aupy, Jerome; Bonnet, Charlotte; Arnould, Jean-Simon; Fernandez, Philippe; Marchal, Cecile; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a sporadic congenital neurocutaneous disorder often related to varying degrees of motor impairment. The phenomenon of prolonged ictal paresis is a rare seizure sign that can be due to lesions affecting the centro-parietal lobe. Focal inhibitory motor seizures can be difficult to differentiate from other clinical entities such as stroke, migraine or postictal paresis. We describe the case of a 40-year-old patient suffering from Sturge-Weber syndrome, admitted due to prolonged right-sided hemiparesis following a usual seizure. Repeated EEGs during the prolonged deficit showed only intermittent left fronto-parietal sharp waves. (99m)Tc HMPAO-brain SPECT performed seven days after the last seizure showed a vast area of parieto-occipital hyperperfusion in the left hemisphere. Aggressive antiepileptic therapy dramatically improved the clinical symptoms and scintigraphic images, which corroborated the diagnosis of ictal paresis. This case highlights the role of SPECT in the evaluation of Sturge-Weber syndrome, not only to investigate progressive neurological deterioration, but also exacerbation of seizures or prolonged neurological deficits. In fact, it may be possible to document ongoing epileptic activity using SPECT, despite a non-contributory EEG, which may be of help in adapting a therapeutic strategy. PMID:26235101

  19. Testing a Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of Therapeutic versus Placebo Shoulder Strapping as an Adjuvant Intervention Early after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Appel, Caroline; Perry, Lin; Jones, Fiona

    2015-06-01

    This study tested a protocol for a randomized controlled trial of therapeutic versus placebo shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention early after stroke. Despite widespread use, there is little evidence of the efficacy or acceptability of shoulder strapping to improve arm function in patients with shoulder paresis following stroke. This study tested a protocol designed to trial shoulder strapping as an adjuvant therapy in patients with shoulder paresis after stroke and tested its acceptability for patients and clinical staff. A multiple-method design comprised one quantitative randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and two qualitative exploratory investigations entailing patient interviews and staff surveys. Seventeen sub-acute stroke patients with shoulder paresis were recruited in London stroke service settings between November 2007 and December 2009. Outcomes from a 4-week therapeutic strapping protocol were compared with those of placebo strapping as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation. Minimal adverse events and greater improvement in arm function (Action Research Arm Test) were seen with therapeutic compared with placebo strapping (effect size 0.34). Patients and staff found the strapping acceptable with minimal adverse effects. This study provided data for sample size calculation and demonstrated a workable research protocol to investigate the efficacy of shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention to routine rehabilitation for stroke patients. Small-scale findings continue to flag the importance of investigating this topic. The protocol is recommended for a definitive trial of shoulder strapping as an adjuvant intervention. PMID:25664993

  20. Toxicity and efficacy of ivermectin in chelonians.

    PubMed

    Teare, J A; Bush, M

    1983-12-01

    Five red-footed tortoises (Geochelone carbonaria) treated for intestinal nematode parasitism with a single IM injection of ivermectin (0.4 mg/kg) were found in a state of extreme paresis or flaccid paralysis. One tortoise recovered normal motor function over the next 7 to 10 days. The remaining tortoises died within 3 days of receiving the ivermectin. The only consistent postmortem finding was a marked fatty change in the liver. Studies in the red-footed tortoise showed that some paresis will occur with dosages as low as 0.05 mg/kg. At least 3 other species of chelonians were found to be susceptible to ivermectin toxicosis at similar dosages (0.1 mg/kg or less). The leopard tortoise (Geochelone pardalis) appeared to be the most susceptible of the species tested, consistently developing mild paresis with a dosage of 0.025 mg/kg. Death occurred with dosages as low as 0.3 mg/kg. A dosage of 0.05 mg/kg was found to be safe in red-footed tortoises, provided that treatment was not repeated at intervals of less than 7 days. Shedding of nematode larvae and eggs in the feces of parasitized red-footed tortoises was prevented with 2 to 6 weekly IM injections of ivermectin at a dosage of 0.05 mg/kg, but limited necropsy findings indicated that elimination of adult nematodes from the intestines was incomplete. PMID:6689009

  1. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  2. What does the head impulse test versus caloric dissociation reveal about vestibular dysfunction in Ménière's disease?

    PubMed

    McGarvie, Leigh A; Curthoys, Ian S; MacDougall, Hamish G; Halmagyi, G Michael

    2015-04-01

    In patients with Ménière's disease (MD), caloric testing can show, depending on the stage and activity of the disease, a variety of results. Between attacks, many, or perhaps even most, patients with unilateral early or mild MD have normal caloric tests; late MD can show abnormalities ranging from mild to severe unilateral canal paresis with or without directional preponderance. The explanation of canal paresis in MD is not clear. The most obvious explanation, severe loss of lateral canal hair cells, is not likely to be correct because hair cell loss will not explain the fluctuating canal paresis to caloric stimulation. In contrast, the published evidence is that rotational testing of semicircular canal function in MD patients typically shows little reduction in function and even enhancement of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain, at least in the early stages of the disease. Here, we offer a novel explanation for this dissociation. We propose that hydropic expansion of the lateral canal membranous labyrinth permits convective recirculation within the duct that allows dissipation of the hydrostatic force that would normally cause cupular displacement and nystagmus in the caloric test. PMID:25721760

  3. Influence of Asymmetric Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Stimulation on Vibration, Acoustics, and Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Neubauer, Juergen; Sofer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Evaluate the influence of asymmetric recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) stimulation on the vibratory phase, acoustics and aerodynamics of phonation. Study Design Basic science study using an in vivo canine model. Methods The RLNs were symmetrically and asymmetrically stimulated over eight graded levels to test a range of vocal fold activation conditions from subtle paresis to paralysis. Vibratory phase, fundamental frequency (F0), subglottal pressure, and airflow were noted at phonation onset. The evaluations were repeated for three levels of symmetric superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation. Results Asymmetric laryngeal adductor activation from asymmetric left-right RLN stimulation led to a consistent pattern of vibratory phase asymmetry, with the more activated vocal fold leading in the opening phase of the glottal cycle and in mucosal wave amplitude. Vibratory amplitude asymmetry was also observed, with more lateral excursion of the glottis of the less activated side. Onset fundamental frequency was higher with asymmetric activation because the two RLNs were synergistic in decreasing F0, glottal width, and strain. Phonation onset pressure increased and airflow decreased with symmetric RLN activation. Conclusion Asymmetric laryngeal activation from RLN paresis and paralysis has consistent effects on vocal fold vibration, acoustics, and aerodynamics. This information may be useful in diagnosis and management of vocal fold paresis. PMID:24913182

  4. Effect of platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, etizolam, on resolution of chronic subdural hematoma--a prospective study to investigate use as conservative therapy.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Yutaka; Kurimoto, Masanori; Nagai, Shoichi; Hori, Emiko; Origasa, Hideki; Endo, Shunro

    2005-12-01

    Inflammatory reaction is very important for formation of the neomembrane of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The present study evaluated medical treatment with the platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, etizolam, for the resolution of CSDH, and the factors indicating surgery or conservative therapy. Alternate patients were assigned to the etizolam group or control group without medical treatment. Patients in the etizolam group received 3.0 mg etizolam per day for 14 days. A total of 53 patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Univariate analysis of differences in demographic characteristics, clinical findings, and initial computed tomography (CT) findings, and multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between etizolam treatment and requirement for surgery using age, sex, low density of hematoma on CT, and paresis as confounders were performed. Etizolam treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.156, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.024-0.999, p = 0.049) was negatively correlated with requirement for surgery. Low density of hematoma (adjusted OR 0.125, 95% CI 0.019-0.846, p = 0.033) was found to be an independent negative predictor, and paresis as an initial symptom (adjusted OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.04-38.7, p = 0.045) was an independent positive predictor of requirement for surgery. Etizolam administration can promote the resolution of CSDH, especially at the stage of hygroma appearing as low density on CT. Surgery is recommended if the patient presents with paresis. PMID:16377949

  5. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  6. Radiation response of the rat cervical spinal cord after irradiation at different ages: Tolerance, latency and pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruifrok, A.C.C.; Van Der Kogel, A.J. ); Stephens, L.C. )

    1994-04-30

    Investigation of the age dependent single-dose radiation tolerance, latency to radiation myelopathy, and the histopathological changes after irradiation of the rat cervical spinal cord is presented. Rats were irradiated with graded single doses of 4 MV photons to the cervical spinal cord. When the rats showed definite signs of paresis of the forelegs, they were killed and processed for histological examination. The radiation dose resulting in paresis due to white matter damage in 50% of the animals (ED[sub 50]) after single dose irradiation was about 21.5 Gy at all ages [ge] 2 weeks. Only the Ed[sub 50] at 1 week was significantly lower. The latency to the development of paresis clearly changed with the age at irradiation, from about 2 weeks after irradiation at 1 week to 6-8 months after irradiation at age [ge] 8 weeks. The white matter damage was similar in all symptomatic animals studied. The most prominent were areas with diffuse demyelination and swollen axons, often with focal necrosis, accompanied by glial reaction. This was observed in all symptomatic animals, irrespective of the age at irradiation. Expression of vascular damage appeared to depend on the age at irradiation. Although the latency to myelopathy is clearly age dependent, single dose tolerance is not age dependent at age [ge] 2 weeks in the rat cervical spinal cord. The white matter damage is similar in all symptomatic animals studied, but the vasculopathies appear to be influenced by the age at irradiation. It is concluded that white matter damage and vascular damage are separate phenomena contributing to the development of radiation myelopathy, expression of which may depend on the radiation dose applied and the age at irradiation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Astrocytoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) suspected wobbly hedgehog syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Makoto; Miwa, Yasutsugu; Itou, Takuya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takeo

    2011-10-01

    A 28-month-old African hedgehog was referred to our hospital with progressive tetraparesis. On the first presentation, the hedgehog was suspected as having wobbly hedgehog syndrome (WHS) and the animal was treated with medication and rehabilitation. The animal died 22 days after onset. Pathological examination revealed that the animal was involved in astrocytoma between the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord (C1). This report indicates that a primary central nervous system tumor should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses for hedgehogs presenting with progressive paresis, together with WHS. PMID:21628867

  8. Pineal cyst apoplexy: report of an unusual case managed conservatively.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Selim; Bal, Ercan; Palaoglu, Selcuk; Cila, Aysenur

    2011-01-01

    Pineal cyst apoplexy is a very rare entity with previously reported symptoms of severe frontal or occipital headache, gaze paresis and visual field defects, nausea or vomiting, syncope, ataxia, hearing loss and sudden death. The treatment options for symptomatic pineal cysts are observation, shunting, aspiration via stereotactic guidance or endoscopy, third ventriculostomy, ventriculocysternostomy, and/or surgical resection by craniotomy and microsurgery. Here, the authors report an unusual case of a 28-year-old male patient with pineal cyst apoplexy, presenting with headache, insomnia, and sexual dysfunction symptoms who is being managed conservatively and observed for two years by an academic tertiary care unit. PMID:22212992

  9. Losing your voice: etiologies and imaging features of vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Vachha, Behroze; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Mallur, Pavan; Moonis, Gul

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic compromise of vocal fold function exists along a continuum encompassing vocal cord hypomobility (paresis) to vocal fold immobility (paralysis) with varying degrees and patterns of reinnervation. Vocal fold paralysis (VFP) may result from injury to the vagus or the recurrent laryngeal nerves anywhere along their course from the brainstem to the larynx. In this article, we review the anatomy of the vagus and recurrent laryngeal nerves and examine the various etiologies of VFP. Selected cases are presented with discussion of key imaging features of VFP including radiologic findings specific to central vagal neuropathy and peripheral recurrent nerve paralysis. PMID:23814687

  10. [Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in patients of African descent].

    PubMed

    Maia, Morgana Lima e; Trevisam, Paula Grasiele Carvalho; Minicucci, Marcos; Mazeto, Glaucia M F S; Azevedo, Paula S

    2014-10-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) is an endocrine emergency marked by recurrent attacks of muscle weakness associated with hypokalemia and thyrotoxicosis. Asiatic male patients are most often affected. On the other hand, African descents rarely present this disease. The case described shows an afrodescendant patient with hypokalemia and tetraparesis, whose diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was considered during this crisis. The THPP, although rare, is potentially lethal. Therefore, in cases of flaccid paresis crisis this diagnosis should always be considered, especially if associated with hypokalemia. In this situation, if no previous diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, this should also be regarded. PMID:25372590

  11. Brain white matter changes during treatment of a child for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Miho; Hayakawa, Jun; Ueda, Takahiro; Migita, Makoto; Asano, Takeshi; Fukunaga, Yoshitaka; Amano, Yasuo

    2005-10-01

    A 13-year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had bilateral paresis of the upper extremities and aphasia 1 week after high dose methotrexate and triple intrathecal therapy (methotrexate, cytarabin, hydrocortisone). The stroke-like neurological symptoms disappeared on the third day. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensities of white matter on the second day. Despite resolution of the neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance images were still abnormal 3 years after the attack. Methotrexate has been considered to be responsible for ischemic damage to oligodendroglial cells, resulting in demyelination. The changes are occasionally prolonged without persistent neurologic symptoms. PMID:16247223

  12. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Donders, Jacobus; Mullarkey, Sr Kathryn; Allchin, Joel

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with bilateral congenital perisylvian syndrome as evidenced by polymicrogyria in the left and right frontotemporal regions, pseudobulbar paresis, seizures, and spastic diplegia. This is the first description of comprehensive neuropsychological assessment in a child with this syndrome. The results reflect significant impairments in auditory processing and independent learning and retention, but relatively preserved cognitive performance on interactive tasks involving frequent feedback and redirection. The findings are interpreted in the context of the neuropathology of this syndrome, with an emphasis on pragmatic implications for rehabilitation. PMID:18618376

  13. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  14. Combined whole body vibration and balance training using Vibrosphere®: improvement of trunk stability, muscle tone, and postural control in stroke patients during early geriatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Merkert, J; Butz, S; Nieczaj, R; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E; Eckardt, R

    2011-08-01

    Strokes are a leading cause of disability, immobility, and reduced ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) among the elderly. Balance and postural control are often affected in stroke patients. Physical therapy for the lower back to improve posture, mobility, and ADLs can be very time consuming. In this randomized, controlled study of 66 geriatric patients (mean age 74.5 years) with stroke-related paresis or hemiplegia, it was demonstrated that stroke patients may benefit more from 3 additional weeks of combined whole body vibration and balance training than from a comprehensive inpatient geriatric rehabilitation program in terms of trunk stability, postural control, and muscle tone. PMID:21505939

  15. Trauma-induced schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve after thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William P; Brody, Robert M; LiVolsi, Virginia A; Wang, Amber R; Mirza, Natasha A

    2016-06-01

    Laryngeal schwannomas are rare, benign tumors, most often arising from the superior laryngeal nerve. We describe a case of a 68-year-old female with a laryngeal schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve after traumatic injury. We postulate that trauma to the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy or thyroplasty incited growth of a nerve sheath tumor. This is the first reported case of a trauma-induced schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and second case of a recurrent laryngeal nerve schwannoma. Although rare, this case demonstrates that these tumors should be considered during workup of vocal cord paresis after surgery or failed thyroplasty. Laryngoscope, 126:1408-1410, 2016. PMID:26421595

  16. Gluteal Necrosis and Lumbosacral Plexopathy in a Diabetic Patient after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, M. A.; Masoumi, N.; Argani, H.

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old diabetic patient underwent a renal transplant which was complicated by right side lower extremity paresis and numbness with gluteal necrosis. The main reason was ligation of internal iliac artery of the same side as a result of extensive microvascular obstruction due to severe atheromatous plaque. This is a rare complication which is mostly reported in aneurysmal patients after bypass surgery. The gluteal necrosis is a serious complication which, as in our patient, resulted in patient's death in most of the reported cases. Because of catastrophic nature of this condition, identifying preventive measures is extremely important. PMID:26793402

  17. Phoniatric management of 3 clinical cases of voice disorders involving the recurrent nerve.

    PubMed

    Faure, M A

    2012-01-01

    These three cases involve aphonia or dysphonia as a consequence of entrapment of one of the recurrent nerves, in the absence of any prior surgical history. Depending on the particular case, one to two months was needed to normalize phonatory function; One case relapsed after a year. The phoniatric management of these cases involved: New functional and acoustic pattern, recorded by the patient as a form of daily maintenance; Laryngeal and perilaryngeal manual therapy, applied according to the "osteovox" method. Manual therapy and different phonatory habits, in association with alternative medicine can reduce the time to recovery in the case of cold-induced unilateral paresis. PMID:23074827

  18. Neuralgic Amyotrophy Manifesting as Mimicking Posterior Interosseous Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin Seo; Cho, Yong Jun; Kang, Suk Hyung; Choi, Eun Hi

    2015-11-01

    The upper trunk of the brachial plexus is the most common area affected by neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), and paresis of the shoulder girdle muscle is the most prevalent manifestation. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a rare presentation in patients with NA. It results in dropped finger on the affected side and may be misdiagnosed as entrapment syndrome or compressive neuropathy. We report an unusual case of NA manifested as PIN palsy and suggest that knowledge of clinical NA phenotypes is crucial for early diagnosis of peripheral nerve palsies. PMID:26713154

  19. Diplopia as the primary presentation of foodborne botulism

    PubMed Central

    Khakshoor, Hamid; Moghaddam, Ali Akbar Saber; Vejdani, Amir Hossein; Armstrong, Blair K.; Moshirfar, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Foodborne botulism is a serious condition caused by Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin. Clinically, botulism presents as bilateral cranial nerve neuropathy and descending paralysis. We report a unique presentation of botulism to remind clinicians of this potentially fatal condition. In this observational case report initial evaluation showed only esodeviation. This progressed to unilateral cranial nerve six (CN VI) paresis along with systemic signs. Clinical diagnosis was made based on in-depth history and concurrent symptoms in three other patients. Foodborne botulism presenting as diplopia and unilateral motility deficits is rare and can represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. PMID:22993467

  20. Losing Your Voice: Etiologies and Imaging Features of Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Vachha, Behroze; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Mallur, Pavan; Moonis, Gul

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic compromise of vocal fold function exists along a continuum encompassing vocal cord hypomobility (paresis) to vocal fold immobility (paralysis) with varying degrees and patterns of reinnervation. Vocal fold paralysis (VFP) may result from injury to the vagus or the recurrent laryngeal nerves anywhere along their course from the brainstem to the larynx. In this article, we review the anatomy of the vagus and recurrent laryngeal nerves and examine the various etiologies of VFP. Selected cases are presented with discussion of key imaging features of VFP including radiologic findings specific to central vagal neuropathy and peripheral recurrent nerve paralysis. PMID:23814687

  1. Irene E. Loewenfeld, PhD Physiologist of the pupil.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H Stanley; Kardon, Randy H

    2006-06-01

    Irene E. Loewenfeld, PhD has devoted a long and vigorous professional life to understanding the workings of the pupil of the human eye. Her interest in the pupil began in 1940 when she went to work as a technician in the pupillography laboratory of Professor Otto Lowenstein at New York University. It culminated in her widely admired textbook The Pupil, published in 1993. Among her many contributions, Loewenfeld provided rigorous observations about Adie tonic pupil, anisocoria in optic tract lesions, Argyll Robertson pupil, oculomotor paresis with cyclic spasms, and innovations in electronic recordings of pupil movement. PMID:16845317

  2. [The experience in employing reciprocal gait orthoses].

    PubMed

    Radło, W; Miklaszewski, K; Gasińska, M; Michno, P

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the experience of the authors in employing reciprocal gait orthoses in a group of 23 patients age 3-25 years (mean age 7.8 years). The orthoses were indicated in patients with flaccid paresis (17 children with myelodysplasia and 3 patients with traumatic paraplegia) and with arthrogryposis (3 patients). The follow-up period was 6 months to 5 years (mean 2.4 years). The authors discuss the principles of construction and operation of reciprocal gait orthoses and types of patients in whom they are recommended. The principles of learning walking and using the orthosis are also presented. PMID:10367535

  3. Origin and significance of acetylcholine and choline in plasma and serum from normal and paretic cows.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, S

    1991-12-01

    Before the onset of bovine paresis a stage of hyperactivity and hypersensitivity was observed in clinical as well as in immunologically provoked cases. By gas chromatographic analysis of choline (Ch) in plasma and serum from four immunologically provoked cows this stage was verified to be an initial immuno-cholinergic hyperactivation. In the first hour after antigen challenge with 0.5 mg nematode AChE there was a very sharp rise in Ch mainly from agonist-stimulated and phospholipase mediated phosphatidylcholine (PC) breakdown. A secondary massive influx of Ca into cells was mirrored in a 1 mmol/l depression of serum-Ca values during the first hours. The hyperagonism mediated Ca-translocation brought water into cells, resulting in reduced plasma volume. The generally supposed mechanism of secondary, Ca-mediated cell damage and cell death was initiated and sometimes resulted in "Downers" with persisting paralysis. All acetylcholine (ACh)-stimulated parts from CNS to the periphery are irregularly involved explaining the very varied clinical appearance of bovine paresis, and the influence on for instance the autonomous nerve system, adrenals and pancreas. In the experimental group, ACh in plasma showed a sharp fall within the first hour, while there were fairly constant values of serum-ACh in the first four hours, possibly indicating some antibody protection. When paresis was established between 15-28 hours after challenge the general anergetic state was characterised by low ACh-levels. Also in a larger field group ACh-levels were significantly depressed in paretic compared to healthy cows. The unexpected finding in this group was considerably higher levels of ACh and especially Ch in serum compared to plasma. The origin of ACh and Ch had to be blood cells. Preliminary gas chromatographic analysis has confirmed ACh-synthesis by leucocytes and an integrated immuno-cholinergic system of great importance can be anticipated. The general feature of bovine paresis is updated

  4. Brainstem Tuberculoma in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Dana A.; Wagner, Katrin; Burian, Rosemarie; Ghaem Maghami, Naghmeh; Lapaire, Olav

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a Somali refugee who presented in the second trimester of her first pregnancy with a four-week history of gradual right-sided sensomotoric hemisyndrome including facial palsy and left-sided paresis of the oculomotorius nerve causing drooping of the left eyelid and double vision. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solitary brainstem lesion. Upon detection of hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray (CXR), the diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis with involvement of the central nervous system was confirmed by PCR and treatment induced with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. The patient had a steady neurological improvement and a favorable pregnancy outcome. PMID:26618014

  5. [Spinal lipoma with a dural closure defect as a cause of neurogenic bladder and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Eichler, I; Ungersböck, K; Waldhauser, F; Balzar, E; Nürnberger, N; Pflüger, H; Frisch, H

    1986-04-01

    It is reported on a 6-year-old boy, in whom 3 years after the appearance of a neurogenic disturbance of the urinary bladder a lipoma in the spinal canal of the inferior thoracic region was diagnosed myelographically. The operative removal of the growing and displacing fatty tissue which by a (congenital?) dural gap continued in epidural direction indeed resulted in a far-reaching regression of the paresis of the lower extremities, not, however, in an improvement of the urological picture of the disease. The renal insufficiency caused by the hydronephrosis was no more reversible, which emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis of this relatively infrequent malformation. PMID:3727820

  6. Hepato-porto-biliary changes following a high energy electrical shock.

    PubMed

    Alnuaimi, Osama; Lazăr, Mihai; Apostolescu, Cătălin; Scheau, Cristian; Adriana Ion, Daniela

    2011-12-24

    Present day increasing dependence on electricity, in both home and work environments, can lead, if the necessary precautions are not met, to a wide type of injuries, from cutaneous burns to important visceral lesions. We report the case of a 44 year-old male with cutaneous and severe visceral lesions, paresis and paresthesia of the right upper limb induced by a high energy electrical shock. No psychiatric manifestations were observed. This case followed an unusual course due to the particular evolution of the hepatic lesions, which included necrosis, abscesses, thrombosis and angiocholitis. PMID:24432255

  7. [Epidural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Rafael; Bernal-García, Luis Miguel; Pineda-Palomo, Manuel; Botana-Fernández, Marcos; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio Javier; Cabezudo-Artero, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant tumour of the bone that sometimes presents extraskeletal involvement, with the epidural location being rare. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with paresthesia, paresis and urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an epidural mass from C6 to D3. Laminectomy from C7 to D2 and partial resection of the lesion was performed. Pathological analysis was consistent with Ewing sarcoma. The patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without evidence of disease at 8 months follow-up. A review of the literature on all published cases of extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma with epidural involvement is presented. PMID:25497289

  8. Far caudally migrated extraforaminal lumbosacral disc herniation treated by a microsurgical lateral extraforaminal transmuscular approach: case report.

    PubMed

    Tschugg, Anja; Tschugg, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sebastian; Rhomberg, Paul; Thomé, Claudius

    2016-03-01

    A 33-year-old man presented with moderate low-back pain and L-5 radiculopathy that progressed to severe paresis of L-5. On initial imaging, a corresponding spinal lesion was overlooked. Further CT and contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated a presacral mass along the L-5 root far extraforaminally. A herniated disc was suspected, but with standard imaging a schwannoma could not be ruled out. The presacral L-5 root was explored via a microsurgical lateral extraforaminal transmuscular approach. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been no reports of sequestered extraforaminal lumbosacral disc herniations that herniated into the presacral region. PMID:26637061

  9. Pure intramedullary spinal cord metastasis secondary to gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Faiola, Andrea; Gazzeri, Giovanni

    2006-04-01

    Pure intramedullary spinal-cord metastases (ISCM) are a rare manifestation of cancer. We report a case of ISCM from gastric cancer. A 68-year-old man, treated with total gastrectomy for a gastric cancer, presented 9 months later with paresis of the left arm, pain and dissociated sensory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a pure intramedullary lesion at the C3-C5 level. After surgical resection, pathological findings revealed an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma of gastric origin. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of ISCM from gastric cancer in the literature. PMID:16465555

  10. Acute lower motor neuron tetraparesis.

    PubMed

    Añor, Sònia

    2014-11-01

    Flaccid nonambulatory tetraparesis or tetraplegia is an infrequent neurologic presentation; it is characteristic of neuromuscular disease (lower motor neuron [LMN] disease) rather than spinal cord disease. Paresis beginning in the pelvic limbs and progressing to the thoracic limbs resulting in flaccid tetraparesis or tetraplegia within 24 to 72 hours is a common presentation of peripheral nerve or neuromuscular junction disease. Complete body flaccidity develops with severe decrease or complete loss of spinal reflexes in pelvic and thoracic limbs. Animals with acute generalized LMN tetraparesis commonly show severe motor dysfunction in all limbs and severe generalized weakness in all muscles. PMID:25441630

  11. Virtual reality system in conjunction with neurorobotics and neuroprosthetics for rehabilitation of motor disorders.

    PubMed

    De Mauro, Alessandro; Carrasco, Eduardo; Oyarzun, David; Ardanza, Aitor; Frizera Neto, Anselmo; Torricelli, Diego; Pons, José Luis; Gil, Angel; Florez, Julian

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) and spinal cord injuries (SCI) are the most common causes of paralysis and paresis with reported prevalence of 12,000 cases per million and 800 cases per million, respectively. Disabilities that follow CVA (hemiplegia) or SCI (paraplegia, tetraplegia) severely impair motor functions (e.g., standing, walking, reaching and grasping) and prevent the affected individuals from healthy-like, full and autonomous participation in daily activities. Our research focuses on the development of a new virtual reality (VR) system combined with wearable neurorobotics (NR), motor-neuroprosthetics (MNP) and brain neuro-machine interface (BNMI) to overcome the major limitations of current rehabilitation solutions. PMID:21335782

  12. Complex Partial Seizure as a Manifestation of Non-Ketotic Hyperglycemia: The Needle Recovered From Haystack?

    PubMed

    Rani, Khairil Amir; Ahmed, Mohamed H; Dunphy, Louise; Behnam, Yousif

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of a 75-year-old gentleman with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus presenting with acute onset expressive dysphasia and right hemi-paresis with no prior history of seizure. He developed clusters of stereotypical complex partial seizures which were refractory to anti-epileptic agents. He was not known to have diabetes and his brain MRI was normal. His random blood sugar measurement on admission to hospital was 30 mmol/L with HbA1c measurement of 14.8%. His seizures terminated completely when his hyperglycemia was corrected with insulin and rehydration therapy. PMID:27222677

  13. Complex Partial Seizure as a Manifestation of Non-Ketotic Hyperglycemia: The Needle Recovered From Haystack?

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Khairil Amir; Ahmed, Mohamed H.; Dunphy, Louise; Behnam, Yousif

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 75-year-old gentleman with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus presenting with acute onset expressive dysphasia and right hemi-paresis with no prior history of seizure. He developed clusters of stereotypical complex partial seizures which were refractory to anti-epileptic agents. He was not known to have diabetes and his brain MRI was normal. His random blood sugar measurement on admission to hospital was 30 mmol/L with HbA1c measurement of 14.8%. His seizures terminated completely when his hyperglycemia was corrected with insulin and rehydration therapy. PMID:27222677

  14. Anesthesia for hemicolectomy in a known porphyric with cecal malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Naithani, B. K.; Shah, Shagun Bhatia; Bhargava, A. K.; Batra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative management of a known acute intermittent porphyria patient is a challenge requiring awareness of factors, which trigger an acute crisis, clinical features of a porphyric attack, knowledge of safe pharmacologic intervention, and preparedness for reintubation and ventilatory support. The classical signs of a porphyric crisis such as pain abdomen, vomiting and neuropsychiatric symptoms are masked under general anesthesia and can be confused with postoperative pain and vomiting and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, especially for intra-abdominal surgeries. Eternal vigilance for onset of an acute crisis is imperative. After a crisis of acute intermittent porphyria, residual paresis may persist for years in the absence of further attacks. PMID:25558204

  15. Submandibular gland excision: long-term clinical outcome in 139 patients operated in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Springborg, Line Kanstrup; Møller, Martin Nue

    2013-03-01

    In transcervical resection of the submandibular gland for benign lesions, only a limited risk of damage to neural structures can be accepted and a cosmetically satisfactory result is mandatory. In this retrospective case series, we evaluated 139 patients operated over a 10-year period and completed long-term clinical follow-up of 113 of these patients after a median of 81 months. In all patients, the operation was effective. We found a 4.3 % risk of reoperation for wound infection or postoperative hematomas and an 18.7 % risk of early paresis of the marginal branch of the facial nerve, which decreased to 2.7 % on long-term follow-up. We found a 4.4 % risk of permanent lingual nerve paresis, and no patients had damage to the hypoglossal nerve. Xerostomia was found in 22.1 % of the patients and could be quantified by the easily performed biscuit test. Only 2.5 % reported an unsatisfactory cosmetic result and all scars were ≤ 6 on the Vancouver Scar Scale. Problems with scarring were more common if there had been postoperative infection. We continue to use the lateral transcervical approach as standard in our institution for patients who cannot be managed by gland-sparing procedures. PMID:22941392

  16. Arytenoid dislocation as a cause of prolonged hoarseness after cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Goz, Vadim; Qureshi, Sheeraz; Hecht, Andrew C

    2013-03-01

    Study Design Case series of two arytenoid dislocations after anterior cervical discectomy. Objective To recognize arytenoid dislocation as a possible cause of prolonged hoarseness in patients after anterior cervical discectomies. Summary of Background Data Prolonged hoarseness is a common postoperative complication after anterior cervical spine surgery. The etiology of prolonged postoperative hoarseness is usually related to a paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. However, other causes of postoperative hoarseness may be overlooked in this clinical scenario. Other possible etiologies include pharyngeal and laryngeal trauma, hematoma and edema, injury of the superior laryngeal nerve, as well as arytenoid cartilage dislocation. Arytenoid dislocation is often misdiagnosed as vocal fold paresis due to recurrent or laryngeal nerve injury. Methods We report two cases of arytenoid dislocation and review the literature on this pathology. Results Two patients treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion experienced prolonged postoperative hoarseness. Arytenoid dislocation was confirmed by flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy in both cases. The dislocations experienced spontaneous reduction at 6 weeks and 3 months postsurgery. Conclusions Arytenoid dislocation must be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged postoperative hoarseness and evaluated for using direct laryngoscopy, computed tomography, or a laryngeal electromyography. Upon diagnosis, treatment must be considered immediately. Slight dislocations can reduce spontaneously without surgical intervention; however, operative intervention may be required at times. PMID:24436851

  17. The influence of functional electrical stimulation on hand motor recovery in stroke patients: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular stimulation has been used as one potential rehabilitative treatment option to restore motor function and improve recovery in patients with paresis. Especially stroke patients who often regain only limited hand function would greatly benefit from a therapy that enhances recovery and restores movement. Multiple studies investigated the effect of functional electrical stimulation on hand paresis, the results however are inconsistent. Here we review the current literature on functional electrical stimulation on hand motor recovery in stroke patients. We discuss the impact of different parameters such as stage after stoke, degree of impairment, spasticity and treatment protocols on the functional outcome. Importantly, we outline the results from recent studies investigating the cortical effects elicited by functional electrical stimulation giving insights into the underlying mechanisms responsible for long-term treatment effects. Bringing together the findings from present research it becomes clear that both, treatment outcomes as well as the neurophysiologic mechanisms causing functional recovery, vary depending on patient characteristics. In order to develop unified treatment guidelines it is essential to conduct homogenous studies assessing the impact of different parameters on rehabilitative success. PMID:25276333

  18. High risk of cerebrospinal fluid leakage in surgery of a rare primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the clivus showing meningeal infiltration: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Lucas; Archavlis, Eleftherios; Januschek, Elke; Ulrich, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICH) of the skull represent an infrequent bone tumor. Although some rare cases of PICHs located in the skull base have been published, to our concern only three cases have been reported in the English literature of PICHs arising within the clivus. Case Description: We present the case of a patient presenting an isolated abducens paresis due to a rare PICH of the clivus showing also an unusual destruction of the inner table as well as infiltration of the dura mater. Due to this uncommon infiltrative pattern of an otherwise expected intraosseous tumor, a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-fistula occurred while performing a transnasal biopsy. The patient recovered successfully without need of lumbar drainage or re-surgery. Additionally, intratumoral decompression was sufficient to relief the abducens paresis. Conclusions: Our case provides new and meaningful information about clinical features as well as growth pattern of these rare clival tumors. We also discuss the importance of knowing these peculiarities before surgery in order to plan the optimal operative management as well as to avoid complications while approaching PICHs localized in such a delicate cranial region. PMID:25949853

  19. Sudden falls as a persistent complication of selective dorsal rhizotomy surgery in children with bilateral spasticity: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Grootveld, Laura R; van Schie, Petra E M; Buizer, Annemieke I; Jeroen Vermeulen, R; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Strijers, Rob L M; Becher, Jules J G

    2016-08-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) surgery is a well-established treatment for ambulatory children with bilateral spastic paresis and is performed to eliminate spasticity and improve walking. The objective of this case report is to describe sudden falls as a persistent complication of SDR. The authors report on 3 patients with bilateral spastic paresis, aged 12, 6, and 7 years at the time of surgery. The percentage of transected dorsal rootlets was around 40% at the L2-S1 levels. Sudden falls were reported with a frequency of several a day, continuing for years after SDR. The falls were often triggered by performing dual tasks as well as occurring in the transition from sitting to standing, during running, after strenuous exercise, or following a fright. Patients also had residual hyperesthesia and dysesthesia of the foot sole. The authors hypothesize that the sudden falls are caused by a muscle inhibition reflex of the muscles in the legs, as an abnormal reaction to a sensory stimulus that is perceived with increased intensity by a patient with hyperesthesia. A favorable effect of gabapentin medication supports this hypothesis. PMID:27104630

  20. Occam's razor in the management of ventriculoperitoneal shunt dysfunction: Diagnosis and management of an unusual pediatric case.

    PubMed

    Dadlani, Ravi; Dadlani, Reena; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar

    2015-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery is probably the commonest surgical procedure in neurosurgery. Belying its technical simplicity is the myriad complications associated with it. Shunt malfunction is a common complication associated with this surgery, second only to shunt related infections, which may be associated with it. Sterile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia (CE) has been reported with VP shunts, which may or may not be related to the dysfunction. Eosinophilia in the CSF has also been associated with a number of other conditions including parasitic infestations in the brain. This may be unrelated to the shunt surgery. We present a case of a child, operated earlier for hydrocephalus, who presented with sub-acute loss of vision and bilateral oculomotor paresis. CSF from a chamber tap revealed eosinophilia. The commonest presenting symptom of shunt malfunction is raised intracranial pressure. There are no reports in the literature of VP shunt malfunction presenting with bilateral oculomotor paresis and decreased visual acuity. The associated CE complicated the clinical picture, especially since the initial brain radiology was normal. We discuss the clinical differential diagnosis of this very interesting presentation, management dilemmas and outcome in this child. This rare clinical presentation was found to be the result of a shunt malfunction and not due to any rare parasitic infestation of the brain. Occam's razor dictates that the simplest explanation in a given situation is usually the most accurate, as is seen in this case. PMID:25972962

  1. Implementation, testing and pilot clinical evaluation of superelastic splints that decrease joint stiffness.

    PubMed

    Pittaccio, Simone; Garavaglia, L; Viscuso, S; Beretta, E; Strazzer, S

    2013-09-01

    The present work aims at demonstrating that a customised choice of shape memory alloy (SMA) composition, thermo-mechanical treatment and shaping can lead to effective rehabilitation devices applicable to sub-acute and chronic spastic paresis in paediatric patients. SMA pseudoelasticity is regarded as a means to implement a corrective action on posture without hindering residual voluntary or reflex mobility of the affected limb. Specific hinges containing NiTi or NiTiNb elements were designed and constructed to transfer pseudoelastic recovery force to fitted splints for the elbow or the ankle joint. The devices were mechanically tested and showed complete stability after 20-100 cycles, and unchanged characteristics after 1000 full-range deflections. Repositioning splints equipped with patient-specific pseudoelastic hinges were prescribed to 25 individuals (aged 7.75 ± 5.40 years) with mild to severe spastic tetraparesis. Clinical and instrumental evaluations were carried out during crossover trials with traditional and pseudoelastic splints. The sequence of treatment steps was randomized for each subject. The results show that, compared to fixed-angle braces, pseudoelastic devices decrease passive joint stiffness while providing the same control on limb posture. Dynamic pseudoelastic braces are therefore an innovative treatment for spastic paresis, which may reduce joint stiffness. PMID:23793385

  2. Laryngeal structure and function in dogs with cough.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lynelle R

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence and type of laryngeal abnormalities in dogs examined because of cough that did not have signs of upper airway disease and to compare the prevalence of those abnormalities among dogs with various respiratory tract diseases. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 138 dogs with cough that did not have signs of upper airway disease. PROCEDURES The study was conducted between July 2001 and October 2014 and included dogs examined for cough that had laryngoscopic and bronchoscopic examinations performed by 1 examiner. Laryngeal hyperemia and swelling were recorded, and laryngeal function was assessed before and after doxapram stimulation when indicated. Results were compared among dogs on the basis of cough duration (acute [< 2 weeks], subacute [2 weeks to 2 months], and chronic [> 2 months]) and disease diagnosed (inflammatory airway disease, airway collapse, lower respiratory tract infection, and eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy). RESULTS Laryngeal hyperemia was detected in 73 of 134 (54%) dogs with cough of subacute or chronic duration, and its prevalence did not vary significantly among dogs with various diseases. Thirteen dogs had laryngeal paresis, and 13 dogs had laryngeal paralysis; dysphonia (n = 2) and stridor (1) were uncommon findings in those dogs. The prevalence of laryngeal dysfunction (paresis or paralysis) did not differ significantly among diseases. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that 26 of 138 (19%) dogs examined because of cough alone had laryngeal dysfunction, which suggested that a complete laryngoscopic examination should be included in the diagnostic evaluation of dogs with cough. PMID:27379595

  3. A patient with atonic seizures mimicking transient ischemic attacks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Ju; Choi, Jun Young; An, Young-Sil; Park, Ki-Hyung; Park, Hyeon-Mi; Lee, Yeong-Bae; Shin, Dong-Jin; Sung, Young Hee; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    A focal atonic seizure is a partial seizure in which the ictal manifestation consists of paresis of the extremities or muscles on one side of the body, and this phenomenon can easily be misdiagnosed as a transient ischemic attack. An 86-year-old woman visited our hospital complaining of transient right upper extremity weakness lasting for 10 min following an unusual sensation in her chest accompanied by palpitations. On the third hospital day, she again complained of right arm weakness, which progressed to jerky movements of her right extremity accompanied by facial twitching and then generalized into a tonic–clonic seizure. The EEG displayed several interictal spikes in the contralateral temporal area, and the ictal SPECT, analyzed using the SISCOM system, showed an increased signal in both the contralateral superior parietal area and the mesial frontal area. In this case, the patient was diagnosed with focal atonic seizures as the cause of the monolimb weakness, which had been initially misdiagnosed aas transient ischemic attacks. In cases in which a patient presents with monolimb paresis, physicians should consider the possibility of an atonic seizure as the cause. PMID:25870790

  4. Historic evidence to support a causal relationship between spirochetal infections and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Following previous observations a statistically significant association between various types of spirochetes and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) fulfilled Hill’s criteria in favor of a causal relationship. If spirochetal infections can indeed cause AD, the pathological and biological hallmarks of AD should also occur in syphilitic dementia. To answer this question, observations and illustrations on the detection of spirochetes in the atrophic form of general paresis, which is known to be associated with slowly progressive dementia, were reviewed and compared with the characteristic pathology of AD. Historic observations and illustrations published in the first half of the 20th Century indeed confirm that the pathological hallmarks, which define AD, are also present in syphilitic dementia. Cortical spirochetal colonies are made up by innumerable tightly spiraled Treponema pallidum spirochetes, which are morphologically indistinguishable from senile plaques, using conventional light microscopy. Local brain amyloidosis also occurs in general paresis and, as in AD, corresponds to amyloid beta. These historic observations enable us to conclude that chronic spirochetal infections can cause dementia and reproduce the defining hallmarks of AD. They represent further evidence in support a causal relationship between various spirochetal infections and AD. They also indicate that local invasion of the brain by these helically shaped bacteria reproduce the filamentous pathology characteristic of AD. Chronic infection by spirochetes, and co-infection with other bacteria and viruses should be included in our current view on the etiology of AD. Prompt action is needed as AD might be prevented. PMID:25932012

  5. Iatrogenic brainstem injury during cerebellomedullary cistern puncture.

    PubMed

    Luján Feliu-Pascual, Alejandro; Garosi, Laurent; Dennis, Ruth; Platt, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid collection is fundamental to the investigation of central nervous system disorders although it carries potential risks. Herein we report the clinical signs and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings associated with needle injury to the brainstem during cerebellomedullary cistern puncture in four dogs. Three dogs were nonambulatory tetraparetic with cranial nerve deficits and one dog had unexplained left thoracic limb paresis. In MR images, there were conspicuous T2 hyperintensities in the myelencephalon in all dogs. In T2* gradient echo images, the lesions were hypointense in two dogs with multiple cranial nerve deficits, and hyperintense in another dog. One dog was euthanized due to sudden neurologic deterioration 12 days later, one died shortly after MR imaging, and a third was euthanized due to concurrent cervical spondylomyelopathy. The fourth dog recovered gradually. Diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically in one dog and was presumptive based on clinical signs and MR findings in three dogs. None of the dogs with cranial nerve deficits recovered, only the one dog with left thoracic limb paresis and concurrent syringomyelia. PMID:18833957

  6. Painful Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Edvard; Vyšata, Oldřich; Včelák, Radek; Pazdera, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients frequently suffer from lumbosacral plexus disorder. When conducting a neurological examination, it is essential to assess the extent of muscle paresis, sensory disorder distribution, pain occurrence, and blocked spine. An electromyography (EMG) can confirm axonal lesions and their severity and extent, root affliction (including dorsal branches), and disorders of motor and sensory fiber conduction. Imaging examination, particularly gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination, ensues. Cerebrospinal fluid examination is of diagnostic importance with radiculopathy, neuroinfections, and for evidence of immunoglobulin synthesis. Differential diagnostics of lumbosacral plexopathy (LSP) include metabolic, oncological, inflammatory, ischemic, and autoimmune disorders. In the presented case study, a 64-year-old man developed an acute onset of painful LSP with a specific EMG finding, MRI showing evidence of plexus affliction but not in the proximal part of the roots. Painful plexopathy presented itself with severe muscle paresis in the femoral nerve and the obturator nerve innervation areas, and gradual remission occurred after 3 months. Autoimmune origin of painful LSP is presumed. We describe a rare case of patient with painful lumbar plexopathy, with EMG findings of axonal type, we suppose of autoimmune etiology. PMID:25929915

  7. [Clinical features and MRI characteristics in neuralgic amyotrophy].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) is a distinct peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorder characterised by sudden attacks of neuropathic pain, usually in a unilateral upper extremity, and patchy paresis with amyotrophy. Under-recognition of NA patients may be frequent because symptoms of NA can be similar to those of common orthopedic disorders. The lesion sites of NA are commonly considered to be brachial plexus (BP) and/or individual branches of the BP. The cause of NA remains unknown. Some evidence support the concept of a complex pathogenesis in NA that includes underlying predisposition and susceptible PNS structures, and it can be triggered by infection, trauma, and strenuous exercise. Typical presentation of NA is characterized by patchy paresis of the periscapular and periglenohumeral muscles. In such cases, STIR-MRI often shows hyperintense signal abnormalities on the affected side of the proximal upper BP. NA is considered to be broad and encompasses a spectrum of atypical presentations, including involvement of lower part of BP, isolated nerves (anterior interosseous nerve or posterior interosseous nerve), or lumbosacral plexuses. Functional prognosis of NA is less favorable than previously assumed. Administration of corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin was described as potential therapeutics for NA, although their efficacy remains unestablished. PMID:25672707

  8. Arytenoid Dislocation as a Cause of Prolonged Hoarseness after Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Goz, Vadim; Qureshi, Sheeraz; Hecht, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Case series of two arytenoid dislocations after anterior cervical discectomy. Objective To recognize arytenoid dislocation as a possible cause of prolonged hoarseness in patients after anterior cervical discectomies. Summary of Background Data Prolonged hoarseness is a common postoperative complication after anterior cervical spine surgery. The etiology of prolonged postoperative hoarseness is usually related to a paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. However, other causes of postoperative hoarseness may be overlooked in this clinical scenario. Other possible etiologies include pharyngeal and laryngeal trauma, hematoma and edema, injury of the superior laryngeal nerve, as well as arytenoid cartilage dislocation. Arytenoid dislocation is often misdiagnosed as vocal fold paresis due to recurrent or laryngeal nerve injury. Methods We report two cases of arytenoid dislocation and review the literature on this pathology. Results Two patients treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion experienced prolonged postoperative hoarseness. Arytenoid dislocation was confirmed by flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy in both cases. The dislocations experienced spontaneous reduction at 6 weeks and 3 months postsurgery. Conclusions Arytenoid dislocation must be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged postoperative hoarseness and evaluated for using direct laryngoscopy, computed tomography, or a laryngeal electromyography. Upon diagnosis, treatment must be considered immediately. Slight dislocations can reduce spontaneously without surgical intervention; however, operative intervention may be required at times. PMID:24436851

  9. Potential determinants of efficacy of mirror therapy in stroke patients – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Maddalena; Morkisch, Nadine; Fritzsch, Claire; Mehnert, Jan; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mirror therapy (MT) was found to improve motor function after stroke. However, there is high variability between patients regarding motor recovery. Objectives: The following pilot study was designed to identify potential factors determining this variability between patients with severe upper limb paresis, receiving MT. Methods: Eleven sub-acute stroke patients with severe upper limb paresis participated, receiving in-patient rehabilitation. After a set of pre-assessments (including measurement of brain activity at the primary motor cortex and precuneus during the mirror illusion, using near-infrared spectroscopy as described previously), four weeks of MT were applied, followed by a set of post-assessments. Discriminant group analysis for MT responders and non-responders was performed. Results: Six out of eleven patients were defined as responders and five as non-responders on the basis of their functional motor improvement. The initial motor function and the activity shift in both precunei (mirror index) were found to discriminate significantly between responders and non-responders. Conclusions: In line with earlier results, initial motor function was confirmed as crucial determinant of motor recovery. Additionally, activity response to the mirror illusion in both precunei was found to be a candidate for determination of the efficacy of MT. PMID:26409402

  10. Focal and abnormally persistent paralysis associated with congenital paramyotonia

    PubMed Central

    Magot, Armelle; David, Albert; Sternberg, Damien; Péréon, Yann

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.4) are an established cause of several clinically distinct forms of periodic paralysis and myotonia. Focal paresis has sometimes already been described. We report a case with atypical clinical manifestation comprising paramyotonia and cold-induced persistent and focal paralysis. A 27-year-old woman presented with paramyotonia congenita since her childhood. She experienced during her childhood one brief episode of generalised weakness. At the age of 27, she experienced a focal paresis lasting for several months. The known mutation p.Val1293Ile was found in the muscle sodium channel gene (SCN4A). Channel inactivation is involved in most Na+ channelopathies. Fast inactivation is known to be responsible for the myotonia phenotype. We hypothesise that the V1293I mutation may also alter the slow inactivation in specific conditions, for example, prolonged cold exposure or prolonged and intensive exercise. This observation broadens the spectrum of clinical manifestations of this sodium channel mutation. PMID:24939454

  11. Reirradiation of spinal metastases with intensity-modulated radiation therapy: an analysis of 23 patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawashiro, Shohei; Harada, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Asakura, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Sumita, Kiyomi; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Murata, Hideki; Nemoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of reirradiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for spinal metastases. We retrospectively analyzed 23 patients with spinal metastases who underwent IMRT reirradiation between December 2006 and July 2013. We evaluated the spinal radiation doses during the first and second radiation therapy courses, the interval between the courses, and the clinical outcomes after reirradiation, including skeletal-related events, local control rates (LCRs), overall survival (OS), and toxicities. The median time from the first irradiation to reirradiation was 13 months (range, 2–75 months). The median reirradiation dose delivered to 90% of the planning target volume was 24.5 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 14.7–50 Gy in 3–25 fractions). Nineteen patients experienced pain at reirradiation, and 15 of these attained pain relief. Two of the three patients with paresis in the upper or lower extremities upon initiation of reirradiation demonstrated improvement. Local progression was identified in four patients. The median time to local progression was 37 months. The 1- and 2-year LCRs after reirradiation were 88% and 75%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year OS rates after reirradiation were 45% and 20%, respectively, with a median OS of 12 months. No late toxicities occurred. In conclusion, spinal metastasis reirradiation using IMRT appears safe; pain relief and paresis improvement and/or prevention can be expected, along with a reduced risk of radiation-induced toxicity, especially in the spinal cord. PMID:26662113

  12. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test. PMID:24998831

  13. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy. PMID:24190889

  14. Recurrent laryngeal edema imitating angioedema caused by dislocated screw after anterior spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Piotr; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Migacz, Ewa; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis. PMID:25755901

  15. [Amyothropic neuralgy of lumbosacral plexus - case report].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Amyothropic neuralgy is a rare disease witch unknown etiopathogenesis. The main popular theory says that inflammatory and immunomodulatory process is connected with that disease. Diagnosis is made after exclusion of other causes of plexus lumbosacralis damage. The main symptom is neuropathic pain after which there is observed muscle weakness and atrophy. ENG/EMG study and MRI are made to confirm the diagnosis. In this study we described a case of 52 years old female with lower limbs paresis, who was diagnosed few years after first symptoms. Limb paresis was preluded by lumbar pain. MRI study revealed central spinal disc herniations on L1-2, L2-3, L3-4 levels with dura matter compression, L4-5 spinal disc right lateral herniation and synovial cyst. MRI of both lumbar plexuses was also normal. EMG study revealed features of bilateral, chronic damage of lower legs nerves on lumbar plexus level. Patient was treated with physiotherapy and gabapentin with dose of 2x600mg per day. PMID:25771520

  16. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  17. Incidence estimate and guideline-oriented treatment for post-stroke spasticity: an analysis based on German statutory health insurance data

    PubMed Central

    Egen-Lappe, Veronika; Köster, Ingrid; Schubert, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Background Spasticity after stroke has been internationally recognized as an important health problem causing impairment of mobility, deformity, and pain. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of first-ever and recurrent stroke and of subsequent spastic and flaccid paresis. Factors influencing the development of spasticity were analyzed. A further major aim was to provide a “real-life” assessment of the treatment of spasticity in Germany and to discuss this in view of the treatment recommended by German and international clinical guidelines. Methods The database used in this study comprised a cohort of 242,090 insurants from a large statutory health insurance fund in the federal state of Hesse, Germany. A first hospital discharge diagnosis in 2009 with any of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes I60–I64 was used to identify patients with acute stroke (hemorrhage and ischemic). These patients were followed up six months after stroke to monitor whether they developed spastic or flaccid paresis (hospital or ambulatory care diagnoses ICD-10 code G81–G83 [excluding G82.6/G83.4/G83.8]). For patients with spastic paresis after stroke the spasticity treatment was analyzed for a six-month period (physiotherapy, oral muscle relaxants, intrathecal baclofen, and botulinum toxin). Results Standardized to the population of Germany, 3.7 per 1000 persons suffered a stroke in 2009 (raw 5.2/1000). Of all surviving patients, 10.2% developed spasticity within 6 months. Cox regression revealed no significant influence of patient age, gender, morbidity (diabetes, hypertensive diseases, ischemic heart diseases) or type of stroke on development of spasticity. 97% of surviving patients with spasticity received physiotherapy (inpatient care 89%, ambulatory care 48%). Oral muscle relaxants were prescribed to 13% of the patients. No patient received intrathecal baclofen or botulinum toxin. Conclusion Claims data enabled analysis of

  18. Towards diagnostic markers for the psychoses.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, Stephen M; O'Donovan, Michael C; Saks, Elyn; Burns, Tom; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Psychotic disorders are currently grouped under broad phenomenological diagnostic rubrics. Researchers hope that progress in identifying aetiological mechanisms will ultimately enable more precise division of heterogeneous diagnoses into specific and valid subgroups. This goal has been an aim of psychiatry since the 19th century, when patients with general paresis were thought to have "insanity" similar to dementia praecox and manic depressive illness. Nowadays, the constructs of organic-induced and substance-induced psychotic disorder show that our diagnostic classification system already reflects, in part, aetiological factors. Most recently, gene copy number variation and autoimmunity have been associated with schizophrenia. We suggest how, on the basis of recent scientific advances, we can progress the identification of further putative subgroups and make the most of currently available interventions. Prompt diagnosis and treatment, and a more routine search for causes, could preserve function and improve outcome, and therefore be more acceptable to patients and carers. PMID:27063388

  19. [An autopsy case of progressive generalized muscle atrophy over 14 years due to post-polio syndrome].

    PubMed

    Oki, Ryosuke; Uchino, Akiko; Izumi, Yuishin; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Murayama, Shigeo; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old man who had contracted acute paralytic poliomyelitis in his childhood. Thereafter, he had suffered from paresis involving the left lower limb, with no relapse or progression of the disease. He began noticing slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy in the upper and lower extremities in his 60s. At the age of 72, muscle weakness developed rapidly, and he demonstrated dyspnea on exertion and dysphagia. He died after about 14 years from the onset of muscle weakness symptoms. Autopsy findings demonstrated motoneuron loss and glial scars not only in the plaque-like lesions in the anterior horns, which were sequelae of old poliomyelitis, but also throughout the spine. No Bunina bodies, TDP-43, and ubiquitin inclusions were found. Post-polio syndrome is rarely fatal due to rapid progressive dyspnea and dysphagia. Thus, the pathological findings in the patient are considered to be related to the development of muscle weakness. PMID:26616485

  20. Nicolau livedoid dermatitis following intramuscular benzathine penicillin injection.

    PubMed

    Andrade, P; Pereira, N; Brites, M M; Gonçalo, M; Figueiredo, A

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 64-year-old male presenting with a rapidly enlarging painful violaceous plaque in the left buttock and posterior thigh, following a gluteal intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin. Associated urinary incontinence and lower left limb paresis were consistent with sciatic and lower sacral nerve damage, as confirmed by electromyography. Additional underlying muscular damage was observed in ultrasound and computer tomodensitometry scans and supported by high serum levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Aggressive treatment was performed with fluid expansion, intravenous steroid bolus, vasodilators and anticoagulation, resulting in slow improvement of cutaneous and muscular lesions. However, no significant effect was observed on neurologic dysfunction after 6 months of regular neuromuscular rehabilitation. Nicolau Livedoid Dermatitis is a rare and potentially fatal condition showing variable levels of tissue impairment and unpredictable course and prognosis. Specific treatment is not consensual and the efficacy of any particular treatment remains to be established. PMID:21199637

  1. Left lower lobe atelectasis and consolidation following cardiac surgery: the effect of topical cooling on the phrenic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, J.J.; Cascade, P.N.; Rubenfire, M.; Wajszczuk, W.; Kerin, N.Z.

    1982-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective analyses of chest radiographs of patients following coronary artery bypass surgery were undertaken. Left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis developed in 13 of 40 (32.5%) patients who were operated upon without topical cooling of the heart with ice, and in 77 of 122 (63.1%) patients in one group and 34 of 40 (85.0%) patients in another group who were operated upon with topical cooling of the heart with ice. This difference was highly significant (p<0.001). Of the patients in one group in whom left lower lobe abnormality developed, 69.2% had paralysis or paresis of the left hemidiaphragm. It is evident that application of ice to the phrenic nerve can lead to temporary paralysis of the left leaf of the diaphragm, with subsequent development of left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis.

  2. An unusual cause of spinal cord ischemia after thoracic endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Koleilat, Issam; Moore, Erin; Hanover, Tod; Eidt, John

    2016-04-01

    A 59-year-old left-handed man presented with chest pain and hypertension and was found to have an acute descending aortic dissection on imaging. After thoracic endovascular repair of the dissection, he developed left arm weakness and ischemia. Despite carotid-subclavian transposition, the patient was found to have persistent left triceps weakness as well as bilateral leg paresis. An urgent spinal drain was placed that improved his lower extremity deficit but did not greatly change his arm symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed previously undiagnosed severe multilevel spinal stenosis requiring operative decompression. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the contribution of cervical spinal stenosis to post-thoracic endovascular repair spinal ischemia. PMID:25564598

  3. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  4. A case of complex partial seizure with reversible MRI abnormalities in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Nobuko; Hosaka, Takashi; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Sachiko; Tamaoka, Akira; Ohkoshi, Norio

    2016-07-28

    A 79-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of prolonged impaired consciousness and right hemiparesis. She was treated for acute cerebral infarction because her brain magnetic resonance imaging showed extensive cortical lesions similar to acute infarction in diffusion weighted image, fluid attenuated inversion recovery, and T2 weighted images. On the fifth day, she had a focal seizure on the right side. A new lesion during imaging and electroencephalogram abnormality were observed at that time. After the antiepileptic drug treatment was started, her right hemiparesis considered as ictal paresis, confusion, and the magnetic resonance imaging findings gradually improved. There was also an old, irreversible lesion in the left hippocampus, which was considered as the focus of her complex partial seizure. In the elderly, the post-ictal period of confusion, which occurs with complex partial seizure, may be prolonged. In our case, improvement of hemiparesis and confusion occurred after about 2 weeks. PMID:27356729

  5. Fatal herpes simplex infection in a pygmy African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Allison, N; Chang, T C; Steele, K E; Hilliard, J K

    2002-01-01

    An adult pygmy African hedgehog developed acute posterior paresis attributed to a prolapsed intervertebral disc diagnosed by C-T scan. Corticosteroid therapy resulted in prompt resolution of the ataxia, but 2 weeks later the animal became anorexic and died. Macroscopically, the liver was stippled with punctate off-white foci which were confirmed microscopically to be foci of necrosis. Numerous hepatocytes contained intranuclear inclusions and syncytial cell formation was also present. A herpes virus was isolated and identified by fluorescent antibody and polymerase chain reaction studies as herpesvirus simplex type 1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of herpes infection in the African hedgehog and the first time herpes simplex has been identified as a cause of disease in insectivores. PMID:11814325

  6. Respiratory Management in the Patient with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras Vázquez, Rita; Rascado Sedes, Pedro; Montoto Marqués, Antonio; Ferreiro Velasco, M. Elena

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) often lead to impairment of the respiratory system and, consequently, restrictive respiratory changes. Paresis or paralysis of the respiratory muscles can lead to respiratory insufficiency, which is dependent on the level and completeness of the injury. Respiratory complications include hypoventilation, a reduction in surfactant production, mucus plugging, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Vital capacity (VC) is an indicator of overall pulmonary function; patients with severely impaired VC may require assisted ventilation. It is best to proceed with intubation under controlled circumstances rather than waiting until the condition becomes an emergency. Mechanical ventilation can adversely affect the structure and function of the diaphragm. Early tracheostomy following short orotracheal intubation is probably beneficial in selected patients. Weaning should start as soon as possible, and the best modality is progressive ventilator-free breathing (PVFB). Appropriate candidates can sometimes be freed from mechanical ventilation by electrical stimulation. Respiratory muscle training regimens may improve patients' inspiratory function following a SCI. PMID:24089664

  7. [Brachial plexus compression from supraclavicular encapsulated fat necrosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Páez, Miguel; de Miguel-Pueyo, Luis; Marín-Salido, Esteban José; Carrasco-Brenes, Antonio; Martín-Gallego, Alvaro; Arráez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old male, lacking clinical history of previous illness, who had surgery at our hospital to treat a mass in the supraclavicular space. The patient presented with a 1-month progressive distal paresis of the left arm. The histo-pathological examination of the mass revealed an encapsulated fat necrosis. Fat necrosis is characterised by cystic architecture, encapsulation with fat necrosis within, and inflammatory infiltration of its walls. Neural structure compression secondary to this tumour mass is very rare. Fat necrosis is more frequent in the lower limbs, in areas exposed to trauma. This article is the first report of brachial plexus compression due to supraclavicular fat necrosis. PMID:24837841

  8. Cretinism revisited.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zu-Pei; Hetzel, Basil S

    2010-02-01

    Endemic cretinism includes two syndromes: a more common neurological disorder with brain damage, deaf mutism, squint and spastic paresis of the legs and a less common syndrome of severe hypothyroidism, growth retardation and less severe mental defect. Both conditions are due to dietary iodine deficiency and can be prevented by correction of iodine deficiency before pregnancy. Endemic cretinism is now included in the spectrum of the effects of iodine deficiency in a population termed the 'iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs)', which also includes a wide range of lesser degrees of cognitive defect that can be prevented by the correction of iodine deficiency. Iodine deficiency is now recognised by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the most common preventable cause of brain damage with in excess of 2 billion at risk from 130 countries. A global United Nations (UN) programme of prevention has achieved 68% household usage of iodised salt by the year 2000 compared with less than 20% prior to 1990. PMID:20172469

  9. Presentation and prognostic indicators for free-living black cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.) admitted to an Australian zoo veterinary hospital over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Le Souëf, Anna; Holyoake, Carly; Vitali, Simone; Warren, Kristin

    2015-04-01

    The veterinary records of three species of free-living, endangered black cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.; n = 565) admitted to the Perth Zoo Veterinary Hospital in Western Australia during a 10-yr period (2000-09) were analyzed to determine the effect of clinical presentation and treatment on survival to release. The most-common reason for admission was trauma (at least 76.7% of cases), and trauma was also the most-frequent finding on necropsy examination (80.1% of cases). Anemia and paralysis-paresis were significant factors determining the decreased likelihood of survival of cockatoos undergoing rehabilitation. Human activities, in particular vehicle strike, were significant causes of morbidity and mortality in free-living black cockatoo populations. PMID:25647589

  10. ASSESSMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY IMPAIRMENT, FUNCTION, AND ACTIVITY FOLLOWING STROKE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Catherine E.; Bland, Marghuretta D.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Schaefer, Sydney Y.; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive approach for assessing the upper extremity (UE) after stroke. First, common upper extremity impairments and how to assess them are briefly discussed. While multiple UE impairments are typically present after stroke, the severity of one impairment, paresis, is the primary determinant of UE functional loss. Second, UE function is operationally defined and a number of clinical measures are discussed. It is important to consider how impairment and loss of function affect UE activity outside of the clinical environment. Thus, this review also identifies accelerometry as an objective method for assessing UE activity in daily life. Finally, the role that each of these levels of assessment should play in clinical decision making is discussed in order to optimize the provision of stroke rehabilitation services. PMID:22975740

  11. [Solitary listerial abscess of the brain stem. Cure with antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Outin, H D; Merrer, J; Molho, M; Rabault, N; Simon, N; Nouailhat, F

    1989-01-01

    A healthy 26-year-old man, without initially presenting fever, rapidly developed a focal right pontomedullary deficit associated with an aseptic lymphocytic meningitis. The diagnosis of Listeria infection was confirmed by blood cultures. CT and MRI demonstrated an abscess extending from the superior cerebellar peduncle to the lateral portion of the medulla. Immunological controls gave no indication of deficiency. With ampicillin therapy, started on the 5th day, clinical recovery was almost complete, but a soft palate right paresis persisted as the unique sequel. Antibiotic therapy was maintained for 5 months up to normal CSF and CT. One year after the onset, MRI was also normal. The rare nature of listerial abscess in the brainstem is discussed with regard to rhombencephalitides. PMID:2727539

  12. VOJTA neurophysiologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, H; Appaji, G; Mundt, D

    1992-01-01

    The reflexlocomotion acc. to VOJTA is a neurophysiologic facilitation system for the whole CNS and neuromuscular apparatus. It consists of all components, in a reciprocal manner of locomotion: (i) automatic control of posture, (ii) uprighting, (iii) aimed movements. Consequently the indications for this type of kinesiologic facilitation are really extensive. In this article the following complete list of indications is described: CCD (central coordination disorder), CP (cerebral palsy), peripheral paresis, Spina bifida (MMC), Myopathies, congenital malformations, orthopaedic problems, traumatic cross sections, neuromuscular dysfunctions etc. Further the experiences of the treatment in each disease are discussed. Even EMG-detections have shown the effect of the therapy in peripheral and central damage. Therefore a good prognosis for improvement and rehabilitation can be given in a large number of disorders, irrespective of age. PMID:1535338

  13. Thrombectomy in posterior circulation stroke through persistent primitive trigeminal artery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Mjhl; Lycklama À Nijeholt, G J; Dinkelaar, W; de Rooij, Tpw; van Es, Acgm; van der Kallen, B F; Emmer, B J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) of acute posterior circulation occlusion in a patient with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA). The patient presented with an acute left sided hemiparesis and loss of consciousness (Glasgow coma score of 5). Computed tomography angiography showed an acute occlusion of the right internal carotid artery (ICA), the PPTA, distal basilar artery (BA), right posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and right superior cerebellar artery (SCA). Stent-retriever assisted thrombectomy was not considered possible through the hypoplastic proximal BA. After passage of the proximal ICA occlusion, the right PCA and SCA were recanalized through the PPTA, with a single thrombectomy procedure. Ten days after intervention patient was discharged scoring optimal EMV with only a mild facial and left hand paresis remaining. PPTA is a persistent embryological carotid-basilar connection. Knowledge of existing (embryonic) variants in neurovascular anatomy is essential when planning and performing acute neurointerventional procedures. PMID:26464287

  14. Interest of Ultrasonographic Assessment of Diaphragmatic Function in Cardiac Rehabilitation Center: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Boussuges, Alain; Chaumet, Guillaume; Poirette, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diaphragmatic paresis is a rare but recognized complication of atrial fibrillation ablation. A 59-year-old woman experiencing dyspnea in supine position and for minimal effort was admitted in a cardiac rehabilitation center. One month before, she was referred to a cardiac center to ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. After the procedure, the patient developed respiratory failure attributed to aspiration pneumonia and requiring mechanical ventilation. At admission in the rehabilitation center, M-mode ultrasonography reported an absence of movement of the right hemidiaphragm during quiet breathing and a paradoxical movement during voluntary sniffing. Chest ultrasonography can be useful to detect diaphragmatic dysfunction in patients suffering from dyspnea, at admission in a cardiac rehabilitation center. Its use should be envisaged more frequently. PMID:25984664

  15. Burkitt Lymphoma with Initial Clinical Presentation due to Infiltration of the Central Nervous System and Eye Orbits

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; Machado, Dequitier Carvalho; de Oliveira, Celso Estevão; Lacerda, Letícia da Silva; de Oliveira, Romulo Varella; de França Silva, Monique; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 17 Final Diagnosis: Burkitt lymphoma Symptoms: Anisocoria, ipsilateral ptosis, opthalmoparesis, paresis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Burkitt lymphoma rarely affects the central nervous system and ocular region. Under these conditions, computed tomography and (particularly) magnetic resonance imaging of the skull increase the diagnostic accuracy, as they objectively show the topography of lesions and the effect of neoplasia on structures. Case Report: We report here the case of a 17-year-old male whose initial clinical manifestations were related to neurological impairment and to the ocular musculature and ocular innervation. The diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma with leukemization and infiltration of the central nervous system was confirmed. Conclusions: In this case, it is important to recognize that the neuroimaging findings were fundamentally important in indicating the initial form of the disease and in directing the appropriate clinical management. PMID:25243420

  16. The Variegate Neurological Manifestations of Varicella Zoster Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), after which the virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With advancing age or immunosuppression, cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines, and the virus reactivates to cause zoster (shingles), dermatomal distribution, pain, and rash. Zoster is often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia), cranial nerve palsies, zoster paresis, vasculopathy, meningoencephalitis, and multiple ocular disorders. This review covers clinical, laboratory, and pathological features of neurological complications of VZV reactivation, including diagnostic testing to verify active VZV infection in the nervous system. Additional perspectives are provided by discussions of VZV latency, animal models to study varicella pathogenesis and immunity, and of the value of vaccination of elderly individuals to boost cell-mediated immunity to VZV and prevent VZV reactivation. PMID:23884722

  17. Eye movement and vestibular dysfunction in mitochondrial A3243G mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Akbarkhodjaeva, Ziyoda Abdulkhaevna; Jung, Ileok; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Studying eye movements and vestibular function would provide insights into brain networks that are vulnerable in mitochondrial disorders. We sought eye movement and vestibular abnormalities in three Korean patients with a mitochondrial A3243G point mutation. The patients suffered from vertigo and imbalance during the stroke-like and seizure episodes from lesions involving the posterior cerebral cortex, which were accompanied by bilateral saccadic hypermetria and horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus. Furthermore, two patients showed bilateral impairments of the vestibulo-ocular reflex during head impulses for the horizontal and posterior canals on both sides in the absence of caloric paresis. Cerebellar atrophy was prominent on MRIs in two patients and was less marked in the other patient. These findings imply that the cerebellum is susceptible to neuronal energy deficiency due to mitochondrial A3243G point mutation. PMID:27075643

  18. Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin Administered to Abolish Acquired Nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. John; Tomsak, Robert L.; Grant, Michael P.; Remler, Bernd F.; Yaniglos, Stacy S.; Lystad, Lisa; Dell'Osso, Louis F.

    1992-01-01

    We injected botulinum toxin into the horizontal rectus muscles of the right eyes of two patients who had acquired pendular nystagmus with horizontal, vertical, and torsional components. This treatment successfully abolished the horizontal component of the nystagmus in the injected eye in both patients for approximately 2 months. Both patients showed a small but measurable improvement of vision in the injected eye that may have been limited by coexistent disease of the visual pathways. The vertical and torsional components of the nystagmus persisted in both patients. In one patient, the horizontal component of nystagmus in the noninjected eye increased; we ascribe this finding to plastic-adaptive changes in response to paresis caused by the botulinum toxin. Such plastic-adaptive changes and direct side effects of the injections - such as diplopia and ptosis - may limit the effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of acquired nystagmus. Neither patient elected to repeat the botulinum treatment.

  19. Concomitant Intraspinal and Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage Caused by an Aneurysm on the Celiac Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Katrien; Schwagten, Veerle; Menovsky, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal hemorrhage is a rare condition. We present a case in which the diagnosis was complicated by a concomitant intra-abdominal hemorrhage. The patient, taking coumarins, presented with acute back pain and abdominal pain and progressive paresis of the lower limbs. Computed tomography angiography of the abdomen showed an intra-abdominal hemorrhage and an aneurysm of the celiac trunk. MR (magnetic resonance) imaging of the spine revealed a combined subdural and epidural hemorrhage from C1 to L1. Both sites were treated conservatively. After 6 months the patient regained strength in both legs with some persistent loss of strength in the left leg. Follow-up MR imaging showed complete resolution of the spinal hemorrhage. The celiac artery aneurysm was treated conservatively. We suggest that the rupture of the celiac artery aneurysm caused increased intra-abdominal pressure leading to spinal hemorrhage. Emergency staff should be aware of the possibility of two rare but concomitant conditions. PMID:26251805

  20. Primary lumbar extradural hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Paek, Matthew; Glass, Eric; Kent, Marc; Clifford, Craig A; De Lahunta, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A 9 yr old castrated male golden retriever weighing 36 kg was presented for evaluation of progressive left pelvic limb paresis and fecal and urinary incontinence. MRI demonstrated an extradural, ovoid mass compressing the lumbar spinal cord. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. Histologically, the mass was consistent with hemangiosarcoma with no involvement of the adjacent vertebrae. The dog underwent a doxorubicin-based chemotherapy protocol with the addition of oral cyclophosphamide. After completion of chemotherapy, the dog was evaluated q 4 mo for restaging. Clinicopathological evidence of primary tumor recurrence or metastatic disease was not detected for 15 mo after initial diagnosis and treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a primary extradural hemangiosarcoma in the lumbar vertebral column in a dog. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome are also discussed. PMID:25955146

  1. Suspected natural lysosomal storage disease from ingestion of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) in goats in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Elvio E; Cholich, Luciana A; Chileski, Gabriela; García, Enrique N; Lértora, Javier; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Guidi, María G; Mussart, Norma; Teibler, Gladys P

    2015-07-01

    This study describes an occurrence of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) intoxication in goats in northern Argentina. The clinical signs displayed by the affected animals were ataxia, lethargy, emaciation, hypertonia of the neck muscles, spastic paresis in the hind legs, abnormal postural reactions and death. The clinico-pathologic examination revealed that the affected animals were anemic and their serum level of aspartate aminotransferase was significantly increased. Cytoplasmic vacuolation in the Purkinje cells and pancreatic acinar cells was observed by histological examination. The neuronal lectin binding pattern showed a strong positive reaction to WGA (Triticum vulgaris), sWGA (succinylated T. vulgaris) and LCA (Lens culinaris). Although I. carnea is common in tropical regions, this is the first report of spontaneous poisoning in goats in Argentina. PMID:25728544

  2. An autopsy case of sudden unexpected death due to a glial cyst of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Park, Jong-Tae

    2014-09-01

    Pineal cysts are usually asymptomatic; however, they may rarely cause symptoms such as chronic headache, paroxysmal headache with gaze paresis, postural syncope, loss of consciousness, and sudden death. A 30-year-old woman with no specific medical history except chronic headache was found collapsed in a public toilet per se. Postmortem examination revealed no external injuries or internal diseases except a cystic lesion of the pineal gland. Histologic examination showed an internal cyst surrounded by glial tissues and pineal parenchyma that was diagnosed as a glial cyst of the pineal gland. Although the pineal cyst cannot be confirmed as the cause of death, it was considered, as no other cause was evident. Herein, we report a pineal cyst considered as an assumed cause of death. PMID:25062343

  3. Bilateral paramedian thalamic artery infarcts: report of eight cases.

    PubMed Central

    Gentilini, M; De Renzi, E; Crisi, G

    1987-01-01

    Eight consecutive patients with CT scan evidence of a bilateral infarct in the territory of the paramedian thalamic artery are reported. In seven cases the infarct also extended to the territory of the polar artery. The main symptoms were: disorder of vigilance which cleared in a few days, and hypersomnolence which lasted longer and in two patients was still present a year later; amnesia, detectable clinically in four patients and only with tests in two patients, which persisted in one patient for three years; changes of mood and bulimia present in five and four patients respectively; and vertical gaze paresis in five patients. Only one patient died, and in the remainder the symptoms tended to subside, but none of the patients who could be followed-up for a year returned to normal behaviour. Clinical and CT scan correlations pointed to the mammillo-thalamic tract as the structure whose damage was responsible for the memory disorders. Images PMID:3625213

  4. Fibular nerve palsy after hip replacement: Not only surgeon responsibility. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) a rare cause of nerve liability.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, G; Del Tedesco, F; Cambise, C; Coraci, D; Donati, F; Santilli, V; Padua, L

    2016-06-01

    Mononeuropathy after surgery may occur and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a possible pathological condition related to paresis after hip surgery. We present a case of 66-year-old man presenting severe weakness at inferior limb muscles after hip prosthesis revision. Clinic and electrophysiology showed severe right fibular nerve damage and ultrasound found a marked enlargement of the same nerve, associated with focal enlargements in other nerves. A diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was suspected and confirmed by genetic test. The patient gradually recovered returning to a normal daily active life. Ultrasound was crucial for diagnosis. The suspicion and diagnosis of latent neuropathy, which can occur after surgical intervention, may lead to a better understand of the risks of the surgery, specific for the patient, and avoid the wrong attribution to surgical malpractice. PMID:27084090

  5. Mislaid dentures: a cause for unusual presentation of bilateral vocal cord palsy

    PubMed Central

    Vallamkondu, Vamsidhar; Gatenby, Andrew; Shakeel, Muhammad; Hussain, Akhtar

    2014-01-01

    An 81-year-old man was referred urgently to the head and neck clinic with symptoms of worsening dysphagia, dysphonia and weight loss. He had a history of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. On full ear, nose and throat examination, he was found to have fixed vocal cords with pooling of saliva in the bilateral pyriform fossa. Hypopharyngeal malignancy was suspected and further imaging was performed. Imaging also raised the suspicion of malignancy in the hypopharynx. Rigid endoscopic examination under general anaesthesia was carried out which revealed an impacted denture in the cricopharynx and upper oesophagus. The patient was aware of his loss of dentures 3 months ago (corresponds to the onset of his symptoms) but felt that he had mislaid them and had never mentioned this to anyone. We present a case highlighting a delay in diagnosis, a missed diagnosis on CT scan and an unusual presentation leading to bilateral vocal cord paresis. PMID:25139929

  6. Ruptured Total Intrameatal Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Cheol; Chang, In Bok; Lee, Ho Kook

    2015-01-01

    Among the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms, a unique aneurysm at the meatal loop inside the internal auditory meatus is extremely rare. The authors report a case of surgically treated total intrameatal AICA aneurysm. A 62-year-old female patient presenting with sudden bursting headache and neck pain was transferred to our department. Computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography showed subarachnoid hemorrhage at the basal, prepontine cistern and an aneurysm of the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery inside the internal auditory meatus. Surgery was performed by retrosigmoid craniotomy with unroofing of the internal auditory meatus. The aneurysm was identified between the seventh and eighth cranial nerve in the meatus and was removed from the canal and clipped with a small straight Sugita clip. After operation the patient experienced transient facial paresis and tinnitus but improved during follow up. PMID:26361531

  7. Zolpidem in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Sandip K.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by motor symptoms, postural instability, personality changes, and cognitive impairment. There is no effective treatment for this disorder. Reduced neurotransmission of GABA in the striatum and globus pallidus may contribute to the symptoms of motor and cognitive symptoms seen in PSP. Zolpidem is a GABA agonist of the benzodiazepine subreceptor BZ1. Here a nondiabetic, normotensive case of PSP is (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy) described, which showed improvement in swallowing, speech, and gaze paresis after zolpidem therapy and possible mechanism of actions are discussed. However, more trials are needed with large number of patients to confirm the effectiveness of zolpidem in progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:23762677

  8. Sudden severe postoperative dyspnea following shoulder surgery: Remember inadvertent phrenic nerve block due to interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Arpit; Kumar, B C Raju Pavan; Coventry, David M

    2014-04-01

    Advanced imaging techniques, improved operative techniques, and instrumentation combined with better patient awareness and expectations have resulted in an exponential increase in upper limb surgical procedures during recent times. Surgical teams expect superior analgesia and regional blocks have matched these expectations quite often resulting in improved patient satisfaction and early rehabilitation to achieve best results. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) is commonly used to provide analgesia for procedures involving shoulder girdle. We report a case of symptomatic hemi-diaphragmatic paresis (HDP) due to the phrenic nerve block following ISB for arthroscopic sub-acromial decompression of the shoulder presenting as severe postoperative dyspnea. There is strong evidence of HDP following ISB in anesthetic literature, but not reported in related surgical specialties such as orthopedics. We wish to inform upper-limb surgeons and educate junior doctors and other ancillary staff working in upper-limb units to be aware of this serious but reversible complication. PMID:25114416

  9. Nonlinear dynamic mechanism of vocal tremor from voice analysis and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-09-01

    Nonlinear dynamic analysis and model simulations are used to study the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of vocal folds with vocal tremor, which can typically be characterized by low-frequency modulation and aperiodicity. Tremor voices from patients with disorders such as paresis, Parkinson's disease, hyperfunction, and adductor spasmodic dysphonia show low-dimensional characteristics, differing from random noise. Correlation dimension analysis statistically distinguishes tremor voices from normal voices. Furthermore, a nonlinear tremor model is proposed to study the vibrations of the vocal folds with vocal tremor. Fractal dimensions and positive Lyapunov exponents demonstrate the evidence of chaos in the tremor model, where amplitude and frequency play important roles in governing vocal fold dynamics. Nonlinear dynamic voice analysis and vocal fold modeling may provide a useful set of tools for understanding the dynamic mechanism of vocal tremor in patients with laryngeal diseases.

  10. Interactive visuo-motor therapy system for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Eng, Kynan; Siekierka, Ewa; Pyk, Pawel; Chevrier, Edith; Hauser, Yves; Cameirao, Monica; Holper, Lisa; Hägni, Karin; Zimmerli, Lukas; Duff, Armin; Schuster, Corina; Bassetti, Claudio; Verschure, Paul; Kiper, Daniel

    2007-09-01

    We present a virtual reality (VR)-based motor neurorehabilitation system for stroke patients with upper limb paresis. It is based on two hypotheses: (1) observed actions correlated with self-generated or intended actions engage cortical motor observation, planning and execution areas ("mirror neurons"); (2) activation in damaged parts of motor cortex can be enhanced by viewing mirrored movements of non-paretic limbs. We postulate that our approach, applied during the acute post-stroke phase, facilitates motor re-learning and improves functional recovery. The patient controls a first-person view of virtual arms in tasks varying from simple (hitting objects) to complex (grasping and moving objects). The therapist adjusts weighting factors in the non-paretic limb to move the paretic virtual limb, thereby stimulating the mirror neuron system and optimizing patient motivation through graded task success. We present the system's neuroscientific background, technical details and preliminary results. PMID:17687578

  11. [Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Machetanz, J

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster develops by endogenous reactivation of varizella zoster virus (VZV). Incidence increases with age. Females are more frequently affected than males. The reactivation rate in seropositive individuals is about 20 %. After a short prodromal stage, herpetiform-grouped vesicles appear in segmental arrangement. Pain and paresthesia are typical zoster symptoms. Complications like bacterial superinfections, vasculopathy, paresis, and oculopathy may occur. During pregnancy herpes zoster is a threat for mother and child. Among elderly patients, cardiovascular risk is increased during the first week of herpes zoster infection. Postherpetic neuropathy is feared. Diagnosis can be made clinically and by the use of polymerase chain reaction. First-line treatment is systemic antiviral drug therapy with either acyclovir or brivudine. Adjuvant therapies consist of pain management and topical treatment. PMID:27389412

  12. Distraction-stabilisation of two adjacent intervertebral spaces in a Dalmatian dog with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Beranek, J; Tomek, A; Lorinson, D

    2013-05-01

    A 4-year-old, 40-kg, male, entire Dalmatian was presented for evaluation of chronic neck pain and pelvic limb ataxia. Myelography revealed ventrodorsal (hourglass) extradural compression over the intervertebral space between the 5th and 6th cervical vertebra and ventral extradural compression between the 6th and 7th cervical vertebra. Cranial compression disappeared and caudal compression markedly diminished after performing cervical traction. MRI scan confirmed protrusion of intervertebral discs and spinal cord compression in previously mentioned intervertebral spaces. Surgical distraction-stabilization of both intervertebral spaces was performed using threaded pins and polymethylmethacrylate. The convalescence from surgery was uneventful and the dog was walking without any signs of paresis until 5 months after surgery when radiography revealed implants loosening. The dog recovered fully of the implant removal and remained asymptomatic for more than 30 months. PMID:23644293

  13. [Philosophy, psychiatry and psychoanalysis: the case of Nietzsche].

    PubMed

    Wolf, M A

    1995-05-01

    In this work dedicated to Frederic Nietzsche, we were first interested by the philosopher's personal psychopathology. Biographic and personality factors, the physical and moral pain, the mood variations, hypersensitivity, solitude and finally megalomanic traits have probably contributed to the development of his thought. Nietzsche gave personal interpretations of his own suffering. Freud himself recognized the organic component of the philosopher's illness. We reviewed the different symptoms in favor of a progressive general paresis. Philologist and moralist, Nietzsche was also a "psychologist". His intuitions in this area often preceded and prepared those of Freud. The relationship is surprising on certain points such as love and sexuality, the unconscious, the interpretation of dreams. We wish to remind readers that a prepsychoanalytic stream of thought, at the end of the 19th century, preceded the teaching now ascribed to Freud and his followers. PMID:7598351

  14. Friedrich Nietzsche: the wandering and learned neuropath under Dionisius.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marleide da Mota

    2015-11-01

    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a remarkable philologist-philosopher while remaining in a condition of ill-health. Issues about his wandering/disruptive behavior that might be a consequence and/or protection against his cognitive decline and multifaceted disease are presented. The life complex that raises speculations about its etiology is constituted by: insight, creativity and wandering behavior besides several symptoms and signs of disease(s), mainly neurological one. The most important issue to be considered at the moment is not the disease diagnosis (Lissauer's general paresis or CADASIL, e.g.), but the probable Nietzsche's great cognitive reserve linked to the multifactorial etiology (genetic and environmental), and shared characteristics both to creativity and psychopathology. This makes any disease seems especial regarding Nietzsche, and whichever the diagnostic hypothesis has to consider the Nietzsche's unique background to express any disease(s). PMID:26517222

  15. The inflatable thymus herniation of the normal mediastinal thymus: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stuut, Marijn; van Zwieten, Gusta; Straetmans, Jos M; Lacko, Martin; Stumpel, Constance T R M

    2016-04-01

    Anterior neck masses in young children can be a diagnostic challenge for otolaryngologists and radiologists. We present a rare case of herniation of normal mediastinal thymus in a four-year-old girl. Additional medical features as an inguinal hernia and trochlear nerve paresis raised the question whether there is a causal relationship or an association. A connective tissue disorder could not be diagnosed as possible causal factor to the abnormal movement of the mediastinal thymus. Awareness and recognition of this benign phenomenon is important in order to avoid unnecessary biopsy or surgery. Diagnosis can be confirmed by ultrasonography. Magnetic Resonance Imaging might be valuable in order to obtain more information about the extension of the mass. PMID:26968057

  16. [Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis due to Parsonage-Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tissier-Ducamp, D; Martinez, S; Alagha, K; Charpin, D; Chanez, P; Palot, A

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 49-years-old patient who presented to the accident and emergency department with sudden onset dyspnea associated with acute shoulder pain. He was breathless at rest with supine hypoxemia. He had an amyotrophic left shoulder with localized paresis of the shoulder. Both hemi-diaphragms were elevated on chest X-rays. Pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive pattern and both phrenic nerve conduction velocities were decreased. At night, alveolar hypoventilation was evidenced by elevated mean capnography (PtcCO2: 57mmHg). Neuralgic amyotrophy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome was the final diagnosis. This syndrome is a brachial plexus neuritis with a predilection for the suprascapular and axillary nerves. Phrenic nerve involvement is rare but where present can be the most prominent clinical feature as in our case report. PMID:25534571

  17. Brachioradial pruritus in a patient with cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is a chronic sensory neuropathy of unknown etiology which affects the skin of the shoulders, arms and forearms on the insertion of the brachioradialis muscle. We describe the case of a 60-yearold woman recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma who refers paresis, severe pruritus and itching lesions on the right arm with 6 months of evolution. Investigation led to a diagnosis of Brachioradial pruritus consequent to the presence of cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome. The patient started gabapentin 900mg/day with good control of itching. Corticosteroids and antihistamines are often ineffective in the treatment of BP. Gabapentin has been used with encouraging results. All patients with Brachioradial pruritus should be evaluated for cervical spine injuries. PMID:26131874

  18. Varicella zoster virus brachioplexitis associated with granulomatous vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Fleming, J; Fogo, A; Haider, S; Diaz-Cano, S; Hay, R; Bashir, S

    2013-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes the common childhood disease chickenpox (varicella), or upon reactivation, the dermatomal vesiculopustular eruption seen in shingles (herpes zoster). The clinical course of herpes zoster in immunocompromised patients is often recurrent, protracted and multidermatomal, and it can result in myelitis, meningoencephalitis, and cerebral or small-vessel vasculopathic or vasculitic changes. Commonly, the vesicular rash settles with aciclovir therapy and does not involve motor neuropathy. We report a 63-year-old man with a prolonged, multidermatomal, nonvesicular rash, and limb paresis secondary to brachioplexitis. PCR for VZV was positive, and the histological results were consistent with granulomatous vasculopathy. Prolonged treatment with valaciclovir was required to resolve the eruption and help improve the patient's motor function. We discuss the problems faced in clinical decision-making about immunosuppressive treatment of granulomatous vasculopathy and motor neuropathy, when any increase in immunosuppressive therapy may increase the likelihood of central nervous system complications. PMID:23621091

  19. Brachioradial pruritus in a patient with cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is a chronic sensory neuropathy of unknown etiology which affects the skin of the shoulders, arms and forearms on the insertion of the brachioradialis muscle. We describe the case of a 60-year old woman recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma who refers paresis, severe pruritus and itching lesions on the right arm with 6 months of evolution. Investigation led to a diagnosis of Brachioradial pruritus consequent to the presence of cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome. The patient started gabapentin 900 mg/day with good control of itching. Corticosteroids and antihistamines are often ineffective in the treatment of BP. Gabapentin has been used with encouraging results. All patients with Brachioradial pruritus should be evaluated for cervical spine injuries. PMID:26131874

  20. [Neuralgic amyotrophy].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Shuichi

    2014-12-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) is a distinct peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorder characterized by sudden attacks of neuropathic pain, usually in a unilateral upper extremity, and patchy paresis with atrophy in the glenohumeral muscles. The lesion sites of NA are commonly considered to be upper brachial plexus (BP) and/or individual branches of the BP. The cause of NA remains unknown. Some evidence suggests a complex pathogenesis in NA that includes predisposition and susceptible PNS structures, and it can be triggered by infection, trauma, and strenuous exercise. NA is considered to be broad and encompasses a spectrum of atypical presentations, including involvement of the lower part of the BP, isolated nerves (anterior interosseous nerve or posterior interosseous nerve), or lumbosacral plexuses. Functional prognosis of NA is less favorable than previously assumed; however, specific therapy for patients with NA remains to be established. PMID:25475029

  1. Extended Neuralgic Amyotrophy Syndrome: voice therapy in one case of vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andréa Gomes de; Pinho, Márcia Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Neuralgic Amyotrophy (NA) is a rare disturb of the peripheral nervous system that can include extreme pain, multifocal paresis and atrophy of the muscles of the upper limbs. When the nerves located outside of the brachial plexus are involved, the term Neuralgic Amyotrophy Extended (ANE) is used. Diagnosis of NA is clinical and has a series of inclusion and compatibility criteria established by the European CMT Consortium. On this study the clinical history, multidimensional vocal assessment data and the vocal techniques used in five-weeks voice therapy for one patient, professional voice, with ANE are presented. In this case, sudden and recurrent paralysis of his right vocal fold was the only manifestation of the disease. At the end of the fifth week the patient's voice was normal, the spoken and sung vocal ranges were same as before the current episode of ANE and scores of his vocal self-assessment were appropriate. PMID:24918513

  2. [Neuralgic amyotrophy--a case report].

    PubMed

    Miller, Małgorzata; Banach, Marta

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 54-year-old woman reporting weakness of the right upper limb, preceded by a period of severe pain in the right shoulder. Despite several orthopedic consultations and two cycles of physical therapy, the symptoms deteriorated over a period of 6 months, and progressive paresis of the extensor muscles of the upper limb and elbow flexion contracture were observed. On the basis of the clinical presentation and results of medical tests including an electrophysiological study that showed axonal damage to the long thoracic nerve, axillary nerve, and posterior interosseous nerve, neuralgic amyotrophy was diagnosed. A treatment with prednisone was introduced, and the patient's condition significantly improved. PMID:26817357

  3. [Differential diagnostics of diseases of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Ritter, C; Wunderlich, G; Macht, S; Schroeter, M; Fink, G R; Lehmann, H C

    2014-02-01

    Progressive, atrophic, asymmetrically distributed flaccid paresis of arm and hand muscles represents a frequent symptom of neuromuscular diseases that can be attributed to injury of the arm nerves, the plexus or the cervical roots. A timely and exact diagnosis is mandatory; however, the broad spectrum of differential diagnoses often represents a diagnostic challenge. A large variety of neuromuscular disorders need to be considered, encompassing autoimmune mediated inflammatory neuropathic conditions, such as multifocal motor neuropathy, as well as chronic degenerative and nerve compression disorders. This review provides an overview of the most frequent disorders of the upper plexus and cervical roots and summarizes the characteristic clinical features as well as electrodiagnostic and laboratory test results. In addition the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging and sonography is discussed. PMID:24343110

  4. [Cerebrospinal nematodosis in sheep in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tschuor, A C; Sydler, T; Rauch, S; Hertzberg, H; Gendotti, M; Schweizer, G

    2006-11-01

    In December 2005 three sheep, originating from Canton Tessin, were presented with cerebrospinal nematodosis. The animals had a history of progressive pelvic limb ataxia and recumbency. The most important clinical findings were an abnormal gait (wide stance, pelvic limb paresis) and decreased sensitivity of the pelvic limbs. The general condition was slightly or moderately disturbed, appetite was normal. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed mononuclear cells and eosinophils, suggesting a helminthic infection of the central nervous system. Postmortem findings confirmed the clinical diagnosis in one animal as parts of a nematode were found in the thoracic spinal cord. Even though the nematode could not be identified, infection with Elaphostrongylus cervi seems very likely, as the sheep are in close contact with deer on the pastures and the parasite is known to infect goats in Switzerland. This is the first description of cerebrospinal nematodosis in sheep in Switzerland. PMID:17209510

  5. Suspected natural lysosomal storage disease from ingestion of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) in goats in northern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    RÍOS, Elvio E.; CHOLICH, Luciana A.; CHILESKI, Gabriela; GARCÍA, Enrique N.; LÉRTORA, Javier; GIMENO, Eduardo J.; GUIDI, María G.; MUSSART, Norma; TEIBLER, Gladys P.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an occurrence of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) intoxication in goats in northern Argentina. The clinical signs displayed by the affected animals were ataxia, lethargy, emaciation, hypertonia of the neck muscles, spastic paresis in the hind legs, abnormal postural reactions and death. The clinico-pathologic examination revealed that the affected animals were anemic and their serum level of aspartate aminotransferase was significantly increased. Cytoplasmic vacuolation in the Purkinje cells and pancreatic acinar cells was observed by histological examination. The neuronal lectin binding pattern showed a strong positive reaction to WGA (Triticum vulgaris), sWGA (succinylated T. vulgaris) and LCA (Lens culinaris). Although I. carnea is common in tropical regions, this is the first report of spontaneous poisoning in goats in Argentina. PMID:25728544

  6. Parasite meningomyelitis in cats in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Rodolfo; Matto, Carolina; Adrien, María de Lourdes; Nan, Fernando; Bell, Todd; Gardiner, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Two outbreaks of progressive hind limb paresis in cats (Felis catus) caused by parasitic meningomyelitis in Uruguay are reported. The case studies occurred in 2008 and 2009 respectively, in the rural areas of Fray Bentos (33° 07' 40.39'' S) and were characterized by hindquarter paralysis. This paralysis was progressive and had a chronic progression of approximately 12 months until the death or euthanasia of the animals. Clinical symptoms started with ataxia of the hindquarters with lateral side-to-side swaying and culminated in total paralysis. Two animals were sent for necropsy in 2009. The main histopathological findings were severe myelitis in the lumbar spinal cord with perivascular cuffing and white matter necrosis, severe nonsuppurative meningitis with thrombi in subarachnoid blood vessels, and intravascular presence of multiple adult parasites. From the morphological characteristics of the parasites and location in the leptomeninges, the parasite was identified as the nematode Gurltia paralysans. PMID:21961761

  7. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  8. Autonomic neuropathy resulting in recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in an HIV patient with Hodgkin lymphoma receiving vinblastine and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cherif, S; Danino, S; Yoganathan, K

    2015-03-01

    Hoarseness of voice due to vocal cord paresis as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy has been well recognised. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy is commonly caused by compression due to tumour or lymph nodes or by surgical damage. Vinca alkaloids are well known to cause peripheral neuropathy. However, vinca alkaloids causing recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy has been reported rarely in children. We report a case of an adult patient with HIV who developed hoarseness of voice due to vocal cord paralysis during vinblastine treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. Mediastinal and hilar lymph node enlargement in such patients may distract clinicians from considering alternative causes of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, with potential ensuing severe or even life-threatening stridor. PMID:24828552

  9. Patulin produced by an Aspergillus clavatus isolated from feed containing malting residues associated with a lethal neurotoxicosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Vilar, Monica; Maas, Roel F M; De Bosschere, Hendrik; Ducatelle, Richard; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2004-11-01

    A severe neurotoxicosis, comprising tremors, ataxia, paresis, recumbency and death, occurred simultaneously among several herds of beef cattle in the region of Flanders (Belgium). After a first multi-toxin screening of some suspected diet elements, verruculogen was detected in a sample of a common feed ingredient. However, when the first animal necropsies revealed serious nervous lesions, including neuronal degeneration of the central nervous system and axonal degeneration in the peripheral nervous system, further investigations focused on fungal isolation. As expected from the pathological lesions, Aspergillus clavatus was found to be the dominant fungal species in a sample of compacted fodder, containing malting residues, consumed by all the affected herds. The isolated fungus appeared to produce patulin in culture medium. Traces of patulin were also detected in the fodder. These findings and their possible role in the intoxication are discussed. PMID:15702266

  10. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Nathan; O’Donohue, Peter; French, Heath; Griffin, Aaron; Gochee, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed effectively. PMID:26090278

  11. [Management of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K; Sekulla, C; Kern, J; Dralle, H

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery stands at 1%-2 %. This low incidence contrasts with the significant potential complications of postoperative hemorrhage. Influencing factors and measures mentioned in the literature and own studies are discussed. Although an improvement in the postoperative hemorrhage rate was to be expected indirectly due to the increasing use of coagulation-relevant medication, there has been neither an increase in incidence nor a reduction in resultant complications, including primarily recurrent vocal cord paresis, tracheotomy and mortality. Factors that influence surgical success include a meticulous technique and caution, as well as ensuring intensive and qualified postoperative monitoring for a minimum of 4-6 h, thereby permitting immediate revision surgery at any time. PMID:25532753

  12. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and—in women—pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing. PMID:26076949

  13. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, Du Hwan; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-04-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  14. Diplonine, a neurotoxin isolated from cultures of the fungus Stenocarpella maydis (Berk.) Sacc. that induces diplodiosis.

    PubMed

    Snyman, Leendert D; Kellerman, T Stephanus; Vleggaar, Robert; Flett, Bradley C; Basson, Karin M; Schultz, R Anitra

    2011-08-24

    Diplodiosis is a neuromycotoxicosis of cattle and sheep caused by ingestion of maize infected with the ear-rot fungus Stenocarpella (= Diplodia ) maydis . Apart from ataxia, paresis, and paralysis, the toxin is responsible for stillbirths and neonatal losses characterized by the presence of spongiform degeneration in the white matter of the brain in the offspring of dams exposed to infected maize cobs. In the present study a toxin, named diplonine, which induced neurological signs in guinea pigs resembling some of those occurring in cattle and sheep, was isolated from S. maydis cultures. Purification of diplonine was achieved by methanol extraction followed by chromatographic separation on silica gel and RP-18 stationary phases. The structure and relative configuration of diplonine were defined by analysis of NMR and MS data as (S)-2-amino-2-[(1R,2S)-1-hydroxy-2-methylcyclopropyl]acetic acid or the (S)-2-amino-2-[(1S,2R)-diastereomer. PMID:21780820

  15. Social Ecological Analysis of an Outbreak of Pufferfish Egg Poisoning in a Coastal Area of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. Saiful; Luby, Stephen P.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Parveen, Shahana; Homaira, Nusrat; Begum, Nur Har; Dawlat Khan, A. K. M.; Sultana, Rebeca; Akhter, Shammi; Gurley, Emily S.

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of marine pufferfish poisoning in Bangladesh highlight the need to understand the context in which the outbreaks occurred. In a recent outbreak investigation, a multidisciplinary team conducted a mixed-method study to identify the demography and clinical manifestation of the victims and to explore different uses of pufferfish, and local buying, selling, and processing practices. The outbreak primarily affected a low income household where an elderly woman collected and cooked pufferfish egg curry. Nine persons consumed the curry, and symptoms developed in 6 (67%) of these persons. Symptoms included vomiting, diarrhea, paresis, and tingling sensation; 2 (22%) persons died. The unstable income of the affected family, food crisis, and the public disposal of unsafe pufferfish byproducts all contributed to the outbreak. A multi-level intervention should be developed and disseminated with the participation of target communities to discourage unsafe discarding of pufferfish scraps and to improve the community knowledge about the risk of consuming pufferfish. PMID:21896811

  16. Computed tomography-guided bone biopsies for evaluation of proliferative vertebral lesions in two boa constrictors (Boa constrictor imperator).

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Selleri, Paolo; Nardini, Giordano; Corlazzoli, Daniele; Fonti, Paolo; Rossier, Christophe; Della Salda, Leonardo; Schilliger, Lionel; Vignoli, Massimo; Bongiovanni, Laura

    2014-12-01

    Two boa constrictors (Boa constrictor imperator) presented with paresis of the trunk originating cranial to the cloaca. Radiographs were consistent with proliferative bone lesions involving several vertebrae. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated the presence of lytic/expansile lesions. Computed tomography-guided biopsies of the lesions were performed without complications. Histology was consistent with bacterial osteomyelitis and osteoarthritis. Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella sp. and Pseudomonas sp.) were isolated from cultures of the biopsies. Medical treatment with specific antibiotics was attempted for several weeks in both cases without clinical or radiographic improvements. The animals were euthanized, and necropsy confirmed the findings observed upon CT. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of the use of CT-guided biopsies to evaluate proliferative vertebral lesions in snakes. In the present report, CT-guided biopsies were easily performed, and both histologic and microbiologic results were consistent with the final diagnosis. PMID:25632696

  17. Changes in Upper-Extremity Functional Capacity and Daily Performance During Outpatient Occupational Therapy for People With Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Doman, Caitlin A.; Waddell, Kimberly J.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explored how upper-extremity (UE) functional capacity and daily performance change during the course of outpatient rehabilitation in people with stroke. METHOD. Fifteen participants receiving outpatient occupational therapy services for UE paresis poststroke were enrolled. UE motor capacity was measured with the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and UE performance was measured using bilateral, wrist-worn accelerometers. Measurements were taken at or near the start of therapy, at every 10th visit or every 30 days throughout the duration of services, and at discharge. RESULTS. Three patterns were observed: (1) increase in ARAT scores and more normalized accelerometry profiles, (2) increase in ARAT scores but no change in accelerometry profiles, and (3) no change in ARAT scores or in accelerometry profiles. CONCLUSION. UE performance in daily life was highly variable, with inconsistencies between change in UE capacity and change in UE performance. UE capacity and performance are important constructs to assess separately during rehabilitation. PMID:27089298

  18. [Sporadic recurrent hypertrophic polyneuropathy. Clinical-histological contributions on differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Haferkamp, G; Regli, F

    1976-01-01

    The authors report about an own case of recurrent sporadic hypertrophic polyneuropathy and describe the clinical course and histologic picture with reference to the literature. The disease is characterized by recurrences of subacutely occurring polyradiculoneuropathy and sequent nearly complete remission. Clinical examination discloses preferentially symmetrically and distally occurring motor paresis while sensibility in most cases is less affected. The peripheral nerves may be enlarged after a few relapses and frequently painful to pressure during the bout. Excessive increase in CSF proteins is found only during the bout. Motor nerve conduction velocity is considerably reduced. Histological pictures typically present an onion bulb formation of the Schwann cells with marked proliferation of connective tissue. There frequently younger individuals are involved; the relation female to male is 3:1. Differentiation has to be made concerning hereditary and symptomatic forms of hypertrophic polyneuropathy. Etiological factors of the disease are discussed. PMID:185690

  19. Intensive care management of patients with acute intermittent porphyria: Clinical report of four cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Madhur; Rath, Girija P.; Padhy, Uma P.; Marda, Manish; Mahajan, Charu; Dash, Hari H.

    2010-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common and the most severe form of acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant condition. It results from lower-than-normal levels (less than 50%) of porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase. Patients may present commonly with gastrointestinal complaints and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Diagnosis may be confirmed with the presence of intermediary metabolites of haem synthesis, amino levulinic acid (ALA) and PBG in urine or with specific enzyme assays. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom (90%). Peripheral polyneuropathy, primarily motor with flaccid paresis of proximal musculature, with or without autonomic involvement, is characteristic. Respiratory failure necessitates ventilator and intensive care support. Avoidance of precipitating factors and the use of haem preparations and intravenous dextrose form the basis of management. Gabapentin and propofol, rather than the conventional antiepileptics appear to be the appropriate choice for seizure control. Here, we present intensive care management of four cases of AIP with varying clinical presentation. PMID:20859493

  20. Cognitive and neurological sequelae after stereoendoscopic disconnection of a hypothalamic hamartoma. A case study.

    PubMed

    Stabell, Kirsten E; Bakke, Søren J; Egge, Arild

    2012-06-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are congenital malformations of the hypothalamus, often generating medically refractory gelastic seizures. There is great risk of progression to various complex partial and generalized seizures and of cognitive and behavioral deterioration. Hence, various surgical approaches have been introduced to resect or disconnect the HH from surrounding tissue, and stereoendoscopic disconnection has been advocated as one of the most lenient approaches to sessile HH embedded in the third ventricle. In fact, no long-term neurological or cognitive impairments have hitherto been reported after this procedure. Yet, unforeseen complications may arise in any surgical intervention on this region. We found serious deterioration of memory and reading skills by comprehensive neuropsychological assessments pre- and postoperatively in a child who, before surgery, was age-appropriate with respect to cognitive, emotional, and behavioral development. The child also contracted a permanent oculomotor paresis. Our results are discussed in light of previous relevant findings. PMID:22546525

  1. Does the choice of outcome scale influence prognostic factors for lumbar disc surgery? A prospective, consecutive study of 121 patients.

    PubMed

    Woertgen, C; Holzschuh, M; Rothoerl, R D; Brawanski, A

    1997-01-01

    From January to June 1994, we operated conventionally on 121 consecutive hemiated lumbar disc patients as part of a prospective study. We analysed general data, case histories, neurological findings on admission and all data from imaging investigations and therapy. In addition, all patients received a questionnaire based on the Low Back Outcome Score. Most of the patients (93%) were followed-up for 1 year postoperatively in the same manner. On the Prolo Scale, we obtained a good result in 70%; 76% had a good Low Back Outcome Score. Predictive factors are different for different outcome scales. The preoperative duration of pain, the preoperative duration of paresis and smoking seem to be general predictive factors. PMID:9258635

  2. Suspected cervical spinal cord vascular anomaly in an African warthog (Phacochoerus africanus).

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Douglas P; Shury, Todd K; Black, Sandra R; Raverty, Stephen

    2006-09-01

    Vascular myelopathies of the spinal cord have not been described in Suidae, and are a rare finding in companion animals. An 8.5-yr female African warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) presented with an acute onset of tetraparesis. Based on neurologic findings, a cervical spinal cord lesion between C7-T2 was suspected. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe intramedullary hemorrhage with suspected abnormal vessels in the spinal cord at the level of the seventh cervical vertebrae. The acute onset of clinical signs and rapid deterioration of neurological status precluded surgical managements. A vascular anomaly was suspected on gross pathology and histology. Immunohistochemistry identified the lesion as a spontaneous intramedullary hematoma. Spontaneous intramedullary hematomyelia should be considered as a differential for acute onset of paresis in suid species. PMID:17319141

  3. Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in an Italian wolf (Canis lupus italicus) with discospondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zeira, Offer; Briola, Chiara; Konar, Martin; Plonek, Marta; Papa, Valentina

    2013-12-01

    An adult male Italian wolf (Canis lupus italicus) was presented with an abnormal gait. Neurologic examination showed thoracic kyphosis, paraparesis, decreased proprioception in the pelvic limbs, and normal spinal reflexes. Neurologic symptoms suggested a thoracolumbar spinal cord lesion. Pathologic findings included leukocytosis. Spinal radiographs revealed ventral spondylosis of T4/T5/T6, a poorly defined intervertebral disc space, and mild lysis of the vertebral margins. Multiple metallic foreign bodies were seen in the thoracic wall. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine detected increased signal intensity on fluid sensitive sequences of the vertebral bodies, the intervertebral disc, and surrounding soft tissues. These findings were interpreted as active discospondylitis at T4/T5. Medical therapy included antibiotic and analgesic treatment as well as movement restriction. Follow-up at 4 wk showed significant clinical and radiologic improvement. Discospondylitis should be included in the differential diagnosis in wolves with paresis. PMID:24450075

  4. [Diagnostics and therapy of spinal disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A; Reith, W

    2014-11-01

    Degenerative processes in a movement segment of the vertebral column, which can potentially give rise to herniation of elements of the nucleus pulposus, are complex and of variable clinical and radiological dimensions; however the mere assumption that degenerative changes precede disc herniation remains a matter of debate. By definition, spinal disc herniation (SDH) refers to components of the gelatinous nucleus pulposus protruding beyond the dorsal level of the vertebral body margin through tears in the annulus fibrosus. Clinical presentation may include pain, paresis and sensory disturbances. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDH. In the majority of patients a conservative approach with physical therapy exercises and adequate analgesic and antiphlogistic medical treatment results in a substantial improvement of symptoms. PMID:25398570

  5. [The lumbar disc herniation - management, clinical aspects and current recommendations].

    PubMed

    Stienen, M N; Cadosch, D; Hildebrandt, G; Gautschi, O P

    2011-11-30

    Lumbar disc herniation has a high prevalence and strong social-medical impact. Patients suffer from lower back pain that radiates from the spine. Loss of sensation or paresis adds to the clinical picture. The diagnosis should be confirmed by imaging in patients considered for surgery. High remission rates initially warrant conservative treatment (adequate analgesia and physiotherapy) in many patients. If this treatment does not lead to significant alleviation within 5-8 weeks, surgery should be performed to reduce the risk of chronic nerve affection. Posterior interlaminar fenestration is the intervention primarily conducted for this diagnosis. A relapse in the same region occurs in up to 10% of patients after months through years, which sometimes necessitates a reoperation if symptoms are pertinent. PMID:22124958

  6. [Laryngomalacia. When does surgery make sense?].

    PubMed

    Koitschev, A; Sittel, C

    2012-07-01

    The most common cause of stridor in newborns is instability of the upper larynx, called laryngomalacia. In approximately 10% of children normal development is impaired. The diagnostics and therapy must follow a clear plan that is also comprehensible to the parents. The obstruction should be localized endoscopically, the anatomical characteristics determined, and the surgical possibilities evaluated. Additional pathological changes of the upper airway (e.g., vocal fold paresis) need to be excluded. Surgery for laryngomalacia, called supraglottoplasty, allows reduction of excess mucus, transectioning of aryepiglottic folds that are too short, and in some cases epiglottic fixation to the base of the tongue. In extreme cases tracheotomy is unavoidable. Surgery is only recommended for severe cases; when carried out correctly according to the medical indications, the success rate is over 90%. PMID:22261848

  7. Axon-glia interactions and the domain organization of myelinated axons requires neurexin IV/Caspr/Paranodin.

    PubMed

    Bhat, M A; Rios, J C; Lu, Y; Garcia-Fresco, G P; Ching, W; St Martin, M; Li, J; Einheber, S; Chesler, M; Rosenbluth, J; Salzer, J L; Bellen, H J

    2001-05-01

    Myelinated fibers are organized into distinct domains that are necessary for saltatory conduction. These domains include the nodes of Ranvier and the flanking paranodal regions where glial cells closely appose and form specialized septate-like junctions with axons. These junctions contain a Drosophila Neurexin IV-related protein, Caspr/Paranodin (NCP1). Mice that lack NCP1 exhibit tremor, ataxia, and significant motor paresis. In the absence of NCP1, normal paranodal junctions fail to form, and the organization of the paranodal loops is disrupted. Contactin is undetectable in the paranodes, and K(+) channels are displaced from the juxtaparanodal into the paranodal domains. Loss of NCP1 also results in a severe decrease in peripheral nerve conduction velocity. These results show a critical role for NCP1 in the delineation of specific axonal domains and the axon-glia interactions required for normal saltatory conduction. PMID:11395000

  8. Atherosclerosis in parrots. A review.

    PubMed

    Bavelaar, F J; Beynen, A C

    2004-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common disease in parrots. The disease is found in all common parrot species, but especially in African Grey parrots and Amazons. It is a disease of older birds that is seen in both males and females. The most common sign is sudden death, but clinical symptoms that can be found include dyspnea, lethargy and nervous signs, such as paresis and collapses. Because the clinical signs are seldomly seen, it is difficult to diagnose atherosclerosis and therefore it is mostly an unexpected finding at necropsy. Age and species are determinants of atherosclerosis in parrots. Suggested risk factors include an elevated plasma cholesterol level, diet composition, social stress and inactivity, but research is needed to confirm this. PMID:15230050

  9. A very unusual organism causing stroke-like symptoms.

    PubMed

    McCann, Eve; Barber, Mark; Hunter, Pamela; Inverarity, Donald

    2014-09-01

    A 78-year-old man presented to hospital with new onset confusion and fever. The working diagnosis was of delirium due to an infection of unknown source, and empirical i.v. antibiotic treatment was given. Two days later, he deteriorated and developed clinical features in keeping with a total anterior circulation stroke. Brain imaging was unremarkable. Blood cultures grew an organism subsequently identified as Facklamia languida. Following treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, his condition improved. A diagnosis of F. languida septicaemia, leading to presumed (unwitnessed) seizure and Todd's paresis was made. The patient went on to make a full recovery and was discharged home. Stroke mimics are common and may be eminently treatable. Around a quarter of patients initially suspected to have a stroke are subsequently found to have an alternative diagnosis. PMID:25038834

  10. A 12-year-old African American girl with subacute bilateral ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    Bar, Amir; Urbine, Jacqueline; Bahora, Yasmine; Berkenstock, Meghan; Vodzak, Jennifer; Guruprasad, Hamalatha; Sinha, Manisha; Abed, Thair; Legido, Agustín

    2014-06-01

    A twelve-year-old African-American female presented with two week history of progressively worsening headache and fatigue, and vision difficulties for the past week. The physical examination was normal. The neurological evaluation was normal, except for cranial nerves (CN) testing, which showed bilateral restriction of adduction (CN III) and up gaze (CN IV) motions, vertical nystagmus, and left side facial paresis of central origin (CN VII). The bilateral exotropia and ophthalmoplegia are characteristics of WEBINO (Wall-Eyed Bilateral Intranuclear Ophthalmoplegia) syndrome, associated to a brain stem structural lesion. The following causes were evaluated and ruled out: tumor, infection, ischemic stroke, non-infectious inflammation. Pediatric Acquired Demyelinating Syndromes were then considered. Neuromyelitis Optica was ruled out in the absence of neuritis and normal spinal cord MRI. The differential diagnosis between Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Acute Demyelinating Encephalomyelitis, causing an isolated brain stem syndrome, is discussed. PMID:25149958

  11. Primary Intradural Extramedullary Spinal Melanoma in the Lower Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Kathrin; Bresch, Anke; Lobsien, Donald; Mueller, Wolf; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Seidel, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Background Context. Up to date, only four cases of primary intradural extramedullary spinal cord melanoma (PIEM) have been reported. No previous reports have described a case of PIEM located in the lower thoracic spine with long-term follow-up. Purpose. Demonstrating an unusual, extremely rare case of melanoma manifestation. Study Design. Case report. Methods. We report a case of a 57-year-old female suffering from increasing lower extremity pain, left-sided paresis, and paraesthesia due to spinal cord compression caused by PIEM in the lower thoracic spine. Results. Extensive investigation excluded other possible primary melanoma sites and metastases. For spinal cord decompression, the tumor at level T12 was resected, yet incompletely. Adjuvant radiotherapy was administered two weeks after surgery. The patient was recurrence-free at 104 weeks after radiotherapy but presents with unchanged neurological symptoms. Conclusion. Primary intradural extramedullary melanoma (PIEM) is extremely rare and its clinical course is unpredictable. PMID:27127667

  12. A severe case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bucek, R A; Schnürer, G; Ahmadi, A; Maca, T H; Meissl, G; Minar, E

    2000-11-24

    We report a 21-year-old patient who presented at the outpatient department of angiology with incipient necroses in the fingertips of the right hand. Colour-coded duplex sonography and angiography demonstrated occlusion of the right brachial, ulnar and radial arteries, obviously resulting from an embolism from the subclavian artery narrowed by a cervical rib. After partly successful local thrombolysis this accessory rib was resected. We review angiologic signs and neurological symptoms of the thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) and analyse the current literature regarding diagnostic procedures and treatment. This complicated and severe case of TOS in a young patient ending with paresis of the right arm and partial finger amputation emphasises the importance of early diagnosis of this condition. PMID:11142135

  13. Osteopenic consequences of botulinum toxin injections in the masticatory muscles: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Raphael, K G; Tadinada, A; Bradshaw, J M; Janal, M N; Sirois, D A; Chan, K C; Lurie, A G

    2014-08-01

    Patients with temporomandibular muscle and joint disorder (TMJD) increasingly seek and receive treatment for their pain with botulinum toxin (BoNTA; botulinum toxin A). Used intramuscularly in therapeutic doses, it produces localised paresis. Such paresis creates risk of reduced bone mineral density, or 'disuse osteopenia'. Animal studies have frequently used BoNTA as a model of paralysis to induce bone changes within short periods. Osteopenic effects can be enduring in animals but have yet to be studied in humans. This is the first study in humans to examine bone-related consequences of BoNTA injections in the masticatory muscles, comparing oral and maxillofacial radiologists' ratings of trabecular bone patterns in the condyles of patients with TMJD exposed to multiple masticatory muscle injection sessions with BoNTA to a sample of patients with TMJD unexposed to masticatory muscle injections with BoNTA. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-derived images of bilateral condyles were evaluated in seven patients with TMJD receiving 2+ recent BoNTA treatment sessions for facial pain and nine demographically matched patients with TMJD not receiving BoNTA treatment. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists evaluated CBCT images for evidence of trabecular changes consistent with osteopenia. Both evaluators noted decreased density in all participants exposed to BoNTA and in none of the unexposed participants (P < 0.001). No other abnormalities associated with reduced loading were detected. These findings need replication in a larger sample and over a longer time period, to ensure safety of patients with TMJD receiving multiple BoNTA injections for their pain. PMID:24836732

  14. Intracranial causes of ophthalmoplegia: the visual reflex pathways.

    PubMed

    Stalcup, Seth T; Tuan, August S; Hesselink, John R

    2013-01-01

    The gathering of visual information is a complex process that relies on concerted movements of the eyes, and cranial nerves II-VIII are at least partially involved in the visual system. The cranial nerves do not function in isolation, however, and there are multiple higher-order cortical centers that have input into the cranial nerves to coordinate eye movement. Among the functions of the cortical reflex pathways are (a) controlling vertical and horizontal gaze in response to vestibular input to keep the eyes focused on an object as the head moves through space, and (b) controlling rapid, coordinated eye movement to a new visual target (saccades). There are also reflex pathways connecting the cranial nerves involved in vision that produce consensual blinking of the eyes in response to corneal stimulation of one eye and consensual pupillary constriction in response to light input on one pupil. A variety of intracranial pathologic conditions, including benign and malignant neoplasms, infection, trauma, autoimmune diseases, vascular anomalies, degenerative diseases, and inherited-congenital disorders, can disrupt the cranial nerves and visual reflex pathways. This disruption can manifest in myriad ways-for example, as extraocular muscle paresis, afferent pupillary defect, oculosympathetic paresis (Horner syndrome), internuclear ophthalmoplegia, dorsal midbrain (Parinaud) syndrome, or loss of the corneal reflex. Knowledge of the function and anatomy of the cranial nerves and visual reflex pathways, coupled with selection of the proper magnetic resonance pulse sequence, will allow the radiologist to order appropriate imaging of the involved cranial nerve or visual reflex pathway based on the patient's symptoms and thereby play an essential role in establishing the diagnosis and planning appropriate therapy. PMID:24025940

  15. VORICONAZOLE TOXICITY IN MULTIPLE PENGUIN SPECIES.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Michael W; Georoff, Timothy A; Nollens, Hendrik H; Wells, Rebecca L; Clauss, Tonya M; Ialeggio, Donna M; Harms, Craig A; Wack, Allison N

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillosis is a common respiratory fungal disease in penguins managed under human care. Triazole antifungal drugs, including itraconazole, are most commonly used for treatment; however, itraconazole treatment failures from drug resistance are becoming more common, requiring newer treatment options. Voriconazole, a newer triazole, is being used more often. Until recently, no voriconazole pharmacokinetic studies had been performed in penguins, leading to empiric dosing based on other avian studies. This has led to increased anecdotal reporting of apparent voriconazole toxicity in penguins. This report describes 18 probable and 6 suspected cases of voriconazole toxicity in six penguin species from nine institutions: 12 African penguins (Spheniscus demersus), 5 Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti), 3 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), 2 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua papua), 1 macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus), and 1 emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). Observed clinical signs of toxicity included anorexia, lethargy, weakness, ataxia, paresis, apparent vision changes, seizure-like activity, and generalized seizures. Similar signs of toxicity have also been reported in humans, in whom voriconazole therapeutic plasma concentration for Aspergillus spp. infections is 2-6 μg/ml. Plasma voriconazole concentrations were measured in 18 samples from penguins showing clinical signs suggestive of voriconazole toxicity. The concentrations ranged from 8.12 to 64.17 μg/ml, with penguins having plasma concentrations above 30 μg/ml exhibiting moderate to severe neurologic signs, including ataxia, paresis, and seizures. These concentrations were well above those known to result in central nervous system toxicity, including encephalopathy, in humans. This case series highlights the importance of species-specific dosing of voriconazole in penguins and plasma therapeutic drug monitoring. Further investigation, including pharmacokinetic studies, is

  16. Spinal cord compression in two related Ursus arctos horribilis.

    PubMed

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Roberts, Greg R; Schmidt, Carrie E; Layton, Arthur W

    2012-09-01

    Two 15-yr-old grizzly bear littermates were evaluated within 9 mo of each other with the symptom of acute onset of progressive paraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia. The most significant clinical examination finding was pelvic limb paresis in both bears. Magnetic resonance examinations of both bears showed cranial thoracic spinal cord compression. The first bear had left-sided extradural, dorsolateral spinal cord compression at T3-T4. Vertebral canal stenosis was also observed at T2-T3. Images of the second bear showed lateral spinal cord compression from T2-T3 to T4-T5. Intervertebral disk disease and associated spinal cord compression was also observed at T2-T3 and T3-T4. One grizzly bear continued to deteriorate despite reduced exercise, steroid, and antibiotic therapy. The bear was euthanized, and a necropsy was performed. The postmortem showed a spinal ganglion cyst that caused spinal cord compression at the level of T3-T4. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C3-T6. The second bear was prescribed treatment that consisted of a combination of reduced exercise and steroid therapy. He continued to deteriorate with these medical therapies and was euthanized 4 mo after diagnosis. A necropsy showed hypertrophy and protrusion of the dorsal longitudinal ligament at T2-T3 and T3-T4, with resulting spinal cord compression in this region. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C2-L1. This is one of few case reports that describes paresis in bears. It is the only case report, to the authors' knowledge, that describes spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings in a grizzly bear and also the only report that describes a cranial thoracic myelopathy in two related grizzly bears with neurologic signs. PMID:23082524

  17. Treatment of cows with milk fever using intravenous and oral calcium and phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Blatter, M; Büchi, R; Hässig, M

    2012-09-01

    Fifteen cows with milk fever were treated with 500ml of 40 % calcium borogluconate (group A) administered intravenously. Fifteen other cows with milk fever received the same treatment, supplemented with 500ml of 10 % sodium phosphate administered intravenously, and 80g calcium as calcium lactate and 70g inorganic phosphorus as sodium phosphate administered orally in drinking water. The cows were monitored and blood samples collected for 3 days to measure the concentrations of total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphorus and magnesium and the activity of creatine kinase. The two groups did not differ significantly with respect to the course of the disease. In each group 14 cows were cured. A rapid and significant increase in serum calcium concentration from the hypo- to the hypercalcaemic range occurred in both groups within 10min of the start of treatment, followed by a slow and steady decrease to the hypocalcaemic range. Calcium lactate did not prevent the calcium concentration from returning to the hypocalcaemic range, and the calcium profiles of the two groups did not differ significantly. As expected, treatment had little effect on the concentration of inorganic phosphorus in group A. In group B, treatment caused a rapid increase in the concentration of inorganic phosphorus to a maximum 20min after the start of treatment. This was followed by a slow decrease in the phosphorus concentration to the normophosphataemic range. Our findings confirmed that combined intravenous and oral administration of sodium phosphate in cows with periparturient paresis attributable to hypocalcaemia and hypophosphataemia results in a rapid and sustained increase in serum phosphorus, but not in serum calcium concentration. This modified therapy did not improve the success rate of milk fever treatment and further studies are needed to improve treatment of periparturient paresis. PMID:22923322

  18. The Effects of Stroke Type, Locus, and Extent on Long-Term Outcome of Gait Rehabilitation: The LEAPS Experience.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Stephen E; Dobkin, Bruce; Wu, Samuel S; Pei, Qinglin; Duncan, Pamela W

    2016-08-01

    Background Paresis in stroke is largely a result of damage to descending corticospinal and corticobulbar pathways. Recovery of paresis predominantly reflects the impact on the neural consequences of this white matter lesion by reactive neuroplasticity (mechanisms involved in spontaneous recovery) and experience-dependent neuroplasticity, driven by therapy and daily experience. However, both theoretical considerations and empirical data suggest that type of stroke (large vessel distribution/lacunar infarction, hemorrhage), locus and extent of infarction (basal ganglia, right-hemisphere cerebral cortex), and the presence of leukoaraiosis or prior stroke might influence long-term recovery of walking ability. In this secondary analysis based on the 408 participants in the Locomotor Experience Applied Post-Stroke (LEAPS) study database, we seek to address these possibilities. Methods Lesion type, locus, and extent were characterized by the 2 neurologists in the LEAPS trial on the basis of clinical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. A series of regression models was used to test our hypotheses regarding the effects of lesion type, locus, extent, and laterality on 2- to 12-month change in gait speed, controlling for baseline gait speed, age, and Berg Balance Scale score. Results Gait speed change at 1 year was significantly reduced in participants with basal ganglia involvement and prior stroke. There was a trend toward reduction of gait speed change in participants with lacunar infarctions. The presence of right-hemisphere cortical involvement had no significant impact on outcome. Conclusions Type, locus, and extent of lesion, and the loss of substrate for neuroplastic effect as a result of prior stroke may affect long-term outcome of rehabilitation of hemiparetic gait. PMID:26498434

  19. Resting-state functional MRI in an intraoperative MRI setting: proof of feasibility and correlation to clinical outcome of patients.

    PubMed

    Roder, Constantin; Charyasz-Leks, Edyta; Breitkopf, Martin; Decker, Karlheinz; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this paper is to prove the feasibility of resting-state (RS) functional MRI (fMRI) in an intraoperative setting (iRS-fMRI) and to correlate findings with the clinical condition of patients pre- and postoperatively. METHODS Twelve patients underwent intraoperative MRI-guided resection of lesions in or directly adjacent to the central region and/or pyramidal tract. Intraoperative RS (iRS)-fMRI was performed pre- and intraoperatively and was correlated with patients' postoperative clinical condition, as well as with intraoperative monitoring results. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to postprocess the RS-fMRI data concerning the sensorimotor networks, and the mean z-scores were statistically analyzed. RESULTS iRS-fMRI in anesthetized patients proved to be feasible and analysis revealed no significant differences in preoperative z-scores between the sensorimotor areas ipsi- and contralateral to the tumor. A significant decrease in z-score (p < 0.01) was seen in patients with new neurological deficits postoperatively. The intraoperative z-score in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the tumor had a significant negative correlation with the degree of paresis immediately after the operation (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) and on the day of discharge from the hospital (r = -0.65, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated moderate prognostic value of the intraoperative z-score (area under the curve 0.84) for the paresis score at patient discharge. CONCLUSIONS The use of iRS-fMRI with ICA-based postprocessing and functional activity mapping is feasible and the results may correlate with clinical parameters, demonstrating a significant negative correlation between the intensity of the iRS-fMRI signal and the postoperative neurological changes. PMID:26722852

  20. The potential for utilizing the "mirror neurone system" to enhance recovery of the severely affected upper limb early after stroke: a review and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Valerie M; Clark, Christopher A; Miller, J Simon G; Baron, Jean-Claude; Markus, Hugh S; Tallis, Raymond C

    2005-03-01

    Recovery of upper limb movement control after stroke might be enhanced by repetitive goal-directed functional activities. Providing such activity is challenging in the presence of severe paresis. A possible new approach is based on the discovery of mirror neurons in the monkey cortical area F5, which are active both in observing and executing a movement. Indirect evidence for a comparable human "mirror neurone system" is provided by functional imaging. The primary motor cortex, the premotor cortex, other brain areas, and muscles appropriate for the action being observed are probably activated in healthy volunteers observing another's movement. These findings raise the hypothesis that observation of another's movement might train the movement execution system of stroke patients who have severe paresis to bring them to the point at which they could actively participate in rehabilitation consisting of goal-directed activities. The point of providing an observation therapy would be to facilitate the voluntary production of movement; therefore, the condition of interest would be observation with intent to imitate. However, there is as yet insufficient evidence to enable the testing of this hypothesis in stroke patients. Studies in normal subjects are needed to determine which brain sites are activated in response to observation with intent to imitate. Studies in stroke subjects are needed to determine how activation is affected after damage to different brain areas. The information from such studies should aid identification of those stroke patients who might be most likely to benefit from observation to imitate and therefore guide phase I clinical studies. PMID:15673838

  1. Parsonage-Turner syndrome following post-exposure prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ‘Parsonage-Turner syndrome’ (PTS) is a rare but distinct disorder with an abrupt onset of shoulder pain, followed by weakness and atrophy of the upper extremity musculature, and a slow recovery requiring months to years. To our best knowledge, this is the first case describing symptoms and signs of PTS following the administration of a post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) regimen against possible human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Case presentation A 25-year-old Caucasian man presented with pain and unilateral scapular winging following PEP against possible HIV and HBV infection. Although atrophy and weakness were observed for the right supraspinatus muscle, a full range of motion was achievable. Neurological examination, plain radiography of the right shoulder and electromyography showed no additional abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with post-vaccination PTS and treated non-operatively. During the following 15 months the scapular winging receded and full muscle strength was regained. Conclusion Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare clinical diagnosis. The precise pathophysiological mechanism of PTS remains unclear, but it seems to involve an interaction between genetic predisposition, mechanical vulnerability and an autoimmune trigger. An immunological event, such as – in this case – a vaccination as part of PEP treatment, can trigger the onset of PTS. The clinical presentation is distinctive with acute severe pain followed by patchy paresis, atrophy and sensory symptoms that persist for months to years. No currently available tests can provide a definite confirmation or exclusion of PTS. Routine blood examination, electromyography (EMG), and computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serve mainly to exclude other disorders. The recovery can be quite lengthy, non-operative treatment is the accepted practice. Supplementary administration of oral prednisolone could shorten the

  2. An imaging informatics-based ePR (electronic patient record) system for providing decision support in evaluating dose optimization in stroke rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Ximing; Konersman, Matt; Martinez, Clarisa; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability in America. After stroke, about 65% of survivors still suffer from severe paresis, while rehabilitation treatment strategy after stroke plays an essential role in recovery. Currently, there is a clinical trial (NIH award #HD065438) to determine the optimal dose of rehabilitation for persistent recovery of arm and hand paresis. For DOSE (Dose Optimization Stroke Evaluation), laboratory-based measurements, such as the Wolf Motor Function test, behavioral questionnaires (e.g. Motor Activity Log-MAL), and MR, DTI, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) imaging studies are planned. Current data collection processes are tedious and reside in various standalone systems including hardcopy forms. In order to improve the efficiency of this clinical trial and facilitate decision support, a web-based imaging informatics system has been implemented together with utilizing mobile devices (eg, iPAD, tablet PC's, laptops) for collecting input data and integrating all multi-media data into a single system. The system aims to provide clinical imaging informatics management and a platform to develop tools to predict the treatment effect based on the imaging studies and the treatment dosage with mathematical models. Since there is a large amount of information to be recorded within the DOSE project, the system provides clinical data entry through mobile device applications thus allowing users to collect data at the point of patient interaction without typing into a desktop computer, which is inconvenient. Imaging analysis tools will also be developed for structural MRI, DTI, and TMS imaging studies that will be integrated within the system and correlated with the clinical and behavioral data. This system provides a research platform for future development of mathematical models to evaluate the differences between prediction and reality and thus improve and refine the models rapidly and efficiently.

  3. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy.

  4. Statistical Analysis of Pure Tone Audiometry and Caloric Test in Herpes Zoster Oticus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Jung, Jinsei; Moon, In Seok; Lee, Ho-Ki

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Pure tone audiometry and caloric test in patients with herpes zoster oticus were performed to determine the biologic features of the varicella zoster virus (VZV) and the pathogenesis of vestibulocochlear nerve disease in herpes zoster oticus. Study Design A retrospective chart review of 160 patients with herpes zoster oticus was designed in order to determine the classic characteristics of vestibulocochlear nerve disease associated with the syndrome. Speech frequency and isolated high frequency acoustic thresholds were analyzed based on severity of facial paralysis and patient age. Patients without cochlear symptoms were selected randomly, and audiological function was evaluated. Patients with symptoms of vestibular dysfunction underwent the caloric test, and canal paresis was analyzed according to the severity of facial paralysis and the age of each patient. Results Among the 160 patients, 111 exhibited pure tone audiometry; 26 (79%) of the patients with cochlear symptoms and 44 (56%) of the patients without cochlear symptoms had abnormal audiological data. Among the patients without cochlear symptoms, 15 (19%) had hearing loss at speech frequency, and 42 (54%) had hearing loss isolated to high frequency. The incidence of cochlear symptoms in herpes zoster oticus was not related to the severity of facial paralysis. The incidence of patients with isolated high frequency hearing loss statistically increased with age, however the incidence of patients with speech frequency hearing loss did not increase. Thirteen patients complained vertigo, and the incidence of vestibular disturbances and the value of canal paresis in the caloric test increased to statistical significance in parallel with increasing severity of facial paralysis. Conclusion Mild or moderate cochlear symptoms with high frequency hearing loss were related to age, and severe vestibular symptoms were related to the severity of facial paralysis after onset of herpetic symptoms. This study might

  5. Glucocorticoids improve acute dizziness symptoms following acute unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrío, Angel; Yañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Sanchez-Blanco, Carmen; Pérez, Pedro Blanco; González-Sanchez, Enrique; Sanchez, Luis Alberto Guardado; Kaski, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Acute unilateral vestibulopathy (AUV) is characterized by acute vertigo, nausea, and imbalance without neurological deficits or auditory symptomatology. Here, we explore the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on the degree of canal paresis in patients with AUV, and critically, establish its relationship with dizziness symptom recovery. We recruited consecutive patients who were retrospectively assigned to one of the two groups according to whether they received glucocorticoid treatment (n = 32) or not (n = 44). All patients underwent pure-tone audiometry, bithermal caloric testing, MRI brain imaging, and were asked to complete a dizziness handicap inventory on admission to hospital and just prior to hospital discharge. In the treatment group, the canal paresis at discharge was significantly lower than in the control group (mean ± SD % 38.04 ± 21.57 versus 82.79 ± 21.51, p < 0.001). We also observed a significant reduction in the intensity of nystagmus in patients receiving glucocorticoid treatment compared to the non-treatment group (p = 0.03). DHI test score was significantly lower at discharge in the treatment group (mean ± SD % 23.15 ± 12.40 versus 64.07 ± 12.87, p < 0.001), as was the length of hospital stay (2.18 ± 1.5 days versus 3.6 ± 1.7 days, p = 0.002). Glucocorticoid treatment leads to acute symptomatic improvement, with a reduced hospital stay and reduction in the intensity of acute nystagmus. Our findings suggest that glucocorticoids may accelerate vestibular compensation via a restoration of peripheral vestibular function, and therefore has important clinical implications for the treatment of AUV. PMID:26459091

  6. Calculated globulin (CG) as a screening test for antibody deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jolles, S; Borrell, R; Zouwail, S; Heaps, A; Sharp, H; Moody, M; Selwood, C; Williams, P; Phillips, C; Hood, K; Holding, S; El Shanawany, T

    2014-01-01

    Calculated globulin (total protein – albumin) is usually tested as part of a liver function test profile in both primary and secondary care and determines the serum globulin concentration, of which immunoglobulins are a major component. The main use hitherto of calculated globulin is to detect paraproteins when the level is high. This study investigated the potential to use low levels of calculated globulin to detect antibody deficiency. Serum samples with calculated globulin cut-off < 18 g/l based on results of a pilot study were collected from nine hospitals in Wales over a 12-month period. Anonymized request information was obtained and the samples tested for immunoglobulin levels, serum electrophoresis and, if appropriate, immunofixation. A method comparison for albumin measurement using bromocresol green and bromocresol purple was undertaken. Eighty-nine per cent (737 of 826) samples had an immunoglobulin (Ig)G level of < 6 g/l using the bromocresol green methodology with a cut-off of < 18 g/l, and 56% (459) had an IgG of < 4 g/l. Patients with both secondary and primary antibody deficiency were discovered and serum electrophoresis and immunofixation showed that 1·2% (10) had previously undetected small paraproteins associated with immune-paresis. Using bromocresol purple, 74% of samples had an IgG of < 6 g/l using a cut-off of < 23 g/l. Screening using calculated globulin with defined cut-off values detects both primary and secondary antibody deficiency and new paraproteins associated with immune-paresis. It is cheap, widely available and under-utilized. Antibody-deficient patients have been discovered using information from calculated globulin values, shortening diagnostic delay and time to treatment with immunoglobulin replacement therapy. PMID:24784320

  7. Experimental lead toxicosis in ponies: comparison of the effects of smelter effluent-contaminated hay and lead acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, G.E.; Borchard, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    Grass hay produced in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin of northern Idaho was fed to a group of 4 ponies. The hay contained Pb in concentration of 423 +/- 82 mg/kg and Cd in concentration of 10.8 +/- 1.4 mg/kg, resulting in daily exposures of the ponies to approximately 7.4 mg of Pb/kg and 0.19 mg of Cd/kg/day. The results in this group of ponies were compared with those from a group fed noncontaminated grass hay and given a daily dose of 10 mg of Pb/kg of body weight, in the form of lead acetate. Clinical toxicologic signs, hematologic changes, and blood and tissue Pb concentrations were similar in the 2 groups. However, the severity of the disease process appeared to be greater in the ponies fed the Pb- and Cd-contaminated hay. This was shown clearly by the shorter interval between onset of clinical changes and death in the ponies fed contaminated hay. The possibility of multiple heavy metal effects is discussed. Clinical toxicologic signs observed include incoordination, labial paresis, pharyngeal paresis, CNS depression, anorexia, and body weight loss. Anemia or marginal anemia was common and was often accompanied by the appearance of nucleated RBC and Howell-Jolly bodies in peripheral blood. Neither the hematologic response nor the blood Pb concentrations were reflective of the severity of poisoning, although blood Pb concentrations were greater than 0.35 micrograms/ml once clinical signs of toxicity were observed. Liver, kidney, spleen, brain, and bone Pb concentrations and liver, kidney, and brain Cd concentrations were increased in both the ponies fed contaminated hay and the ponies given lead acetate.

  8. Early Controversies Over Athetosis: II. Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lanska, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Athetosis has been controversial since it was first described by William Hammond in 1871; many aspects of Hammond’s career were equally controversial. Methods Primary sources have been used to review treatment controversies in the 50-year period following the initial description of athetosis. Results The treatments used most commonly employed available pharmaceutical agents and modalities (e.g., galvanism). Initial anecdotal reports of success were seldom confirmed with subsequent experience. Several novel invasive therapies were also developed and promoted, all of which damaged or destroyed either upper or lower motor neuron pathways, and were also often associated with high mortality rates. In general, these therapies substituted paresis for abnormal spontaneous movements. These included peripheral nerve stretching, excision of a portion of the precentral gyrus, rhizotomy, nerve “transplantation” (i.e., neurotomy and nerve-to-nerve anastomoses), and “muscle group isolation” (i.e., alcohol neurolysis). There was no agreement on the appropriateness of such high-risk procedures, particularly given the intentional generation of further neurological morbidity. Discussion Pharmaceutical agents and modalities initially employed for athetosis had little a priori evidence-based justification and no biologically plausible theoretical framework to guide empiric treatment selection. Subsequently, all the invasive procedures employed were directed at lessening or removing the manifestations, rather than the underlying cause, of the abnormal central nervous system “irritation,” usually by imposing paresis or paralysis. Factors contributing to the disparity in outcomes between favorable initial reports and the often-disappointing results of later studies included reliance on anecdotal reports or small uncontrolled case series, placebo effects, biased observation, misdiagnosis, and biased reporting. PMID:23450199

  9. Low cortisol levels in blood from dairy cows with ketosis: a field study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An elevated plasma glucose concentration has been considered to be a potential risk factor in the pathogenesis of left-displaced abomasums (DA). Therefore the present study was performed to investigate if spontaneous disease (parturient paresis, metritis, ketosis etc) in dairy cows results in elevated concentrations of glucose and cortisol in blood as cortisol is the major regulator of glucose in ruminants. Methods Cortisol, insulin, β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA), non esterified fatty acids (NEFA), and serum calcium were analyzed in blood serum and glucose, in whole blood, from 57 spontaneously diseased cows collected at different farms. The cows were grouped according to the disease; parturient paresis, recumbent for other reasons, mastitis, metritis, ketosis, inappetance and others. Results No elevated concentrations of cortisol or glucose were found in cows with metritis and mastitis but both cortisol and glucose were elevated in cows stressed by recumbency. Cows with ketonemia (BHBA > 1.5 mmol/l) did not have low concentration of glucose in blood but significantly low levels of cortisol. Some of these cows even had cortisol concentrations below the detection limit of the analysing method (< 14 nmol/l). Conclusions The study gives patho-physiological support to the treatment strategies of ketosis, recommending glucocorticoids, insulin etc. However further studies of this problem are needed to understand why cows with ketosis have low levels of cortisol and normal levels of glucose. To what extent elevated cortisol and glucose levels in hypocalcemic and recumbent cows are involved in the ethiology and /or the pathogenesis of DA also will need further research. PMID:20487518

  10. Task-related training combined with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation promotes upper limb functions in patients with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; In, Tae Sung; Cho, Hwi-young

    2013-01-01

    Severe upper limb paresis is a major contributor to disability after stroke. This study investigated the efficacy of task-related training (TRT) with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on recovery of upper limb motor function in chronic-stroke survivors. Thirty patients with chronic stroke were randomly allocated two groups: the TRT+TENS group (n = 15) and the TRT+placebo (TRT+PLBO) group (n = 15). Patients in the TRT+TENS group received TENS stimulation (two to three times the sensory threshold), while subjects in the TRT+PLBO group received TENS without real electrical stimulation. TENS was applied to muscle belly of triceps and wrist extensors, while placebo (PLBO) stimulation was administrated without real electrical stimulation. Both interventions were given for 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week, for a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes were assessed with Fugl-Meyer assessment scores (FMA), Manual function test (MFT), Box and block test (BBT), and Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), each of which was performed one day before and one day after intervention. Both groups showed significant improvements in FMA, MFT, and BBT after intervention. When compared with the TRT+PLBO group, the TRT+TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in FMA (p = 0.034), MFT (p = 0.037), and BBT (p = 0.042). In MAS score, significant improvement was observed only in the TRT+TENS group (p = 0.011). Our findings indicate that TRT with TENS can reduce motor impairment and improve motor activity in stroke survivors with chronic upper limb paresis, highlighting the benefits of somatosensory stimulation from TENS. PMID:24097280

  11. Facial disability index (FDI): Adaptation to Spanish, reliability and validity

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cardero, Eduardo; Cayuela, Aurelio; Acosta-Feria, Manuel; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To adapt to Spanish the facial disability index (FDI) described by VanSwearingen and Brach in 1995 and to assess its reliability and validity in patients with facial nerve paresis after parotidectomy. Study Design: The present study was conducted in two different stages: a) cross-cultural adaptation of the questionnaire and b) cross-sectional study of a control group of 79 Spanish-speaking patients who suffered facial paresis after superficial parotidectomy with facial nerve preservation. The cross-cultural adaptation process comprised the following stages: (I) initial translation, (II) synthesis of the translated document, (III) retro-translation, (IV) review by a board of experts, (V) pilot study of the pre-final draft and (VI) analysis of the pilot study and final draft. Results: The reliability and internal consistency of every one of the rating scales included in the FDI (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient) was 0.83 for the complete scale and 0.77 and 0.82 for the physical and the social well-being subscales. The analysis of the factorial validity of the main components of the adapted FDI yielded similar results to the original questionnaire. Bivariate correlations between FDI and House-Brackmann scale were positive. The variance percentage was calculated for all FDI components. Conclusions: The FDI questionnaire is a specific instrument for assessing facial neuromuscular dysfunction which becomes a useful tool in order to determine quality of life in patients with facial nerve paralysis. Spanish adapted FDI is equivalent to the original questionnaire and shows similar reliability and validity. The proven reproducibi-lity, reliability and validity of this questionnaire make it a useful additional tool for evaluating the impact of facial nerve paralysis in Spanish-speaking patients. Key words:Parotidectomy, facial nerve paralysis, facial disability. PMID:22926474

  12. Conducting processes in simulated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at 20°C-42°C.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Daskalova, M; Mladenov, M

    2015-03-01

    Decreased conducting processes leading usually to conduction block and increased weakness of limbs during cold (cold paresis) or warmth (heat paresis) have been reported in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). To explore the mechanisms of these symptoms, the effects of temperature (from 20°C to 42°C) on nodal action potentials and their current kinetics in previously simulated case of 70% CIDP are investigated, using our temperature dependent multi-layered model of the myelinated human motor nerve fiber. The results show that potential amplitudes have a bifid form at 20°C. As in the normal case, for the CIDP case, the nodal action potentials are determined mainly by the nodal sodium currents (I Na ) for the temperature range of 20-39°C, as the contribution of nodal fast and slow potassium currents (I Kf and I Ks ) to the total ionic current (Ii) is negligible. Also, the contribution of I Kf and I Ks to the membrane repolarization is enhanced at temperatures higher than 39°C. However, in the temperature range of 20-42°C, all potential parameters in the CIDP case, except for the conduction block during hyperthermia (≥ 40°C) which is again at 45°C, worsen: (i) conduction velocities and potential amplitudes are decreased; (ii) afterpotentials and threshold stimulus currents for the potential generation are increased; (iii) the current kinetics of action potentials is slowed and (iv) the conduction block during hypothermia (≤ 25°C) is at temperatures lower than 20°C. These potential parameters are more altered during hyperthermia and are most altered during hypothermia. The present results suggest that the conducting processes in patients with CIDP are in higher risk during hypothermia than hyperthermia. PMID:25597276

  13. Pharmacological treatment of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Hain, Timothy C; Uddin, Mohammed

    2003-01-01

    This review discusses the physiology and pharmacological treatment of vertigo and related disorders. Classes of medications useful in the treatment of vertigo include anticholinergics, antihistamines, benzodiazepines, calcium channel antagonists and dopamine receptor antagonists. These medications often have multiple actions. They may modify the intensity of symptoms (e.g. vestibular suppressants) or they may affect the underlying disease process (e.g. calcium channel antagonists in the case of vestibular migraine). Most of these agents, particularly those that are sedating, also have a potential to modulate the rate of compensation for vestibular damage. This consideration has become more relevant in recent years, as vestibular rehabilitation physical therapy is now often recommended in an attempt to promote compensation. Accordingly, therapy of vertigo is optimised when the prescriber has detailed knowledge of the pharmacology of medications being administered as well as the precise actions being sought. There are four broad causes of vertigo, for which specific regimens of drug therapy can be tailored. Otological vertigo includes disorders of the inner ear such as Ménière's disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and bilateral vestibular paresis. In both Ménière's disease and vestibular neuritis, vestibular suppressants such as anticholinergics and benzodiazepines are used. In Ménière's disease, salt restriction and diuretics are used in an attempt to prevent flare-ups. In vestibular neuritis, only brief use of vestibular suppressants is now recommended. Drug treatments are not presently recommended for BPPV and bilateral vestibular paresis, but physical therapy treatment can be very useful in both. Central vertigo includes entities such as vertigo associated with migraine and certain strokes. Prophylactic agents (L-channel calcium channel antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, beta-blockers) are the mainstay of treatment

  14. Differing Prevalence and Diversity of Bacterial Species in Fetal Membranes from Very Preterm and Term Labor

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hannah E.; Harris, Kathryn A.; Azizia, Malika; Bank, Lindsay; Carpenter, Bernadette; Hartley, John C.; Klein, Nigel; Peebles, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Background Intrauterine infection may play a role in preterm delivery due to spontaneous preterm labor (PTL) and preterm prolonged rupture of membranes (PPROM). Because bacteria previously associated with preterm delivery are often difficult to culture, a molecular biology approach was used to identify bacterial DNA in placenta and fetal membranes. Methodology/Principal findings We used broad-range 16S rDNA PCR and species-specific, real-time assays to amplify bacterial DNA from fetal membranes and placenta. 74 women were recruited to the following groups: PPROM <32 weeks (n = 26; 11 caesarean); PTL with intact membranes <32 weeks (n = 19; all vaginal birth); indicated preterm delivery <32 weeks (n = 8; all caesarean); term (n = 21; 11 caesarean). 50% (5/10) of term vaginal deliveries were positive for bacterial DNA. However, little spread was observed through tissues and species diversity was restricted. Minimal bacteria were detected in term elective section or indicated preterm deliveries. Bacterial prevalence was significantly increased in samples from PTL with intact membranes [89% (17/19) versus 50% (5/10) in term vaginal delivery p = 0.03] and PPROM (CS) [55% (6/11) versus 0% (0/11) in term elective CS, p = 0.01]. In addition, bacterial spread and diversity was greater in the preterm groups with 68% (13/19) PTL group having 3 or more positive samples and over 60% (12/19) showing two or more bacterial species (versus 20% (2/10) in term vaginal deliveries). Blood monocytes from women with PTL with intact membranes and PPROM who were 16S bacterial positive showed greater level of immune paresis (p = 0.03). A positive PCR result was associated with histological chorioamnionitis in preterm deliveries. Conclusion/Significance Bacteria are found in both preterm and term fetal membranes. A greater spread and diversity of bacterial species were found in tissues of women who had very preterm births. It is unclear to what extent the greater

  15. Carbon Ion Irradiation of the Rat Spinal Cord: Dependence of the Relative Biological Effectiveness on Linear Energy Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Saager, Maria; Glowa, Christin; Peschke, Peter; Brons, Stephan; Scholz, Michael; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Jürgen; Karger, Christian P.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions in the rat spinal cord as a function of linear energy transfer (LET). Methods and Materials: As an extension of a previous study, the cervical spinal cord of rats was irradiated with single doses of carbon ions at 6 positions of a 6-cm spread-out Bragg peak (16-99 keV/μm). The TD{sub 50} values (dose at 50% complication probability) were determined according to dose-response curves for the development of paresis grade 2 within an observation time of 300 days. The RBEs were calculated using TD{sub 50} for photons of our previous study. Results: Minimum latency time was found to be dose-dependent, but not significantly LET-dependent. The TD{sub 50} values for the onset of paresis grade 2 within 300 days were 19.5 ± 0.4 Gy (16 keV/μm), 18.4 ± 0.4 Gy (21 keV/μm), 17.7 ± 0.3 Gy (36 keV/μm), 16.1 ± 1.2 Gy (45 keV/μm), 14.6 ± 0.5 Gy (66 keV/μm), and 14.8 ± 0.5 Gy (99 keV/μm). The corresponding RBEs increased from 1.26 ± 0.05 (16 keV/μm) up to 1.68 ± 0.08 at 66 keV/μm. Unexpectedly, the RBE at 99 keV/μm was comparable to that at 66 keV/μm. Conclusions: The data suggest a linear relation between RBE and LET at high doses for late effects in the spinal cord. Together with additional data from ongoing fractionated irradiation experiments, these data will provide an extended database to systematically benchmark RBE models for further improvements of carbon ion treatment planning.

  16. Oxygen and neodymium isotope evidence for source diversity in Cretaceous anorogenic granites from Namibia and implications for A-type granite genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbull, A.-type granite genesis R. B.; Harris, C.; Frindt, S.; Wigand, M.

    2004-03-01

    Many of the early Cretaceous intrusive complexes in the Damaraland of west-central Namibia are silicic in composition. Although all have trace element characteristics typical for the so-called A-type granites, major differences in alkali/aluminum ratios and isotopic compositions require diverse magma sources. This paper presents Nd and O isotope data from the five largest silicic complexes (Paresis, Erongo, Brandberg, Cape Cross, Gross Spitzkoppe) that provide new constraints on the nature of crustal and mantle sources involved, and their relative proportions. The Paresis complex has an isotopic signature ( δ18O=+9‰, ɛNd 130 Ma=-21) indicating a crustal component similar to Mesoproterozoic gneisses of the Angola craton. The other complexes have isotope variations ( δ18O from +8.1‰ to +10.7‰ and ɛNd 130 Ma from -1 to -9) that can be explained by a binary mixing model between a mantle and crustal component. More importantly, this same mixing line also fits the Nd-O isotope variations reported from the mafic Okenyenya and Messum complexes, and from rhyodacites in the southern Etendeka volcanic sequence. The uniformity of the crustal component implied by this mixing model suggests lower crustal material, in contrast to the geologic complexity of the Neoproterozoic Damara Belt presently exposed at the surface. This is consistent with the isotopic data, and we interpret the crustal component to be lower crustal metametasediments that were dehydrated and perhaps melt-depleted by generation of the S-type granites, which are widespread in the Damara Belt. The mantle component is interpreted to be dominated by the Tristan mantle plume, but some involvement of depleted mantle material is needed to explain all of the isotope data. The data rule out any significant role for enriched, subcontinental mantle lithosphere. All silicic Damaraland complexes, as well as the Etendeka rhyodacites, classify as A-type granites despite their proven source diversity. This means

  17. Comparing unilateral and bilateral upper limb training: The ULTRA-stroke program design

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background About 80% of all stroke survivors have an upper limb paresis immediately after stroke, only about a third of whom (30 to 40%) regain some dexterity within six months following conventional treatment programs. Of late, however, two recently developed interventions - constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and bilateral arm training with rhythmic auditory cueing (BATRAC) - have shown promising results in the treatment of upper limb paresis in chronic stroke patients. The ULTRA-stroke (acronym for Upper Limb TRaining After stroke) program was conceived to assess the effectiveness of these interventions in subacute stroke patients and to examine how the observed changes in sensori-motor functioning relate to changes in stroke recovery mechanisms associated with peripheral stiffness, interlimb interactions, and cortical inter- and intrahemispheric networks. The present paper describes the design of this single-blinded randomized clinical trial (RCT), which has recently started and will take several years to complete. Methods/Design Sixty patients with a first ever stroke will be recruited. Patients will be stratified in terms of their remaining motor ability at the distal part of the arm (i.e., wrist and finger movements) and randomized over three intervention groups receiving modified CIMT, modified BATRAC, or an equally intensive (i.e., dose-matched) conventional treatment program for 6 weeks. Primary outcome variable is the score on the Action Research Arm test (ARAT), which will be assessed before, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. During those test sessions all patients will also undergo measurements aimed at investigating the associated recovery mechanisms using haptic robots and magneto-encephalography (MEG). Discussion ULTRA-stroke is a 3-year translational research program which aims (1) to assess the relative effectiveness of the three interventions, on a group level but also as a function of patient characteristics, and (2) to

  18. Gamma loop contributing to maximal voluntary contractions in man.

    PubMed

    Hagbarth, K E; Kunesch, E J; Nordin, M; Schmidt, R; Wallin, E U

    1986-11-01

    A local anaesthetic drug was injected around the peroneal nerve in healthy subjects in order to investigate whether the resulting loss in foot dorsiflexion power in part depended on a gamma-fibre block preventing 'internal' activation of spindle end-organs and thereby depriving the alpha-motoneurones of an excitatory spindle inflow during contraction. The motor outcome of maximal dorsiflexion efforts was assessed by measuring firing rates of individual motor units in the anterior tibial (t.a.) muscle, mean voltage e.m.g. from the pretibial muscles, dorsiflexion force and range of voluntary foot dorsiflexion movements. The tests were performed with and without peripheral conditioning stimuli, such as agonist or antagonist muscle vibration or imposed stretch of the contracting muscles. As compared to control values of t.a. motor unit firing rates in maximal isometric voluntary contractions, the firing rates were lower and more irregular during maximal dorsiflexion efforts performed during subtotal peroneal nerve blocks. During the development of paresis a gradual reduction of motor unit firing rates was observed before the units ceased responding to the voluntary commands. This change in motor unit behaviour was accompanied by a reduction of the mean voltage e.m.g. activity in the pretibial muscles. At a given stage of anaesthesia the e.m.g. responses to maximal voluntary efforts were more affected than the responses evoked by electric nerve stimuli delivered proximal to the block, indicating that impaired impulse transmission in alpha motor fibres was not the sole cause of the paresis. The inability to generate high and regular motor unit firing rates during peroneal nerve blocks was accentuated by vibration applied over the antagonistic calf muscles. By contrast, in eight out of ten experiments agonist stretch or vibration caused an enhancement of motor unit firing during the maximal force tasks. The reverse effects of agonist and antagonist vibration on the

  19. AICA syndrome with facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Ikegami-Takada, Tomoko; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Doi, Tadashi; Takada, Yohei; Tomoda, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of infarction of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) with peripheral facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss. A 39-year-old female presented with vertigo and sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness of the right ear. An audiogram revealed a severe hearing loss at all tested frequencies in the right ear. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the left side was also observed. Otoneurological examinations showed sensorineural hearing loss of the right ear and horizontal and rotatory gaze nystagmus toward the left side, and a caloric reflex test demonstrated canal paresis. Initially, we diagnosed the patient for sudden deafness with vertigo. However, right peripheral facial palsy appeared 2 days later. An eye tracking test (ETT) and optokinetic pattern test (OKP) showed centralis abnormality. The patient's brain was examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angioglaphy (MRA) and showed an infarction localized in the pons and cerebellum. MRI and MRA revealed infarction of the right cerebellar hemisphere indicating occlusion of the AICA. Consequently, the patient was diagnosed with AICA syndrome but demonstrated regression following steroid and edaravone treatment. We suggest that performing MRI and MRA in the early stage of AICA syndrome is important for distinguishing cerebellar infarction resulting from vestibular disease. PMID:21862260

  20. Bone marrow mastocytosis associated with IgM kappa plasma cell myeloma.

    PubMed

    Stellmacher, Florian; Sotlar, Karl; Balleisen, Leopold; Valent, Peter; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2004-04-01

    An association between mastocytosis and monoclonal gammopathy is a relatively rare but well recognized clinical finding. In the majority of cases, however, overt myeloma or lymphoma is not detectable morphologically. Here we describe the case of a 51 year-old male patient first presenting with paresis of the right facial nerve and the serological finding of IgM kappa paraproteinemia. The patient did not have organomegaly, lytic bone lesions, or urticaria pigmentosa-type skin lesions. Histological examination of a trephine biopsy specimen revealed the unusual coexistence of plasma cell myeloma and mastocytosis. Immunohistochemically, plasma cells were found to exhibit a monotypic staining for Ig heavy chain mu and Ig light chain kappa, thus confirming their neoplastic nature. Mast cells showed prominent spindling and formed dense multifocal infiltrates, thus enabling the diagnosis of bone marrow mastocytosis. Immunohistochemically, mast cells expressed tryptase, chymase, and KIT (CD117). In addition, aberrant expression of CD25 on mast cells was detected, confirming the coexistence of a neoplastic mast cell-proliferative disorder. According to the WHO proposal for classification of hematopoietic malignancies, this unique case, showing the association of two very rare haematologic neoplasms, can therefore best be referred to as bone marrow mastocytosis associated with IgM kappa plasma cell myeloma (SM-AHNMD). PMID:15160959

  1. Herpes zoster epidemiology, management, and disease and economic burden in Europe: a multidisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert W; Alvarez-Pasquin, Marie-José; Bijl, Marc; Franco, Elisabetta; Gaillat, Jacques; Clara, João G; Labetoulle, Marc; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Naldi, Luigi; Sanmarti, Luis S; Weinke, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is primarily a disease of nerve tissue but the acute and longer-term manifestations require multidisciplinary knowledge and involvement in their management. Complications may be dermatological (e.g. secondary bacterial infection), neurological (e.g. long-term pain, segmental paresis, stroke), ophthalmological (e.g. keratitis, iridocyclitis, secondary glaucoma) or visceral (e.g. pneumonia, hepatitis). The age-related increased incidence of HZ and its complications is thought to be a result of the decline in cell-mediated immunity (immunosenescence), higher incidence of comorbidities with age and social-environmental changes. Individuals who are immunocompromised as a result of disease or therapy are also at increased risk, independent of age. HZ and its complications (particularly postherpetic neuralgia) create a significant burden for the patient, carers, healthcare systems and employers. Prevention and treatment of HZ complications remain a therapeutic challenge despite recent advances. This is an overview of the multidisciplinary implications and management of HZ in which the potential contribution of vaccination to reducing the incidence HZ and its complications are also discussed. PMID:26478818

  2. Characterization of Thoracic Motor and Sensory Neurons and Spinal Nerve Roots in Canine Degenerative Myelopathy, a Potential Disease Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brandie R.; Coates, Joan R.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Shelton, G. Diane; Katz, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Canine Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) is a progressive adult-onset multisystem degenerative disease with many features in common with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As with some forms of ALS, DM is associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Clinical signs include general proprioceptive ataxia and spastic upper motor neuron paresis in pelvic limbs, which progress to flaccid tetraplegia and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to characterize DM as a potential disease model for ALS. We previously reported that intercostal muscle atrophy develops in dogs with advanced stage DM. To determine if other components of the thoracic motor unit (MU) also demonstrated morphological changes consistent with dysfunction, histopathologic and morphometric analyses were conducted on thoracic spinal motor neurons (MN) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and in motor and sensory nerve root axons from DM-affected Boxers and Pembroke Welsh Corgis (PWCs). No alterations in MNs, or motor root axons were observed in either breed. However, advanced stage PWCs exhibited significant losses of sensory root axons, and numerous DRG sensory neurons displayed evidence of degeneration. These results indicate that intercostal muscle atrophy in DM is not preceded by physical loss of the motor neurons innervating these muscles, or of their axons. Axonal loss in thoracic sensory roots and sensory nerve death suggest sensory involvement may play an important role in DM disease progression. Further analysis of the mechanisms responsible for these morphological findings would aid in the development of therapeutic intervention for DM and some forms of ALS. PMID:24375814

  3. Longitudinal tear of the inferior rectus muscle in orbital floor fracture.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of longitudinal avulsion of the inferior rectus muscle following orbital floor fracture and describe its clinical presentation, computed tomography (CT) features and management. A 53-year-old man felt vertical diplopia in all gaze immediately after the trauma. Orthoptic assessment showed left over right hypertropia of 20 prism diopters and left exotropia of 10 prism diopters in primary position. The left orbital floor fracture and the prolapse of orbital contents into the maxillary sinus were presented by CT. Exploration of the orbit was performed under general anesthesia. The displaced bone fragment was elevated and repositioned below the slastic implant. Diplopia continued in all directions of gaze, although the impairment of depression was reduced postoperatively. A residual left hypertropia of 10 prism diopters and exotropia of 10 prism diopters was present in primary position 1 month after surgery, though there were no enopthalmos or worsening of hypesthesia. Repeated CT revealed the muscle avulsion of inferior rectus at the lateral portion of the belly. The avulsion of a small segment of the inferior rectus and its herniation into maxillary sinus in more posterior views was detected by review of the preoperative images. Muscle avulsion should be considered in the management of orbital fracture if orbital tissue entrapment and nerve paresis are excluded as causes of reduction in ocular motility. A thorough review of the imaging studies for possible muscle injury is required before surgery in all cases of orbital fracture. PMID:22551369

  4. Efficacy of petrosectomy in malignant invasion of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, M; Kopeć, T; Szyfter, W; Buczkowska, A; Borucki, Ł

    2016-09-01

    We present the outcomes of lateral, subtotal, and total petrosectomies in patients with invasion of the temporal bone by specific primary cancers, with particular emphasis on survival in the advanced stages of disease. We made a retrospective study of 20 consecutive patients (squamous cell carcinoma of the temporal bone, n=11, and primary cancer of the parotid gland with infiltration of the lateral skull base, n=9) treated by total, subtotal, or lateral petrosectomy at the University Department of Otolaryngology, a tertiary referral centre, between June 2006 and December 2010. Fourteen of the 20 patients were alive at the time of analysis, and follow-up ranged from 36-60 months. Six of seven patients whose disease relapsed (4 local and 3 distant metastases) died. The three-year, disease-free survival was 65% and the overall survival 68%. Survival between those with temporal bone and parotid tumours did not differ significantly. The combined group survival was affected by involvement of invaded resection margins (n=6, p=0.03). Involved margins were significant in the development of recurrence (p=0.03). Tumour stage, nodal involvement, type of operation, sex, age, skin involvement, facial palsy, and previous history of disease had no impact on prognosis. There was a significant difference in the survival curves of patients with carcinoma of the temporal bone with and without facial paresis (n=6 compared with n=5; p=0.046). Two of 11 free flaps required revision of the anastomoses, but none was lost. PMID:27241556

  5. Symptomatic spinal cord metastasis from cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Elefante, A; Peca, C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Russo, C; Formicola, F; Mariniello, G; Brunetti, A; Maiuri, F

    2012-06-01

    Spinal subarachnoid spread is not uncommon in brain oligodendrogliomas; on the other hand, symptomatic involvement of the spinal cord and cauda is very rare, with only 16 reported cases. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent resection of a low-grade frontal oligodendroglioma 4 years previously. He was again observed because of bilateral sciatic pain followed by left leg paresis. A spine MRI showed an intramedullary T12-L1 tumor with root enhancement. At operation, an intramedullary anaplastic oligodendroglioma with left exophytic component was found and partially resected. Two weeks later, a large left frontoparietal anaplastic oligodendroglioma was diagnosed and completely resected. The patient was neurologically stable for 8 months and died 1 year after the spinal surgery because of diffuse brain and spinal leptomeningeal spread. The review of the reported cases shows that spinal symptomatic metastases can occur in both low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, even many years after surgery of the primary tumor; however, they exceptionally occur as first clinical manifestation or as anaplastic progression. The spinal seeding represents a negative event leading to a short survival. PMID:21927882

  6. Anaplastic astrocytoma in the spinal cord of an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Gibson, C J; Parry, N M A; Jakowski, R M; Eshar, D

    2008-11-01

    A 2-year-old, female hedgehog presented with an 8-month history of progressive, ascending paresis/paralysis and was tentatively diagnosed with wobbly hedgehog syndrome. She died awaiting further diagnostic tests, and the owners consented to postmortem examination. Grossly, the bladder was large and flaccid and the cervical and lumbar spinal cord were regionally enlarged, light grey, and friable with multifocal hemorrhages. The thoracic spinal cord was grossly normal. Microscopically all regions of the spinal cord had similar changes, although the cervical and lumbar sections were most severely affected. These regions were completely effaced by a moderately cellular infiltration of highly pleomorphic polygonal to spindle shaped cells, mineralization, and necrosis, which were most consistent with anaplastic astrocytoma. The thoracic spinal cord white matter was similarly infiltrated by the neoplastic cells, with perivascular extension into the otherwise normal grey matter. A diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma was confirmed using immunohistochemical stains that were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100. PMID:18984799

  7. Treatment of an amelanotic melanoma using radiation therapy in a lesser Madagascar hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Dominguez, Pedro; Hanzlik, Kim; Sikarskie, James G; Agnew, Dalen; Bergin, Ingrid; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Kitchell, Barbara E; McNiel, Elizabeth

    2010-03-01

    A 15-yr-old, male lesser Madagascar hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi) presented with a mass caudal to the right ear. Cytology suggested a sarcoma. Surgical removal was attempted. Histology was consistent with a soft tissue sarcoma. The mass recurred within 331 days post operation. Radiation therapy was initiated. Computed tomography was used for staging in conjunction with three-dimensional computerized treatment planning software to permit accurate lesion localization and to optimize normal tissue sparing. A total dose of 6,480 cGy was administered in 24 fractions over 46 days. Transient hind limb paresis developed during the course of the radiation therapy, but resolved after 7 days with prednisone treatment. Minimal acute radiation toxicity was observed. The mass responded with at least a 90% reduction in volume following radiation treatment. The animal survived 266 days from the initiation of treatment. On necropsy, a small mass and granulation tissue were found at the site of the initial neoplasm, indicating good regional control of the tumor; however, extensive metastases to the spleen and liver were present. Immunohistochemically, the original, recurrent, and metastatic populations were strongly positive for HMB 45 and weakly positive for S-100, and the final diagnosis was metastatic amelanotic melanoma. PMID:20722271

  8. Surgical management of special cases of intractable Meniere's disease: unilateral cases with intact canals and bilateral cases.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Tadashi; Kondoh, Kazumasa; Morihana, Tetsuo; Okumura, Shin-ichi; Mishiro, Yasuo; Kubo, Takeshi

    2004-05-01

    If a clinician seeks to allow patients with vertigo to return to work as soon as possible, it is very important to determine the appearance of vestibular symptoms during convalescence just after treatment, as well as the long-term results. Apprehensive patients with vertigo may undergo severe psychological torment if treatment requires long-term rest in bed before they can return to daily life. In this paper, we observed postoperative vestibular symptoms (subjective sensation and objective nystagmus) in 50 patients with intractable Meniere's disease, including cases from our previous preliminary report, during the period of convalescence just after endolymphatic sac drainage and steroid instillation surgery (EDSS). All symptoms were eliminated within 8 days after EDSS. There was no significant difference in the duration of any vestibular symptoms between bilateral (n = 8) and unilateral cases (n = 42). This result indicates that EDSS could be as safe a treatment for bilateral Meniere's disease as for unilateral disease. In unilateral cases with intact semicircular canal function (n = 17), postoperative evoked vestibular sensation, positional, and positioning (Dix-Hallpike) nystagmus disappeared significantly earlier than in those with canal paresis (n = 25). This result indicates that EDSS could keep the vestibular peripheral function of patients with unilateral Meniere's disease with intact canals quite stable after surgery. Therefore, EDSS could be recommended as an initial, less-invasive surgical treatment for intractable Meniere's disease, especially in unilateral cases with intact canals and in bilateral cases. PMID:15174769

  9. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  10. Recurrent Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Atypical Clinical and Radiological Features

    PubMed Central

    Lamdhade, S.; Almulla, A.; Alroughani, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE) is a clinical diagnosis with serious neurological consequences. Its occurrence is underestimated in nonalcoholics and is uncommon in adolescents. We aim to draw the attention to a rare case, which had additional clinical and radiological features. Case. A 16-year-old girl presented with three-week history of vomiting secondary to intestinal obstruction. She developed diplopia soon after hospitalization. Neurological evaluation revealed restriction of bilateral lateral recti with horizontal nystagmus, and bilateral limb dysmetria. Brain MRI was normal. She had prompt improvement to thiamine. Four months later, she presented with headache, bilateral severe deafness, and tinnitus. Clinically, she had severe sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral lateral recti paresis, and gait ataxia. CT head showed bilateral caudate nucleus hypodensities. MRI brain revealed gadolinium enhancement of mamillary bodies and vermis. She had significant improvement after IV thiamine. Headache completely resolved while the ocular movements, hearing, and tinnitus improved partially in 72 hours. Conclusions. Recurrent WE in adolescence is uncommon. Headache, tinnitus, and deafness are rare clinical features. Although MRI study shows typical features of WE, the presence of bilateral caudate nuclei hypodensities on CT scan is uncommon. Prompt treatment with thiamine is warranted in suspected cases to prevent permanent neurological sequelae. PMID:24790762

  11. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and management of such cases. Case Description: An 18-year-old male presented with bilateral lower limb paresis. He was a known case of homozygous beta thalassemia major. He had undergone surgery for spinal cord compression due to EMH 4 months prior to presentation. Symptom resolution was followed by deterioration 5 days later. He was operated again at our hospital with complete resection of the mass. He underwent local radiotherapy to prevent recurrence. At 2 years follow-up, he showed complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up imaging demonstrated no residual mass. Conclusion: The possibility of EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis as a cause of spinal cord compression. Treatment of such cases is usually done with blood transfusions, which can reduce the hematopoietic drive for EMH. Other options include surgery, hydroxyurea, radiotherapy, or a combination of these on a case to case basis. PMID:27069747

  12. Description of a new genus and three new species of Otothyrinae (Siluriformes, Loricariidae)

    PubMed Central

    Roxo, Fábio F.; Silva, Gabriel S. C.; Ochoa, Luz E.; Oliveira, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The genus Hisonotus was resurrected as a member of the tribe Otothyrini (actually subfamily Otothyrinae). However, phylogenetic studies based on morphological and molecular data showed that Hisonotus is not monophyletic and independent lineages can be identified, such as the group composed of the species Hisonotus insperatus, Hisonotus luteofrenatus, Hisonotus oliveirai, Hisonotus paresi and Hisonotus piracanjuba, a lineage unrelated to that containing the type species of the genus Hisonotus (Hisonotus notatus). Herein, based in molecular and morphological data, a new genus is described to accommodate the lineage mentioned above, into which are also added three new species. This new genus can be distinguished from other genera of Otothyrinae by the following combination of characters: (1) a pair of rostral plates at the tip of the snout; (2) two large pre-nasal plates just posterior to the rostral plates; (3) a supra-opercular plate that receives the laterosensory canal from the compound pterotic before the preopercle; (4) a well developed membrane at anal opening in females; and (5) a V-shaped spinelet. A key to species of Curculionichthys is provided. PMID:26668550

  13. Posterior cervical spinal fusion in a 3-week-old infant with a severe subaxial distraction injury.

    PubMed

    Holland, Christopher M; Kebriaei, Meysam A; Wrubel, David M

    2016-03-01

    Unstable spinal injuries in the neonate pose particular challenges in the clinical and radiographic assessment as well as the surgical stabilization of the spine. In this report, the authors present the unfortunate case of a 3-week-old infant who suffered a severe subaxial cervical fracture dislocation with spinal cord injury that occurred as a result of nonaccidental trauma. Imaging demonstrated severe distraction at C5-6 and near-complete spinal cord transection resulting in quadri-paresis. Open surgical reduction was performed with noninstrumented posterior fusion augmented with split rib autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Postoperative imaging demonstrated progressive bony fusion at 2 months, and clinical examination findings progressed to a motor examination classification of ASIA C. At 2 years, the fusion mass is stable and cervical alignment is maintained. The patient remains flaccid in the bilateral lower extremities, but has movement with some dexterity in both hands. Follow-up MRI shows severe spinal cord injury with evidence of bilateral C-5 nerve root avulsions. This case represents the first report of spinal fusion in an infant of less than 1 month of age. Given the extreme young age of the patient, the diagnostic challenges as well as the mechanical and technical considerations of surgical fusion are discussed. PMID:26613276

  14. Endoscopically controlled laser lithotripsy of sialoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Peter; Hopf, Juergen U. G.; Linnarz, Marietta; Leege, Nils; Scherer, Hans H.; Tschepe, Johannes; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1992-08-01

    Among the diseases of the major salivary glands, sialolithiasis is a frequent clinical picture. Until now the condition has nearly always had to be treated surgically. In rare cases, discharge can be achieved by acid stimulation of secretion. If located distally in the excretory duct, concrements may be removed by enoral lancing. If it is close to glands, e.g., in the knee of Wharton's duct or in the ductal part of the submandibular gland, extirpation of the gland including the stone is unavoidable. Besides wound healing problems and the occurrence of salivary fistulas, the main risk of surgery is injury to the nerves around the major salivary glands, e.g., the n. facialis or one of its branches, the n. hypoglossus, or the n. lingualis with consecutive paresis. Based on the clinical results of lithotripsy by laser-induced shock waves (LIL) applied to renal stones and ureteroliths as well as bilary duct and pancreas stones, we investigated the suitability of endoscopically controlled laser therapy for sialolithiasis.

  15. Combinations of Susceptibility Genes Are Associated with Higher Risk for Multiple Sclerosis and Imply Disease Course Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Akkad, Denis A.; Olischewsky, Alexandra; Reiner, Franziska; Hellwig, Kerstin; Esser, Sarika; Epplen, Jörg T.; Curk, Tomaz; Gold, Ralf; Haghikia, Aiden

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that predominantly affects young adults. The genetic contributions to this multifactorial disease were underscored by a genome wide association study (GWAS) conducted by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetic Consortium in a multinational cohort prompting the discovery of 57 non-MHC MS-associated common genetic variants. Hitherto, few of these newly reported variants have been replicated in larger independent patient cohorts. We genotyped a cohort of 1033 MS patients and 644 healthy controls with a consistent genetic background for the 57 non-MHC variants reported to be associated with MS by the first large GWAS as well as the HLA DRB1*1501 tagging SNP rs3135388. We robustly replicated three of the 57 non-MHC reported MS-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, our study revealed several genotype-genotype combinations with an evidently higher degree of disease association than the genotypes of the single SNPs. We further correlated well-defined clinical phenotypes, i.e. ataxia, visual impairment due to optic neuritis and paresis with single SNPs and genotype combinations, and identified several associations. The results may open new avenues for clinical implications of the MS associated genetic variants reported from large GWAS. PMID:26011527

  16. Intraoperative identification of the facial nerve by needle electromyography stimulation with a burr

    PubMed Central

    KHAMGUSHKEEVA, N.N.; ANIKIN, I.A.; KORNEYENKOV, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the safety of surgery for patients with a pathology of the middle and inner ear by preventing damage to the facial nerve by conducting intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve by needle electromyography with continuous stimulation with a burr. Patients and Methods The clinical part of the prospective study was carried out on 48 patients that were diagnosed with suppurative otitis media. After the surgery with intraoperative monitoring, the facial nerve with an intact bone wall was stimulated electrically in the potentially dangerous places of damage. Minimum (threshold) stimulation (mA) of the facial nerve with a threshold event of 100 μV was used to register EMG events. The anatomical part of the study was carried out on 30 unformalinized cadaver temporal bones from adult bodies. The statistical analysis of obtained data was carried out with parametric methods (Student’s t-test), non-parametric correlation (Spearman’s method) and regression analysis. Results It was found that 1 mA of threshold amperage corresponded to 0.8 mm thickness of the bone wall of the facial canal. Values of transosseous threshold stimulation in potentially dangerous sections of the injury to the facial nerve were obtained. Conclusion These data lower the risk of paresis (paralysis) of the facial muscles during otologic surgery. PMID:27142821

  17. [Intelligent operating theater].

    PubMed

    Iseki, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    The intelligent operating theater (IOT) is an operating room where it provided with "Advanced hands, vision and brain for Surgeon". Improvement of the surgical outcome of malignant brain tumor surgery requires a better anticipation of the surgical procedure and patient's anatomical and functional environment of the region of interest (ROI). Localization of functional areas in the brain also differs among patients, and excess removal of tumor near eloquent areas may increase the risk of damage to function, such as motor paresis and speech disturbance. Recent progress in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technology which enabled to acquire intraoperative images totally changed the neurosurgery of malignant brain tumor. Since intraoperative MR images (iMRI) visualize the size of residual tumor and the positional relationship between the tumor and eloquent areas, surgeons can achieve safe and reliable surgery. The IOT with iMRI has a role to assist the surgeon's decision for next surgical procedures by showing the present status real-timely. In order to compensate the deformation and shift of the organ due to surgical procedures preoperative images are not sufficient and it is necessary to up-date the navigation information using intraoperatively acquired images. These surgical support using intraoperative images are a must to accomplish the safe and accurate surgery. PMID:17432186

  18. Two male sibs with severe micrognathia and a missense variant in MED12.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Trine E; Kulseth, Mari Ann; Heimdal, Ketil R; Stadheim, Barbro; Hopp, Einar; Gambin, Tomasz; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep H; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg

    2016-08-01

    Missense variants in MED12 cause three partially overlapping dysmorphic X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) syndromes: Lujan-Fryns syndrome (also known as Lujan syndrome), FG syndrome (also known as Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome) and X-linked Ohdo syndrome. We report a family with two severely micrognathic male sibs, a 10½ year old boy and a fetus, in which hemizygosity for a previously unreported missense variant in exon 13 of MED12 (NM_005120.2), c.1862G > A, p.(Arg621Gln) was detected by whole exome sequencing. The affected sibs shared no other rare variant with relevance to the phenotype. X-chromosome inactivation in blood was completely skewed (100:0) in the unaffected heterozygous mother, most likely as a result of preferential inactivation of the X-chromosome harbouring the missense variant in MED12. Neither the unaffected brother nor the unaffected maternal grandfather carried the missense variant in MED12. In the 10½ year old boy, upper airway obstruction secondary to Pierre Robin sequence necessitated a tracheostomy for the first 10 months of life. He has mild to moderate intellectual disability and some dysmorphic features seen in MED12-related syndromes. In addition, he has a horizontal gaze paresis, anomalies of the inner ear, and a cervical block vertebra. This report contributes to the expanding phenotypic range associated with MED12-mutations. PMID:27286923

  19. West Nile Virus outbreak in Sardinia, Italy, in 2011.

    PubMed

    Spissu, Nicoletta; Panichi, Giovanni; Montisci, Antonio; Fiore, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is an enveloped, positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, antigenically related to the Japanese encephalitis complex in the family Flaviviridae. The principal vectors are mosquitoes, in particular Culex spp, and virus amplification seems to occur in susceptible birds that are the principal vertebrate reservoir hosts, whereas humans, horses and other vertebrates are considered incidental or dead-end hosts. The first Italian equine outbreak was reported in late summer of 1998 in Tuscany, in the area surrounding the Fucecchio marshes, where 14 clinical cases of WND in housed equines were recorded. In 2011 WNV appeared for the first time in Sardinia, representing the first clinical cases in equines in Italy in 2011. The outbreak occurred both in humans and in equines. The serological survey performed on 253 equines living in the province of Oristano detected a total of 87 IgG-positive subjects. Among them, 46 horses showed neurological signs such as ataxia, paresis, paralysis, hyperesthesia, muscle fasciculations, seizures, or fever. Nine of them died or were euthanized. In forthcoming years, surveillance of wild birds and insects will be used to forecast the extension and spread of WNV. The information gathered will be used to direct or optimise strategies intended to prevent virus transmission. PMID:23324814

  20. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with plasma exchange or exchange transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, K. V.; Fishleder, A.; Lucas, F. V.; Goormastic, M.; Bukowski, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Of 40 patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, 17 were treated with plasma exchange, 15 with exchange transfusions, and 6 with both types of therapy. One patient died before being treated and another patient was seen but not treated. Plasma exchange was performed daily for a mean of seven exchanges per patient. The replacement fluid during plasma exchange was fresh frozen plasma in all cases. The complete response rates for each type of treatment were as follows: 88% for plasma exchange (15 patients), 47% for exchange transfusions (7 patients), and 67% for exchange transfusions and plasma exchange (4 patients). Clinical and laboratory factors were examined for any statistically significant association with therapy response. Treatment with plasma exchange was statistically the initial factor most strongly associated with prognosis. Paresis, paresthesias, seizures, mental status change, and coma showed no association with response to treatment. Some of the laboratory factors that did not show significant association with treatment response were the initial creatinine, hemoglobin, platelet count, lactate dehydrogenase, and total bilirubin. This study supports the hypothesis that plasma exchange has significantly improved the prognosis of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. These patients should be treated aggressively regardless of the severity of their symptoms. PMID:1877181

  1. Evaluation of Injured Axons Using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy after Spinal Cord Contusion Injury in YFP-H Line Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Hideki; Oshima, Yusuke; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Matsuda, Seiji; Miura, Hiromasa; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of degeneration of injured axons is important for the development of therapeutic modules for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. The aim of this study was to establish a method for time-lapse observation of injured axons in living animals after spinal cord contusion injury. YFP (yellow fluorescent protein)-H transgenic mice, which we used in this study, express fluorescence in their nerve fibers. Contusion damage to the spinal cord at the 11th vertebra was performed by IH (Infinite Horizon) impactor, which applied a pressure of 50 kdyn. The damaged spinal cords were re-exposed during the observation period under anesthesia, and then observed by two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, which can observe deep regions of tissues including spinal cord axons. No significant morphological change of injured axons was observed immediately after injury. Three days after injury, the number of axons decreased, and residual axons were fragmented. Seven days after injury, only fragments were present in the damaged tissue. No hind-limb movement was observed during the observation period after injury. Despite the immediate paresis of hind-limbs following the contusion injury, the morphological degeneration of injured axons was delayed. This method may help clarification of pathophysiology of axon degeneration and development of therapeutic modules for the treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:26184175

  2. Training-induced modifications of corticospinal reactivity in severely affected stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Barker, Ruth N; Brauer, Sandra G; Barry, Benjamin K; Gill, Toby J; Carson, Richard G

    2012-08-01

    When permitted access to the appropriate forms of rehabilitation, many severely affected stroke survivors demonstrate a capacity for upper limb functional recovery well in excess of that formerly considered possible. Yet, the mechanisms through which improvements in arm function occur in such profoundly impaired individuals remain poorly understood. An exploratory study was undertaken to investigate the capacity for brain plasticity and functional adaptation, in response to 12-h training of reaching using the SMART Arm device, in a group of severely affected stroke survivors with chronic upper limb paresis. Twenty-eight stroke survivors were enroled. Eleven healthy adults provided normative data. To assess the integrity of ipsilateral and contralateral corticospinal pathways, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to evoke responses in triceps brachii during an elbow extension task. When present, contralateral motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were delayed and reduced in amplitude compared to those obtained in healthy adults. Following training, contralateral responses were more prevalent and their average onset latency was reduced. There were no reliable changes in ipsilateral MEPs. Stroke survivors who exhibited contralateral MEPs prior to training achieved higher levels of arm function and exhibited greater improvements in performance than those who did not initially exhibit contralateral responses. Furthermore, decreases in the onset latency of contralateral MEPs were positively related to improvements in arm function. Our findings demonstrate that when severely impaired stroke survivors are provided with an appropriate rehabilitation modality, modifications of corticospinal reactivity occur in association with sustained improvements in upper limb function. PMID:22777103

  3. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    PubMed Central

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsychiatric features and movement disorders. Psychiatric features reported in the literature include: cognitive impairment, depression, hallucinations, delusions, manic symptoms, anxiety, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and personality change. Other clinical features include: Parkinsonism, ataxia, headache, seizures, vertigo, stroke-like events, orthostatic hypotension, tremor, dysarthria, and paresis. Fahr’s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, particularly when associated with movement disorder. The disease should be differentiated from other conditions that can cause intracranial calcification. No specific treatment is currently available. Further research is needed to bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge of the prevalence, etiology, symptoms, and treatment of Fahr’s disease. PMID:24983277

  4. [Experience of very early Vojta therapy in two infants with severe perinatal hypoxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Hayasi, M; Arizono, Y

    1999-11-01

    We present two case reports with severe hypoxic encephalopathy at birth. Studies carried out in the NICU included cranial ultrasonography, CT, and MRI. Due to abnormalities found by the latter two they were referred to our center at the age of two months and one month, and then an early Vojta therapy commenced. Changes were monitored periodically by assessing their spontaneous movements, postural reactions and neurological manifestations. The first case presented with ventricular hemorrhage and was diagnosed as having severe CCD (central coordination disturbance) with the risk of athetotic type cerebral palsy. The second case presented with severe low density in the frontal and temporo-parietal white matter and was diagnosed as having moderate CCD with the risk of mental retardation or brain atrophy. Although their status fluctuated temporarily, the two infants didn't show any paresis or mental retardation. Recently the studies on mechanisms of brain plasticity have advanced. The findings of our experience might suggest that the plasticity of an immature brain could be enhanced by the very early Vojta therapy. We propose that a therapeutic intervention should commence early before clinical symptoms become evident. PMID:10565191

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF REFERENCE RANGES FOR PLASMA TOTAL CHOLINESTERASE AND BRAIN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN FREE-RANGING CARNABY'S BLACK-COCKATOOS (CALYPTORHYNCHUS LATIROSTRIS).

    PubMed

    Vaughan-Higgins, Rebecca; Vitali, Simone; Reiss, Andrea; Besier, Shane; Hollingsworth, Tom; Smith, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    Published avian reference ranges for plasma cholinesterase (ChE) and brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) are numerous. However, a consistently reported recommendation is the need for species- and laboratory-specific reference ranges because of variables, including assay methods, sample storage conditions, season, and bird sex, age, and physiologic status. We developed normal reference ranges for brain AChE and plasma total ChE (tChE) activity for Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) using a standardized protocol (substrate acetylthiocholine at 25 C). We report reference ranges for brain AChE (19-41 μmol/min per g, mean 21±6.38) and plasma tChE (0.41-0.53 μmol/min per mL, mean 0.47±0.11) (n=15). This information will be of use in the ongoing field investigation of a paresis-paralysis syndrome in the endangered Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos, suspected to be associated with exposure to anticholinesterase compounds and add to the paucity of reference ranges for plasma tChE and brain AChE in Australian psittacine birds. PMID:27195690

  6. A clinical study of auriculotherapy in canine thoracolumbar disc disease.

    PubMed

    Still, J

    1990-09-01

    Auriculotherapy (ear-point acupuncture) was used in dogs (n = 30) suffering from thoracolumbar disc disease, Types I-IV, with a duration of 1 to (47 means = 8) d. During auriculotherapy treatment, no analgaesics or antiinflammatory medications were used. Pressure-sensitive and electrically detectable points on the concave aspect of the external auricle were stimulated by insertion of stainless steel acupuncture needles for 20 min. One to 6 needles were used on each occasion in a maximum of 3 treatments. Fifty per cent of dogs recovered completely and 23% improved. Dogs with backpain only (Type I) and dogs with paresis (Type II) responded best with mean recovery times of 1.7 and 3.2 d respectively. The analgaesic effects were especially impressive. Auriculotherapy failed in 3 (50%) paralysed dogs (Types III and IV) in which post-mortem examinations confirmed focal myelitis and myelomalacia. Four of 12 dogs (33%) recorded relapsed in 1.4 to 26 weeks after successful treatment. PMID:2286993

  7. Autosomal recessive MFN2-related Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with diaphragmatic weakness: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christopher A; Rabideau, Marina; Blevins, Amy; Westbrook, Marjorie Jody; Ekstein, Tali; Nykamp, Keith; Deucher, Anne; Harper, Amy; Demmer, Laurie

    2016-06-01

    Pathogenic variants in the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2) disease, which is typically characterized by axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We report on a 7-month-old white female with hypotonia, motor delay, distal weakness, and motor/sensory axonal neuropathy in which next-generation sequencing analysis identified compound heterozygous pathogenic variants (c.2054_2069_1170del and c.392A>G) in MFN2. A review of the literature reveals that sporadic and familial cases of compound heterozygous or homozygous pathogenic MFN2 variants have been infrequently described, which indicates that MFN2 can also be inherited in a recessive manner. This case highlights several clinical findings not typically associated with MFN2 pathogenic variants, including young age of onset and rapidly progressing diaphragmatic paresis that necessitated tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation, and adds to the growing list of features identified in autosomal recessive MFN2-related CMT2. Our patient with MFN2-related CMT2 expands the clinical and mutational spectrum of individuals with autosomal recessive CMT2 and identifies a new clinical feature that warrants further observation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26955893

  8. Intraneural ganglion cyst on the external popliteal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Diego; Pescador, David; Cano, Carlos; Blanco, Juan

    2014-01-01

    There are many causes for the paralysis of the external sciatic popliteal nerve , such as the intraneural ganglion cyst. In this case, we evaluate a 52-year-old woman with no relevant personal record, who was admitted with paresis of the right foot of 4 months of evolution associated with alterations in the sensitivity that rose up to the posterolateral region of the leg. The diagnosis was based on MR and cyst decompression and disconnection of the articular branch. Given the low incidence of these lesions, their origin is still subject to controversy. The most widely accepted theory is the unifying articular theory described by Spinner in the year 2003. Intraneural ganglion cysts must be included in the differential diagnosis of progressive paralysis of the sciatic nerve, lesions of the nerve root at L5 and nerve sheath tumours that start at the lateral compartment of the knee. The treatment of a fibular intraneural ganglion cyst must be surgical and the operation must be performed as soon as possible. PMID:24891476

  9. Varicella Zoster Complications

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.; Gilden, Don

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With advancing age or immunosuppression, cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines and virus reactivates to cause zoster (shingles), which can occur anywhere on the body. Skin lesions resolve within 1-2 weeks, while complete cessation of pain usually takes 4-6 weeks. Zoster can be followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia), cranial nerve palsies, zoster paresis, meningoencephalitis, cerebellitis, myelopathy, multiple ocular disorders and vasculopathy that can mimic giant cell arteritis. All of the neurological and ocular disorders listed above may also develop without rash. Diagnosis of VZV-induced neurological disease may require examination of CSF, serum and/ or ocular fluids. In the absence of rash in a patient with neurological disease potentially due to VZV, CSF should be examined for VZV DNA by PCR and for anti-VZV IgG and IGM. Detection of VZV IgG antibody in CSF is superior to detection of VZV DNA in CSF to diagnose vasculopathy, recurrent myelopathy, and brainstem encephalitis. Oral antiviral drugs speed healing of rash and shorten acute pain. Immunocompromised patients require intravenous acyclovir. First-line treatments for post-herpetic neuralgia include tricyclic antidepressants gabapentin, pregabalin, and topical lidocaine patches. VZV vasculopathy, meningoencephalitis, and myelitis are all treated with intravenous acyclovir. PMID:23794213

  10. Encephalomyelopathy and polyneuropathy associated with neuronal vacuolation in two Boxer littermates.

    PubMed

    Geiger, D A; Miller, A D; Cutter-Schatzberg, K; Shelton, G D; de Lahunta, A; Schatzberg, S J

    2009-11-01

    Neuronal vacuolation and spinocerebellar degeneration is a rare, presumably inherited condition that is reported only in Rottweilers and in crossbred dogs with known or potential Rottweiler heritage. Gross and histopathologic findings include laryngeal muscle atrophy, neuronal vacuolation, and a combined central and peripheral axonopathy. Two 6-month-old Boxer puppies from the same litter were referred for evaluation of progressive pelvic limb paresis and ataxia, upper airway stridor, and visual deficits. Examination of each dog suggested a combined myelopathy and peripheral neuropathy, as well as congenital ocular disease. Gross lesions were limited to atrophy of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. Histopathologically, there was diffuse loss of axons and myelin in the dorsolateral and ventral funiculi throughout the spinal cord and extending into the caudal aspect of the brain stem. Vacuolation of scattered neuronal cell bodies was present in the spinal cord and selected brain stem nuclei. Multifocal axonal degeneration and demyelination was observed in the recurrent laryngeal nerve, sciatic nerve, and brachial plexus and was most severe in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Ocular abnormalities included microphthalmia, cataracts, and retinal dysplasia. The findings in these Boxer dogs, unrelated to the Rottweiler breed, are analogous to the syndrome of neuronal vacuolation and spinocerebellar degeneration reported in Rottweilers. PMID:19605909

  11. Neurological associations in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder: Results from a tertiary hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Lepcha, Anjali; Chandran, Reni K.; Alexander, Mathew; Agustine, Ann Mary; Thenmozhi, K.; Balraj, Achamma

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To find out the prevalence and types of neurological abnormalities associated in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder in a large tertiary referral center. Settings and Design: A prospective clinical study was conducted on all patients diagnosed with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder in the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) and neurology departments during a 17-month period. Patients with neurological abnormalities on history and examination were further assessed by a neurologist to determine the type of disorder present. Results: The frequency of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was 1.12%. Sixty percent were found to have neurological involvement. This included cerebral palsy in children, peripheral neuropathy (PN), spinocerebellar ataxia, hereditary motor-sensory neuropathy, spastic paresis, and ponto-bulbar palsy. Neurological lesions did not present simultaneously with hearing loss in most patients. Sixty-six percent of patients with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder were born of consanguineous marriages. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of neurological lesions in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder which has to be kept in mind while evaluating such patients. Follow-up and counselling regarding the appearance of neuropathies is therefore important in such patients. A hereditary etiology is indicated in a majority of cases of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. PMID:26019414

  12. Evidence for cerebellar motor functional reorganization in brain tumor patients: An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Kosuke; Nakada, Tsutomu; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2016-05-27

    Functional reorganization of the motor system following brain damage has been studied extensively in stroke patients, in which not only the cerebrum but also the cerebellum (Cbll) undergoes substantial reorganization. However, the role of Cbll in motor functional reorganization in brain tumor patients remains poorly investigated. Because brain damages in brain tumor patients occur much more slowly than in stroke patients, the neural mechanisms for motor functional reorganization might differ between these two disease conditions. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated whether Cbll constitutes the neural substrates for motor functional reorganization in eighteen supratentorial brain tumor patients who exhibited no clinical signs of paresis. The patients and normal volunteers underwent a unilateral hand movement task. In the patients, the locus of primary sensory motor (SM1) activation during contralesional hand movement was significantly displaced by the tumor, suggesting functional compromise and/or reorganization in the central sulcus region. In addition, their contralesional Cbll activation during contralesional hand movement was substantially increased as compared to normal controls. The finding represents the first conclusive evidence that Cbll is involved in the motor-related functional reorganization in patients with brain tumor. PMID:27102144

  13. Altered swallowing function in elderly patients without dysphagia: radiologic findings in 56 cases.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, O; Feinberg, M J

    1991-06-01

    Swallowing disorder is an increasing problem in our aging population. A majority of these patients have a functional abnormality of the oral, pharyngeal, and/or esophageal stage of swallowing. However, what constitutes normalcy is not well understood, and baseline swallowing in elderly persons without dysphagia has not been adequately described. We therefore evaluated 56 persons with a mean age of 83 years who had no symptoms of dysphagia or eating difficulty. Videofluoroscopy and radiographs with the subject erect and recumbent were obtained. Normal deglutition, as defined in young persons, was present in only 16%. Oral abnormalities (difficulty ingesting, controlling, and delivering bolus relative to swallowing initiation) were seen in 63%. Pharyngeal dysfunction (bolus retention and lingual propulsion or pharyngeal constrictor paresis) was seen in 25%. Pharyngoesophageal segment abnormalities were observed in 39% (mostly cricopharyngeal muscle dysfunction). Esophageal abnormalities (mostly motor in nature) were observed in 36%. What has been described as swallowing dysfunction in young persons may not be abnormal in very elderly persons. It is difficult to distinguish the effect of normal aging from the effects of specific diseases or gradual degenerative changes. PMID:2028863

  14. [Postoperative lumbar extradural arachnoid cyst. Report of two cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Uchibori, M; Kinuta, Y; Koyama, T

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of postoperative extradural arachnoid cyst in the lumbar region were reported. The symptoms such as lumbago, sciatica and paresis of foot which were perfectly cured at discharge relapsed after several months of daily business. The two patients were readmitted and reexamined by myelography and computer assisted tomography. In the two patients a cystic pooling of metrizamide having a connection with the subarachnoid space was noted in the same way. At the second operation a small dural tear and an extradural arachnoid cyst were recognized similarly. Burres and coworkers reported that an extradural arachnoid cyst would easily grow through a small dural defect in the lumbar region, because the hydrostatic pressure is higher than that of the cervical level. Our two cases might well coincident with their theory. In consequence of the experience of the two postoperative extradural arachnoid cyst, we give emphasis that even though the dural tear would be small, especially in the lumbar region, it should not be overlooked and be closed carefully with fine sutures. PMID:6235458

  15. [A case of a penetrating brain injury due to an explosion of a construction machine].

    PubMed

    Ibayashi, Kenji; Tsutsumi, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Gakushi; Uno, Takeshi; Shimada, Shiko; Kawashima, Mariko; Koizumi, Satoshi; Ochiai, Yushi

    2012-05-01

    Penetrating brain injury caused by a high speed projectile is rather rare in Japan, known for its strict gun-control laws. We report a case of a 55-year-old male, who was transferred to our hospital with a foreign body in the brain due to penetrating head injury, which was caused by an explosion of a construction machine. Neurological examination demonstrated severe motor aphagia with no apparent motor paresis. The patient had a scalp laceration on his left forehead with exposed cerebral tissue and CSF leakage. Head CT scan and plain skull X-ray revealed a 20 mm×25 mm bolt which had penetrated due to the explosion of the machine. The anterior wall of the left frontal sinus was fractured resulting in dural laceration, and scattered bone fragments were seen along the trajectory of the bolt. Digital subtraction angiography showed no significant vascular injuries including superior sagittal sinus. We performed open surgery, and successfully removed the bolt along with the damaged frontal lobe. The patient had no infection or seizure after the surgery, and was transferred for further rehabilitation therapy. We performed a cosmetic cranioplasty six months later. Surgical debridement of the damaged cerebral tissue along the trajectory led to successful removal of the bolt with no further neurological deficit. PMID:22538284

  16. Air gun impactor--a novel model of graded white matter spinal cord injury in rodents.

    PubMed

    Marcol, Wiesław; Slusarczyk, Wojciech; Gzik, Marek; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Bobrowski, Michał; Grynkiewicz-Bylina, Beata; Rosicka, Paulina; Kalita, Katarzyna; Węglarz, Władysław; Barski, Jarosław J; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Labuzek, Krzysztof; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2012-10-01

    Understanding mechanisms of spinal cord injury and repair requires a reliable experimental model. We have developed a new device that produces a partial damage of spinal cord white matter by means of a precisely adjusted stream of air applied under high pressure. This procedure is less invasive than standard contusion or compression models and does not require surgical removal of vertebral bones. We investigated the effects of spinal cord injury made with our device in 29 adult rats, applying different experimental parameters. The rats were divided into three groups in respect to the applied force of the blast wave. Functional outcome and histopathological effects of the injury were analyzed during 12-week follow-up. The lesions were also examined by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The weakest stimulus produced transient hindlimb paresis with no cyst visible in spinal cord MRI scans, whereas the strongest was associated with permanent neurological deficit accompanied by pathological changes resembling posttraumatic syringomyelia. Obtained data revealed that our apparatus provided a spinal cord injury animal model with structural changes very similar to that present in patients after moderate spinal cord trauma. PMID:22711195

  17. Distribution pattern of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs in males

    PubMed Central

    Nnamdi, Ibe Michael Onwuzuruike

    2013-01-01

    Background: The pattern of distribution of surgically treated symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs has been published, though scantily, especially in males. We decided to look at our own series, compare and contrast ours with some of those published. Materials and Methods: We treated 88 locations of this lesion in 68 males. The clinical features were those of lower back pains, with or without radiation into the lower extremities, sensory loss and paresis of the limbs. There was a case of loss of urinary bladder and ano-rectal control. All lesions were confirmed through cauda-equinograms and treated under general anaesthesia in knee-chest position (MECCA position). The patients were followed up for 3-6 months post-operatively. Results: There were 88 locations in 68 males of 21-70 years of age, with 29 prolapses occurring during the age range 31-40 years, while 54 locations were on the left and 48 at L4/5. The procedures were well tolerated by all patients and there were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: This lesion in our series occurred mostly on the left, at the L4/5 level and peaked at 31-40 years age range. The predictability of occurrence of this disease, using side, level and age is still not feasible in males from our series. PMID:24403714

  18. A personal overview of causalgia and other reflex dystrophies.

    PubMed Central

    Shumacker, H B

    1985-01-01

    This is a personal assessment of true major causalgia and the other reflex dystrophies, related but distinctly separate entities. The clinical picture of causalgia differs only in minor respects from that described by Mitchell over 120 years ago. Its management has, however, been clarified, largely through the extensive experiences of World War II. It is readily recognized and can be treated effectively by sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy together with active exercise. The other reflex dystrophies are far less understood. They appear to have a similar pattern in their early phase and to respond well to a program of exercise and control of edema--a regimen which, because of pain and paresis, cannot be carried out without sympathetic blocks or occasionally sympathectomy. When not recognized early and treated properly, the sympatomatology usually changes dramatically and treatment differs. Often control of edema and active use of the affected part are all that is necessary. Sometimes, in addition to these measures, sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy is required. Guidelines found useful in management are outlined. Puzzling features are discussed. PMID:3977427

  19. An EMG-Controlled SMA Device for the Rehabilitation of the Ankle Joint in Post-Acute Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity of flexing one's ankle is an indispensible segment of gait re-learning, as imbalance, wrong compensatory use of other joints and risk of falling may depend on the so-called drop-foot. The rehabilitation of ankle dorsiflexion may be achieved through active exercising of the relevant musculature (especially tibialis anterior, TA). This can be troublesome for patients affected by weakness and flaccid paresis. Thus, as needs evolve during patient's improvements, a therapeutic device should be able to guide and sustain gradual recovery by providing commensurate aid. This includes exploiting even initial attempts at voluntary motion and turns those into effective workout. An active orthosis powered by two rotary actuators containing NiTi wire was designed to obtain ankle dorsiflexion. A computer routine that analyzes the electromyographic (sEMG) signal from TA muscle is used to control the orthosis and trigger its activation. The software also provides instructions and feed-back for the patient. Tests on the orthosis proved that it can produce strokes up to 36° against resisting torques exceeding 180 Ncm. Three healthy subjects were able to control the orthosis by modulating their TA sEMG activity. The movement produced in the preliminary tests is interesting for lower limb rehabilitation, and will be further improved by optimizing body-orthosis interface. It is hoped that this device will enhance early rehabilitation and recovery of ankle mobility in stroke patients.

  20. A Novel Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Treatment for Recovery of Ankle Dorsiflexion in Chronic Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Chae, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of improving active ankle dorsiflexion with contralaterally controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (CCNMES). Design CCNMES dorsiflexes the paretic ankle with a stimulation intensity that is directly proportional to the degree of voluntary dorsiflexion of the unimpaired contralateral ankle, which is detected by an instrumented sock. Three subjects with chronic (>6-mo poststroke) dorsiflexor paresis participated in a 6-wk CCNMES treatment, which consisted of self-administering CCNMES-assisted ankle dorsiflexion exercises at home daily and practicing an ankle motor control task in the research laboratory twice a week. Results For subjects 1 and 2, respectively, maximum voluntary ankle dorsiflexion increased by 13 and 17 degrees, ankle movement tracking error decreased by ~57% and 57%, and lower limb Fugl-Meyer score (maximum score is 34) increased by 4 and 5 points. Subject 3 had no appreciable improvement in these measures. Both subjects 1 and 2 maintained their performance in ankle movement tracking through the 3-mo follow-up; subject 2 also maintained the gains in maximum ankle dorsiflexion and Fugl-Meyer score. Conclusions These results suggest that CCNMES may have a positive effect on ankle motor impairment in some stroke survivors. Further investigation of the effect of CCNMES on gait is warranted. PMID:20531158

  1. [Visual disturbances following right cerebral lesion: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Yasui, N; Suzuki, A; Kobayashi, T

    1984-07-01

    A 49-year-old right handed male, who showed three types of visual disturbance, e. g. hemianopsia, obscuration phenomena and unilateral visuospatial agnosia at different times, was reported. At first, he had hemiparesis, hemisensory disturbance and homonymous hemianopsia on the left side because of multiple stenoses of posterior branches of the right middle cerebral artery. His motor and visual field disturbances improved for several days after onset, but there appeared transient obscuration phenomena on the left visual field. CT scan revealed an abnormal low density area in the right temporo-parietal region. At about 4.5 years after the first attack, he again had hemiparesis and homonymous hemianopsia on the left side. Cerebral angiography showed an occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Since his paresis was progressive, STA-MCA anastomoses was performed. Hemiparesis was improved, but homonymous hemianopsia remained. Moreover, at about one year after the second attack, left visuospatial agnosia participated in his hemianopsia. Cerebral angiography showed an additional occlusion in the crural segment of the right posterior cerebral artery. CT scan showed a lesion in the right basal ganglia and temporo-parietal lobe. In most cases, unilateral visuospatial agnosia occurs with hemianopsia. But, in this case, these symptoms occurred at different times. This may indicate the differentiation between unilateral visuospatial agnosia and hemianopsia. PMID:6487433

  2. Critical illness myopathy and polyneuropathy - A challenge for physiotherapists in the intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Pattanshetty, Renu B; Gaude, Gajanan S

    2011-04-01

    The development of critical patient related generalized neuromuscular weakness, referred to as critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and critical illness myopathy (CIM), is a major complication in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Both CIP and CIM cause muscle weakness and paresis in critically ill patients during their ICU stay. Early mobilization or kinesiotherapy have shown muscle weakness reversion in critically ill patients providing faster return to function, reducing weaning time, and length of hospitalization. Exercises in the form of passive, active, and resisted forms have proved to improve strength and psychological well being. Clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation to increase muscle mass, muscle strength and improve blood circulation to the surrounding tissue have proved beneficial. The role of electrical stimulation is unproven as yet. Recent evidence indicates no difference between treated and untreated muscles. Future research is recommended to conduct clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation, exercises, and early mobilization as a treatment protocol in larger populations of patients in ICU. PMID:21814370

  3. [Hypokalemic periodic paralysis provoked by "Ambene"].

    PubMed

    Wessel, K; Schumm, F; Peiffer, J; Schlote, W

    1985-12-01

    The case of a 42-year-old man is reported, who on four occasions developed a hypokalaemic periodic paralysis after an intramuscular injection of "Ambene". The detailed examination of this patient shows, that it is the primary, autosomal dominant inherited form of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis, and not the secondary form, which is caused by a renal or gastrointestinal loss of potassium. Clinical and electrophysiological, as well as histopathological and electron microscopic findings are presented, showing the typical vacuolar myopathy with submicroscopic tubular structures. In the literature there is evidence for an increased sensitivity of the muscle membrane to insulin with an increased potassium-shift inside the cell in hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. "Ambene" is a combination, which contains amongst other substances dexamethasone and the local anaesthetic drug lidocain. In the present case the paresis was possibly caused by a combined effect of dexamethasone with a consequent hyperglycaemia and lidocain with a change in the excitability of the muscle membrane. The pathophysiological mechanism of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis is discussed in terms of the release by the combination of these two drugs. It has not previously been reported that "Ambene" can provoke a hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. This is a severe side effect because of the resulting cardiac and respiratory problems. PMID:2936967

  4. [A case of ipsilateral ageusia, sensorineural hearing loss and facial sensorimotor disturbance due to pontine lesion].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nitta, E

    2000-05-01

    We report a 58-year-old woman with pontine lesion presented with subacute onset of unilateral gustatory disturbance accompanied by facial numbness, and hearing loss. Neurologic examination revealed superficial hypesthesia and paresthesia on the right side of the face, right peripheral type facial paresis, ageusia on the right half of the tongue and right sensorineural deafness. No other neurologic signs were observed, and laboratory data were all normal. Brain MRI revealed a small lesion in the right dorsolateral tegmentum of the middle pons. Electrogustometry showed marked reduction in the sense of taste on the right half of the tongue. ABR showed diminished amplitude in the IV-V wave of the right side, while SEP and VEP were normal. The clinical diagnosis was demyelinating lesion and intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g/day) was administered for 3 consecutive days, resulting in prompt improvement in the symptoms. The lesion was suspected of affecting ipsilateral side of the spinal trigeminal nerve tract and the nucleus, the intraaxial infranuclear facial nerve fiber, the lateral lemniscus adjacent to the superior olivary nucleus and the central gustatory tract. Our case suggests that the central gustatory pathway projecting from the nucleus of the solitary tract to the parabrachial nucleus, presumed to be pontine taste area, ascends ipsilaterally and is located laterally from the medial lemniscus. PMID:11002734

  5. Respiratory muscle activity and oxygenation during sleep in patients with muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    White, J E; Drinnan, M J; Smithson, A J; Griffiths, C J; Gibson, G J

    1995-05-01

    Patients with respiratory muscle weakness show nocturnal hypoventilation, with oxygen desaturation particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but evidence in individuals with isolated bilateral diaphragmatic paresis (BDP) is conflicting. The effect of sleep on relative activity of the different respiratory muscles of such patients and, consequently, the precise mechanisms causing desaturation have not been clarified. We have studied eight patients, four with generalized muscle weakness and four with isolated BDP during nocturnal sleep with measurements including oxygen saturation and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of various respiratory muscle groups. Nocturnal oxygenation correlated inversely with postural fall in vital capacity, an index of diaphragmatic strength. During REM sleep, hypopnoea and desaturation occurred particularly during periods of rapid eye movements (phasic REM sleep). In most subjects, such events were "central" in type and associated with marked suppression of intercostal muscle activity, but two subjects had recurrent desaturation due to "obstructive" hypopnoea and/or apnoea. Expiratory activity of the external oblique muscle was present whilst awake and during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in seven of the eight subjects in the semirecumbent posture. This probably represents an "accessory inspiratory" effect, which aids passive caudal diaphragmatic motion as the abdominal muscles relax at the onset of inspiration. Expiratory abdominal muscle activity was suppressed in phasic REM sleep, suggesting that loss of this "accessory inspiratory" effect may contribute to "central" hypopnoea. We conclude that, in patients with muscle weakness, nocturnal oxygenation correlates with diaphragmatic strength.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656954

  6. Differences in influence between pitched-from-vertical lines and slanted-from-frontal horizontal lines on egocentric localization.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Matin, L

    1995-01-01

    The visual field exerts powerful effects on egocentric spatial localization along both horizontal and vertical dimensions. Thus, (1) prism-produced visual pitch and visual slant generate similar mislocalizations of visually perceived eye level (VPEL) and visually perceived straight ahead (VPSA) and (2) in darkness curare-produced extraocular muscle paresis under eccentric gaze generates similar mislocalizations in VPEL and VPSA that are essentially eliminated by introducing a normal visual field. In the present experiments, however, a search for influences of real visual slant on VPSA to correspond to the influences of visual pitch on VPEL failed to find one. Although the elevation corresponding to VPEL changes linearly with the pitch of a visual field consisting of two isolated 66.5 degrees-long pitched-from-vertical lines, the corresponding manipulation of change in the slant of either a horizontal two-line or a horizontal four-line visual field on VPSA did not occur. The average slope of the VPEL-versus-pitch function across 5 subjects was +0.40 over a +/- 30 degrees pitch range, but was indistinguishable from 0.00 for the VPSA-versus-slant function over a +/- 30 degrees slant range. Possible contributions to the difference between susceptibility of VPEL and VPSA to visual influence from extraretinal eye position information, gravity, and several retinal gradients are discussed. PMID:7885809

  7. Coexistence of intracranial germ cell tumor and craniopharyngioma in an adolescent: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Tolia, Maria; Kostakis, Ioannis D; Pistamaltzian, Nikolaos; Tryfonopoulos, Dimitrios; Lypas, Georgios; Koumakis, Georgios; Barbounis, Vasileios; Goutas, Nikolaos; Efremidis, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We present the case of a patient treated for intracranial germ cell tumor in which elements of craniopharyngioma were found in the residual tumor mass. Findings: A 17 year old patient presented with a history of secondary amenorrhea. She deteriorated with headache and left eyelid drop, paresis of the abducent nerve and convergent strabismus (Parinaud syndrome). β-HCG was 722mIU/ml and pregnancy was excluded. AFP was 6322 ng/ml. Brain CT scan showed a large endosellar tumor to the hypersellar region. There was left papillary atrophy. MRI confirmed a tumor to dorsum sellae. Primary germ cell intracranial tumor was diagnosed. Severe clinically evident pituitary failure developed with signs of increased intracranial pressure and brain edema as well as diabetes insipidus, while AFP increased to 15786,3ng/ml. Urgent treatment with combination chemotherapy including cisplatin etoposide and bleomycin (ΡEB) was administered for 4 courses. As a result her clinical condition improved and tumor markers dropped but nevertheless did not become normal. In addition CT scans revealed a remaining endocranial mass and therefore the patient was subjected to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stemcell rescue which resulted in complete clinical and biochemical remission. Due to the persisting mass in the area, it was delivered radiotherapy. Conclusions: The above case is extremely rare in worldwide literature. Dysgerminoma may coexist with craniopharyngioma which in fact may be part of a germ cell tumor in the context of dysembryogenesis and benign “teratoma”. PMID:23573353

  8. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction. PMID:22790805

  9. Necrotic enteritis in young calves.

    PubMed

    Morris, Winston E; Venzano, Agustín J; Elizondo, Ana; Vilte, Daniel A; Mercado, Elsa C; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2011-03-01

    Non-enterotoxin (CPE)-producing Clostridium perfringens type A has been associated with enteritis in calves. Recent evidence has suggested that a novel toxin, named beta2 (CPB2), is implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease, although there is little evidence supporting this. In the current study, the role of C. perfringens type A in an outbreak of enteritis in calves was studied. Two 20-day-old dairy calves exhibiting apathy and reluctance to eat, with paresis of the anterior limbs, were euthanized for postmortem examination. Gross and histological changes compatible with acute enteritis, rumenitis, meningitis, and pneumonia were seen in both calves. Clostridium perfringens type A non-CPE, non-CPB2 was isolated from the abomasum and the small intestine. Escherichia coli ONTH8 (with cdtBIII and f17 virulence genes detected by polymerase chain reaction) was also isolated from the brain, abomasum, and intestine from both calves. All the samples were negative for Salmonella spp. When the C. perfringens strain was inoculated into bovine ligated small and large intestinal loops, cell detachment, erosion, and hemorrhage of the lamina propria were observed, predominantly in the small intestine. The results suggest that non-CPE, non-CPB2 C. perfringens type A is able to induce pathologic changes in the intestine of calves, probably enhanced by other pathogens, such as some pathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:21398444

  10. [Cervical Spondylotic Amyotrophy].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Keegan (1965) reported a patient who presented with "dissociated motor loss," an acute paralysis of the upper extremity with minimal sensory signs and no long tract signs, and documented an anterior root lesion following autopsy. Sobue et al. (1975) reported similar cases using the term "cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA)," but postulated pathology of the anterior horn. Although Keegan's "dissociated motor loss" surely referred to isolated motor paresis with no or minimal sensory signs, contrary to existing criticism, a more general term, CSA, should be preferred. CSA is divided into proximal and distal types. Distal CSA often presents with a drop finger, and thus may be misdiagnosed as posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Documentation of the involvement of ulnar muscles by clinical signs and EMG would lead to the diagnosis of distal CSA. Proximal CSA may be confused with neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), although the sparing of the serratus anterior and the stereotypic involvement of deltoid, infraspinatus, biceps brachii, and brachioradialis suggest CSA. Cervical MRI is not diagnostic in around half of CSA cases, and denervation in paraspinal EMG is a more sensitive test that can exclude NA. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is another important differential diagnosis for CSA. PMID:27156504

  11. Bilateral Painful Ophthalmoplegia: A Case of Assumed Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kastirr, Ilko; Kamusella, Peter; Andresen, Reimer

    2016-03-01

    We present the case of a man of 47 years with vertical and horizontal paresis of view combined with periorbital pain that developed initially on the right side but extended after 3-4 days to the left. Gadolinum uptaking tissue in the cavernous sinus was shown by MRI of the orbital region in the T1 spin echo sequence with fat saturation (SEfs) with a slice thickness of 2 mm. As no other abnormalities were found and the pain resolved within 72 hours of treatment with cortison a bilateral Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome (THS) was assumed. THS is an uncommon cause for Painful Ophthalmoglegia (PO) and only few cases of bilateral appearance have been reported. Even though the diagnostic criteria for THS oblige unilateral symptoms we suggest that in patients with bilateral PO THS should not be excluded as a differential diagnosis. Further more when using MRI to detect granulomatous tissue in the orbital region the chosen sequence should be T1 SEfs and slice thickness should possibly be as low as 2 mm, as granulomas are often no larger than 1-2 mm. PMID:27134970

  12. Heterogeneous Appearance of Central Nervous System Involvement in Malignant Mixed Müllerian Tumors.

    PubMed

    Könnecke, Helen K; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Reimann, Regina; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl

    2016-09-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is rarely described in malignant mixed Müllerian tumors (MMMTs). Only four intracranial and two spinal cases have been published to date. Here we report two more cases with heterogeneous clinical, radiologic and pathologic features and summarize the available contemporary literature. One patient presented with aphasia due to an intra-axial contrast-enhanced left temporal lesion with marked perifocal edema. After surgical resection, histology showed collections of small uniform tumor cells embedded in a myxoid matrix and compartmentalized by connective tissue septations, consistent with an MMMT. The other patient presented with trigeminal/tongue hypesthesia and double vision accompanied by left radiculopathy and paresis. Magnetic resonance imaging MRI revealed an extraaxial lesion at the petrous tip with mild perifocal edema and multiple small intradural contrast-enhancing lesions of the conus and cauda medullaris. Histologic examination of the intracranial lesion showed a mainly papillary architecture, also consistent with MMMTs. The spinal lesions were not excised, and both patients received adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The first patient died 3 months and the second patient 12 months after surgery. As illustrated by the heterogeneous clinicopathologic features of our two cases as well as the reviewed literature, CNS metastasis of MMMTs is diagnostically challenging, shows a variable outcome, and thus requires individualized treatment. In the present cases and CNS metastases reported to date, a higher histologic ratio of sarcomatous to epithelial components portends a worse outcome. PMID:26216730

  13. Hla-DR2-restricted responses to proteolipid protein 95-116 peptide cause autoimmune encephalitis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, K; Yamamura, T; Yokoyama, K; Chui, D H; Fukui, Y; Sasazuki, T; Inoko, H; David, C S; Tabira, T

    2000-04-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who carry the Class II major histocompatibility (MHC) type HLA-DR2, T cells specific for amino acids 95-116 in the proteolipid protein (PLP) are activated and clonally expanded. However, it remains unclear whether these autoreactive T cells play a pathogenic role or, rather, protect against the central nervous system (CNS) damage. We have addressed this issue, using mice transgenic for the human MHC class II region carrying the HLA-DR2 (DRB1* 1502) haplotype. After stimulating cultured lymph node cells repeatedly with PLP95-116, we generated 2 HLA-DR2-restricted, PLP95-116-specific T-cell lines (TCLs) from the transgenic mice immunized with this portion of PLP. The TCLs were CD4+ and produced T-helper 1 (Th1) cytokines in response to the peptide. These TCLs were adoptively transferred into RAG-2/2 mice expressing HLA-DR2 (DRG1* 1502) molecules. Mice receiving 1 of the TCLs developed a neurological disorder manifested ataxic movement without apparent paresis on day 3, 4, or 5 after cell transfer. Histological examination revealed inflammatory foci primarily restricted to the cerebrum and cerebellum, in association with scattered demyelinating lesions in the deep cerebral cortex. These results support a pathogenic role for PLP95-116-specific T cells in HLA-DR2+ MS patients, and shed light on the possible correlation between autoimmune target epitope and disease phenotype in human CNS autoimmune diseases. PMID:10841661

  14. Simulation of bilateral movement training through mirror reflection: a case report demonstrating an occupational therapy technique for hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jennifer A; Stoykov, Mary Ellen Phillips

    2004-01-01

    In rehabilitation for hemiparesis, one of the goals of an occupational therapist is to practice upper extremity tasks with the recovering individual. The practice is intended to strengthen muscles and refine movements. It also provides examples for the recovering body and brain as they attempt to reestablish the now delicate cognitive and neural connections mediating voluntary behavior. However, the paresis significantly limits the movement sequence possibilities that may be physically practiced. We outline a method for using simulation of movement, which is intended to provide a means for experiencing a range of smooth and controlled movements completed by a paretic limb. The simulation provides a compelling perceptual experience of bilateral motion beyond the current capabilities of the affected limb. The benefits of this technique after a 3-week course of the simulation practice are exemplified by the presented case study that reveals improved function as demonstrated by increases in Fugl-Meyer scores and faster movement speeds as demonstrated by decreased movement times for the Jebsen test of hand function. PMID:14872400

  15. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lisa A.; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S.; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet’s equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  16. Catatonic Syndrome in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers' critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position. PMID:27114630

  17. Quality of Grasping and the Role of Haptics in a 3-D Immersive Virtual Reality Environment in Individuals With Stroke.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mindy F; Magdalon, Eliane C; Michaelsen, Stella M; Quevedo, Antonio A F

    2015-11-01

    Reaching and grasping parameters with and without haptic feedback were characterized in people with chronic post-stroke behaviors. Twelve (67 ± 10 years) individuals with chronic stroke and arm/hand paresis (Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Arm: ≥ 46/66 pts) participated. Three dimensional (3-D) temporal and spatial kinematics of reaching and grasping movements to three objects (can: cylindrical grasp; screwdriver: power grasp; pen: precision grasp) in a physical environment (PE) with and without additional haptic feedback and a 3-D virtual environment (VE) with haptic feedback were recorded. Participants reached, grasped and transported physical and virtual objects using similar movement strategies in all conditions. Reaches made in VE were less smooth and slower compared to the PE. Arm and trunk kinematics were similar in both environments and glove conditions. For grasping, stroke subjects preserved aperture scaling to object size but used wider hand apertures with longer delays between times to maximal reaching velocity and maximal grasping aperture. Wearing the glove decreased reaching velocity. Our results in a small group of subjects suggest that providing haptic information in the VE did not affect the validity of reaching and grasping movement. Small disparities in movement parameters between environments may be due to differences in perception of object distance in VE. Reach-to-grasp kinematics to smaller objects may be improved by better 3-D rendering. Comparable kinematics between environments and conditions is encouraging for the incorporation of high quality VEs in rehabilitation programs aimed at improving upper limb recovery. PMID:25594971

  18. Cervical spondylomyelopathy (wobbler syndrome) in the Boerboel.

    PubMed

    Gray, M J; Kirberger, R M; Spotswood, T C

    2003-12-01

    The Boerboel is a South African large-breed dog resembling a Bullmastiff. The records of Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital were searched for dogs that had presented, between 1998 and 2003, with symptoms indicative of wobbler syndrome and had undergone survey radiographic and myelographic studies. Ten cases fitted the inclusion criteria. Dogs presented within the first 2 years of life, often with acute onset of symptoms. All presented with pelvic limb and 6 with concomitant thoracic limb ataxia or paresis. Treatment varied and included none (4), prednisolone (2), and dorsal laminectomy (2). Two dogs were euthanased at the time of diagnosis. The breed appears to be affected with a form of spondylomyelopathy that comprises bony malformation of cervical and/or thoracic vertebrae. In 8 dogs, malformations were evident on survey radiographs and were characterised by enlarged, irregular articular facets and associated medial deviation of the pedicles. These changes resulted in axial compression of the spinal cord best seen on ventrodorsal or dorsoventral myelographic studies. Multiple vertebrae were affected in some dogs and lesions were not confined to the caudal area of the cervical spine. Three dogs were alive and without symptoms at follow-up. Four were euthanased as a result of the disease and 1 died as a result of post-operative complications. Two additional dogs presenting with wobbler clinical signs are also described. One had medial deviation of the T5 and T6 caudal pedicles and 1 dog suffered from multiple cervical articular facet synovial cysts. PMID:15038422

  19. Recovery of laryngeal function after intraoperative injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hydman, Jonas; Svensson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) during thyroid/parathyroid surgery, despite a macroscopically intact nerve, is a challenge which highlights the sensitivity and complexity of laryngeal innervation. Furthermore, the uncertain prognosis stresses a lack of capability to diagnose the reason behind the impaired function. There is a great deal of literature considering risk factors, surgical technique and mechanisms outside the nerve affecting the incidence of RLN paresis during surgery. To be able to prognosticate recovery in cases of laryngeal dysfunction and voice changes after thyroid surgery, the surgeon would first need to define the presence, location, and type of laryngeal nerve injury. There is little data describing the events within the nerve and the neurobiological reasons for the impaired function related to potential recovery and prognosis. In addition, very little data has been presented in order to clarify any differences between the transient and permanent injury of the RLN. This review aims, from an anatomical and neurobiological perspective, to provide an update on the current understandings of surgically-induced injury to the laryngeal nerves. PMID:25713777

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi Causes Paralyzing Systemic Necrotizing Vasculitis Driven by Pathogen-Specific Type I Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Roffê, Ester; Marino, Ana Paula M P; Weaver, Joseph; Wan, Wuzhou; de Araújo, Fernanda F; Hoffman, Victoria; Santiago, Helton C; Murphy, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Infectious agents are often considered potential triggers of chronic inflammatory disease, including autoimmunity; however, direct evidence is usually lacking. Here we show that following control of acute infection of mice with the myotropic Colombiana strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, parasites persisted in tissue at low levels associated with development of systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Lesions occurred in many but not all organs and tissues, with skeletal muscle arteries being the most severely affected, and were associated with myositis, atrophy, paresis/paralysis, and death. Histopathology showed fibrinoid vascular necrosis, rare amastigote nests within skeletal muscle myocytes, and massive leukocyte infiltrates composed mainly of inflammatory monocytes, F4/80(+)macrophages, and T. cruzi tetramer-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not interleukin-17 (IL-17). T. cruzi-specific IgG was detected in sera from infected mice, but antibody deposits and neutrophilic inflammation were not features of the lesions. Thus,T. cruzi infection of mice may be a specific infectious trigger of paralyzing systemic necrotizing vasculitis most severely affecting skeletal muscle, driven by pathogen-specific type I immune responses. PMID:26857570

  1. Paralytic illness resembling inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy in a chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Alford, P L; Satterfield, W C

    1995-07-01

    An adult male chimpanzee housed in an outdoor corral with a group of other chimpanzees had an acute onset of ascending motor paresis that progressed to flaccid tetraplegia over 3 days. Tendon reflexes were weak, and CSF protein concentration was high. The chimpanzee regained normal mobility over several months. This chimpanzee's ascending, symmetrical, monophasic, flaccid paralytic illness, with albuminocytologic dissociation in CSF, and recovery following supportive treatment, was characteristic of inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy, known as Guillain-Barré syndrome in human beings. Coonhound paralysis and experimentally induced allergic neuritis are the counterparts in dogs and laboratory animals, respectively, of the syndrome. In human beings, the syndrome is apparently immunologically mediated, as it is known to develop after bacterial and viral infections, vaccinations, and surgery or injury. The chimpanzee of this report had been given a rabies vaccination and had been treated for dental abscess 12 days prior to onset of signs, and had been inoculated with material containing neuronal antigens 20 years prior to onset of signs. PMID:7601702

  2. Supravalvular aortic stenosis associated to infectious endocarditis and cerebral vascular disease in a patient with Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Rubens Figueroa, Jesús; Marhx, Alfonso; López Terrazas, Javier; Palacios Macedo, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by: (a) typical facial features; (b) psychomotor retardation with a specific neurocognitive profile; (c) cardiovascular condition and (d) likely transient hypocalcemia in infancy. The objective of this study was to describe the clinic evolution and diagnosis of patient with this syndrome that was associated with endocarditis caused by Streptococcus parasanguis in the ascending aorta and an aneurism located in the fronto-temporal area, which produced a parenchymal hematoma in the left lobe, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was treated with ceftriaxone and dicloxacillin. Then we proceeded to correct the aneurysm and perform vegetation resection in aortic arteries with supravalvular aortic stenosis correction. The evolution after one year has been favorable and is currently without neurologic sequelae. A 5-year-old male patient presented a diagnosis of supravalvular aortic stenosis. After cardiac catheterization was performed, he presented a fever and right side paresis. The echocardiogram showed multiple vegetations in the ascendant aortic arch and the supraortic arteries. The blood cultures reported S. parasanguis. The magnetic resonance showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage with an aneurysm and a hematoma. PMID:25882107

  3. Description of two new species of Hisonotus Eigenmann & Eigenmann, 1889 (Ostariophysi, Loricariidae) from the rio Paraná-Paraguay basin, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Roxo, Fábio F.; Zawadzki, Cláudio H.; Troy, Waldo P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Hisonotus are described from the rio Paraná-Paraguay basin in Brazil. The most remarkable features of the new species are the odontodes forming longitudinally aligned rows (one odontode after the other, but not necessarily forming parallel series) on the head and trunk (vs. odontodes not forming longitudinally aligned rows), a pair of rostral plates at the tip of the snout (vs. a single rostral plate), the functional v-shaped spinelet (vs. spinelet non-functional, square-shaped, or absent). These features suggest close phylogenetic relationships with Hisonotus bockmanni, H. insperatus, H. luteofrenatus and H. piracanjuba. Additionally, both new species are distinguished from their congeners by characters related to head length and depth, orbital diameter, suborbital depth, caudal peduncle depth, pectoral-fin spine length, snout length and counts of teeth. Hisonotus paresi sp. n. further differs from its congeners by having contrasting dark geometric spots on the anterodorsal region of the body, a character lacking in H. oliveirai sp. n. The variation in number and shape of the rostral plate, posterior rostrum plates, infraorbitals and the preopercle in both new species and in H. insperatus are discussed. PMID:24715789

  4. Factors Associated With Upper Extremity Motor Recovery After Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Min Ah; Lee, Sook Joung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine factors associated with motor recovery of the upper extremity after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment in stroke patients. Methods Twenty-nine patients with subacute stroke participated in this study. rTMS was applied to the hand motor cortex for 10 minutes at a 110% resting motor threshold and 10 Hz frequency for two weeks. We evaluated the biographical, neurological, clinical, and functional variables, in addition to the motor-evoked potential (MEP) response. The Manual Function Test (MFT) was performed before, immediately after, and two weeks after, the treatment. Patients were divided into a responder and non-responder group according to their respective improvements on the MFT. Data were compared between the two groups. Results Patients with exclusively subcortical stroke, absence of aphasia, the presence of a MEP response, high scores on the Mini-Mental Status Examination, Motricity Index arm score, Functional Independence Measure, and Functional Ambulatory Classification; and a shorter period from stroke onset to rTMS were found to be significantly associated with a response to rTMS. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that rTMS may have a greater effect on upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients who have a MEP response, suffer an exclusively subcortical stroke, mild paresis, and have good functional status. Applying rTMS early would have additional positive effects in the patients with the identified characteristics. PMID:25932424

  5. Reliability of nursing assistants' observations of functioning and clinical symptoms and signs.

    PubMed

    Ranhoff, A H

    1997-10-01

    Simple methods for the early detection of function loss and disease in the elderly were evaluated. Such methods might be used by non-professional personnel as case-finding tools for early intervention. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of functional and clinical data collected by non-professional nursing assistants. The study group consisted of sixty elderly short-stay patients in a stable clinical situation, admitted for rehabilitation and aid in a nursing home. Barthel ADL index items and clinical symptoms and signs were scored by nursing assistants and nurses (the reference method). Agreement between scores was assessed by Cohen's kappa statistics and test of marginal homogeneity. All the Barthel items and the clinical symptoms and signs had fair or better agreement (weighted kappa > 0.40). For dressing, chair-to-bed transfer, ambulation, bathing, paresis and edema, the agreement was strong (weighted kappa > 0.75). The reliability of the Barthel sumscores was also acceptable. We concluded that observation of functioning and clinical symptoms and signs by non-professional nursing assistants is reliable. PMID:9458999

  6. Postsurgical Parsonage-Turner syndrome: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Verhasselt, Skrallan; Schelfaut, Sebastiaan; Bataillie, Filiep; Moke, Lieven

    2013-02-01

    Parsonage-Turner syndrome (PTS) is a distinct clinical syndrome, characterized by acute and severe (mostly) unilateral shoulder pain, followed by paresis and atrophy of the shoulder girdle, while the pain decreases. Most authors consider it as an immune-mediated disorder. PTS is notoriously unrecognised and is usually diagnosed with delay. A PTS may also occur following a surgical procedure. Postsurgical PTS is an under-recognised and challenging clinical entity, as illustrated in the case reported here of a 59-year-old man, 4 weeks after anterior discectomy and fusion C5C7. In such cases, the differential diagnosis must be made with a complication of surgery, such as postoperative C5 palsy due for instance to a migrated bone graft. Arguments for PTS are: a certain delay between surgery and symptoms, intolerable pain followed by weakness and improvement of pain complaints, divergent distribution of weakness, sensory deficit and pain, which may be confirmed by electrodiagnosis. Early recognition of postsurgical PTS may avoid unnecessary investigations or surgical exploration. It allows to treat the patient properly, leading to greater satisfaction of both surgeon and patient; pain management, physical therapy and reassurance are the cornerstones. PMID:23547510

  7. Catatonic Syndrome in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers’ critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position. PMID:27114630

  8. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography findings--case report.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Miwa, Shigeru; Noda, Tomoyuki; Sobajima, Atsuhiro; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    A 51-year-old female with a history of rheumatoid arthritis rapidly developed anterior neck pain and paresis in the left upper and lower extremities and right lower extremity, sensory disturbance in the left upper and lower extremities, and bladder and rectal disorder. Adduction of the left eye and abduction of the right eye were also disturbed. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated severe edema in the C1-T5 levels, which then deteriorated rapidly over 3 days, and lesions enhanced with gadolinium in the C1-C3 and C5-T3 levels. 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography study demonstrated the inflammatory sites as segmental enhanced accumulation in the C1-C3, C5-C6, and T1 levels. The serum anti-aquaporin 4 antibody level was positive and she was diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Marked improvement in the neurological conditions, concomitant with reduced spinal cord edema, was obtained by steroid pulse therapy. PMID:23095275

  9. [Bilateral tibial compartment syndrome with crush symptoms after cannabis abuse].

    PubMed

    Huber, F X; Eckstein, H H; Allenberg, J R

    1997-08-01

    Acute compartmental syndrome (CS) is a surgical emergency. Different conditions in which high non-physiological pressure appears within a closed fascial space reduce the necessary blood perfusion. CS is caused by trauma, burns, bleeding in patients with coagulopathies arterial injuries, nephrotic syndrome or unusual physical exercise with secondary compartmental swelling. When decompression occurs too late, permanent loss of function and limb contracture may result. In the following paper we report on a case of four-compartmental syndrome in the lower legs of a patient with drug intoxication. After cannabis consumption, the patient fell asleep sitting cross-legged. During our first examination several hours later, the signs of compartmental syndrome with spontaneous pain, turgid swelling and paresis were present. Bilateral skin incision technique was used to gain entrance into the four compartments in both lower legs. Immediately after the operation, the patient showed crush syndrome with high serum creatine kinase activity 140.501 U/l and acute renal failure caused by rhabdomyolysis. Within 2 weeks of haemofiltration and dialysis, a full recovery to a normal serum creatinine level of 0.7 mg/dl was achieved. After emergency treatment and rehabilitation, the patient showed neither vascular nor neural defects. PMID:9377997

  10. Using phosphate supplementation to reverse hypophosphatemia and phosphate depletion in neurological disease and disturbance.

    PubMed

    Håglin, Lena

    2016-06-01

    Hypophosphatemia (HP) with or without intracellular depletion of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine triphosphate has been associated with central and peripheral nervous system complications and can be observed in various diseases and conditions related to respiratory alkalosis, alcoholism (alcohol withdrawal), diabetic ketoacidosis, malnutrition, obesity, and parenteral and enteral nutrition. In addition, HP may explain serious muscular, neurological, and haematological disorders and may cause peripheral neuropathy with paresthesias and metabolic encephalopathy, resulting in confusion and seizures. The neuropathy may be improved quickly after proper phosphate replacement. Phosphate depletion has been corrected using potassium-phosphate infusion, a treatment that can restore consciousness. In severe ataxia and tetra paresis, complete recovery can occur after adequate replacement of phosphate. Patients with multiple risk factors, often with a chronic disease and severe HP that contribute to phosphate depletion, are at risk for neurologic alterations. To predict both risk and optimal phosphate replenishment requires assessing the nutritional status and risk for re-feeding hypophosphatemia. The strategy for correcting HP depends on the severity of the underlying disease and the goal for re-establishing a phosphate balance to limit the consequences of phosphate depletion. PMID:25909152

  11. Radiotherapy-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in a patient with cervical cancer: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kosobucki, Radosław; Łuczyńska, Elżbieta; Bieda, Tomasz; Urbański, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in cervical cancer treatment is a very rare, but extremely serious complication. The clinical course is associated with severe bilateral lower leg pain, reduced sensation, different degrees of weakness, paresis or paralysis, and sometimes also urinary or fecal incontinence. Patient quality of life becomes significantly deteriorated. Escalating neurological disorders may make self-sufficient functioning impossible. Neurological symptoms, most often irreversible, may develop at different times after irradiation, even after more than 30 years. We present a case of neurological toxicity in a patient successfully treated for cervical cancer with pelvis and para-aortic lymph node irradiation and weekly cisplatin. Neurological symptoms developed a few weeks after completion of external irradiation, were gradually escalating and resulted in complete immobilization of the woman. We underline the significance of long-term, systematic physiotherapy and pharmacological therapy which has resulted in significant improvement of motion efficiency. The literature review concerns the questions of frequency, clinical course and mechanisms of radiation-induced plexopathy. PMID:23788877

  12. Clinical investigation into feed-related hypervitaminosis D in a captive flock of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus): morbidity, mortalities, and pathologic lesions.

    PubMed

    Olds, June E; Burrough, Eric; Madison, Darin; Ensley, Steve; Horst, Ronald; Janke, Bruce H; Schwartz, Kent; Stevenson, Gregory W; Gauger, Phillip; Cooper, Vickie L; Arruda, Paulo; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2015-03-01

    The Blank Park Zoo began suffering mortalities in the spring of 2012 within a flock of 229 captive budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) housed in an interactive public-feeding aviary. Clinical signs in affected birds included weakness, posterior paresis, inability to fly, or acute death. Gross and microscopic lesions were not initially apparent in acutely affected deceased birds. Many birds had evidence of trauma, which is now hypothesized to have been related to the birds' weakness. Investigation into the cause(s) of morbidity and mortality were complicated by the opening of a new interactive enclosure. For this reason, environmental conditions and husbandry protocols were heavily scrutinized. Microscopic examination of dead budgies later in the course of the investigation revealed mineralization of soft tissues consistent with hypervitaminosis D. Pooled serum analysis of deceased birds identified elevated vitamin D3 levels. Vitamin D3 analysis was performed on the feed sticks offered by the public and the formulated maintenance diet fed to the flock. This analysis detected elevated levels of vitamin D3 that were 22.5-times the manufacturer's labeled content in the formulated diet. These findings contributed to a manufacturer recall of more than 100 formulated diets fed to a wide variety of domestic and captive wild animal species throughout the United States and internationally. This case report discusses the complexities of determining the etiology of a toxic event in a zoologic institution. PMID:25831571

  13. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: a clinico-pathologic study of twenty-six patients from Martinique.

    PubMed

    Plumelle, Y; Pascaline, N; Nguyen, D; Panelatti, G; Jouannelle, A; Jouault, H; Imbert, M

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-six cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) were identified between 1983 and 1991 in Martinique (French West Indies). There were 14 men and 12 women, all of mixed racial descent and born in Martinique. Their ages ranged from 23 to 95 years. The main clinical and laboratory features at initial presentation were peripheral lymphadenopathy (22 cases), hepatomegaly (11 cases), splenomegaly (10 cases), cutaneous lesions (12 cases), hypercalcemia (16 cases), refractory infection by Strongyloides stercoralis (12 cases), and pre-existing autoimmune disorders (4 cases). All patients had absolute lymphocytosis with circulating pleomorphic abnormal lymphocytes. The prognosis was poor, with most patients (20 cases) surviving for less than 6 months. Although the overall clinicopathologic features of ATLL in this series are similar to those described in previous reports, we observed three additional points of interest: a high association with Strongyloides infection, an increased incidence of tropical spastic paresis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) among the relatives of the patients (5 cases), and the presence of prior collagen vascular diseases. PMID:8113152

  14. Enterococcal-related vertebral osteoarthritis in South African broiler breeders: A case report.

    PubMed

    Aitchison, Henry; Poolman, Petrus; Coetzer, Marilette; Griffiths, Caron; Jacobs, Johan; Meyer, Mignon; Bisschop, Shahn

    2014-01-01

    Infections in broilers and broiler breeders by Enterococcus cecorum, causing clinical disease, have increasingly been described in various countries in the Northern Hemisphere over the past decade. This case report describes an outbreak of enterococcal-associated vertebral osteoarthritis (EVOA) in male broiler breeders in several flocks in South Africa. Male birds aged 4 and 9 weeks displayed the common presentation of lameness, paresis or complete paralysis. Autopsies of culled birds revealed masses on caudal thoracic vertebrae T5-T7, with vertebral osteomyelitis and spondylitis. Microbiological assays identified E. cecorum cultured from spondylitic lesions. Affected flocks were treated with amoxycillin at 25 mg/kg in the drinking water for 5 days, resulting in decreased numbers of lame birds and culls. The origin and pathogenesis of EVOA are poorly understood, which limits prevention to environmental factors that may inhibit systemic access by the enteric bacteria. Skeletal growth trends of male birds are thought to increase their susceptibility to bacterial colonisation at sites of skeletal strain, resulting in abscesses and lesions. Evidence points to the emergence of E. cecorum strains with increased pathogenicity; this highlights the need for greater understanding of the origins, treatment and prevention of EVOA to minimise its economic impact on poultry operations. PMID:25686375

  15. [A Pair of Siblings with Frontotemporal Dementia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and a Novel Thr462Lysfs Mutation in the TBK1 Gene].

    PubMed

    Schönecker, S; Brendel, M; van der Zee, J; van Broeckhoven, C; Rominger, A; Danek, A; Levin, J

    2016-08-01

    We report on a pair of siblings with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and a novel Thr462Lysfs mutation in the TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) gene identified through the European Early-Onset Dementia Consortium. The patients presented at the age of 77 and 75 years and displayed dementia and bulbar symptoms as well as progressive paresis. After a progressive course, both of them died only a few months after diagnosis. Most recently, TBK1 mutations were identified in patients with FTD and ALS. A loss of expression of the mutant allele, leading to 50 % reduced TBK1 protein levels, seems to be causative. The occurrence of TBK1 mutations in FTD and ALS underlines the fact that FTD and ALS are part of the same disease spectrum. For future therapeutic trials, characterization of TBK1 mutation carriers in presymptomatic cohorts, such as the genetic frontotemporal dementia initiative (GENFI), is of great importance. PMID:27570907

  16. Classification of peripheral and central (pontine infarction) vestibular deficits. Selection of a neuro-otological test battery using discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Allum, J H; Ura, M; Honegger, F; Pfaltz, C R

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained from a complete neuro-otological test battery were examined statistically in order to select measurement variables which would optimally indicate significant differences between four groups: normal patients, patients with partially compensated unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit, patients with an acoustic neurinoma and patients with central (brainstem) vestibular deficit. A stepwise-discriminant analysis was performed on measurements of slow-phase velocity obtained from each test. The primary measurements selected to assign a subject optimally to one population were the canal paresis (CP) of the caloric test, the eye-tracking gain contralateral to the deficit for a 15 deg/s stimulus, the gain asymmetry for optokinetic nystagmus with a 30 deg/s stimulus, and the level of spontaneous nystagmus. The resulting classifications were 100% correct for normal and central deficit patients. However, the division between peripheral deficit and acoustic neurinoma patients overlapped causing about 30% false classifications of neurinoma patients: some 20% of the peripheral deficit patients were classified as normal. If the CP was not available the discriminant analysis substituted the rotating chair response for 5 deg/s2, in place of CP. This substitution caused a 10 to 20% decrease in classification accuracy. PMID:2014753

  17. Sandfly virus seroconversion associated with neurologic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Makranz, Chen; Qutteineh, Hiba; Bin, Hanna; Lustig, Yaniv; Gomori, John Moshe; Honig, Asaf; Bayya, Abed El-Raouf; Moses, Allon E.; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Averbuch, Diana; Eichel, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical presentation and unique neurologic manifestations of sandfly viruses (SFVs) in the Jerusalem area. Methods: We identified all patients with acute seroconversion to SFV at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Centers during the years 2008–2013 and retrospectively collected and analyzed the clinical and imaging data. Results: Nine patients (ranging from 1.5 to 85 years old) were identified. Presentation included acute neurologic disease, mostly with fever, change in consciousness and behavior, seizures, headache, meningitis, limb paresis, or myelitis. Eight patients had clinical signs of meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or encephalitis alone. Four patients had myelitis. MRI identified pathologic symmetrical changes in the basal ganglia, thalami, and other deep structures in 5 patients, and additional myelitis of the spine was noted on imaging in 3 patients. Seven patients had long-term follow-up: 4 completely recovered and 3 had remaining neurologic sequelae, among them 1 with permanent severe brain damage. Conclusion: Neurologic involvement associated with acute SFV infections is considered to be benign. However, in this series, all 9 patients presented with significant neurologic pathology associated with a unique finding of myelitis and symmetrical basal ganglia, thalami, or white matter involvement. Thus, acute SFV infection should be included in the differential diagnosis in febrile onset of neurologic manifestations and neuroradiologic changes. PMID:26767189

  18. Effects of Task-Oriented Training as an Added Treatment to Electromyogram-Triggered Neuromuscular Stimulation on Upper Extremity Function in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ho; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Jung, Min-Ye; Yoo, Eun-Young

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of electromyogram-triggered neuromuscular stimulation (EMG-stim) combined with task-oriented training (TOT) on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients. Twenty chronic stroke patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 10) or control (n = 10) group. The intervention group conducted TOT with EMG-stim on the wrist and finger extensor of the affected arm for 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week, for 4 weeks. The control group was provided EMG-stim for 20 minutes per day for the same duration. The intervention group exhibited significant improvement relative to the control group in muscle activation, motor recovery (Fugl-Meyer assessment) and dexterity (Box and Block Test) (p < 0.05). Significant differences in hand function between the groups were detected in the writing of short sentences and in stacking checkers (p < 0.05). It is concluded that EMG-stim in combination with TOT may be better than EMG-stim alone for the treatment of arm paresis in stroke patients. Further research with a larger sample is recommended to examine neurologic changes or cerebral cortex reorganization. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26876527

  19. Acute responses of American kestrels to methyl parathion and fenvalerate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Franson, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and toxicological effects of p.o, methyl parathion (0.375-3.0 mg/kg) or fenvalerate (1000-4000 mg/kg) were examined over a 10 h period in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) maintained in thermoneutral (22?.C) and cold (-5?.C) environments. Methyl parathion was highly toxic (LD50=3.08 mg/kg, 95% confidence limits=2.29-4.l4 mg/kg, producing overt intoxication (abnormal posture, ataxia, paresis), dose-dependent inhibition (26-67%) of brain acetylcholinesterase activity, hyperglycemia, and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration. Transient but pronounced hypothermia was associated with plasma cholinesterase inhibition in excess of 50% (2 h after intubation), although this response was highly variable (plasma ChE inhibition vs. A cloacal temperature, r=-0.60). Fenvalerate, at doses far exceeding those encountered in the environment, caused mild intoxication (irregular head movement) and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, but did not alter cloacal temperature, plasma activities of CK, U-HBDH, and LDK, or concentrations of corticosterone, glucose, triiodothyronine, and uric acid. Cold exposure intensified methyl parathion toxicity, but did not affect that of fenvalerate. It would thus appear that the organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion poses far greater hazard than the pyrethroid fenvalerate to raptorial birds.

  20. Epidemiological and clinical features of the endomyocardial form of restrictive cardiomyopathy in cats: a review of 41 cases.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yusuke; Fukushima, Ryuji; Hirakawa, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Machida, Noboru

    2016-06-01

    Examination of our necropsy records for the period 2005 to 2014 yielded 41 cases of the endomyocardial form of restrictive cardiomyopathy among 327 cats with evidence of heart disease, and here, we reviewed their epidemiological and clinical features. The medical data obtained retrospectively included signalment, presenting complaints, findings of physical examination, results of various diagnostic tests, methods of treatment and survival times. Except for one Chinchilla Persian cat, all were domestic short-haired cats. The mean age at death was 7.3 ± 4.5 years (median, 6 years; range, 4 months to 19 years), and males accounted for 61% (25/41) of the total. Dyspnea was the most common clinical sign, being evident in 83% (35/41) of the cats. Hind limb paresis or paralysis due to aortic thromboembolism was evident in 41% (17/41). Arrhythmias of atrial origin were common. Echocardiography commonly revealed left atrial or biatrial enlargement with severe endocardial thickening of the left ventricle. Most of the affected cats had a poor outcome; the disease duration ranged from 1 to 977 days, and the median survival period was 30 days. PMID:26822001

  1. Late-onset hereditary ataxia with global thermoanalgesia and absence of fungiform papillae on the tongue in a Japanese family.

    PubMed

    Fukutake, T; Kita, K; Sakakibara, R; Takagi, K; Tokumaru, Y; Kojima, S; Hattori, T; Hirayama, K

    1996-06-01

    Two Japanese male siblings, aged 68 and 59 years, affected by late-onset progressive ataxia distinguished by extensive sensory and mild autonomic disturbances are described. They had global thermoanalgesia, positive Romberg signs, sensorineural deafness, canal paresis and ageusia. Their autonomic disturbances consisted of absence of overflow tears with usual stimuli, dysphagia, blood pressure and vasomotor instability, diarrhoea/constipation, and urinary frequency. Sensory nerve action potentials were completely absent, whereas motor conduction velocity was slightly reduced only in the lower extremities. Sural nerve biopsy on the younger brother demonstrated a marked loss of myelinated fibres and a reduction in the number of unmyelinated axons. Tongue histology revealed absence of fungiform papillae and taste buds. Autonomic function tests showed widespread but mild sympathetic and parasympathetic failures. Neuro-imaging studies revealed atrophy of the spinal cord, cerebellum, brainstem and corpus callosum, and enlargement of the lateral, third and fourth ventricles. These siblings represent a previously unrecognized variant of late-onset hereditary spinocerebellar degeneration with global thermoanalgesia and absence of fungiform papillae on the tongue. PMID:8673478

  2. Two outbreaks of type C and type D botulism in sheep and goats in south Africa.

    PubMed

    Van der Lugt, J J; De Wet, S C; Bastianello, S S; Kellerman, T S; Van Jaarsveld, L P

    1995-06-01

    Two outbreaks of botulism in sheep and goats are described; in one, 329 out of 900 sheep in a feedlot died within 9 d of the onset of the disease and in the other, 100 sheep and goats out of 330 succumbed over a period of about 3 weeks. Animals were found dead or died suddenly, without exhibiting clinical signs. Others stood with lowered heads and showed drooling of saliva or a stiff gait. Paresis and/or paralysis were frequent signs in the terminal stages of the disease. Gross lesions such as the accumulation of fluids in body cavities, pulmonary oedema, foam in the trachea, epicardial haemorrhages and congestion of the mucosa of the small intestine, suggestive of heart failure, were present in animals from both outbreaks. Botulism was confirmed via the mouse toxicity test, by the demonstration of Type C and Type D toxins in the feed and intestinal contents of sheep from the first outbreak and Type D toxin in intestinal contents of sheep from the second. The clinical signs and macropathology in the outbreaks of botulism in sheep and goats in South Africa may resemble "krimpsiekte" and cardiac glycoside and ionophore poisoning, as well as other conditions causing heart failure. PMID:8544166

  3. A highly fatal tremorgenic mycotoxicosis of cattle caused by Aspergillus clavatus.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, T S; Pienaar, J G; van der Westhuizen, G C; Anderson, G C; Naude, T W

    1976-09-01

    During February 1975, a tremorgenic neurotoxicosis decimated a herd of cattle in the northern Transvaal. This hitherto unidentified disease was characterized by hypersensitivity, incoordination, a peculiar stiff-legged gait of the hind legs, severe generalized tumors of the sketetal muscles, progressive paresis, paralysis and constipation. The most notable gross pathological lesions were degenerative and necrotic changes in certain skeletal muscles, haemorrhages on the serosal surfaces, especially on the dorsal aspect of the rumen, and gastro-intestinal stasis. Microscopical examination of the central nervous system revealed cytopathological changes consisting of degeneration and necrosis of the large motor cells in the ventral horns of the spinal cord and bigger neurones in numerous nuclei of the medulla oblongata, midbrain and thalamus. By feeding the suspect ration and its component parts to cattle and sheep, it was possible to identify mouldy sorghum beer residue as the toxic component in the ration. A. clavatus, the dominant fungus on the toxic residue, was readily isolated in pure culture. The entire syndrome was then reproduced in a yearling Friesland steer dosed with pure cultures of the A. clavatus isolate grown on autoclaved non-toxic sorghum beer residue. The toxic principle is not known, but it does not appear to be patulin, tryptoquivalone, tryptoquivaline, or any other known tremorgen. PMID:1012654

  4. Anatomic considerations in botulinum toxin type A therapy for spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, P F; Gates, G A; Esselman, G; Song, F; Vannier, M W; Kuo, M

    1994-06-01

    Chemodenervation by injection of botulinum toxin type A into the vocal fold(s) has become the preferred treatment for patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Injection may be done either perorally or transcutaneously; each method has its advocates and advantages. The authors have used the transcutaneous transcricothyroid membrane route exclusively with satisfactory results in more than 50 patients. Temporary breathliness and aspiration are common. The preferred injection site should be as close as possible to the motor end plates of the affected muscle. The thyroarytenoid muscle end plates are distributed throughout the muscle, whereas in the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle they are located in band in the center of the muscle. The transcutaneous injection site is below and posterior to the midpoint of the vibrating vocal fold as visualized by indirect laryngoscopy. The proximity of this site to the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle suggests that postinjection breathiness and aspiration may be related to spread of botulinum toxin type A to the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle. However, it is likely that thyroarytenoid muscle paresis is mainly responsible for this side effect and that the rapid clearing of the breathy dysphonia in the face of prolonged relief of spasmodic dysphonia symptoms suggests the action of an adaptive neural response, such as axonal sprouting. Further research of this subject is warranted. PMID:8196438

  5. Encephalitozoon cuniculi: Grading the Histological Lesions in Brain, Kidney, and Liver during Primoinfection Outbreak in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tovar, Luis E.; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M.; Trejo-Chávez, Armando; Hernández-Martínez, Carlos A.; Zarate-Ramos, Juan J.; Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel

    2016-01-01

    This is the first confirmed report of Encephalitozoon cuniculi (E. cuniculi) in farm meat rabbits located in Northern Mexico. Eighty young rabbits exhibited clinical signs of this zoonotic emerging disease, like torticollis, ataxia, paresis, circling, and rolling. Samples of brain, kidney, and liver were examined for histology lesions. For the first time the lesions caused by E. cuniculi were graded according to their severity (I, II, and III) and the size of the granulomas (Types A, B, and C). The main cerebral injuries were Grade III, coinciding with the presence of Type C granulomas. The cerebral lesions were located in the cortex, brain stem, and medulla. The renal lesions were also Grade III distributed throughout cortex and renal medulla, with no granuloma formation. The involvement of hypersensitivity Types III and IV is suggested. All of the rabbits were seropositive to E. cuniculi by CIA testing, suggesting that this zoonotic and emerging pathogen is widely distributed among animals intended for human consumption. We believe this work could be used as a guide when examining E. cuniculi and will provide direction to confirm the diagnosis of this pathogen. PMID:27022485

  6. Toxic effects of lasalocid in horses.

    PubMed

    Hanson, L J; Eisenbeis, H G; Givens, S V

    1981-03-01

    Lasalocid was given to horses in a series of sequentially increasing single oral doses ranging between 5 and 30 mg/kg of body weight, with an appropriate washout period between treatments. One of the 5 horses died after a dosage of 15 mg/kg, 1 of 3 horses died after 21 mg/kg, 1 of 3 horses died after 22 mg/kg, and 1 of 2 horses died after 26 mg/kg. The LD50 of lasalocid for horses was estimated to be 21.5 mg/kg. Monensin was given to horses in a similar manner at dosages of 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg of body weight. One of the 2 horses died after a dosage of 2 mg/kg and 1 horse died after a dosage of 3 mg/kg. The clinical signs of toxicosis observed in horses given either drug were progressive and included depression, ataxia, paresis, and paralysis with partial anorexia. Intermittent profuse sweating was observed before death in horses given monensin. PMID:7271010

  7. The Negligible Influence of Chronic Obesity on Hospitalization, Clinical Status, and Complications in Elective Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kombos, Theodoros; Bode, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a common surgical treatment for degenerative spinal instability, but many surgeons consider obesity a contraindication for elective spinal fusion. The aim of this study was to analyze whether obesity has any influence on hospitalization parameters, change in clinical status, or complications. Methods. In this prospective study, regression analysis was used to analyze the influence of the body mass index (BMI) on operating time, postoperative care, hospitalization time, type of postdischarge care, change in paresis or sensory deficits, pain level, wound complications, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and implant complications. Results. Operating time increased only 2.5 minutes for each increase of BMI by 1. The probability of having a wound complication increased statistically with rising BMI. Nonetheless, BMI accounted for very little of the variation in the data, meaning that other factors or random chances play a much larger role. Conclusions. Obesity has to be considered a risk factor for wound complications in patients undergoing elective PLIF for degenerative instability. However, BMI showed no significant influence on other kinds of peri- or postoperative complications, nor clinical outcomes. So obesity cannot be considered a contraindication for elective PLIF. PMID:27478866

  8. Lethal Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype III infection in Steppe lemmings (Lagurus lagurus).

    PubMed

    Hofmannová, Lada; Sak, Bohumil; Jekl, Vladimír; Mináriková, Andrea; Skorič, Miša; Kváč, Martin

    2014-09-15

    Microsporidia are ubiquitous, spore-forming, intracellular parasites infecting invertebrates and vertebrates. Some of them are important opportunistic pathogens in humans, including three species of genus Encephalitozoon. Intraspecies genetic variation with a different range of hosts is known in Encephalitozoon cuniculi distinguishing four genotypes. Recently, E. cuniculi is often observed in pet animals, mainly E. cuniculi genotype I in pet rabbits. This study described a fatal encephalitozoonosis in a group of pet rodents Steppe lemmings (Lagurus lagurus). The animals were presented with progressive weight loss, aggression, cannibalism, purulent conjunctivitis and hind limb paresis. Death occurred within 48 h after the onset of clinical signs. The group comprised of 15 animals was affected and died within a period of three months. Post-mortal examination did not show any macroscopic changes. Microsporidial vacuoles with typical spores were found in brain and kidney tissues and E. cuniculi DNA in all tested organs. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of rRNA gene showed 100% homology with E. cuniculi genotype III previously identified in dogs, tamarin colonies from zoos, swine, birds and humans. Pet lemmings could represent a new potential source of the infection for their breeders. PMID:25073415

  9. CNS-accessible Inhibitor of Glucosylceramide Synthase for Substrate Reduction Therapy of Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, John; Sun, Ying; Bangari, Dinesh S; Budman, Eva; Park, Hyejung; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Allaire, Amy; Cromwell, Mary A; Wang, Bing; Grabowski, Gregory A; Leonard, John P; Cheng, Seng H

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase and the consequent lysosomal accumulation of unmetabolized glycolipid substrates. Enzyme-replacement therapy adequately manages the visceral manifestations of nonneuronopathic type-1 Gaucher patients, but not the brain disease in neuronopathic types 2 and 3 GD. Substrate reduction therapy through inhibition of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) has also been shown to effectively treat the visceral disease. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel small molecule inhibitor of GCS with central nervous system (CNS) access (Genz-682452) to treat the brain disease. Treatment of the conduritol β epoxide-induced mouse model of neuronopathic GD with Genz-682452 reduced the accumulation of liver and brain glycolipids (>70% and >20% respectively), extent of gliosis, and severity of ataxia. In the genetic 4L;C* mouse model, Genz-682452 reduced the levels of substrate in the brain by >40%, the extent of gliosis, and paresis. Importantly, Genz-682452-treated 4L;C* mice also exhibited an ~30% increase in lifespan. Together, these data indicate that an orally available antagonist of GCS that has CNS access is effective at attenuating several of the neuropathologic and behavioral manifestations associated with mouse models of neuronopathic GD. Therefore, Genz-682452 holds promise as a potential therapeutic approach for patients with type-3 GD. PMID:26948439

  10. A case-control study of motor neurone disease: its relation to heritability, and occupational exposures, particularly to solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, L G; Bodin, L; Söderfeldt, B; Axelson, O

    1992-01-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND) was studied in relation to various determinants in a case-control study covering nine counties in southern Sweden. A questionnaire about occupational exposures, medical history, lifestyle factors etc was given to all cases in the age range 45-79 and to a random sample of 500 population controls in the same age range. The questionnaires were answered by 92 cases and 372 controls, a response rate of 85% and 75% respectively. Among men high Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios (MHORs) were obtained for electricity work (MHOR = 6.7, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0-32.1), welding (MHOR = 3.7, 95% CI 1.1-13.0), and impregnating agents (MHOR = 3.5, 95% CI 0.9-13.1). Heritability with regard to a neurodegenerative disease or thyroid disease seemed to predispose to a risk of developing MND (OR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.0-4.3). The highest OR was found for the combination of such heritability, exposure to solvents, and male sex (OR = 15.6, 95% CI 2.8-87.0), a combination that occurred for seven cases and three controls. Hereditary factors and external exposures had a different distribution among cases with the spinal type of MND than among cases with involvement of the pyramidal tract or bulbar paresis also. PMID:1463680

  11. The Pirate group intervention protocol: description and a case report of a modified constraint-induced movement therapy combined with bimanual training for young children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Pauline B; van Hartingsveldt, Margo; Anderson, Patricia G; van den Tillaar, Ingrid; van der Burg, Jan; Geurts, Alexander C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a child-friendly modified constraint-induced movement therapy protocol that is combined with goal-directed task-specific bimanual training (mCIMT-BiT). This detailed description elucidates the approach and supports various research reports. This protocol is used in a Pirate play group setting and aims to extend bimanual skills in play and self-care activities for children with cerebral palsy and unilateral spastic paresis of the upper limb. To illustrate the content and course of treatment and its effect, a case report of a two-year-old boy is presented. After the eight-week mCIMT-BiT intervention, the child improved the capacity of his affected arm and hand in both quantitative and qualitative terms and his bimanual performance in daily life as assessed by the Assisting Hand Assessment, ABILHAND-Kids, Video Observations Aarts and Aarts Module Determine Developmental Disregard, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and Goal Attainment Scaling. It is argued that improvement of affected upper-limb capacity in a test situation may be achieved and retained relatively easily, but it may take a lot more training to stabilize the results and automate motor control of the upper limb. Future studies with groups of children should elaborate on these intensity and generalization issues. PMID:21751275

  12. [Acute postop ischemic hepatitis and hypotension].

    PubMed

    Uzhva, V P

    2000-01-01

    The significance of the pronounced durable systemic arterial hypotension (SAH) in the origin of an acute postoperative ischemic hepatitis (APIH) was established, basing on the analysis of 40 clinical observations. Its occurrence is promoted by hemorrhage with 30% and more the circulating blood volume (CBV) deficiency, chronic cardiovascular system and pulmonary diseases, liver cirrhosis, shock, massive infusions of the blood and its components, the abdominal aorta atherosclerosis with stenosis of tr. coeliacus, a. hepatica. Forgoing SAH, the presence of promoting factors, jaundice, the transpherase activity raising in 3-5 times, the level of blood coagulating factors reduction, stable intestinal paresis were diagnostically significant symptoms. Experimental model of an APIH was elaborated in dogs, which occurs due to hypotension, caused by CBV reduction by 40% during two hours. The refractoriness of a. hepatica propria to the blood reinfusion was established. In the APIH occurrence threat the perftoran application in the 20 ml/kg dosage is the prophylaxis method as well as the method of the curative tactics choice. PMID:10857279

  13. Results of treatment of displaced supracondylar humeral fractures in children by K-wiring.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Zdenko; Prlić, Jerko; Juka, Kristijan; Ljubić, Bozo; Roth, Sandor; Bekavac, Josip

    2010-03-01

    The supracondylar fracture of the humerus in children remains the most challenging injury for the orthopedic surgeon. It is important to consider the options of treatment very carefully and tailor the treatment according to the characteristics of each fracture. In this study we observed outcomes of surgical procedures using the Kirschner-wire for the dislocated (displaced) supracondylar fractures in 135 children (mean age 6.7 years). In 96 patients closed reposition (reduction) and fixation with crossed K-wire was done. A total of 41 children were operated by the means of open reposition and crossed K-wire fixation. Another 41 underwent similar (1-mm) K-wire application. In classifying the fractures Gartland classification of the supracondilar fractures of the humerus was used. Postoperatively, cubitus varus was found in seven, and cubitus valgus in three children (5% and 2% respectively). Stiffness of the elbow was recorded in 18 patients, while the paresis of the ulnar nerve was recorded in three cases (13 and 2% respectively). In conclusion, we can suggest crossed fixation while applying the K-wire throughout two cortexes, since such technique ensures the most superior fixation and stable osteosynthesis. PMID:20402326

  14. Laparoscopic vasectomy in African savannah elephant (Loxodonta africana); surgical technique and results.

    PubMed

    Marais, Hendrik J; Hendrickson, Dean A; Stetter, Mark; Zuba, Jeffery R; Penning, Mark; Siegal-Willott, Jess; Hardy, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Several small, enclosed reserves in southern Africa are experiencing significant elephant population growth, which has resulted in associated environmental damage and changes in biodiversity. Although several techniques exist to control elephant populations, e.g., culling, relocation, and immunocontraception, the technique of laparoscopic vasectomy of free-ranging bull elephants was investigated. Bilateral vasectomies were performed in 45 elephants. Of these elephants, one died within 24 hr of recovery and two had complications during surgery but recovered uneventfully. Histologic examination confirmed the resected tissue as ductus deferens in all the bulls. Most animals recovered uneventfully and showed no abnormal behavior after surgery. Complications recorded included incisional dehiscence, 1 full-thickness and 2 partial-thickness lacerations of the large intestine, and initial sling-associated complications, for example, deep radial nerve paresis. One bull was found dead 6 weeks after surgery without showing any prior abnormal signs. Vasectomy in free-ranging African bull elephants may be effectively performed in their normal environment. The surgical procedure can be used as a realistic population management tool in free-ranging elephants without major anesthetic, surgical, or postoperative complications. PMID:24437080

  15. En Bloc Resection of Desmoplastic Neurotropic Melanoma with Perineural Invasion of the Intracranial Trigeminal and Intraparotid Facial Nerve: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Serkan; Acharya, Aanand N.; Savundra, James; Lewis, Stephen B.; Rajan, Gunesh P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Desmoplastic neurotropic melanoma (DNM) is a rare, highly malignant, and locally invasive form of cutaneous melanoma with a tendency for perineural invasion (PNI). Methods We report a case of a 61-year-old man presenting with right-sided trigeminal neuralgia and progressive facial paresis due to the PNI of the intracranial trigeminal nerve and the intraparotid facial nerve from DNM. We also present a review of the literature with six cases of DNM with PNI of the intracranial trigeminal nerve identified. Results The combined transtemporal-infratemporal fossa approach was performed to achieve total en bloc resection of the tumor mass followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). After 24 months of follow-up, the patient remains disease free with no signs of recurrence on magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion We recommend the en bloc resection of the tumor mass followed by PORT for the management of DNM with PNI. A high index of suspicion for PNI as a cause of cranial neuropathies is essential for the early detection and treatment of patients with known melanoma. PMID:26929895

  16. Herpes zoster epidemiology, management, and disease and economic burden in Europe: a multidisciplinary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert W.; Alvarez-Pasquin, Marie-José; Bijl, Marc; Franco, Elisabetta; Gaillat, Jacques; Clara, João G.; Labetoulle, Marc; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Naldi, Luigi; Sanmarti, Luis S.; Weinke, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is primarily a disease of nerve tissue but the acute and longer-term manifestations require multidisciplinary knowledge and involvement in their management. Complications may be dermatological (e.g. secondary bacterial infection), neurological (e.g. long-term pain, segmental paresis, stroke), ophthalmological (e.g. keratitis, iridocyclitis, secondary glaucoma) or visceral (e.g. pneumonia, hepatitis). The age-related increased incidence of HZ and its complications is thought to be a result of the decline in cell-mediated immunity (immunosenescence), higher incidence of comorbidities with age and social-environmental changes. Individuals who are immunocompromised as a result of disease or therapy are also at increased risk, independent of age. HZ and its complications (particularly postherpetic neuralgia) create a significant burden for the patient, carers, healthcare systems and employers. Prevention and treatment of HZ complications remain a therapeutic challenge despite recent advances. This is an overview of the multidisciplinary implications and management of HZ in which the potential contribution of vaccination to reducing the incidence HZ and its complications are also discussed. PMID:26478818

  17. Lessons learned from the first 50 thyroidectomies with Harmonic Focus Curved Shears - technical note.

    PubMed

    Iorgulescu, R; Badanoiu, D; Lupu, A; Cucu, C; Niculescu, D; Iordache, N

    2014-01-01

    Precise and safe hemostasis is necessary for successful thyroid surgery. In this respect, the advent of the ultrasonic surgical device Harmonic Focus Curved Shears (HFCS) from Ethicon Endo-Surgery constituted a major progress in the domain by its multiple capabilities of dissection, grasping, vessel sealing and transecting. The paper presents the initial experience of 50 cases with this device of a surgical team with special interest in endocrine surgery, mostly thyroid and parathyroid. The thyroid conditions for which surgery was indicated were: diffuse toxic goiter in 8 patients; multinodular toxic and nontoxic goiter in 30 patients; autonomous nodule in 2 patients; 2 patients with benign nodules at fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB); 4 patients with nodules positive for carcinoma at FNAB, among them 2 with unilateral cervical lymph nodes enlargement; 4 patients with highly suspect nodule on FNAB. The types of surgery performed were 4 hemithyroidectomies and 46 total thyroidectomies, 2 in association with unilateral functional neck dissections. We had 4 intraoperative hemorrhagic incidents, all in the first 15 cases and imputable to lack of expertise and improper usage of the device. We registered the following noticeable postoperative complications: 1 cervical hematoma from an arteriolar source in sternothyroid muscle demanding prompt reintervention; 8 hypocalcemias and 2 vocal cord paresis, none of which permanent. We remarked several advantages with HFCS: no necessity of changing instruments, fluentness of the intervention and more comfort for the operating team, reduced operating time, safe hemostasis. Some important tips and tricks with the usage of the instrument are presented. PMID:27057249

  18. Epidemiological and clinical features of the endomyocardial form of restrictive cardiomyopathy in cats: a review of 41 cases

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Yusuke; FUKUSHIMA, Ryuji; HIRAKAWA, Atsushi; KOBAYASHI, Masayuki; MACHIDA, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Examination of our necropsy records for the period 2005 to 2014 yielded 41 cases of the endomyocardial form of restrictive cardiomyopathy among 327 cats with evidence of heart disease, and here, we reviewed their epidemiological and clinical features. The medical data obtained retrospectively included signalment, presenting complaints, findings of physical examination, results of various diagnostic tests, methods of treatment and survival times. Except for one Chinchilla Persian cat, all were domestic short-haired cats. The mean age at death was 7.3 ± 4.5 years (median, 6 years; range, 4 months to 19 years), and males accounted for 61% (25/41) of the total. Dyspnea was the most common clinical sign, being evident in 83% (35/41) of the cats. Hind limb paresis or paralysis due to aortic thromboembolism was evident in 41% (17/41). Arrhythmias of atrial origin were common. Echocardiography commonly revealed left atrial or biatrial enlargement with severe endocardial thickening of the left ventricle. Most of the affected cats had a poor outcome; the disease duration ranged from 1 to 977 days, and the median survival period was 30 days. PMID:26822001

  19. Critical ischemia time in a model of spinal cord section. A study performed on dogs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Martinez, David; Rosales Corral, Sergio A.; Flores Soto, Mario E.; Velarde Silva, Gustavo; Portilla de Buen, Eliseo

    2006-01-01

    Vascular changes after acute spinal cord trauma are important factors that predispose quadriplegia, in most cases irreversible. Repair of the spinal blood flow helps the spinal cord recovery. The average time to arrive and perform surgery is 3 h in most cases. It is important to determine the critical ischemia time in order to offer better functional prognosis. A spinal cord section and vascular clamping of the spinal anterior artery at C5–C6 model was used to determine critical ischemia time. The objective was to establish a critical ischemia time in a model of acute spinal cord section. Four groups of dogs were used, anterior approach and vascular clamp of spinal anterior artery with 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of ischemia and posterior hemisection of spinal cord at C5–C6 was performed. Clinical evaluation was made during 12 weeks and morphological evaluation at the end of this period. We obtained a maximal neurological coordination at 23 days average. Two cases showed sequels of right upper limb paresis at 1 and 3 ischemia hours. There was nerve conduction delay of 56% at 3 h of ischemia. Morphological examination showed 25% of damaged area. The VIII and IX Rexed’s laminae were the most affected. The critical ischemia time was 3 h. Dogs with 4 h did not exhibit any recovery. PMID:17024402

  20. Canine neosporosis: clinical and pathological findings and first isolation of Neospora caninum in Germany.

    PubMed

    Peters, M; Wagner, F; Schares, G

    2000-01-01

    Neosporosis was diagnosed in an 11-week-old puppy of the breed Kleiner Münsterländer with progressive hindlimb paresis. Pathohistological and immunohistological examinations revealed a disseminated infection with Neospora caninum. Parasitic stages were demonstrated in the brain, spinal cord, retina, muscles, thymus, heart, liver, kidney, stomach, adrenal gland, and skin. Immunohistochemistry investigations were carried out using polyclonal rabbit antisera developed against N. caninum tachyzoites and the recombinant bradyzoite-specific antigen BAG-5 of Toxoplasma gondii, which is known to cross-react with N. caninum bradyzoites. BAG-5 antibodies recognized tissue cysts within the CNS and some protozoan stages that were not surrounded by a visible cyst wall. All parasite clusters in the retina and some in muscle tissue stained positively with the BAG-5 antiserum. N. caninum was isolated in cell culture and mice inoculated with brain and spinal cord of the puppy. The new isolate is the first reported in Germany and is designated NC-GER1. PMID:10669128

  1. What Is the Evidence for Harm of Neuromuscular Blockade and Corticosteroid Use in the Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed

    Annane, Djillali

    2016-02-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents and corticosteroids are widely used in medicine and in particular in the intensive care unit (ICU). Neuromuscular blockade is commonly used to ease tracheal intubation, to optimize mechanical ventilation and oxygenation in acute respiratory disorders such as status asthmaticus and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), to prevent shivering during therapeutic hypothermia, and also in patients with elevated intracranial pressure. In the ICU, patients with sepsis, ARDS, community-acquired pneumonia, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, severe asthma, or trauma may receive corticosteroids. It is not rare that ICU patients receive concomitantly neuromuscular blocking drugs and corticosteroids. Among the various serious adverse reactions to these drugs, secondary infection and ICU-acquired weakness may place a burden to the health-care system by resulting in substantial cost and long-term morbidity. Both superinfections and ICU-acquired paresis are more likely when high doses of fluorinated corticosteroids are combined with prolonged treatment with a long-acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocker. Modern ICU practices favor lower dose of corticosteroids and very short course of short-acting curare for the management of sepsis or ARDS. Recent trials provided no evidence for increased risk of secondary infections or critical illness neuromyopathy in patients with sepsis or ARDS with the use of corticosteroids or neuromuscular blockers. PMID:26820274

  2. Facial nerve identification with fluorescent dye in rats.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Giulianno Molina; Cervantes, Onivaldo; Covolan, Luciene; Baptista, Heloisa Allegro; Ferreira, Elenn Soares; Abrahao, Marcio

    2016-02-01

    PURPOSE The parotidectomy technique still has an elevated paresis and paralysis index, lowering patient life's quality. The correct identification of the facial nerve can prevent nerve damage. Fluorescent dye identifies nerves in experimental studies but only few articles focused its use on facial nerve study in parotidectomies. We aimed to stain the rat facial nerve with fluorescent dye to facilitate visualization and dissection in order to prevent injuries. METHODS Forty adult male Wistar rats were submitted to facial injection of saline solution (Gsf-control group, 10) or fluorescent dye solution (Gdye group, 30) followed by parotidectomy preserving the facial nerve, measuring the time for localization and facility of localization (LocTime and LFN). Nerve function was assessed using the Vibrissae Movements (PMV) and Eyelid Closure Motion (PFP) scores. RESULTS Nerve localization was faster in Gdye group, with 83% Easy LFN rate. The Gdye group presented with low nerve injury degree and better PMV and PFP scores, with high sensitivity and accuracy. CONCLUSIONS This experimental method of facial nerve fluorescence was effective for intraoperative nerve visualization, identification and preservation. The technique may be used in future facial nerve studies, translated to humans, contributing to the optimization of parotid surgery in the near future. PMID:26959618

  3. Combinations of susceptibility genes are associated with higher risk for multiple sclerosis and imply disease course specificity.

    PubMed

    Akkad, Denis A; Olischewsky, Alexandra; Reiner, Franziska; Hellwig, Kerstin; Esser, Sarika; Epplen, Jörg T; Curk, Tomaz; Gold, Ralf; Haghikia, Aiden

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that predominantly affects young adults. The genetic contributions to this multifactorial disease were underscored by a genome wide association study (GWAS) conducted by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetic Consortium in a multinational cohort prompting the discovery of 57 non-MHC MS-associated common genetic variants. Hitherto, few of these newly reported variants have been replicated in larger independent patient cohorts. We genotyped a cohort of 1033 MS patients and 644 healthy controls with a consistent genetic background for the 57 non-MHC variants reported to be associated with MS by the first large GWAS as well as the HLA DRB1*1501 tagging SNP rs3135388. We robustly replicated three of the 57 non-MHC reported MS-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, our study revealed several genotype-genotype combinations with an evidently higher degree of disease association than the genotypes of the single SNPs. We further correlated well-defined clinical phenotypes, i.e. ataxia, visual impairment due to optic neuritis and paresis with single SNPs and genotype combinations, and identified several associations. The results may open new avenues for clinical implications of the MS associated genetic variants reported from large GWAS. PMID:26011527

  4. Anterior-only Partial Sacrectomy for en bloc Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Hector; Perez-Orribo, Luis F.; Plata-Bello, Julio M.; Martin-Malagon, Antonio I.; Garcia-Marin, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The usual procedure for partial sacrectomies in locally advanced rectal cancer combines a transabdominal and a posterior sacral route. The posterior approach is flawed with a high rate of complications, especially infections and wound-healing problems. Anterior-only approaches have indirectly been mentioned within long series of rectal cancer surgery. We describe a case of partial sacrectomy for en bloc resection of a locally advanced rectal cancer with invasion of the low sacrum through a combined transabdominal and perineal approach without any posterior incision. Methods Through a midline laparotomy, the tumor was dissected and the sacral osteotomy was performed. Once the sacrum was mobile, the muscular attachments to its posterior wall were cut through the perineal approach. This latter route was also used to remove the whole specimen. Results The postoperative period was uneventful in terms of infection and wound healing, but the patient developed right foot dorsiflexion paresis that completely disappeared in 1 month. Resection margins were negative. After a follow-up of 18 months, the patient has no local recurrence but presented lung and liver metastases. Conclusion In cases of rectal cancer involving the low sacrum, the combination of a transabdominal and a perineal route to carry out the partial sacrectomy is a feasible approach that avoids changes of surgical positioning and the morbidity related to posterior incisions. This strategy should be considered when deciding on undertaking partial sacrectomy in locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:25396109

  5. Culling of dairy cows. Part I. Effects of diseases on culling in Finnish Ayrshire cows.

    PubMed

    Rajala-Schultz, P J; Gröhn, Y T

    1999-07-20

    The effects of 15 diseases on time until culling were studied in 39,727 Finnish Ayrshire cows that calved during 1993 and were followed until the next calving or culling. The diseases studied were: dystocia, milk fever, retained placenta, displacement of the abomasum, metritis, non-parturient paresis, ketosis, rumen disorders, acute mastitis, hypomagnesemia, lameness, traumatic reticuloperitonitis, anestrus, ovarian cysts, and teat injuries. Survival analysis, using the Cox proportional hazards model, was performed and diseases were modeled as time-dependent covariates. Different stages of lactation when culling can occur were also considered. Parity, calving season and herd were included as covariates in every model. Parity had a significant effect on culling, the risk of culling being four times higher for a cow in her sixth or higher parity than for a first parity cow. The effects of diseases varied according to when the diseases occurred and when culling occurred. Mastitis, teat injuries and lameness had a significant effect on culling throughout the whole lactation. Anestrus and ovarian cysts had a protective effect against culling at the time when they were diagnosed. In general, diseases affected culling decisions mostly at the time of their occurrence. The effect seemed to decrease with time from the diagnosis of the disease. However, milk fever, dystocia and metritis also had a significant effect on culling at the end of the lactation. PMID:10448946

  6. First autologous cell therapy of cerebral palsy caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in a child after cardiac arrest-individual treatment with cord blood.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A; Hamelmann, E

    2013-01-01

    Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75 × 10e8 mononuclear cells) intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy) was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy's motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words). This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage. PMID:23762741

  7. Giant macroprolactinoma and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Joana; Gomes, Leonor; Paiva, Sandra; Ruas, Luisa; Carvalheiro, Manuela

    2013-10-01

    Prolactinomas are a common cause of gonadal dysfunction and infertility. We present the case of a 38-year-old woman with history of amenorrhea and infertility. At seven weeks of pregnancy she presented neuro-ophthalmologic complaints of headaches, diplopia, and right ptosis. The work-up study revealed an invasive pituitary macroadenoma with a maximum diameter of 9 cm and serum prolactin of 25,800 ng/mL (3-20). At 12 weeks, she was referred to the Endocrinology Department of the Coimbra University Hospital and started therapy with bromocriptine, initially 5 mg/day and then at crescent doses. Hyperprolactinemia was rapidly and drastically reduced to 254 ng/mL three weeks after taking bromocriptine 15 mg/day. Tumoral volume was reduced and there was improvement of III pair paresis. At 38 weeks, a male healthy baby was born. This is a relevant clinical case that illustrates the efficacy and safety of bromocriptine therapy during pregnancy, even in severe cases like this one. PMID:24232822

  8. A personal overview of causalgia and other reflex dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B

    1985-03-01

    This is a personal assessment of true major causalgia and the other reflex dystrophies, related but distinctly separate entities. The clinical picture of causalgia differs only in minor respects from that described by Mitchell over 120 years ago. Its management has, however, been clarified, largely through the extensive experiences of World War II. It is readily recognized and can be treated effectively by sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy together with active exercise. The other reflex dystrophies are far less understood. They appear to have a similar pattern in their early phase and to respond well to a program of exercise and control of edema--a regimen which, because of pain and paresis, cannot be carried out without sympathetic blocks or occasionally sympathectomy. When not recognized early and treated properly, the sympatomatology usually changes dramatically and treatment differs. Often control of edema and active use of the affected part are all that is necessary. Sometimes, in addition to these measures, sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy is required. Guidelines found useful in management are outlined. Puzzling features are discussed. PMID:3977427

  9. The Outcome of Infantile Onset Pompe Disease in South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moravej, Hossein; Karamizadeh, Zohre; Paran, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infantile Onset Pompe Disease (IOPD) is a rare autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder. It is associated with cardiomegaly, hypotonia, paresis, and death in the first year of life. Since 2006, following the use of Alglucosidase alfa as Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT), the patients’ survival is improved to a noticeable extent. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the outcome of IOPD patients in South of Iran and the degree of responsiveness to ERT. Patients and Methods: All patients who were diagnosed with IOPD on the bases of clinical symptoms, and enzyme assay on dried blood spot, were included in the study; and were followed up regarding cardiac function, locomotor activity, and cognition. Results: Six patients with IOPD were identified. All these six patients suffered from Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Four (67%) of them also had generalized hypotonia. Three patients expired during the first weeks due to severe respiratory infection. One of them also got involved with Acute Cardiopulmonary Failure while receiving the fifth dose of ERT; and expired. However, the remaining two patients had a significant improvement after the maximum of 117 weeks of following up both cardiac and locomotor findings. These two patients were the same patients who showed cardiac symptoms from the beginning but did not have generalized hypotonia. Conclusions: Although ERT has a significant effect on enhancing the survival of IOPD patients, it should be associated with meticulous heart-respiratory cares during the first months of treatment and preventing infection especially nosocomial infections. PMID:26848380

  10. AGGREGATED, WILD-TYPE PRION PROTEIN CAUSES NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION AND SYNAPTIC ABNORMALITIES

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Roberto; Piccardo, Pedro; Biasini, Emiliano; Ghetti, Bernardino; Harris, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The neurotoxic forms of the prion protein (PrP) that cause neurodegeneration in prion diseases remain to be conclusively identified. Considerable evidence points to the importance of non-infectious oligomers of PrP in the pathogenic process. In this study, we describe lines of Tg(WT) transgenic mice that over-express wild-type PrP by either ∼5-fold or ∼10-fold (depending on whether the transgene array is, respectively, hemizygous or homozygous). Homozygous but not hemizygous Tg(WT) mice develop a spontaneous neurodegenerative illness characterized clinically by tremor and paresis. Both kinds of mice accumulate large numbers of punctate PrP deposits in the molecular layer of the cerebellum as well as in several other brain regions, and they display abnormally enlarged synaptic terminals accompanied by a dramatic proliferation of membranous structures. The over-expressed PrP in Tg(WT) mice assembles into an insoluble form that is mildly protease-resistant and is recognizable by aggregation-specific antibodies, but that is not infectious in transmission experiments. Taken together, our results demonstrate that non-infectious aggregates of wild-type PrP are neurotoxic, particularly to synapses, and they suggest common pathogenic mechanisms shared by prion diseases and non-transmissible neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. PMID:19052217

  11. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy following oral fludarabine treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cid, J; Revilla, M; Cervera, A; Cervantes, F; Muñoz, E; Ferrer, I; Montserrat, E

    2000-07-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a subacute demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system usually affecting immunocompromised individuals and is due to infection of the oligodendrocytes by the JC virus. A case of PML in a chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient treated with fludarabine is reported, representing the second such instance in which the diagnosis of the neurological disorder was established by brain biopsy. A 61-year-old man with a 14-year history of B-cell type CLL, for which he had received chlorambucil therapy 10 years earlier, developed progressive paresis of both left extremities at 7 months of receiving low doses of oral fludarabine, when his CD4 count has decreased to 0.08 x 10(9)/l. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a subcortical focal lesion at the right precentral gyrus and a focal lesion at the right thalamus, and a stereotactic brain biopsy showed pathological findings consistent with PML, namely severe myelin breakdown, reactive astrocytosis, and abnormal, huge glial cells with large bizarre nuclei showing granular basophilic inclusions, whereas the presence of the JC virus was demonstrated by in situ hybridization. The present case, in addition to a few previously reported, calls attention to the possibility that severe neurological side effects can be associated with the immunosuppression provoked by the use of fludarabine in CLL patients. PMID:10965788

  12. Clinical application of the Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) for gait training—a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Anneli; Borg, Jörgen; Palmcrantz, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to review the literature on clinical applications of the Hybrid Assistive Limb system for gait training. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted using Web of Science, PubMed, CINAHL and clinicaltrials.gov and additional search was made using reference lists in identified reports. Abstracts were screened, relevant articles were reviewed and subject to quality assessment. Results: Out of 37 studies, 7 studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Six studies were single group studies and 1 was an explorative randomized controlled trial. In total, these studies involved 140 participants of whom 118 completed the interventions and 107 used HAL for gait training. Five studies concerned gait training after stroke, 1 after spinal cord injury (SCI) and 1 study after stroke, SCI or other diseases affecting walking ability. Minor and transient side effects occurred but no serious adverse events were reported in the studies. Beneficial effects on gait function variables and independence in walking were observed. Conclusions: The accumulated findings demonstrate that the HAL system is feasible when used for gait training of patients with lower extremity paresis in a professional setting. Beneficial effects on gait function and independence in walking were observed but data do not allow conclusions. Further controlled studies are recommended. PMID:25859191

  13. Endoscopic Endonasal Management of Recurrent Petrous Apex Cholesterol Granuloma

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Kelly, Daniel F.; Prevedello, Daniel M.; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Carrau, Ricardo L.; Kassam, Amin B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Petrous apex cholesterol granulomas (PACGs) are uncommon lesions. Recurrence following transcranial or endonasal approaches to aerate the cyst occurs in up to 60% of cases. We describe the technical nuances pertinent to the endonasal endoscopic management of a recurrent symptomatic PACG and review the literature. Results A 19-year-old woman presented with a recurrent abducens nerve paresis. Four months prior, she underwent an endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for drainage of a symptomatic PACG. Current imaging documented recurrence of the right PACG. Transsphenoidal and infrapetrous approaches were performed to obtain a wider bony opening along the petrous apex and drain the cyst. A Doyle splint was inserted into the cyst's cavity and extended out into the sphenoid sinus, maintaining patency during the healing process. Three months after surgery, the splint was removed endoscopically, allowing visualization of a patent cylindrical communication between both aerated cavities. The patient remains symptom-free and recurrence-free. Conclusion Endoscopic endonasal surgery must be adapted to manage a recurrent PACG. A TSS may not be sufficient. An infrapetrous approach with wider bony opening, extensive removal of the cyst's anterior wall, and the use of a stent are indicated for the treatment of recurrent PACG and to prevent recurrences. PMID:23730548

  14. Characterization of thoracic motor and sensory neurons and spinal nerve roots in canine degenerative myelopathy, a potential disease model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brandie R; Coates, Joan R; Johnson, Gayle C; Shelton, G Diane; Katz, Martin L

    2014-04-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive, adult-onset, multisystem degenerative disease with many features in common with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As with some forms of ALS, DM is associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Clinical signs include general proprioceptive ataxia and spastic upper motor neuron paresis in pelvic limbs, which progress to flaccid tetraplegia and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to characterize DM as a potential disease model for ALS. We previously reported that intercostal muscle atrophy develops in dogs with advanced-stage DM. To determine whether other components of the thoracic motor unit (MU) also demonstrated morphological changes consistent with dysfunction, histopathologic and morphometric analyses were conducted on thoracic spinal motor neurons (MNs) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and in motor and sensory nerve root axons from DM-affected boxers and Pembroke Welsh corgis (PWCs). No alterations in MNs or motor root axons were observed in either breed. However, advanced-stage PWCs exhibited significant losses of sensory root axons, and numerous DRG sensory neurons displayed evidence of degeneration. These results indicate that intercostal muscle atrophy in DM is not preceded by physical loss of the motor neurons innervating these muscles, nor of their axons. Axonal loss in thoracic sensory roots and sensory neuron death suggest that sensory involvement may play an important role in DM disease progression. Further analysis of the mechanisms responsible for these morphological findings would aid in the development of therapeutic intervention for DM and some forms of ALS. PMID:24375814

  15. Selective Long-term Reorganization of the Corticospinal Projection from the Supplementary Motor Cortex following Recovery from Lateral Motor Cortex Injury

    PubMed Central

    McNeal, David W.; Darling, Warren G.; Ge, Jizhi; Stilwell-Morecraft, Kimberly S.; Solon, Kathryn M.; Hynes, Stephanie M.; Pizzimenti, Marc A.; Rotella, Diane; Vanadurongvan, Tyler; Morecraft, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Brain injury affecting the frontal motor cortex or its descending axons often causes contralateral upper extremity paresis. Although recovery is variable, the underlying mechanisms supporting favorable motor recovery remain unclear. Since the medial wall of the cerebral hemisphere is often spared following brain injury and recent functional neuroimaging studies in patients indicate a potential role for this brain region in the recovery process, we investigated the long-term effects of isolated lateral frontal motor cortical injury on the corticospinal projection (CSP) from intact, ipsilesional supplementary motor cortex (M2). Following injury to the arm region of the primary motor (M1) and lateral premotor (LPMC) cortices, upper extremity recovery is accompanied by terminal axon plasticity in the contralateral CSP but not the ipsilateral CSP from M2. Furthermore, significant contralateral plasticity occurs only in lamina VII and dorsally within lamina IX. Thus, selective intraspinal sprouting transpires in regions containing interneurons, flexor-related motor neurons and motor neurons supplying intrinsic hand muscles which all play important roles in mediating reaching and digit movements. Following recovery, subsequent injury of M2 leads to reemergence of hand motor deficits. Considering the importance of the CSP in humans and the common occurrence of lateral frontal cortex injury, these findings suggest that spared supplementary motor cortex may serve as an important therapeutic target that should be considered when designing acute and long-term post-injury patient intervention strategies aimed to enhance the motor recovery process following lateral cortical trauma. PMID:20034062

  16. Active illumination based 3D surface reconstruction and registration for image guided medialization laryngoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ge; Lee, Sang-Joon; Hahn, James K.; Bielamowicz, Steven; Mittal, Rajat; Walsh, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The medialization laryngoplasty is a surgical procedure to improve the voice function of the patient with vocal fold paresis and paralysis. An image guided system for the medialization laryngoplasty will help the surgeons to accurately place the implant and thus reduce the failure rates of the surgery. One of the fundamental challenges in image guided system is to accurately register the preoperative radiological data to the intraoperative anatomical structure of the patient. In this paper, we present a combined surface and fiducial based registration method to register the preoperative 3D CT data to the intraoperative surface of larynx. To accurately model the exposed surface area, a structured light based stereo vision technique is used for the surface reconstruction. We combined the gray code pattern and multi-line shifting to generate the intraoperative surface of the larynx. To register the point clouds from the intraoperative stage to the preoperative 3D CT data, a shape priori based ICP method is proposed to quickly register the two surfaces. The proposed approach is capable of tracking the fiducial markers and reconstructing the surface of larynx with no damage to the anatomical structure. We used off-the-shelf digital cameras, LCD projector and rapid 3D prototyper to develop our experimental system. The final RMS error in the registration is less than 1mm.

  17. Selenium toxicity and porcine focal symmetrical poliomyelomalacia: description of a field outbreak and experimental reproduction.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, T M; Scholz, R W; Drake, T R

    1983-01-01

    An acute afebrile paretic condition was diagnosed in 18 of 225 feeder pigs between eight to ten weeks of age. Nine pigs died acutely, seven pigs were euthanatized and two appeared to recover. Macroscopic lesions in the ventral horns of the cervical and lumbar/sacral spinal cord enlargements consisted of focal, bilateral, depressed areas. Histopathologically, the lesion consisted of endothelial proliferation, glial cell reaction and microcavitation. Similar lesions were observed in some brain stem motor nuclei. High selenium levels were detected in the pig feed and in pig tissues and blood. Two of five experimental pigs fed a commercial grower ration and supplemented with 52 ppm selenium as sodium selenite developed paresis and paralysis after a 29 day feeding trial. Histopathological lesions of focal symmetrical poliomyelomalacia confined to the cervical and lumbar/sacral spinal cord enlargements, and identical to those in the field cases, were produced. Select brain stem motor nuclei were also affected. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. PMID:6667430

  18. A case of interhemispheric subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Koumtchev, Y; Petkov, S; Gozmanov, G

    1994-01-01

    The interhemispheric subdural hematoma is a rare condition. We present a case of interhemispheric subdural hematoma in a patient aged 65 years. A day prior to admission he was struck with a water-pipe on the head. He went to sleep the same evening complaining of a slight headache. At about two o'clock in the morning the headache increased in intensity. By the morning he lost consciousness. On examination by a neurosurgeon the patient was found to be comatose. The physical examination revealed blue eyelids of the left eye, paraplegia of the right leg, paresis of the left leg and arms. Bilateral Babinski's reflex was present, the abdominal reflexes were absent, the tendon and periosteal reflexes were hyperactive. The pupils were equal in size and slowly reactive to light. The patient exhibited symptoms of meningoradicular irritation. An emergency CT scan revealed high-density area in the interhemispheric sulcus extending frontally to parietally. The patients was operated on in an emergency. At operation, extensive rupture of the sagittal sinus was identified. Later the patient died. The presented case was interesting with the extensive rupture of the sagittal sinus and the relatively long lucid interval until clear manifestation of the clinical picture becomes evident. PMID:7867995

  19. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability.

    PubMed

    Wayman, Christina; Duricki, Denise A; Roy, Lisa A; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet's equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  20. Retrospective analysis of spinal arachnoid cysts in 14 dogs.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Helena; Lipsitz, David; Berry, Wayne L; Sturges, Beverly K; Vernau, Karen M; Dickinson, Peter J; Añor, Sonia A; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    Spinal cord dysfunction secondary to spinal arachnoid cysts (SACs) has been reported previously in dogs. This retrospective study reviews the clinical signs, radiographic findings, and outcome after surgical resection of SACs in 14 dogs. Plain vertebral column radiographs and myelography were done in all dogs. Computed tomography (CT) was done in 7 dogs and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 3 dogs. Affected dogs were between 1 and 12 years of age, and 8 of 14 were Rottweilers. Abnormalities detected on neurological examination depended on the location of the SAC. Five dogs had bilobed or multiple SACs. SACs were located in the cervical vertebral column in 11 dogs and in the thoracic vertebral column in 4 dogs. All dogs had dorsally or dorsolaterally located SACs. Two dogs also had additional ventrally located SACs. Spinal cord compression secondary to intervertebral disc extrusion or protrusion was demonstrated at the site of the SACs in 2 dogs. Surgical resection of the SACs was completed in all dogs. Eleven dogs were available for follow-up. Five weeks postoperatively, 7 dogs improved in neurological function, with some residual ataxia and paresis in 6 of these dogs. Neurological function had deteriorated in 4 dogs. It was concluded from this study that Rottweilers have a higher incidence of SACs than other breeds of dog. Furthermore, bilobed or multiple SACs can occur commonly, and myelography effectively localized SACs in dogs. Surgical resection of SACs resulted in improvement in neurological function in the majority of treated dogs. PMID:12465766

  1. [MRI findings delay the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Becker, H

    2011-09-01

    This report concerns a 55-year-old female patient who presented with headache, dry right eye and dry nose on the right side. After 5 months magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out but no pathological findings were diagnosed. Right-sided facial pain appeared 6 months later and a second MRI was carried out but only fluid retention in the right mastoid was diagnosed. After a further 8 months paresis of the right abducent nerve occurred and a computed tomography (CT) scan of the petrous bone showed extensive destruction of the apex of the petrous pyramid. Subsequently a third MRI revealed a tumor of about 5 cm in diameter in the right pterygopalatine fossa which was also retrospectively visible in the first MRI with a size of approximately 3 cm and in the second MRI with 4 cm in diameter. The histological examination after biopsy resulted in the diagnosis of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma and radiochemotherapy was initiated. The patient died 9 months later. The relatives of the patient applied to the arbitration board for medical liability which requested expert opinions in neuroradiology and otorhinolaryngology. The board came to the conclusion that the claims for damages against the radiologist who had made the three MRIs were well-founded and recommended an extrajudicial settlement. PMID:21717162

  2. Slowly progressive anarthria with late anterior opercular syndrome: a variant form of frontal cortical atrophy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Bakchine, S; Tommasi, M; Laurent, B; Bazin, B; Cinotti, L; Cohen, L; Chazot, G

    1996-12-01

    We describe eight patients with slowly progressive speech production deficit combining speech apraxia, dysarthria, dysprosody and orofacial apraxia, and initially no other deficit in other language and non-language neuropsychological domains. Long-term follow-up (6-10 years) in 4 cases showed an evolution to muteness, bilateral suprabulbar paresis with automatic-voluntary dissociation and frontal lobe cognitive slowing without generalised intellectual deterioration. Most disabled patients presented with an anterior opercular syndrome (Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome), and pyramidal or extrapyramidal signs. CT and MRI findings disclosed asymmetric (left > right) progressive cortical atrophy of the frontal lobes predominating in the posterior inferior frontal region, notably the operculum. SPECT and PET revealed a decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolism, prominent in the left posterior-inferior frontal gyrus and premotor cortex, extending bilaterally in the most advanced cases. Pathological study of two cases showed non-specific neuronal loss, gliosis, and spongiosis of superficial cortical layers, mainly confined to the frontal lobes, with no significant abnormalities in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem (except severe neuronal loss in the substantia nigra in one case), and spinal cord. We propose to call this peculiar syndrome Slowly Progressive Anarthria (SPA), based on its specific clinical presentation, and its metabolic and pathological correlates. SPA represents another clinical expression of focal cortical degeneration syndromes, that may overlap with other similar syndromes, specially primary progressive aphasia and the various frontal lobe dementias. PMID:8994103

  3. [Sterilization of women].

    PubMed

    Tandberg, A

    1988-01-30

    The records of 209 women sterilized in the Lillehammer (Norway) county hospital during the period 1980-82 were examined for age, residence, parity, method of operation, induced abortions and frequency of complications. The patients were sent a questionnaire 6 months after the operation and were asked about how long they had felt unable to work after the operation, whether they regretted the operation, and whether they were satisfied with the cosmetic results. 96% of the patients returned the questionnaires. On the average the women had had 2.4 children at the time of sterilization. Those who had received induced abortions at the same time had 2.5 children. Women resident in the city had 2.1 children, those in the country had 2.4 children. None had 6 children. 20% had received abortion simultaneously. Aside from 1 patient who had transitory paresis in the left arm due to faulty padding in a shoulder support, there were no complications noted in the material. 2 patients regretted the operation. Neither of them had had simultaneous abortion. 1 of these had 1 child. Advised to be sterilized because of severe preeclampsia in her 1st pregnancy, she desired more children. The other, who had 4 children, gave decreased libido as the cause for her regret. Of the 177 who had had laparoscopy, only 6 patients (3.5%) said that they were dissatisfied with the appearance of the scar. PMID:3353913

  4. Effects of oral administration of "rumen-bypass" vitamin D3 on vitamin D and calcium metabolism in periparturient cows.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, N; Dohmae, H; Shirato, A; Sato, J; Sato, R; Naito, Y

    2000-04-01

    Eleven late-pregnant Jersey cows were assigned to two groups; a group (PO-RBVD group) consisting of five cows treated with an oral administration of 10 million I.U. of an encapsulated form of vitamin D3 ("rumen-bypass" VD3; RBVD3) and another group (IMVD group) consisting of the other six treated with an intramuscular injection of 10 million I.U. of vitamin D3 (VD3). The cows received the RBVD3 or VD3 administration at 7 days before the expected parturition. The changes in the plasma concentrations of vitamin D metabolites, ionized Ca (Ca++) and inorganic phosphorus (iP) were evaluated. Of the vitamin D metabolites, the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in PO-RBVD group increased significantly after the RBVD3 administration and remained in high levels that were significantly higher than those in IMVD group. This suggested that RBVD3 was absorbed rapidly and excellently from the post-ruminal digestive tract without the degradation by ruminal microorganisms. The plasma Ca++ and iP concentrations in PO-RBVD group tended to be higher after the administration and around parturition than those in IMVD group. From these observations, it was suggested the oral RBVD3 administration had more potent ability to prevent parturient paresis compared with the VD3 injection used widely in Japan. PMID:10823727

  5. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis: a case of chronic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Fonnesu, C; Giovinale, M; Verrecchia, E; De Socio, G; Cerquaglia, C; Curigliano, V; Soriano, A; Obici, L; Grieco, A; Lauriola, L; Gasbarrini, G; Manna, R

    2009-03-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease caused by extracellular deposits of insoluble fibrillar proteins in various organs and tissues. There are different forms of amyloidosis distinguished by the type of protein fibrils, by the sites of deposition and by associated conditions. Gastrointestinal involvement is common both in primary and secondary amyloidosis, while isolated gastrointestinal amyloidosis is rare. We describe a case of AL amyloidosis with a gastrointestinal involvement and restrictive cardiomiopathy. A 64 year old woman came to our attention with a history of chronic diarrhoea and weight loss, associated with dysphagia, dry mouth, xerophtalmia, chronic gastritis and depression. Clinical diagnosis has been difficult because of aspecificity of symptoms that mimed other more common diseases, like gastro-paresis, epigastric discomfort, gastric or duodenal ulcers, perforation, malabsorption, intestinal pseudo-obstruction. There is an important risk of misunderstanding and diagnostic delay. Indeed in this patient a diagnosis of irritable colon syndrome was erroneously established two years before admission in our hospital. Therefore gastrointestinal amyloidosis should be considered among differential diagnoses of chronic diarrhoea and weight loss when other more common diseases have been excluded. PMID:19530511

  6. Congenital spinal stenosis and dam mortality associated with feeding moldy cereal straw.

    PubMed

    Ribble, C S; Janzen, E D; Doige, C E

    1993-04-01

    We describe herein an epidemiological investigation of the cause of a syndrome of congenital spinal stenosis (CSS) in four beef herds in western Canada. Three of the herds were affected with the syndrome in 1987, the fourth was affected in 1990. The prevalence of CSS in affected groups of calves varied from 29% (16/55) to 100% (14/14). All affected calves had congenital posterior paralysis or paresis; some calves also had one or more of the following: shortened limbs, forelimb varus deformities, superior brachygnathia, and a dome-shaped cranium. Affected calves showed focal premature closure of axial and appendicular metaphyseal growth plates. At three of the four farms most of the pregnant cows were affected with alopecia with or without pruritus in January, and 25% of the cows in one herd died during the winter. The investigation indicated that CSS was associated with feeding moldy cereal straw to pregnant beef cows during the winter. At all four farms, the cereal straw bales were thoroughly soaked by rain prior to stacking, and obvious mold was present when they were broken open for feeding. Species of both Penicillium and Fusarium were abundant within the bales. The most likely cause of the disease was a fungal mycotoxicosis, although the mycotoxin responsible was not isolated. PMID:17424199

  7. Congenital spinal stenosis and dam mortality associated with feeding moldy cereal straw

    PubMed Central

    Ribble, Carl S.; Janzen, Eugene D.; Doige, Cecil E.

    1993-01-01

    We describe herein an epidemiological investigation of the cause of a syndrome of congenital spinal stenosis (CSS) in four beef herds in western Canada. Three of the herds were affected with the syndrome in 1987, the fourth was affected in 1990. The prevalence of CSS in affected groups of calves varied from 29% (16/55) to 100% (14/14). All affected calves had congenital posterior paralysis or paresis; some calves also had one or more of the following: shortened limbs, forelimb varus deformities, superior brachygnathia, and a dome-shaped cranium. Affected calves showed focal premature closure of axial and appendicular metaphyseal growth plates. At three of the four farms most of the pregnant cows were affected with alopecia with or without pruritus in January, and 25% of the cows in one herd died during the winter. The investigation indicated that CSS was associated with feeding moldy cereal straw to pregnant beef cows during the winter. At all four farms, the cereal straw bales were thoroughly soaked by rain prior to stacking, and obvious mold was present when they were broken open for feeding. Species of both Penicillium and Fusarium were abundant within the bales. The most likely cause of the disease was a fungal mycotoxicosis, although the mycotoxin responsible was not isolated. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17424199

  8. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status. PMID:27162595

  9. A novel Caspr mutation causes the shambling mouse phenotype by disrupting axoglial interactions of myelinated nerves.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-yang; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Okabe, Erina; Chishima, Yûko; Kanou, Yasuhiko; Murase, Shiori; Mizumura, Kazue; Inaba, Mie; Komatsu, Yukio; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Peles, Elior; Oda, Sen-ichi; Murata, Yoshiharu

    2009-11-01

    The neurological mouse mutation shambling (shm) exhibits ataxia and hindlimb paresis. Positional cloning of shm showed that it encodes contactin-associated protein (Caspr), which is required for formation of the paranodal junction in myelinated nerves. The shm mutation is a TT insertion in the Caspr gene that results in a frame shift and a premature stop codon at the COOH-terminus. The truncated Caspr protein that is generated lacks the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Here, we found that the nodal/paranodal axoplasm of shm mice lack paranodal junctions and contain large mitochondria and abnormal accumulations of cytoplasmic organelles that indicate altered axonal transport. Immunohistochemical analysis of mutant mice showed reduced expression of Caspr, contactin, and neurofascin 155, which are thought to form a protein complex in the paranodal region; protein 4.1B, however, was normally distributed. The mutant mice had aberrant localization of voltage-gated ion channels on the axolemma of nodal/paranodal regions. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated that the velocity of saltatory conduction was reduced in sciatic nerves and that the visual response was attenuated in the primary visual cortex. These abnormalities likely contribute to the neurological phenotype of the mutant mice. PMID:19816196

  10. Neurologic complications after intrathecal liposomal cytarabine in combination with systemic polychemotherapy in primary CNS lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Kathrin; Pels, Hendrik; Kowoll, Annika; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Schlegel, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    Intrathecal application of liposomal cytarabine (Ara-C) (DepoCyte(®)) has been associated with neurotoxicity when applied as part of a polychemotherapy regimen. Patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma treated with high-dose systemic methotrexate (MTX)- and Ara-C-based polychemotherapy including six cycles of liposomal Ara-C (50 mg intrathecally every 3 weeks) were prospectively monitored for neurotoxic side-effects. Between November 2005 and February 2009, 149 intrathecal applications of liposomal cytarabine (DepoCyte(®)) were carried out in 33 patients, 7 (21%) of whom developed an incomplete conus medullaris/cauda equina syndrome with incontinence for bladder (6) and bowel function (3) or lumbosacral polyradicular paresis (1), resolving only incompletely over a follow-up period of 9-30 months. In six of these seven patients, lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was negative for leptomeningeal infiltration or arachnoiditis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis performed in six of these seven patients showed normal cell count in all and increased total protein in four of them. One patient among these seven suffered a seizure without other identifiable causes. Conus/cauda syndrome has to be considered as a serious potential neurotoxic side-effect in patients receiving liposomal Ara-C as part of a multimodal regimen including high-dose systemic MTX and Ara-C. PMID:20953896

  11. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern. PMID:23634273

  12. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in a Patient with Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Alex; Wenz, Holger; Groden, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) has initially been described in acute ischemic stroke. The phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium enhancement in the subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Here we report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with transient paresis and sensory loss in the right arm. Initial routine stroke MRI including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging demonstrated no acute pathology. Follow-up MRI after three hours demonstrated subarachnoid gadolinium enhancement in the left middle cerebral artery territory consistent with HARM that completely resolved on follow-up MRI three days later. This case illustrates that even in transient ischemic attack patients disturbances of the blood-brain barrier may be present which significantly exceed the extent of acute ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging. Inclusion of FLAIR images with delayed acquisition after intravenous contrast agent application in MRI stroke protocols might facilitate the diagnosis of a recent acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27127673

  13. En Bloc Resection of Desmoplastic Neurotropic Melanoma with Perineural Invasion of the Intracranial Trigeminal and Intraparotid Facial Nerve: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Serkan; Acharya, Aanand N; Savundra, James; Lewis, Stephen B; Rajan, Gunesh P

    2016-03-01

    Background Desmoplastic neurotropic melanoma (DNM) is a rare, highly malignant, and locally invasive form of cutaneous melanoma with a tendency for perineural invasion (PNI). Methods We report a case of a 61-year-old man presenting with right-sided trigeminal neuralgia and progressive facial paresis due to the PNI of the intracranial trigeminal nerve and the intraparotid facial nerve from DNM. We also present a review of the literature with six cases of DNM with PNI of the intracranial trigeminal nerve identified. Results The combined transtemporal-infratemporal fossa approach was performed to achieve total en bloc resection of the tumor mass followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). After 24 months of follow-up, the patient remains disease free with no signs of recurrence on magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion We recommend the en bloc resection of the tumor mass followed by PORT for the management of DNM with PNI. A high index of suspicion for PNI as a cause of cranial neuropathies is essential for the early detection and treatment of patients with known melanoma. PMID:26929895

  14. Guillain–Barré syndrome occurring synchronously with systemic lupus erythematosus as initial manifestation treated successfully with low-dose cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naveed; Rampure, Ritesh; Malik, Faizan; Jafri, Syed Imran Mustafa; Amberker, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is frequently encountered in clinical practice; a widespread immunological response can involve any organ system, sometimes leading to rare and diagnostically challenging presentations. We describe a 38-year-old female who presented with symmetric numbness and tingling of the hands and feet, and cervical pain. Imaging studies were not diagnostic of any serious underlying pathology. The patient developed ascending paresis involving lower extremities and cranial muscles (dysphagia and facial weakness). Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) was diagnosed on the basis of electromyography and lumbar puncture showing albuminocytologic dissociation. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) were administered for 5 days. Supported by anti-dsDNA antibody, oral ulcers, proteinuria of 0.7 g in 24 h, and neurological manifestation, she was diagnosed with lupus. After completion of IVIG, she received pulse-dose corticosteroids and one dose of low-dose cyclophosphamide. Her neurological symptoms improved and she had complete neurological recovery several months after her initial presentation. Literature search provides evidence of co-occurrence of lupus and GBS occurring mostly later in the course of the disease. However, GBS as initial manifestation of SLE is exceedingly rare and less understood. The association of GBS with lupus is important to recognize for rapid initiation of appropriate therapy and for consideration of immunosuppressive therapy which may affect the outcome. PMID:27124163

  15. Results and Complications of 1104 Surgeries for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hirschberg, Jenő

    2012-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) means that the velopharyngeal closure is inadequate or disturbed. VPI may be organic or functional, congenital or acquired and is caused by structural alterations or paresis. The symptoms are primarily to be found in speech (hypernasality), more rarely in swallowing and hearing. The management types are as follows: speech therapy, surgery, speech bulb, and others. Surgery is indicated if the symptoms of VPI cannot be improved by speech therapy. Among the operative methods, velopharyngoplasty constitutes the basis of the surgery. The pharyngeal flap was incorporated and survived in 98.1% of the cases, hyperrhinophony disappeared or became minimal in 90% after surgery in our material (1104 cases). The speech results seemed to be the same with superiorly or inferiorly based pharyngeal flap. The Furlow technique, push-back procedure, the sphincteroplasty, and the augmentation were indicated by us if the VP gap was less than 7 mm; these methods may also be used as secondary operation. We observed among 1104 various surgeries severe hemorrhage in 5 cases, aspiration in 2 cases, significant nasal obstruction in 68 patients, OSAS in 5 cases; tracheotomy was necessary in 2 cases. Although the complication rate is rare, it must always be considered that this is not a life-saving but a speech-correcting operation. A tailor-made superiorly based pharyngeal flap is suggested today, possibly in the age of 5 years. PMID:23724266

  16. [The mirror neuron system in motor and sensory rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Oouchida, Yutaka; Izumi, Shinichi

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of the mirror neuron system has dramatically changed the study of motor control in neuroscience. The mirror neuron system provides a conceptual framework covering the aspects of motor as well as sensory functions in motor control. Previous studies of motor control can be classified as studies of motor or sensory functions, and these two classes of studies appear to have advanced independently. In rehabilitation requiring motor learning, such as relearning movement after limb paresis, however, sensory information of feedback for motor output as well as motor command are essential. During rehabilitation from chronic pain, motor exercise is one of the most effective treatments for pain caused by dysfunction in the sensory system. In rehabilitation where total intervention unifying the motor and sensory aspects of motor control is important, learning through imitation, which is associated with the mirror neuron system can be effective and suitable. In this paper, we introduce the clinical applications of imitated movement in rehabilitation from motor impairment after brain damage and phantom limb pain after limb amputation. PMID:24899347

  17. Postnatal development of Blake's pouch cyst: a case report and new insight for its pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Ito, Daisuke; Murai, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Suyama, Maiko; Fujii, Katsunori; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2014-10-01

    Blake's pouch cyst (BPC), a rare cystic malformation in the posterior fossa, is believed to be caused by the congenital expansion of the posterior membranous area that normally regresses during embryogenesis. However, due to the wide spectrum of the onset pattern and age of patients, the natural history and the pathogenesis are poorly understood. The authors describe the case of a girl who admitted with headache and right abducens nerve paresis at the age of 3 years and 10 months. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a tetraventricular hydrocephalus, an open aqueduct, and a posterior fossa cyst compatible with BPC. Multiple tumors were also noticed in the ventricular wall. Tumor biopsy and an endoscopic third ventriculostomy were performed. Intraoperative observation confirmed the BPC, and pathological diagnosis was pilomyxoid astrocytoma. In retrospect, MR imaging was performed twice in the past, at the age of 8 months and again at 22 months, and no anomaly was detected, suggesting that Blake's pouch was once regressed. Therefore, a BPC in this patient was certainly developed after her second or third year of life. The ventricular tumors may influence the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption, which triggered the re-expansion of BPC from the possible remnant of Blake's pouch. This is a rare but important report providing evidence that in addition to the classic congenital BPC in which the remnant of Blake's pouch remains persistent, there could be postnatal or secondary BPC, which develops after birth. Possible mechanisms include that the remnant of Blake's pouch, which originally disappears, may re-expand postnatally in association with unknown trigger or a change in CSF dynamics or absorption. PMID:24907110

  18. Functional networks of motor inhibition in conversion disorder patients and feigning subjects.

    PubMed

    Hassa, Thomas; de Jel, Esther; Tuescher, Oliver; Schmidt, Roger; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2016-01-01

    The neural correlates of motor inhibition leading to paresis in conversion disorder are not well known. The key question is whether they are different of those of normal subjects feigning the symptoms. Thirteen conversion disorder patients with hemiparesis and twelve healthy controls were investigated using functional magnetic resonance tomography under conditions of passive motor stimulation of the paretic/feigned paretic and the non-paretic hand. Healthy controls were also investigated in a non-feigning condition. During passive movement of the affected right hand conversion disorder patients exhibited activations in the bilateral triangular part of the inferior frontal gyri (IFG), with a left side dominance compared to controls in non-feigning condition. Feigning controls revealed for the same condition a weak unilateral activation in the right triangular part of IFG and an activity decrease in frontal midline areas, which couldn't be observed in patients. The results suggest that motor inhibition in conversion disorder patients is mediated by the IFG that was also involved in inhibition processes in normal subjects. The activity pattern in feigning controls resembled that of conversion disorder patients but with a clear difference in the medial prefrontal cortex. Healthy controls showed decreased activity in this region during feigning compared to non-feigning conditions suggesting a reduced sense of self-agency during feigning. Remarkably, no activity differences could be observed in medial prefrontal cortex for patients vs healthy controls in feigning or non-feigning conditions suggesting self-agency related activity in patients to be in between those of non-feigning and feigning healthy subjects. PMID:27330971

  19. [Fiftieth anniversary of Hans Berger's publication of the electroencephalogram. His first records in 1924--1931 (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jung, R; Berger, W

    1979-12-01

    For the fiftieth anniversary of Berger's first EEG publication, some of his early recordings obtained between 1924 and 1931 are discussed and illustrated. Examples of his protocols from the Freiburg Berger Archives are reproduced. Three types of Berger's early investigations are described: (1) String-galvanometer recordings obtained between 1924 and 1926, mainly from trephined patients with cerebral diseases, which usually showed brain waves slowed to 6--8 per second; (2) Direct recordings from the cortex and white matter proving the cortical origin of the EEG in 1930; (3) Typical unpublished EEG recordings of epileptics and of petit-mal attacks obtained in 1930 and 1931. Berger's first six papers published between 1929 and 1933 described nearly all the main EEG findings of cerebral diseases and the EEG alterations of normals during attention, sleep, and narcosis, but they did not report on convulsive potentials in the EEGs of epileptics. Berger had, however, obtained excellent records of epileptic EEG features, here depicted in Figs. 4 through 7. These remained unpublished until 1933 and 1938, because Berger suspected that they contained artifacts caused by blinks and facial movements which he had recorded in his controls (Fig. 4). Only in 1933, after other authors had described large amplitudes of convulsive potentials in the cortex of animals, did Berger publish parts of the EEGs of a petit-mal attack and of focal attacks in progressive paresis. In 1938, Berger presented the EEG of the beginning of a petit-mal attack with large 3/s spikes and waves recorded in 1931 which were similar to those described by Gibbs and coworkers in 1935. In 1933 and 1938, Berger interpreted the abnormal brain potentials of epileptics as signs of a preconvulsive state of the forebrain and suggested that the periods of 3/s waves were cortical correlates of an epileptic absence. PMID:398691

  20. Isolated vestibular nuclear infarction: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Seung-Han; Park, Jae Han; Choi, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral infarction presenting with isolated vertigo remains a diagnostic challenge. To define the clinical characteristics of unilateral infarctions restricted to the vestibular nuclei, two patients with isolated unilateral vestibular nuclear infarction had bedside and laboratory evaluation of the ocular motor and vestibular function, including video-oculography, bithermal caloric irrigation, the head impulse test (HIT) using magnetic scleral coils, and cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). We also reviewed the literature on isolated vertigo from lesions restricted to the vestibular nuclei, and analyzed the clinical features of seven additional patients. Both patients showed spontaneous torsional-horizontal nystagmus that beat away from the lesion side, and direction-changing gaze-evoked nystagmus. Recording of HIT using a magnetic search coil system documented decreased gains of the vestibular-ocular reflex for the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals on both sides, but more for the ipsilesional canals. Bithermal caloric tests showed ipsilesional canal paresis in both patients. Cervical and ocular VEMPs showed decreased or absent responses during stimulation of the ipsilesional ear. Initial MRIs including diffusion-weighted images were normal or equivocal, but follow-up imaging disclosed a circumscribed acute infarction in the area of the vestibular nuclei. Infarctions restricted to the vestibular nuclei may present with isolated vertigo with features of both peripheral and central vestibulopathies. Central signs should be sought even in patients with spontaneous horizontal-torsional nystagmus and positive HIT. In patients with combined peripheral and central vestibulopathy, a vestibular nuclear lesion should be considered especially when hearing is preserved. PMID:24162036

  1. FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY FOLLOWING MOTOR CORTEX LESIONS IN NON-HUMAN PRIMATES: EXPERIMENTAL IMPLICATIONS FOR HUMAN STROKE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Warren G.; Pizzimenti, Marc A.; Morecraft, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses selected classical works and contemporary research on recovery of contralesional fine hand motor function following lesions to motor areas of the cerebral cortex in non-human primates. Findings from both the classical literature and contemporary studies show that lesions of cortical motor areas induce paresis initially, but are followed by remarkable recovery of fine hand/digit motor function that depends on lesion size and post-lesion training. Indeed, in recent work where considerable quantification of fine digit function associated with grasping and manipulating small objects has been observed, very favorable recovery is possible with minimal forced use of the contralesional limb. Studies of the mechanisms underlying recovery have shown that following small lesions of the digit areas of primary motor cortex (M1), there is expansion of the digit motor representations into areas of M1 that did not produce digit movements prior to the lesion. However, after larger lesions involving the elbow, wrist and digit areas of M1, no such expansion of the motor representation was observed, suggesting that recovery was due to other cortical or subcortical areas taking over control of hand/digit movements. Recently, we showed that one possible mechanism of recovery after lesion to the arm areas of M1 and lateral premotor cortex is enhancement of corticospinal projections from the medially located supplementary motor area (M2) to spinal cord laminae containing neurons which have lost substantial input from the lateral motor areas and play a critical role in reaching and digit movements. Because human stroke and brain injury patients show variable, and usually poorer, recovery of hand motor function than that of nonhuman primates after motor cortex damage, we conclude with a discussion of implications of this work for further experimentation to improve recovery of hand function in human stroke patients. PMID:21960307

  2. Immunoparesis in MGUS - Relationship of uninvolved immunoglobulin pair suppression and polyclonal immunoglobuline levels to MGUS risk categories.

    PubMed

    Pika, T; Lochman, P; Sandecka, V; Maisnar, V; Minarik, J; Tichy, M; Zapletalova, J; Solcova, L; Scudla, V; Hajek, R

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is an asymptomatic, potentially malignant condition. It has been established that annually approximately 1-2% of MGUS cases transforms into one of the malignant forms of monoclonal gammopathies. Progression risk factors include the quantity and type of M-protein, and namely the ratio of free light immunoglobulin chains (FLC). These factors, enable purposeful stratification of MGUS individuals. Some authors consider suppression of polyclonal immunoglobulin levels to be another progression factor. The aim of the study was to compare polyclonal immunoglobulin (PIg) levels with uninvolved heavy/light chain pair (HLC) levels in order to verify the degree of immunoparesis depending on MGUS risk category (0-3). The analyzed set consisted of 159 serum samples from MGUS patients (102 IgG, 57 IgA), who were stratified into 4 risk groups (0 - low, 1 - low-intermediate, 2 - high-intermediate and 3 - high risk of transformation). The results of analysis showed that with increasing degree of MGUS increases risk of immune paresis defined by decreasing levels of polyclonal immunoglobulins, ie. IgA and IgM in the case of IgG MGUS, respectively, IgG and IgM in case of IgA MGUS. Significant differences were also found when analyzing the levels of uninvolved HLC pairs IgG kappa (resp. IgG lambda) in IgG lambda (IgG kappa) dominant secretion. In the case of MGUS with IgA isotype, the results were similar. Discovery of the connection between the degree of immunosuppression and the level of MGUS risk contributes to our understanding of the relationship between biology, development and potential malignant transformation of MGUS. It is apparent that uninvolved HLC pair assay enables more reliable identification of at-risk MGUS patients than a simple quantitative assay for polyclonal immunoglobulins alone. PMID:26278155

  3. Results for local control and functional outcome after linac-based image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery in 190 patients with vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Böhmer, Dirk; Synowitz, Michael; Wiener, Edzard; Budach, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Background We assessed local control (LC) and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods Between 1998 and 2008, 190 patients with VS were treated with SRS. All patients had tumors <2 cm diameter. Patients received 13.5 Gy prescribed to the 80th isodose at the tumor margin. The primary endpoint was LC. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. Results Median follow-up was 40 months. LC was achieved in 88% of patients. There were no acute reactions exceeding Grade I. Trigeminal nerve dysfunction was present in 21.6% (n = 41) prior to SRS. After treatment, 85% (n = 155) had no change, 4.4,% (n = 8) had a relief of symptoms, 10.4% (n = 19) had new symptoms. Facial nerve dysfunction was present in some patients prior to treatment, e.g. paresis (12.6%; n = 24) and dysgeusia (0.5%; n = 1). After treatment 1.1% (n = 2) reported improvement and 6.1% (n = 11) experienced new symptoms. Hearing problems before SRS were present in 69.5% of patients (n = 132). After treatment, 62.6% (n = 144) had no change, 10.4% (n = 19) experienced improvement and 26.9% (n = 49) became hearing impaired. Conclusion This series of SRS for small VS provided similar LC rates to microsurgery; thus, it is effective as a non-invasive, image-guided procedure. The functional outcomes observed indicate the safety and effectiveness of linac-based SRS. Patients may now be informed of the clinical equivalence of SRS to microsurgery. PMID:23979079

  4. The Role of Extraocular Muscle Pulleys in Incomitant Non-Paralytic Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) and inferior oblique muscle have paths through the orbit constrained by connective tissue pulleys. These pulleys shift position during contraction and relaxation of the EOMs, dynamically changing the biomechanics of force transfer from the tendon onto the globe. The paths of the EOMs are tightly conserved in normal patients and disorders in the location and/or stability of the pulleys can create patterns of incomitant strabismus that may mimic oblique muscle dysfunction and cranial nerve paresis. Developmental disorders of pulley location can occur in conjunction with large, obvious abnormalities of orbital anatomy (e.g., craniosynostosis syndromes) or subtle, isolated abnormalities in the location of one or more pulleys. Acquired disorders of pulley location can be divided into four broad categories: Connective tissue disorders (e.g., Marfan syndrome), globe size disorders (e.g., high myopia), senile degeneration (e.g., sagging eye syndrome), and trauma (e.g., orbital fracture or postsurgical). Recognition of these disorders is important because abnormalities in pulley location and movement are often resistant to standard surgical approaches that involve strengthening or weakening the oblique muscles or changing the positions of the EOM insertions. Preoperative diagnosis is aided by: (1) Clinical history of predisposing risk factors, (2) observation of malpositioning of the medial canthus, lateral canthus, and globe, and (3) gaze-controlled orbital imaging using direct coronal slices. Finally, surgical correction frequently involves novel techniques that reposition and stabilize the pulley and posterior muscle belly within the orbit using permanent scleral sutures or silicone bands without changing the location of the muscle's insertion. PMID:26180464

  5. Modulation of rodent spinal cord radiation tolerance by administration of platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Andratschke, Nicolaus H.; Nieder, Carsten M.D. . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Price, Roger E.; Rivera, Belinda; Tucker, Susan L.; Ang, K.

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To examine the role of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) for ameliorating radiation myelopathy of the cervical spinal cord in a rodent model. Methods and materials: After developing the technique for cannulation of the basal cistern, initial animal experiments were conducted to test the feasibility of intrathecal continuous infusion of PDGF in a model of cervical spinal cord irradiation in adult Fisher F-344 rats and to determine the most effective dose level of PDGF. Subsequently, the dose-modification factor was determined in a larger group of rats. Irradiation was given in 2 fractions (16 Gy followed by 14-24 Gy) and animals were examined for the development of paresis. Results: The initial dose-finding experiment revealed significant differences in the incidence of radiation myelopathy (100% in saline-treated control rats, 25% with the most effective dose of PDGF, up to 100% with less effective doses). The most effective dose of PDGF was 0.014 {mu}g per day. Subsequent experiments revealed a median effective dose (ED{sub 50}) of 35.6 Gy (95% confidence interval, 34.7-36.5 Gy) for animals receiving this dose of PDGF in contrast to 33.8 Gy (33.4-34.3 Gy) for the control group (p = 0.003). The dose-modification factor obtained with this dose of PDGF was 1.05. Conclusions: Intrathecal administration of PDGF concomitant to irradiation of the cervical spinal cord in rats was feasible. Treatment with PDGF significantly increased the tolerance of the spinal cord. The PDGF experiments should be viewed as a proof of principle that brief therapeutic intervention in the earliest phase of damage induction can reduce late effects in the spinal cord. They form the basis for further studies of growth factor administration in this particular model.

  6. Prolonged detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) DNA in cerebrospinal fluid despite antiviral therapy in a patient with HSV-2-associated radiculitis.

    PubMed

    Ganzenmueller, Tina; Karaguelle, Deniz; Schmitt, Corinna; Puppe, Wolfram; Stachan-Kunstyr, Rita; Bronzlik, Paul; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Wegner, Florian; Heim, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) can cause radiculo-myelitis as a neurological manifestation. We report a case of ongoing HSV-2 DNA positivity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of at least eight weeks under antiviral therapy with acyclovir in a highly immunocompromised hemato-oncologic patient with HSV-2-associated radiculitis. Upon admission, the patient presented with pain, leg paresis, and urinary incontinence, as well as pleocytosis in the CSF. Quantitative real-time PCR of the CSF at day 3 after admission revealed HSV-2 with a concentration of 2.0×10(5) copies/ml and treatment with acyclovir intravenously and prednisolone by mouth was started. Clinical symptoms resolved almost completely after approximately 3 weeks of antiviral therapy. However, CSF samples of day 12, 19, 26, 33, 39, 48 and 54 after admission showed a slow decline of HSV-2 DNA concentrations. HSV-2 DNA was still detectable (1.6×10(4) copies/ml) at day 54 after admission. Genotypic resistance testing showed, as far as available, no mutations indicative for acyclovir resistance. Since an increasing specific antibody index for HSV was observed, we speculate that the prolonged detectability of HSV-2 DNA in the CSF might not necessarily indicate ongoing viral replication but neutralized virus. Other hypotheses and the consequences on treatment are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first report about the long-term viral load kinetics of HSV-2 in the CSF of a patient with radiculitis under antiviral therapy, highlighting the need for further studies on HSV DNA kinetics in the CSF and their significance for an appropriate antiviral treatment. PMID:22267477

  7. Venomous snakebites in children in southern Croatia.

    PubMed

    Karabuva, Svjetlana; Vrkić, Ivana; Brizić, Ivica; Ivić, Ivo; Lukšić, Boris

    2016-03-15

    This retrospective study represents observation of 160 children and adolescents aged up to 18 years that experienced venomous snakebites in southern Croatia and were treated in the Clinical Department of Infectious Diseases in the University Hospital Centre Split from 1979 to 2013. The main purpose of this research was to determine the epidemiological characteristics, clinical presentation, local and general complications, and received treatment. Most bites occurred during warm months, from early May to late August (80%), mostly in May and June. Upper limb bites were more frequent (59%) than lower limb bites (40%). Out of the total number of poisoned children, 24% developed local, and 25% general complications. The most common local complications were haemorrhagic blisters that occurred in 20% children, followed by compartment syndrome presented in 7.5% patients. The most dominated general complication was cranial nerve paresis or paralysis, which was identified in 11.2% patients, whereas shock symptoms were registrated in 7% children. According to severity of poisoning, 9.4% children had minor, 35% mild, 30.6% moderate, and 24.4% had severe clinical manifestation of envenomation. Only one (0.6%) child passed away because of snakebite directly on the neck. All patients received antivenom produced by the Institute of Immunology in Zagreb, tetanus prophylaxis as well, and almost all of them received antibiotics, and a great majority of them also received corticosteroids and antihistamines. Neighter anaphylactic reaction nor serum disease were noticed in our patients after administrating antivenom. A total of 26% children underwent surgical interventions, and incision of haemorrhagic blister was the most common applied surgical treatment, which was preformed in 15.6% patients, while fasciotomy was done in 7.5% subjects. All of our surgically treated patients recovered successfully. PMID:26802624

  8. Brain Function and Upper Limb Outcome in Stroke: A Cross-Sectional fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Buma, Floor E.; Raemaekers, Mathijs; Kwakkel, Gert; Ramsey, Nick F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The nature of changes in brain activation related to good recovery of arm function after stroke is still unclear. While the notion that this is a reflection of neuronal plasticity has gained much support, confounding by compensatory strategies cannot be ruled out. We address this issue by comparing brain activity in recovered patients 6 months after stroke with healthy controls. Methods We included 20 patients with upper limb paresis due to ischemic stroke and 15 controls. We measured brain activation during a finger flexion-extension task with functional MRI, and the relationship between brain activation and hand function. Patients exhibited various levels of recovery, but all were able to perform the task. Results Comparison between patients and controls with voxel-wise whole-brain analysis failed to reveal significant differences in brain activation. Equally, a region of interest analysis constrained to the motor network to optimize statistical power, failed to yield any differences. Finally, no significant relationship between brain activation and hand function was found in patients. Patients and controls performed scanner task equally well. Conclusion Brain activation and behavioral performance during finger flexion-extensions in (moderately) well recovered patients seems normal. The absence of significant differences in brain activity even in patients with a residual impairment may suggest that infarcts do not necessarily induce reorganization of motor function. While brain activity could be abnormal with higher task demands, this may also introduce performance confounds. It is thus still uncertain to what extent capacity for true neuronal repair after stroke exists. PMID:26440276

  9. Radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas: Early experience

    SciTech Connect

    Linskey, M.E.; Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    We reviewed our early experience with the first 26 patients with acoustic neurinomas (21 unilateral, 5 bilateral) treated by stereotactic radiosurgery using the first North American 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 19 months (median, 13 months). Serial postoperative imaging showed either a decrease in tumor size (11 patients) or growth arrest (15 patients). Loss of central contrast enhancement was a characteristic change (18 patients). Seven patients had good or serviceable hearing preoperatively. In all 7 the preoperative hearing status was retained immediately after radiosurgery. At follow-up, 3 had preserved hearing, 1 had reduced hearing, and 3 had lost all hearing in the treated ear. Hearing in 1 patient that was nonserviceable preoperatively later improved to a serviceable hearing level. Delayed facial paresis developed in 6 patients, and delayed trigeminal sensory loss developed in 7 patients, none of whom had significant deficits before radiosurgery. Both facial and trigeminal deficits tended to improve within 3 to 6 months of onset with excellent recovery anticipated. Lower cranial nerve dysfunction was not observed. All 26 patients remain at their preoperative employment or functional status. At present, stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative treatment for acoustic neurinomas in patients who are elderly, have significant concomitant medical problems, have a tumor in their only hearing ear, have bilateral acoustic neurinomas, refuse microsurgical excision, or have recurrent tumor despite surgical resection. Although longer and more extensive follow-up is required, the control of tumor growth and the acceptable rate of complications in this early experience testifies to the future expanding role of this technique in the management of selected acoustic neurinomas.

  10. Funktionelle Elektrostimulation Paraplegischer Patienten

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation on Paraplegic Patients. We report on clinical and physiological effects of 8 months Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of quadriceps femoris muscle on 16 paraplegic patients. Each patient had muscle biopsies, CT-muscle diameter measurements, knee extension strength testing carried out before and after 8 months FES training. Skin perfusion was documented through infrared telethermography and xenon clearance, muscle perfusion was recorded through thallium scintigraphy. After 8 months FES training baseline skin perfusion showed 86 % increase, muscle perfusion was augmented by 87 %. Muscle fiber diameters showed an average increase of 59 % after 8 months FES training. Muscles in patients with spastic paresis as well as in patients with denervation showed an increase in aerob and anaerob muscle enzymes up to the normal range. Even without axonal neurotropic substances FES was able to demonstrate fiberhypertrophy, enzyme adaptation and intracellular structural benefits in denervated muscles. The increment in muscle area as visible on CT-scans of quadriceps femoris was 30 % in spastic paraplegia and 10 % in denervated patients respectively. FES induced changes were less in areas not directly underneath the surface electrodes. We strongly recommend the use of Kern’s current for FES in denervated muscles to induce tetanic muscle contractions as we formed a very critical opinion of conventional exponential current. In patients with conus-cauda-lesions FES must be integrated into modern rehabilitation to prevent extreme muscle degeneration and decubital ulcers. Using FES we are able to improve metabolism and induce positive trophic changes in our patients lower extremities. In spastic paraplegics the functions „rising and walking“ achieved through FES are much better training than FES ergometers. Larger muscle masses are activated and an increased heart rate is measured, therefore the impact on cardiovascular fitness and metabolism

  11. Passive ankle dorsiflexion by an automated device and the reactivity of the motor cortical network.

    PubMed

    Pittaccio, Simone; Zappasodi, Filippo; Tamburro, Gabriella; Viscuso, Stefano; Marzetti, Laura; Garavaglia, Lorenzo; Tecchio, Franca; Pizzella, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Gait impairment is an important consequence of neurological disease. Passive mobilization of the affected lower limbs is often prescribed in order to safeguard tissue properties and prevent circulatory sequelae during paresis. However, passive movement could play a role also in stimulating cortical areas of the brain devoted to the control of the lower limb, so that deafferentation and learned non-use can be contrasted. The purpose of the present work is to investigate cortical involvement during active and passive movements of the ankle joint, in an attempt to gain deeper insight in the similarities between these two conditions. A wearable device to mobilize the ankle joint was implemented utilizing rotary shape memory alloy actuators. The technical characteristics of this actuator make it very compatible with the tight limitations on electromagnetic noise imposed by diagnostic instrumentation. Eleven healthy volunteers took part in the pre-clinical phase of the study. According to the protocol, brain activity was recorded by 165-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) under three different conditions: rest, active dorsiflexion of the ankle and passive mobilization of the same joint. The acquired data were processed to obtain cortical ERD/ERS (Event Related Desynchronization/ Synchronization) maps, which were then compared. The results of this analysis show that there are similar patterns of activity between active and passive movement, particularly in β band, in the contralateral primary sensorimotor, dorsal premotor and supplementary motor areas. This result, albeit obtained from healthy subjects, might suggest that passive motion provides somatosensory afferences that, to some extent, are processed in a similar manner as for voluntary control. Should this evidence be confirmed by further experiments on neurological patients, it could support the prescription of passive exercise as a surrogate of active workout, at least, so long as patients are paretic. PMID

  12. Can passive mobilization provide clinically-relevant brain stimulation? A pilot EEG and NIRS study on healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pittaccio, Simone; Garavaglia, Lorenzo; Molteni, Erika; Guanziroli, Eleonora; Zappasodi, Filippo; Beretta, Elena; Strazzer, Sandra; Molteni, Franco; Villa, Elena; Passaretti, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Lower limb rehabilitation is a fundamental part of post-acute care in neurological disease. Early commencement of active workout is often prevented by paresis, thus physical treatment may be delayed until patients regain some voluntary command of their muscles. Passive mobilization of the affected joints is mostly delivered in order to safeguard tissue properties and shun circulatory problems. The present paper investigates the potential role of early passive motion in stimulating cortical areas of the brain devoted to the control of the lower limb. An electro-mechanical mobilizer for the ankle joint (Toe-Up!) was implemented utilizing specially-designed shape-memory-alloy-based actuators. This device was constructed to be usable by bedridden subjects. Besides, the slowness and gentleness of the imparted motion, make it suitable for patients in a very early stage of their recovery. The mobilizer underwent technical checks to confirm reliability and passed the required safety tests for electric biomedical devices. Four healthy volunteers took part in the pre-clinical phase of the study. The protocol consisted in measuring of brain activity by EEG and NIRS in four different conditions: rest, active dorsiflexion of the ankle, passive mobilization of the ankle, and assisted motion of the same joint. The acquired data were processed to obtain maps of cortical activation, which were then compared. The measurements collected so far show that there is a similar pattern of activity between active and passive/assisted particularly in the contralateral premotor areas. This result, albeit based on very few observations, might suggest that passive motion provides somatosensory afferences that are processed in a similar manner as for voluntary control. Should this evidence be confirmed by further trials on healthy individuals and neurological patients, it could form a basis for a clinical use of early passive exercise in supporting central functional recovery. PMID:24110495

  13. Mycoplasma-associated polyarthritis in farmed crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Foggin, C M; Muvavarirwa, P; Honywill, J; Pawandiwa, A

    1995-03-01

    Outbreaks of polyarthritis in farmed crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) on five farms in Zimbabwe are described. Cases were reported only among the rearing stock aged 1-3 years. No breeding stock suffered. Morbidity was about 10% and the mortality even lower. All the sick animals consistently displayed swollen limb joints as well as progressive lameness and paresis. The synovial structures in subacute cases contained mycoplasmas and excess turbid mucus which, at a later stage of the disease, became yellowish, inspissated and sterile. Cellular changes in the joint capsule included oedema, necrosis of the superficial layers of membrane, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis. Evidence of pneumonia was observed only at necropsies. Fifteen isolates of Mycoplasma were cultured from the clinical specimens collected from the four sick and three dead crocodiles. The affected joints of all these animals yielded Mycoplasma in pure culture, but the culture from lungs yielded post-mortem invaders also. The sick animals were treated with a single intramuscular injection of long-acting tetracycline (10 mg/kg), and oxytetracycline mixed in feed at 550 mg/kg was fed for 10 d. The treatment appeared to be effective in ameliorating the clinical signs, but in some cases inflammatory swelling persisted. All 15 the isolates conformed to the characteristics of the genus Mycoplasma, and were serologically indistinguishable in growth-inhibition (Gl) tests. Although these isolates shared the main biochemical characteristics of Mycoplasma capricolum, they differed serologically. Also goats were refractory to experimental infection with crocodile strains. In crocodile yearlings, however, the disease was reproduced with an isolate from one of the affected farms. The source of infection remained elusive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8539034

  14. Influence of cochlear implantation on vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulan; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Fan; Qin, Zhaobing

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion Vestibular function in patients can be damaged following cochlear implantation. Therefore, assessing the pre-operative vestibular status, carefully choosing the side of implantation, and preserving function by using minimally invasive surgical techniques are important. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the influence of cochlear implantation on vestibular function in patients with severe and profound sensorineural hearing loss, and to analyze a possible correlation between the changes in vestibular testing and post-operative vestibular symptoms. Methods Thirty-four patients were evaluated for vestibular function using the cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP, respectively), and 29 patients underwent caloric tests pre-operatively and 4 weeks post-operatively. Results Before surgery, the cVEMPs were recorded bilaterally in 22 patients, unilaterally in eight patients, and absent bilaterally in four patients. The oVEMPs were recorded bilaterally in 19 patients, unilaterally in six patients, and absent bilaterally in nine patients. After implantation, the cVEMPs were absent in 10 patients and the oVEMPs were absent in seven patients on the implanted side. Caloric tests demonstrated canal paresis in 17 patients, and normal responses were recorded in 12 of the 29 patients pre-operatively. There was a significant decrease post-implantation in the ear implanted, with the exception of two patients. Two patients presented with vertigo and another two patients reported slight unsteadiness post-operatively, but all symptoms resolved within 7 days. The impaired vestibular function did not correlate with vestibular symptoms, age, or gender. Function on the contralateral side remained unaffected. PMID:27008103

  15. Chronic Subdural Hematomas Associated with Arachnoid Cysts: Significance in Young Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    TAKIZAWA, Ken; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi; HONDA, Yumie; ISHIZAKA, Hideo; BABA, Tanefumi; OSADA, Takahiro; NISHIYAMA, Jun; INOUE, Go; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    Although arachnoid cysts (ACs) are associated with chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), especially in young patients, the detailed features of CSDHs associated with ACs remain poorly understood. The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between the location of CSDHs and ACs and the significance of ACs in young patients with CSDHs. We retrospectively assessed 605 consecutive patients 7 years of age and older who were diagnosed with a CSDH between 2002 and 2014. Twelve patients (2%) had ACs, and 10 of the 12 patients were 7–40 years of age. Patients with ACs as a complication of CSDHs were significantly younger than those without ACs (p < 0.05). Three different relationships between the location of CSDHs and ACs were found: a CSDH contacting an AC, an ipsilateral CSDH apart from an AC, and a CSDH contralateral to an AC. In 21 patients with CSDHs who were 7–40 years of age, 10 (47.6%) had ACs (AC group) and 7 (33.3%) had no associated illnesses (non-AC group). All 10 young patients with ACs showed ipsilateral CSDHs including a CSDH apart from an AC. All 17 patients in both the AC and non-AC groups showed headache but no paresis at admission. The pathogenesis of CSDHs associated with ACs may be different among the three types of locations. The clinical characteristics of patients with a combination of a CSDH and an AC including headache as a major symptom may be attributed to young age in the majority of patients with ACs. PMID:26345665

  16. The Armeo Spring as training tool to improve upper limb functionality in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few research in multiple sclerosis (MS) has focused on physical rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction, though the latter strongly influences independent performance of activities of daily living. Upper limb rehabilitation technology could hold promise for complementing traditional MS therapy. Consequently, this pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an 8-week mechanical-assisted training program for improving upper limb muscle strength and functional capacity in MS patients with evident paresis. Methods A case series was applied, with provision of a training program (3×/week, 30 minutes/session), supplementary on the customary maintaining care, by employing a gravity-supporting exoskeleton apparatus (Armeo Spring). Ten high-level disability MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale 7.0-8.5) actively performed task-oriented movements in a virtual real-life-like learning environment with the affected upper limb. Tests were administered before and after training, and at 2-month follow-up. Muscle strength was determined through the Motricity Index and Jamar hand-held dynamometer. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT). Results Muscle strength did not change significantly. Significant gains were particularly found in functional capacity tests. After training completion, TEMPA scores improved (p = 0.02), while a trend towards significance was found for the 9HPT (p = 0.05). At follow-up, the TEMPA as well as ARAT showed greater improvement relative to baseline than after the 8-week intervention period (p = 0.01, p = 0.02 respectively). Conclusions The results of present pilot study suggest that upper limb functionality of high-level disability MS patients can be positively influenced by means of a technology-enhanced physical rehabilitation program. PMID:21261965

  17. Lateral Semicircular Canal Asymmetry in Idiopathic Scoliosis: An Early Link between Biomechanical, Hormonal and Neurosensory Theories?

    PubMed Central

    Hitier, Martin; Hamon, Michèle; Denise, Pierre; Lacoudre, Julien; Thenint, Marie-Aude; Mallet, Jean-François; Moreau, Sylvain; Quarck, Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite its high incidence and severe morbidity, the physiopathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is still unknown. Here, we looked for early anomalies in AIS which are likely to be the cause of spinal deformity and could also be targeted by early treatments. We focused on the vestibular system, which is suspected of acting in AIS pathogenesis and which exhibits an end organ with size and shape fixed before birth. We hypothesize that, in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis, vestibular morphological anomalies were already present at birth and could possibly have caused other abnormalities. Materials and Methods The vestibular organ of 18 adolescents with AIS and 9 controls were evaluated with MRI in a prospective case controlled study. We studied lateral semicircular canal orientation and the three semicircular canal positions relative to the midline. Lateral semicircular canal function was also evaluated by vestibulonystagmography after bithermal caloric stimulation. Results The left lateral semicircular canal was more vertical and further from the midline in AIS (p = 0.01) and these two parameters were highly correlated (r = -0.6; p = 0.02). These morphological anomalies were associated with functional anomalies in AIS (lower excitability, higher canal paresis), but were not significantly different from controls (p>0.05). Conclusion Adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis exhibit morphological vestibular asymmetry, probably determined well before birth. Since the vestibular system influences the vestibulospinal pathway, the hypothalamus, and the cerebellum, this indicates that the vestibular system is a possible cause of later morphological, hormonal and neurosensory anomalies observed in AIS. Moreover, the simple lateral SCC MRI measurement demonstrated here could be used for early detection of AIS, selection of children for close follow-up, and initiation of preventive treatment before spinal deformity occurs. PMID:26186348

  18. Chronic methylmercurialism in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gruber, T A; Costigan, P; Wilkinson, G T; Seawright, A A

    1978-04-01

    The mercury levels in 69 muscle samples from fish weighing from 0.3 to 200 kg caught in Moreton Bay, Queensland, in the latter half of 1976 ranged from less than 10 to 2,030 ng/g. Mercury levels in blood samples from 53 humans and 100 dogs in Brisbane almost all contained less than 10 ng/ml while the level in 162 cats sampled ranged from less than 10 to 329 ng/ml. Chronic methylmercurialism developed in 2 cats dosed daily with methylmercury, bound to cysteine, at the rate of 0.6 mg/kg body weight for 74 and 77 days respectively. Terminal clinical signs included anorexia, weight loss, knuckling over at the carpus and tarsus, hypermetria initially involving the forelegs and later the hindlegs, sluggish reflexes, paresis involving all limbs, persistent crying, apparent blindness, tonic and clonic convulsions and salivation. Pathological changes were confined to the nervous system and included degeneration of neurones and perivascular cuffing in the cerebrocortical grey matter, focal atrophy of the granular layer, focal spongiosus of the molecular layer and degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and demyelination in the fibre tracts of the dorsal funiculus, mainly the fasciculus cuneatus and in the lateral and ventral corticospinal tracts. Terminal blood methylmercury levels were in excess of 18 microgram/ml, while brain methylmercury levels ranged from 21.0 to 28.4 microgram/g. The liver and kidney contained the highest total levels of mercury of 50 to 80 microgram/g, of which 23 to 37% was inorganic. PMID:687273

  19. Clinical and EEG analysis of initial status epilepticus during infancy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Mayu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Awaya, Yutaka; Osawa, Makiko

    2002-06-01

    This study investigated the clinical and EEG characteristics of initial status epilepticus (SE) during infancy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). The subjects were six patients who had been brought to our emergency clinic and treated for their initial SE between 1977 and 1988, and later developed MTLE. We reviewed the medical records and laboratory findings at the time of the initial SE, and the clinical evolution up to the development of MTLE. The six patients included four females and two males. The initial SE developed at ages ranging from 7 months to 2 years and 9 months with a mean of 1 year and 2 months. These episodes were characterized by an elevated temperature of more than 38 degrees C (4/6 cases), clusters of prolonged seizures during one episode of SE (4/6 cases), long-lasting SE (120-380 min, mean 227 min, 6/6 cases), postictal prolonged loss of consciousness (median 5 h, 6/6 cases), and the presence of Todd's paralysis (3/6 cases). The lateralization of the ictal or postictal EEGs of the SE in five of the six cases was identical to that of the hippocampal atrophy later confirmed by MRI. Follow-up EEG examinations at a 6 month interval demonstrated temporal spike discharges appearing only after the onset of complex partial seizures. Two patients, who had no fever at the initial SE, were characterized by a very early appearance of epileptic EEG abnormality and a short interval between the initial SE and the development of complex partial seizures, suggesting that the SE was the first epileptic manifestation. The result of this study showed that SE progressing to MTLE tends to have complicated clinical manifestations characterized by clusters of unilateral or generalized SE followed by prolonged postictal unconsciousness, generalized clinical manifestations despite lateralized ictal EEG discharges, and the Todd's paresis in addition to the prolonged seizure duration. PMID:12015166

  20. Experimental rabies virus infection in Artibeus jamaicensis bats with CVS-24 variants.

    PubMed

    Reid, J E; Jackson, A C

    2001-12-01

    An experimental model of rabies was established in the fruit-eating bat species Artibeus jamaicensis. The infections caused by CVS-N2c and CVS-B2c, which are both stable variants of CVS-24, were compared after inoculation of adult bats in the right masseter muscle. CVS-N2c produced neurologic signs of rabies with paresis, ataxia, and inability to fly, while CVS-B2c did not produce neurologic signs. Bats were sacrificed and the distribution of rabies virus antigen was assessed in tissue sections with immunoperoxidase staining. Both viruses spread to the brain stem and bilaterally to the trigeminal ganglia by days 2 to 3. CVS-N2c had disseminated widely in the central nervous system (CNS) by day 4 and had involved the spinal cord, thalamus, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. CVS-B2c had infected neurons in the spinal cord on day 5 and in the cerebellum, thalamus, and cerebral cortex on day 6. Infected pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus were observed on day 5 in CVS-N2c infection, but infected neurons were never noted in the hippocampus in CVS-B2c infection. CVS-N2c infected many more neurons and more prominently involved neuronal processes than CVS-B2c. CVS-N2c spread more efficiently in the CNS than CVS-B2c. Morphologic changes of apoptosis or biochemical evidence of DNA fragmentation were not observed in neurons with either virus after this route of inoculation. The different neurovirulent properties of these CVS variants in this model were not related to their in vivo ability to induce apoptosis. PMID:11704883

  1. Non-mastoidectomy Cochlear Implant Approaches: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; ElAassar, Ahmed Shaker; Foad, Yaser Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Posterior tympanotomy approach for cochlear implant (CI) surgery, has been the most commonly used worldwide with current 0.7% rate of facial nerve injury. Non-mastoidectomy CI approaches include the suprameatal approach (SMA) and its modifications, the transcanal approach and its modifications and the pericanal approach for electrode insertion. Objectives The objective of this study was to review the literature regarding non-mastoidectomy CI approaches. Data Synthesis A search was performed in the LILACS, MEDLINE, SciELO, PubMed databases and Cochrane Library in February 2015, and the key words used in the search were CI, SMA, transcanal approach, pericanal approach, or electrode extrusion. About 30 studies that met the criteria described in "Study Selection" were read in full. The studies showed 1014 patients that underwent CI by SMA or its modifications, 266 CI patients treated by transcanal approach or its modifications, and 15 patients implanted by the pericanal approach. Reported complication with SMA was 99 (9.8%) minor and 13 (1.3%) major. With transcanal, there were 24 complications; 19 (7.1%) minor and 5 (1.9%) major. No post-operative complication was reported in pericanal approach. Studies showed no reported facial nerve paresis or paralysis in all non-mastoidectomy approaches. Conclusion Complications rates with non-mastoidectomy approaches are similar to those found in the mastoidectomy approach. Thus, non-mastoidectomy approaches may be an alternative in cases where the conventional mastoidectomy approach is difficult to perform. It would be helpful for CI surgeons to become familiarized with these approaches. PMID:27096025

  2. [Health economics of early summer meningoencephalitis in Austria. Effects of a vaccination campaign 1981 to 1990].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, B

    1993-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) was until the early 1980s among the most frequent causes of viral induced central-nervous infectious diseases in Austria. Since 1981 the vaccination was forced by intensive media campaigns. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the media campaigns and to evaluate them under health economic criteria. The number of hospitalized TBE-cases declines from 1981 to 1990, the linear trend shows a reduction from 427 to 109. If the linear trend from 1971 to 1980 would have continued the respective number in 1990 would have been 585 cases. Thus the model shows that from 1981 to 1990 more than 50% or 2,690 out of 5,368 possible cases are prohibited, from 1991 to 2000 based on the 1990 vaccination rate approximately 85% or 500 cases annually. In the age group 7 to 14 years the proportion of protected exposed is almost 97%. The loss of quality of life is higher than represented by the inpatient statistics. Many of the TBE victims have chronic impairments, mainly due to paresis and depression. Based on the 1990 cost data economic benefits for the social insurance companies in the decade 1981 to 1990 are AS 147 millions for inpatient care, respectively AS 108 millions for loss of productivity and AS 77 millions for early retirement, resulting in total benefits of AS 331 millions. The estimated benefits for 1991 to 2000 based on 1990 cost data are AS 270 millions for inpatient care, AS 200 millions for loss of productivity, and AS 368 for early retirement (total AS 828 millions). PMID:8147001

  3. Non-mastoidectomy Cochlear Implant Approaches: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; ElAassar, Ahmed Shaker; Foad, Yaser Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Posterior tympanotomy approach for cochlear implant (CI) surgery, has been the most commonly used worldwide with current 0.7% rate of facial nerve injury. Non-mastoidectomy CI approaches include the suprameatal approach (SMA) and its modifications, the transcanal approach and its modifications and the pericanal approach for electrode insertion. Objectives The objective of this study was to review the literature regarding non-mastoidectomy CI approaches. Data Synthesis A search was performed in the LILACS, MEDLINE, SciELO, PubMed databases and Cochrane Library in February 2015, and the key words used in the search were CI, SMA, transcanal approach, pericanal approach, or electrode extrusion. About 30 studies that met the criteria described in “Study Selection” were read in full. The studies showed 1014 patients that underwent CI by SMA or its modifications, 266 CI patients treated by transcanal approach or its modifications, and 15 patients implanted by the pericanal approach. Reported complication with SMA was 99 (9.8%) minor and 13 (1.3%) major. With transcanal, there were 24 complications; 19 (7.1%) minor and 5 (1.9%) major. No post-operative complication was reported in pericanal approach. Studies showed no reported facial nerve paresis or paralysis in all non-mastoidectomy approaches. Conclusion Complications rates with non-mastoidectomy approaches are similar to those found in the mastoidectomy approach. Thus, non-mastoidectomy approaches may be an alternative in cases where the conventional mastoidectomy approach is difficult to perform. It would be helpful for CI surgeons to become familiarized with these approaches. PMID:27096025

  4. Is there a need for ophthalmological examinations after a first seizure in paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Matthias K; Gläser, Alexandra; Ulrich, Kathrin; Merkenschlager, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the recommendations of the International Liga against Epilepsy, many hospitals perform routinely complete ophthalmological examinations in children admitted after a first seizure. As there is no study available to date to prove the benefit of complete eye examinations in first seizure diagnosis, we conducted a study to analyse the value of a complete ophthalmological examination. All children aged 1 month to 18 years who were admitted to the children's university hospital of Leipzig with the clinical diagnosis of a first convulsive or non-convulsive afebrile seizure between 1999 and August 2005 were investigated. All children who had obtained a complete ophthalmological examination within 72 h after the seizure were included in the observational study. A total of 310 children were analysed in the study. Two hundred thirty patients had a tonic-clonic afebrile seizure, the others focal, complex-partial seizures or absences. Two hundred seven out of 310 children showed no ophthalmological pathologies. Eighty-three children had refraction anomalies or strabism, 18 children had optic atrophy, three had congenital eye muscle paresis, and three had malformations. A 16-year-old girl had a homonymous quadrantanopia due to an occipital glioglioma that caused the seizure. An 11-year-old girl had a retinal haemorrhage without any brain lesions after a fall caused by a first tonic-clonic seizure. None of the ophthalmological findings influenced directly the immediate clinical course of diagnosis and treatment of the seizure. Our data suggest that routine ophthalmological examination in all children does not have additional benefit in the first seizure diagnosis management. PMID:19271236

  5. [Surgical treatment after cervical spine and spinal cord injuries of the C3-C7 level].

    PubMed

    Kopczyński, Stefan; Derenda, Marek; Kowalina, Ireneusz; Siwiecki, Tomasz

    2002-01-01

    The authors report the methods and results of the treatment of 83 patients with lower cervical spine (C3-C7) injuries, who were treated in the Neurosurgery Department in Elblag in a period of 11 years. Lesions ranged from fractures mainly of vertebral C5 and C6 bodies, and dislocations--mostly at levels C4-C5 and C5-C6. Most lesions were the consequence of a headlong jump into water (38.5%) and traffic accidents (29%). In admission sensory disturbances (38.5%) and tetraplegia or paresis of the upper limbs with paralysis of lower limbs (together 44.6%) were most frequently observed. The state of the patients was evaluated according to the ASIA-Frankel's scale. 148 surgical procedures were carried out. Decompression and autogenic and/or plate stabilization--from the anterior approach using Caspar's system and Crutchfield's traction--were the preferred methods. The post-surgical follow up extends from 9 years to 3 months. The most satisfying result was the improvement observed in the patients from groups A and B according to ASIA-Frankel's scale. Among 36 such patients, the medullary functions of 17 patients improved. 14 patients died from 5 days to 3 months after surgery. The authors also present an overview of contemporary management of lower cervical spine injuries. The emphasis is placed on the importance of factors making the treatment of spine and spinal cord injuries more difficult and delaying the beginning of early and efficient surgery. PMID:12418133

  6. Primary hyperaldosteronism, a mediator of progressive renal disease in cats.

    PubMed

    Javadi, S; Djajadiningrat-Laanen, S C; Kooistra, H S; van Dongen, A M; Voorhout, G; van Sluijs, F J; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Boer, W H; Rijnberk, A

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in primary hyperaldosteronism, particularly because of its possible role in the progression of kidney disease. While most studies have concerned humans and experimental animal models, we here report on the occurrence of a spontaneous form of (non-tumorous) primary hyperaldosteronism in cats. At presentation, the main physical features of 11 elderly cats were hypokalemic paroxysmal flaccid paresis and loss of vision due to retinal detachment with hemorrhages. Primary hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed on the basis of plasma concentrations of aldosterone (PAC) and plasma renin activity (PRA), and the calculation of the PAC:PRA ratio. In all animals, PACs were at the upper end or higher than the reference range. The PRAs were at the lower end of the reference range, and the PAC:PRA ratios exceeded the reference range. Diagnostic imaging by ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed no or only very minor changes in the adrenals compatible with nodular hyperplasia. Adrenal gland histopathology revealed extensive micronodular hyperplasia extending from zona glomerulosa into the zona fasciculata and reticularis. In three cats, plasma urea and creatinine concentrations were normal when hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed but thereafter increased to above the upper limit of the respective reference range. In the other eight cats, urea and creatinine concentrations were raised at first examination and gradually further increased. Even in end-stage renal insufficiency, there was a tendency to hypophosphatemia rather than to hyperphosphatemia. The histopathological changes in the kidneys mimicked those of humans with hyperaldosteronism: hyaline arteriolar sclerosis, glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The non-tumorous form of primary hyperaldosteronism in cats has many similarities with "idiopathic" primary hyperaldosteronism in humans. The condition is associated with progressive renal disease

  7. Moyamoya syndrome associated with Graves' disease: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shaneela; Russman, Andrew N; Katramados, Angelos M; Silver, Brian; Mitsias, Panayiotis D

    2011-11-01

    We report a patient and critically review the literature in order to define the demographic, clinical, neuroradiologic, and treatment features of moyamoya syndrome (MMS) in the setting of Graves' disease (GD). We performed a comprehensive English language Medline search using the keywords "moyamoya," "Graves' disease," and "thyrotoxicosis." We included all patients with angiographic findings consistent with MMS. A 23-year-old woman with active GD presented with intermittent confusion and right arm paresis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute left and chronic bilateral hemispheric infarcts. Cerebral angiography revealed multivessel intracranial occlusive disease. Initial treatment with plasmapheresis plus aspirin stabilized the patient's neurologic deficits. Antithyroid treatment plus subsequent surgical encephalomyosynangiosis resulted in prolonged neurologic stability. We studied 30 patients (27 women [90%], 23 of Asian descent [77%]), with a mean age of 29 ± 11.6 years. Hemiparesis (n = 12; 40%) was the leading clinical sign, and ischemic infarction was the most frequent neuroimaging finding (n = 26; 87%). Treatment regimens included antithyroid medications alone (n = 5; 17%), antithyroid plus antiplatelet agents (n = 9; 30%), neurosurgical revascularization after antithyroid medication (n = 11; 37%), and plasmapheresis in the acute thyrotoxic state (n = 2; 7%). Most patients had good short-to-medium term outcome (n = 14; 78% of reported outcome). Plasmapheresis-treated patients achieved neurologic stabilization and had good outcomes. MMS, an infrequent complication of GD, typically affects young women. Our findings indicate that plasmapheresis can stabilize the neurologic picture in the acute phase, and that antithyroid and antiplatelet therapy, combined with revascularization surgery, may improve long-term outcomes. Further work is needed to establish an optimal treatment strategy. PMID:21130668

  8. Impairment of learning the voluntary control of posture in patients with cortical lesions of different locations: the cortical mechanisms of pose regulation.

    PubMed

    Ustinova, K I; Chernikova, L A; Ioffe, M E; Sliva, S S

    2001-01-01

    The process of learning to produce voluntary changes in the position of the center of pressures using biological feedback was studied by stabilography in patients with hemipareses due to cerebrovascular lesions in the zone supplied by the middle cerebral artery. There were significant impairments to learning in all groups of patients, who had lesions in different sites, demonstrating that cortical mechanisms are involved in learning to control posture voluntarily. These studies showed that patients with lesions in the right hemisphere had rather greater deficits in performing the task than those with lesions in the left hemisphere. There were significant differences in the initial deficit in performing the task on the first day of training depending on the side of the lesion. All groups of patients differed from healthy subjects in that significant learning occurred only at the initial stages of training (the first five days). Learning at the initial stage in patients with concomitant lesions of the parietal-temporal area and with combined lesions with motor, premotor, and parietal-temporal involvement was significantly worse and the level of task performance at the end of the initial stage was significantly worse than in patient with local lesions of the motor cortex. The level of learning was independent of the severity of the motor deficit (paresis, spasticity), but was associated with the severity of impairment of the proprioceptive sense and the severity of disruption to the upright posture (asymmetry in the distribution of support pressures, amplitude of variation in the position of the center of pressures). The learning process had positive effects on the severity of motor impairment and on the asymmetry of the distribution of support pressures in the standing posture. Reorganization of posture during bodily movements occurred mainly because of impairment to the developed "non-use" stereotype of the paralyzed lower limb. PMID:11430569

  9. Development of a reliable dual-gene amplification RT-PCR assay for the detection of Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus in Turkey brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Al-Tori, Amira; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Yuval, Chanoch; Perk, Shimon; Lublin, Avishai

    2012-11-01

    The Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus (TMEV) causes neuroparalytic signs, paresis, in-coordination, morbidity and mortality in turkeys. In parallel to the increased worldwide scientific interest in veterinary avian flaviviruses, including the Bagaza, Tembusu and Tembusu-related BYD virus, TMEV-caused disease also reemergence in commercial turkeys during late summer of 2010. While initially TMEV was detected by NS5-gene RT-PCR, subsequently, the env-gene RT-PCR was employed. As lately several inconsistencies were observed between the clinical, serological and molecular detection of the TMEV env gene, this study evaluated whether genetic changes occurred in the recently isolated viruses, and sought to optimize and improve the direct TMEV amplification from brain tissues of affected turkeys. The main findings indicated that no changes occurred during the years in the TMEV genome, but the PCR detection sensitivities of the env and NS5 genes differed. The RT-PCR and RNA purification were optimized for direct amplification from brain tissues without pre-replication of clinical samples in tissue cultures or in embryonated eggs. The amplification sensitivity of the NS5-gene was 10-100 times more than the env-gene when separate. The new dual-gene amplification RT-PCR was similar to that of the NS5 gene, therefore the assay can be considered as a reliable diagnostic assay. Cases where one of the two amplicons would be RT-PCR negative would alert and warn on the virus identity, and possible genetic changes. In addition, the biochemical environment of the dual-gene amplification reaction seemed to contribute in deleting non-specific byproducts that occasionally appeared in the singular RT-PCR assays on RNA purified from brain tissues. PMID:22705084

  10. Evidence that antibodies against recombinant SnSAG1 of Sarcocystis neurona merozoites are involved in infection and immunity in equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Siobhan; Witonsky, Sharon

    2009-07-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the principal etiologic agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). An immunodominant protein of S. neurona, SnSAG-1, is expressed by the majority of S. neurona merozoites isolated from spinal tissues of horses diagnosed with EPM and may be a candidate for diagnostic tests and prophylaxis for EPM. Five horses were vaccinated with adjuvanted recombinant SnSAG1 (rSnSAG1) and 5 control (sham vaccinated) horses were vaccinated with adjuvant only. Serum was evaluated pre- and post-vaccination, prior to challenge, for antibodies against rSnSAG1 and inhibitory effects on the infectivity of S. neurona by an in vitro serum neutralization assay. The effect of vaccination with rSnSAG1 on in vivo infection by S. neurona was evaluated by challenging all the horses with S. neurona merozoites. Blinded daily examinations and 4 blinded neurological examinations were used to evaluate the presence of clinical signs of EPM. The 5 vaccinated horses developed serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) titers of SnSAG1, detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), post-vaccination. Post-vaccination serum from vaccinated horses was found to have an inhibitory effect on merozoites, demonstrated by in vitro bioassay. Following the challenge, the 5 control horses displayed clinical signs of EPM, including ataxia. While 4 of the 5 vaccinated horses did not become ataxic. One rSnSAG-1 vaccinated horse showed paresis in 1 limb with muscle atrophy. All horses showed mild, transient, cranial nerve deficits; however, disease did not progress to ataxia in rSnSAG-1 vaccinated horses. The study showed that vaccination with rSnSAG-1 produced antibodies in horses that neutralized merozoites when tested by in vitro culture and significantly reduced clinical signs demonstrated by in vivo challenge. PMID:19794889

  11. Non-Traumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation During Treatment with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jessica M.; Afanador, Hayley F.; Manjarrez, Efren; Morales, Ximena A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma Symptoms: Paraplegia Medication: Rivaroxaban Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: General Internal Medicine • Hospital Medicine • Cardiology • Hematology • Neurology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare but disabling condition, accounting for only 4.1% of all intraspinal hematomas. Risk factors include arteriovenous malformations, coagulopathy, therapeutic anticoagulation, underlying neoplasms, or following spinal puncture. Vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet agents, and heparinoids have been associated with SSDHs in prior reports. To the best of our knowledge, no cases have reported this association with the factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, and SSDHs. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old Honduran man with a 5-year history of symptomatic palpitations due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation. He was initially refractory to pharmacologic therapy. He underwent cardioversion in February 2014. After cardioversion, he remained asymptomatic on flecainide. He was anticoagulated on rivaroxaban 20 mg daily without incident since early 2013 until presentation in August 2014. He presented with sudden onset of excruciating upper and lower back pain after minimal movement. This was immediately followed by bilateral lower extremity paresis rapidly progressing to paraplegia with bowel and bladder dysfunction over 15 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an acute spinal subdural hematoma extending from T3 inferiorly to the conus medullaris. Six months after undergoing cervical and lumbar drainage procedures, he has not recovered bowel, bladder, or lower extremity neurologic function. Conclusions: Non-traumatic spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is a rare neurological emergency that may occur during the use of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Physicians should suspect SSDH in

  12. Techniques for preserving vertebral artery perfusion during thoracic aortic stent grafting requiring aortic arch landing.

    PubMed

    Woo, Edward Y; Bavaria, Joseph E; Pochettino, Alberto; Gleason, Thomas G; Woo, Y Joseph; Velazquez, Omaida C; Carpenter, Jeffrey P; Cheung, Albert T; Fairman, Ronald M

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic endografting offers many advantages over open repair. However, delivery of the device can be difficult and may necessitate adjunctive procedures. We describe our techniques for preserving perfusion to the left subclavian artery despite endograft coverage to obtain a proximal seal zone. We reviewed our experience with the Talent thoracic stent graft (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA). From 1999 to 2003, 49 patients received this device (29 men, 20 women). Seventeen patients required adjunctive procedures to facilitate proximal graft placement. We performed left subclavian-to-left common carotid artery transposition (6), left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass with ligation proximal to the vertebral artery (7), and left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass with proximal coil embolization (4). Patients who had anatomy unfavorable to transposition or bypass with proximal ligation (large aneurysms or proximal vertebral artery origin) were treated with coil embolization of the proximal left subclavian artery in order to prevent subsequent type II endoleaks. Technical success rate of the carotid subclavian bypass was 100%. Patient follow-up ranged from 3 to 48 months with a mean of 12 months. Six patients had follow-up <6 months owing to recent graft placement. Primary patency was 100%. No neurologic events occurred during the procedure or upon follow-up. One patient had a transient chyle leak that spontaneously resolved in 24 hours. Another patient had a phrenic nerve paresis that resolved after 3 weeks. We believe that it is important to maintain patency of the vertebral artery specifically when a patent right vertebral system and an intact basilar artery is not demonstrated. Furthermore, we describe a novel technique of coil embolization of the proximal left subclavian artery in conjunction with left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass. This circumvents the need for potentially hazardous mediastinal dissection and ligation of the

  13. Neurovirulence of H5N1 Infection in Ferrets Is Mediated by Multifocal Replication in Distinct Permissive Neuronal Cell Regions

    PubMed Central

    Plourde, Jennifer R.; Pyles, John A.; Layton, R. Colby; Vaughan, Sarah E.; Tipper, Jennifer L.; Harrod, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI), subtype H5N1, remains an emergent threat to the human population. While respiratory disease is a hallmark of influenza infection, H5N1 has a high incidence of neurological sequelae in many animal species and sporadically in humans. We elucidate the temporal/spatial infection of H5N1 in the brain of ferrets following a low dose, intranasal infection of two HPAI strains of varying neurovirulence and lethality. A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN1203) induced mortality in 100% of infected ferrets while A/Hong Kong/483/1997 (HK483) induced lethality in only 20% of ferrets, with death occurring significantly later following infection. Neurological signs were prominent in VN1203 infection, but not HK483, with seizures observed three days post challenge and torticollis or paresis at later time points. VN1203 and HK483 replication kinetics were similar in primary differentiated ferret nasal turbinate cells, and similar viral titers were measured in the nasal turbinates of infected ferrets. Pulmonary viral titers were not different between strains and pathological findings in the lungs were similar in severity. VN1203 replicated to high titers in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, and brain stem; whereas HK483 was not recovered in these tissues. VN1203 was identified adjacent to and within the olfactory nerve tract, and multifocal infection was observed throughout the frontal cortex and cerebrum. VN1203 was also detected throughout the cerebellum, specifically in Purkinje cells and regions that coordinate voluntary movements. These findings suggest the increased lethality of VN1203 in ferrets is due to increased replication in brain regions important in higher order function and explains the neurological signs observed during H5N1 neurovirulence. PMID:23056366

  14. Neonatal PCP Is More Potent than Ketamine at Modifying Preweaning Behaviors of Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boctor, Sherin Y.; Wang, Cheng; Ferguson, Sherry A.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as ketamine (KET) or phencyclidine (PCP), can trigger apoptotic neurodegeneration in neonatal rodents; however, little is known about the behavioral alterations resulting from such treatment. Here, rats were sc treated with saline; 10 mg/kg PCP on postnatal days (PNDs) 7, 9, and 11; 20 mg/kg KET (six injections every 2 h on PND 7); or a regimen of ketamine and 250 mg/kg L-carnitine (KLC) both administered on PND 7 with additional 250 mg/kg doses of L-carnitine given on PNDs 8–11. Postinjection, the home cage behavior of each pup was categorized on PNDs 7–11. Slant board and forelimb hang behaviors were examined on PNDs 8–11 and 12–16, respectively. The initial KET or KLC injections on PND 7 elevated abnormal home cage activity (i.e., paresis and paddling); however, KLC pup behavior returned to normal by the fourth injection, indicating the protective effects of L-carnitine against NMDA antagonist toxicity. PCP treatment caused substantial abnormal home cage activity on each injection day (PNDs 7, 9, and 11). Latencies to turn on the slant board were significantly longer on PND 8 for KET- and PCP-treated pups and PND 10 for PCP-treated pups. On PND 12, the forelimb hang time of PCP-treated pups was significantly shorter. Body weight was decreased on PNDs 8–18 in PCP-treated pups and PNDs 8–10 in KET-treated pups. These data indicate that developmental NMDA antagonist treatment causes short-term behavioral alterations which appear related to motor coordination and may be cerebellar in nature. Furthermore, single PCP injections appear more potent at altering behavior than multiple injections of KET. PMID:18667523

  15. The neurovirulent determinants of ts1, a paralytogenic mutant of Moloney murine leukemia virus TB, are localized in at least two functionally distinct regions of the genome.

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, P H; Tzeng, E; Knupp, C; Wong, P K

    1986-01-01

    To better understand the molecular mechanism involved in retrovirus ts1-induced paralytic disease in mice, we constructed a panel of recombinant viruses between ts1 and the wild-type viruses Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) and MoMuLV-TB, a strain of MoMuLV. These recombinant viruses were constructed in an attempt to identify the sequence(s) in the genome of ts1 which contains the critical mutation(s) responsible for the neurovirulence of ts1. Two functionally distinct sequences in the genome of ts1 were found to be responsible for its paralytogenic ability. One of these sequences, the 0.77-kilobase-pair XbaI-BamHI (nucleotides 5765 to 6537) fragment which encodes the 5' half of gp70 and 11 base pairs upstream of the env gene coding sequence, determines the inability of ts1 to process Pr80env. The other sequence, the 2.30-kilobase-pair BamHI-PstI (nucleotides 538 to 8264 and 1 to 567) fragment, which comprises nearly two-thirds of the env gene, the long terminal repeat, and the 5' noncoding sequence, determines the enhanced neurotropism of ts1. Replacement of any one of these two regions with the homologous region from either one of the two wild-type viruses resulted in recombinant viruses which either totally failed to induce paralysis or induced a greatly attenuated form of paresis in some of the infected mice. Images PMID:3712556

  16. Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of Visual Cue Training to Improve Adaptability of Walking after Stroke: Multi-Centre, Single-Blind Randomised Control Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hollands, Kristen L.; Pelton, Trudy A.; Wimperis, Andrew; Whitham, Diane; Tan, Wei; Jowett, Sue; Sackley, Catherine M.; Wing, Alan M.; Tyson, Sarah F.; Mathias, Jonathan; Hensman, Marianne; van Vliet, Paulette M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Given the importance of vision in the control of walking and evidence indicating varied practice of walking improves mobility outcomes, this study sought to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of varied walking practice in response to visual cues, for the rehabilitation of walking following stroke. Design This 3 arm parallel, multi-centre, assessor blind, randomised control trial was conducted within outpatient neurorehabilitation services Participants Community dwelling stroke survivors with walking speed <0.8m/s, lower limb paresis and no severe visual impairments Intervention Over-ground visual cue training (O-VCT), Treadmill based visual cue training (T-VCT), and Usual care (UC) delivered by physiotherapists twice weekly for 8 weeks. Main outcome measures: Participants were randomised using computer generated random permutated balanced blocks of randomly varying size. Recruitment, retention, adherence, adverse events and mobility and balance were measured before randomisation, post-intervention and at four weeks follow-up. Results Fifty-six participants participated (18 T-VCT, 19 O-VCT, 19 UC). Thirty-four completed treatment and follow-up assessments. Of the participants that completed, adherence was good with 16 treatments provided over (median of) 8.4, 7.5 and 9 weeks for T-VCT, O-VCT and UC respectively. No adverse events were reported. Post-treatment improvements in walking speed, symmetry, balance and functional mobility were seen in all treatment arms. Conclusions Outpatient based treadmill and over-ground walking adaptability practice using visual cues are feasible and may improve mobility and balance. Future studies should continue a carefully phased approach using identified methods to improve retention. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01600391 PMID:26445137

  17. Chronic or Late Lyme Neuroborreliosis: Analysis of Evidence Compared to Chronic or Late Neurosyphilis

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Whether spirochetes persist in affected host tissues and cause the late/chronic manifestations of neurosyphilis was the subject of long-lasting debate. Detection of Treponema pallidum in the brains of patients with general paresis established a direct link between persisting infection and tertiary manifestations of neurosyphilis. Today, the same question is in the center of debate with respect to Lyme disease. The goal of this review was to compare the established pathological features of neurosyphilis with those available for Lyme neuroborreliosis. If the main tertiary forms of neurosyphilis also occur in Lyme neuroborreliosis and Borrelia burgdorferi can be detected in brain lesions would indicate that the spirochete is responsible for the neuropsychiatric manifestations of late/chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. The substantial amounts of data available in the literature show that the major forms of late/chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis (meningovascular and meningoencephalitis) are clinically and pathologically confirmed. Borrelia burgdorferi was detected in association with tertiary brain lesions and cultivated from the affected brain or cerebrospinal fluid. The accumulated data also indicate that Borrelia burgdorferi is able to evade from destruction by the host immune reactions, persist in host tissues and sustain chronic infection and inflammation. These observations represent evidences that Borrelia burgdorferi in an analogous way to Treponema pallidum is responsible for the chronic/late manifestations of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Late Lyme neuroborreliosis is accepted by all existing guidelines in Europe, US and Canada. The terms chronic and late are synonymous and both define tertiary neurosyphilis or tertiary Lyme neuroborreliosis. The use of chronic and late Lyme neuroborreliosis as different entities is inaccurate and can be confusing. Further pathological investigations and the detection of spirochetes in infected tissues and body fluids are strongly needed

  18. Traumatic spondyloptosis at the cervico-thoracic junction without neurological deficits

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Lozen, Andrew; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Background: There have been rare cases of traumatic cervical spondyloptosis without neurological compromise. We report another case and provide a review of the literature, with a focus on appropriate management. Case Description: A 60-year-old male rode his bicycle into a stationary semi-truck. He reported initial bilateral upper extremity paresthesias that resolved. Imaging demonstrated C7 on T1 spondyloptosis. Traction did not achieve reduction and a halo was applied. Subsequently, he underwent posterior decompression C6-T1, reduction via bilateral complete facetectomies at C7, and fixation from C4 to T2 fixation. Afterward, an anterior C7-T1 fixation occurred, where exposure was performed through a midline sternotomy. Postoperatively, he woke up with baseline motor and sensory examination in his extremities. He did exhibit voice hoarseness due to paralysis of the left vocal cords. He was discharged home 3 days after surgery. At 6 months follow-up, there was a progressive improvement of the left vocal cords to slight paresis; dynamic X-rays demonstrated no instability with good fusion progression. Conclusion: Traumatic cervical spondyloptosis without neurological compromise is a rare and challenging scenario. There is a concern for neurologic compromise with preoperative traction, but if specific posterior elements are fractured, the spinal canal may be wide enough where the concern for disc migration is minimal. For patients who have not been reduced preoperatively, a posterior approach with initial decompression to widen the canal, before reduction, appears safe. This scheme may avoid an initial anterior approach for decompression, necessitating a 3-stage procedure if circumferential stabilization is pursued. PMID:27274411

  19. Medicolegal Corner: When minimally invasive thoracic surgery leads to paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    A patient with mild cervical myelopathy due to multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) initially underwent a cervical C3-T1 laminectomy with C2-T2 fusion utilizing lateral mass screws. The patient's new postoperative right upper extremity paresis largely resolved within several postoperative months. However, approximately 6 months later, the patient developed increased paraparesis attributed to thoracic OPLL and Ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) at the T2-T5 and T10-T11 levels. The patient underwent simultaneous minimally invasive (MIS) unilateral MetRx approaches to both regions. Postoperatively, the patient was paraplegic and never recovered function. Multiple mistakes led to permanent paraplegia due to MIS MetRx decompressions for T2-T5 and T10-11 OPLL/OYL in this patient. First, both thoracic procedures should have been performed "open" utilizing a full laminectomy rather than MIS; adequate visualization would have likely averted inadvertent cord injury, and the resultant CSF leak. Second, the surgeon should have used an operating microscope. Third, the operation should have been monitored with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and EMG (electromyography). Fourth, preoperatively the patient should have received a 1-gram dose of Solumedrol for cord "protection". Fifth, applying Gelfoam as part of the CSF leak repair is contraindicated (e.g. due to swelling in confined spaces- see insert). Sixth, if the patient had not stopped Excedrin prior to the surgery, the surgery should have been delayed to avoid the increased perioperative risk of bleeding/hematoma. PMID:24843811

  20. The efficacy of botulinum neurotoxin A for the treatment of complete and partially recovered chronic sixth nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Repka, M X; Lam, G C; Morrison, N A

    1994-01-01

    Esotropia from chronic sixth nerve palsy or paresis usually requires surgery. Chemodenervation of the antagonist medial rectus muscle, while popular for the treatment of acute sixth nerve palsies and pareses, has not been used extensively for chronic cases. In this study, 22 patients with sixth nerve palsies or partially recovered palsies of greater than 5 months duration were treated with chemodenervation. The etiologies of the sixth nerve palsies were trauma (n = 7), tumor (n = 4), infection/inflammation (n = 3), nerve compression from aneurysm or increased intracranial pressure (n = 4), congenital (n = 1), ischemia (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 1). The mean preinjection deviation was 41 prism diopters. A total of 38 injections were administered (mean, 1.7 per patient). Each patient received an injection of 2.5 to 7.5 units (mean, 4.1) of botulinum neurotoxin A to the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle. Treatment success was assessed 6 months after the last injection. A course of chemodenervation significantly improved the alignment of 9 of the 22 patients (41%). The mean postinjection deviation was 8 delta. Seven patients (32%) had single binocular vision in primary position restored. These patients had a mean horizontal binocular field of 70 degrees (range, 40 degrees to 100 degrees). Thirteen patients (59%) had only modest improvement and required surgery. The data suggest that injection of botulinum neurotoxin A is a useful treatment for some patients with chronic sixth nerve weakness. A course of chemodenervation therapy compares less favorably with transposition surgery with concomitant neurotoxin injection for the treatment of these difficult problems. PMID:8014791

  1. Restoration of ankle movements with the ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator: a safe and reliable treatment option for permanent central leg palsy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Klaus Daniel; Polanski, Witold Henryk; Schulz, Anne-Kathrin; Jöbges, Michael; Hoff, Hansjoerg; Schackert, Gabriele; Pinzer, Thomas; Sobottka, Stephan B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The ActiGait drop foot stimulator is a promising technique for restoration of lost ankle function by an implantable hybrid stimulation system. It allows ankle dorsiflexion by active peroneal nerve stimulation during the swing phase of gait. In this paper the authors report the outcome of the first prospective study on a large number of patients with stroke-related drop foot. METHODS Twenty-seven patients who experienced a stroke and with persisting spastic leg paresis received an implantable ActiGait drop foot stimulator for restoration of ankle movement after successful surface test stimulation. After 3 to 5 weeks, the stimulator was activated, and gait speed, gait endurance, and activation time of the system were evaluated and compared with preoperative gait tests. In addition, patient satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire. RESULTS Postoperative gait speed significantly improved from 33.9 seconds per 20 meters to 17.9 seconds per 20 meters (p < 0.0001), gait endurance from 196 meters in 6 minutes to 401 meters in 6 minutes (p < 0.0001), and activation time from 20.5 seconds to 10.6 seconds on average (p < 0.0001). In 2 patients with nerve injury, surgical repositioning of the electrode cuff became necessary. One patient showed a delayed wound healing, and in another patient the system had to be removed because of a wound infection. Marked improvement in mobility, social participation, and quality of life was confirmed by 89% to 96% of patients. CONCLUSIONS The ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator improves gait speed, endurance, and quality of life in patients with stroke-related drop foot. Regarding gait speed, the ActiGait system appears to be advantageous compared with foot orthosis or surface stimulation devices. Randomized trials with more patients and longer observation periods are needed to prove the long-term benefit of this device. PMID:26207599

  2. Progressive hemifacial atrophy. A natural history study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Spencer, M A

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe two very different natural history courses in 2 patients with hemifacial atrophy. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome, Romberg syndrome, PHA) is characterized by slowly progressive atrophy, frequently involving only one side of the face, primarily affecting the subcutaneous tissue and fat. The onset usually occurs during the first 2 decades of life. The cause and pathophysiology are unknown. Ophthalmic involvement is common, with progressive enophthalmos a frequent finding. Pupillary disturbances, heterochromia, uveitis, pigmentary disturbances of the ocular fundus, and restrictive strabismus have also been reported. Neurologic findings may be present, but the natural history and progression of ocular findings are often not described in the literature. METHODS: We studied the records and present findings of 2 patients with progressive hemifacial atrophy who were observed in our institution over a 10-year period. RESULTS: Both patients showed progression of ophthalmic findings, primarily on the affected side. One patient has had chronic uveitis with secondary cataract and glaucoma, in addition to retinal pigmentary changes. She also had a third-nerve paresis of the contralateral eye and mild seizure activity. The other patient had mild uveitis, some progression of unilateral retinal pigmentary changes, and a significant increase in hyperopia in the affected eye, in addition to hypotony at age 19 without a clear cause, but with secondary retinal and refractive changes. CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of progressive hemifacial atrophy are varied, but can progress from mild visual impairment to blindness. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719679

  3. Clinical Value of the Assessment of Changes in MEP Duration with Voluntary Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Marisa; Cabib, Christopher; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) gives rise to muscle responses, known as motor evoked potentials (MEP), through activation of the motor pathways. Voluntary contraction causes facilitation of MEPs, which consists of shortening MEP latency, increasing MEP amplitude and widening MEP duration. While an increase in excitability of alpha motorneurons and the corticospinal tract can easily explain latency shortening and amplitude increase, other mechanisms have to be accounted for to explain the increase in duration. We measured the increase in duration of the MEP during contraction with respect to rest in a group of healthy volunteers and retrospectively assessed this parameter in patients who were examined in a standardized fashion during the past 5 years. We included 25 healthy subjects, 21 patients with multiple sclerosis, 33 patients with acute stroke, 5 patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis, and 5 patients with signs suggesting psychogenic paresis. We found already significant differences among groups in the MEP duration at rest, patients with MS had a significantly longer duration, and patients with stroke had significantly shorter duration, than the other two groups. The increase in MEP duration during voluntary contraction was different in patients and in healthy subjects. It was significantly shorter in MS and significantly longer in stroke patients. It was absent in the five patients with suspected psychogenic weakness. In patients with HSP, an abnormally increase in duration occurred only in leg muscles. Our results suggest that the increase in duration of the MEP during contraction may reveal the contribution of propriospinal interneurons to the activation of alpha motorneurons. This mechanism may be altered in some diseases and, therefore, the assessment proposed in this work may have clinical applicability for the differential diagnosis of weakness. PMID:26793051

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury and Peripheral Immune Suppression: Primer and Prospectus

    PubMed Central

    Hazeldine, Jon; Lord, Janet M.; Belli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a common occurrence in patients following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are associated with an increased risk of mortality, longer length of hospital stay, and poor neurological outcome. Systemic immune suppression arising as a direct result of injury to the central nervous system (CNS) is considered to be primarily responsible for this increased incidence of infection, a view strengthened by recent studies that have reported novel changes in the composition and function of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system post-TBI. However, our knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie TBI-induced immune suppression is equivocal at best. Here, after summarizing our current understanding of the impact of TBI on peripheral immunity and discussing CNS-mediated regulation of immune function, we propose roles for a series of novel mechanisms in driving the immune suppression that is observed post-TBI. These mechanisms, which have never been considered before in the context of TBI-induced immune paresis, include the CNS-driven emergence into the circulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and suppressive neutrophil subsets, and the release from injured tissue of nuclear and mitochondria-derived damage associated molecular patterns. Moreover, in an effort to further our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie TBI-induced changes in immunity, we pose throughout the review a series of questions, which if answered would address a number of key issues, such as establishing whether manipulating peripheral immune function has potential as a future therapeutic strategy by which to treat and/or prevent infections in the hospitalized TBI patient. PMID:26594196

  5. Diagnostic findings in the 1992 epornitic of neurotropic velogenic Newcastle disease in double-crested cormorants from the upper midwestern United States.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, Carol U.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Glaser, Linda C.; Franson, J.C.; Senne, Dennis A.; Duncan, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Neurotropic velogenic Newcastle disease (NVND) occurred in juvenile double-crested cormorants,Phalacrocorax auritus, simultaneously in nesting colonies in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska and in Lakes Michigan, Superior, Huron, and Ontario during the summer of 1992. Mortality as high as 80%-90% was estimated in some of the nesting colonies. Clinical signs observed in 4- to -6wk-old cormorants included torticollis, tremors, ataxia, curled toes, and paresis or weakness of legs, wings or both, which was sometimes unilateral. No significant mortality or unusual clinical signs were seen in adult cormorants. Necropsy of 88 cormorants yielded no consistent gross observations. Microscopic lesions in the brain and spinal cord were consistently present in all cormorants from which Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was isolated. Characteristic brain lesions provided rapid identification of new suspect sites of NVND. Lesions were also present in the heart, kidney, proventriculus, spleen, and pancreas but were less consistent or nonspecific. NDV was isolated at the National Wildlife Health Center from 27 of 93 cormorants tested. Virus was most frequently isolated from intestine or brain tissue of cormorants submitted within the first 4wk of the epornitic. Sera collected from cormorants with neurologic signs were consistently positive for NDV antibody.The NDV isolate from cormorants was characterized as NVND virus at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories Ames, Iowa. The NVND virus was also identified as the cause of neurologic disease in a North Dakota turkey flock during the summer of 1992. Although no virus was isolated from cormorants tested after the first month of submissions, brain and spinal cord lesions characteristic of NVND were observed in cormorants from affected sites for 2 mo, at which time nesting colonies dispersed and no more submissions were received. Risk to susceptible populations of both wild avian species and domestic poultry makes

  6. Brain-Machine-Interface in Chronic Stroke Rehabilitation: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Broetz, Doris; Rea, Massimiliano; Läer, Leonhard; Yilmaz, Özge; Brasil, Fabricio L; Liberati, Giulia; Curado, Marco R; Garcia-Cossio, Eliana; Vyziotis, Alexandros; Cho, Woosang; Agostini, Manuel; Soares, Ernesto; Soekadar, Surjo; Caria, Andrea; Cohen, Leonardo G; Birbaumer, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic stroke patients with severe hand weakness, respond poorly to rehabilitation efforts. Here, we evaluated efficacy of daily brain-machine-interface training to increase the hypothesized beneficial effects of physiotherapy alone in patients with severe paresis in a double blind sham-controlled design proof of concept study. Methods 32 chronic stroke patients with severe hand weakness, were randomly assigned to two matched groups and participated in 17.8 ± 1.4 days of training rewarding desynchronization of ipsilesional oscillatory sensorimotor rhythms (SMR) with contingent online movements of hand and arm orthoses (experimental group , n=16). In the control group (sham group, n=16) movements of the orthoses occurred randomly. Both groups received identical behavioral physiotherapy immediately following BMI training or the control intervention. Upper limb motor function scores, electromyography from arm and hand muscles, placebo-expectancy effects and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) blood oxygenation level dependent activity were assessed before and after intervention. Results A significant group × time interaction in upper limb Fugl-Meyer motor (cFMA) scores was found. cFMA scores improved more in the experimental than in the control group, presenting a significant improvement of cFMA scores (3.41±0.563 points difference, p=0.018) reflecting a clinically meaningful change from no activity to some in paretic muscles. cFMA improvements in the experimental group correlated with changes in functional MRI laterality index and with paretic hand electromyography activity. Placebo-expectancy scores were comparable for both groups. Interpretation The addition of BMI training to behaviorally oriented physiotherapy can be used to induce functional improvements in motor function in chronic stroke patients without residual finger movements and may open a new door in stroke neurorehabilitation. PMID:23494615

  7. High extracellular levels of potassium and trace metals in human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Daniel; Ivanovic, Jugoslav; Mariussen, Espen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2015-03-01

    Brain abscesses frequently cause symptoms such as seizures, delirium, paresis and sensory deficits that could reflect brain edema, increased intracranial pressure, or tissue destruction. However, it is also possible that pus constituents could disturb neuronal function in the surrounding brain tissue. In pus from 16 human brain abscesses, extracellular potassium ([K(+)]o) was 10.6 ± 4.8 mmol/L (mean ± SD; maximum value 22.0 mmol/L). In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), [K(+)]o was 2.7 ± 0.6 mmol/L (N = 14; difference from pus p < 0.001), which is similar to previous control values for [K(+)]o in CSF and brain parenchyma. Zinc and iron were >40-fold higher in pus than in CSF; calcium, copper, manganese, and chromium were also higher, whereas sodium and magnesium were similar. Pus from 10 extracerebral abscesses (empyemas) also had higher [K(+)]o, zinc, iron, calcium, copper, manganese, and chromium than did CSF. Brain abscess [K(+)]o was significantly higher than serum potassium (3.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L; p = 0.0001), indicating that the elevated abscess [K(+)]o originated from damaged cells (e.g. brain cells and leukocytes), not from serum. High [K(+)]o could depolarize neurons, high levels of zinc could inhibit glutamate and GABA receptors, and high levels of iron and copper could cause oxidative damage, all of which could contribute to neuronal dysfunction in brain abscess patients. PMID:25684071

  8. From alienism to the birth of modern psychiatry: a neurological story?

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Moulin, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between developing neurology and psychiatry in Paris are of interest, in a city which was the main center for studies on the nervous system and its disorders during the nineteenth century. Contrary to a common view, and in spite of an established tradition for mental diseases, emerging neurology had a much stronger influence on psychiatry ('alienism') than the reverse. This was largely due to the school built up by Jean-Martin Charcot, which was organized around the study and management of hysteria. Although Charcot himself always claimed his disinterest in mental medicine, he stimulated the development of an original scientific approach to nervous system conditions, along with a structured academic teaching, while alienism paradoxically remained stuck in organicism, after Antoine Bayle's report in 1822 of 'arachnitis' as the substratum of general paresis of the insane. Contrary to alienism, the young neurological school was able of self-criticism, and progressively underscored mental factors in hysteria. This led to the paradox that neurologists were active in a disease with a recognized lack of organic lesion, while alienists were postulating brain lesions in all mental disorders. The neurological activity thus indirectly and involuntarily led to the first developments of psychodynamic concepts in mental diseases. The academic evolution led to the launch of a faculty chair of mental and brain diseases in 1875, which was taken over for nearly half a century by direct pupils of Charcot: Benjamin Ball, Alix Joffroy, and Gilbert Ballet held the position until 1916, supporting the development of modern psychiatry in general hospitals, while alienism progressively disappeared at the turn of the century. PMID:19690418

  9. Birth of modern psychiatry and the death of alienism: the legacy of Jean-Martin Charcot.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Moulin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    At the time of Jean-Martin Charcot, Paris--the main center for studies on the nervous system and its disorders--was home to critical exchanges between the developing discipline of neurology and psychiatry. Contrary to the commonly held view, and in spite of an established tradition concerning mental diseases, emerging neurology had a much stronger influence on psychiatry ('alienism') than the reverse. This was largely due to the school built up by Jean-Martin Charcot himself, which was organized around the study and management of hysteria. Although Charcot always claimed to be uninterested in mental medicine, he stimulated the development of an original scientific approach to nervous system conditions, based on Claude Bernard's method, along with structured academic teaching. Conversely, alienism paradoxically remained stuck in organicism, after Antoine Bayle's report in 1822 of 'arachnitis' as the substratum of general paresis of the insane. Contrary to alienism, the young neurological school was capable of self-criticism, and progressively highlighted mental factors in hysteria. This led to the paradox that neurologists were active in a disease with no organic cerebral lesion, while alienists were postulating brain lesions in all mental disorders. Pushed by Charcot, the academic evolution led to the launch of a faculty chair of mental and brain diseases in 1875, which was taken over for nearly half a century by his direct pupils Benjamin Ball, Alix Joffroy and Gilbert Ballet, who held the position until 1916, supporting the development of modern psychiatry in general hospitals, while alienism progressively disappeared at the turn of the century. PMID:20938143

  10. Two-dimensional analysis of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, C-H; Shin, J E; Kim, T S; Shim, B S; Park, H J

    2013-01-01

    The HSN test is a simple examination that can be easily performed by clinicians, however only a few studies have analyzed the 2-dimensional characteristics of HSN in patients with MD. The objective of the study was to characterize different types of 2-dimensional head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) in patients with Meniere's disease (MD). Sixty-five patients with definite MD were enrolled. HSN was considered pathologic, if slow-phase velocity (SPV) was ≥ 4°/s and was classified as paretic or recovery according to the direction, and as monophasic or biphasic according to the presence of direction change. HSN was categorized as pure horizontal, mixed or pure vertical. When vertical SPV was larger than horizontal SPV, HSN was categorized as perverted. Forty-four patients (68%) had pathologic HSN and 28 patients (43%) had pathologic canal paresis. Monophasic-paretic HSN was the most common and followed by biphasic-paretic HSN, monophasic-recovery HSN and biphasic-recovery HSN. Delayed-peak monophasic-paretic HSN, which was not observed in vestibular neuritis, was found in 6 patients with MD. Thirty-three patients (51%) had a vertical component, which was monophasic and downbeat in 32 (97%). Every pathologic HSN in horizontal plane had higher SPV in horizontal plane than that of vertical plane. Perverted HSN was found in 4 patients, of whom 3 had pure vertical and one had mixed type HSN. Our data showed that HSN is a sensitive detector of vestibular dysfunction. HSN showed diverse types with a new type of delayed-peak HSN. Vertical components of HSN were observed in about half, but they were negligible compared to horizontal components. Weak perverted HSN (vertical SPV ≤ 4°/s) could be found in patients with MD. PMID:23788137

  11. Volume effects in Rhesus monkey spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E. ); Stephens, L.C.; Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Peters, L.J. )

    1994-04-30

    An experiment was conducted to test for the existence of a volume effect in radiation myelopathy using Rhesus monkeys treated with clinically relevant field sizes and fractionation schedules. Five groups of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated using 2.2 Gy per fraction to their spinal cords. Three groups were irradiated with 8 cm fields to total doses of 70.4, 77, and 83.6 Gy. Two additional groups were irradiated to 70.4 Gy using 4 and 16 cm fields. The incidence of paresis expressed within 2 years following the completion of treatment was determined for each group. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to determine parameters of a logistic dose response function. The volume effect was modeled using the probability model in which the probability of producing a lesion in an irradiated volume is governed by the probability of the occurrence of independent events. This is a two parameter model requiring only the estimates of the parameters of the dose-response function for the reference volume, but not needing any additional parameters for describing the volume effect. The probability model using a logistic dose-response function fits the data well with the D[sub 50] = 75.8 Gy for the 8-cm field. No evidence was seen for a difference in sensitivities for different anatomical levels of the spinal cord. Most lesions were type 3, combined white matter parenchymal and vascular lesions. Latent periods did not differ significantly from those of type 3 lesions in humans. The spinal cord exhibits a volume effect that is well described by the probability model. Because the dose response function for radiation myelopathy is steep, the volume effect is modest. The Rhesus monkey remains the animal model most similar to humans in dose response, histopathology, and latency for radiation myelopathy. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The clinical spectrum of laryngeal dystonia includes dystonic cough: observations of a large series.

    PubMed

    Payne, Susannah; Tisch, Stephen; Cole, Ian; Brake, Helen; Rough, Judy; Darveniza, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Laryngeal dystonia is a movement disorder of the muscles within the larynx, which most commonly manifests as spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Rarer reported manifestations include dystonic respiratory stridor and dyscoordinate breathing. Laryngeal dystonia has been treated successfully with botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) injections since 1984. We reviewed prospectively collected data in a consecutive series of 193 patients with laryngeal dystonia who were seen at St. Vincent's Hospital between 1991 and 2011. Patient data were analyzed in Excel, R, and Prism. Laryngeal dystonia manifested as SD (92.7%), stridor (11.9%), dystonic cough (6.2%), dyscoordinate breathing (4.1%), paroxysmal hiccups (1.6%), and paroxysmal sneezing (1.6%). There were more women (68.4%) than men (31.6%), and the average age at onset was 47 years. A positive family history of dystonia was present in 16.1% of patients. A higher incidence of extra-laryngeal dystonia (ie, torticollis and blepharospasm) and concurrent manifestations of laryngeal dystonia were present in patients with dystonic cough, dyscoordinate breathing, paroxysmal sneezing, and hiccups than in other patients (P = 0.003 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The average starting dose of BTX decreased from 2.3 to 0.5 units between 1991 and 2011. The median treatment rating was excellent across all subgroups. Patients with adductor SD, stridor, extra-laryngeal dystonia and male patients had relatively better treatment outcomes. Technical failures were rare (1.1%). Dysphonia secondary to vocal cord paresis followed 38.7% of treatments. Laryngeal dystonia manifests predominantly as SD, but other manifestations include stridor, dyscoordinate breathing, paroxysmal cough, hiccups, and sneezing. BTX injections are very effective across all subgroups. Severe adverse events are rare. PMID:24753288

  13. The Major Brain Endocannabinoid 2-AG Controls Neuropathic Pain and Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Pellkofer, Hannah L.; Havla, Joachim; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; Azad, Shahnaz C.; Kuempfel, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent myelitis is one of the predominant characteristics in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). While paresis, visual loss, sensory deficits, and bladder dysfunction are well known symptoms in NMO patients, pain has been recognized only recently as another key symptom of the disease. Although spinal cord inflammation is a defining aspect of neuromyelitis, there is an almost complete lack of data on altered somatosensory function, including pain. Therefore, eleven consecutive patients with NMO were investigated regarding the presence and clinical characteristics of pain. All patients were examined clinically as well as by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) following the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS). Additionally, plasma endocannabinoid levels and signs of chronic stress and depression were determined. Almost all patients (10/11) suffered from NMO-associated neuropathic pain for the last three months, and 8 out of 11 patients indicated relevant pain at the time of examination. Symptoms of neuropathic pain were reported in the vast majority of patients with NMO. Psychological testing revealed signs of marked depression. Compared to age and gender-matched healthy controls, QST revealed pronounced mechanical and thermal sensory loss, strongly correlated to ongoing pain suggesting the presence of deafferentation-induced neuropathic pain. Thermal hyperalgesia correlated to MRI-verified signs of spinal cord lesion. Heat hyperalgesia was highly correlated to the time since last relapse of NMO. Patients with NMO exhibited significant mechanical and thermal dysesthesia, namely dynamic mechanical allodynia and paradoxical heat sensation. Moreover, they presented frequently with either abnormal mechanical hypoalgesia or hyperalgesia, which depended significantly on plasma levels of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerole (2-AG). These data emphasize the high prevalence of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia in patients

  14. Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Cystic Brain Tumors with Holmium-166-Chico : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Eun Jin; Rhee, Chang Hun; Youn, Sang Min; Choi, Chang-Woon; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracavitary injection of beta-emitting radiation source for control of cystic tumors has been tried with a benefit of localized internal radiation. The authors treated cystic brain tumor patients with Holmium-166-chitosan complex (Ho-166-chico), composed of a beta-emitting radionuclide Holmium-166 and biodegradable chit polymer, and evaluated the safety and effective measurement for response. Methods Twenty-two patients with recurrent cystic brain tumor and/or located in a deep or eloquent area were enrolled in this pilot study. The cyst volume and wall thickness were determined on CT or MRI to assess radiological response. The activity of Ho-166-chico injected via Ommaya reservoir was prescribed to be 10-25 Gy to the cyst wall in a depth of 4 mm. Results There was neither complications related to systemic absorption nor leakage of Ho-166-chico in all 22 patients. But, two cases of oculomotor paresis were observed in patients with recurrent craniopharyngioma. Radiological response was seen in 14 of 20 available follow-up images (70%). Seven patients of 'evident' radiological response experienced more than 25% decrease of both cyst volume and wall thickness. Another 7 patients with 'suggestive' response showed decrease of cyst volume without definitive change of the wall thickness or vice versa. All patients with benign tumors or low grade gliomas experienced symptomatic improvement. Conclusion Ho-166-chico intracavitary radiation therapy for cystic tumor is a safe method of palliation without serious complications. The determination of both minimal effective dosage and time interval of repeated injection through phase 1 trial could improve the results in the future. PMID:24278644

  15. Validity of Body-Worn Sensor Acceleration Metrics to Index Upper Extremity Function in Hemiparetic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Urbin, M.A.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In people with stroke, real-world use of the paretic upper extremity influences function. Therefore, measures of real-world use are of value for guiding rehabilitation. We undertook a study to identify the acceleration characteristics that have a stable association with upper extremity function and sensitivity to within-participant fluctuations in function over multiple sessions of task-specific training. Methods Twenty-seven adults > 6 months post stroke with upper extremity paresis participated. Signals from wrist-worn accelerometers were sampled at 30 Hz during seven sessions of task-specific training. Paretic upper extremity function was evaluated with the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). We used Spearman correlations to examine within-session associations between acceleration metrics and ARAT performance. A mixed model was used to determine which metrics were sensitive to within-participant fluctuations in upper extremity function across the seven training sessions. Results Upper extremity function correlated with bilateral acceleration variability and use ratio during five and six session, respectively. Time accelerating between 76-100% of peak acceleration correlated with function in six sessions. Variability of the paretic upper extremity acceleration and the ratio of acceleration variability between upper extremities were associated with function during all seven sessions. Variability in both the acceleration of the paretic upper extremity, and acceleration of the paretic and non-paretic extremities combined were sensitive to within-participant fluctuations in function across training sessions. Conclusion Multiple features of the acceleration profile track with upper extremity function within and across sessions of task-specific training. It may be possible to monitor these features with accelerometers to index upper extremity function outside of clinical settings. PMID:25742378

  16. Minimally invasive surgery using mini anterior incision for thyroid diseases: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncuoglu, Mehmet Zafer; Sabuncuoglu, Aylin; Sozen, Isa; Benzin, Mehmet Fatih; Cakir, Tugrul; Cetin, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Minimally invasive surgical techniques have attracted interest in all surgical specialties since 1980. The thyroidectomy technique requires meticulous surgical dissection, absolute hemostasis, en bloc tumor resection and adequate visualization of the operative field, all of which can be accomplished with minimally invasive techniques. Methods: The study group comprised all patients undergoing MITS from its introduction in 2010 until July 2012. All data were prospectively recorded in the Elbistan Hospital and Suleyman Demirel University in Turkey. This study was designed to demonstrate our experience with mini-incision-technique in thyroidectomy. Results: Over the 2-year period, 37 patients underwent bilateral MITS procedures. The procedure made with a small (2.5 cm) anterior incision made above the isthmus. The final diagnoses were benign multinodular goitre (37%), follicular adenoma (28%) incidental carcinoma (11%), Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (15%), Hurtle cell adenoma (5%), subacute thyroiditis (3%), residual thyroid-non carcinoma (2%), simple cyst (1%), diffuse hyperplasia (1%) and other (1%). Of the carcinomas, 80% were papillary thyroid cancer, 13% were follicular, and the remaining 7% were Hurtle cell carcinomas. We dont need to extend our incision in any cases. Two patients had temporary recurrent laryngeal nevre paresis and one patient had temporary hypocalcemia. Conclusions: It is not easy to demonstrate the advantages of MIT over conventional and video-assisted surgery. The main complications, such as nerve injury, hypoparathyroidism, or hemorrhage, are the same as in other surgical approaches. MIT has demonstrated advantages over conventional open approaches for both hemi- and total thyroidectomy and the benefits do not depend on the open or video-assisted approach. The anterior mini-incision approach can be performed with an operative time and postoperative complication profile equivalent to conventional thyroidectomy while providing excellent

  17. Operative treatment of Schwannoma, the primary sacral tumor--case presentation.

    PubMed

    Labędź, Wojciech; Kubaszewski, Lukasz; Adamek, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    Sacral bone tumors constitute a separate group in spinal surgery among all other neoplastic dis-orders due to the specificity of clinical symptoms and methods of surgical treatment. In the majority of cases, in the initial phase, symptoms are nonspecific for neoplastic disease, which is a sig-nificant factor delaying the final diagnosis. At the moment of diagnosis, most tumors are so large in size that removing the whole mass carries a risk related to the extent of surgery and maintaining the stability of pelvic girdle and sacro-lumbar junction. In this publication we present a case of a 38-year-old female patient with primary sacral tumor (S2-S4) undergoing surgical treatment at the Spinal Surgery, Oncological Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic at Poznan University of Medical Sciences. The patient was referred to an orthopedic outpatient clinic following gynecological surgery for removal of a suspected tumor of the uterus confirmed in an ultrasound examination. In a control magnetic resonance examination (MRI) there was a pathological mass visualized within the sacral bone infiltrating the presacral region and compressing the distal part of the colon. The patient underwent subtotal sacrectomy from a posterior approach. In order to reconstruct the posterior pelvic wall, biological material Permacol™ was used. There was a transient anal sphincter atony and urinary bladder paresis as well as sensory disturbances in S3-S5 dermatomes after the surgery. Several days after surgery, the patient was diagnosed with a deep cutaneous fistula and a significant volume of fluid in the postoperative cavity (in control CT). VAC treatment was implemented following a few days of passive drainage and significant improvement as well as secondary closing of the fistula were observed within a short period of time. PMID:23306280

  18. [The most frequent electrolyte disorders in the emergency department : what must be done immediately?].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, B M W

    2015-07-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common form of electrolyte disorder in the emergency room. The symptoms are unspecific and include nausea, dizziness and often falls. Typical symptoms of severe hypernatremia are vomiting, cerebral seizures, somnolence and even coma. The specific initial laboratory diagnostics include measurement of serum electrolytes, serum glucose, serum and urine osmolarity and sodium in urine. The main aim of the clinical examination is to estimate the volume status. If a patient has hypovolemia an infusion of isotonic sodium chloride solution (0.9 %) is the method of choice. If the patient is euvolemic the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or (neurotropic) drugs might be the cause. In these cases the primary measure is restriction of fluid intake. As a rapid correction of sodium levels can lead to pontine myelinolysis, the increase in sodium concentration must not be less than 10 mmol/l within the first 24 h and 18 mmol/l within the first 48 h. Clinical symptoms of hyperkalemia include neurological (e.g. muscle weakness, paresis, hyperreflexia, cramps and dysesthesia), gastrointestinal (e.g. nausea, vomiting and diarrhea) and cardiac symptoms (e.g. dysrhythmia and conductance disorders). Calcium injection stabilizes cardiac rhythm disorders immediately. For a rapid drop in potassium by shifting the potassium to the intracellular space, administration of glucose with insulin and high-dose inhalative administration of betamimetics can be used. Potassium elimination is achieved by infusion of isotonic sodium choride (0.9 %) with i.v. administration of furosemide, ion exchange resins and hemodialysis. PMID:26036654

  19. Möbius syndrome: classification and grading system.

    PubMed

    Abramson, D L; Cohen, M M; Mulliken, J B

    1998-09-01

    Möbius syndrome is characterized by facial abnormalities, but the limbs, chest wall, spine, and soft tissues also can be involved. There is no system for categorizing the various anomalies, grading phenotypic severity, designing treatment protocols, or assessing therapeutic results. This is a retrospective analysis of 27 patients with Möbius syndrome seen in our craniofacial unit from 1980 to 1994. We categorized and graded the cranial nerve deficits and diverse musculoskeletal abnormalities of the face, upper and lower limbs, and trunk. The first letter for each of five potentially involved structures, i.e., cranial nerve, lower limb, upper limb, face, and thorax, formed the acronym CLUFT. The structural and/or functional deficits for each component were graded on a scale of 0 to 3. Complete facial nerve paralysis was documented in 11 patients and paresis in 16. Facial nerve paralysis was bilaterally symmetric in 17 of 26 patients. Sixth nerve paralysis was present in 23 of 27 patients; other cranial nerves were affected in 8 of 27 patients. Lower limbs were involved in 10 of 27 patients and upper limbs in 7 of 27 patients. Facial structures were affected in 17 of 27 patients (e.g., microtia, micrognathia, and microphthalmia), and chest wall deformities were found in 8 of 27 patients (e.g., scoliosis, hypoplasia of the breast, pectoral muscles, and scapula). We noted that microtia primarily involved second pharyngeal arch-derived structures. The CLUFT system permits categorization and comparison of Möbius patients for phenotypic and management outcome studies. Documentation of the widespread structural anomalies suggests that pathogenesis involves vascular disruption; a detailed prenatal history is indicated. PMID:9734409

  20. Dysbiosis in the Gut Microbiota of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis, with a Striking Depletion of Species Belonging to Clostridia XIVa and IV Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Matsuoka, Takako; Chihara, Norio; Tomita, Atsuko; Sato, Wakiro; Kim, Seok-Won; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Masahira; Yamamura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease affecting the brain and spinal cord, remains poorly understood. Patients with MS typically present with recurrent episodes of neurological dysfunctions such as blindness, paresis, and sensory disturbances. Studies on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal models have led to a number of testable hypotheses including a hypothetical role of altered gut microbiota in the development of MS. To investigate whether gut microbiota in patients with MS is altered, we compared the gut microbiota of 20 Japanese patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) MS (MS20) with that of 40 healthy Japanese subjects (HC40) and an additional 18 healthy subjects (HC18). All the HC18 subjects repeatedly provided fecal samples over the course of months (158 samples in total). Analysis of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene by using a high-throughput culture-independent pyrosequencing method provided evidence of a moderate dysbiosis in the structure of gut microbiota in patients with MS. Furthermore, we found 21 species that showed significant differences in relative abundance between the MS20 and HC40 samples. On comparing MS samples to the 158 longitudinal HC18 samples, the differences were found to be reproducibly significant for most of the species. These taxa comprised primarily of clostridial species belonging to Clostridia clusters XIVa and IV and Bacteroidetes. The phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that none of the clostridial species that were significantly reduced in the gut microbiota of patients with MS overlapped with other spore-forming clostridial species capable of inducing colonic regulatory T cells (Treg), which prevent autoimmunity and allergies; this suggests that many of the clostridial species associated with MS might be distinct from those broadly associated with autoimmune conditions. Correcting the dysbiosis and altered gut microbiota might deserve consideration as a potential

  1. Vulnerability of the Medial Frontal Corticospinal Projection Accompanies Combined Lateral Frontal and Parietal Cortex Injury in Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Morecraft, R.J.; Ge, J.; Stilwell-Morecraft, K.S.; McNeal, D.W.; Hynes, S.M.; Pizzimenti, M.A.; Rotella, D.L.; Darling, W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent damage to the lateral frontal and parietal cortex is common following middle cerebral artery infarction leading to upper extremity paresis, paresthesia and sensory loss. Motor recovery is often poor and the mechanisms that support, or impede this process are unclear. Since the medial wall of the cerebral hemisphere is commonly spared following stroke, we investigated the long-term (6 and 12 month) effects of lateral frontoparietal injury (F2P2 lesion) on the terminal distribution of the corticospinal projection (CSP) from intact, ipsilesional supplementary motor cortex (M2) at spinal levels C5 to T1. Isolated injury to the frontoparietal arm/hand region resulted in a significant loss of contralateral corticospinal boutons from M2 compared to controls. Specifically, reductions occurred in the medial and lateral parts of lamina VII and the dorsal quadrants of lamina IX. There were no statistical differences in the ipsilateral corticospinal projection. Contrary to isolated lateral frontal motor injury (F2 lesion) which results in substantial increases in contralateral M2 labeling in laminae VII and IX (McNeal et al., Journal of Comparative Neurology 518:586-621, 2010), the added effect of adjacent parietal cortex injury to the frontal motor lesion (F2P2 lesion) not only impedes a favorable compensatory neuroplastic response, but results in a substantial loss of M2 CSP terminals. This dramatic reversal of the CSP response suggests a critical trophic role for cortical somatosensory influence on spared ipsilesional frontal corticospinal projections, and that restoration of a favorable compensatory response will require therapeutic intervention. PMID:25349147

  2. Use of Barbed Sutures in Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Single-Layer Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Masahide; Kinoshita, Jun; Shimizu, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic anastomotic methods are not commonly used because of the cumbersome laparoscopic intracorporeal sutures and tying involved. The barbed suture is one of the various devices developed to simplify the placement of intracorporeal sutures. However, barbed sutures are not commonly used during reconstruction after radical gastrectomy in cancer patients or for single-layer entire-thickness running suturing for intestinal anastomoses. We describe the procedure for using barbed sutures and report on the short-term surgical outcomes. Methods: Between August 2012 and March 2014, 15-cm-long barbed sutures (V-Loc 180; Covidien, Mansfield, MA, USA) were used for laparoscopic intestinal anastomoses, including intestinal hole closure for esophagojejunal and gastrojejunal anastomoses after mechanical anastomoses and gastric wall closure after partial resection. Results: In total, 38 patients underwent 40 laparoscopic anastomoses (esophagojejunostomies, 26; gastrojejunostomies, 7; and simple closure of gastric defect, 7); no cases required conversion to open surgery. Two cases exhibited positive air leak test results during surgery (1 case of esophagojejunostomy and 1 case of simple closure of gastric defect). Two cases of intestinal obstruction were noted; of those, one patient with postoperative intestinal paresis (grade II) was managed conservatively, and the other underwent repeat laparoscopic surgery (grade IIIb) for internal herniation unrelated to V-Loc use. No postoperative complications at the anastomosis site and no surgery-related deaths were noted. Conclusion: Single-layer entire-thickness running suturing with the V-Loc 180 barbed suture after stapled side-to-side intestinal anastomosis was found to be safe and feasible in the reported cases. PMID:27493467

  3. Spontaneous and experimental glycoprotein storage disease of goats induced by Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Armién, A G; Tokarnia, C H; Peixoto, P Vargas; Frese, K

    2007-03-01

    Spontaneous and experimental poisoning with the swainsonine-containing and calystegine-containing plant Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa is described. Three of 8 goats presenting with emaciation, weakness, symmetrical ataxia, posterior paresis, proprioceptive deficits, abnormal posture, abnormal postural reaction, and muscle hypertonia were necropsied. I fistulosa was suspected to be the cause of the neurologic disease in all cases. An experiment was conducted to confirm the diagnosis using 12 goats and diets containing 3 different concentrations of the plant. All goats fed I fistulosa developed neurological signs that were similar to those observed in the spontaneous intoxication. Muscle atrophy and pallor were the only macroscopic changes observed in spontaneous and in experimental intoxication. Histological lesions of spontaneous and experimental animals were similar. The most prominent lesion was cytoplasmic vacuolation in neurons of the central and the autonomous nervous system, pancreatic acinar cells, hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, follicular epithelial cells of the thyroid gland, and macrophages of the lymphatic tissues. Neuronal necrosis, axonal spheroids formation, and astrogliosis were additionally observed in the brain. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasmic vacuoles consisted of distended lysosomes surrounded by a single-layered membrane. Nonreduced end-rests or sequence of alpha-Man, alpha-Glc, beta(1-4)-GlcNAc, and NeuNAc on lysosomal membrane were revealed by lectin histochemistry. Samples of plants used in the experimental trial contained swainsonine and calystegine and their intermediary derivate. We conclude that I fistulosa induces a glycoprotein storage disease primarily based on the inhibition of the lysosomal alpha-mannosidase by the alkaloid swainsonine. PMID:17317794

  4. Gene dosage-dependent rescue of HSP neurite defects in SPG4 patients’ neurons

    PubMed Central

    Havlicek, Steven; Kohl, Zacharias; Mishra, Himanshu K.; Prots, Iryna; Eberhardt, Esther; Denguir, Naime; Wend, Holger; Plötz, Sonja; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Aigner, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Groemer, Teja W.; Hehr, Ute; Lampert, Angelika; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Winkler, Jürgen; Gage, Fred H.; Winner, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of motorneuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and paresis of the lower limbs. Mutations in Spastic Gait 4 (SPG4), encoding spastin, are the most frequent cause of HSP. To understand how mutations in SPG4 affect human neurons, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fibroblasts of two patients carrying a c.1684C>T nonsense mutation and from two controls. These SPG4 and control hiPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons and glia at comparable efficiency. All known spastin isoforms were reduced in SPG4 neuronal cells. The complexity of SPG4 neurites was decreased, which was paralleled by an imbalance of axonal transport with less retrograde movement. Prominent neurite swellings with disrupted microtubules were present in SPG4 neurons at an ultrastructural level. While some of these swellings contain acetylated and detyrosinated tubulin, these tubulin modifications were unchanged in total cell lysates of SPG4 neurons. Upregulation of another microtubule-severing protein, p60 katanin, may partially compensate for microtubuli dynamics in SPG4 neurons. Overexpression of the M1 or M87 spastin isoforms restored neurite length, branching, numbers of primary neurites and reduced swellings in SPG4 neuronal cells. We conclude that neurite complexity and maintenance in HSP patient-derived neurons are critically sensitive to spastin gene dosage. Our data show that elevation of single spastin isoform levels is sufficient to restore neurite complexity and reduce neurite swellings in patient cells. Furthermore, our human model offers an ideal platform for pharmacological screenings with the goal to restore physiological spastin levels in SPG4 patients. PMID:24381312

  5. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  6. [Herpes zoster and human imunodeficiency virus in the medical centers of Ouagadougou].

    PubMed

    Barro-Traoré, F; Traoré, A; Ilboudo, L; Ouédraogo, L T; Kaboré, J

    2007-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an acute posterior ganglio-radiculitis related to the reactivation of the chicken pox-herpes zoster virus remained quiescent in the neurons of the nerve-knots. It usually occurs at the subject after 60 years old. For young patient, it is closely related to the infection by the HIV. Our exploratory descriptive and analytical study was carried out from 1 October 2002 to 30 September 2003, in order to describe the epidemiological, clinical aspects of the herpes zoster in the medical formations of the town of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) and to determine the prevalence of the infection by the HIV in the patients. We have collected 118 patients who have a herpes zoster through 6500 consultants. There were 79 women and 39 men. The average age was 34.4 years. The age bracket from 20 to 40 years was the most touched. The blistered eruption was the first reason for consultation; the light with type of burn, intermittent pain prevailed. The lesions healed in one month but there were 28 ulcerated necrotic cases. Post zoster pains have been observed in 33 cases. The localizations were the members in 44 cases (37.29%), the head in 35 cases (29.66%) and the trunk in 40 cases (33.90%). We have observed a case with double localization of herpes zoster. On 65 patients tested for the HIV, 58 (89.2%) were infected. The age bracket from 20 to 40 was the most concerned. A case of corneal necrosis isolated, with blindness and another with an opposed, spasmodic and total hemi paresis were notified. Fourteen patients having an antecedent of herpes zoster were all infected by HIV. Since the pandemic infection by the HIV, the incidence of the herpes zoster increases within the young population. The high frequency of HIV infection among our patients (89.2%) showed that the herpes zoster is closely related to this disease. PMID:19097409

  7. Minimally-Invasive, Image-Guided Cochlear Implantation Surgery: First report of clinical implementation

    PubMed Central

    Labadie, Robert F; Balachandran, Ramya; Noble, Jack H; Blachon, Grégoire S; Mitchell, Jason E; Reda, Fitsum A; Dawant, Benoit M; Fitzpatrick, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally-invasive image-guided approach to cochlear implantation (CI) involves drilling a narrow, linear tunnel to the cochlea. Reported herein is the first clinical implementation of this approach. STUDY DESIGN Prospective, cohort study. METHODS On preoperative CT, a safe linear trajectory through the facial recess targeting the scala tympani was planned. Intraoperatively, fiducial markers were bone-implanted, a second CT was acquired, and the trajectory was transferred from preoperative to intraoperative CT. A customized microstereotactic frame was rapidly designed and constructed to constrain a surgical drill along the desired trajectory. Following sterilization, the frame was employed to drill the tunnel to the middle ear. After lifting a tympanomeatal flap and performing a cochleostomy, the electrode array was threaded through the drilled tunnel and into the cochlea. RESULTS Eight of nine patients were successfully implanted using the proposed approach with six insertions completely within scala tympani. Traditional mastoidectomy was performed on one patient following difficulty threading the electrode array via the narrow tunnel. Other difficulties encountered included use of the back-up implant when an electrode was dislodged during threading via the tunnel, tip fold-over, and facial nerve paresis (House-Brackmann II/VII at 12 months) secondary to heat during drilling. Average time of intervention was 182±36 minutes. CONCLUSION Minimally-invasive, image-guided CI is clinically achievable. Further clinical study is necessary to address technological difficulties during drilling and insertion and to assess potential benefits including decreased time of intervention, standardization of surgical intervention, and decreased tissue dissection potentially leading to shorter recovery and earlier implant activation. PMID:24272427

  8. Detection and molecular characterization of Newcastle disease virus in peafowl (Pavo cristatus) in Haryana State, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aman; Maan, Sushila; Mahajan, Nand Kishore; Rana, Virender Pratap; Jindal, Naresh; Batra, Kanisht; Ghosh, Arnab; Mishra, Shiv Kumar; Kapoor, Sanjay; Maan, Narender Singh

    2013-12-01

    Present study was undertaken to investigate the cause of deaths of peafowls in Haryana State. In total, 145 birds were sick and 28 birds were reported dead during July to September 2012. Some of the sick birds were showing signs of shaking of heads, torticollis and paresis. Blood and cloacal swab samples from sick birds along with brain and intestinal tissues from dead birds were collected for further investigation. Although post-mortem examination showed no typical lesions of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) yet raised HI tires against NDV in some serum samples and clinical signs indicated the presence of NDV. One of the brain tissues (NDV/IND2012/01) from the field case was processed and adapted to Vero cell line for virus isolation. The fusion (F) gene based nested RT-PCR (RT-nPCR) confirmed the presence of NDV in all field samples and cell culture isolate. Sequencing of the partial F gene amplicons (216 bp) using the PCR primers as sequencing primers confirmed the PCR results. The deduced amino acid sequences of partial F gene were found to have the amino acid motif (111)GRRQKR/F(117) in the fusion protein cleavage site (FPCS). This amino acid motif is indicative of the velogenic nature of these NDVs. Phylogenetic studies have shown that the virus belonged to class II genotype VII very closely related to virus isolates originated from outbreaks in Western Europe, Israel, Indonesia, Taiwan and India. Phylogenetic grouping of the virus and sequence of FPCS is indicative of pathogenic potential of virus strain circulating in peacocks in Haryana. PMID:24426301

  9. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: “spasticity” vs. “contracture”). Differentiation between these components is hard to achieve by common manual tests. We applied an assessment instrument to obtain quantitative measures of neural and non-neural contributions to ankle joint stiffness in CP. Methods Twenty-three adolescents with CP and eleven healthy subjects were seated with their foot fixated to an electrically powered single axis footplate. Passive ramp-and-hold rotations were applied over full ankle range of motion (RoM) at low and high velocities. Subject specific tissue stiffness, viscosity and reflexive torque were estimated from ankle angle, torque and triceps surae EMG activity using a neuromuscular model. Results In CP, triceps surae reflexive torque was on average 5.7 times larger (p = .002) and tissue stiffness 2.1 times larger (p = .018) compared to controls. High tissue stiffness was associated with reduced RoM (p < .001). Ratio between neural and non-neural contributors varied substantially within adolescents with CP. Significant associations of SPAT (spasticity test) score with both tissue stiffness and reflexive torque show agreement with clinical phenotype. Conclusions Using an instrumented and model based approach, increased joint stiffness in CP could be mainly attributed to higher reflexive torque compared to control subjects. Ratios between contributors varied substantially within adolescents with CP. Quantitative differentiation of neural and non-neural stiffness contributors in CP allows for assessment of individual patient characteristics and tailoring of therapy. PMID:23880287

  10. The Assessment of Inter-Hemispheric Imbalance using Imaging and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, David A.; Machado, Andre; Janini, Daniel; Varnerin, Nicole; Bonnett, Corin; Yue, Guang; Jones, Stephen; Lowe, Mark; Beall, Erik; Sakaie, Ken; Plow, Ela B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how inter-hemispheric balance in stroke, measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), relates to balance defined using neuroimaging (functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)), and how these metrics of balance are associated with clinical measures of upper limb function and disability. DESIGN Cross-Sectional SETTING Clinical Research Laboratory PARTICIPANTS Ten chronic stroke patients (63±9 years) in a population based sample with unilateral upper-limb paresis. INTERVENTION Not applicable MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Inter-hemispheric balance was measured with TMS, fMRI and DTI. TMS defined inter-hemispheric differences in recruitment of corticospinal output, the size of the corticomotor output maps and the degree of mutual transcallosal inhibition they exerted upon one another. fMRI studied whether cortical activation during the movement of the paretic hand was lateralized to the ipsilesional or to the contralesional primary motor (M1), premotor (PMC) and supplementary motor cortices (SMA). DTI was used to define inter-hemispheric differences in the integrity of the corticospinal tracts projecting from M1. Clinical outcomes tested function (upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer (UEFM) and the perceived disability in the use of the paretic hand [Motor Activity Log (MAL)]. RESULTS Inter-hemispheric balance assessed with TMS relates differently to fMRI and DTI. Patients with high fMRI lateralization to the ipsilesional hemisphere possessed stronger ipsilesional corticomotor output maps [M1 (r=.831, p=.006), PMC (r=.797, p=.01)], and better balance of mutual transcallosal inhibition (r=.810, p=.015). Conversely, we have found that patients with less integrity of the corticospinal tracts in the ipsilesional hemisphere show greater corticospinal output of homologous tracts in the contralesional hemisphere (r=.850, p=.004). However, neither an imbalance in their integrity nor an imbalance of their output relates to

  11. Safety of AS03-adjuvanted inactivated split virion A(H1N1)pdm09 and H5N1 influenza virus vaccines administered to adults: pooled analysis of 28 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, David W; Seifert, Harry; Hepburn, Anne; Dewe, Walthere; Li, Ping; Drame, Mamadou; Cohet, Catherine; Innis, Bruce L; Fries, Louis F

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials have shown that AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines are highly immunogenic, although with an increased reactogenicity profile relative to non-adjuvanted vaccines in terms of the incidence of common injection site and systemic adverse events (AEs). We evaluated pooled safety data from 22,521 adults who had received an AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 or A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza or control vaccine with the purpose to identify medically-attended AEs (MAEs), including subsets of serious AEs (SAEs), potentially immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs), and AEs of special interest (AESI), and to explore a potential association of these AEs with the administration of an AS03-adjuvanted influenza vaccine. For participants who had received an AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, the relative risks (RRs) for experiencing a MAE or a SAE compared to control group (participants who had received a non-adjuvanted vaccine or saline placebo) were 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9; 1.1) and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.9; 1.4), respectively. The overall RRs for experiencing an AESI or a pIMD (AS03-adjuvanted vaccine/control) were 1.2 (95% CI: 0.9; 1.6) and 1.7 (95% CI: 0.8; 3.8), respectively. Thirty-8 participants in the AS03-adjuvanted vaccine group had a pIMD reported after vaccine administration, yielding an incidence rate (IR) of 351.9 (95% CI: 249.1; 483.1) per 100,000 person-years. The estimated IRs in the AS03-adjuvanted vaccine group were greater than the literature reported rates for: facial paresis/VIIth nerve paralysis, celiac disease, thrombocytopenia and ulcerative colitis. These results do not support an association between AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines and the AEs collected in the trials included in the analysis. PMID:25483467

  12. Minimum effective local anesthetic volume for surgical anesthesia by subparaneural, ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block: A prospective dose-finding study.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seung Uk; Kim, Dong Ju; Bae, Jin Ho; Chung, Kyudon; Kim, Yeesuk

    2016-08-01

    Because of its rapid onset time, recent years have seen an increase in the use of ultrasound (US)-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block (PSNB) via subparaneural injection for induction of surgical anesthesia. Moreover, in below-knee surgery, combined blocks, as opposed to sciatic nerve block alone, have become more common. These combined blocks often require a large volume of local anesthetic (LA), thus increasing the risk of local-anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST). Thus, to decrease the risk of LAST, it is important to know the minimum effective volume (MEV) required for an adequate block. We, therefore, aimed to determine the MEV of ropivacaine 0.75% for induction of surgical anesthesia by the method of US-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block via subparaneural injection.Thirty patients underwent a US-guided PSNB with ropivacaine 0.75% at a 20-mL starting volume. Using a step-up/step-down method, we determined injection volumes for consecutive patients from the preceding patient's outcome. When an effective block was achieved within 40 minutes after injection, the next patient's volume was decreased by 2 mL. If the block failed, the next patient's volume was increased by 2 mL. The sensory and motor blockade was graded according to a 4-point scale. The block was considered a success if a combination of anesthesia and paresis (a score of 3 for both the sensory and motor nerves) was achieved within 40 minutes. The primary outcome measure was the MEV resulting in a successful subparaneural block of the sciatic nerve in 50% of patients (MEV50). Additionally, the data were processed with a probit regression analysis to determine the volume required to produce a complete sciatic nerve block in 90% of subjects (ED90).The MEV50 of 0.75% ropivacaine is 6.14 mL (95% confidence interval, 4.33-7.94 mL). The ED90 by probit analysis for a subparaneural injection was 8.9 mL (95% CI, 7.09-21.75 mL).The 6.14-mL MEV50 of ropivacaine 0.75% represents a 71% reduction

  13. Epizootic vacuolar myelinopathy of the central nervous system of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and American coots (Fulica americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.J.; Meteyer, C.U.; Sileo, L.

    1998-01-01

    Unprecedented mortality occurred in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) at DeGray Lake, Arkansas, during the winters of 1994-1995 and 1996-1997. The first eagles were found dead during November, soon after arrival from fall migration, and deaths continued into January during both episodes. In total, 29 eagles died at or near DeGray Lake in the winter of 1994-1995 and 26 died in the winter of 1996-1997; no eagle mortality was noted during the same months of the intervening winter or in the earlier history of the lake. During the mortality events, sick eagles were observed overflying perches or colliding with rock walls. Signs of incoordination and limb paresis were also observed in American coots (Fulica americana) during the episodes of eagle mortality, but mortality in coots was minimal. No consistent abnormalities were seen on gross necropsy of either species. No microscopic findings in organs other than the central nervous system (CNS) could explain the cause of death. By light microscopy, all 26 eagles examined and 62/77 (81%) coots had striking, diffuse, spongy degeneration of the white matter of the CNS. Vacuolation occurred in all myelinated CNS tissue, including the cerebellar folia and medulla oblongata, but was most prominent in the optic tectum. In the spinal cord, vacuoles were concentrated near the gray matter, and occasional swollen axons were seen. Vacuoles were uniformly present in optic nerves but were not evident in the retina or peripheral or autonomic nerves. Cellular inflammatory response to the lesion was distinctly lacking. Vacuoles were 8-50 microns in diameter and occurred individually, in clusters, or in rows. In sections stained by luxol fast blue/periodic acid-Schiff stain, the vacuoles were delimited and transected by myelin strands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intramyelinic vacuoles formed in the myelin sheaths by splitting of one or more myelin lamellae at the intraperiodic line. This lesion is characteristic of

  14. [A 57-year-old woman with gait disturbance, headache, character change, convulsion, and coma].

    PubMed

    Takubo, H; Satoh, S; Mori, H; Tsukahara, M; Suda, K; Imai, H; Mizuno, Y

    1995-07-01

    We report a 57-year-old woman with progressive gait disturbance, headache, character change, convulsion and coma. She was well until 55 years of age, when she noted an onset of unsteady gait. At times she experienced transient weakness in her right hand, which was followed some difficulty in articulation. She was admitted to our service for the work up on April 6, 1992. Neurologic examination at that time revealed an alert Japanese lady in no acute distress. She was oriented to all spheres, however, she was somewhat bradyphrenic and had some disturbance in recent memory. Higher cerebral functions appeared intact. The visual acuity and visual fields were normal as were the optic fundi. Pupils were round and isocoric reacting promptly to light. Ocular movement was full, however, horizontal nystagmus was noted upon right lateral gaze. The sensation of the face was intact. She showed right facial paresis of the central type. Hearing was intact. She showed slurred speech and some difficulty in swallowing. The tongue was deviated to the right. Her gait was wide based and unsteady; tandem gait was difficult, however, walking on toes and on heels were performed well. No cerebellar ataxia was noted, but she showed some clumsiness in her right hand. Deep reflexes were symmetric and normally reactive; plantar response was extensor bilaterally. Sensation was intact; no meningeal sign was elicited. Routine laboratory work up was unremarkable; the CSF was under a borderline pressure (180 mmH2O) and contained 39 mg/dl of protein and 59 mg/dl of sugar. Cranial CT scan revealed diffuse low density areas involving bilateral cerebral white matter as well as the brain stem; MRI revealed high signal intensity lesions in those areas; gadolinium enhancement was negative; cortical sulci were effaced and the anterior part of the left lateral ventricle was compressed without deviation of the midline structure. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy without effect. She was

  15. [A 86-year-old woman with dementia, gait and speech disturbance, and right hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, K; Morikawa, N; Mori, H; Miyake, T; Suda, K; Kondo, T; Mizuno, Y

    1995-08-01

    aspiration pneumonia. On admission, she was semicomatose, and no intelligible words were heard. Right facial paresis of the central type was noted. She was unable to stand or walk, and her right upper and lower extremities were paretic. Deep reflexes were increased with extensor toe sign on the right. She was treated with chemotherapy and intravenous fluid, however, her clinical course was complicated with respiratory as well as urinary tract infections. She developed cardiac as well as renal failure and expired on September 25, 1993.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7546929

  16. Pharmacological properties and pathophysiological significance of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (Rusvikunin-II) and its protein complex (Rusvikunin complex) purified from Daboia russelii russelii venom.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2014-10-01

    A 7.1 kDa basic peptide (Rusvikunin-II) was purified from a previously described protein complex (Rusvikunin complex, consists of Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II) of Daboia russelii russelii venom. The N-terminal sequence of Rusvikunin-II was found to be blocked, but peptide mass fingerprinting analysis indicated its identity as Kunitz-type basic protease inhibitor 2, previously reported from Russell's Viper venom. A tryptic peptide sequence of Rusvikunin-II containing the N-terminal sequence HDRPTFCNLFPESGR demonstrated significant sequence homology to venom basic protease inhibitors, Kunitz-type protease inhibitors and trypsin inhibitors. The secondary structure of Rusvikunin-II was dominated by β-sheets (60.4%), followed by random coil (38.2%), whereas α-helix (1.4%) contributes the least to its secondary structure. Both Rusvikunin-II and the Rusvikunin complex demonstrated dose-dependent anticoagulant activity; however, the anticoagulant potency of latter was found to be higher. Both inhibited the amidolytic activity of trypsin > plasmin > FXa, fibrinogen clotting activity of thrombin, and, to a lesser extent, the prothrombin activation property of FXa; however, the inhibitory effect of the Rusvikunin complex was more pronounced. Neither Rusvikunin-II nor Rusvikunin complex inhibited the amidolytic activity of chymotrypsin and thrombin. Rusvikunin-II at 10 μg/ml was not cytotoxic to Colo-205, MCF-7 or 3T3 cancer cells; conversely, Rusvikunin complex showed ∼30% reduction of MCF-7 cells under identical experimental conditions. Rusvikunin-II (5.0 mg/kg body weight, i.p. injection) was not lethal to mice or House Geckos; nevertheless, it showed in vivo anticoagulant action in mice. However, the Rusvikunin complex (at 5.0 mg/kg) was toxic to NSA mice, but not to House Geckos, suggesting it has prey-specific toxicity. Rusvikunin complex-treated mice exhibited dyspnea and hind-limb paresis prior to death. The present study indicates that the Kunitz

  17. Epizootic vacuolar myelinopathy of the central nervous system of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and American coots (Fulica americana).

    PubMed

    Thomas, N J; Meteyer, C U; Sileo, L

    1998-11-01

    Unprecedented mortality occurred in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) at DeGray Lake, Arkansas, during the winters of 1994-1995 and 1996-1997. The first eagles were found dead during November, soon after arrival from fall migration, and deaths continued into January during both episodes. In total, 29 eagles died at or near DeGray Lake in the winter of 1994-1995 and 26 died in the winter of 1996-1997; no eagle mortality was noted during the same months of the intervening winter or in the earlier history of the lake. During the mortality events, sick eagles were observed overflying perches or colliding with rock walls. Signs of incoordination and limb paresis were also observed in American coots (Fulica americana) during the episodes of eagle mortality, but mortality in coots was minimal. No consistent abnormalities were seen on gross necropsy of either species. No microscopic findings in organs other than the central nervous system (CNS) could explain the cause of death. By light microscopy, all 26 eagles examined and 62/77 (81%) coots had striking, diffuse, spongy degeneration of the white matter of the CNS. Vacuolation occurred in all myelinated CNS tissue, including the cerebellar folia and medulla oblongata, but was most prominent in the optic tectum. In the spinal cord, vacuoles were concentrated near the gray matter, and occasional swollen axons were seen. Vacuoles were uniformly present in optic nerves but were not evident in the retina or peripheral or autonomic nerves. Cellular inflammatory response to the lesion was distinctly lacking. Vacuoles were 8-50 microns in diameter and occurred individually, in clusters, or in rows. In sections stained by luxol fast blue/periodic acid-Schiff stain, the vacuoles were delimited and transected by myelin strands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intramyelinic vacuoles formed in the myelin sheaths by splitting of one or more myelin lamellae at the intraperiodic line. This lesion is characteristic of

  18. [Brain stem auditory and visual evoked potentials in children and adolescents with Guillain-Barré syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zgorzalewicz, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Mariola; Kilarski, Dariusz

    2004-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is the most common acquired polyradiculoneuropathy in childhood. It has been conventionally regarded as a disease exclusively of the peripheral nervous system. The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with GBS has been rarely described. The purpose of the study was to delineate the extent of subclinical neurological changes of CNS in children and adolescents with this syndrome. Thirty patients aged 8-18 years with GBS were treated in the Chair and Department of Developmental Neurology. The upper and lower limbs paresis dominated in clinical pictures of these patients. Cranial nerve involvement was noticed in 9 children. An ascending bulbar paralysis was noted in four cases. Sensory symptoms were found in all children. The nerve conduction velocities were abnormal in all examined patients with GBS. The control group for neurophysiological studies consisted of 66 healthy children and adolescents at the matched age. Evoked potentials (EP) were registered by means of Multiliner (Toennies, Germany). Brainstem evoked potentials (BAEP) and visual evoked potentials (VEP) were always performed in the same conditions with the same equipment for the children and adolescents in the GBS and control group, according to the guidelines of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology (IFCN). The following BAEP parameters were considered: the latencies of waves I to V, interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V. The latencies of N75, P100, N145 as well as the amplitudes of N75/P100, P100/N145 for mono- and binocular stimulations of VEP were analysed. BAEP showed abnormalities in 6 cases and VEP in 5 cases. The statistically significant prolongation of the latencies of waves III, V and interpeak I-V were found in children and adolescents with GBS. The BAEP changes may reflect impairment at the brainstem level in these patients. In VEP recording in GBS the prolongation of latencies P100 and N145 without changes in

  19. A Gly98Val mutation in the N-Myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in Alaskan Malamutes with polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bruun, Camilla S; Jäderlund, Karin H; Berendt, Mette; Jensen, Kristine B; Spodsberg, Eva H; Gredal, Hanne; Shelton, G Diane; Mickelson, James R; Minor, Katie M; Lohi, Hannes; Bjerkås, Inge; Stigen, Oyvind; Espenes, Arild; Rohdin, Cecilia; Edlund, Rebecca; Ohlsson, Jennie; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Leifsson, Páll S; Drögemüller, Cord; Moe, Lars; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2013-01-01

    The first cases of early-onset progressive polyneuropathy appeared in the Alaskan Malamute population in Norway in the late 1970s. Affected dogs were of both sexes and were ambulatory paraparetic, progressing to non-ambulatory tetraparesis. On neurologic examination, affected dogs displayed predominantly laryngeal paresis, decreased postural reactions, decreased spinal reflexes and muscle atrophy. The disease was considered eradicated through breeding programmes but recently new cases have occurred in the Nordic countries and the USA. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene (NDRG1) is implicated in neuropathies with comparable symptoms or clinical signs both in humans and in Greyhound dogs. This gene was therefore considered a candidate gene for the polyneuropathy in Alaskan Malamutes. The coding sequence of the NDRG1 gene derived from one healthy and one affected Alaskan Malamute revealed a non-synonymous G>T mutation in exon 4 in the affected dog that causes a Gly98Val amino acid substitution. This substitution was categorized to be "probably damaging" to the protein function by PolyPhen2 (score: 1.000). Subsequently, 102 Alaskan Malamutes from the Nordic countries and the USA known to be either affected (n = 22), obligate carriers (n = 7) or healthy (n = 73) were genotyped for the SNP using TaqMan. All affected dogs had the T/T genotype, the obligate carriers had the G/T genotype and the healthy dogs had the G/G genotype except for 13 who had the G/T genotype. A protein alignment showed that residue 98 is conserved in mammals and also that the entire NDRG1 protein is highly conserved (94.7%) in mammals. We conclude that the G>T substitution is most likely the mutation that causes polyneuropathy in Alaskan Malamutes. Our characterization of a novel candidate causative mutation for polyneuropathy offers a new canine model that can provide further insight into pathobiology and therapy of human polyneuropathy. Furthermore, selection against this mutation can

  20. Therapeutic plasma exchange in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in children.

    PubMed

    Borras-Novell, Cristina; García Rey, Enric; Perez Baena, Luis Francisco; Jordan Garcia, Iolanda; Catella Cahiz, Dolors; Cambra, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that is probably due to an autoimmune mechanism with an acute presentation and a monophasic course. The management of patients with ADEM is based on supportive therapy, corticosteroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin, and in selected cases, with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of TPE, as adjuvant therapy in pediatric patients with ADEM. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children with the diagnosis of ADEM between 2009 and 2011 to which TPE was indicated and were admitted in the ICU of Hospital Sant Joan de Deu (Spain). The diagnosis of ADEM was made by clinical and laboratory criteria and by the presence of compatible lesions on cranio-spinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). For signaling TPE, we followed the guidelines established by the American Association of Apheresis (ASFA) in 2010. Five cases were identified. The predominant neurological symptoms in our patients were: altered level of consciousness, seizures, motor deficits, cranial nerve disorders, and aphasia. Most important demyelinating lesions were located in cortical and subcortical white matter of the brain and highlighted brainstream. Patients performed between 4 and 5 sessions, with no reported side effects. Progressive clinical improvement was evident in all patients, with good neurosensory response to stimulation, cessation of seizures, and recovery of limb mobility. Nowadays, one patient's right paresis persists and another suffers epileptic seizures. None of the cases in our series presented new episodes of demyelination. Due to the suggested immune-mediated pathogenesis of ADEM, treatment is based on immunomodulatory agents, being glucocorticoids the most important ones. The treatment can be complemented with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. Available data suggests that plasma exchange is beneficial

  1. Results of "elephant trunk" total aortic arch replacement using a multi-branched, collared graft prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan R B; Dell'Aquila, Angelo M; Akil, Ali; Schlarb, Dominik; Panuccio, Guiseppe; Martens, Sven; Rukosujew, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We report on our experience with a simplified elephant trunk (ET) procedure with a multi-branched prosthesis (Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft). It consists of a proximal portion (20 cm) with prefabricated side branches, a collar and a distal portion (30 cm). The collar, which can be trimmed into any desired diameter, constitutes the suture portion to the descending aorta. Radiopaque markers in the distal portion indicate the landing zone. Between January 2011 and June 2013, 20 consecutive patients (10 women; mean age, 66 ± 9.3 years) underwent ET procedure, including 6 re-do cases. Underlying aortic diseases were acute dissection (n = 6), chronic dissection (n = 4), aneurysm (n = 8) and PAU (n = 2). Mean preoperative diameter of the descending aorta was 49.1 ± 12.9 mm (range 74.7-29.7 mm). Concomitant procedures included ascending aortic replacement in 16 patients; root replacement in 2; AVR in 2, CABG in 3 and mitral repair in 1 patient. CPB time was 263 ± 94 min; mean duration of ACP was 65 ± 14 min. Two patients died on POD 8 and 78, respectively. Major adverse events included stroke (n = 1), resternotomy for bleeding (n = 2), renal failure requiring temporary dialysis (n = 1) and recurrent nerve paresis (n = 2). After a mean follow-up of 10 ± 8 months, all discharged patients were alive. Seven patients underwent stent-graft implantation of the descending aorta and one patient underwent open descending aortic replacement. The last generation of multi-branched arch prosthesis and especially the Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft make ET procedure a reasonable treatment option even in patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:25491933

  2. Effect of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy: multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Tore K; Romner, Bertil; Wilsgaard, Tom; Twisk, Jos; Anke, Audny; Nygaard, Øystein; Hasvold, Toralf; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy in the short (6 weeks), intermediate (12 weeks), and long term (52 weeks). Design Multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial. Setting Outpatient multidisciplinary back clinics of five Norwegian hospitals. Participants Between October 2005 and February 2009, 461 patients assessed for inclusion (presenting with lumbar radiculopathy >12 weeks). 328 patients excluded for cauda equina syndrome, severe paresis, severe pain, previous spinal injection or surgery, deformity, pregnancy, ongoing breast feeding, warfarin therapy, ongoing treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, body mass index >30, poorly controlled psychiatric conditions with possible secondary gain, and severe comorbidity. Interventions Subcutaneous sham injections of 2 mL 0.9% saline, caudal epidural injections of 30 mL 0.9% saline, and caudal epidural injections of 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide in 29 mL 0.9% saline. Participants received two injections with a two week interval. Main outcome measures Primary: Oswestry disability index scores. Secondary: European quality of life measure, visual analogue scale scores for low back pain and for leg pain. Results Power calculations required the inclusion of 41 patients per group. We did not allocate 17 of 133 eligible patients because their symptoms improved before randomisation. All groups improved after the interventions, but we found no statistical or clinical differences between the groups over time. For the sham group (n=40), estimated change in the Oswestry disability index from the adjusted baseline value was −4.7 (95% confidence intervals −0.6 to −8.8) at 6 weeks, −11.4 (−6.3 to −14.5) at 12 weeks, and −14.3 (−10.0 to −18.7) at 52 weeks. For the epidural saline intervention group (n=39) compared with the sham group, differences in primary outcome were −0.5 (−6.3 to 5.4) at 6 weeks, 1.4 (−4.5 to 7

  3. When Does Return of Voluntary Finger Extension Occur Post-Stroke? A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Caroline; Kwakkel, Gert; Nijland, Rinske; van Wegen, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Patients without voluntary finger extension early post-stroke are suggested to have a poor prognosis for regaining upper limb capacity at 6 months. Despite this poor prognosis, a number of patients do regain upper limb capacity. We aimed to determine the time window for return of voluntary finger extension during motor recovery and identify clinical characteristics of patients who, despite an initially poor prognosis, show upper limb capacity at 6 months post-stroke. Methods Survival analysis was used to assess the time window for return of voluntary finger extension (Fugl-Meyer Assessment hand sub item finger extension≥1). A cut-off of ≥10 points on the Action Research Arm Test was used to define return of some upper limb capacity (i.e. ability to pick up a small object). Probabilities for regaining upper limb capacity at 6 months post-stroke were determined with multivariable logistic regression analysis using patient characteristics. Results 45 of the 100 patients without voluntary finger extension at 8 ± 4 days post-stroke achieved an Action Research Arm Test score of ≥10 points at 6 months. The median time for regaining voluntary finger extension for these recoverers was 4 weeks (lower and upper percentile respectively 2 and 8 weeks). The median time to return of VFE was not reached for the whole group (N = 100). Patients who had moderate to good lower limb function (Motricity Index leg≥35 points), no visuospatial neglect (single-letter cancellation test asymmetry between the contralesional and ipsilesional sides of <2 omissions) and sufficient somatosensory function (Erasmus MC modified Nottingham Sensory Assessment≥33 points) had a 0.94 probability of regaining upper limb capacity at 6 months post-stroke. Conclusions We recommend weekly monitoring of voluntary finger extension within the first 4 weeks post-stroke and preferably up to 8 weeks. Patients with paresis mainly restricted to the upper limb, no visuospatial neglect and

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of cavernous hemangioma of the internal auditory canal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei Dong; Huang, Qi; Li, Xi Ye; Chen, Hong Sai; Wang, Zhao Yan; Wu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Cavernous hemangioma of the internal auditory canal (IAC) is an extremely rare type of tumor, and only 50 cases have been reported in the literature prior to this study. The aim in this study was to describe the symptomatology, radiological features, and surgical outcomes for patients with cavernous hemangioma of the IAC and to discuss the diagnostic criteria and treatment strategy for the disease. METHODS The study included 6 patients with cavernous hemangioma of the IAC. All patients presented with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus, and 2 also suffered from vertigo. Five patients reported a history of facial symptoms with hemispasm or palsy: 3 had progressive facial weakness, 1 had a hemispasm, and 1 had a history of recovery from sudden facial paresis. All patients underwent CT and MRI to rule out intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas and facial nerve neuromas. Five patients had their tumors surgically removed, while 1 patient, who did not have facial problems, was followed up with a wait-and-scan approach. RESULTS All patients had a presurgical diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of the IAC, which was confirmed pathologically in the 5 patients who underwent surgical removal of the tumor. The translabyrinthine approach was used to remove the tumor in 4 patients, while the middle cranial fossa approach was used in the 1 patient who still had functional hearing. Tumors adhered to cranial nerves VII and/or VIII and were difficult to dissect from nerve sheaths during surgeries. Complete hearing loss occurred in all 5 patients. In 3 patients, the facial nerve could not be separated from the tumor, and primary end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Intact facial nerve preservation was achieved in 2 patients. Patients were followed up for at least 1 year after treatment, and MRI showed no evidence of tumor regrowth. All patients experienced some level of recovery in facial nerve function. CONCLUSIONS Cavernous hemangioma of the IAC can be diagnosed

  5. Édouard Manet's Tabes Dorsalis: From Painful Ataxia to Phantom Limb.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Tatu, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Édouard Manet (1832-1883) is considered the 'father' of Impressionism and even of XXth century modern art. Manet's genius involved getting away from the classical narrative or historical topics and replacing them by the banality of daily life. Technically, he erased volumes into flat two-dimensional coloured planes, and distorted conventional perspective with often gross brushstrokes intentionally giving an 'unfinished' aspect to the work. It is little known that Manet had a very painful second part of his life, due to excruciating limb and chest pains, which developed in parallel with proprioceptive ataxia and gait imbalance. Manet always remained discreet about his private life, and we mainly know that his future wife was his family piano teacher, with whom he had a liaison already at age 17. Later, the great but platonic passion of his life was the painter Berthe Morisot (1841-1895), who got married to Manet's brother Eugène. In fact, we do not know whether he had any mistress at all, although he had several elegant 'flirts' in the mundane and artistic milieu. Thus, while Manet's progressive painful ataxia from age 40 yields little doubt on its tabetic origin, how he contracted syphilis at least 15-20 years before will probably remain a mystery. It is fascinating that Manet's daily struggle against pain and poor coordination may have led his art to become one of the most significant of modern times, opening the way to XXth century avant-gardes, along with another victim of syphilis, Paul Gauguin (1848-1903). Manet never showed any sign of General Paresis, and like his contemporary the writer Alphonse Daudet, his clinical picture remained dominated by paroxysmal pain and walking impairment. Difficult hand coordination made him quit watercolor painting, and during the last 2 years of his life, he had to focus on small format oil works, whose subject was nearly limited to modest bunches of fresh flowers, now often considered to be his maturity masterpieces

  6. Genetic parameters of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium serum concentrations during the first 8 days after calving in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Tsiamadis, V; Banos, G; Panousis, N; Kritsepi-Konstantinou, M; Arsenos, G; Valergakis, G E

    2016-07-01

    Calcium, Mg, P, and K are of great importance for the health and productivity of dairy cows after calving. So far genetic studies have focused on clinical hypocalcemia, leaving the genetic parameters of these macroelements unstudied. Our objective was to estimate the genetic parameters of Ca, Mg, P, and K serum concentrations and their changes during the first 8d after calving. The study was conducted in 9 herds located in northern Greece, with 1,021 Holstein cows enrolled from November 2010 until November 2012. No herd used any kind of preventive measures for hypocalcemia. Pedigree information for all cows was available. A total of 35 cows were diagnosed and treated for periparturient paresis and, therefore, excluded from the study. The remaining 986 cows were included in genetic analysis. The distribution of cows across parities was 459 (parity 1), 234 (parity 2), 158 (parity 3), and 135 (parity ≥4). A sample of blood was taken from each cow on d1, 2, 4, and 8 after calving and serum concentrations of Ca, P, Mg, and K were measured in each sample. A final data set of 15,390 biochemical records was created consisting of 3,903 Ca, 3,902 P, 3,903Mg, and 3,682K measurements. Moreover, changes of these concentrations between d1 and 4 as well as 1 and 8 after calving were calculated and treated as different traits. Random regression models were used to analyze the data. Results showed that daily heritabilities of Ca, P, and Mg concentrations traits were moderate to high (0.20-0.43), whereas those of K were low to moderate (0.12-0.23). Regarding concentration changes, only Mg change between d1 and 8 after calving had a significant heritability of 0.18. Genetic correlations between Ca, P, Mg, and K concentrations and their concentration changes from d1 to 4 and 1 to 8 after calving were not significantly different from zero. Most phenotypic correlations among Ca, P, Mg, and K concentrations were positive and low (0.09-0.16), whereas the correlation between P and Mg was

  7. Long-term intrathecal morphine and bupivacaine in "refractory" cancer pain. I. Results from the first series of 52 patients.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, M; Appelgren, L; Einarsson, S; Hultman, E; Linder, L E; Nitescu, P; Curelaru, I

    1991-01-01

    Neither epidural (EDA) or intrathecal (IT) morphine nor EDA opiate + bupivacaine provides acceptable relief of some types of cancer pain, e.g. pain originating from mucocutaneous ulcers, deafferentation pain, continuous and intermittent visceral and ischaemic pain, and that occurring with body movement as a result of a fracture. To improve pain relief in such conditions, we gave combinations of morphine and bupivacaine through open IT-catheters to 52 patients with "refractory", severe (VAS 7-10 out of 10), complex cancer pain (Edmonton Stage-3), for periods of 1-305 (median = 23) days. The efficacy of the treatment was estimated from: 1) daily dosage (intraspinal and total opiates, and intraspinal bupivacaine), and 2) scores of non-opiate analgesic and sedative consumption, gait and daily activities, and amount and pattern of sleep. Forty-four patients obtained continuous and acceptable pain relief (VAS 0-2), 26 of them with daily doses of IT-bupivacaine of less than or equal to 30 mg/day (less than or equal to 1.5 mg/h). Higher IT-bupivacaine doses (greater than 60-305 mg/day), not always giving acceptable pain relief, were necessary in 13 patients with deafferentation pain from the spinal cord or brachial or lumbosacral plexuses or pain from the coeliac plexus, or from large, ulcerated mucocutaneous tumours. By combining IT-bupivacaine with IT-morphine, it was possible to use relatively low IT-morphine doses (10-25 mg/day during the first 2 months of treatment) in more than half of the patients. The IT-treatment significantly decreased the total (all routes) opiate consumption and significantly improved sleep, gait and daily activities. For the whole period of observation (6 months), the IT-treatment was assessed as adequate in 3.8%, good in 23.1%, very good in 59.6% and excellent in 13.5% of the cases. Adverse effects of the IT-bupivacaine (paraesthesiae, paresis, gait impairment, urinary retention, anal sphincter disturbances and orthostatic hypotension) did

  8. Protozoan infections (Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis spp.) in sheep and goats: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Buxton, D

    1998-01-01

    excretes sporocysts into the environment. Clinical sarcocystiosis is much less commonly diagnosed than toxoplasmosis and neither is it normally associated with fetal infection or abortion in either sheep or goats. However, infection is extremely common throughout the world and follows ingestion of food or water contaminated with sporocysts. Clinical signs, when seen, include fever, anaemia, inappetance and weight loss or reduced weight gain. Central nervous signs (hind limb weakness, ataxia, paresis), acute myopathy and death may occur. Diagnosis is difficult as infection is so common and clinical signs absent, mild or non-specific. Serology may be useful in some situations and histopathology/immunohistochemistry is valuable for confirming the cause of death. Control relies on preventing contamination of pasture and water with faeces of dogs, foxes and cats or by controlling access of young susceptible stock to contaminated land. Relatively little is known of the immunity induced by infection with Sarcocystis spp. but research indicates that protective immunity does develop and that cell-mediated mechanisms are probably important. It is likely that sarcocystiosis is underdiagnosed as a problem and that better diagnostic methods are needed to show the true extent of the losses caused. Neosporosis on the other hand would appear not to be so common in sheep and goats. The value of experimental infections in these animals may be to provide a comparative model of the infection in cattle in the same way that our understanding of toxoplasmosis in sheep provides a superior model of human toxoplasmosis. PMID:9689743

  9. Unilateral magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G. H.; Kyroussis, D.; Hamnegard, C. H.; Wragg, S.; Moxham, J.; Green, M.

    1995-01-01

    mm double coil. Supramaximal unilateral magnetic stimulation produced a higher TwPDI than electrical stimulation (mean (SD) 13.4 (2.5) cm H2O with 35 mm coil; 14.1 (3.8) cm H2O with 43 mm coil; 10.0 (1.7) cm H2O with electrical stimulation). Spread of the magnetic field to the opposite phrenic nerve produced a small amplitude contralateral diaphragm EMG measured from skin surface electrodes which reached a mean of 15% of the maximum EMG amplitude produced by ipsilateral stimulation. Similarly, in six patients with EMG activity recorded directly from needle electrodes, the contralateral spread of the magnetic field produced EMG activity up to a mean of 3% and a maximum of 6% of that seen with ipsilateral stimulation. Unilateral magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerve was rapidly achieved and well tolerated. In the 54 patients unilateral magnetic TwPDI was more closely related than unilateral electrical TwPDI to transdiaphragmatic pressure produced during maximum sniffs and cervical magnetic stimulation. Unilateral magnetic stimulation eliminated the problem of producing a falsely low TwPDI because of technical difficulties in locating and adequately stimulating the nerve. Eight patients with unilateral phrenic nerve paresis, as indicated by a unilaterally elevated hemidiaphragm on a chest radiograph and maximum sniff PDI consistent with hemidiaphragm weakness, were all accurately identified by unilateral magnetic stimulation. CONCLUSIONS--Unilateral magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation is easy to apply and is a reproducible technique in the assessment of hemidiaphragm contractility. It is well tolerated and allows hemidiaphragm contractility to be rapidly and reliably assessed because precise positioning of the coils is not necessary. This may be particularly useful in patients. In addition, the anterolateral positioning of the coil allows the use of the magnet in the supine patient such as in the operating theatre or intensive care unit. Images PMID:8553272

  10. Results of the superior oblique tendon elongation procedure for severe Brown's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K W

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the outcomes of the silicone tendon expander for the treatment of Brown's syndrome. METHODS: This paper consists of 2 parts: a chart review of patients who have under gone the silicone tendon elongation procedure for Brown's syndrome and a survey of the surgical experience of the members of the American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Charts of 15 consecutive Brown's syndrome patients who underwent the superior oblique tendon expander were reviewed by the author from 1987 to 1997. An additional patient referred to the author for management of complications of the silicone tendon expander procedure after surgery elsewhere for Brown's syndrome is reported. The second aspect of the study is a fax survey sent to all 450 members of the American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus listed in the 1997-1998 directory. Pediatric ophthalmologists were asked to answer questions regarding their experience using the silicone tendon expander for Brown's syndrome. RESULTS: Of 15 patients operated on by the author, preoperative limitation of elevation in adduction measured -4 in 14 patients and -3 in 1 patient preoperatively. Postoperatively, 14 of the 15 patients showed improved motility, with essentially normal versions in 10 patients (no more than +/- 1 oblique dysfunction); 3 patients were undercorrected (2 mild and 1 severely); and 2 had a consecutive superior oblique paresis (1 mild and 1 requiring an inferior oblique weakening procedure). The 1 patient with a severe undercorrection that did not improve after the silicone tendon elongation procedure showed continued restriction by intraoperative forced ductions after superior oblique tenotomy. Superior oblique tendon was not the cause of Brown's syndrome in this patient. The average final result graded on a scale of 1 to 10 (10 being best) was 8.3. Thirteen of 15 patients (87%) achieved a final result score of 7 or better with a single surgery, and an additional

  11. Brown's syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K W

    1999-01-01

    primary position in 56 (76%) of 74 congenital and nontraumatic acquired cases despite severe limitation of elevation. 3. Of 7 patients with Brown's syndrome, 6 had no significant fundus torsion in primary position, but had significant (+2 to +3) intorsion in up gaze. Spontaneous resolution occurred in approximately 16% of acquired nontraumatic Brown's syndrome patients. The silicone tendon expander was used on 15 patients, 13 (87%) were corrected with 1 surgery and 14 (93%) with 2 surgeries. The only failure was a Brown's syndrome not caused by superior oblique pathology. Five of the silicone tendon expander patients had at least 5 years follow-up (range, 5 to 11 years). Four (80%) of the 5 patients had an excellent outcome with 1 surgery, final results graded between 9 and 10 (on a scale of 1-10, 10 is best). The fifth patient had a consecutive superior oblique paresis and a good outcome after a recession of the ipsilateral inferior oblique muscle. The AAPOS survey had a mean outcome score of 7.3, with 65% between 8 and 10. There were 9 (6%) complications reported: 4 related to scarring and 5 extrusions of the implant. Three of the 5 extrusions were reported from the same surgeon. The computer model of an inelastic superior oblique muscle-tendon complex best simulated the motility pattern of Brown's syndrome with severe limitation of elevation in adduction, mild limitation of elevation in abduction, minimal hypotropia in primary position, no superior oblique overaction, and intorsion in up gaze. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of mild to moderate limitation of elevation in abduction is common, and its presence does not eliminate the diagnosis of Brown's syndrome. The majority of Brown's syndrome patients have a pattern of strabismus consistent with an inelastic superior oblique muscle-tendon complex that does not extend, but can contract normally; not the presence of a short tendon. The presence of inelastic or tethered superior oblique muscle-tendon can be diagnosed without