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Sample records for parietal foramina craniofacial

  1. Delineation of a contiguous gene syndrome with multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation, caused by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, O.; Wuyts, W.; Van Hul, W.; Hecht, J. T.; Meinecke, P.; Hogue, D.; Werner, W.; Zabel, B.; Hinkel, G. K.; Powell, C. M.; Shaffer, L. G.; Willems, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    A contiguous gene syndrome due to deletions of the proximal short arm of chromosome 11 is described in eight patients belonging to four families. The main clinical features are multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation. The patients have cytogenetic and/or molecular deletions of chromosome 11p11-p13. These deletions are located between the centromere and D11S914 in a region of approximately 20cM. The present study confirms the presence of a multiple exostoses gene on chromosome 11p. Furthermore, it suggests that the gene for isolated foramina parietalie permagna and genes associated with craniofacial dysostosis and mental retardation reside in the same chromosomal region. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8644736

  2. Delineation of a contiguous gene syndrome with multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation, caused by deletions on the short arm of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, O.; Werner, W.; Hinkel, G.K.; Van Hul, W.; Willems, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A contiguous gene syndrome due to deletions of the proximal short arm of chromosome 11 is described in eight patients belonging to four families. The main clinical features are multiple exostoses, enlarged parietal foramina, craniofacial dysostosis, and mental retardation. The patients have cytogenetic and/or molecular deletions of chromosome 11p11-p13. These deletions are located between the centromere and D11S914 in a region of {approximately}20 cM. The present study confirms the presence of a multiple exostoses gene on chromosome 11p. Furthermore, it suggests that the gene for isolated foramina parietalia permagna and genes associated with craniofacial dysostosis and mental retardation reside in the same chromosomal region. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: enlarged parietal foramina

    MedlinePlus

    ... parietal foramina is an inherited condition of impaired skull development. It is characterized by enlarged openings (foramina) ... that form the top and sides of the skull. This condition is due to incomplete bone formation ( ...

  4. Enlarged parietal foramina: a rare forensic autopsy finding.

    PubMed

    Durão, Carlos; Carpinteiro, Dina; Pedrosa, Frederico; Machado, Marcos P; Cunha, Eugénia

    2016-05-01

    Enlarged parietal foramina (EPF) are a quite rare developmental defect of the parietal bone which has to be distinguished from the normal small parietal foramina. We report a forensic case of an individual found in an advanced state of putrefaction in his own house with an undetermined cause of death. No evidence of trauma was observed, and the toxicological exam was negative. The victim was a 40-year-old man with a history of epilepsy. The large biparietal foramina, a rare anatomical variation and unusual autopsy finding, were observed at autopsy. The recognition of anatomical variations is important to avoid false interpretations and conclusions and has a significant potential as an identity factor, thus contributing to positive identification. PMID:26233611

  5. [Mother and son with enlarged parietal foramina, persistent fetal vein, and ALX4 mutation].

    PubMed

    Morita, Motoaki; Nanba, Eiji; Adachi, Kaori; Ohno, Kousaku

    2016-05-01

    Enlarged parietal foramina (EPF) are rare congenital skull defects. These round or oval defects are situated on each parietal bone approximately 1 cm from the midline. Most patients with EPF have a positive family history. The condition is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with relatively high, but not full, penetrance. Mutation in either MSX2 or ALX4 genes is associated with enlarged parietal foramina. Case 1 is a boy who was noticed to have a large anterior fontanelle, large posterior fontanelle, and widely opened sagittal suture at 2 months. During development, the anterior fontanelle and sagittal suture closed at 3 years and the posterior fontanelle subsequently divided into two foramina with ossification of the midline bridge by 4 years. The foramina were about 2.5 x 2.5 cm in diameter at 8 years. Case 2 is the 34-year-old mother of Case 1. She showed similar bone defects in her cranium, again about 2.5 x 2.5 cm in diameter. Neither patient showed any neurological symptoms. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation in the ALX4 gene in both patients, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a persistent falcine sinus and a hypoplastic straight sinus. Further evaluation revealed that the mother of Case 2 also had a mutation in the ALX4 gene, but no enlarged parietal foramina. Although high penetrance of this condition has been reported, this family suggests incomplete penetrance of this disorder. PMID:27349084

  6. Malformation of cortical and vascular development in one family with parietal foramina determined by an ALX4 homeobox gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Valente, Marcelo; Valente, Kette D; Sugayama, Sofia S M; Kim, Chong Ae

    2004-01-01

    Vascular and cortical anomalies have been found in a family with parietal foramina type 2 (PFM2), which is determined by the ALX4 gene. It is believed that ALX4 has a bone-restricted expression. We report a case of PFM with age-related size variation in a 4-year-old boy, as well as in his mother, aunt and grandfather. MR imaging of the child demonstrates prominent malformations of cortical (polymicrogyric cortex with an unusual infolding pattern) and vascular development (persistence median prosencephalic vein), associated with high tentorial incisure periatrial white matter changes. PMID:15569759

  7. Characterization of a new syndrome that associates craniosynostosis, delayed fontanel closure, parietal foramina, imperforate anus, and skin eruption: CDAGS.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Lammer, Edward; Watson, Rosemarie; Harper, John; Hatamochi, Atsushi; Hatamochi-Hayashi, Saori; Napierala, Dobrawa; Hermanns, Pia; Collins, Sinead; Roa, Benjamin B; Hedge, Madhuri R; Wakui, Keiko; Nguyen, Diep; Stockton, David W; Lee, Brendan

    2005-07-01

    We describe the clinical characterization, molecular analyses, and genetic mapping of a distinct genetic condition characterized by craniosynostosis, delayed closure of the fontanel, cranial defects, clavicular hypoplasia, anal and genitourinary malformations, and skin eruption. We have identified seven patients with this phenotype in four families from different geographic regions and ethnic backgrounds. This is an autosomal recessive condition that brings together apparently opposing pathophysiologic and developmental processes, including accelerated suture closure and delayed ossification. Selected candidate genes--including RUNX2, CBFB, MSX2, ALX4, TWIST1, and RECQL4--were screened for mutations, by direct sequencing of their coding regions, and for microdeletions, by fluorescent in situ hybridization. No mutations or microdeletions were detected in any of the genes analyzed. A genomewide screen yielded the maximum estimated LOD score of +2.38 for markers D22S283 and D22S274 on chromosome 22q12-q13. We hypothesize that the gene defect in this condition causes novel context-dependent dysregulation of multiple signaling pathways, including RUNX2, during osteoblast differentiation and craniofacial morphogenesis. PMID:15924278

  8. Characterization of a New Syndrome That Associates Craniosynostosis, Delayed Fontanel Closure, Parietal Foramina, Imperforate Anus, and Skin Eruption: CDAGS

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Londono, Roberto ; Lammer, Edward ; Watson, Rosemarie ; Harper, John ; Hatamochi, Atsushi ; Hatamochi-Hayashi, Saori ; Napierala, Dobrawa ; Hermanns, Pia ; Collins, Sinead ; Roa, Benjamin B. ; Hedge, Madhuri R. ; Wakui, Keiko ; Nguyen, Diep ; Stockton, David W. ; Lee, Brendan 

    2005-01-01

    We describe the clinical characterization, molecular analyses, and genetic mapping of a distinct genetic condition characterized by craniosynostosis, delayed closure of the fontanel, cranial defects, clavicular hypoplasia, anal and genitourinary malformations, and skin eruption. We have identified seven patients with this phenotype in four families from different geographic regions and ethnic backgrounds. This is an autosomal recessive condition that brings together apparently opposing pathophysiologic and developmental processes, including accelerated suture closure and delayed ossification. Selected candidate genes—including RUNX2, CBFB, MSX2, ALX4, TWIST1, and RECQL4—were screened for mutations, by direct sequencing of their coding regions, and for microdeletions, by fluorescent in situ hybridization. No mutations or microdeletions were detected in any of the genes analyzed. A genomewide screen yielded the maximum estimated LOD score of +2.38 for markers D22S283 and D22S274 on chromosome 22q12-q13. We hypothesize that the gene defect in this condition causes novel context-dependent dysregulation of multiple signaling pathways, including RUNX2, during osteoblast differentiation and craniofacial morphogenesis. PMID:15924278

  9. Anatomical observations of the foramina transversaria.

    PubMed Central

    Taitz, C; Nathan, H; Arensburg, B

    1978-01-01

    Four hundred and eighty foramina transversaria in dry cervical vertebrae of 36 spines and in a number of dissections were studied and classified according to size, shape, and direction of their main diameter. A coefficient of roundness was then elaborated. The variations of foramina appear to follow a pattern at various vertebral levels. The possible factors (in addition to the embryological ones) involved in causing these variations-for example, mechanical stress, size, course, and number of vertebral vessels-were analysed. The importance of the correct interpretation of the variations in the foramina transversaria in radiographic or computerised axial tomography is discussed. The contribution of the present study to the understanding and diagnosis of pathological conditions related to the vertebral artery and its sympathetic plexus is stressed. Images PMID:632823

  10. A microdeletion encompassing PHF21A in an individual with global developmental delay and craniofacial anomalies.

    PubMed

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Vogt, Julie; Reali, Lisa; Kong, Il-Keun; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2015-12-01

    In Potocki-Shaffer syndrome (PSS), the full phenotypic spectrum is manifested when deletions are at least 2.1 Mb in size at 11p11.2. The PSS-associated genes EXT2 and ALX4, together with PHF21A, all map to this region flanked by markers D11S1393 and D11S1319. Being proximal to EXT2 and ALX4, a 1.1 Mb region containing 12 annotated genes had been identified by deletion mapping to explain PSS phenotypes except multiple exostoses and parietal foramina. Here, we report a male patient with partial PSS phenotypes including global developmental delay, craniofacial anomalies, minor limb anomalies, and micropenis. Using microarray, qPCR, RT-qPCR, and Western blot analyses, we refined the candidate gene region, which harbors five genes, by excluding two genes, SLC35C1 and CRY2, which resulted in a corroborating role of PHF21A in developmental delay and craniofacial anomalies. This microdeletion contains the least number of genes at 11p11.2 reported to date. Additionally, we also discuss the phenotypes observed in our patient with respect to those of published cases of microdeletions across the Potocki-Shaffer interval. PMID:26333423

  11. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  12. Anterior Mandibular Lingual Foramina: An In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Claudio; Leuter, Cinzia; Gatto, Roberto; Continenza, Maria Adelaide

    2014-01-01

    In descriptions of surgical procedures in mandible, often there is no mention of an anatomical variance, the genial spinal foramina, where nerves and vessels go through. Aim of this study is to investigate frequency, shape, and dimensions of these foramina. 56 computed tomography dentascans were analyzed with an implant planning software. The considered parameters were frequency, number, position, diameters, and length of canals; the collected data were inserted in a spreadsheet and statistically analyzed; therefore, they were compared with those found in the literature. The measurements agree with the ones found in earlier studies, except for the length of the inferior spinal canals, which resulted lesser than that found in the literature. The frequency of the inferior spinal foramina, the data related to the inferior spinal foramina diameter (cross scan), and the measurements related to the superior spinal foramina diameter (axial scan) resulted to be major compared to those reported in literature. These obtained results are clinically interesting because an implant planning software has been employed, daily used by operators, and that permits in vivo investigations. Furthermore, due to the possibility of hemorrhagic accidents in this mandibular region, these data are particularly interesting for all of the operators who make interventions in this area. PMID:25215238

  13. [Craniofacial neuralgias].

    PubMed

    Mikula, Ivan

    2008-05-01

    Craniofacial neuralgias are characterized by sudden paroxysmal pain along the distribution of one or more of the cranial or upper cervical spinal nerves. The most significant neuralgia of the craniofacial region is trigeminal neuralgia, while geniculate neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia and occipital neuralgia are less common. Trigeminal neuralgia may be primary or secondary. Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia or tic douloureux has been recognized for centuries as an extremely painful disorder most commonly involving the maxillary nerve. Recurrent lancinating, shocklike unilateral pain lasting for seconds to minutes is provoked by non noxious stimulation of the skin at specific sites around the face and less frequently by movement of the tongue. The trigger zones are usually within the same dermatome as the painful sensation. After each episode, there is usually a refractive period during which stimulation of the trigger zone will not induce pain. Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia occurs somewhat more frequently in women and usually begins in individuals 50 to 70 years of age. There is no pain between attacks, and the frequency of painful episodes can range from several per day to only a few per year. With time, the features may become more atypical, with greater areas of more enduring and dull pain and occasionally bilateral pain, rarely on both sides simultaneously. No sensory or reflex deficit is detectable by routine neurologic testing. Diagnostic local anesthetic blocks will identify the specific nerves involved and the trigger point distribution. Neurologic and neuroradiologic examination is advised in all cases to rule out diseases such as intracranical tumors, vascular malformations or multiple sclerosis. PMID:18710080

  14. Occipital foramina development involves localised regulation of mesenchyme proliferation and is independent of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Akbareian, Sophia E; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Macharia, Raymond G; McGonnell, Imelda M

    2015-06-01

    Cranial foramina are holes within the skull, formed during development, allowing entry and exit of blood vessels and nerves. Once formed they must remain open, due to the vital structures they contain, i.e. optic nerves, jugular vein, carotid artery, and other cranial nerves and blood vessels. Understanding cranial foramina development is essential as cranial malformations lead to the stenosis or complete closure of these structures, resulting in blindness, deafness, facial paralysis, raised intracranial pressure and lethality. Here we focus on describing early events in the formation of the jugular, carotid and hypoglossal cranial foramina that form in the mesoderm-derived, endochondral occipital bones at the base of the embryonic chick skull. Whole-mount skeletal staining of skulls indicates the appearance of these foramina from HH32/D7.5 onwards. Haematoxylin & eosin staining of sections shows that the intimately associated mesenchyme, neighbouring the contents of these cranial foramina, is initially very dense and gradually becomes sparser as development proceeds. Histological examination also revealed that these foramina initially contain relatively large-diameter nerves, which later become refined, and are closely associated with the blood vessel, which they also innervate within the confines of the foramina. Interestingly cranial foramina in the base of the skull contain blood vessels lacking smooth muscle actin, which suggests these blood vessels belong to glomus body structures within the foramina. The blood vessel shape also appears to dictate the overall shape of the resulting foramina. We initially hypothesised that cranial foramina development could involve targeted proliferation and local apoptosis to cause 'mesenchymal clearing' and the creation of cavities in a mechanism similar to joint cavitation. We find that this is not the case, and propose that a mechanism reliant upon local nerve/blood vessel-derived restriction of ossification may contribute

  15. An Anatomical Study of the Nutrient Foramina of the Human Humeral Diaphysis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zichao; Ding, Haoliang; Hu, Chuanzhen; Xu, Haitao; An, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the nutrient foramina is critical to clinical practice. An insult to the nutrient foramina can be caused by trauma and/or surgical dissection and lead to devascularization and bad outcomes. Few studies have looked at the humerus, and no studies have described relative information of humeral nutrient foramen related to anatomical structures that might be located by palpable landmarks. In this study, we analyzed the anatomical features of the nutrient foramina of the diaphyseal humerus and provide a discussion of clinical relevance. MATERIAL AND METHODS We dissected 19 cadavers and analyzed the relative positions of the foramina and surrounding muscles, and the number, direction, diameter, and location of the nutrient foramina. Foramina index and a new landmark index were used to calculate the location. We compared the data from both sides and the relationships between transverse and longitudinal locations, diameter and total length, and foramina index and landmark index were also analyzed. RESULTS The humeri had one or two main nutrient foramina located in a small area between the coracobrachialis and brachial muscles and oriented toward the elbow. The mean diameter was 1.11±0.32 mm. The mean index and landmark index were 43.76±4.94% and 42.26±5.35%, respectively. There were no differences between sides in terms of diameter, length, or nutrient foramina index. There were no significant correlations between transverse and longitudinal locations or diameter and total length. The foramina index and landmark index showed strong positive correlation (r=0.994, p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Our study provides details about the nutrient foramina that will benefit clinicians who treat injuries and diseases of the humerus. Surgeons should be mindful of soft tissue in the foraminal area during surgical procedures. PMID:27180828

  16. An Anatomical Study of the Nutrient Foramina of the Human Humeral Diaphysis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zichao; Ding, Haoliang; Hu, Chuanzhen; Xu, Haitao; An, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the nutrient foramina is critical to clinical practice. An insult to the nutrient foramina can be caused by trauma and/or surgical dissection and lead to devascularization and bad outcomes. Few studies have looked at the humerus, and no studies have described relative information of humeral nutrient foramen related to anatomical structures that might be located by palpable landmarks. In this study, we analyzed the anatomical features of the nutrient foramina of the diaphyseal humerus and provide a discussion of clinical relevance. Material/Methods We dissected 19 cadavers and analyzed the relative positions of the foramina and surrounding muscles, and the number, direction, diameter, and location of the nutrient foramina. Foramina index and a new landmark index were used to calculate the location. We compared the data from both sides and the relationships between transverse and longitudinal locations, diameter and total length, and foramina index and landmark index were also analyzed. Results The humeri had one or two main nutrient foramina located in a small area between the coracobrachialis and brachial muscles and oriented toward the elbow. The mean diameter was 1.11±0.32 mm. The mean index and landmark index were 43.76±4.94% and 42.26±5.35%, respectively. There were no differences between sides in terms of diameter, length, or nutrient foramina index. There were no significant correlations between transverse and longitudinal locations or diameter and total length. The foramina index and landmark index showed strong positive correlation (r=0.994, p<0.0001). Conclusions Our study provides details about the nutrient foramina that will benefit clinicians who treat injuries and diseases of the humerus. Surgeons should be mindful of soft tissue in the foraminal area during surgical procedures. PMID:27180828

  17. Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Websites.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Agarwal, Divyansh; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    Applicants for craniofacial surgery fellowships utilize Internet-based resources like the San Francisco (SF) Match to manage applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility and content of craniofacial surgery fellowship websites (CSFWs). A list of available craniofacial surgery fellowships was compiled from directories of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery (ACSFS) and SF Match. Accessibility of CSFWs was assessed via links from these directories and a Google search. Craniofacial surgery fellowship websites were evaluated on education and recruitment content and compared via program characteristics. Twenty-four of the 28 US-based craniofacial surgery fellowship programs had a CSFW (86%). The ACSFS and SF Match databases had limited CSFW accessibility, but a Google search revealed most CSFWs had the top search result (76%). In total, CSFWs provided an average of 39% of education and recruitment variables. While most programs provided fellowship program descriptions (96%), application links (96%), and faculty listings (83%), relatively few provided rotation schedules (13%), fellow selection process information (13%), or interview dates (8%). CSFW content did not vary by program location, faculty size, accreditation status, or institutional affiliations (P > 0.05). Craniofacial surgery fellowships often lack readily accessible websites from national program lists and have limited information for interested applicants. The consistent lack of online information across programs suggests future opportunities exist to improve these educational resources. PMID:27285892

  18. Parietal bone agenesis and associated multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    de Heer, Inge M; van Nesselrooij, Bernadette P M; Spliet, Willem; Vermeij-Keers, Christl

    2003-03-01

    Congenital defects of the calvaria in general and the parietal bones in particular are rare diseases. The latter are of three kinds: 1) cranioschisis, 2) craniodysostosis, and 3) foramina parietalia permagna (FPP). Here, we describe an exceptional anomaly, namely, complete absence of one parietal bone and dysplasia of the other. Agenesis has been reported twice before in the literature. In these cases, the calvarial defect was the only congenital anomaly. In contrast, the patient described in this article exhibited many other congenital deformities, namely, iris coloboma, facial dysmorphism, a large ventricular septal defect of the heart, and a horseshoe kidney. Some of these deformities are associated with neural crest development. Chromosomal analysis was normal in both blood and fibroblasts, and fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis failed to demonstrate a 22q11 deletion as seen in DiGeorge syndrome, a neural crest-related disease complex. Since 2000, the third group of congenital defects of the parietal bones, FPP, has been associated with mutations of the MSX-2 gene. In our case, a genetic analysis of this gene was performed, but no mutations or deletions of MSX-2 were detected. PMID:12621289

  19. Distribution of the lingual foramina in mandibular cortical bone in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Moon Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The interforminal region, between the mandibular foramen, is known as a relatively safe area that is free of anatomic structures, such as inferior alveolar nerve, submandibular fossa, and lingual side of the mandible is occasionally neglected for its low clinical importance. Even in the case of a severely constricted alveolus, perforation of the lingual cortical bone had been intended. However, anterior extension of the inferior alveolar canal, important anatomic structure, such as concavity of lingual bone, lingual foramina, and lingual canal, has recently been reported through various studies, and untypical bleeding by perforation of the lingual plate on implantation has also been reported. Therefore, in this study, we performed radiographic and statistical analysis on distribution and appearance frequencies of the lingual foramina that causes perforation of the mandibular lingual cortical bone to prevent complications, such as untypical bleeding, during surgical procedure. Materials and Methods We measured the horizontal length from a midline of the mandible to the lingual foramina, as well as the horizontal length from the alveolar crest to the lingual foramina and from the lingual foramina to the mandibular border by multi-detector computed tomography of 187 patients, who visited Dankook University Dental Hospital for various reasons from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2012. Results From a total of 187 human mandibles, 110 (58.8%) mandibles had lingual foramina; 39 (20.9%) had bilateral lingual foramen; 34 (18.2%) had the only left lingual foramen; and 37 (19.8%) had the only right lingual foramen. Conclusion When there is consistent bleeding during a surgical procedure, clinicians must consider damages on the branches of the sublingual artery, which penetrate the lingual foramina. Also, when there is a lingual foramina larger than 1 mm in diameter on a pre-implantation computed tomography, clinicians must beware of vessel damage. In order to prevent

  20. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jhamb, Aakarsh; Mohanty, Sujata; Jhamb, Parul A

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia can present clinically in varied forms which may appear as collision of different pathologic processes. We report a rare case of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia with coexisting epithelial lined cyst and superimposed osteomyelitis with sequestrum formation. Its clinical features and management with possible hypotheses are described along with the post operative course. Pertinent literature has been reviewed with emphasis on pathogenesis of this unique occurrence. PMID:23248490

  1. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Pat; Magliocca, Kelly R; Lee, Janice S

    2012-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of the natural history and molecular abnormalities, many questions remain surrounding the progression and management of fibrous dysplasia (FD). In the absence of comorbidities, the expected behavior of craniofacial FD (CFD) is to be slow growing and without functional consequence. Understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms contributing to the various phenotypes of this condition, as well as the predictors of the different behaviors of FD lesions, must be improved. Long-term follow-up of patients with CFD is vital because spontaneous recovery is unlikely, and the course of disease can be unpredictable. PMID:22771278

  2. Enlargement of Neural Foramina and Dynamic Stabilization in Spondylolisthesis without Restoring the Alignment: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Suzer, Tuncer; Sasani, Mehdi; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Egemen, Emrah

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the cause of radiculopathy is the compression of the nerve root within the foramina which is narrowed secondary to sliding of the corpus and reduced disc height. In some patients, unroofing the foramen does not resolve this problem. We described a new decompression technique using pedicle removal and transpedicular dynamic instrumentation to stabilization the spine. We performed this operation in 2 patients and achieved very good results. PMID:27123030

  3. Fibronectin and craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; AlShomer, Feras; Alqahtani, Abdullah; Alhadlg, Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Fibronectin is an essential component of the extracellular matrix. The role of fibronectin in craniofacial surgery has not been previously reviewed. Fibronectin mediates bone differentiation and development of the skull. Studies have shown that normal development of the skull requires a specific pattern of expression around the epithelial-mesenchymal interface of the neurocranium. Fibronectin is also essential in mediating the migration of neural crest cells to form the facial skeleton. The calvaria of patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes have an abnormally elevated collagen level. However, fibronectin levels are elevated in the former syndrome and decreased in the latter syndrome. The significance of this requires further research. Fibronectin gene expression is increased in port wine-derived fibroblasts in patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Normal palatogenesis also requires a specific pattern of expression of fibronectin around the maxillary process as well as the roof of the stomodeum, and several studies have linked the development of cleft lip/palate to an imbalance of fibronectin content of the extracellular matrix. Fibronectin mediates cell-to-cell attachment during repair of calvarial defects; hence, fibronectin has been used as a carrier for bone morphogenetic proteins to treat calvarial defects. Finally, fibronectin is now an essential component in stem cell technology related to craniofacial surgery. PMID:24322634

  4. Regenerative Strategies for Craniofacial Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Catharine B.; Pomerantz, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial disorders present markedly complicated problems in reconstruction because of the complex interactions of the multiple, simultaneously affected tissues. Regenerative medicine holds promise for new strategies to improve treatment of these disorders. This review addresses current areas of unmet need in craniofacial reconstruction and emphasizes how craniofacial tissues differ from their analogs elsewhere in the body. We present a problem-based approach to illustrate current treatment strategies for various craniofacial disorders, to highlight areas of need, and to suggest regenerative strategies for craniofacial bone, fat, muscle, nerve, and skin. For some tissues, current approaches offer excellent reconstructive solutions using autologous tissue or prosthetic materials. Thus, new “regenerative” approaches would need to offer major advantages in order to be adopted. In other tissues, the unmet need is great, and we suggest the greatest regenerative need is for muscle, skin, and nerve. The advent of composite facial tissue transplantation and the development of regenerative medicine are each likely to add important new paradigms to our treatment of craniofacial disorders. PMID:23248598

  5. Cell lineage in mammalian craniofacial mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Vivatbutsiri, Philaiporn; Morriss-Kay, Gillian; Saga, Yumiko; Iseki, Sachiko

    2008-01-01

    We have analysed the contributions of neural crest and mesoderm to mammalian craniofacial mesenchyme and its derivatives by cell lineage tracing experiments in mouse embryos, using the permanent genetic markers Wnt1-cre for neural crest and Mesp1-cre for mesoderm, combined with the Rosa26 reporter. At the end of neural crest cell migration (E9.5) the two patterns are reciprocal, with a mutual boundary just posterior to the eye. Mesodermal cells expressing endothelial markers (angioblasts) are found not to respect this boundary; they are associated with the migrating neural crest from the 5-somite stage, and by E9.5 they form a pre-endothelial meshwork throughout the cranial mesenchyme. Mesodermal cells of the myogenic lineage also migrate with neural crest cells, as the branchial arches form. By E17.5 the neural crest-mesoderm boundary in the subectodermal mesenchyme becomes out of register with that of the underlying skeletogenic layer, which is between the frontal and parietal bones. At E13.5 the primordia of these bones lie basolateral to the brain, extending towards the vertex of the skull during the following 4-5 days. We used DiI labelling of the bone primordia in ex-utero E13.5 embryos to distinguish between two possibilities for the origin of the frontal and parietal bones: (1) recruitment from adjacent connective tissue or (2) proliferation of the original primordia. The results clearly demonstrated that the bone primordia extend vertically by intrinsic growth, without detectable recruitment of adjacent mesenchymal cells. PMID:18617001

  6. Craniofacial surgery: present and future.

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, L A; Schut, L; Randall, P

    1976-01-01

    The possibilities for radical craniofacial restructuring have increased dramatically in the past 6 years with the development of craniofacial surgery. The field developed from a background of patients with major craniofacial birth defects allowing orderly planning and expansion to correction of a multitude of other craniofacial structural problems. The procedures concentrate upon changing the skeletal structures using extensive subperiostial dissection of soft tissue, and adding bone to fill in areas of deficiency. There are three grades of complexity in craniofacial procedures. After extensive soft tissue sub-periostial stripping about the orbits and upper face, the simplest form consists of onlay bone grafts. The next most complicated involves osteotomies to shift the face into a more normal position. In its most complicated form, abnormal proportions of bone are removed and the orbits or cranium are shifted into a new or normal position. We have had experience with 69 patients since September, 1972. Thirty-six have had intracranial procedures. Infection has been the most serious problem, and there have been no instances of death or blindness. A number of lesser problems occur. Future applications of craniofacial surgery are appearing with great frequency as more experience is gained with its uses. It has particular application in acute and late reconstruction of patients with traumatic defects about the face. Preventive osteotomies are an area with great potential, by releasing stenotic areas of bone and allowing the developing brain to mold the upper face and orbits. There is also applicability in surgery of tumors about the craniofacial structure and in cosmetic surgery. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b. Fig. 1c. Fig. 1d. Fig. 1e. Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b. Fig. 2c. PMID:984925

  7. Understanding Cleft and Craniofacial Team Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donor Spotlight Fundraising Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area Team Disclaimer ...

  8. Biomaterials for Craniofacial Bone Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tevlin, R.; McArdle, A.; Atashroo, D.; Walmsley, G.G.; Senarath-Yapa, K.; Zielins, E.R.; Paik, K.J.; Longaker, M.T.; Wan, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Conditions such as congenital anomalies, cancers, and trauma can all result in devastating deficits of bone in the craniofacial skeleton. This can lead to significant alteration in function and appearance that may have significant implications for patients. In addition, large bone defects in this area can pose serious clinical dilemmas, which prove difficult to remedy, even with current gold standard surgical treatments. The craniofacial skeleton is complex and serves important functional demands. The necessity to develop new approaches for craniofacial reconstruction arises from the fact that traditional therapeutic modalities, such as autologous bone grafting, present myriad limitations and carry with them the potential for significant complications. While the optimal bone construct for tissue regeneration remains to be elucidated, much progress has been made in the past decade. Advances in tissue engineering have led to innovative scaffold design, complemented by progress in the understanding of stem cell–based therapy and growth factor enhancement of the healing cascade. This review focuses on the role of biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering, highlighting key advances in scaffold design and development. PMID:25139365

  9. Bone Grafts in Craniofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elsalanty, Mohammed E.; Genecov, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of cranial and maxillofacial defects is a challenging task. The standard reconstruction method has been bone grafting. In this review, we shall describe the biological principles of bone graft healing, as pertinent to craniofacial reconstruction. Different types and sources of bone grafts will be discussed, as well as new methods of bone defect reconstruction. PMID:22110806

  10. Craniofacial reconstruction following oncologic resection.

    PubMed

    Hanasono, Matthew M; Hofstede, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    The ability to reliably reconstruct complex and sizable wounds has decreased the morbidity of skull base surgery substantially, preventing major complications and allowing treatment of tumors previously considered inoperable. Addressing facial nerve function with static and dynamic procedures as well as fabrication of craniofacial prostheses to replace delicate facial landmarks has further increased surgeons' ability to restore the appearance and function of the face. PMID:23174362

  11. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... and craniofacial health of our nation. Grants & Funding Funding Opportunity Announcements By Topic RFAs PAs See All Grants & Funding Application Forms and Deadlines Grant Application Forms Application ...

  12. Biomimetic approaches to complex craniofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Teven, Chad M; Fisher, Sean; Ameer, Guillermo A; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R

    2015-01-01

    The primary goals of craniofacial reconstruction include the restoration of the form, function, and facial esthetics, and in the case of pediatric patients, respect for craniofacial growth. The surgeon, however, faces several challenges when attempting a reconstructive cranioplasty. For that reason, craniofacial defect repair often requires sophisticated treatment strategies and multidisciplinary input. In the ideal situation, autologous tissue similar in structure and function to that which is missing can be utilized for repair. In the context of the craniofacial skeleton, autologous cranial bone, or secondarily rib, iliac crest, or scapular bone, is most favorable. Often, this option is limited by the finite supply of available bone. Therefore, alternative strategies to repair craniofacial defects are necessary. In the field of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering has emerged as a promising concept, and several methods of bone engineering are currently under investigation. A growth factor-based approach utilizing bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) has demonstrated stimulatory effects on cranial bone and defect repair. When combined with cell-based and matrix-based models, regenerative goals can be optimized. This manuscript intends to review recent investigations of tissue engineering models used for the repair of craniofacial defects with a focus on the role of BMPs, scaffold materials, and novel cell lines. When sufficient autologous bone is not available, safe and effective strategies to engineer bone would allow the surgeon to meet the reconstructive goals of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26389027

  13. Heritability of the Human Craniofacial Complex.

    PubMed

    Šešelj, Maja; Duren, Dana L; Sherwood, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying normal variation and the genetic underpinnings of anatomical structures is one of the main goals of modern morphological studies. However, the extent of genetic contributions to normal variation in craniofacial morphology in humans is still unclear. The current study addresses this gap by investigating the genetic underpinnings of normal craniofacial morphology. The sample under investigation consists of 75 linear and angular measurements spanning the entire craniofacial complex, recorded from lateral cephalographs of 1,379 participants in the Fels Longitudinal Study. Heritabilities for each trait were estimated using SOLAR, a maximum-likelihood variance components approach utilizing all pedigree information for parameter estimation. Trait means and mean effects of the covariates age, sex, age(2) , sex × age, and sex × age(2) were simultaneously estimated in the analytic models. All traits of the craniofacial complex were significantly heritable. Heritability estimates ranged from 0.10 to 0.60, with the majority being moderate. It is important to note that we found similar ranges of heritability occurring across the different functional/developmental components of the craniofacial complex, the splanchnocranium, the basicranium, and the neurocranium. This suggests that traits from different regions of the craniofacial complex are of comparable utility for the purposes of population history and phylogeny reconstruction. At the same time, this genetic influence on craniofacial morphology signals a caution to researchers of nongenetic studies to consider the implications of this finding when selecting samples for study given their project design and goals. PMID:26097051

  14. Biomimetic approaches to complex craniofacial defects

    PubMed Central

    Teven, Chad M.; Fisher, Sean; Ameer, Guillermo A.; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary goals of craniofacial reconstruction include the restoration of the form, function, and facial esthetics, and in the case of pediatric patients, respect for craniofacial growth. The surgeon, however, faces several challenges when attempting a reconstructive cranioplasty. For that reason, craniofacial defect repair often requires sophisticated treatment strategies and multidisciplinary input. In the ideal situation, autologous tissue similar in structure and function to that which is missing can be utilized for repair. In the context of the craniofacial skeleton, autologous cranial bone, or secondarily rib, iliac crest, or scapular bone, is most favorable. Often, this option is limited by the finite supply of available bone. Therefore, alternative strategies to repair craniofacial defects are necessary. In the field of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering has emerged as a promising concept, and several methods of bone engineering are currently under investigation. A growth factor-based approach utilizing bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) has demonstrated stimulatory effects on cranial bone and defect repair. When combined with cell-based and matrix-based models, regenerative goals can be optimized. This manuscript intends to review recent investigations of tissue engineering models used for the repair of craniofacial defects with a focus on the role of BMPs, scaffold materials, and novel cell lines. When sufficient autologous bone is not available, safe and effective strategies to engineer bone would allow the surgeon to meet the reconstructive goals of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26389027

  15. Stem Cells in Teeth and Craniofacial Bones.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Chai, Y

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells are remarkable, and stem cell-based tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical science aiming to restore damaged tissue or organs. In dentistry and reconstructive facial surgery, it is of great interest to restore lost teeth or craniofacial bone defects using stem cell-mediated therapy. In the craniofacial region, various stem cell populations have been identified with regeneration potential. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge concerning the various types of tooth- and craniofacial bone-related stem cells and discuss their in vivo identities and regulating mechanisms. PMID:26350960

  16. Advances in Bioprinting Technologies for Craniofacial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Dafydd O; Farré-Guasch, Elisabet; Helder, Marco N; Gibbs, Susan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; van Zuijlen, Paul P; Wolff, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in craniofacial reconstruction have shown important advances in both the materials and methods used. While autogenous tissue is still considered to be the gold standard for these reconstructions, the harvesting procedure remains tedious and in many cases causes significant donor site morbidity. These limitations have subsequently led to the development of less invasive techniques such as 3D bioprinting that could offer possibilities to manufacture patient-tailored bioactive tissue constructs for craniofacial reconstruction. Here, we discuss the current technological and (pre)clinical advances of 3D bioprinting for use in craniofacial reconstruction and highlight the challenges that need to be addressed in the coming years. PMID:27113634

  17. Core issues in craniofacial myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Robert G.

    2010-11-01

    Branchiomeric craniofacial muscles control feeding, breathing and facial expression. These muscles differ on multiple counts from all other skeletal muscles and originate in a progenitor cell population in pharyngeal mesoderm characterized by a common genetic program with an adjacent population of cardiac progenitor cells, the second heart field, that gives rise to much of the heart. The transcription factors and signaling molecules that trigger the myogenic program at sites of branchiomeric muscle formation are correspondingly distinct from those in somite-derived muscle progenitor cells. Here new insights into the regulatory hierarchies controlling branchiomeric myogenesis are discussed. Differences in embryological origin are reflected in the lineage, transcriptional program and proliferative and differentiation properties of branchiomeric muscle satellite cells. These recent findings have important implications for our understanding of the diverse myogenic strategies operative both in the embryo and adult and are of direct biomedical relevance to deciphering the mechanisms underlying the cause and progression of muscle restricted myopathies.

  18. Orthognathic Surgery in Craniofacial Microsomia: Treatment Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Salvador; Torrealba, Ramón; Nuñez, Marcelo; Uribe, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Craniofacial microsomia is a broad term that covers a variety of craniofacial malformation conditions that are caused by alterations in the derivatives of the first and second pharyngeal arches. In general terms, diverse therapeutic alternatives are proposed according to the growth stage and the severity of the alteration. When craniofacial growth has concluded, conventional orthognathic surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, and genioplasty) provides good alternatives for MI and MIIA type cases. Reconstruction of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint before orthognathic surgery is the indicated treatment for cases MIIB and MIII. The goal of this article is to establish a surgical treatment algorithm for orthognathic surgery on patients with craniofacial microsomia, analyzing the points that allow the ideal treatment for each patient to be chosen. PMID:25674375

  19. Craniofacial and Dental Development in Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Alice F.; Oberoi, Snehlata; Landan, Maya; Charles, Cyril; Massie, Jessica C.; Fairley, Cecilia; Rauen, Katherine A.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a RASopathy characterized by a wide range of cardiac, musculoskeletal, dermatological, and developmental abnormalities. The RASopathies are defined as a group of syndromes caused by activated Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Specifically, CS is caused by activating mutations in HRAS. Although receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, which is upstream of Ras/MAPK, is known to play a critical role in craniofacial and dental development, the craniofacial and dental features of CS have not been systematically defined in a large group of individuals. In order to address this gap in our understanding and fully characterize the CS phenotype, we evaluated the craniofacial and dental phenotype in a large cohort (n=41) of CS individuals. We confirmed that the craniofacial features common in CS include macrocephaly, bitemporal narrowing, convex facial profile, full cheeks, and large mouth. Additionally, CS patients have a characteristic dental phenotype that includes malocclusion with anterior open bite and posterior crossbite, enamel hypo-mineralization, delayed tooth development and eruption, gingival hyperplasia, thickening of the alveolar ridge, and high palate. Comparison of the craniofacial and dental phenotype in CS with other RASopathies, such as cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC), provides insight into the complexities of Ras/MAPK signaling in human craniofacial and dental development. PMID:24668879

  20. Volume reduction of the jugular foramina in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the pathogenesis of the chiari-like malformation in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS) is incomplete, and current hypotheses do not fully explain the development of syringomyelia (SM) in the spinal cords of affected dogs. This study investigates an unconventional pathogenetic theory for the development of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure waves in the subarachnoid space in CKCS with SM, by analogy with human diseases. In children with achondroplasia the shortening of the skull base can lead to a narrowing of the jugular foramina (JF) between the cranial base synchondroses. This in turn has been reported to cause a congestion of the major venous outflow tracts of the skull and consequently to an increase in the intracranial pressure (ICP). Amongst brachycephalic dog breeds the CKCS has been identified as having an extremely short and wide braincase. A stenosis of the JF and a consequential vascular compromise in this opening could contribute to venous hypertension, raising ICP and causing CSF jets in the spinal subarachnoid space of the CKCS. In this study, JF volumes in CKCSs with and without SM were compared to assess a possible role of this pathologic mechanism in the development of SM in this breed. Results Computed tomography (CT) scans of 40 CKCSs > 4 years of age were used to create three-dimensional (3D) models of the skull and the JF. Weight matched groups (7–10 kg) of 20 CKCSs with SM and 20 CKCSs without SM were compared. CKCSs without SM presented significantly larger JF -volumes (median left JF: 0.0633 cm3; median right JF: 0.0703 cm3; p < 0.0001) when compared with CKCSs with SM (median left JF: 0.0382 cm3; median right JF: 0.0434 cm3; p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference between the left and right JF within each group. Bland-Altman analysis revealed excellent reproducibility of all volume measurements. Conclusion A stenosis of the JF and consecutive venous congestion may explain the aetiology of CSF

  1. The 50 Most Cited Papers in Craniofacial Anomalies and Craniofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Cormac W; Thomas, Sangeetha; Concannon, Elizabeth; Murray, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Background Citation analysis is a recognized scientometric method of classifying cited articles according to the frequency of which they have been referenced. The total number of citations an article receives is considered to reflect it's significance among it's peers. Methods Until now, a bibliometric analysis has never been performed in the specialty of craniofacial anomalies and craniofacial surgery. This citation analysis generates an extensive list of the 50 most influential papers in this developing field. Journals specializing in craniofacial surgery, maxillofacial surgery, plastic surgery, neurosurgery, genetics and pediatrics were searched to demonstrate which articles have cultivated the specialty within the past 55 years. Results The results show an intriguing compilation of papers which outline the fundamental knowledge of craniofacial anomalies and the developments of surgical techniques to manage these patients. Conclusions This citation analysis provides a summation of the current most popular trends in craniofacial literature. These esteemed papers aid to direct our decision making today within this specialty. PMID:26430626

  2. Progressive bilateral thinning of the parietal bones

    SciTech Connect

    Cederlund, C.G.; Andren, L.; Olivecrona, H.

    1982-03-01

    Observation of a case of progressive bilateral parietal thinning within a period of 14 years induced us to study skull films of 3 636 consecutive patients. Parietal thinning was found in 86 patients (2.37%). It was more common in women, with a sex ratio of 1:1.9. The mean age of the females was 72 years, and that of the males 63 years. Previous skull films of 25 of these patients were available and showed progression in 10. It is concluded that parietal thinning is a slowly progressive disease of middle-aged and old patients and is not an anatomical variant or congenital dysplasia of the dipole.

  3. Craniofacial plasticity in ancient Peru.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jessica H; Chew, Kristen; Ross, Ann H; Verano, John W

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have utilized craniometric data to explore the roles of genetic diversity and environment in human cranial shape variation. Peru is a particularly interesting region to examine cranial variation due to the wide variety of high and low altitude ecological zones, which in combination with rugged terrain have created isolated populations with vastly different physiological adaptations. This study examines seven samples from throughout Peru in an effort to understand the contributions of environmental adaptation and genetic relatedness to craniofacial variation at a regional scale. Morphological variation was investigated using a canonical discriminant analysis and Mahalanobis D(2) analysis. Results indicate that all groups are significantly different from one another with the closest relationship between Yauyos and Jahuay, two sites that are located geographically close in central Peru but in very different ecozones. The relationship between latitude/longitude and face shape was also examined with a spatial autocorrelation analysis (Moran's I) using ArcMap and show that there is significant spatial patterning for facial measures and geographic location suggesting that there is an association between biological variation and geographic location. PMID:25807293

  4. Dramatic Cataplexy Improvement Following Right Parietal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fam, David J.; Shammi, Prathiba; Mainprize, Todd G.; Murray, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the case of a 34-year-old woman with severe narcolepsy with cataplexy who experienced a dramatic reduction in cataplexy symptoms after resection of a right parietal astrocytoma. The patient underwent detailed neurological exam, neuropsychological testing, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency testing following surgery. Citation: Fam DJ, Shammi P, Mainprize TG, Murray BJ. Dramatic cataplexy improvement following right parietal surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):829–830. PMID:25902819

  5. Craniofacial characteristics of Croatian and Syrian populations.

    PubMed

    Grbesa, Durdica; Pezerović-Panijan, Ruzica; Kalaya, Mohamed Nadim; Gorsić, Irma; Cavcić, Anamarija; Zura, Nikolino; Berberović, Behija

    2007-12-01

    Craniofacial area is apart of the human body which undergoes the greatest changes during development and is characterized by uneven growth. External and internal factors affect the growth and development of craniofacial structures. They are responsible for the occurrence of specific craniofacial characteristics in different races or populations within the same race. The present study investigates the possible differences of the basic head and face shapes between the Croatian and Syrian populations. The sample included 400 subjects of both sexes aged 18-24 years and was divided into a Croatian and a Syrian group with 200 subjects each. Six variables defined according to Martin and Saller were measured by standard anthropometric instruments. The results of the study demonstrated statistically significant differences between our subjects in all variables except face width. The dolichocephalic head type and the mesoprosopic face type were predominant in the Croatian population, while the brachycephalic head type and the euryprosopic face type dominated in the Syrian population. PMID:18217470

  6. Craniofacial ontogeny in Centrosaurus apertus

    PubMed Central

    Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R.

    2014-01-01

    Centrosaurus apertus, a large bodied ceratopsid from the Late Cretaceous of North America, is one of the most common fossils recovered from the Belly River Group. This fossil record shows a wide diversity in morphology and size, with specimens ranging from putative juveniles to fully-grown individuals. The goal of this study was to reconstruct the ontogenetic changes that occur in the craniofacial skeleton of C. apertus through a quantitative cladistic analysis. Forty-seven cranial specimens were independently coded in separate data matrices for 80 hypothetical multistate growth characters and 130 hypothetical binary growth characters. Both analyses yielded the max-limit of 100,000 most parsimonious saved trees and the strict consensus collapsed into large polytomies. In order to reduce conflict resulting from missing data, fragmentary individuals were removed and the analyses were rerun. Among both the complete and the reduced data sets the multistate analyses recovered a shorter tree with a higher consistency index (CI) than the additive binary data sets. The arrangement within the trees shows a progression of specimens with a recurved nasal horn in the least mature individuals, followed by specimens with straight nasal horns in relatively more mature individuals, and finally specimens with procurved nasal horns in the most mature individuals. The most mature individuals are further characterized by the reduction of the cranial horn ornamentations in late growth stages, a trait that similarly occurs in the growth of other dinosaurs. Bone textural changes were found to be sufficient proxies for relative maturity in individuals that have not reached adult size. Additionally, frill length is congruent with relative maturity status and makes an acceptable proxy for ontogenetic status, especially in smaller individuals. In adult-sized individuals, the fusion of the epiparietals and episquamosals and the orientation of the nasal horn are the best indicators of relative

  7. Craniofacial ontogeny in Centrosaurus apertus.

    PubMed

    Frederickson, Joseph A; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R

    2014-01-01

    Centrosaurus apertus, a large bodied ceratopsid from the Late Cretaceous of North America, is one of the most common fossils recovered from the Belly River Group. This fossil record shows a wide diversity in morphology and size, with specimens ranging from putative juveniles to fully-grown individuals. The goal of this study was to reconstruct the ontogenetic changes that occur in the craniofacial skeleton of C. apertus through a quantitative cladistic analysis. Forty-seven cranial specimens were independently coded in separate data matrices for 80 hypothetical multistate growth characters and 130 hypothetical binary growth characters. Both analyses yielded the max-limit of 100,000 most parsimonious saved trees and the strict consensus collapsed into large polytomies. In order to reduce conflict resulting from missing data, fragmentary individuals were removed and the analyses were rerun. Among both the complete and the reduced data sets the multistate analyses recovered a shorter tree with a higher consistency index (CI) than the additive binary data sets. The arrangement within the trees shows a progression of specimens with a recurved nasal horn in the least mature individuals, followed by specimens with straight nasal horns in relatively more mature individuals, and finally specimens with procurved nasal horns in the most mature individuals. The most mature individuals are further characterized by the reduction of the cranial horn ornamentations in late growth stages, a trait that similarly occurs in the growth of other dinosaurs. Bone textural changes were found to be sufficient proxies for relative maturity in individuals that have not reached adult size. Additionally, frill length is congruent with relative maturity status and makes an acceptable proxy for ontogenetic status, especially in smaller individuals. In adult-sized individuals, the fusion of the epiparietals and episquamosals and the orientation of the nasal horn are the best indicators of relative

  8. Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Tissues. An update

    PubMed Central

    Litsas, George

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. In childhood, it determines the longitudinal bone growth, skeletal maturation, and acquisition of bone mass. In adulthood, it is necessary to maintain bone mass throughout life. Although an association between craniofacial and somatic development has been clearly established, craniofacial growth involves complex interactions of genes, hormones and environment. Moreover, as an anabolic hormone seems to have an important role in the regulation of bone remodeling, muscle enhancement and tooth development. In this paper the influence of growth hormone on oral tissues is reviewed. PMID:25674165

  9. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  10. Craniofacial reconstruction using rational cubic ball curves.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R U; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  11. Influence of congenital facial nerve palsy on craniofacial growth in craniofacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehoon; Park, Sang Woo; Kwon, Geun-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Hur, Ji An; Baek, Seung-Hak; Kim, Jae Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sukwha

    2014-11-01

    Facial muscles are of major importance in human craniofacial growth and development. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether congenital facial nerve palsy influences craniofacial growth in craniofacial microsomia. Fifty-one patients with unilateral craniofacial microsomia and no history of craniofacial skeletal surgery whose radiographs were taken after craniofacial growth was complete were included in this study. These patients were divided into groups in which the facial nerve was involved or uninvolved. The authors evaluated a total of seven measurement items to analyze the midface and mandibular asymmetry. Twenty patients had facial nerve involvement, and 31 had no involvement. None of the measurement items revealed any significant differences between the facial nerve-involved group and the uninvolved group within the same modified Pruzansky grade. There was no correlation between the type of facial nerve involvement and the measurement items. In relationships among the measurement items within each group, maxillary asymmetry was indirectly correlated with mandibular asymmetry or midline deviation through the occlusal plane angle in the uninvolved groups. However, in the facial nerve-involved group, the relationships disappeared. When the correlations in the facial nerve-involved group were compared with those of the uninvolved group, the relationships in the uninvolved group appeared more significant than in the facial nerve-involved group. The loss of relationships between the upper and lower jaw in the facial nerve-involved group might have been caused by subtle changes, which occur in midfacial bones and in the mandible due to facial nerve palsy. The main limitation of our study is that aside from facial nerve palsy, craniofacial microsomia has many factors that can influence craniofacial growth, such as hypoplasia of the mandibular condyle and soft tissue deficiencies. PMID:25210001

  12. Parietal contributions to recollection: electrophysiological evidence from aging and patients with parietal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ally, Brandon A; Simons, Jon S; McKeever, Joshua D; Peers, Polly V; Budson, Andrew E

    2008-01-01

    There has been much recent investigation into the role of parietal cortex in memory retrieval. Proposed hypotheses include attention to internal memorial representations, an episodic working memory-type buffer, and an accumulator of retrieved memorial information. The current investigation used event-related potentials (ERPs) to test the episodic buffer hypothesis, and to assess the memorial contribution of parietal cortex in younger and older adults, and in patients with circumscribed lateral parietal lesions. In a standard recognition memory paradigm, subjects studied color pictures of common objects. One-third of the test items were presented in the same viewpoint as the study phase, one-third were presented in a 90 degrees rotated viewpoint, and one-third were presented in a noncanonical viewpoint. Conflicting with the episodic buffer hypothesis, results revealed that the duration of the parietal old/new effect was longest for the canonical condition and shortest for the noncanonical condition. Results also revealed that older adults demonstrated a diminished parietal old/new effect relative to younger adults. Consistent with previous data reported by Simons et al., patients with lateral parietal lesions showed no behavioral impairment compared to controls. Behavioral and ERP data from parietal lesion patients are presented and discussed. From these results, the authors speculate that the parietal old/new effect may be the neural correlate of an individual's subjective recollective experience. PMID:18402990

  13. Bone Repair Cells for Craniofacial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, G; Kaigler, D; Rasperini, G; Avila-Ortiz, G; Bartel, R; Giannobile, WV

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of complex craniofacial deformities is a clinical challenge in situations of injury, congenital defects or disease. The use of cell-based therapies represents one of the most advanced methods for enhancing the regenerative response for craniofacial wound healing. Both Somatic and Stem Cells have been adopted in the treatment of complex osseous defects and advances have been made in finding the most adequate scaffold for the delivery of cell therapies in human regenerative medicine. As an example of such approaches for clinical application for craniofacial regeneration, Ixmyelocel-T or bone repair cells are a source of bone marrow derived stem and progenitor cells. They are produced through the use of single pass perfusion bioreactors for CD90+ mesenchymal stem cells and CD14+ monocyte/macrophage progenitor cells. The application of ixmyelocel-T has shown potential in the regeneration of muscular, vascular, nervous and osseous tissue. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight cell therapies used to repair bony and soft tissue defects in the oral and craniofacial complex. The field at this point remains at an early stage, however this review will provide insights into the progress being made using cell therapies for eventual development into clinical practice. PMID:22433781

  14. EARLY CRANIOFACIAL DEVELOPMENT: LIFE AMONG THE SIGNALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early Craniofacial Development: Life Among the Signals. Sid Hunter and Keith Ward. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711

    Haloacetic acids (HAA) are chemicals formed during drinking water disinfection and present in finished tap water. Exposure o...

  15. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  16. Mouse Models of Rare Craniofacial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    A rare disease is defined as a condition that affects less than 1 in 2000 individuals. Currently more than 7000 rare diseases have been documented, and most are thought to be of genetic origin. Rare diseases primarily affect children, and congenital craniofacial syndromes and disorders constitute a significant proportion of rare diseases, with over 700 having been described to date. Modeling craniofacial disorders in animal models has been instrumental in uncovering the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous conditions and in some cases has even led to potential therapeutic avenues for their prevention. In this chapter, we focus primarily on two general classes of rare disorders, ribosomopathies and ciliopathies, and the surprising finding that the disruption of fundamental, global processes can result in tissue-specific craniofacial defects. In addition, we discuss recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of an extremely rare and specific craniofacial condition known as syngnathia, based on the first mouse models for this condition. Approximately 1% of all babies are born with a minor or major developmental anomaly, and individuals suffering from rare diseases deserve the same quality of treatment and care and attention to their disease as other patients. PMID:26589934

  17. Discrimination among adults with craniofacial conditions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to establish the level of perceived discrimination experienced by adults with congenital craniofacial conditions in Australia and to examine predictors of discrimination. Specifically, this study tested whether social support mediates the relationship between discrimination and health. Adults (n = 93) who had been treated at the Australian Craniofacial Unit, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide for congenital craniofacial conditions (not including cleft lip and/or palate) completed questionnaires examining satisfaction with life, quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, satisfaction with social support, and satisfaction with appearance. A substantial minority of adults with congenital craniofacial conditions reported that they experience discrimination almost every day in a range of areas. Higher reports of discrimination were related to older age, being male, and less education. Other factors related to higher discrimination included lower levels of satisfaction with life, self-esteem, satisfaction with appearance and mental quality of life, as well as higher levels of anxiety and depression. Social support partially mediated the relationship between discrimination and mental health outcomes. The current study shows that discrimination experiences continue into adulthood confirming the importance of ensuring patients are well supported both by psychosocial services as well as within their own social support networks. PMID:24240765

  18. Injectable Biomaterials for Regenerating Complex Craniofacial Tissues**

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D.; Young, Simon; Klouda, Leda; Wong, Mark; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering complex tissues requires a precisely formulated combination of cells, spatiotemporally released bioactive factors, and a specialized scaffold support system. Injectable materials, particularly those delivered in aqueous solution, are considered ideal delivery vehicles for cells and bioactive factors and can also be delivered through minimally invasive methods and fill complex 3D shapes. In this review, we examine injectable materials that form scaffolds or networks capable of both replacing tissue function early after delivery and supporting tissue regeneration over a time period of weeks to months. The use of these materials for tissue engineering within the craniofacial complex is challenging but ideal as many highly specialized and functional tissues reside within a small volume in the craniofacial structures and the need for minimally invasive interventions is desirable due to aesthetic considerations. Current biomaterials and strategies used to treat craniofacial defects are examined, followed by a review of craniofacial tissue engineering, and finally an examination of current technologies used for injectable scaffold development and drug and cell delivery using these materials. PMID:19750143

  19. Psychosocial adjustment and craniofacial malformations in childhood.

    PubMed

    Pertschuk, M J; Whitaker, L A

    1985-02-01

    Forty-three children between the ages of 6 and 13 years with congenital facial anomalies underwent psychosocial evaluation prior to surgery. Also evaluated were healthy children matched to the craniofacial subjects by sex, age, intelligence, and economic background. Relative to this comparison group, the craniofacial children were found to have poorer self-concept, greater anxiety at the time of evaluation, and more introversion. Parents of the craniofacial children noted more frequent negative social encounters for their children and more hyperactive behavior at home. Teachers reported more problematic classroom behavior. Examination of these results revealed craniofacial malformations to be associated with psychosocial limitations rather than marked deficits. These children tended to function less well than the comparison children, but with few exceptions, they were not functioning in a psychosocially deviant range. Explanations for the observed circumscribed impact of facial deformity include the use of denial as a coping mechanism, possible diminished significance of appearance for younger children, and the restricted environment experienced by most of the subjects. It can be predicted that time would render these protective influences ineffective, so that adolescent and young adult patients could be at far greater psychosocial risk. PMID:3969404

  20. Spatial updating in human parietal cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Elisha P.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Colby, Carol L.

    2003-01-01

    Single neurons in monkey parietal cortex update visual information in conjunction with eye movements. This remapping of stimulus representations is thought to contribute to spatial constancy. We hypothesized that a similar process occurs in human parietal cortex and that we could visualize it with functional MRI. We scanned subjects during a task that involved remapping of visual signals across hemifields. We observed an initial response in the hemisphere contralateral to the visual stimulus, followed by a remapped response in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulus. We ruled out the possibility that this remapped response resulted from either eye movements or visual stimuli alone. Our results demonstrate that updating of visual information occurs in human parietal cortex.

  1. Apraxia, pantomime and the parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, E.; Fink, G.R.; Weiss, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Apraxia, a disorder of higher motor cognition, is a frequent and outcome-relevant sequel of left hemispheric stroke. Deficient pantomiming of object use constitutes a key symptom of apraxia and is assessed when testing for apraxia. To date the neural basis of pantomime remains controversial. We here review the literature and perform a meta-analysis of the relevant structural and functional imaging (fMRI/PET) studies. Based on a systematic literature search, 10 structural and 12 functional imaging studies were selected. Structural lesion studies associated pantomiming deficits with left frontal, parietal and temporal lesions. In contrast, functional imaging studies associate pantomimes with left parietal activations, with or without concurrent frontal or temporal activations. Functional imaging studies that selectively activated parietal cortex adopted the most stringent controls. In contrast to previous suggestions, current analyses show that both lesion and functional studies support the notion of a left-hemispheric fronto-(temporal)-parietal network underlying pantomiming object use. Furthermore, our review demonstrates that the left parietal cortex plays a key role in pantomime-related processes. More specifically, stringently controlled fMRI-studies suggest that in addition to storing motor schemas, left parietal cortex is also involved in activating these motor schemas in the context of pantomiming object use. In addition to inherent differences between structural and functional imaging studies and consistent with the dedifferentiation hypothesis, the age difference between young healthy subjects (typically included in functional imaging studies) and elderly neurological patients (typically included in structural lesion studies) may well contribute to the finding of a more distributed representation of pantomiming within the motor-dominant left hemisphere in the elderly. PMID:24967158

  2. Parietal function in good and poor readers

    PubMed Central

    Laycock, Robin; Crewther, Sheila G; Kiely, Patricia M; Crewther, David P

    2006-01-01

    Background While there are many psychophysical reports of impaired magnocellular pathway function in developmental dyslexia (DD), few have investigated parietal function, the major projection of this pathway, in good and poor readers closely matched for nonverbal intelligence. In view of new feedforward-feedback theories of visual processing, impaired magnocellular function raises the question of whether all visually-driven functions or only those associated with parietal cortex functions are equally impaired and if so, whether parietal performance is more closely related to general ability levels than reading ability. Methods Reading accuracy and performance on psychophysical tasks purported to selectively activate parietal cortex such as motion sensitivity, attentional tracking, and spatial localization was compared in 17 children with DD, 16 younger reading-age matched (RA) control children, and 46 good readers of similar chronological-age (CA) divided into CA-HighIQ and a CA-LowIQ matched to DD group nonverbal IQ. Results In the age-matched groups no significant differences were found between DD and CA controls on any of the tasks relating to parietal function, although performance of the DD group and their nonverbal IQ scores was always lower. As expected, CA and RA group comparisons indicated purported parietal functioning improves with age. No difference in performance was seen on any of the parietally driven tasks between the DD and age-nonverbal IQ matched groups, whereas performance differentiated the DD group from the age-matched, higher nonverbal IQ group on several such tasks. An unexpected statistical difference in performance between lower reading age (DD and RA children) and all higher reading age (CA) children was seen on a test of chromatic sensitivity, whereas when high and low nonverbal IQ normal readers were compared performance was not different Conclusion The results indicate that performance on purported parietal functions improves with age

  3. Craniofacial morphology of Homo floresiensis: description, taxonomic affinities, and evolutionary implication.

    PubMed

    Kaifu, Yousuke; Baba, Hisao; Sutikna, Thomas; Morwood, Michael J; Kubo, Daisuke; Saptomo, E Wahyu; Jatmiko; Awe, Rokhus Due; Djubiantono, Tony

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes in detail the external morphology of LB1/1, the nearly complete and only known cranium of Homo floresiensis. Comparisons were made with a large sample of early groups of the genus Homo to assess primitive, derived, and unique craniofacial traits of LB1 and discuss its evolution. Principal cranial shape differences between H. floresiensis and Homo sapiens are also explored metrically. The LB1 specimen exhibits a marked reductive trend in its facial skeleton, which is comparable to the H. sapiens condition and is probably associated with reduced masticatory stresses. However, LB1 is craniometrically different from H. sapiens showing an extremely small overall cranial size, and the combination of a primitive low and anteriorly narrow vault shape, a relatively prognathic face, a rounded oval foramen that is greatly separated anteriorly from the carotid canal/jugular foramen, and a unique, tall orbital shape. Whereas the neurocranium of LB1 is as small as that of some Homo habilis specimens, it exhibits laterally expanded parietals, a weak suprameatal crest, a moderately flexed occipital, a marked facial reduction, and many other derived features that characterize post-habilis Homo. Other craniofacial characteristics of LB1 include, for example, a relatively narrow frontal squama with flattened right and left sides, a marked frontal keel, posteriorly divergent temporal lines, a posteriorly flexed anteromedial corner of the mandibular fossa, a bulbous lateral end of the supraorbital torus, and a forward protruding maxillary body with a distinct infraorbital sulcus. LB1 is most similar to early Javanese Homo erectus from Sangiran and Trinil in these and other aspects. We conclude that the craniofacial morphology of LB1 is consistent with the hypothesis that H. floresiensis evolved from early Javanese H. erectus with dramatic island dwarfism. However, further field discoveries of early hominin skeletal remains from Flores and detailed analyses of the

  4. Magnetoencephalography in Fronto-Parietal Opercular Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Iwasaki, Masaki; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.; Enatsu, Rei; Jin, Kazutaka; Wang, Zhong I.; Mosher, John C.; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Nair, Dileep R.; Burgess, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To clarify the clinical and neurophysiological profiles of fronto-parietal opercular epilepsy in which epileptic spikes are detected with magnetoencephalography (MEG) but not with scalp electroencephalography (EEG). Methods Four patients presented with epileptic spikes localized to the fronto-parietal opercular cortex, which were only appreciated following MEG recordings. Results In all cases, seizure semiology suggested early activation of the operculum and lower peri-rolandic cortex consistent with the somatotopic organization of this region, i.e. tingling sensation involving the throat and hemi-face or contralateral upper limb, and spasms of the neck and throat. MEG spikes were localized in the fronto-parietal operculum. Three of the four patients underwent invasive electrocorticography and/or stereo-EEG recordings, and spikes were confirmed to arise from the estimated area of MEG dipole localization. Two patients remained seizure-free for over 1 year after resection of the epileptogenic region; the other patient declined resective surgery due to proximity to the language cortex. Conclusion This study demonstrates the usefulness of MEG in localizing spikes arising from within the fronto-parietal opercular regions, and implies that MEG may provide localizing information in patients with symptoms suggestive of opercular epilepsy, even if scalp EEG recordings fail to disclose any epileptogenic activities. PMID:22658720

  5. A Legal Perspective of the Parietal Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Barbara Y.

    The legal issues involved in requiring students to live on campus, the parietal rule, are examined. It is suggested that the reason for establishing student housing and the rationale justifying the establishment of residence halls are important aspects of the question. Court cases are cited from 1899 that upheld the college's right to exemption…

  6. Enhancing duration processing with parietal brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dormal, Valérie; Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Pesenti, Mauro; Walsh, Vincent; Cappelletti, Marinella

    2016-05-01

    Numerosity and duration are thought to share common magnitude-based mechanisms in brain regions including the right parietal and frontal cortices like the supplementary motor area, SMA. Numerosity and duration are, however, also different in several intrinsic features. For instance, in a quantification context, numerosity is known for being more automatically accessed than temporal events, and durations are by definition sequential whereas numerosity can be both sequential and simultaneous. Moreover, numerosity and duration processing diverge in terms of their neuronal correlates. Whether these observed neuronal specificities can be accounted for by differences in automaticity or presentation-mode is however not clear. To address this issue, we used brain stimulation (transcranial random noise stimulation, tRNS) to the right parietal cortex or the SMA combined with experimental stimuli differing in their level of automaticity (numerosity and duration) and presentation mode (sequential or simultaneous). Compared to a no stimulation group, performance changed in duration but not in numerosity categorisation following right parietal but not SMA stimulation. These results indicate that the right parietal cortex is critical for duration processing, and suggest that tRNS has a stronger effect on less automatic processes such as duration. PMID:27037043

  7. 77 FR 35990 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  1. 75 FR 4833 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  1. 77 FR 68136 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  7. The concept of pattern in craniofacial growth.

    PubMed

    Moyers, R E; Bookstein, F L; Guire, K E

    1979-08-01

    1. There are semantic and associated problems with the word pattern in biology, particularly in orthodontics and facial growth. 2. Pattern, as we use the term, is invariance of relationships--"a set of constraints operating to preserve the integration of parts under varying conditions and through time." 3. Craniofacial pattern can be described and quantified by the identification of craniofacial constants, measures that are relatively invariant. 4. Growth is change and is best identified by studying those measures of size and shape that vary most sensitively through time over development stages. 5. The many traditional cephalometric measures that represent well neither pattern nor growth (mixed) are of less clinical utility than either pure pattern indices or growth indices. 6. The analytical and conceptual separation of pattern and growth seems useful in analysis of morphology, analysis of growth, prediction of growth, and clinical treatment planning. PMID:289292

  8. Craniofacial malformation among endemic cretins in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Israel, H; Johnson, G F; Fierro-Benitez, R

    1983-01-01

    Nearly 6% of the inhabitants of two villages in Ecuador are deaf-mute and mentally retarded cretins. These communities are situated in the Andean highlands where environmental and dietary stores of iodine are extremely scarce. Endemic goiter and cretinism are widespread, and 10% of the cretins are additionally burdened with dwarfism and facial dysmorphia. Those with obvious involvement of the skeletal system were selected in order to study the extent of craniofacial malformation. Their appearance is characterized by midface hypoplasia, a broad nose with a depressed bridge, and a conspicuous circumoral prominence. Radiographic evaluation demonstrates a vertical displacement of the cranial base with an associated upward tilt of the midface. The flattened frontal bone, reduced frontal sinus pneumatization, and diminutive nasal bones collectively create a backward sloping face. The defect in the craniofacial skeleton of these Ecuadorian cretins is characteristic, and it readily sets them apart from the dysmorphism of those cretins with myxedema. PMID:6874895

  9. Imaging findings in craniofacial childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Merks, Johannes H. M.; Saeed, Peerooz; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Bras, Johannes; Pieters, Bradley R.; Adam, Judit A.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the commonest paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma constituting 3–5% of all malignancies in childhood. RMS has a predilection for the head and neck area and tumours in this location account for 40% of all childhood RMS cases. In this review we address the clinical and imaging presentations of craniofacial RMS, discuss the most appropriate imaging techniques, present characteristic imaging features and offer an overview of differential diagnostic considerations. Post-treatment changes will be briefly addressed. PMID:20725831

  10. The Quadratojugal of Eryops studied by computed tomography and the morphological variability of foramina and canals in the quadratojugal of basal tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Čerňanský, Andrej; Witzmann, Florian; Klembara, Jozef; van Heteren, Anneke H

    2016-08-01

    With respect to its large size and abundance, Eryops is an important representative of Permo-Carboniferous basal tetrapods and one of the best-known large temnospondyl amphibians of this period. This taxon forms a significant component of the Early Permian tetrapod fauna of Texas and New Mexico and here we describe a new record of skull remains, the first one from Brushy Creek (30 km northeast of Seymour) in Texas (Petrolia Formation, Wichita Group; Lower Permian - lower Artinskian). Our material, found in 2015, consists of a left nasal, a jaw fragment (premaxilla or maxilla), left quadratojugal fragments, and a partial left mandible. We used computed tomography methods (micro-CT) for imaging both internal and external structures, for the first time, for Eryops. The quadratojugal presented here is exceptional compared to all known basal tetrapods in having four different internal foramina. CT data show that these foramina are interconnected by canals within the bone. This indicates that the morphology of the foramina and the course of the canals in the quadratojugal of basal tetrapods are more variable than hitherto thought. Anat Rec, 299:1073-1079, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27224928

  11. [Mechanisms of growth, development and disease of the craniofacial skeleton].

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial skeleton is derived from several pieces of bone, which hold the brain and house the sensory organ of vision, hearing, taste and smell. It also serves as an entrance of the digestive and respiratory tracts. Hence, craniofacial complex develops under sophisticated balance between the shape and the function. Disruption of such balance leads to various types of malformation and/or deformation of the face. This review focuses on the molecular aspects of growth and developments of the craniofacial structures and also on the genetic basis of congenital craniofacial malformations. PMID:26728542

  12. Venous air embolism during a craniofacial procedure.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R J; Mulliken, J B

    1988-07-01

    The possibility of venous air embolism exists whenever the craniofacial operative field is above the level of the heart. Craniotomy with the high-torque craniotome is hypothesized to have produced venous air embolism in the patient described in this report. The diagnosis of venous air embolism is determined by transesophageal Doppler probe, transesophageal echocardiogram or external echocardiogram, and end-tidal N2 and CO2 determinations. Treatment includes control of the air entry sites, aspiration of air from the right atrium via a catheter placed prior to operation, and discontinuing nitrous oxide. If these measures are unsuccessful, the operative field should be transposed below heart level and the procedure terminated. In the event of significant hemodynamic compromise, closed cardiac massage should be tried; if that fails, open cardiac massage and direct aspiration are necessary. The true incidence of venous air embolism in craniofacial operations may be much higher than previously suspected. We therefore recommend placement of appropriate monitoring equipment to detect intracardiac air in those major craniofacial procedures in which there is a potential for intravascular air ingress. PMID:3289061

  13. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  14. Parathyroid Hormone Applications in the Craniofacial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H.L.; McCauley, L.K.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is known for its ability to ‘build’ bone, with research in this area centered on its use as an osteoporosis therapeutic. Recent interest has developed regarding its potential for regenerative applications such as fracture healing and osseous defects of the oral cavity. Many years of investigation using murine gene-targeted models substantiate a role for signaling at the PTH/PTH-related protein (PTHrP) receptor (PPR) in intramembranous bone formation in the craniofacial region as well as in tooth development. Pre-clinical studies clearly support a positive role of intermittent PTH administration in craniofacial bones and in fracture healing and implant integration. A few human clinical studies have shown favorable responses with teriparatide (the biologically active fragment of PTH) administration. Favorable outcomes have emerged with teriparatide administration in patients with osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). New delivery strategies are in development to optimize targeted application of PTH and to help maximize local approaches. The promising host-modulating potential of PTH requires more information to further its effectiveness for craniofacial regeneration and osseous wound-healing, including a better delineation of cellular targets, temporal effects of PTH action, and improved approaches for local/targeted delivery of PTH. PMID:23071071

  15. Midline Anterior Craniofacial Approach for Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Bryan John; Traynelis, Vincent C.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Funk, Gerry F.; Menezes, Arnold H.; Hoffman, Henry T.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty consecutive cases of midline anterior craniofacial procedures for the treatment of malignant neoplasms arising from the paranasal sinuses were reviewed. Posterior and lateral base craniofacial procedures were specifically excluded. This review compares the results, in terms of survival and major complication rate, between en bloc and piecemeal resections. The average follow-up was 4 years and 3 months. Sixteen patients were treated with an en bloc resection. The major complication rate was 31%. One-year survival rate was 94% for the en bloc resection group, 67% for patients with positive margins, and 100% for patients with clear margins. Three-year survival for en bloc resection dropped to 56, 33, and 67%, respectively. Fourteen patients were treated with piecemeal resections. The major complication rate was 21%. One-year survival rate was 83% for the piecemeal resection group, 60% for patients with positive margins, and 100% for patients with clear margins. Three-year survival dropped to 70, 60, and 80%, respectively. Although it is considered desirable to obtain an en bloc resection in some craniofacial procedures, we conclude that a piecemeal resection is a viable alternative in situations where an en bloc procedure is difficult to obtain safely. ImagesFigure 1p43-bFigure 2p44-b PMID:17171080

  16. Atrophy of the Parietal Lobe in Preclinical Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Heidi I. L.; Van Boxtel, Martin P. J.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Gronenschild, Ed H. B. M.; Verhey, Frans R.; Jolles, Jelle

    2011-01-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal lobule was measured in 75 older adults…

  17. Social Distance Evaluation in Human Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Yoshinori; Kanai, Ryota; Matsumura, Michikazu; Naito, Eiichi

    2009-01-01

    Across cultures, social relationships are often thought of, described, and acted out in terms of physical space (e.g. “close friends” “high lord”). Does this cognitive mapping of social concepts arise from shared brain resources for processing social and physical relationships? Using fMRI, we found that the tasks of evaluating social compatibility and of evaluating physical distances engage a common brain substrate in the parietal cortex. The present study shows the possibility of an analytic brain mechanism to process and represent complex networks of social relationships. Given parietal cortex's known role in constructing egocentric maps of physical space, our present findings may help to explain the linguistic, psychological and behavioural links between social and physical space. PMID:19204791

  18. The left parietal cortex and motor attention.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, M F; Nixon, P D; Renowden, S; Wade, D T; Passingham, R E

    1997-09-01

    The posterior parietal cortex, particularly in the right hemisphere, is crucially important for covert orienting; lesions impair the ability to disengage the focus of covert orienting attention from one potential saccade target to another (Posner, M. I. et al., Journal of Neuroscience, 1984, 4, 1863-1874). We have developed a task where precues allow subjects to covertly prepare subsequent cued hand movements, as opposed to an orienting or eye movement. We refer to this process as motor attention to distinguish it from orienting attention. Nine subjects with lesions that included the left parietal cortex and nine subjects with lesions including the right parietal cortex were compared with control subjects on the task. The left hemisphere subjects showed the same ability as controls to engage attention to a movement when they were forewarned by a valid precue. The left hemisphere subjects, however, were impaired in their ability to disengage the focus of motor attention from one movement to another when the precue was incorrect. The results support the existence of two distinct attentional systems allied to the orienting and limb motor systems. Damage to either system causes analogous problems in disengaging from one orienting/movement target to another. The left parietal cortex, particularly the supramarginal gyrus, is associated with motor attention. All the left hemisphere subjects had ideomotor apraxia and had particular problems performing sequences of movements. We suggest that the well documented left hemisphere and apraxic impairment in movement sequencing is the consequence of a difficulty in shifting the focus of motor attention from one movement in a sequence to the next. PMID:9364496

  19. 76 FR 30373 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial...: Marilyn Moore-Hoon, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of...

  20. OCT imaging of craniofacial anatomy in xenopus embryos (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Engin; Jonas, Stephan M.; Griffin, John; Hooper, Michael C.; Choma, Michael A.; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2016-03-01

    The etiology of craniofacial defects is incompletely understood. The ability to obtain large amounts of gene sequence data from families affected by craniofacial defects is opening up new ways to understand molecular genetic etiological factors. One important link between gene sequence data and clinical relevance is biological research into candidate genes and molecular pathways. We present our recent research using OCT as a nondestructive phenotyping modality of craniofacial morphology in Xenopus embryos, an important animal model for biological research in gene and pathway discovery. We define 2D and 3D scanning protocols for a standardized approach to craniofacial imaging in Xenopus embryos. We define standard views and planar reconstructions for visualizing normal anatomy and landmarks. We compare these views and reconstructions to traditional histopathology using alcian blue staining. In addition to being 3D, nondestructive, and having much faster throughout, OCT can identify craniofacial features that are lost during traditional histopathological preparation. We also identify quantitative morphometric parameters to define normative craniofacial anatomy. We also note that craniofacial and cardiac defects are not infrequently present in the same patient (e.g velocardiofacial syndrome). Given that OCT excels at certain aspects of cardiac imaging in Xenopus embryos, our work highlights the potential of using OCT and Xenopus to study molecular genetic factors that impact both cardiac and craniofacial development.

  1. Craniofacial dysmorphology: Studies in honor of Samuel Pruzansky

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.M.; Rollnick, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 31 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Regional Specification of Cell-Specific Gene Expression During Craniofacial Development; Timing Cleft Palate Closure - Age Should Not Be the Sole Determinant; Excess of Parental Non-Righthandedness in Children with Right-Sided Cleft Lip: A Preliminary Report; and The Application of Roentgencephalometry to the Study of Craniofacial Anomalies.

  2. Discovery and characterization of spontaneous mouse models of craniofacial dysmorphology.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Kristina; Fairfield, Heather; Borgeia, Suhaib; Curtain, Michelle; Hassan, Mohamed G; Dionne, Louise; Yong Karst, Son; Coombs, Harold; Bronson, Roderick T; Reinholdt, Laura G; Bergstrom, David E; Donahue, Leah Rae; Cox, Timothy C; Murray, Stephen A

    2016-07-15

    Craniofacial abnormalities are among the most common features of human genetic syndromes and disorders. The etiology of these conditions is often complex, influenced by both genetic context and the environment. Frequently, craniofacial abnormalities present as part of a syndrome with clear comorbid phenotypes, providing additional insight into mechanisms of the causative gene or pathway. The mouse has been a key tool in our understanding of the genetic mechanisms of craniofacial development and disease, and can provide excellent models for human craniofacial abnormalities. While powerful genetic engineering tools in the mouse have contributed significantly our understanding of craniofacial development and dysmorphology, forward genetic approaches provide an unbiased means to identify new genes and pathways. Moreover, spontaneous mutations can occur on any number of genetic backgrounds, potentially revealing critical genes that require a specific genetic context. Here we report discovery and phenotyping of 43 craniofacial mouse models, derived primarily from a screen for spontaneous mutations in production colonies at the Jackson Laboratory. We identify the causative gene for 33 lines, including novel genes in pathways not previously connected to craniofacial development, and novel alleles of known genes that present with unique phenotypes. Together with our detailed characterization, this work provides a valuable gene discovery resource for the craniofacial community, and a rich source of mouse models for further investigation. PMID:26234751

  3. Facing up to the Challenges of Advancing Craniofacial Research

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, Paul A.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial anomalies are among the most common human birth defects and have considerable functional, aesthetic, and social consequences. The early developmental origin as well as the anatomical complexity of the head and face render these tissues prone to genetic and environmental insult. The establishment of craniofacial clinics offering comprehensive care for craniofacial patients at a single site together with international research networks focused on the origins and treatment of craniofacial disorders has led to tremendous advances in our understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of congenital craniofacial anomalies. However, the genetic, environmental, and developmental sources of many craniofacial disorders remain unknown. To overcome this problem and further advance craniofacial research, we must recognize current challenges in the field and establish priority areas for study. We still need (i) a deeper understanding of variation during normal development and within the context of any disorder, (ii) improved genotyping and phenotyping and understanding of the impact of epigenetics, (iii) continued development of animal models and functional analyses of genes and variants, and (iv) integration of patient derived cells and tissues together with 3D printing and quantitative assessment of surgical outcomes for improved practice. Only with fundamental advances in each of these areas will we be able to meet the challenge of translating potential therapeutic and preventative approaches into clinical solutions and reduce the financial and emotional burden of craniofacial anomalies. PMID:25820983

  4. Towards an understanding of parietal mnemonic processes: some conceptual guideposts

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The posterior parietal lobes have been implicated in a range of episodic memory retrieval tasks, but the nature of parietal contributions to remembering remains unclear. In an attempt to identify fruitful avenues of further research, several heuristic questions about parietal mnemonic activations are considered in light of recent empirical findings: Do such parietal activations reflect memory processes, or their contents? Do they precede, follow, or co-occur with retrieval? What can we learn from their pattern of lateralization? Do they index access to episodic representations, or the feeling of remembering? Are parietal activations graded by memory strength, quantity of retrieved information, or the type of retrieval? How do memory-related activations map onto functional parcellation of parietal lobes suggested by other cognitive phenomena? Consideration of these questions can promote understanding of the relationship between parietal mnemonic effects and perceptual, attentional, and action-oriented cognitive processes. PMID:22783175

  5. Craniofacial Reconstruction with Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Derrick C.; Wong, Victor W.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold enormous promise for the treatment of complex tissue defects throughout the entire body. The ability for iPSCs to form all tissue types makes them an ideal autogenous cellular building block for tissue engineering strategies designed to replace any combination of skin, muscle, nerve, and bone deficiencies in the craniofacial region. Several obstacles to their use remain, however, chief among which include concerns over insertional mutagenesis and tumorigenicity. As studies continue to develop strategies minimizing these risks, the potential for development of patient-specific regenerative therapies has become tantalizingly close. PMID:22627398

  6. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Sina A.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Ohse, Takamoto; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire. PMID:25127402

  7. Hedgehog receptor function during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Guilherme M; Seppala, Maisa; Barrell, William; Birjandi, Anahid A; Geoghegan, Finn; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2016-07-15

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway plays a fundamental role in orchestrating normal craniofacial development in vertebrates. In particular, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is produced in three key domains during the early formation of the head; neuroectoderm of the ventral forebrain, facial ectoderm and the pharyngeal endoderm; with signal transduction evident in both ectodermal and mesenchymal tissue compartments. Shh signalling from the prechordal plate and ventral midline of the diencephalon is required for appropriate division of the eyefield and forebrain, with mutation in a number of pathway components associated with Holoprosencephaly, a clinically heterogeneous developmental defect characterized by a failure of the early forebrain vesicle to divide into distinct halves. In addition, signalling from the pharyngeal endoderm and facial ectoderm plays an essential role during development of the face, influencing cranial neural crest cells that migrate into the early facial processes. In recent years, the complexity of Shh signalling has been highlighted by the identification of multiple novel proteins that are involved in regulating both the release and reception of this protein. Here, we review the contributions of Shh signalling during early craniofacial development, focusing on Hedgehog receptor function and describing the consequences of disruption for inherited anomalies of this region in both mouse models and human populations. PMID:26875496

  8. Osmotic barrier of the parietal peritoneum.

    PubMed

    Flessner, M F

    1994-11-01

    Fluid movement into the peritoneal cavity results after instillation of a hypertonic solution. Some investigators have assumed that the peritoneum is a significant barrier to small solutes and have predicted that fluid would be drawn by an osmotic gradient into the cavity from the tissue surrounding the peritoneal cavity, resulting in tissue hydrostatic pressures well below atmospheric pressure. Contrary to this, we have previously shown that protein and fluid cross the peritoneum and enter the tissue at the same rate during either isotonic or hypertonic dialysis. To investigate the nature of the osmotic barrier of the peritoneum, the hydrostatic pressure profiles were measured in the abdominal wall of the rat during conditions of either isotonicity or hypertonicity in the peritoneal cavity and constant intraperitoneal hydrostatic pressure (Pip). Measurements were made with a micropipette mounted on a micromanipulator and connected to a servo-null pressure measurement system. No interstitial pressures below atmospheric pressure were observed with either type of solution in the peritoneal cavity. For the three Pip values tested, there were few significant differences between the corresponding pressure profiles of isotonic or hypertonic solutions. It is concluded that the parietal peritoneum is not a functional barrier to small solutes, which are often used to raise the osmolality of intraperitoneal solutions. This finding also implies that the tissue interstitium underlying the parietal peritoneum is not the source of water flow into the cavity, which is observed during hypertonic dialysis. PMID:7977791

  9. Alzheimer's disease: the downside of a highly evolved parietal lobe?

    PubMed

    Bruner, Emiliano; Jacobs, Heidi I L

    2013-01-01

    Clinical grade Alzheimer's disease (AD) is only described in humans. Recent imaging studies in early AD patients showed that the parietal areas display the most prominent metabolic impairments. So far, neuroimaging studies have not been able to explain why the medial parietal regions possess this hub characteristic in AD. Paleoneurological and neuroanatomical studies suggest that our species, Homo sapiens, has a unique and derived organization of the parietal areas, which are involved in higher cognitive functions. Combining evidence from neuroimaging, paleontology, and comparative anatomy, we suggest that the vulnerability of the parietal lobe to neurodegenerative processes may be associated with the origin of our species. The species-specific parietal morphology in modern humans largely influenced the brain spatial organization, and it involved changes in vascularization and energy management, which may underlie the sensitivity of these areas to metabolic impairment. Metabolic constraints and anatomical evolutionary changes in the medial parietal regions of modern humans may be important in early AD onset. Taking into account the species-specific adaptations of the modern human parietal areas and their association with AD, we hypothesize that AD can be the evolutionary drawback of the specialized structure of our parietal lobes. The cognitive advantage is associated with increased sensitivity to neurodegenerative processes which, being limited to the post-reproductive period, have a minor effect on the overall genetic fitness. The changes of energy requirements associated with form and size variations at the parietal areas may support the hypothesis of AD as a metabolic syndrome. PMID:23435412

  10. Atrophy of the parietal lobe in preclinical dementia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Heidi I L; Van Boxtel, Martin P J; Uylings, Harry B M; Gronenschild, Ed H B M; Verhey, Frans R; Jolles, Jelle

    2011-03-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal lobule was measured in 75 older adults (38 cognitively stable and 37 individuals with cognitive decline after 3 years). Dementia screening 6 years after scanning resulted in nine AD cases from the cognitively stable (n=3) and cognitive decline group (n=6), who were assigned to a third group, the preclinical AD group. When regional differences in cortical volume in the parietal lobe areas were compared between groups, significant differences were found between either the cognitive decline or stable group on the one hand and preclinical AD individuals on the other hand in the inferior parietal lobule. Group membership was best predicted by the grey matter volume of the inferior parietal lobule, compared to the other parietal lobe areas. The parietal lobe was characterised by a differential atrophy pattern based on cognitive status, which is in agreement with the 'last-developed-first-atrophied' principle. Future studies should investigate the surplus value of the inferior parietal lobe as a potential marker for the diagnosis of AD compared to other brain regions, such as the medial temporal lobe and the prefrontal lobe. PMID:21130554

  11. Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Tolarová, Marie M; Poulton, Donald; Aubert, Maryse M; Oh, HeeSoo; Ellerhorst, Thomas; Mosby, Terezie; Tolar, Miroslav; Boyd, Robert L

    2006-10-01

    There is no doubt modern genetics have greatly influenced our professional and personal lives during the last decade. Uncovering genetic causes of many medical and dental pathologies is helping to narrow the diagnosis and select a treatment plan that would provide the best outcome. Importantly, having an understanding of multifactorial etiology helps direct our attention toward prevention. We now understand much better our own health problems. In some cases, we can modify our lifestyle and diet in order to prevent "environmental factors" from triggering the mutated genes inherited from our parents. Good examples are diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. If we realize we might have inherited genes for cardiovascular problems from several ancestors who had heart attacks, we already know that these genes will make us only "susceptible" for disease. Those who exercise, watch one's weight, diet, and carefully monitor one's lifestyle will very likely--though possessing "susceptibility genes"--stay healthier and, maybe, will never experience any cardiovascular problems. In principle, the same applies for craniofacial anomalies, especially for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate. One needs to understand genetic and environmental causes of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts in order to prevent them. With all this in mind, the Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program have been established at the Department of Orthodontics, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. A partnership with Rotaplast International, Inc., has made it possible for the faculty, orthodontic residents, and students to participate in 27 multidisciplinary cleft medical missions in underdeveloped and developing countries by donating professional and educational services, and, last but not least, by collecting valuable data and specimens to further research. A significant number of research studies, including 15 master of science theses, have been accomplished in

  12. The pathology of parietal pleural plaques

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, G. Hefin

    1971-01-01

    The incidence, morbid anatomy, histology, and relationship of hyaline pleural plaques to exposure to asbestos has been studied. Plaques were found in 12·3% of 334 hospital necropsies (in an urban population in Glasgow, 41 cases). In 85·3% (35 cases) asbestos bodies were found in the lungs. There is evidence of a dose-response relationship between the number of asbestos bodies found in the lungs and the presence of pleural plaques. The selective distribution of plaques within the pleural cavities suggests that mechanical factors play a part in their localization. Histological examination contributed little to understanding the mechanism of plaque formation; that asbestos bodies have been detected in only a few cases suggest that their presence in the parietal pleura is not essential to plaque formation. The suggested mechanisms of plaque formation are discussed. Images PMID:5556121

  13. Computed tomography assessment of peripubertal craniofacial morphology in a sheep model of binge alcohol drinking in the first trimester.

    PubMed

    Birch, Sharla M; Lenox, Mark W; Kornegay, Joe N; Shen, Li; Ai, Huisi; Ren, Xiaowei; Goodlett, Charles R; Cudd, Tim A; Washburn, Shannon E

    2015-11-01

    Identification of facial dysmorphology is essential for the diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS); however, most children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) do not meet the dysmorphology criterion. Additional objective indicators are needed to help identify the broader spectrum of children affected by prenatal alcohol exposure. Computed tomography (CT) was used in a sheep model of prenatal binge alcohol exposure to test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of craniofacial bone volumes and linear distances could identify alcohol-exposed lambs. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to four groups: heavy binge alcohol, 2.5 g/kg/day (HBA); binge alcohol, 1.75 g/kg/day (BA); saline control (SC); and normal control (NC). Intravenous alcohol (BA; HBA) or saline (SC) infusions were given three consecutive days per week from gestation day 4-41, and a CT scan was performed on postnatal day 182. The volumes of eight skull bones, cranial circumference, and 19 linear measures of the face and skull were compared among treatment groups. Lambs from both alcohol groups showed significant reduction in seven of the eight skull bones and total skull bone volume, as well as cranial circumference. Alcohol exposure also decreased four of the 19 craniofacial measures. Discriminant analysis showed that alcohol-exposed and control lambs could be classified with high accuracy based on total skull bone volume, frontal, parietal, or mandibular bone volumes, cranial circumference, or interorbital distance. Total skull volume was significantly more sensitive than cranial circumference in identifying the alcohol-exposed lambs when alcohol-exposed lambs were classified using the typical FAS diagnostic cutoff of ≤10th percentile. This first demonstration of the usefulness of CT-derived craniofacial measures in a sheep model of FASD following binge-like alcohol exposure during the first trimester suggests that volumetric measurement of cranial bones may be a novel biomarker

  14. Reforming craniofacial orthodontics via stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Pritam; Prasad, N.K.K.; Sahoo, Nivedita; Kumar, Gunjan; Mohanty, Debapreeti; Sah, Sushila

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are the most interesting cells in cell biology. They have the potential to evolve as one of the most powerful technologies in the future. The future refers to an age where it will be used extensively in various fields of medical and dental sciences. Researchers have discovered a number of sources from which stem cells can be derived. Craniofacial problems are very common and occur at all ages. Stem cells can be used therapeutically in almost every field of health science. In fact, many procedures will be reformed after stem cells come into play. This article is an insight into the review of the current researches being carried out on stem cells and its use in the field of orthodontics, which is a specialized branch of dentistry. Although the future is uncertain, there is a great possibility that stem cells will be used extensively in almost all major procedures of orthodontics. PMID:25767761

  15. Application of Digital Anthropometry for Craniofacial Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jayaratne, Yasas S. N.; Zwahlen, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial anthropometry is an objective technique based on a series of measurements and proportions, which facilitate the characterization of phenotypic variation and quantification of dysmorphology. With the introduction of stereophotography, it is possible to acquire a lifelike three-dimensional (3D) image of the face with natural color and texture. Most of the traditional anthropometric landmarks can be identified on these 3D photographs using specialized software. Therefore, it has become possible to compute new digital measurements, which were not feasible with traditional instruments. The term “digital anthropometry” has been used by researchers based on such systems to separate their methods from conventional manual measurements. Anthropometry has been traditionally used as a research tool. With the advent of digital anthropometry, this technique can be employed in several disciplines as a noninvasive tool for quantifying facial morphology. The aim of this review is to provide a broad overview of digital anthropometry and discuss its clinical applications. PMID:25050146

  16. The eye as an organizer of craniofacial development

    PubMed Central

    Kish, Phillip E.; Bohnsack, Brenda L; Gallina, Donika D.; Kasprick, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    The formation and invagination of the optic stalk coincides with the migration of cranial neural crest (CNC) cells, and a growing body of data reveals that the optic stalk and CNC cells communicate to lay the foundations for periocular and craniofacial development. Following migration, the interaction between the developing eye and surrounding periocular mesenchyme (POM) continues, leading to induction of transcriptional regulatory cascades that regulate craniofacial morphogenesis. Studies in chick, mice and zebrafish have revealed a remarkable level of genetic and mechanistic conservation, affirming the power of each animal model to shed light on the broader morphogenic process. This review will focus on the role of the developing eye in orchestrating craniofacial morphogenesis, utilizing morphogenic gradients, paracrine signaling, and transcriptional regulatory cascades to establish an evolutionarily-conserved facial architecture. We propose that in addition to the forebrain, the eye functions during early craniofacial morphogenesis as a key organizer of facial development, independent of its role in vision. PMID:21309065

  17. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. Material and Methods A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts’ analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. Results No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Conclusions Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general. PMID:27489610

  18. Impact of Stem Cells in Craniofacial Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A.; Zhao, Hu; Bajpai, Ruchi; Abdelhamid, Alaa I.; Warburton, David

    2012-01-01

    Interest regarding stem cell based therapies for the treatment of congenital or acquired craniofacial deformities is rapidly growing. Craniofacial problems such as periodontal disease, cleft lip and palate, ear microtia, craniofacial microsomia, and head and neck cancers are not only common but also some of the most burdensome surgical problems worldwide. Treatments often require a multi-staged multidisciplinary team approach. Current surgical therapies attempt to reduce the morbidity and social/emotional impact, yet outcomes can still be unpredictable and unsatisfactory. The concept of harvesting stem cells followed by expansion, differentiation, seeding onto a scaffold and re-transplanting them is likely to become a clinical reality. In this review, we will summarize the translational applications of stem cell therapy in tissue regeneration for craniofacial defects. PMID:22737127

  19. Adult psychological functioning of individuals born with craniofacial anomalies.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, D B; Bartlett, S P; Whitaker, L A; Paige, K T; Pertschuk, M J; Wadden, T A

    1999-02-01

    This study represents an initial investigation into the adult psychological functioning of individuals born with craniofacial disfigurement. A total of 24 men and women born with a craniofacial anomaly completed paper and pencil measures of body image dissatisfaction, self-esteem, quality of life, and experiences of discrimination. An age- and gender-matched control group of 24 non-facially disfigured adults also completed the measures. As expected, craniofacially disfigured adults reported greater dissatisfaction with their facial appearance than did the control group. Craniofacially disfigured adults also reported significantly lower levels of self-esteem and quality of life. Dissatisfaction with facial appearance, self-esteem, and quality of life were related to self-ratings of physical attractiveness. More than one-third of craniofacially disfigured adults (38 percent) reported experiences of discrimination in employment or social settings. Among disfigured adults, psychological functioning was not related to number of surgeries, although the degree of residual facial deformity was related to increased dissatisfaction with facial appearance and greater experiences of discrimination. Results suggest that adults who were born with craniofacial disfigurement, as compared with non-facially disfigured adults, experience greater dissatisfaction with facial appearance and lower self-esteem and quality of life; however, these experiences do not seem to be universal. PMID:9950526

  20. Antimicrobial surfaces for craniofacial implants: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Actis, Lisa; Gaviria, Laura; Guda, Teja

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to regain function and aesthetics in the craniofacial region, different biomaterials, including titanium, hydroxyapatite, biodegradable polymers and composites, have been widely used as a result of the loss of craniofacial bone. Although these materials presented favorable success rates, osseointegration and antibacterial properties are often hard to achieve. Although bone-implant interactions are highly dependent on the implant's surface characteristics, infections following traumatic craniofacial injuries are common. As such, poor osseointegration and infections are two of the many causes of implant failure. Further, as increasingly complex dental repairs are attempted, the likelihood of infection in these implants has also been on the rise. For these reasons, the treatment of craniofacial bone defects and dental repairs for long-term success remains a challenge. Various approaches to reduce the rate of infection and improve osseointegration have been investigated. Furthermore, recent and planned tissue engineering developments are aimed at improving the implants' physical and biological properties by improving their surfaces in order to develop craniofacial bone substitutes that will restore, maintain and improve tissue function. In this review, the commonly used biomaterials for craniofacial bone restoration and dental repair, as well as surface modification techniques, antibacterial surfaces and coatings are discussed. PMID:24471018

  1. The Aponeurotic Tension Model of Craniofacial Growth in Man

    PubMed Central

    Standerwick, Richard G; Roberts, W. Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Craniofacial growth is a scientific crossroad for the fundamental mechanisms of musculoskeletal physiology. Better understanding of growth and development will provide new insights into repair, regeneration and adaptation to applied loads. Traditional craniofacial growth concepts are insufficient to explain the dynamics of airway/vocal tract development, cranial rotation, basicranial flexion and the role of the cranial base in expression of facial proportions. A testable hypothesis is needed to explore the physiological pressure propelling midface growth and the role of neural factors in expression of musculoskeletal adaptation after the cessation of anterior cranial base growth. A novel model for craniofacial growth is proposed for: 1. brain growth and craniofacial adaptation up to the age of 20; 2. explaining growth force vectors; 3. defining the role of muscle plasticity as a conduit for craniofacial growth forces; and 4. describing the effect of cranial rotation in the expression of facial form. Growth of the viscerocranium is believed to be influenced by the superficial musculoaponeurotic systems (SMAS) of the head through residual tension in the occipitofrontalis muscle as a result of cephalad brain growth and cranial rotation. The coordinated effects of the regional SMAS develop a craniofacial musculoaponeurotic system (CFMAS), which is believed to affect maxillary and mandibular development. PMID:19572022

  2. The Contribution of the Parietal Lobes to Speaking and Writing

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Richard J. S.

    2010-01-01

    The left parietal lobe has been proposed as a major language area. However, parietal cortical function is more usually considered in terms of the control of actions, contributing both to attention and cross-modal integration of external and reafferent sensory cues. We used positron emission tomography to study normal subjects while they overtly generated narratives, both spoken and written. The purpose was to identify the parietal contribution to the modality-specific sensorimotor control of communication, separate from amodal linguistic and memory processes involved in generating a narrative. The majority of left and right parietal activity was associated with the execution of writing under visual and somatosensory control irrespective of whether the output was a narrative or repetitive reproduction of a single grapheme. In contrast, action-related parietal activity during speech production was confined to primary somatosensory cortex. The only parietal area with a pattern of activity compatible with an amodal central role in communication was the ventral part of the left angular gyrus (AG). The results of this study indicate that the cognitive processing of language within the parietal lobe is confined to the AG and that the major contribution of parietal cortex to communication is in the sensorimotor control of writing. PMID:19531538

  3. Parcellation of left parietal tool representations by functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Garcea, Frank E.; Z. Mahon, Bradford

    2014-01-01

    Manipulating a tool according to its function requires the integration of visual, conceptual, and motor information, a process subserved in part by left parietal cortex. How these different types of information are integrated and how their integration is reflected in neural responses in the parietal lobule remains an open question. Here, participants viewed images of tools and animals during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). K-means clustering over time series data was used to parcellate left parietal cortex into subregions based on functional connectivity to a whole brain network of regions involved in tool processing. One cluster, in the inferior parietal cortex, expressed privileged functional connectivity to the left ventral premotor cortex. A second cluster, in the vicinity of the anterior intraparietal sulcus, expressed privileged functional connectivity with the left medial fusiform gyrus. A third cluster in the superior parietal lobe expressed privileged functional connectivity with dorsal occipital cortex. Control analyses using Monte Carlo style permutation tests demonstrated that the clustering solutions were outside the range of what would be observed based on chance ‘lumpiness’ in random data, or mere anatomical proximity. Finally, hierarchical clustering analyses were used to formally relate the resulting parcellation scheme of left parietal tool representations to previous work that has parcellated the left parietal lobule on purely anatomical grounds. These findings demonstrate significant heterogeneity in the functional organization of manipulable object representations in left parietal cortex, and outline a framework that generates novel predictions about the causes of some forms of upper limb apraxia. PMID:24892224

  4. Mandatory Housing Requirements: The Constitutionality of Parietal Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Law Review, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Analyzes the validity of parietal rules under both the due process and equal protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. Models of substantive due process and equal protection are developed and applied to the various types of parietal rules that have been implemented at universities throughout the nation. (Author/JT)

  5. The Role of Human Parietal Cortex in Attention Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Shihui; Jiang, Yi; Gu, Hua; Rao, Hengyi; Mao, Lihua; Cui, Yong; Zhai, Renyou

    2004-01-01

    The parietal cortex has been proposed as part of the neural network for guiding spatial attention. However, it is unclear to what degree the parietal cortex contributes to the attentional modulations of activities of the visual cortex and the engagement of the frontal cortex in the attention network. We recorded behavioural performance and…

  6. The old and new face of craniofacial research: How animal models inform human craniofacial genetic and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Williams, Trevor; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2016-07-15

    The craniofacial skeletal structures that comprise the human head develop from multiple tissues that converge to form the bones and cartilage of the face. Because of their complex development and morphogenesis, many human birth defects arise due to disruptions in these cellular populations. Thus, determining how these structures normally develop is vital if we are to gain a deeper understanding of craniofacial birth defects and devise treatment and prevention options. In this review, we will focus on how animal model systems have been used historically and in an ongoing context to enhance our understanding of human craniofacial development. We do this by first highlighting "animal to man" approaches; that is, how animal models are being utilized to understand fundamental mechanisms of craniofacial development. We discuss emerging technologies, including high throughput sequencing and genome editing, and new animal repository resources, and how their application can revolutionize the future of animal models in craniofacial research. Secondly, we highlight "man to animal" approaches, including the current use of animal models to test the function of candidate human disease variants. Specifically, we outline a common workflow deployed after discovery of a potentially disease causing variant based on a select set of recent examples in which human mutations are investigated in vivo using animal models. Collectively, these topics will provide a pipeline for the use of animal models in understanding human craniofacial development and disease for clinical geneticist and basic researchers alike. PMID:26808208

  7. Uncertain relational reasoning in the parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ragni, Marco; Franzmeier, Imke; Maier, Simon; Knauff, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The psychology of reasoning is currently transitioning from the study of deductive inferences under certainty to inferences that have degrees of uncertainty in both their premises and conclusions; however, only a few studies have explored the cortical basis of uncertain reasoning. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we show that areas in the right superior parietal lobe (rSPL) are necessary for solving spatial relational reasoning problems under conditions of uncertainty. Twenty-four participants had to decide whether a single presented order of objects agreed with a given set of indeterminate premises that could be interpreted in more than one way. During the presentation of the order, 10-Hz TMS was applied over the rSPL or a sham control site. Right SPL TMS during the inference phase disrupted performance in uncertain relational reasoning. Moreover, we found differences in the error rates between preferred mental models, alternative models, and inconsistent models. Our results suggest that different mechanisms are involved when people reason spatially and evaluate different kinds of uncertain conclusions. PMID:26970943

  8. Decoding Trajectories from Posterior Parietal Cortex Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, Grant H.; Musallam, Sam; Andersen, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    High-level cognitive signals in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) have previously been used to decode the intended endpoint of a reach, providing the first evidence that PPC can be used for direct control of a neural prosthesis (Musallam et al., 2004). Here we expand on this work by showing that PPC neural activity can be harnessed to estimate not only the endpoint but also to continuously control the trajectory of an end effector. Specifically, we trained two monkeys to use a joystick to guide a cursor on a computer screen to peripheral target locations while maintaining central ocular fixation. We found that we could accurately reconstruct the trajectory of the cursor using a relatively small ensemble of simultaneously recorded PPC neurons. Using a goal-based Kalman filter that incorporates target information into the state-space, we showed that the decoded estimate of cursor position could be significantly improved. Finally, we tested whether we could decode trajectories during closed-loop brain control sessions, in which the real-time position of the cursor was determined solely by a monkey’s neural activity in PPC. The monkey learned to perform brain control trajectories at 80% success rate(for 8 targets) after just 4–5 sessions. This improvement in behavioral performance was accompanied by a corresponding enhancement in neural tuning properties (i.e., increased tuning depth and coverage of encoding parameter space) as well as an increase in off-line decoding performance of the PPC ensemble. PMID:19036985

  9. 75 FR 28031 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

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  10. 78 FR 3009 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-01-15

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  11. 76 FR 57061 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-09-15

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  12. 76 FR 5183 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-01-28

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  13. 77 FR 64815 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-10-23

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  14. 77 FR 10540 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-02-22

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  15. 77 FR 76297 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-12-27

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  16. 78 FR 24761 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-04-26

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  17. 75 FR 8976 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-26

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  18. 77 FR 57098 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-09-17

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  19. 75 FR 7486 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-02-19

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  20. Morphometrics, 3D Imaging, and Craniofacial Development.

    PubMed

    Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Percival, Christopher J; Green, Rebecca; Young, Nathan M; Mio, Washington; Marcucio, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown how volumetric imaging and morphometrics can add significantly to our understanding of morphogenesis, the developmental basis for variation, and the etiology of structural birth defects. On the other hand, the complex questions and diverse imaging data in developmental biology present morphometrics with more complex challenges than applications in virtually any other field. Meeting these challenges is necessary in order to understand the mechanistic basis for variation in complex morphologies. This chapter reviews the methods and theory that enable the application of modern landmark-based morphometrics to developmental biology and craniofacial development, in particular. We discuss the theoretical foundations of morphometrics as applied to development and review the basic approaches to the quantification of morphology. Focusing on geometric morphometrics, we discuss the principal statistical methods for quantifying and comparing morphological variation and covariation structure within and among groups. Finally, we discuss the future directions for morphometrics in developmental biology that will be required for approaches that enable quantitative integration across the genotype-phenotype map. PMID:26589938

  1. Endodontic treatment of a C-shaped mandibular second premolar with four root canals and three apical foramina: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Thikamphaa

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a unique C-shaped mandibular second premolar with four canals and three apical foramina and its endodontic management with the aid of cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT). C-shaped root canal morphology with four canals was identified under a dental operating microscope. A CBCT scan was taken to evaluate the aberrant root canal anatomy and devise a better instrumentation strategy based on the anatomy. All canals were instrumented to have a 0.05 taper using 1.0 mm step-back filing with appropriate apical sizes determined from the CBCT scan images and filled using a warm vertical compaction technique. A C-shaped mandibular second premolar with multiple canals is an anatomically rare case for clinicians, yet its endodontic treatment may require a careful instrumentation strategy due to the difficulty in disinfecting the canals in the thin root area without compromising the root structure. PMID:26877993

  2. Applying Craniofacial Principles to Neurosurgical Exposures in Cerebrovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Alperovich, Michael; Frey, Jordan D; Potts, Matthew B; Riina, Howard A; Staffenberg, David A

    2016-06-01

    The subspecialty of craniofacial surgery emphasizes skeletal exposure, preservation of critical structures, and provision of a superior cosmetic result. In recent decades, an emphasis on minimally invasive neurosurgical exposure has paved the way for increased collaboration between neurosurgeons and craniofacial surgeons.The 1990s saw the growing popularity of an eyebrow incision for orbital roof craniotomies in neurosurgery to address lesions in the anterior skull base. Disadvantages of this approach included conspicuous scarring above the brow skin, risk of injury to the frontal branch of the facial nerve, and numbness from supraorbital or supratrochlear nerve transection.A transpalpebral approach was first described in 2008 in the neurosurgical literature. An approach familiar to the craniofacial surgeon, transpalpebral exposure is used for zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures as well as aesthetic brow and periorbital surgery.In conjunction with neurosurgery, the authors have applied craniofacial principles to address the major pitfalls of the transpalpebral craniotomy. The authors present their patient series experience. Hopefully, in the future, other institutions will have increased collaboration between craniofacial surgeons and neurosurgeons. PMID:27192638

  3. Zebrafish Craniofacial Development: A Window into Early Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Mork, Lindsey; Crump, Gage

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the face and skull involves a complex series of developmental events mediated by cells derived from the neural crest, endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Although vertebrates boast an enormous diversity of adult facial morphologies, the fundamental signaling pathways and cellular events that sculpt the nascent craniofacial skeleton in the embryo have proven to be highly conserved from fish to man. The zebrafish Danio rerio, a small freshwater cyprinid fish from eastern India, has served as a popular model of craniofacial development since the 1990s. Unique strengths of the zebrafish model include a simplified skeleton during larval stages, access to rapidly developing embryos for live imaging, and amenability to transgenesis and complex genetics. In this chapter, we describe the anatomy of the zebrafish craniofacial skeleton; its applications as models for the mammalian jaw, middle ear, palate, and cranial sutures; the superior imaging technology available in fish that has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of facial morphogenesis; the use of the zebrafish to decipher the genetic underpinnings of craniofacial biology; and finally a glimpse into the most promising future applications of zebrafish craniofacial research. PMID:26589928

  4. Cranio-facial clefts in pre-hispanic America.

    PubMed

    Marius-Nunez, A L; Wasiak, D T

    2015-10-01

    Among the representations of congenital malformations in Moche ceramic art, cranio-facial clefts have been portrayed in pottery found in Moche burials. These pottery vessels were used as domestic items during lifetime and funerary offerings upon death. The aim of this study was to examine archeological evidence for representations of cranio-facial cleft malformations in Moche vessels. Pottery depicting malformations of the midface in Moche collections in Lima-Peru were studied. The malformations portrayed on pottery were analyzed using the Tessier classification. Photographs were authorized by the Larco Museo.Three vessels were observed to have median cranio-facial dysraphia in association with midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible. ML001489 portrays a median cranio-facial dysraphia with an orbital cleft and a midline cleft of the lower lip extending to the mandible. ML001514 represents a median facial dysraphia in association with an orbital facial cleft and a vertical orbital dystopia. ML001491 illustrates a median facial cleft with a soft tissue cleft. Three cases of midline, orbital and lateral facial clefts have been portrayed in Moche full-figure portrait vessels. They represent the earliest registries of congenital cranio-facial malformations in ancient Peru. PMID:26010214

  5. Genetic Analysis of Craniofacial Traits in the Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuaki; Shimada, Atsuko; Sakai, Noriyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Tamiya, Gen; Shinya, Minori

    2007-01-01

    Family and twin studies suggest that a substantial genetic component underlies individual differences in craniofacial morphology. In the current study, we quantified 444 craniofacial traits in 100 individuals from two inbred medaka (Oryzias latipes) strains, HNI and Hd-rR. Relative distances between defined landmarks were measured in digital images of the medaka head region. A total of 379 traits differed significantly between the two strains, indicating that many craniofacial traits are controlled by genetic factors. Of these, 89 traits were analyzed via interval mapping of 184 F2 progeny from an intercross between HNI and Hd-rR. We identified quantitative trait loci for 66 craniofacial traits. The highest logarithm of the odds score was 6.2 for linkage group (LG) 9 and 11. Trait L33, which corresponds to the ratio of head length to head height at eye level, mapped to LG9; trait V15, which corresponds to the ratio of snout length to head width measured behind the eyes, mapped to LG11. Our initial results confirm the potential of the medaka as a model system for the genetic analysis of complex traits such as craniofacial morphology. PMID:18073435

  6. Craniofacial shape variation in Twist1+/- mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Trish E; Weinberg, Seth M; Khaksarfard, Kameron; Howie, R Nicole; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Yu, Jack C; Cray, James J

    2014-05-01

    Craniosynostosis (CS) is a relatively common birth defect resulting from the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. Human genetic studies have identified several genes in association with CS. One such gene that has been implicated in both syndromic (Saethre-Chotzen syndrome) and nonsyndromic forms of CS in humans is TWIST1. In this study, a heterozygous Twist1 knock out (Twist1(+/-) ) mouse model was used to study the craniofacial shape changes associated with the partial loss of function. A geometric morphometric approach was used to analyze landmark data derived from microcomputed tomography scans to compare craniofacial shape between 17 Twist1(+/-) mice and 26 of their Twist1(+/+) (wild type) littermate controls at 15 days of age. The results show that despite the purported wide variation in synostotic severity, Twist1(+/-) mice have a consistent pattern of craniofacial dysmorphology affecting all major regions of the skull. Similar to Saethre-Chotzen, the calvarium is acrocephalic and wide with an overall brachycephalic shape. Mutant mice also exhibited a shortened cranial base and a wider and shorted face, consistent with coronal CS associated phenotypes. The results suggest that these differences are at least partially the direct result of the Twist1 haploinsufficiency on the developing craniofacial skeleton. This study provides a quantitative phenotype complement to the developmental and molecular genetic research previously done on Twist1. These results can be used to generate further hypotheses about the effect of Twist1 and premature suture fusion on the entire craniofacial skeleton. PMID:24585549

  7. 76 FR 38193 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-06-29

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  8. 77 FR 23488 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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  9. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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  10. Evolution of posterior parietal cortex and parietal-frontal networks for specific actions in primates.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Jon H; Stepniewska, Iwona

    2016-02-15

    Posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is an extensive region of the human brain that develops relatively late and is proportionally large compared with that of monkeys and prosimian primates. Our ongoing comparative studies have led to several conclusions about the evolution of this posterior parietal region. In early placental mammals, PPC likely was a small multisensory region much like PPC of extant rodents and tree shrews. In early primates, PPC likely resembled that of prosimian galagos, in which caudal PPC (PPCc) is visual and rostral PPC (PPCr) has eight or more multisensory domains where electrical stimulation evokes different complex motor behaviors, including reaching, hand-to-mouth, looking, protecting the face or body, and grasping. These evoked behaviors depend on connections with functionally matched domains in premotor cortex (PMC) and motor cortex (M1). Domains in each region compete with each other, and a serial arrangement of domains allows different factors to influence motor outcomes successively. Similar arrangements of domains have been retained in New and Old World monkeys, and humans appear to have at least some of these domains. The great expansion and prolonged development of PPC in humans suggest the addition of functionally distinct territories. We propose that, across primates, PMC and M1 domains are second and third levels in a number of parallel, interacting networks for mediating and selecting one type of action over others. PMID:26101180

  11. Premotor and parietal cortex: corticocortical connectivity and combinatorial computations.

    PubMed

    Wise, S P; Boussaoud, D; Johnson, P B; Caminiti, R

    1997-01-01

    The dorsal premotor cortex is a functionally distinct cortical field or group of fields in the primate frontal cortex. Anatomical studies have confirmed that most parietal input to the dorsal premotor cortex originates from the superior parietal lobule. However, these projections arise not only from the dorsal aspect of area 5, as has long been known, but also from newly defined areas of posterior parietal cortex, which are directly connected with the extrastriate visual cortex. Thus, the dorsal premotor cortex receives much more direct visual input than previously accepted. It appears that this fronto-parietal network functions as a visuomotor controller-one that makes computations based on proprioceptive, visual, gaze, attentional, and other information to produce an output that reflects the selection, preparation, and execution of movements. PMID:9056706

  12. Parietal damage impairs learning of a visuomotor tracking skill.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Sara; Anderson, Steven W; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Damasio, Hanna

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the consequences of damage to the parietal lobe for learning a visuomotor tracking skill. Thirty subjects with a single unilateral brain lesion (13 with and 17 without parietal damage) and 23 demographically comparable healthy subjects performed the Rotary Pursuit task. For each group, time on target increased significantly across the four learning blocks. Subjects with parietal lesions had smaller improvements on the Rotary Pursuit from the 1st to the 4th block than subjects with lesions in other brain areas and healthy comparison subjects. The improvements on task performance from the 1st to the 2nd and from the 1st to the 3rd learning blocks were similar between groups. The parietal lobe appears to play an important role in the acquisition of a new visuomotor tracking skill, in particular during a relatively late phase of learning. PMID:26536523

  13. Cephalometric Assessment of Upper Airway Effects on Craniofacial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, Mojtaba Mohamadi; Zarch, Varasteh Vakili; Joibari, Mohammad-Esmaeil; Kouhi, Ali

    2016-03-01

    To investigate craniofacial growth deformities in children with upper airway obstruction, this controlled study was performed. Cephalometry is used as a screening test for anatomic abnormalities in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Therefore, the current work selected this method to investigate the effect of upper airway obstruction on craniofacial morphology.Patients with upper airway obstruction (104) were compared with 71 controls. Patients with upper airway compromise had mandibular hypoplasia, mandibular retrognathism, and higher hard palates in comparison with controls with no history of airway obstruction. The difference was higher in the older age group.Airway obstruction has significant correlation craniofacial morphology. Our findings support the idea of early assessment and thorough management of mouth breathing in children. PMID:26967073

  14. Alcohol use in pregnancy, craniofacial features, and fetal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Rostand, A; Kaminski, M; Lelong, N; Dehaene, P; Delestret, I; Klein-Bertrand, C; Querleu, D; Crepin, G

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to study the relationship between the level of alcohol consumption in pregnancy and craniofacial characteristics of the neonate. DESIGN--This was a prospective survey of a sample of pregnant women, stratified on prepregnancy level of alcohol consumption. SETTING--The study was carried out at the public antenatal clinic of Roubaix maternity hospital. PARTICIPANTS--During an eight month period, 684 women (89% of those eligible) were interviewed in a standardised way at their first antenatal clinic visit. Of these, all who were suspected of being alcoholic or heavy drinkers (at least 21 drinks per week) were selected for follow up, as was a subsample of light (0-6 drinks per week) and moderate (7-20 drinks per week) drinkers. Of 347 women selected in this way, 202 had their infants assessed by a standardised morphological examination. MEASUREMENTS AND AND MAIN RESULTS--Suggestive craniofacial characteristics of the infants, present either in isolation or in association with growth retardation ("fetal alcohol effects"), were compared in relation to maternal alcohol consumption (alcoholic 12%; heavy drinking 24%; moderate drinking 28%; light drinking 36%). No differences were found between light and moderate drinkers. Infants born to alcoholics had a greater number of craniofacial characteristics and the proportion with features compatible with fetal alcohol effects was higher. There was a similar trend for infants of heavy drinkers. Infants of heavy drinkers who had decreased their alcohol consumption during pregnancy had fewer craniofacial features. Infants of heavy smokers were also found to have increased numbers of craniofacial characteristics. CONCLUSIONS--Craniofacial morphology could be a sensitive indicator of alcohol exposure in utero. Altered morphology is usually considered specific for alcohol exposure, but the relation observed with smoking needs further exploration. PMID:2277252

  15. Craniofacial Asymmetry in Adults With Neglected Congenital Muscular Torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kil-Yong; Min, Kyung-Jay; Woo, Jieun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the craniofacial asymmetry in adults with neglected congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) by quantitative assessment based on craniofacial three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). Methods Preoperative craniofacial asymmetry was measured by 3D-CT for 31 CMT subjects ≥18 years of age who visited a tertiary medical center and underwent 3D-CT between January 2009 and December 2013. The relationship between the age and the severity of craniofacial asymmetry was analyzed in reference to anteroposterior length asymmetry of the frontal bone and zygomatic arch, vertical and lateral displacements of the facial landmarks, and mandibular axis rotation. Results The age at CT was 27.71±7.02 years (range, 18-44 years). All intra-class correlation coefficients were higher than 0.7, suggesting good inter-rater reliability (p<0.05) of all the measurements. The frontal and the zygomatic length ratio (i.e., the anteroposterior length asymmetry on the axial plane) was 1.06±0.03 and 1.07±0.03, respectively, which was increased significantly with age in the linear regression analysis (r2=0.176, p=0.019 and r2=0.188, p=0.015, respectively). The vertical or lateral displacement of the facial landmarks and rotation of the mandibular axis did not significantly correlate with age (p>0.05). Conclusion Craniofacial asymmetry of neglected CMT became more severe with age in terms of anteroposterior length asymmetry of the ipsilateral frontal bone and zygomatic arch on the axial plane even after growth cessation. This finding may enhance the understanding of therapeutic strategies for craniofacial asymmetry in adults with neglected CMT. PMID:26161351

  16. Parietal lesion effects on cued recall following pair associate learning.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, Shir; Soroker, Nachum; Levy, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the involvement of the posterior parietal cortex in episodic memory in a lesion-effects study of cued recall following pair-associate learning. Groups of patients who had experienced first-incident stroke, generally in middle cerebral artery territory, and exhibited damage that included lateral posterior parietal regions, were tested within an early post-stroke time window. In three experiments, patients and matched healthy comparison groups executed repeated study and cued recall test blocks of pairs of words (Experiment 1), pairs of object pictures (Experiment 2), or pairs of object pictures and environmental sounds (Experiment 3). Patients' brain CT scans were subjected to quantitative analysis of lesion volumes. Behavioral and lesion data were used to compute correlations between area lesion extent and memory deficits, and to conduct voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. These analyses implicated lateral ventral parietal cortex, especially the angular gyrus, in cued recall deficits, most pronouncedly in the cross-modal picture-sound pairs task, though significant parietal lesion effects were also found in the unimodal word pairs and picture pairs tasks. In contrast to an earlier study in which comparable parietal lesions did not cause deficits in item recognition, these results indicate that lateral posterior parietal areas make a substantive contribution to demanding forms of recollective retrieval as represented by cued recall, especially for complex associative representations. PMID:25998492

  17. Mapping multisensory parietal face and body areas in humans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruey-Song; Chen, Ching-fu; Tran, Alyssa T; Holstein, Katie L; Sereno, Martin I

    2012-10-30

    Detection and avoidance of impending obstacles is crucial to preventing head and body injuries in daily life. To safely avoid obstacles, locations of objects approaching the body surface are usually detected via the visual system and then used by the motor system to guide defensive movements. Mediating between visual input and motor output, the posterior parietal cortex plays an important role in integrating multisensory information in peripersonal space. We used functional MRI to map parietal areas that see and feel multisensory stimuli near or on the face and body. Tactile experiments using full-body air-puff stimulation suits revealed somatotopic areas of the face and multiple body parts forming a higher-level homunculus in the superior posterior parietal cortex. Visual experiments using wide-field looming stimuli revealed retinotopic maps that overlap with the parietal face and body areas in the postcentral sulcus at the most anterior border of the dorsal visual pathway. Starting at the parietal face area and moving medially and posteriorly into the lower-body areas, the median of visual polar-angle representations in these somatotopic areas gradually shifts from near the horizontal meridian into the lower visual field. These results suggest the parietal face and body areas fuse multisensory information in peripersonal space to guard an individual from head to toe. PMID:23071340

  18. Parietal cortex and representation of the mental Self

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Hans C.; Luber, Bruce; Crupain, Michael; Keenan, Julian P.; Nowak, Markus; Kjaer, Troels W.; Sackeim, Harold A.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2004-01-01

    For a coherent and meaningful life, conscious self-representation is mandatory. Such explicit “autonoetic consciousness” is thought to emerge by retrieval of memory of personally experienced events (“episodic memory”). During episodic retrieval, functional imaging studies consistently show differential activity in medial prefrontal and medial parietal cortices. With positron-emission tomography, we here show that these medial regions are functionally connected and interact with lateral regions that are activated according to the degree of self-reference. During retrieval of previous judgments of Oneself, Best Friend, and the Danish Queen, activation increased in the left lateral temporal cortex and decreased in the right inferior parietal region with decreasing self-reference. Functionally, the former region was preferentially connected to medial prefrontal cortex, the latter to medial parietal. The medial parietal region may, then, be conceived of as a nodal structure in self-representation, functionally connected to both the right parietal and the medial prefrontal cortices. To determine whether medial parietal cortex in this network is essential for episodic memory retrieval with self-representation, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation over the region to transiently disturb neuronal circuitry. There was a decrease in the efficiency of retrieval of previous judgment of mental Self compared with retrieval of judgment of Other with transcranial magnetic stimulation at a latency of 160 ms, confirming the hypothesis. This network is strikingly similar to the network of the resting conscious state, suggesting that self-monitoring is a core function in resting consciousness. PMID:15096584

  19. Genesis of alcohol-induced craniofacial dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Sulik, Kathleen K

    2005-06-01

    The initial diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) in the United States was made because of the facial features common to the first cohort of patients. This article reviews the development of an FAS mouse model whose craniofacial features are remarkably similar to those of affected humans. The model is based on short-term maternal treatment with a high dosage of ethanol at stages of pregnancy that are equivalent to Weeks 3 and 4 of human gestation. At these early stages of development, alcohol's insult to the developing face is concurrent with that to the brain, eyes, and inner ear. That facial and central nervous system defects consistent with FAS can be induced by more "realistic" alcohol dosages as illustrated with data from an oral alcohol intake mouse model in which maternal blood alcohol levels do not exceed 200 mg/dl. The ethanol-induced pathogenesis involves apoptosis that occurs within 12 hrs of alcohol exposure in selected cell populations of Day 7, 8, and 9 mouse embryos. Experimental evidence from other species also shows that apoptosis underlies ethanol-induced malformations. With knowledge of sensitive and resistant cell populations at specific developmental stages, studies designed to identify the basis for these differing cellular responses and, therefore, to determine the primary mechanisms of ethanol's teratogenesis are possible. For example, microarray comparisons of sensitive and resistant embryonic cell populations have been made, as have in situ studies of gene expression patterns in the populations of interest. Studies that illustrate agents that are effective in diminishing or exacerbating ethanol's teratogenesis have also been helpful in determining mechanisms. Among these agents are antioxidants, sonic hedgehog protein, retinoids, and the peptides SAL and NAP. PMID:15956766

  20. Distinguishing Goldenhar Syndrome from Craniofacial Microsomia.

    PubMed

    Tuin, Jorien; Tahiri, Youssef; Paliga, James T; Taylor, Jesse A; Bartlett, Scott P

    2015-09-01

    Goldenhar syndrome is characterized by the typical features of craniofacial microsomia (CFM) with the addition of epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies. The aim of this study is to examine the objective differences between patients carrying a diagnosis of Goldenhar syndrome to those diagnosed with CFM. Thus, we performed an Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective chart review on all patients who presented with a diagnosis of CFM or Goldenhar syndrome from January 1990 to December 2012. Demographic, diagnosis, OMENS+ classification, accompanying diagnoses, and radiographic data were collected. For subjective analysis, subgroups were designed based on the diagnosis Goldenhar syndrome or CFM per history. For objective analysis, subgroups were designed based on the presence of epibulbar dermoids and/or vertebral anomalies. The cohorts were compared with respect to associated medical abnormalities and severity of CFM features. One hundred thirty eight patients met inclusion criteria. Epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies were seen in 17% and 34% of the patients, respectively. Only 10 patients (7.2%) had both epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies. The subjective "Goldenhar" group (N = 44, 32%) was found to have a higher percentage of bilaterally affected patients (P = 0.001), a more severe mandibular deformity (P = <0.001), a more severe soft tissue deformity (P = 0.01), and a higher incidence of macrostomia (P = 0.003). In the objective subgroup analysis, the only significant difference was found in the degree of soft tissue deficiency (P = 0.049). The diagnostic criteria of Goldenhar syndrome remain unclear, thereby making clinical use of the term "Goldenhar" inconsequential. Goldenhar syndrome is over diagnosed subjectively in patients who show more severe CFM features. PMID:26267577

  1. Obstructive sleep apnoea in children with craniofacial syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is common in children. Craniofacial anomalies such as cleft palate are among the most common congenital conditions. Children with a variety of craniofacial conditions, including cleft palate, micrognathia, craniosynostosis, and midface hypoplasia are at increased risk for OSAS. Available evidence, which is largely limited to surgical case series and retrospective studies, suggests that OSAS can be successfully managed in these children through both surgical and non-surgical techniques. Prospective studies using larger cohorts of patients and including polysomnograms are needed to better understand the risk factors for this patient population and the efficacy of treatment options for OSAS and their underlying conditions. PMID:25555676

  2. Analysis of the 50 most cited papers in craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Tahiri, Youssef; Fleming, Tara M; Greathouse, Travis; Tholpady, Sunil S

    2015-12-01

    The intent of this study is to discuss the most prominent literature in craniofacial surgery. To do so, using the ISI Web of Science, a ranking by average number of citations per year of the top 50 craniofacial surgery articles was compiled. All plastic surgery journals listed in the "Surgery" category in the ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports 2013 Science Edition were considered. Journal of publication, country of origin, collaborating institutions, topic of interest, and level of evidence were analyzed. The total number of citations ranged from 47 to 1017. Average number of citations per year ranged from 46.2 to 8.6. The oldest article in the top 50 was published in 1988 and the most recent in 2009. The majority of the articles came from Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery with 28 of the 50. The majority of the articles, originated from the United States (56%). Reconstruction of acquired defects was the most commonly examined topic at 46.2%; followed by articles discussing reconstruction of congenital defects (23.1%). The most common level of evidence was level 3. This extensive examination of the craniofacial literature highlights the important part that craniofacial surgery takes in the field of plastic surgery. PMID:26541748

  3. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: Oral and craniofacial phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, D.L.; Trujillo, M.I.; Council, S.E.; Merideth, M.A.; Gordon, L.B.; Wu, T.; Introne, W.J.; Gahl, W.A.; Hart, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare early-onset accelerated senescence syndrome. In HGPS, a recently identified de novo dominant mutation of the lamin A gene (LMNA) produces abnormal lamin A, resulting in compromised nuclear membrane integrity. Clinical features include sclerotic skin, cardiovascular and bone abnormalities, and marked growth retardation. Craniofacial features include “bird-like” facies, alopecia, craniofacial disproportion and dental crowding. Our prospective study describes dental, oral soft tissue, and craniofacial bone features in HGPS. METHODS Fifteen patients with confirmed p.G608G LMNA mutation (1–17 years, 7 males, 8 females) received comprehensive oral evaluations. Anomalies of oral soft tissue, gnathic bones and dentition were identified. RESULTS Radiographic findings included hypodontia (n=7), dysmorphic teeth (n=5), steep mandibular angles (n=11), and thin basal bone (n=11). Soft tissue findings included ogival palatal arch (n=8), median sagittal palatal fissure (n=7), and ankyloglossia (n=7). Calculated dental ages (9months–11y2m) were significantly lower than chronological ages (1y6m–17y8m) (p=0.002). Eleven children manifested a shorter mandibular body, anterior/posterior cranial base and ramus, but a larger gonial angle, compared to age/gender/race norms. CONCLUSION Novel oral-craniofacial phenotypes and quantification of previously reported features are presented. Our findings expand the HGPS phenotype and provide additional insight into the complex pathogenesis of HGPS. PMID:19236595

  4. The relationship between nasal obstruction and craniofacial growth.

    PubMed

    Smith, R M; Gonzalez, C

    1989-12-01

    The relationship between nasal obstruction and craniofacial growth is unclear. The literature indicates that upper-airway compromise produces chronic mouth breathing, especially in the dolichocephalic (narrow-faced) child. It has been shown that a greater tendency exists toward the skeletal pattern associated with long face syndrome in dolichocephalic head types. Therefore, it becomes difficult to assess whether the long face syndrome is a cause or an effect of increased nasal airway resistance. Nevertheless, animal studies have demonstrated the development of typical craniofacial anomalies in experimentally induced nasal obstruction. Some of these changes are also noted to be reversed by removing the nasal obstruction. Although much of the concern for nasal obstruction and abnormal dentofacial growth has centered around adenotonsillar hypertrophy, other causes for nasal obstruction should be sought. Allergic rhinitis and choanal atresia also should be considered. Longitudinal data are lacking to support conclusively abnormal dentofacial growth as an indication for surgical intervention. Available literature would suggest, however, that relief of nasal obstruction should be attempted in an effort to establish a patent airway and decrease the possibility of abnormal craniofacial development. The more information we gain about nasal obstruction and abnormal dentofacial development, the greater our diagnostic ability becomes. We can now incorporate information from a thorough nasal-oral examination with rhinomanometry and cephalometrics to provide a rational treatment plan for these children. Future directions should investigate genetic influences on craniofacial morphology and growth. PMID:2587086

  5. The genesis of craniofacial biology as a health science discipline.

    PubMed

    Sperber, G H; Sperber, S M

    2014-06-01

    The craniofacial complex encapsulates the brain and contains the organs for key functions of the body, including sight, hearing and balance, smell, taste, respiration and mastication. All these systems are intimately integrated within the head. The combination of these diverse systems into a new field was dictated by the dental profession's desire for a research branch of basic science devoted and attuned to its specific needs. The traditional subjects of genetics, embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, dental materials, odontology, molecular biology and palaeoanthropology pertaining to dentistry have been drawn together by many newly emerging technologies. These new technologies include gene sequencing, CAT scanning, MRI imaging, laser scanning, image analysis, ultrasonography, spectroscopy and visualosonics. A vibrant unitary discipline of investigation, craniofacial biology, has emerged that builds on the original concept of 'oral biology' that began in the 1960s. This paper reviews some of the developments that have led to the genesis of craniofacial biology as a fully-fledged health science discipline of significance in the advancement of clinical dental practice. Some of the key figures and milestones in craniofacial biology are identified. PMID:24495071

  6. Mechanisms of spatial attention control in frontal and parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Szczepanski, Sara M; Konen, Christina S; Kastner, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Theories of spatial attentional control have been largely based upon studies of patients suffering from visuospatial neglect, resulting from circumscribed lesions of frontal and posterior parietal cortex. In the intact brain, the control of spatial attention has been related to a distributed frontoparietal attention network. Little is known about the nature of the control mechanisms exerted by this network. Here, we used a novel region-of-interest approach to relate activations of the attention network to recently described topographic areas in frontal cortex [frontal eye field (FEF), PreCC/IFS (precentral cortex/inferior frontal sulcus)] and parietal cortex [intraparietal sulcus areas (IPS1-IPS5) and an area in the superior parietal lobule (SPL1)] to examine their spatial attention signals. We found that attention signals in most topographic areas were spatially specific, with stronger responses when attention was directed to the contralateral than to the ipsilateral visual field. Importantly, two hemispheric asymmetries were found. First, a region in only right, but not left SPL1 carried spatial attention signals. Second, left FEF and left posterior parietal cortex (IPS1/2) generated stronger contralateral biasing signals than their counterparts in the right hemisphere. These findings are the first to characterize spatial attention signals in topographic frontal and parietal cortex and provide a neural basis in support of an interhemispheric competition account of spatial attentional control. PMID:20053897

  7. Reorganization of craniofacial/cleft care delivery: the Massachusetts experience.

    PubMed

    Borah, G L; Hagberg, N; Jakubiak, C; Temple, J

    1993-05-01

    Until 1989, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts operated a mandated care program known as Services for Handicapped Children (SHC) for children with cleft lip/palate or craniofacial anomalies. During the mid 1980s, the federal government reduced its block grant funds and encouraged the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to develop Project SERVE to address this changing fiscal reality. The principal outcome of Project SERVE was the recommendation that the SHC direct care programs, including all craniofacial and cleft palate clinics, should be dismantled over a number of years. However, due to the economic recession, all government funding was suddenly withdrawn from cleft palate teams and the state-run SHC clinics were abruptly dissolved. To treat patients left without coordinated care, former team members reassembled and began a new craniofacial team based at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Difficulties with the transition of the clinic included recruiting and retaining team members; remuneration procedures for team members; maintenance of patient records previously kept by the state; coordination of clinical/clerical responsibilities; identifying a physical locale to hold the clinics; and solicitation of referring health care provider referrals and follow-up. All these issues required specific interventions that are presented in this paper. Project SERVE, begun under federal auspices, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, has recently been promoted as a model for a new and improved approach to the management of cleft palate and craniofacial care delivery nationwide. Awareness of the potential for abrupt, radical change in funding for federally mandated cleft/craniofacial care is essential, and a successful transition to a medical center-based model is possible using the procedures established at our center. PMID:8338866

  8. [Microbiocenosis of parietal mucin in the gastrointestinal tract of rats].

    PubMed

    Vorob'ev, A A; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Bogdanova, E A; Korneev, L M

    2005-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative composition of the microbial community in parietal mucin at different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of rats was revealed. The pronounced variability in the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of microbiocenosis in parietal mucin of rats at different sections was revealed. The differences were most pronounced in the passage from upper to lower GIT sections, the large intestine found to be the richest biocenosis. The microbial composition of rat feces was faintly associated with the GIT parietal microbiocenosis. The individual areas of GIT mucosa were unique of their microbial characteristics and organization. This makes it possible to regard them as relatively independent biotopes and indicates that it is impossible to evaluate the microbial community by one of the colonic mucosal sifes. PMID:16438365

  9. FRONTAL AND PARIETAL CORTEX CONTRIBUTIONS TO ACTION MODIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Mutha, Pratik K.; Stapp, Lee H.; Sainburg, Robert L.; Haaland, Kathleen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Successful achievement of task goals depends critically on the ability to adjust ongoing actions in response to environmental changes. The neural substrates underlying action modification have been a topic of great controversy: both, posterior parietal cortex and frontal regions, particularly prefrontal cortex have been previously identified as crucial in this regard, with most studies arguing in favor of one or the other. We aimed to address this controversy and understand whether frontal and parietal regions might play distinct roles during action modification. We tested ipsilesional arm performance of 27 stroke patients with focal lesions to frontal or parietal regions of the left or right cerebral hemisphere, and left or right arm performance of 18 healthy subjects on the classic double-step task in which a target is unpredictably displaced to a new location, requiring modification of the ongoing action. Only right hemisphere frontal lesions adversely impacted the timing of initiation of the modified response, while only left hemisphere parietal lesions impaired the accuracy of the modified action. Patients with right frontal lesions tended to complete the ongoing action to the initially displayed baseline target and initiated the new movement after a significant delay. In contrast, patients with left parietal damage did not accurately reach the new target location, but compared to the other groups, initiated the new action during an earlier phase of motion, before their baseline action was complete. Our findings thus suggest distinct, hemisphere specific contributions of frontal and parietal regions to action modification, and bring together, for the first time, disparate sets of prior findings about its underlying neural substrates. PMID:24763127

  10. The suture provides a niche for mesenchymal stem cells of craniofacial bones

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hu; Feng, Jifan; Ho, Thach-Vu; Grimes, Weston; Urata, Mark; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue undergoes constant turnover supported by stem cells. Recent studies showed that perivascular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to the turnover of long bones. Craniofacial bones are flat bones derived from a different embryonic origin than the long bones. The identity and regulating niche for craniofacial bone MSCs remain unknown. Here, we identify Gli1+ cells within the suture mesenchyme as the major MSC population for craniofacial bones. They are not associated with vasculature, give rise to all craniofacial bones in the adult and are activated during injury repair. Gli1+ cells are typical MSCs in vitro. Ablation of Gli1+ cells leads to craniosynostosis and arrest of skull growth, indicating these cells are an indispensible stem cell population. Twist1+/− mice with craniosynostosis show reduced Gli1+ MSCs in sutures, suggesting that craniosynostosis may result from diminished suture stem cells. Our study indicates that craniofacial sutures provide a unique niche for MSCs for craniofacial bone homeostasis and repair. PMID:25799059

  11. Parietal cortex mediates perceptual Gestalt grouping independent of stimulus size.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Pablo R; Zaretskaya, Natalia; Bartels, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    The integration of local moving elements into a unified gestalt percept has previously been linked to the posterior parietal cortex. There are two possible interpretations for the lack of involvement of other occipital regions. The first is that parietal cortex is indeed uniquely functionally specialized to perform grouping. Another possibility is that other visual regions can perform grouping as well, but that the large spatial separation of the local elements used previously exceeded their neurons' receptive field (RF) sizes, preventing their involvement. In this study we distinguished between these two alternatives. We measured whole-brain activity using fMRI in response to a bistable motion illusion that induced mutually exclusive percepts of either an illusory global Gestalt or of local elements. The stimulus was presented in two sizes, a large version known to activate IPS only, and a version sufficiently small to fit into the RFs of mid-level dorsal regions such as V5/MT. We found that none of the separately localized motion regions apart from parietal cortex showed a preference for global Gestalt perception, even for the smaller version of the stimulus. This outcome suggests that grouping-by-motion is mediated by a specialized size-invariant mechanism with parietal cortex as its anatomical substrate. PMID:26975554

  12. Parietal network underlying movement control: disturbances during subcortical electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Almairac, Fabien; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of brain movement control has changed over the last two decades. Recent findings in the monkey and in humans have led to a parallel and interconnected network. Nevertheless, little is known about these networks. Here, we present two cases of patients with a parietal low-grade glioma. They underwent surgery under local anesthesia with cortical and subcortical mapping. For patient 1, subcortical electrostimulation immediately posterior to thalamocortical fibers induced movement disorders, with an inhibition of leg and arm movements medially and, more laterally, an acceleration of arm movement. For patient 2, electrostimulation of white matter immediately posterior to thalamocortical fibers induced an inhibition of both arm movement. It means that the detected fibers in the parietal lobe may be involved in the motor control modulation. They are distributed veil-like immediately posterior to thalamocortical pathways and could correspond to a fronto-parietal movement control subnetwork. These two cases highlight the major role of the subcortical connectivity in movement regulation, involving parietal lobe, thus the necessity to be identified and preserved during brain surgery. PMID:24526369

  13. Impairments in Tactile Search Following Superior Parietal Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skakoon-Sparling, Shayna P.; Vasquez, Brandon P.; Hano, Kate; Danckert, James

    2011-01-01

    The superior parietal cortex is critical for the control of visually guided actions. Research suggests that visual stimuli relevant to actions are preferentially processed when they are in peripersonal space. One recent study demonstrated that visually guided movements towards the body were more impaired in a patient with damage to superior…

  14. Left inferior parietal lobe engagement in social cognition and language.

    PubMed

    Bzdok, Danilo; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Reid, Andrew; Laird, Angela R; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-09-01

    Social cognition and language are two core features of the human species. Despite distributed recruitment of brain regions in each mental capacity, the left parietal lobe (LPL) represents a zone of topographical convergence. The present study quantitatively summarizes hundreds of neuroimaging studies on social cognition and language. Using connectivity-based parcellation on a meta-analytically defined volume of interest (VOI), regional coactivation patterns within this VOI allowed identifying distinct subregions. Across parcellation solutions, two clusters emerged consistently in rostro-ventral and caudo-ventral aspects of the parietal VOI. Both clusters were functionally significantly associated with social-cognitive and language processing. In particular, the rostro-ventral cluster was associated with lower-level processing facets, while the caudo-ventral cluster was associated with higher-level processing facets in both mental capacities. Contrarily, in the (less stable) dorsal parietal VOI, all clusters reflected computation of general-purpose processes, such as working memory and matching tasks, that are frequently co-recruited by social or language processes. Our results hence favour a rostro-caudal distinction of lower- versus higher-level processes underlying social cognition and language in the left inferior parietal lobe. PMID:27241201

  15. The society for craniofacial genetics and developmental biology 38th annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Taneyhill, Lisa A; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Lozanoff, Scott; Marcucio, Ralph; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    The mission of the Society for Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology (SCGDB) is to promote education, research, and communication about normal and abnormal development of the tissues and organs of the head. The SCGDB welcomes as members undergraduate students, graduate students, post doctoral researchers, clinicians, orthodontists, scientists, and academicians who share an interest in craniofacial biology. Each year our members come together to share their novel findings, build upon, and challenge current knowledge of craniofacial biology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27102868

  16. Generation algorithm of craniofacial structure contour in cephalometric images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Jain, Ashish; Sardana, H. K.

    2010-02-01

    Anatomical structure tracing on cephalograms is a significant way to obtain cephalometric analysis. Computerized cephalometric analysis involves both manual and automatic approaches. The manual approach is limited in accuracy and repeatability. In this paper we have attempted to develop and test a novel method for automatic localization of craniofacial structure based on the detected edges on the region of interest. According to the grey scale feature at the different region of the cephalometric images, an algorithm for obtaining tissue contour is put forward. Using edge detection with specific threshold an improved bidirectional contour tracing approach is proposed by an interactive selection of the starting edge pixels, the tracking process searches repetitively for an edge pixel at the neighborhood of previously searched edge pixel to segment images, and then craniofacial structures are obtained. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated by the preliminary experimental results obtained with the proposed method.

  17. The oral and craniofacial relevance of chemically modified RNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Kormann, Michael S D; Khorsand, Behnoush; Salem, Aliasger K

    2016-01-01

    Several tissue engineering strategies in the form of protein therapy, gene therapy, cell therapy, and their combinations are currently being explored for oral and craniofacial regeneration and repair. Though each of these approaches has advantages, they all have common inherent drawbacks of being expensive and raising safety concerns. Using RNA (encoding therapeutic protein) has several advantages that have the potential to overcome these limitations. Chemically modifying the RNA improves its stability and mitigates immunogenicity allowing for the potential of RNA to become an alternative to protein and gene based therapies. This brief review article focuses on the potential of RNA therapeutics in the treatment of disorders in the oral and craniofacial regions. PMID:26896600

  18. RSK2 Is a Modulator of Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Marangoni, Pauline; Pilgram, Coralie; Langer, Arnaud; Kuntz, Thibaut; Demassue, Julie; Morkmued, Supawich; Choquet, Philippe; Constantinesco, André; Bornert, Fabien; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Pannetier, Solange; Viriot, Laurent; Hanauer, André; Dollé, Pascal; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Background The RSK2 gene is responsible for Coffin-Lowry syndrome, an X-linked dominant genetic disorder causing mental retardation, skeletal growth delays, with craniofacial and digital abnormalities typically associated with this syndrome. Craniofacial and dental anomalies encountered in this rare disease have been poorly characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined, using X-Ray microtomographic analysis, the variable craniofacial dysmorphism and dental anomalies present in Rsk2 knockout mice, a model of Coffin-Lowry syndrome, as well as in triple Rsk1,2,3 knockout mutants. We report Rsk mutation produces surpernumerary teeth midline/mesial to the first molar. This highly penetrant phenotype recapitulates more ancestral tooth structures lost with evolution. Most likely this leads to a reduction of the maxillary diastema. Abnormalities of molar shape were generally restricted to the mesial part of both upper and lower first molars (M1). Expression analysis of the four Rsk genes (Rsk1, 2, 3 and 4) was performed at various stages of odontogenesis in wild-type (WT) mice. Rsk2 is expressed in the mesenchymal, neural crest-derived compartment, correlating with proliferative areas of the developing teeth. This is consistent with RSK2 functioning in cell cycle control and growth regulation, functions potentially responsible for severe dental phenotypes. To uncover molecular pathways involved in the etiology of these defects, we performed a comparative transcriptomic (DNA microarray) analysis of mandibular wild-type versus Rsk2-/Y molars. We further demonstrated a misregulation of several critical genes, using a Rsk2 shRNA knock-down strategy in molar tooth germs cultured in vitro. Conclusions This study reveals RSK2 regulates craniofacial development including tooth development and patterning via novel transcriptional targets. PMID:24416220

  19. A review of craniofacial disorders caused by spliceosomal defects.

    PubMed

    Lehalle, D; Wieczorek, D; Zechi-Ceide, R M; Passos-Bueno, M R; Lyonnet, S; Amiel, J; Gordon, C T

    2015-11-01

    The spliceosome is a large ribonucleoprotein complex that removes introns from pre-mRNA transcripts. Mutations in EFTUD2, encoding a component of the major spliceosome, have recently been identified as the cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis, Guion-Almeida type (MFDGA), characterized by mandibulofacial dysostosis, microcephaly, external ear malformations and intellectual disability. Mutations in several other genes involved in spliceosomal function or linked aspects of mRNA processing have also recently been identified in human disorders with specific craniofacial malformations: SF3B4 in Nager syndrome, an acrofacial dysostosis (AFD); SNRPB in cerebrocostomandibular syndrome, characterized by Robin sequence and rib defects; EIF4A3 in the AFD Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome, characterized by Robin sequence, median mandibular cleft and limb defects; and TXNL4A in Burn-McKeown syndrome, involving specific craniofacial dysmorphisms. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular aspects of these syndromes. Given the apparent sensitivity of craniofacial development to defects in mRNA processing, it is possible that mutations in other proteins involved in spliceosomal function will emerge in the future as causative for related human disorders. PMID:25865758

  20. Unmasking the ciliopathies: craniofacial defects and the primary cilium.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Claudio R; Metzis, Vicki; Wicking, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the primary cilium has emerged as a pivotal sensory organelle that acts as a major signaling hub for a number of developmental signaling pathways. In that time, a vast number of proteins involved in trafficking and signaling have been linked to ciliary assembly and/or function, demonstrating the importance of this organelle during embryonic development. Given the central role of the primary cilium in regulating developmental signaling, it is not surprising that its dysfunction results in widespread defects in the embryo, leading to an expanding class of human congenital disorders known as ciliopathies. These disorders are individually rare and phenotypically variable, but together they affect virtually every vertebrate organ system. Features of ciliopathies that are often overlooked, but which are being reported with increasing frequency, are craniofacial abnormalities, ranging from subtle midline defects to full-blown orofacial clefting. The challenge moving forward is to understand the primary mechanism of disease given the link between the primary cilium and a number of developmental signaling pathways (such as hedgehog, platelet-derived growth factor, and WNT signaling) that are essential for craniofacial development. Here, we provide an overview of the diversity of craniofacial abnormalities present in the ciliopathy spectrum, and reveal those defects in common across multiple disorders. Further, we discuss the molecular defects and potential signaling perturbations underlying these anomalies. This provides insight into the mechanisms leading to ciliopathy phenotypes more generally and highlights the prevalence of widespread dysmorphologies resulting from cilia dysfunction. PMID:26173831

  1. Versatility of Distraction Osteogenesis for the Craniofacial Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Klement, Kristen A; Black, Jonathan S; Denny, Arlen D

    2016-05-01

    Malformations of the craniofacial skeleton are common. Restoration of anatomic shape, size, and position has been traditionally accomplished using autologous bone grafting to fill gaps created by surgery and segmental movement. The authors present their practice using distraction in many different ages and settings over 20 years. A retrospective review was performed of all craniofacial patients treated using distraction osteogenesis for mandible, midface, and calvarium. The authors identified 205 patient. Mandible: 112 patients were treated at an average age of 3.4 years. 18.8% of patients required repeat distraction. There was no difference in the neonatal versus older group (P = 0.71). There were significantly higher reoperation rates in syndromic children (P < 0.01). Midface: 58 patients underwent Lefort III distraction at an average age of 13.6 years. One (1.7%) required repeat distraction (Miller syndrome). Five (8.6%) patients underwent subsequent Lefort I advancement for occlusal changes. Calvarium: 33 patients were treated at an average age of 4.7 years. No repeat distractions were performed. One patient required an additional advancement procedure. Distraction demonstrates successful long-term correction of defects in the craniofacial skeleton with the versatility and control needed to treat the wide spectrum of deformity. PMID:26999694

  2. Web-based cephalometric procedure for craniofacial and dentition analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun Kumar, N. S.; Kamath, Srijit R.; Ram, S.; Muthukumaran, B.; Venkatachalapathy, A.; Nandakumar, A.; Jayakumar, P.

    2000-05-01

    Craniofacial analysis is a very important and widely used procedure in orthodontic caphalometry, which plays a key role in diagnosis and treatment planning. This involves establishing reference standards and specification of landmarks and variables. The manual approach takes up a tremendous amount of the orthodontist's time. In this paper, we developed a web-based approach for the craniofacial and dentition analyses. A digital computed radiography (CR) system is utilized for obtaining the craniofacial image, which is stored as a bitmap file. The system comprises of two components - a server and a client. The server component is a program that runs on a remote machine. To use the system, the user has to connect to the website. The client component is now activated, which uploads the image from the PC and displays it on the canvas area. The landmarks are identified using a mouse interface. The reference lines are generated. The resulting image is then sent to the server which performs all measurement and calculates the mean, standard deviation, etc. of the variables. The results generated are sent immediately to the client where it is displayed on a separate frame along with the standard values for comparison. This system eliminates the need for every user to load other expensive programs on his machine.

  3. Growth changes in internal and craniofacial flexion measurements.

    PubMed

    May, R; Sheffer, D B

    1999-09-01

    Growth changes in both internal and craniofacial flexion angles are presented for Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and modern humans. The internal flexion angle (IFA) was measured from lateral radiographs, and the craniofacial flexion angle (CFA) was calculated from coordinate data. Stage of dental development is used as a baseline for examination of growth changes and nonparametric correlations between flexion angles and dental development stage are tested for significance. In Gorilla, the IFA increases during growth. The IFA is relatively stable in Pan and modern humans. Pan and Gorilla display an increase in the CFA. However, this angle decreases during growth in modern humans. Flexion angles were derived from coordinate data collected for several early hominid crania. Measurements for two robust australopithecine crania indicate strong internal flexion. It has been suggested that cerebellar expansion in this group may relate to derived features of the posterior cranial base. In general, australopithecine crania exhibit craniofacial flexion intermediate between great apes and modern humans. The "archaic" Homo sapiens specimen from Kabwe is most similar to modern humans. PMID:10490467

  4. Study on the performance of different craniofacial superimposition approaches (I).

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, O; Vicente, R; Navega, D S; Wilkinson, C; Jayaprakash, P T; Huete, M I; Briers, T; Hardiman, R; Navarro, F; Ruiz, E; Cavalli, F; Imaizumi, K; Jankauskas, R; Veselovskaya, E; Abramov, A; Lestón, P; Molinero, F; Cardoso, J; Çağdır, A S; Humpire, D; Nakanishi, Y; Zeuner, A; Ross, A H; Gaudio, D; Damas, S

    2015-12-01

    As part of the scientific tasks coordinated throughout The 'New Methodologies and Protocols of Forensic Identification by Craniofacial Superimposition (MEPROCS)' project, the current study aims to analyse the performance of a diverse set of CFS methodologies and the corresponding technical approaches when dealing with a common dataset of real-world cases. Thus, a multiple-lab study on craniofacial superimposition has been carried out for the first time. In particular, 26 participants from 17 different institutions in 13 countries were asked to deal with 14 identification scenarios, some of them involving the comparison of multiple candidates and unknown skulls. In total, 60 craniofacial superimposition problems divided in two set of females and males. Each participant follow her/his own methodology and employed her/his particular technological means. For each single case they were asked to report the final identification decision (either positive or negative) along with the rationale supporting the decision and at least one image illustrating the overlay/superimposition outcome. This study is expected to provide important insights to better understand the most convenient characteristics of every method included in this study. PMID:26060056

  5. Latest Research from NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Latest Research from NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table ... D., is director of NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR). The NIH's National Institute ...

  6. Overlapping Parietal Activity in Memory and Perception: Evidence for the Attention to Memory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabeza, Roberto; Mazuz, Yonatan S.; Stokes, Jared; Kragel, James E.; Woldorff, Marty G.; Ciaramelli, Elisa; Olson, Ingrid R.; Moscovitch, Morris

    2011-01-01

    The specific role of different parietal regions to episodic retrieval is a topic of intense debate. According to the Attention to Memory (AtoM) model, dorsal parietal cortex (DPC) mediates top-down attention processes guided by retrieval goals, whereas ventral parietal cortex (VPC) mediates bottom-up attention processes captured by the retrieval…

  7. Dissociation of Subtraction and Multiplication in the Right Parietal Cortex: Evidence from Intraoperative Cortical Electrostimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Xiaodan; Chen, Chuansheng; Pu, Song; Wu, Chenxing; Li, Yongnian; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Xinlin

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has consistently shown that the left parietal cortex is critical for numerical processing, but the role of the right parietal lobe has been much less clear. This study used the intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation approach to investigate neural dissociation in the right parietal cortex for subtraction and…

  8. Optic ataxia: from Balint's syndrome to the parietal reach region.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Richard A; Andersen, Kristen N; Hwang, Eun Jung; Hauschild, Markus

    2014-03-01

    Optic ataxia is a high-order deficit in reaching to visual goals that occurs with posterior parietal cortex (PPC) lesions. It is a component of Balint's syndrome that also includes attentional and gaze disorders. Aspects of optic ataxia are misreaching in the contralesional visual field, difficulty preshaping the hand for grasping, and an inability to correct reaches online. Recent research in nonhuman primates (NHPs) suggests that many aspects of Balint's syndrome and optic ataxia are a result of damage to specific functional modules for reaching, saccades, grasp, attention, and state estimation. The deficits from large lesions in humans are probably composite effects from damage to combinations of these functional modules. Interactions between these modules, either within posterior parietal cortex or downstream within frontal cortex, may account for more complex behaviors such as hand-eye coordination and reach-to-grasp. PMID:24607223

  9. Neuronal oscillations form parietal/frontal networks during contour integration

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Marta; Plöchl, Michael; Vicente, Raul; Pipa, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    The ability to integrate visual features into a global coherent percept that can be further categorized and manipulated are fundamental abilities of the neural system. While the processing of visual information involves activation of early visual cortices, the recruitment of parietal and frontal cortices has been shown to be crucial for perceptual processes. Yet is it not clear how both cortical and long-range oscillatory activity leads to the integration of visual features into a coherent percept. Here, we will investigate perceptual grouping through the analysis of a contour categorization task, where the local elements that form contour must be linked into a coherent structure, which is then further processed and manipulated to perform the categorization task. The contour formation in our visual stimulus is a dynamic process where, for the first time, visual perception of contours is disentangled from the onset of visual stimulation or from motor preparation, cognitive processes that until now have been behaviorally attached to perceptual processes. Our main finding is that, while local and long-range synchronization at several frequencies seem to be an ongoing phenomena, categorization of a contour could only be predicted through local oscillatory activity within parietal/frontal sources, which in turn, would synchronize at gamma (>30 Hz) frequency. Simultaneously, fronto-parietal beta (13–30 Hz) phase locking forms a network spanning across neural sources that are not category specific. Both long range networks, i.e., the gamma network that is category specific, and the beta network that is not category specific, are functionally distinct but spatially overlapping. Altogether, we show that a critical mechanism underlying contour categorization involves oscillatory activity within parietal/frontal cortices, as well as its synchronization across distal cortical sites. PMID:25165437

  10. [The endocranial parietal vascular traces in the hominid line].

    PubMed

    Saban, R

    1977-03-01

    The study of the grooves traced by the middle meningeal veins on the parietal bone or the endocast of Hominid fossils shows different patterns which correspond to each evolutive stage. Height types are characterised among the Hominids (Australopithecines, Archanthropines, Paleanthropines and Neanthropines): I, robust Australopithecine type; II, gracile Australopithecine type; III, earliest Pithecanthropine type; IV, evolved Pithecanthropine type; V, Preneandertal type; VI, neandertal type; VII, Neanthropine type; VIII, modern type. PMID:405108

  11. Bottom-up Visual Integration in the Medial Parietal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Nösberger, Myriam; Gutbrod, Klemens; Weber, Konrad P; Linnebank, Michael; Brugger, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Largely based on findings from functional neuroimaging studies, the medial parietal lobe is known to contribute to internally directed cognitive processes such as visual imagery or episodic memory. Here, we present 2 patients with behavioral impairments that extend this view. Both had chronic unilateral lesions of nearly the entire medial parietal lobe, but in opposite hemispheres. Routine neuropsychological examination conducted >4 years after the onset of brain damage showed little deficits of minor severity. In contrast, both patients reported persistent unusual visual impairment. A comprehensive series of tachistoscopic experiments with lateralized stimulus presentation and comparison with healthy participants revealed partial visual hemiagnosia for stimuli presented to their contralesional hemifield, applying inferential single-case statistics to evaluate deficits and dissociations. Double dissociations were found in 4 experiments during which participants had to integrate more than one visual element, either through comparison or formation of a global gestalt. Against the background of recent neuroimaging findings, we conclude that of all medial parietal structures, the precuneus is the most likely candidate for a crucial involvement in such bottom-up visual integration. PMID:25331599

  12. Early recurrence and ongoing parietal driving during elementary visual processing.

    PubMed

    Plomp, Gijs; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Astolfi, Laura; Michel, Christoph M

    2015-01-01

    Visual stimuli quickly activate a broad network of brain areas that often show reciprocal structural connections between them. Activity at short latencies (<100 ms) is thought to represent a feed-forward activation of widespread cortical areas, but fast activation combined with reciprocal connectivity between areas in principle allows for two-way, recurrent interactions to occur at short latencies after stimulus onset. Here we combined EEG source-imaging and Granger-causal modeling with high temporal resolution to investigate whether recurrent and top-down interactions between visual and attentional brain areas can be identified and distinguished at short latencies in humans. We investigated the directed interactions between widespread occipital, parietal and frontal areas that we localized within participants using fMRI. The connectivity results showed two-way interactions between area MT and V1 already at short latencies. In addition, the results suggested a large role for lateral parietal cortex in coordinating visual activity that may be understood as an ongoing top-down allocation of attentional resources. Our results support the notion that indirect pathways allow early, evoked driving from MT to V1 to highlight spatial locations of motion transients, while influence from parietal areas is continuously exerted around stimulus onset, presumably reflecting task-related attentional processes. PMID:26692466

  13. Early recurrence and ongoing parietal driving during elementary visual processing

    PubMed Central

    Plomp, Gijs; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Astolfi, Laura; Michel, Christoph M.

    2015-01-01

    Visual stimuli quickly activate a broad network of brain areas that often show reciprocal structural connections between them. Activity at short latencies (<100 ms) is thought to represent a feed-forward activation of widespread cortical areas, but fast activation combined with reciprocal connectivity between areas in principle allows for two-way, recurrent interactions to occur at short latencies after stimulus onset. Here we combined EEG source-imaging and Granger-causal modeling with high temporal resolution to investigate whether recurrent and top-down interactions between visual and attentional brain areas can be identified and distinguished at short latencies in humans. We investigated the directed interactions between widespread occipital, parietal and frontal areas that we localized within participants using fMRI. The connectivity results showed two-way interactions between area MT and V1 already at short latencies. In addition, the results suggested a large role for lateral parietal cortex in coordinating visual activity that may be understood as an ongoing top-down allocation of attentional resources. Our results support the notion that indirect pathways allow early, evoked driving from MT to V1 to highlight spatial locations of motion transients, while influence from parietal areas is continuously exerted around stimulus onset, presumably reflecting task-related attentional processes. PMID:26692466

  14. 76 FR 4123 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, ZDE1 VH (13) NIDCR Review of Small Research Grants for Data Analysis and...

  15. 75 FR 82033 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  16. 75 FR 13561 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  17. 75 FR 4833 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Dr., Rm 4AN 32J,...

  18. 75 FR 55592 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Dental and Craniofacial Research Council, September 27, 2010, 8:30 a.m. to September 27, 2010, 3...

  19. 78 FR 65343 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... published in the Federal Register on September 16, 2013, 78 FR 56902. Meeting date has changed from October... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, October 7, 2013, 10:00 a.m. to October 7,...

  20. 77 FR 49820 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  1. 75 FR 62546 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research..., National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Dr. Rm 4AN...

  2. 78 FR 50066 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is ] hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  3. 78 FR 24761 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  4. 76 FR 23612 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  5. 76 FR 51995 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  6. 76 FR 48874 - National Institute Of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, Review of RFA-DE-12-002; National Dental Practice-based Research, Network...

  7. 78 FR 65348 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ..., MD 20892 which was published in the Federal Register on September 27, 2013, 78 FR 59708. Meeting date... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, October 21, 2013, 9:00 a.m. to October 21,...

  8. 77 FR 74674 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  9. 75 FR 51275 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  10. Scene-Selectivity and Retinotopy in Medial Parietal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Silson, Edward H; Steel, Adam D; Baker, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies in human reliably identify a trio of scene-selective regions, one on each of the lateral [occipital place area (OPA)], ventral [parahippocampal place area (PPA)], and medial [retrosplenial complex (RSC)] cortical surfaces. Recently, we demonstrated differential retinotopic biases for the contralateral lower and upper visual fields within OPA and PPA, respectively. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we combine detailed mapping of both population receptive fields (pRF) and category-selectivity, with independently acquired resting-state functional connectivity analyses, to examine scene and retinotopic processing within medial parietal cortex. We identified a medial scene-selective region, which was contained largely within the posterior and ventral bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS). While this region is typically referred to as RSC, the spatial extent of our scene-selective region typically did not extend into retrosplenial cortex, and thus we adopt the term medial place area (MPA) to refer to this visually defined scene-selective region. Intriguingly MPA co-localized with a region identified solely on the basis of retinotopic sensitivity using pRF analyses. We found that MPA demonstrates a significant contralateral visual field bias, coupled with large pRF sizes. Unlike OPA and PPA, MPA did not show a consistent bias to a single visual quadrant. MPA also co-localized with a region identified by strong differential functional connectivity with PPA and the human face-selective fusiform face area (FFA), commensurate with its functional selectivity. Functional connectivity with OPA was much weaker than with PPA, and similar to that with face-selective occipital face area (OFA), suggesting a closer link with ventral than lateral cortex. Consistent with prior research, we also observed differential functional connectivity in medial parietal cortex for anterior over posterior PPA, as well as a region on the lateral

  11. Scene-Selectivity and Retinotopy in Medial Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Silson, Edward H.; Steel, Adam D.; Baker, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies in human reliably identify a trio of scene-selective regions, one on each of the lateral [occipital place area (OPA)], ventral [parahippocampal place area (PPA)], and medial [retrosplenial complex (RSC)] cortical surfaces. Recently, we demonstrated differential retinotopic biases for the contralateral lower and upper visual fields within OPA and PPA, respectively. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we combine detailed mapping of both population receptive fields (pRF) and category-selectivity, with independently acquired resting-state functional connectivity analyses, to examine scene and retinotopic processing within medial parietal cortex. We identified a medial scene-selective region, which was contained largely within the posterior and ventral bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS). While this region is typically referred to as RSC, the spatial extent of our scene-selective region typically did not extend into retrosplenial cortex, and thus we adopt the term medial place area (MPA) to refer to this visually defined scene-selective region. Intriguingly MPA co-localized with a region identified solely on the basis of retinotopic sensitivity using pRF analyses. We found that MPA demonstrates a significant contralateral visual field bias, coupled with large pRF sizes. Unlike OPA and PPA, MPA did not show a consistent bias to a single visual quadrant. MPA also co-localized with a region identified by strong differential functional connectivity with PPA and the human face-selective fusiform face area (FFA), commensurate with its functional selectivity. Functional connectivity with OPA was much weaker than with PPA, and similar to that with face-selective occipital face area (OFA), suggesting a closer link with ventral than lateral cortex. Consistent with prior research, we also observed differential functional connectivity in medial parietal cortex for anterior over posterior PPA, as well as a region on the lateral

  12. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  13. First molar health status in different craniofacial relationships

    PubMed Central

    Linjawi, Amal I

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between the health status of permanent first molars and different craniofacial relationships among adolescents. Study design This is a retrospective study on patients’ records aged 11–15 years. Sex, skeletal relationship, vertical growth pattern, malocclusion, overjet, and overbite were assessed. The health status of permanent first molars was recorded from the orthopantomograms and intraoral photographs as “sound” and “not sound”. Chi-square, Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were used to analyze and correlate the assessed variables. Significance level was set at P<0.05. Results A total of 210 records were evaluated; 81 were male, 68 had Class I and 91 had Class II skeletal relationships. More than half of the subjects had normal (n=67) to moderate deep bite (n=72); normal (n=91), moderately increased (n=54), to severely increased (n=50) overjet; and Class I (n=106) and Class II division 1 (n=75) malocclusion. Significant differences were found in the health status of the permanent first molars with respect to sex (P=0.034), vertical growth pattern (P=0.01), and overbite (P=0.047). Strong correlations were only found between the health status of the permanent first molars and the following variables: sex (P=0.036) and vertical growth pattern (P=0.004). Significant correlation was further found between the upper left first molar health status and sex (P=0.019) and the lower right first molar health status and the vertical growth pattern (P=0.001). No significant association was found with the anteroposterior craniofacial relationships (P>0.05). Conclusion Sex difference and vertical growth patterns were found to be potential predictors of the health status of the permanent first molars. No significant association was found with the anteroposterior craniofacial relationships. PMID:27462176

  14. Antibacterial coating on biocomposites for cranio-facial reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    LAZAR, MADALINA ANCA; VODNAR, DAN; PRODAN, DOINA; ROTARU, HORATIU; ROMAN, CALIN RARES; SORCOI, LIDIA ADRIANA; BACIUT, GRIGORE; CAMPIAN, RADU SEPTIMIU

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Despite the fact that implants are sterilized, antiseptic techniques are applied and systemic antibiotics are routinely administered prior to and after craniofacial surgery, infection rates between 3% and 40% are still reported for alloplastic implants, urging for implant removal. The present study focuses on the development of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implant for craniofacial reconstruction with antimicrobial properties. Methods A new fiber-reinforced composite coated with gentamicin was developed and tested for bacterial adherence and antibacterial efficiency, using two of the most involved bacterial strains in the postoperative infections: Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results Bacteria were efficiently inactivated in direct contact with gentamicin coatings (p<0.05). The inhibition zone for Staphylococcus aureus ranged from 17.21 mm to 20.13 mm and for Pseudomonas aeruginosa ranged from 12.93 mm to 15.33 mm. Although no significant statistical results were found for bacterial adhesion and gentamicin concentration, (Staphylococcus aureus: β= −0.974; p=0.144>0.05 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: β = −0.921; p=0.255>0.05), a negative relation was observed, indicating the reversed relation between the antibiotic dosage and the bacterial adherence. Conclusion The results of the two applied microbiological protocols used in the study suggested that gentamicin eluting coating inhibited not only the bacterial growth, but also led to a lower initial bacterial adhesion to the surface of the implant. Thus, antibiotic coating of craniofacial implants may reduce the infection rate related to reconstructive surgery. PMID:27547065

  15. SP8 regulates signaling centers during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Kasberg, Abigail D; Brunskill, Eric W; Steven Potter, S

    2013-09-15

    Much of the bone, cartilage and smooth muscle of the vertebrate face is derived from neural crest (NC) cells. During craniofacial development, the anterior neural ridge (ANR) and olfactory pit (OP) signaling centers are responsible for driving the outgrowth, survival, and differentiation of NC populated facial prominences, primarily via FGF. While much is known about the functional importance of signaling centers, relatively little is understood of how these signaling centers are made and maintained. In this report we describe a dramatic craniofacial malformation in mice mutant for the zinc finger transcription factor gene Sp8. At E14.5 they show facial prominences that are reduced in size and underdeveloped, giving an almost faceless phenotype. At later times they show severe midline defects, excencephaly, hyperterlorism, cleft palate, and a striking loss of many NC and paraxial mesoderm derived cranial bones. Sp8 expression was primarily restricted to the ANR and OP regions during craniofacial development. Analysis of an extensive series of conditional Sp8 mutants confirmed the critical role of Sp8 in signaling centers, and not directly in the NC and paraxial mesoderm cells. The NC cells of the Sp8 mutants showed increased levels of apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation, thereby explaining the reduced sizes of the facial prominences. Perturbed gene expression in the Sp8 mutants was examined by laser capture microdissection coupled with microarrays, as well as in situ hybridization and immunostaining. The most dramatic differences included striking reductions in Fgf8 and Fgf17 expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers. We were also able to achieve genetic and pharmaceutical partial rescue of the Sp8 mutant phenotype by reducing Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. These results show that Sp8 primarily functions to promote Fgf expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers that drive the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of the NC and paraxial

  16. SP8 regulates signaling centers during craniofacial development

    PubMed Central

    Kasberg, Abigail D.; Brunskill, Eric W.; Potter, S. Steven

    2014-01-01

    Much of the bone, cartilage and smooth muscle of the vertebrate face is derived from neural crest (NC) cells. During craniofacial development, the anterior neural ridge (ANR) and olfactory pit (OP) signaling centers are responsible for driving the outgrowth, survival, and differentiation of NC populated facial prominences, primarily via FGF. While much is known about the functional importance of signaling centers, relatively little is understood of how these signaling centers are made and maintained. In this report we describe a dramatic craniofacial malformation in mice mutant for the zinc finger transcription factor gene Sp8. At E14.5 they show facial prominences that are reduced in size and underdeveloped, giving an almost faceless phenotype. At later times they show severe midline defects, excencephaly, hyperterlorism, cleft palate, and a striking loss of many NC and paraxial mesoderm derived cranial bones. Sp8 expression was primarily restricted to the ANR and OP regions during craniofacial development. Analysis of an extensive series of conditional Sp8 mutants confirmed the critical role of Sp8 in signaling centers, and not directly in the NC and paraxial mesoderm cells. The NC cells of the Sp8 mutants showed increased levels of apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation, thereby explaining the reduced sizes of the facial prominences. Perturbed gene expression in the Sp8 mutants was examined by laser capture microdissection coupled with microarrays, as well as in situ hybridization and immunostaining. The most dramatic differences included striking reductions in Fgf8 and Fgf17 expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers. We were also able to achieve genetic and pharmaceutical partial rescue of the Sp8 mutant phenotype by reducing Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. These results show that Sp8 primarily functions to promote Fgf expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers that drive the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of the NC and paraxial

  17. A bivariate approach to the variation of the parietal curvature in the genus homo.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Emiliano; De La Cuétara, José Manuel; Holloway, Ralph

    2011-09-01

    The parietal bones approximately cover the extension of the underlying parietal lobes. Although the boundaries of these two anatomical elements do not coincide, during morphogenesis the growth of the parietal bones is largely induced by the pressure exerted by the parietal lobes. Modern humans display larger parietal chords and arcs compared with non-modern human species. However, the variation of these variables have not been analyzed before according to the covariation with the general endocranial diameters. When the curvature of the parietal bones is regressed onto the main neurocranial distances, modern humans show larger relative values, suggesting not only an absolute enlargement but a definite allometric change. Taking into account the morphogenetic relationships with the parietal lobes, these results further support previous hypotheses suggesting a relative enlargement of these cortical areas in Homo sapiens, by using simple and reliable homologous neurocranial arcs. PMID:21809464

  18. An image processing system for locating craniofacial landmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Cardillo, J.; Sid-Ahmed, M.A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    A new automatic target recognition algorithm has been developed to extract craniofacial landmarks from lateral skull x-rays (cephalograms). The locations of these landmarks are used by orthodontists in what is referred to as a cephalometric evaluation. The evaluation assists in the diagnosis of anomalies and in the monitoring of treatments. The algorithm is based on gray-scale mathematical morphology. A statistical approach to training was used to overcome subtle differences in skeletal topographies. Decomposition was used to desensitize the algorithm to size differences. A system was trained to locate 20 landmarks. Tests on 40 x-rays showed an 85% recognition rate on average.

  19. Single gene disorders with craniofacial and oral manifestations.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali

    2014-01-01

    Gene and environmental factors are instrumental in genesis of complex and wide range of disorders and syndromes. The newer gene sequencing and other advanced technologies have made our previous knowledge of genetic etiopathogenesis of various disorders more transparent. Single gene disorders refer to the disorders caused due to mutations in a single gene and a fair number of these manifest as craniofacial defects and anomalies. This review is an attempt to give a detailed insight into the varied single gene disorders and syndromes with an emphasis on dental implications. PMID:25707843

  20. Measuring outcomes in craniofacial and pediatric plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Karen W Y; Forrest, Christopher R; Goodacre, Tim E E; Klassen, Anne F

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses the measurement of outcomes in craniofacial and pediatric plastic surgery, using examples of craniosynostosis and cleft lip and/or palate (CLP). The challenges in measuring the standard outcomes of function, aesthetics, and health-related quality of life are discussed, along with the importance of developing evidence and studying quality improvement in this specialty. The need to define specific and comprehensive goals is discussed with a focus on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Examples from the development of the CLEFT-Q, a PRO instrument for patients with CLP, are provided to support the need to seek the patient perspective. PMID:23506771

  1. Syndecan-1 in the Mouse Parietal Peritoneum Microcirculation in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewska, Paulina M.; Patrick, Amanda L.; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138) was shown to regulate inflammatory responses by binding chemokines and cytokines and interacting with adhesion molecules, thereby modulating leukocyte trafficking to tissues. The objectives of this study were to examine the expression of syndecan-1 and its role in leukocyte recruitment and chemokine presentation in the microcirculation underlying the parietal peritoneum. Methods Wild-type BALB/c and syndecan-1 null mice were stimulated with an intraperitoneal injection of Staphylococcus aureus LTA, Escherichia coli LPS or TNFα and the microcirculation of the parietal peritoneum was examined by intravital microscopy after 4 hours. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was used to examine syndecan-1 expression in the peritoneal microcirculation using fluorescent antibodies. Blocking antibodies to adhesion molecules were used to examine the role of these molecules in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in response to LTA. To determine whether syndecan-1 co-localizes with chemokines in vivo, fluorescent antibodies to syndecan-1 were co-injected intravenously with anti-MIP-2 (CXCL2), anti-KC (CXCL1) or anti-MCP-1 (CCL2). Results and Conclusion Syndecan-1 was localized to the subendothelial region of peritoneal venules and the mesothelial layer. Leukocyte rolling was significantly decreased with LPS treatment while LTA and TNFα significantly increased leukocyte adhesion compared with saline control. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were not different in syndecan-1 null mice. Antibody blockade of β2 integrin (CD18), ICAM-1 (CD54) and VCAM-1 (CD106) did not decrease leukocyte adhesion in response to LTA challenge while blockade of P-selectin (CD62P) abrogated leukocyte rolling. Lastly, MIP-2 expression in the peritoneal venules was not dependent on syndecan-1 in vivo. Our data suggest that syndecan-1 is expressed in the parietal peritoneum microvasculature but does not regulate leukocyte recruitment

  2. Creation of three-dimensional craniofacial standards from CBCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanyan, Krishna; Palomo, Martin; Hans, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Low-dose three-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is becoming increasingly popular in the clinical practice of dental medicine. Two-dimensional Bolton Standards of dentofacial development are routinely used to identify deviations from normal craniofacial anatomy. With the advent of CBCT three dimensional imaging, we propose a set of methods to extend these 2D Bolton Standards to anatomically correct surface based 3D standards to allow analysis of morphometric changes seen in craniofacial complex. To create 3D surface standards, we have implemented series of steps. 1) Converting bi-plane 2D tracings into set of splines 2) Converting the 2D splines curves from bi-plane projection into 3D space curves 3) Creating labeled template of facial and skeletal shapes and 4) Creating 3D average surface Bolton standards. We have used datasets from patients scanned with Hitachi MercuRay CBCT scanner providing high resolution and isotropic CT volume images, digitized Bolton Standards from age 3 to 18 years of lateral and frontal male, female and average tracings and converted them into facial and skeletal 3D space curves. This new 3D standard will help in assessing shape variations due to aging in young population and provide reference to correct facial anomalies in dental medicine.

  3. Craniofacial resection: decreased complication rate with a modified subcranial approach.

    PubMed

    Ross, D A; Marentette, L J; Moore, C E; Switz, K L

    1999-01-01

    The authors have successfully utilized a modified subcranial approach to the anterior skull base, based upon the procedure first described by Joram Raveh, as an alternative to standard craniofacial resection. The complication rate of this procedure in 31 consecutive cases (28 tumors, 2 congenital malformations, and 1 mucocele) has been 19.4% with no permanent complications, no deaths, no new neurological deficits, no brain injuries, no infections, and no seizures. Minor complications without permanent sequelae included two cases of tension pnenmocephalus, a subdural hygroma, two transient cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and a case of bacterial meningitis secondary to fecal contamination of a lumbar drain in a child. Average length of hospitalization was 7.1 days (range 2 to 16 days). The overall complication rate is considerably below the complication rate for other reported craniofacial procedures. We describe the technique we have used and the results. The subcranial approach as described herein provides wide exposure of the anterior cranial base without brain retraction, does not require prolonged operating times or hospitalization, and has a potentially lower complication rate than reported for other transfrontal transbasal approaches. PMID:17171124

  4. IFT46 plays crucial roles in craniofacial and cilia development.

    PubMed

    Park, Inji; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Chowon; Ismail, Tayaba; Kim, Yoo-Kyung; Park, Jeen-Woo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Dong-Seok; Park, Tae-Joo; Park, Mae-Ja; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Lee, Hyun-Shik

    2016-08-26

    The intraflagellar transport (IFT) system is essential for bidirectional movement of ciliary components from the basal body to the tip beneath the ciliary sheath and is conserved for cilia and flagella formation in most vertebrates. IFT complex A is involved in anterograde trafficking, whereas complex B is involved in retrograde trafficking. IFT46 is well known as a crucial component of IFT complex B, however, its developmental functions are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the novel functions of IFT46 during vertebrate development, especially, ciliogenesis and neurogenesis, because IFT46 is strongly expressed in both multiciliated cells of epithelial and neural tissues. Knockdown of IFT46 using morpholino microinjections caused shortening of the body axis as well as the formation of fewer and shorter cilia. Furthermore, loss of IFT46 down-regulated the expression of the neural plate and neural tube markers, thus may influence Wnt/planar cell polarity and the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway during neurogenesis. In addition, loss of IFT46 caused craniofacial defects by interfering with cartilage formation. In conclusion, our results depict that IFT46 plays important roles in cilia as well as in neural and craniofacial development. PMID:27320864

  5. Thermal shell fragment craniofacial injury: biophysics, pathophysiology, and management.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to bring attention to unique risks and burns by thermal shell fragment craniofacial soft tissue injury. Hot shrapnel may inflict burns to major vessel walls and lead to life-threatening hemorrhaging or death, which adds a new challenge for craniofacial surgeons. Morbidity of thermal deep tissue may lead to deep tissue necrosis and infection.Thermal energy (TE) physics, biophysics, and pathophysiological effects relate directly to the amount of heat generated from shell casing detonation, which transfers to skin, deep tissue, as well as brain and leads to life-threatening burning of organs; this is different from shrapnel kinetic energy injury.The unprecedented increase in using a large range of explosives and high-heat thermobaric weapons contributes to the superfluous and unnecessary suffering caused by thermal injury wounds.Surgeons and medics should recognize that a surprising amount of TE can be found in an explosion or detonation of a steel-encased explosive, resulting in TEs ranging from 400 F up to 1000 F. PMID:25534053

  6. Developmental mechanisms underlying variation in craniofacial disease and evolution.

    PubMed

    Fish, Jennifer L

    2016-07-15

    Craniofacial disease phenotypes exhibit significant variation in penetrance and severity. Although many genetic contributions to phenotypic variation have been identified, genotype-phenotype correlations remain imprecise. Recent work in evolutionary developmental biology has exposed intriguing developmental mechanisms that potentially explain incongruities in genotype-phenotype relationships. This review focuses on two observations from work in comparative and experimental animal model systems that highlight how development structures variation. First, multiple genetic inputs converge on relatively few developmental processes. Investigation of when and how variation in developmental processes occurs may therefore help predict potential genetic interactions and phenotypic outcomes. Second, genetic mutation is typically associated with an increase in phenotypic variance. Several models outlining developmental mechanisms underlying mutational increases in phenotypic variance are discussed using Satb2-mediated variation in jaw size as an example. These data highlight development as a critical mediator of genotype-phenotype correlations. Future research in evolutionary developmental biology focusing on tissue-level processes may help elucidate the "black box" between genotype and phenotype, potentially leading to novel treatment, earlier diagnoses, and better clinical consultations for individuals affected by craniofacial anomalies. PMID:26724698

  7. Wnt Signaling and Its Contribution to Craniofacial Tissue Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yin, X; Li, J; Salmon, B; Huang, L; Lim, W H; Liu, B; Hunter, D J; Ransom, R C; Singh, G; Gillette, M; Zou, S; Helms, J A

    2015-11-01

    A new field of dental medicine seeks to exploit nature's solution for repairing damaged tissues, through the process of regeneration. Most adult mammalian tissues have limited regenerative capacities, but in lower vertebrates, the molecular machinery for regeneration is an elemental part of their genetic makeup. Accumulating data suggest that the molecular pathways responsible for the regenerative capacity of teleosts, amphibians, and reptiles have fallen into disuse in mammals but that they can be "jumpstarted" by the selective activation of key molecules. The Wnt family of secreted proteins constitutes one such critical pathway: Wnt proteins rank among the most potent and ubiquitous stem cell self-renewing factors, with tremendous potential for promoting human tissue regeneration. Wnt reporter and lineage-tracing strains of mice have been employed to create molecular maps of Wnt responsiveness in the craniofacial tissues, and these patterns of Wnt signaling colocalize with stem/progenitor populations in the rodent incisor apex, the dental pulp, the alveolar bone, the periodontal ligament, the cementum, and oral mucosa. The importance of Wnt signaling in both the maintenance and healing of these craniofacial tissues is summarized, and the therapeutic potential of Wnt-based strategies to accelerate healing through activation of endogenous stem cells is highlighted. PMID:26285808

  8. Thymus, kidney and craniofacial abnormalities in Six 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Laclef, Christine; Souil, Evelyne; Demignon, Josiane; Maire, Pascal

    2003-06-01

    Six genes are widely expressed during vertebrate embryogenesis, suggesting that they are implicated in diverse differentiation processes. To determine the functions of the Six1 gene, we constructed Six1-deficient mice by replacing its first exon by the beta-galactosidase gene. We have previously shown that mice lacking Six1 die at birth due to thoracic skeletal defects and severe muscle hypoplasia affecting most of the body muscles. Here, we report that Six1(-/-) neonates also lack a kidney and thymus, as well as displaying a strong disorganisation of craniofacial structures, namely the inner ear, the nasal cavity, the craniofacial skeleton, and the lacrimal and parotid glands. These organ defects can be correlated with Six1 expression in the embryonic primordium structures as revealed by X-Gal staining at different stages of embryogenesis. Thus, the fetal abnormalities of Six1(-/-) mice appear to result from the absence of the Six 1 homeoprotein during early stages of organogenesis. Interestingly, these Six1 defects are very similar to phenotypes caused by mutations of Eya 1, which are responsible for the BOR syndrome in humans. Close comparison of Six1 and Eya 1 deficient mice strongly suggests a functional link between these two factors. Pax gene mutations also lead to comparable phenotypes, suggesting that a regulatory network including the Pax, Six and Eya genes is required for several types of organogenesis in mammals. PMID:12834866

  9. A gene expression atlas of early craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, Andrew S; Distasio, Andrew; Dexheimer, Phillip; Plassard, Andrew; Aronow, Bruce J; Potter, S Steven

    2014-07-15

    We present a gene expression atlas of early mouse craniofacial development. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate cells from the principal critical microregions, whose development, differentiation and signaling interactions are responsible for the construction of the mammalian face. At E8.5, as migrating neural crest cells begin to exit the neural fold/epidermal ectoderm boundary, we examined the cranial mesenchyme, composed of mixed neural crest and paraxial mesoderm cells, as well as cells from adjacent neuroepithelium. At E9.5 cells from the cranial mesenchyme, overlying olfactory placode/epidermal ectoderm, and underlying neuroepithelium, as well as the emerging mandibular and maxillary arches were sampled. At E10.5, as the facial prominences form, cells from the medial and lateral prominences, the olfactory pit, multiple discrete regions of underlying neuroepithelium, the mandibular and maxillary arches, including both their mesenchymal and ectodermal components, as well as Rathke's pouch, were similarly sampled and profiled using both microarray and RNA-seq technologies. Further, we performed single cell studies to better define the gene expression states of the early E8.5 pioneer neural crest cells and paraxial mesoderm. Taken together, and analyzable by a variety of biological network approaches, these data provide a complementing and cross validating resource capable of fueling discovery of novel compartment specific markers and signatures whose combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and growth factors/receptors are responsible for providing the master genetic blueprint for craniofacial development. PMID:24780627

  10. A Gene Expression Atlas of Early Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W.; Potter, Andrew S.; Distasio, Andrew; Dexheimer, Phillip; Plassard, Andrew; Aronow, Bruce J.; Potter, S. Steven

    2014-01-01

    We present a gene expression atlas of early mouse craniofacial development. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate cells from the principal critical micro-regions, whose development, differentiation and signaling interactions are responsible for the construction of the mammalian face. At E8.5, as migrating neural crest cells begin to exit the neural fold/epidermal ectoderm boundary, we examined the cranial mesenchyme, composed of mixed neural crest and paraxial mesoderm cells, as well as cells from adjacent neuroepithelium. At E9.5 cells from the cranial mesenchyme, overlying olfactory placode/epidermal ectoderm, and underlying neuroepithelium, as well as the emerging mandibular and maxillary arches were sampled. At E10.5, as the facial prominences form, cells from the medial and lateral prominences, the olfactory pit, multiple discrete regions of underlying neuroepithelium, the mandibular and maxillary arches, including both their mesenchymal and ectodermal components, as well as Rathke’s pouch, were similarly sampled and profiled using both microarray and RNA-seq technologies. Further, we performed single cell studies to better define the gene expression states of the early E8.5 pioneer neural crest cells and paraxial mesoderm. Taken together, and analyzable by a variety of biological network approaches, these data provide a complementing and cross-validating resource capable of fueling discovery of novel compartment specific markers and signatures whose combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and growth factors/receptors are responsible for providing the master genetic blueprint for craniofacial development. PMID:24780627