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Sample records for parity-nonconserving transition amplitude

  1. Parity nonconservation in atomic Zeeman transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Angstmann, E. J.; Dinh, T. H.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2005-11-15

    We discuss the possibility of measuring nuclear anapole moments in atomic Zeeman transitions and perform the necessary calculations. Advantages of using Zeeman transitions include variable transition frequencies and the possibility of enhancement of parity nonconservation effects.

  2. Influence of the Dirac-Hartree-Fock starting potential on the parity-nonconserving electric-dipole-transition amplitudes in cesium and thallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perger, W. F.; Das, B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The parity-nonconserving electric-dipole-transition amplitudes for the 6s1/2-7s1/2 transition in cesium and the 6p1/2-7p1/2 transition in thallium have been calculated by the Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. The effects of using different Dirac-Hartree-Fock atomic core potentials are examined and the transition amplitudes for both the length and velocity gauges are given. It is found that the parity-nonconserving transition amplitudes exhibit a greater dependence on the starting potential for thallium than for cesium.

  3. Radiative and correlation effects on the parity-nonconserving transition amplitude in heavy alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Pachucki, K.; Plunien, G.; Yerokhin, V. A.

    2005-12-15

    The complete gauge-invariant set of the one-loop QED corrections to the parity-nonconserving (PNC) amplitude in cesium and francium is evaluated to all orders in {alpha}Z using a local form of the Dirac-Fock potential. The calculations are performed in both length and velocity gauges for the absorbed photon and the total binding QED correction is found to be -0.27(3)% for Cs and -0.28(5)% for Fr. Moreover, a high-precision calculation of the electron-correlation and Breit-interaction effects on the 7s-8s PNC amplitude in francium using a large-scale configuration-interaction Dirac-Fock method is performed. The obtained results are employed to improve the theoretical predictions for the PNC transition amplitude in Cs and Fr. Using an average value from two most accurate measurements of the vector transition polarizability, the weak charge of {sup 133}Cs is derived to amount to Q{sub W}=-72.65(29){sub exp}(36){sub theor}. This value deviates by 1.1{sigma} from the prediction of the standard model. The values of the 7s-8s PNC amplitude in {sup 223}Fr and {sup 210}Fr are obtained to be -15.49(15) and -14.16(14), respectively, in units of ix10{sup -11}(-Q{sub W})/N a.u.

  4. Development of the configuration-interaction + all-order method and application to the parity-nonconserving amplitude and other properties of Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porsev, S. G.; Kozlov, M. G.; Safronova, M. S.; Tupitsyn, I. I.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a significantly more flexible variant of the relativistic atomic method of calculation that combines configuration-interaction and coupled-cluster approaches. The new version is no longer restricted to a specific choice of the initial approximation corresponding to the self-consistent field of the atomic core. We have applied this approach to calculation of different properties of atomic lead, including the energy levels, hyperfine structure constants, electric-dipole transition amplitudes, and E 1 parity nonconserving (PNC) amplitude for the 6 p2P30-6 p2P31 transition. The uncertainty of the E 1 PNC amplitude was reduced by a factor of two in comparison with the previous most accurate calculation [V. A. Dzuba et al., Europhys. Lett. 7, 413 (1988), 10.1209/0295-5075/7/5/006]. Our value for the weak charge QW=-117 (5 ) is in agreement with the standard-model prediction.

  5. Enhanced spin-dependent parity-nonconservation effect in the 7 s 1/2 2S →6 d 5/2 2D transition in Fr: A possibility for unambiguous detection of the nuclear anapole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. K.; Aoki, T.; Das, B. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Employing the relativistic coupled-cluster method, comparative studies of the parity nonconserving electric dipole amplitudes for the 7 s 1/2 2S →6 d 5/2 2D transitions in 210Fr and 211Fr isotopes have been carried out. It is found that these transition amplitudes, sensitive only to the nuclear spin-dependent effects, are enhanced substantially owing to the very large contributions from the electron core-polarization effects in Fr. This translates to a relatively large and, in principle, measurable induced light shift, which would be a signature of nuclear spin-dependent parity nonconservation that is dominated by the nuclear anapole moment in a heavy atom like Fr. A plausible scheme to measure this quantity using the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) facility at Tohoku University has been outlined.

  6. Parity nonconservation in the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    The development of experiments to detect parity nonconserving (PNC) mixing of the 2s/sub a/2/ and 2p/sub 1/2/ levels of the hydrogen atom in a 570 Gauss magnetic field is described. The technique involves observation of an asymmetry in the rate of microwave induced transitions at 1608 MHz due to the interference of two amplitudes, one produced by applied microwave and static electric fields and the other produced by an applied microwave field and the 2s/sub 1/2/-2p/sub 1/2/ mixing inducd by a PNC Hamiltonian.

  7. Relativistic Coupled-Cluster Theory of Atomic Parity Nonconservation: Application to {sup 137}Ba{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Bijaya K.; Chaudhuri, Rajat; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2006-04-28

    We report the result of our ab initio calculation of the 6s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}5d{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} parity nonconserving electric dipole transition amplitude in {sup 137}Ba{sup +} based on relativistic coupled-cluster theory. Considering single, double, and partial triple excitations, we have achieved an accuracy of less than 1%. If the accuracy of our calculation can be matched by the proposed parity nonconservation experiment in Ba{sup +} for the above transition, then the combination of the two results would provide an independent nonaccelerator test of the standard model of particle physics.

  8. Parity nonconservation in the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    The development of experiments to detect parity nonconserving (PNC) mixing of the 2s/sub 1///sub 2/ and 2p/sub 1///sub 2/ levels of the hydrogen atom in a 570 Gauss magnetic field is described. The technique involves observation of an asymmetry in the rate of microwave induced transitions at 1608 MHz due to the interference of two amplitudes, one produced by applied microwave and static electric fields and the other produced by an applied microwave field and the 2s/sub 1///sub 2/ - 2p/sub 1///sub 2/ mixing induced by a PNC Hamiltonian. These investigations, underway since 1977, have led to an experiment in which the two amplitudes are produced in two independently phased microwave cavities. The apparatus has the great advantage that all applied fields are cylindrically symmetric, thus false PNC effects can be generated only by departures from cylindrical symmetry which enter as the product of two small misalignment angles. The apparatus also has great diagnostic power since the sectioned microwave cavities can be used to produce static electric fields over short, well localized regions of space. This permits alignment of the apparatus and provides a sensitive probe of cylindrical symmetry. A phase regulation loop greatly reduces phase noise due to instabilities of the magnetic field, microwave generators, and resonant cavities. A preliminary measurement following alignment of the apparatus sets an upper limit of 575 on the parameter C/sub 2/p, which gives the strength of the PNC-induced mixing of the ..beta../sub 0/ (2s/sub 1///sub 2/) and e/sub 0/ (2p/sub 1///sub 2/) states. The prediction of the standard model, including radiative corrections, is C/sub 2/p = 0.08 +/- 0.037.

  9. Breit interaction and parity nonconservation in many-electron atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Safronova, M. S.

    2006-02-15

    We present accurate ab initio nonperturbative calculations of the Breit correction to the parity nonconserving (PNC) amplitudes of the 6s-7s and 6s-5d{sub 3/2} transitions in Cs, 7s-8s and 7s-6d{sub 3/2} transitions in Fr, 6s-5d{sub 3/2} transition in Ba{sup +}, 7s-6d{sub 3/2} transition in Ra{sup +}, and 6p{sub 1/2}-6p{sub 3}/{sub 2} transition in Tl. The results for the 6s-7s transition in Cs and 7s-8s transition in Fr are in good agreement with other calculations. We demonstrate that higher-orders many-body corrections to the Breit interaction are especially important for the s-d PNC amplitudes. We confirm good agreement of the PNC measurements for cesium and thallium with the standard model.

  10. Precise measurement of parity nonconservation in atomic thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, L.R.

    1981-05-01

    Observation of parity non-conservation in the 6P/sub 1/2/ - 7P/sub 1/2/ transition in /sub 81/Tl/sup 203/ /sup 205/ is reported. The transition is nominally forbidden M1 with amplitude M. Due to the violation of parity in the electron-nucleon interaction, the transition acquires an additional (parity nonconserving) amplitude e/sub p/. In the presence of an electric field, incident 293 nm circularly polarized light results in a polarization of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state through interference of the Stark amplitude with M and E/sub p/. This polarization is observed by selective excitation of the 7P/sub 1/2/ - (8S/sub 1/2) transition with circularly polarized 2.18 ..mu..m light and observation of the subsequent fluorescence at 323 nm. By utilizing this technique and carefully determining possible systematic contributions through auxiliary measurements, the circular dichroism delta = 2Im(E/sub p/)/ M is observed: delta/sub exp/ = (2.8 + 1.0 - .9) x 10/sup -3/. In addition, measurements of A(6D/sub 3/2/ - 7P/sub 1/2/) = (5.97 +- .78) x 10/sup 5/ s/sup -1/, A(7P/sub 1/2/ - 7S/sub 1/2/) = (1.71 +- .07) x 10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/ and A(7P/sub 3/2/ - 7S/sub 1/2/) = (2.37 +- .09) s/sup -1/ are reported. These values are employed in a semiempirical determination of delta based on the Weinberg-Salam Model. The result of this calculation for sin/sup 2/THETA/sub 2/ = .23 is delta/sub Theo/ = 1.7 +- .8) x 10/sup -3/.

  11. Measurement of the parity nonconserving neutral weak interaction in atomic thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bucksbaum, P.H.

    1980-11-01

    This thesis describes an experiment to measure parity nonconservation in atomic thallium. A frequency doubled, flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser is used to excite the 6P/sub 1/2/(F = 0) ..-->.. 7P/sub 1/2/(F = 1) transition at 292.7 nm, with circularly polarized light. An electrostatic field E of 100 to 300 V/cm causes this transition to occur via Stark induced electric dipole. Two field free transitions may also occur: a highly forbidden magnetic dipole M, and a parity nonconserving electric dipole epsilon/sub P/. The latter is presumed to be due to the presence of a weak neutral current interaction between the 6p valence electron and the nucleus, as predicted by gauge theories which unite the electromagnetic and weak interactions. Both M and epsilon/sub P/ interfere with the Stark amplitude ..beta..E to produce a polarization of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state. This is measured with a circularly polarized infrared laser beam probe, tuned to the 7P/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 8S/sub 1/2/ transition. This selectively excites m/sub F/ = +1 or -1 components of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state, and the polarization is seen as an asymmetry in 8S ..-->.. 6P/sub 3/2/ fluorescence when the probe helicity is reversed. The polarization due to M is ..delta../sub M/ = -2M/(BETAE). It is used to calibrate the analyzing efficiency. The polarization due to epsilon/sub P/ is ..delta../sub P/ = 2i epsilon/sub P//(..beta..E), and can be distinguished from ..delta../sub M/ by its properties under reversal of the 292.7 nm photon helicity and reversal of the laser direction. A preliminary measurement yielded a parity violation in agreement with the gauge theory of Weinberg and Salam.

  12. Parity nonconservation in radioactive atoms: An experimental perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, D.

    1994-11-01

    The measurement of parity nonconservation (PNC) in atoms constitutes an important test of electroweak interactions in nuclei. Great progress has been made over the last 20 years in performing these measurements with ever increasing accuracies. To date the experimental accuracies have reached a level of 1 to 2%. In all cases, except for cesium, the theoretical atomic structure uncertainties now limit the comparison of these measurements to the predictions of the standard model. New measurements involving the ratio of Stark interference transition rates for a series of Cs or Fr radioisotopes are foreseen as a way of eliminating these atomic structure uncertainties. The use of magneto-optical traps to collect and concentrate the much smaller number of radioactive atoms that are produced is considered to be one of the key steps in realizing these measurements. Plans for how these measurements will be done and progress made to date are outlined.

  13. Parity nonconservation in Fr-like actinide and Cs-like rare-earth-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Parity-nonconservation (PNC) amplitudes are calculated for the 7s-6d3/2 transitions of the francium isoelectronic sequence (Fr, Ra+, Ac2+, Th3+, Pa4+, U5+, and Np6+) and for the 6s-5d3/2 transitions of the cesium isoelectronic sequence (Cs, Ba+, La2+, Ce3+, and Pr4+). We show in particular that isotopes of La2+, Ac2+, and Th3+ ions have strong potential in the search for new physics beyond the standard model: The PNC amplitudes are large, the calculations are accurate, and the nuclei are practically stable. In addition, 232Th3+ ions have recently been trapped and cooled [Campbell , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.233004 102, 233004 (2009)]. We also extend previous works by calculating the s-s PNC transitions in Ra+ and Ba+ and provide calculations of several energy levels, and electric dipole and quadrupole transition amplitudes for the Fr-like actinide ions.

  14. Cavity-enhanced parity-nonconserving optical rotation in metastable Xe and Hg.

    PubMed

    Bougas, L; Katsoprinakis, G E; von Klitzing, W; Sapirstein, J; Rakitzis, T P

    2012-05-25

    We propose the measurement of cavity-enhanced parity-nonconserving (PNC) optical rotation in several transitions of metastable Xe and Hg, including Xe (2P(3/2)(o))6s(2)[3/2](2)(o)→(2P(1/2)(o))6s(2)[1/2](1)(o) and Hg 6s6p (3)P(2)(o)→6s6p (1)P(1)(o), with calculated amplitude ratios of E(1)(PNC)/M1=11×10(-8) and 10×10(-8), respectively. We demonstrate the use of a high-finesse bow-tie cavity with counterpropagating beams and a longitudinal magnetic field, which allows the absolute measurement of chiral optical rotation, with a path length enhancement of about 10(4), necessary for PNC measurement from available column densities of 10(14) cm(-2) for metastable Xe or Hg. Rapid PNC-signal reversal, allowing robust background subtraction, is achieved by shifting the cavity resonance to an opposite polarization mode or by inverting the magnetic field. The precise measurement of isotope and nuclear-spin dependent E(1)(PNC) amplitudes provides a sensitive low-energy test of the standard model. PMID:23003234

  15. Relations between matrix elements of different weak interactions and interpretation of the parity-nonconserving and electron electric-dipole-moment measurements in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Harabati, C.

    2011-11-15

    The relations between matrix elements of different (P,T)-odd weak interactions are derived. We demonstrate that similar relations hold for parity-nonconserving transition amplitudes and electron electric dipole moments (EDMs) of atoms and molecules. This allows one to express P- and T-odd effects in many-electron systems caused by different symmetry-breaking mechanisms via each other using simple analytical formulas. We use these relations for the interpretation of the anapole moment measurements in cesium and thallium and for the analysis of the relative contributions of the scalar-pseudoscalar CP-odd weak interaction and electron EDMs to the EDMs of Cs, Tl, Fr, and other atoms and many polar molecules (YbF, PbO, ThO, etc.). Model-independent limits on electron EDMs and the parameter of the scalar-pseudoscalar CP-odd interaction are found from the analysis of the EDM measurements for Tl and YbF.

  16. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of parity nonconservation in Ba{sup +} by the sum-over-states approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gopakumar, Geetha; Das, Bhanu Pratap; Chaudhuri, R. K.; Mukherjee, D.; Hirao, K.

    2007-01-07

    The authors present the results of their calculation for the parity nonconserving 5p{sup 6}6s{sub 1/2}{yields}5p{sup 6}5d{sub 3/2} transition in Ba{sup +} using the relativistic coupled-cluster theory in the singles, doubles, and partial triples approximation. The contributions from the leading intermediate states are explicitly considered. It is found that the largest contribution comes from the |5p{sup 6}6p{sub 1/2}> state. Their results are in reasonable agreement with other calculations.

  17. Neutron resonances in the compound nucleus: Parity nonconservation to dynamic temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.

    1997-08-01

    Experiments using epithermal neutrons that interact to form compound-nuclear resonances serve a wide range of scientific applications. Changes in transmission which are correlated to polarization reversal in incident neutrons have been used to study parity nonconservation in the compound nucleus for a wide range of targets. The ensemble of measured parity asymmetries provides statistical information for the extraction of the rms parity-violating mean-square matrix element as a function of mass. Parity nonconservation in neutron resonances can also be used to determine the polarization of neutron beams. Finally the motion of target atoms results in an observed temperature-dependent Doppler broadening of resonance line widths. This broadening can be used to determine temperatures on a fast time scale of one microsecond or less.

  18. Theoretical studies of the long lifetimes of the 6 d D 3 /2 ,5 /2 2 states in Fr: Implications for parity-nonconservation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.

    2015-11-01

    Lifetimes of the 6 d D 3 /2 2 and 6 d D 5 /2 2 states in Fr are determined from calculations of the radiative transition amplitudes of the allowed electric dipole (E 1 ) and the forbidden electric quadrupole (E 2 ) and magnetic dipole (M 1 ) channels which were performed using the second-order many-body perturbation theory and the coupled-cluster method at different levels of approximations in the relativistic framework. The values obtained for these two quantities are 540(10) and 1704(32) ns, respectively. These relatively long lifetimes and the large electric dipole parity-non-conserving amplitudes of 7 s S 1 /2 2 →6 d D 3 /2 ,5 /2 2 transitions strongly favor Fr as a leading candidate for the measurement of parity nonconservation arising from the neutral-current weak interaction and the nuclear anapole moment. In another important application, these 6 D states in Fr can be used efficiently for resonance ionization spectroscopic techniques to carry out precise measurements of the properties of the higher excited states due to the long lifetimes of these states.

  19. Combined effect of coherent Z exchange and the hyperfine interaction in the atomic parity-nonconserving interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Safronova, M.S.; Safronova, U.I.

    2003-06-01

    The nuclear spin-dependent parity-nonconserving (PNC) interaction arising from a combination of the hyperfine interaction and the coherent, spin-independent, PNC interaction from Z exchange is evaluated using many-body perturbation theory. For the 6s{sub 1/2}-7s{sub 1/2} transition in {sup 133}Cs, we obtain a result that is about 40% smaller than that found previously by Bouchiat and Piketty [Phys. Lett. B 269, 195 (1991)]. Applying this result to {sup 133}Cs leads to an increase in the experimental value of nuclear anapole moment and exacerbates differences between constraints on PNC meson coupling constants obtained from the Cs anapole moment and those obtained from other nuclear parity violating experiments. Nuclear spin-dependent PNC dipole matrix elements, including contributions from the combined weak-hyperfine interaction, are also given for the 7s{sub 1/2}-8s{sub 1/2} transition in {sup 211}Fr and for transitions between ground-state hyperfine levels in K, Rb, Cs, Ba{sup +}, Au, Tl, Fr, and Ra{sup +}.

  20. Parity Nonconservation in Proton-water Scattering at 800 MeV

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nagle, D. E.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; Mischke, R. E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A. B.; Talaga, R.

    1982-01-01

    A search has been made for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 800 MeV polarized protons from an unpolarized water target. The result is for the longitudinal asymmetry, A{sub L} = +(6.6 +- 3.2) x 10{sup -7}. Control runs with Pb, using a thickness which gave equivalent beam broadening from Coulomb multiple scattering, but a factor of ten less nuclear interactions than the water target, gave A{sub L} = -(0.5 +- 6.0) x 10{sup -7}.

  1. Parity nonconservation in the {gamma} decay of polarized 17/2{sup -} isomers in {sup 93}Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.S. Nara; Hass, M.; Goldring, G.; Ackermann, D.; Sulignano, B.; Gerl, J.; Hessberger, F.P.; Hofmann, S.; Kojouharov, I.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Schaffner, H.; Brown, B.A.

    2005-08-01

    The determination of the 0 deg. - 180 deg. asymmetry (A{sub {gamma}}), which arises because of the parity nonconserving matrix element, in the 751-keV {gamma} decay of polarized 17/2{sup -} isomers in {sup 93}Tc with respect to the direction of polarization is reported. A combined analysis of the present results together with those from our earlier work yields an effect of two standard deviations.

  2. Calculation of energy levels, {ital E}1 transition amplitudes, and parity violation in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V.A.; Flambaum, V.V.; Sushkov, O.P.

    1995-05-01

    Many-body perturbation theory in the screened Coulomb interaction was used to calculate energy levels, {ital E}1 trransition amplitudes, and the parity-nonconserving (PNC) {ital E}1 amplitude of the 7{ital s}-8{ital s} transition in francium. The method takes into account the core-polarization effect, the second-order correlations, and the three dominating sequences of higher-order correlation diagrams: screening of the electron-electron interaction, particle-hole interaction, and the iterations of the self-energy operator. The result for the PNC amplitude for {sup 223}Fr is {ital E}1(7{ital s}-8{ital s})=(1.59{plus_minus}{similar_to}1%){times}10{sup {minus}10}{ital iea}{sub {ital B}}({minus}{ital Q}{sub {ital W}}/{ital N}), where {ital Q}{sub {ital W}} is the weak charge of the nucleus, {ital N}=136 is the number of neutrons, {ital e}={vert_bar}{ital e}{vert_bar} is the elementary charge, and {ital a}{sub {ital B}} is the Bohr radius. Our prediction for the position of the 8{ital s} energy level of Fr, which has not been measured yet, is 13 110 cm{sup {minus}1} below the limit of the continuous spectrum. The accuracy of the calculations was controlled by comparison with available experimental data and analogous calculations for cesium. It is estimated to be {similar_to}0.1% for the energy levels and {similar_to}1% for the transition amplitudes.

  3. Parity Nonconservation in Proton-Proton and Proton-Water Scattering at 1.5 GeV/c

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mischke, R. E.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; MacArthur, D.; Nagle, D. E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A. B.; Talaga, R. L.

    1984-07-01

    Experiments searching for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 1.5 GeV/c (800 MeV) polarized protons from an unpolarized water target and a liquid hydrogen target are described. The intensity of the incident proton beam was measured upstream and downstream of the target by a pair of ionization detectors. The beam helicity was reversed at a 30-Hz rate. Auxiliary detectors monitored beam properties that could give rise to false effects. The result for the longitudinal asymmetry from the water is A{sub L} = (1.7 +- 3.3 +- 1.4) x 10{sup -7}, where the first error is statistical and the second is an estimate of systematic effects. The hydrogen data yield a preliminary result of A{sub L} = (1.0 +- 1.6) x 10{sup -7}. The systematic errors for p-p are expected to be < 1 x 10{sup -7}.

  4. Measuring parity nonconservation with a single trapped atomic ion or with trapped neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fortson, E.N.

    1993-05-01

    We have begun a measurement of atomic party nonconservation (PNC) by a new approach that utilizes the remarkable sensitivity of a single trapped atomic ion. A Ba{sup +} ion in the 6{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ground state, trapped in an RF electric potential well and cooled to an orbit much smaller than optical wavelengths, is illuminated with intense laser light tuned to the 6S-5D electric quadrupole transition at 2.05 {mu}m. PNC interference causes a light shift of the Larmor precession frequency of order 0.3 Hz, creating a detectable rotation of the electron spin in the ground state. The accuracy may be sufficient to provide a valuable test of electroweak theory either with a single barium isotope or with a string of isotopes to cancel the uncertainties in PNC due to atomic structure. The current status of the barium ion experiment will be discussed, together with the prospects for applying the PNC light shift technique also to neutral atoms with long lived excited states, such as cooled, optically confined neutral barium.

  5. Parity nonconservation in hydrogen.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R. W.; Holt, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for parity violation experiments in atomic hydrogen and deuterium to contribute to testing the Standard Model (SM). We find that, if parity experiments in hydrogen can be done, they remain highly desirable because there is negligible atomic-physics uncertainty and low energy tests of weak neutral current interactions are needed to probe for new physics beyond the SM. Analysis of a generic APV experiment in deuterium indicates that a 0.3% measurement of C{sub 1D} requires development of a slow (77K) metastable beam of {approx} 5 x 10{sup 14}D(2S)s{sup -1} per hyperfine component. The advent of UV radiation from free electron laser (FEL) technology could allow production of such a beam.

  6. Explanation of parity nonconservation

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I. E.; Ørsted, B.; Paneitz, S. M.; Vogan, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    Space inversion and other discrete symmetries are treated within the frame of a theory of fundamental forces based only on general considerations of causality, symmetry, and stability, without ad hoc differential equations. The basic space-time ˜M is the Einstein universe R1 × S3 as a causal (or conformal) rather than a pseudo-Riemannian manifold. Its connected symmetry group is then a 15-parameter group ˜G locally equivalent to SO(2, 4), while the isometry group ˜K of the Einstein universe is a 7-parameter subgroup. Correlation with conventional relativistic theory is based on a canonical imbedding of Minkowski space M0 into ˜M, together with the unique extendability of all transformations of the scaling-extended Poincaré group ˜P from M0 to global transformations on ˜M. The fundamental fermion field F and boson field B are here restricted to be real and are fully invariant under ˜Ge, where the superscript e denotes the inclusion of space and time inversions. The role of C on F is taken over by a real matrix having the eigenvalues ±i, that commutes with ˜G but anticommutes with space inversion. The spin space for B consists of the real linear transformations on that for F. There is a corresponding natural total Lagrangian that is both ˜Ge and O(2)-gauge invariant, the latter leading to lepton and baryon number conservation, and which is nonparametric except for scale. The Weyl and Maxwell equations are deduced, and compelling identifications made for neutrinos and the photon. The e and μ neutrino pairs occur in strikingly inequivalent positions in F, appearing symmetric only in the conventional relativistic limit R → ∞, where R is the (˜G-invariant) fundamental length interpretable as the radius of the space S3. The photon occurs as the lowest member of a coherent subfamily of B that includes natural candidates for bare versions of the W and Z particles. In the relativistic limit the interaction Lagrangian becomes a sum over all elementary processes, one of which appears as quantum electrodynamics with Majorana-type electrons. PMID:16593799

  7. Small-amplitude synchrotron tune near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The separatrices of the rf buckets near transition are mapped when the synchronous phase is neither 0 or {pi}. The small-amplitude synchronous tune is derived when the rf frequency is changed. Synchrotron radiation is present in all electron storage ring. As a result, the synchronous phase is always offset from {phi}{sub s} = {pi} to compensate for the power loss. Even for proton storage rings with negligible synchrotron radiation, the synchronous phase is also required to be offset from {phi}{sub s} = 0 or {pi} slightly to compensate for beam loading. Thus for all storage rings operating near transition, beam particles reside in accelerating buckets instead of stationary bucket. It is of interest to map these buckets and see how they evolve near transition. When the rf frequency is varied, the closed orbit is pushed radially inward or outward. The momentum of the particle synchronous with the rf is thus changed. By measuring the small-amplitude synchrotron tune as a function of the rf frequency, the lowest first few orders of the slip factor can be inferred. Here, we derive this relationship up to the lowest first three orders of the slip factor when the particle velocity is not ultra-relativistic.

  8. Amplitude transitions of swimmers and flexors in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert; Thomases, Becca

    2015-11-01

    In both theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of fluid elasticity on micro-organism swimming, very different behavior has been observed for small and large amplitude strokes. We present simulations of an undulatory swimmer in an Oldroyd-B fluid and show that the resulting viscoelastic stresses are a nonlinear function of the amplitude. Specifically, there appears to be an amplitude dependent transition that is key to obtaining a speed-up over the Newtonian swimming speed. To understand the physical mechanism of the transition, we examine the stresses in a time-symmetric oscillatory bending beam, or flexor. We compare the flow in a neighborhood of the flexor tips with a large-amplitude oscillatory extensional flow, and we see similar amplitude dependent transitions. We relate these transitions to observed speed-ups in viscoelastic swimmers.

  9. Transition to amplitude death in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiqing; Wang, Xingang; Guan, Shuguang; Lai, Choy-Heng

    2009-09-01

    Transition to amplitude death in scale-free networks of nonlinear oscillators is investigated both numerically and analytically. It is found that, as the coupling strength increases, the network will undergo three different stages in approaching the state of complete amplitude death (CAD). In the first stage of the transition, the amplitudes of the oscillators present a 'stair-like' arrangement, i.e. the squared amplitude of an oscillator linearly decreases with the number of links that the oscillator receives (node degree). In this stage, as the coupling strength increases, the amplitude stairs are eliminated hierarchically by descending order of the node degree. At the end of the first stage, except for a few synchronized oscillators, all other oscillators in the network have small amplitudes. Then, in the second stage of the transition, the synchronous clusters formed in the first stage gradually disappear and, as a consequence, the number of small-amplitude oscillators is increased. At the end of the second stage, almost all oscillators in the network have small but finite amplitudes. Finally, in the third stage of the transition, without the support of the synchronous clusters, the amplitudes of the oscillators are quickly decreased, eventually leading to the state of CAD.

  10. Transition Distribution Amplitudes for γ⋆γ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansberg, J. P.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.

    2008-11-01

    We study the exclusive production of ππ and ρπ in hard γ⋆γ scattering in the forward kinematical region where the virtuality of one photon provides us with a hard scale in the process. The newly introduced concept of Transition Distribution Amplitudes (TDA) is used to perform a QCD calculation of these reactions thanks to two simple models for TDAs. The sizable cross sections for ρπ and ππ production may be tested at intense electron-positron colliders such as CLEO and B factories (Belle and BABAR).

  11. Non-gauge phase transformations in quantum transition amplitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    The prescription for introducing a gauge transformation into a quantum transition amplitude, nominally well known, contains an ambiguous feature. It is presumed by some authors that an appropriate transformation of the phase of a wave function will generate the associated gauge transformation. It is shown that this is a necessary but not sufficient step. Examples from the literature are cited to show the consequences of the failure of this procedure. One must distinguish between true gauge transformations and unitary transformations within a fixed gauge.

  12. Higher-order multipole amplitudes in charmonium radiative transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Khalil, S.; Mountain, R.; Randrianarivony, K.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, L. M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Lincoln, A.; Smith, M. J.; Zhou, P.; Zhu, J.; Naik, P.; Rademacker, J.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Robichaud, A. N.; Tatishvili, G.; White, E. J.; Briere, R. A.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hunt, J. M.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Ledoux, J.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Lowrey, N.; Mehrabyan, S.; Selen, M.; Wiss, J.; Kornicer, M.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Tarbert, C. M.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Xavier, J.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A.; Brisbane, S.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.

    2009-12-01

    Using 24×106 ψ'≡ψ(2S) decays in CLEO-c, we have searched for higher multipole admixtures in electric-dipole-dominated radiative transitions in charmonia. We find good agreement between our data and theoretical predictions for magnetic quadrupole (M2) amplitudes in the transitions ψ'→γχc1,c2 and χc1,c2→γJ/ψ, in striking contrast to some previous measurements. Let b2J and a2J denote the normalized M2 amplitudes in the respective aforementioned decays, where the superscript J refers to the angular momentum of the χcJ. By performing unbinned maximum likelihood fits to full five-parameter angular distributions, we found the following values of M2 admixtures for Jχ=1: a2J=1=(-6.26±0.63±0.24)×10-2 and b2J=1=(2.76±0.73±0.23)×10-2, which agree well with theoretical expectations for a vanishing anomalous magnetic moment of the charm quark. For Jχ=2, if we fix the electric octupole (E3) amplitudes to zero as theory predicts for transitions between charmonium S states and P states, we find a2J=2=(-9.3±1.6±0.3)×10-2 and b2J=2=(1.0±1.3±0.3)×10-2. If we allow for E3 amplitudes we find, with a four-parameter fit, a2J=2=(-7.9±1.9±0.3)×10-2, b2J=2=(0.2±1.4±0.4)×10-2, a3J=2=(1.7±1.4±0.3)×10-2, and b3J=2=(-0.8±1.2±0.2)×10-2. We determine the ratios a2J=1/a2J=2=0.67-0.13+0.19 and a2J=1/b2J=1=-2.27-0.99+0.57, where the theoretical predictions are independent of the charmed quark magnetic moment and are a2J=1/a2J=2=0.676±0.071 and a2J=1/b2J=1=-2.27±0.16.

  13. Quantum metrology to probe atomic parity nonconservation

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, P.; Mukherjee, M.

    2010-11-15

    An entangled state prepared in a decoherence-free subspace, together with a Ramsey-type measurement, can probe parity violation in heavy alkali-metal ions such as Ba{sup +} or Ra{sup +}. Here we propose an experiment with Ba{sup +} as an example to measure the small parity-violating effect in this system. It has been shown that a measurement on a maximally correlated system will reduce the uncertainty as compared to that on a single ion measurement, and also provides a feasible solution to measure the nuclear-spin-dependent part of the total parity-violating light shift in an ionic system.

  14. Relativistic multireference Fock-space coupled-cluster calculation of the forbidden 6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6s5d {sup 3}D{sub 1} magnetic-dipole transition in ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, Chiranjib; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.

    2007-07-15

    We report the forbidden 6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6s5d {sup 3}D{sub 1} magnetic-dipole transition amplitude computed using multireference Fock-space coupled-cluster theory. Our computed transition matrix element (1.34x10{sup -4}){mu}{sub B} is in excellent agreement with the experimental value (1.33x10{sup -4}){mu}{sub B}. This value in combination with other known quantities will be helpful in determining the parity-nonconserving amplitude for the 6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6s5d {sup 3}D{sub 1} transition in atomic Yb. To our knowledge, this calculation is the most accurate to date, and can be very important in the search for physics beyond the standard model. We further report the 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1} and 6s5d {sup 3}D{sub 1}{yields}6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition matrix elements, which are also in good agreement with the earlier theoretical estimates.

  15. Multichannel 1 → 2 transition amplitudes in a finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2015-02-03

    We perform a model-independent, non-perturbative investigation of two-point and three-point finite-volume correlation functions in the energy regime where two-particle states can go on-shell. We study three-point functions involving a single incoming particle and an outgoing two-particle state, relevant, for example, for studies of meson decays (e.g., B⁰ → K*l⁺l⁻) or meson photo production (e.g., πγ* → ππ). We observe that, while the spectrum solely depends upon the on-shell scattering amplitude, the correlation functions also depend upon off-shell amplitudes. The main result of this work is a non-perturbative generalization of the Lellouch-Luscher formula relating matrix elements of currents in finite and infinite spatial volumes. We extend that work by considering a theory with multiple, strongly-coupled channels and by accommodating external currents which inject arbitrary four-momentum as well as arbitrary angular-momentum. The result is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections governed by the pion mass times the box size. We also apply our master equation to various examples, including two processes mentioned above as well as examples where the final state is an admixture of two open channels.

  16. Diffusion-induced periodic transition between oscillatory modes in amplitude-modulated patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaodong; He, Yuxiu; Wang, Shaorong; Gao, Qingyu; Epstein, Irving R.; Wang, Qun

    2014-06-15

    We study amplitude-modulated waves, e.g., wave packets in one dimension, overtarget spirals and superspirals in two dimensions, under mixed-mode oscillatory conditions in a three-variable reaction-diffusion model. New transition zones, not seen in the homogeneous system, are found, in which periodic transitions occur between local 1{sup N−1} and 1{sup N} oscillations. Amplitude-modulated complex patterns result from periodic transition between (N − 1)-armed and N-armed waves. Spatial recurrence rates provide a useful guide to the stability of these modulated patterns.

  17. Frequency and amplitude transitioned waveforms mitigate the onset response in high frequency nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Gerges, Meana; Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Narendra; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    High frequency alternating currents (HFAC) have proven to be a reversible and rapid method of blocking peripheral nerve conduction, holding promise for treatment of disorders associated with undesirable neuronal activity. The delivery of HFAC is characterized by a transient period of neural firing at its inception, termed the “onset response”. The onset response is minimized for higher frequencies and higher amplitudes, but requires larger currents. However, complete block can be maintained at lower frequencies and amplitudes, using lower currents. In this in-vivo study on whole mammalian peripheral nerves, we demonstrate a method to minimize the onset response by initiating the block using a stimulation paradigm with a high frequency and large amplitude, and then transitioning to a low frequency and low amplitude waveform, reducing the currents required to maintain the conduction block. In five of six animals it was possible to transition from a 30 kHz to a 10 kHz waveform without inducing any transient neural firing. The minimum transition time was 0.03 sec. Transition activity was minimized or eliminated with longer transition times. The results of this study show that this method is feasible for achieving a nerve block with minimal onset responses and current amplitude requirements. PMID:20966536

  18. Amplitude Variation of Bottom Simulating Reflection with Respect to Frequency - Transitional Base or Attenuation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude of a bottom simulating reflection (BSR), which occurs near the phase boundary between gas hydrate-bearing sediments and underlying gas-filled sediments, strongly depends on the frequency content of a seismic signal, as well as the impedance contrast across the phase boundary. A strong-amplitude BSR, detectable in a conventional seismic profile, is a good indicator of the presence of free gas beneath the phase boundary. However, the BSR as observed in low-frequency multichannel seismic data is generally difficult to identify in high-frequency, single-channel seismic data. To investigate the frequency dependence of BSR amplitudes, single-channel seismic data acquired with an air gun source at Blake Ridge, which is located off the shore of South Carolina, were analyzed in the frequency range of 10-240 Hz. The frequency-dependent impedance contrast caused by the velocity dispersion in partially gas saturated sediments is important to accurately analyze BSR amplitude. Analysis indicates that seismic attenuation of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, velocity dispersion, and a transitional base all contribute to the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude variation in the frequency range of 10-500 Hz. When velocity dispersion is incorporated into the BSR amplitude analysis, the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude at Blake Ridge can be explained with gas hydrate-bearing sediments having a quality factor of about 250 and a transitional base with a thickness of about 1 meter.

  19. Adiabatic quenches and characterization of amplitude excitations in a continuous quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thai M; Bharath, Hebbe M; Boguslawski, Matthew J; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce A; Chapman, Michael S

    2016-08-23

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in a physical system whenever the ground state does not share the symmetry of the underlying theory, e.g., the Hamiltonian. This mechanism gives rise to massless Nambu-Goldstone modes and massive Anderson-Higgs modes. These modes provide a fundamental understanding of matter in the Universe and appear as collective phase or amplitude excitations of an order parameter in a many-body system. The amplitude excitation plays a crucial role in determining the critical exponents governing universal nonequilibrium dynamics in the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM). Here, we characterize the amplitude excitations in a spin-1 condensate and measure the energy gap for different phases of the quantum phase transition. At the quantum critical point of the transition, finite-size effects lead to a nonzero gap. Our measurements are consistent with this prediction, and furthermore, we demonstrate an adiabatic quench through the phase transition, which is forbidden at the mean field level. This work paves the way toward generating entanglement through an adiabatic phase transition. PMID:27503886

  20. Adiabatic quenches and characterization of amplitude excitations in a continuous quantum phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thai M.; Bharath, Hebbe M.; Boguslawski, Matthew J.; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce A.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in a physical system whenever the ground state does not share the symmetry of the underlying theory, e.g., the Hamiltonian. This mechanism gives rise to massless Nambu–Goldstone modes and massive Anderson–Higgs modes. These modes provide a fundamental understanding of matter in the Universe and appear as collective phase or amplitude excitations of an order parameter in a many-body system. The amplitude excitation plays a crucial role in determining the critical exponents governing universal nonequilibrium dynamics in the Kibble–Zurek mechanism (KZM). Here, we characterize the amplitude excitations in a spin-1 condensate and measure the energy gap for different phases of the quantum phase transition. At the quantum critical point of the transition, finite-size effects lead to a nonzero gap. Our measurements are consistent with this prediction, and furthermore, we demonstrate an adiabatic quench through the phase transition, which is forbidden at the mean field level. This work paves the way toward generating entanglement through an adiabatic phase transition. PMID:27503886

  1. Measurement of the radial matrix elements of the 6s 2S1/2 --> 7p 2PJ transitions in atomic cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Daniel; Antypas, Dionysis

    2014-05-01

    We report measurements of the absorption strength of the cesium 6s 2S1/2 --> 7p 2P3/2 and the 6s 2S1/2 --> 7p 2P1/2 transitions at λ = 456 nm and 459 nm, respectively. We simultaneously measure the absorption strength on the Cs D1 line (6s 2S1/2 --> 6p 2P1/2) at λ = 894 nm, for which the electric dipole transition moment is precisely known, allowing us to precisely determine the reduced dipole matrix elements for these two lines. Our results are <7P3/2||r||6S1/2 > = 0.5780 (7) a0 and <7P1/2||r||6S1/2 > = 0.2789 (16) a0, with fractional uncertainties of 0.12% and 0.6%, respectively. These new values allow a more precise determination of the scalar polarizability for the Cs 6s 2S1/2 --> 7s 2S1/2 transition, which in turn leads to a more precise value of the vector polarizability for this same transition. The vector polarizability has played a critical role in measurements of the parity nonconserving transition amplitude EPNC in cesium. This revised value of the vector polarizability is in reasonable agreement with the value determined through the nuclear spin dependent component of the transition magnetic dipole moment. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number PHY-0970041.

  2. Transitions in skin blood flow fractal scaling: the importance of fluctuation amplitude in microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Esen, Hamza; Ata, Necmi; Esen, Ferhan

    2015-01-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) time series from volar skin reveals three scaling regions: cardiac, cardio-respiratory and local. Scaling exponents, slopes (αC, αCR and αL) of the straight lines, in these regions indicate correlation properties of LDF signal. Transitions from uncorrelated to positive in cardiac (αC) and positive to negative correlations in the cardio-respiratory (αCR) exponent have been observed for vasodilatation signals in response to local heating. However, positive correlation in local region (αL) did not change with vasodilatation. We studied whether the transitions in scaling exponents are correlated with the increase in peak to peak fluctuation amplitude (AF) of LDF signal. LDF signals were normalized to unity using average values of their pulsatile parts: baseline and saturation signals. If AF of normalized LDF signal is ≥0.5, we observed transitions in αC and in αCR but not in αL, in healthy subjects. It is suggested that the transition from positive to negative correlation in αCR with increasing amplitude may be explained by intact arteriolar myogenic activity in healthy young (Y) and middle aged (MA) subjects. In contrast, we did not observe transition in αCR suggesting impaired myogenic activity in patients with essential hypertension (EHT). PMID:25241251

  3. A first look at transition amplitudes in (2 + 1)-dimensional causal dynamical triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooperman, Joshua H.; Miller, Jonah M.

    2014-02-01

    We study a lattice regularization of the gravitational path integral—causal dynamical triangulations—for (2 + 1)-dimensional Einstein gravity with positive cosmological constant in the presence of past and future spacelike boundaries of fixed intrinsic geometries. For spatial topology of a 2-sphere, we determine the form of the Einstein-Hilbert action supplemented by the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary terms within the Regge calculus of causal triangulations. Employing this action we numerically simulate a variety of transition amplitudes from the past boundary to the future boundary. To the extent that we have so far investigated them, these transition amplitudes appear consistent with the gravitational effective action previously found to characterize the ground state of quantum spacetime geometry within the Euclidean de Sitter-like phase. Certain of these transition amplitudes convincingly demonstrate that the so-called stalks present in this phase are numerical artifacts of the lattice regularization, seemingly indicate that the quantization technique of causal dynamical triangulations differs in detail from that of the no-boundary proposal of Hartle and Hawking, and possibly represent the first numerical simulations of portions of temporally unbounded quantum spacetime geometry within the causal dynamical triangulations approach. We also uncover tantalizing evidence suggesting that Lorentzian not Euclidean de Sitter spacetime dominates the ground state on sufficiently large scales.

  4. Parity nonconservation and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilenkin, A.; Leahy, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Three mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field generation are discussed: (1) asymmetric decay of particles emitted by rotating black holes; (2) asymmetric proton emission by black holes due to weak radiative corrections, and (3) equilibrium parity-violating currents. It is shown that all three mechanisms can produce a seed field sufficiently strong to account for the present galactic fields.

  5. Pion-photon transition distribution amplitudes in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Courtoy, A.; Noguera, S.

    2007-11-01

    We define the pion-photon transition distribution amplitudes (TDA) in a field theoretic formalism from a covariant Bethe-Salpeter approach for the determination of the bound state. We apply our formalism to the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, as a realistic theory of the pion. The obtained vector and axial TDAs satisfy all features required by general considerations. In particular, sum rules and the polynomiality condition are explicitly verified. We have numerically proved that the odd coefficients in the polynomiality expansion of the vector TDA vanish in the chiral limit. The role of PCAC and the presence of a pion pole are explicitly shown.

  6. Pion-photon transition distribution amplitudes in the Nambu Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtoy, A.; Noguera, S.

    2007-11-01

    We define the pion-photon transition distribution amplitudes (TDA) in a field theoretic formalism from a covariant Bethe-Salpeter approach for the determination of the bound state. We apply our formalism to the Nambu Jona-Lasinio model, as a realistic theory of the pion. The obtained vector and axial TDAs satisfy all features required by general considerations. In particular, sum rules and the polynomiality condition are explicitly verified. We have numerically proved that the odd coefficients in the polynomiality expansion of the vector TDA vanish in the chiral limit. The role of PCAC and the presence of a pion pole are explicitly shown.

  7. Pion-to-Photon Transition Distribution Amplitudes in the Non-Local Chiral Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotko, P.; Praszałowicz, M.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the non-local chiral quark model to study vector and axial pion-to-photon transition amplitudes that are needed as a nonperturbative input to estimate the cross-section of pion annihilation into the real and virtual photon. We use a simple form of the non-locality that allows to perform all calculations in the Minkowski space and guaranties polynomiality of the TDAs. We note only residual dependence on the precise form of the cut-off function, however vector TDA that is symmetric in skewedness parameter in the local quark model is no longer symmetric in the non-local case. We calculate also the transition form-factors and compare them with existing experimental parametrizations.

  8. The generalized log-derivative method for evaluation of second-order transition amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Mrugala, F.

    1989-07-15

    The log-derivative method of Johnson is generalized to calculate matrix elements of multichannel Green's functions---second-order transition amplitudes---which arise from description of a variety of physical processes involving weak interactions of initial and final (bound) states with a set of strongly coupled continuum and/or bound intermediate states. A purely approximate-solution algorithm and two hybrid approximate-solution approximate-potential versions, based on the use of piecewise constant reference potentials, are presented and tested on problems concerning investigations of nonadiabatic effects in the spectroscopy of H/sub 2/. A comparison with the renormalized Numerov method, extended to calculation of considered transition amplitudes, is made and superior efficiency of the hybrid log-derivative algorithms is demonstrated. It is shown both practically and theoretically that discretization errors of the hybrid algorithms grow linearly with increasing energy in calculations, whereas cubic growth of errors with energy is characteristic for the purely approximate-solution log-derivative and Numerov algorithms.

  9. Calculation of energy levels and transition amplitudes for barium and radium.

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Physics; Univ. of New South Wales

    2007-01-01

    The radium atom is a promising system for studying parity and time invariance violating weak interactions. However, available experimental spectroscopic data for radium are insufficient for designing an optimal experimental setup. We calculate the energy levels and transition amplitudes for radium states of significant interest. Forty states corresponding to all possible configurations consisting of the 7s, 7p and 6d single-electron states as well as the states of the 7s8s, 7s8p and 7s7d configurations have been calculated. The energies of ten of these states corresponding to the 6d{sup 2}, 7s8s, 7p{sup 2} and 6d7p configurations are not known from experiment. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy.

  10. Relativistic, model-independent, multichannel 2→2 transition amplitudes in a finite volume

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briceno, Raul A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.

    2016-07-13

    We derive formalism for determining 2 + J → 2 infinite-volume transition amplitudes from finite-volume matrix elements. Specifically, we present a relativistic, model-independent relation between finite-volume matrix elements of external currents and the physically observable infinite-volume matrix elements involving two-particle asymptotic states. The result presented holds for states composed of two scalar bosons. These can be identical or non-identical and, in the latter case, can be either degenerate or non-degenerate. We further accommodate any number of strongly-coupled two-scalar channels. This formalism will, for example, allow future lattice QCD calculations of themore » $$\\rho$$-meson form factor, in which the unstable nature of the $$\\rho$$ is rigorously accommodated. In conclusion, we also discuss how this work will impact future extractions of nuclear parity and hadronic long-range matrix elements from lattice QCD.« less

  11. Rare transition event with self-consistent theory of large-amplitude collective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, Kyosuke Maeda, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-15

    A numerical simulation method, based on Dang et al.’s self-consistent theory of large-amplitude collective motion, for rare transition events is presented. The method provides a one-dimensional pathway without knowledge of the final configuration, which includes a dynamical effect caused by not only a potential but also kinetic term. Although it is difficult to apply the molecular dynamics simulation to a narrow-gate potential, the method presented is applicable to the case. A toy model with a high-energy barrier and/or the narrow gate shows that while the Dang et al. treatment is unstable for a changing of model parameters, our method stable for it.

  12. Relativistic, model-independent, multichannel 2 →2 transition amplitudes in a finite volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.

    2016-07-01

    We derive formalism for determining 2 +J →2 infinite-volume transition amplitudes from finite-volume matrix elements. Specifically, we present a relativistic, model-independent relation between finite-volume matrix elements of external currents and the physically observable infinite-volume matrix elements involving two-particle asymptotic states. The result presented holds for states composed of two scalar bosons. These can be identical or nonidentical and, in the latter case, can be either degenerate or nondegenerate. We further accommodate any number of strongly coupled two-scalar channels. This formalism will, for example, allow future lattice QCD calculations of the ρ -meson form factor, in which the unstable nature of the ρ is rigorously accommodated.

  13. Feasibility study for the measurement of πN transition distribution amplitudes with PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atomssa, Ermias

    2016-05-01

    Transition Distribution Amplitudes (TDA) are parametrizations of the hadronic matrix elements that occur in the perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) calculations of a certain family of reactions within the framework of collinear factorization. We propose a complete feasibility study of the measurement of one of the reactions covered by the TDA models p ¯p →π0J /ψ (J /ψ →e+e-) at PANDA (AntiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt) experiment currently under construction at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). We show that PANDA will be ideally suited to access the relevant observables, in particular the pion-to-nucleon TDAs (πN TDAs) which are important for the understanding of the pion cloud contribution in the nucleon wave function.

  14. Consistent model for πN transition distribution amplitudes and backward pion electroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansberg, J. P.; Pire, B.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K.; Szymanowski, L.

    2012-03-01

    The extension of the concept of generalized parton distributions leads to the introduction of baryon to meson transition distribution amplitudes (TDAs), nondiagonal matrix elements of the nonlocal three quark operator between a nucleon and a meson state. We present a general framework for modeling nucleon to pion (πN) TDAs. Our main tool is the spectral representation for πN TDAs in terms of quadruple distributions. We propose a factorized Ansatz for quadruple distributions with input from the soft-pion theorem for πN TDAs. The spectral representation is complemented with a D-term like contribution from the nucleon exchange in the cross channel. We then study backward pion electroproduction in the QCD collinear factorization approach in which the nonperturbative part of the amplitude involves πN TDAs. Within our two component model for πN TDAs, we update previous leading-twist estimates of the unpolarized cross section. Finally, we compute the transverse target single spin asymmetry as a function of skewness. We find it to be sizable in the valence region and sensitive to the phenomenological input of our πN TDA model.

  15. Calculations of hydrogen atom multiphoton energy level shifts, transition amplitudes and ionization probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, K. G.; Chang, C. S.

    2008-07-01

    Analyses of the resonant multiphoton ionization of atoms require knowledge of ac Stark energy shifts and of multiphoton, bound-to-bound state, transition amplitudes. In this paper, we consider the three-photon photoionization of hydrogen atoms at frequencies that are at and surrounding the two-photon 1s to 2s resonance. AC energy shift sums of both the 1s and 2s states are calculated as a function of the laser frequency along with two-photon 1s → 2s resonant transition amplitude sums. These quantities are calculated using an extended version of a method, which has often been employed in a variety of ways, of calculating these sums by expressing them in terms of solutions to a variety of differential equations that are derived from the different sums being evaluated. We demonstrate how exact solutions are obtained to these differential equations, which lead to exact evaluations of the corresponding sums. A variety of different cases are analysed, some involving analytic continuation, some involving real number analysis and some involving complex number analysis. A dc Stark sum calculation of the 2s state is carried out to illustrate the case where analytic continuation, pole isolation and pole subtraction are required and where the calculation can be carried out analytically; the 2s state, ac Stark shift sum calculations involve a case where no analytic continuation is required, but where the solution to the differential equation produces complex numbers owing to the finite photoionization lifetime of the 2s state. Results from these calculations are then used to calculate three-photon ionization probabilities of relevance to an analysis of the multiphoton ionization data published by Kyrala and Nichols (1991 Phys. Rev. A 44, R1450).

  16. π π →π γ* amplitude and the resonant ρ →π γ* transition from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.; Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the P -wave π π →π γ⋆ transition amplitude from lattice quantum chromodynamics. Matrix elements of the vector current in a finite volume are extracted from three-point correlation functions, and from these we determine the infinite-volume amplitude using a generalization of the Lellouch-Lüscher formalism. We determine the amplitude for a range of discrete values of the π π energy and virtuality of the photon and observe the expected dynamical enhancement due to the ρ resonance. Describing the energy dependence of the amplitude, we are able to analytically continue into the complex energy plane and from the residue at the ρ pole extract the ρ →π γ⋆ transition form factor. This calculation, at mπ≈400 MeV , is the first to determine the form factor of an unstable hadron within a first principles approach to QCD.

  17. Experimental access to Transition Distribution Amplitudes with the P¯ANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Liu, B.; Liu, H.; Liu, Z.; Shen, X.; Wang, C.; Zhao, J.; Albrecht, M.; Fink, M.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Holtmann, T.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Kümmel, M.; Kuhl, G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Leyhe, M.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Pelizäus, M.; Pychy, J.; Richter, M.; Schnier, C.; Schröder, T.; Sowa, C.; Steinke, M.; Triffterer, T.; Wiedner, U.; Beck, R.; Hammann, C.; Kaiser, D.; Ketzer, B.; Kube, M.; Mahlberg, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitz, R.; Thoma, U.; Walther, D.; Wendel, C.; Wilson, A.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Caprini, M.; Pantea, D.; Pietreanu, D.; Vasile, M. E.; Patel, B.; Kaplan, D.; Brandys, P.; Czyzewski, T.; Czyzycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Hawryluk, M.; Filo, G.; Krawczyk, M.; Kwiatkowski, D.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Mindur, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Czech, B.; Kliczewski, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Lebiedowicz, P.; Malgorzata, K.; Pysz, K.; Schäfer, W.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A.; Biernat, J.; Jowzaee, S.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, S.; Korcyl, G.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Palka, M.; Psyzniak, A.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Wrońska, A.; Augustin, I.; Lehmann, I.; Nicmorus, D.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Al-Turany, M.; Cahit, U.; Capozza, L.; Dbeyssi, A.; Deppe, H.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Ehret, A.; Flemming, H.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Karabowicz, R.; Kliemt, R.; Kunkel, J.; Kurilla, U.; Lehmann, D.; Lühning, J.; Maas, F.; Morales Morales, C.; Mora Espí, M. C.; Nerling, F.; Orth, H.; Peters, K.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Saito, N.; Saito, T.; Sánchez Lorente, A.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Valente, R.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Festchenko, A. A.; Galoyan, A. S.; Grigoryan, S.; Karmokov, A.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Yu. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mustafaev, G. A.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pasyuk, M. A.; Perevalova, E. A.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T. A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V. K.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Salmin, R. A.; Samartsev, A. G.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, G. S.; Skachkov, N. B.; Skachkova, A. N.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M. K.; Teshev, R. Sh.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Uzhinsky, V. V.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Woods, P.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Dobbs, S.; Seth, K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Drago, A.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Savriè, M.; Stancari, G.; Akishina, V.; Kisel, I.; Kulakov, I.; Zyzak, M.; Arora, R.; Bel, T.; Gromliuk, A.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Patsyuk, M.; Zuehlsdorf, M.; Bianchi, N.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Pace, E.; Bersani, A.; Bracco, G.; Macri, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Bianco, S.; Bremer, D.; Brinkmann, K. T.; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Düren, M.; Eissner, T.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Galuska, M.; Gessler, T.; Gutz, E.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Hu, J.; Kröck, B.; Kühn, W.; Kuske, T.; Lange, S.; Liang, Y.; Merle, O.; Metag, V.; Mülhheim, D.; Münchow, D.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Pitka, A.; Quagli, T.; Rieke, J.; Rosenbaum, C.; Schnell, R.; Spruck, B.; Stenzel, H.; Thöring, U.; Ullrich, M.; Wasem, T.; Werner, M.; Zaunick, H. G.; Ireland, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Deepak, P. N.; Kulkarni, A. V.; Apostolou, A.; Babai, M.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Lemmens, P.; Lindemulder, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Schakel, P.; Smit, H.; van der Weele, J. C.; Tiemens, M.; Veenstra, R.; Vejdani, S.; Kalita, K.; Mohanta, D. P.; Kumar, A.; Roy, A.; Sahoo, R.; Sohlbach, H.; Büscher, M.; Cao, L.; Cebulla, A.; Deermann, D.; Dosdall, R.; Esch, S.; Georgadze, I.; Gillitzer, A.; Goerres, A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grunwald, D.; Herten, A.; Hu, Q.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Kozlov, V.; Lehrach, A.; Leiber, S.; Maier, R.; Nellen, R.; Ohm, H.; Orfanitski, S.; Prasuhn, D.; Prencipe, E.; Ritman, J.; Schadmand, S.; Schumann, J.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wüstner, P.; Xu, H.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Rigato, V.; Fissum, S.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Lundin, M.; Schröder, B.; Achenbach, P.; Bleser, S.; Cardinali, M.; Corell, O.; Deiseroth, M.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.; Feldbauer, F.; Fritsch, M.; Jasinski, P.; Hoek, M.; Kangh, D.; Karavdina, A.; Lauth, W.; Leithoff, H.; Merkel, H.; Michel, M.; Motzko, C.; Müller, U.; Noll, O.; Plueger, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez, S.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Steinen, M.; Thiel, M.; Weber, T.; Zambrana, M.; Dormenev, V. I.; Fedorov, A. A.; Korzihik, M. V.; Missevitch, O. V.; Balanutsa, P.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Varentsov, V.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Semenov, A.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Grieser, S.; Hergemöller, A. K.; Khoukaz, A.; Köhler, E.; Täschner, A.; Wessels, J.; Dash, S.; Jadhav, M.; Kumar, S.; Sarin, P.; Varma, R.; Chandratre, V. B.; Datar, V.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumawat, H.; Mohanty, A. K.; Roy, B.; Yan, Y.; Chinorat, K.; Khanchai, K.; Ayut, L.; Pornrad, S.; Barnyakov, A. Y.; Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Kononov, S. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Sokolov, A. A.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Atomssa, E.; Hennino, T.; Imre, M.; Kunne, R.; Le Galliard, C.; Ma, B.; Marchand, D.; Ong, S.; Ramstein, B.; Rosier, P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Van de Wiele, J.; Boca, G.; Costanza, S.; Genova, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Abramov, V.; Belikov, N.; Bukreeva, S.; Davidenko, A.; Derevschikov, A.; Goncharenko, Y.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Kormilitsin, V.; Melnik, Y.; Levin, A.; Minaev, N.; Mochalov, V.; Morozov, D.; Nogach, L.; Poslavskiy, S.; Ryazantsev, A.; Ryzhikov, S.; Semenov, P.; Shein, I.; Uzunian, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Yakutin, A.; Yabsley, B.; Bäck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Makónyi, K.; Tegnér, P. E.; von Würtemberg, K. M.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Izotov, A.; Kashchuk, A.; Levitskaya, O.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Naryshkin, Y.; Suvorov, K.; Veretennikov, D.; Zhadanov, A.; Rai, A. K.; Godre, S. S.; Duchat, R.; Amoroso, A.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, L.; Greco, M.; Maggiora, M.; Maniscalco, G.; Marcello, S.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Zotti, L.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Lusso, S.; Mazza, G.; Mingnore, M.; Rivetti, A.; Wheadon, R.; Balestra, F.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lavagno, A.; Younis, H.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Clement, H.; Gålnander, B.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Calén, H.; Fransson, K.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Pettersson, J.; Schönning, K.; Wolke, M.; Zlomanczuk, J.; Díaz, J.; Ortiz, A.; Vinodkumar, P. C.; Parmar, A.; Chlopik, A.; Melnychuk, D.; Slowinski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Wojciechowski, M.; Wronka, S.; Zwieglinski, B.; Bühler, P.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Fröhlich, B.; Khaneft, D.; Lin, D.; Zimmermann, I.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K.

    2015-08-01

    Baryon-to-meson Transition Distribution Amplitudes (TDAs) encoding valuable new information on hadron structure appear as building blocks in the collinear factorized description for several types of hard exclusive reactions. In this paper, we address the possibility of accessing nucleon-to-pion ( πN) TDAs from reaction with the future P¯ANDA detector at the FAIR facility. At high center-of-mass energy and high invariant mass squared of the lepton pair q 2, the amplitude of the signal channel admits a QCD factorized description in terms of πN TDAs and nucleon Distribution Amplitudes (DAs) in the forward and backward kinematic regimes. Assuming the validity of this factorized description, we perform feasibility studies for measuring with the P¯ANDA detector. Detailed simulations on signal reconstruction efficiency as well as on rejection of the most severe background channel, i.e. were performed for the center-of-mass energy squared s = 5 GeV2 and s = 10 GeV2, in the kinematic regions 3.0 < q 2 < 4.3 GeV2 and 5 < q 2 GeV2, respectively, with a neutral pion scattered in the forward or backward cone in the proton-antiproton center-of-mass frame. Results of the simulation show that the particle identification capabilities of the P¯ANDA detector will allow to achieve a background rejection factor of 5 · 107 (1 · 107) at low (high) q 2 for s = 5 GeV2, and of 1 · 108 (6 · 106) at low (high) q 2 for s = 10 GeV2, while keeping the signal reconstruction efficiency at around 40%. At both energies, a clean lepton signal can be reconstructed with the expected statistics corresponding to 2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The cross sections obtained from the simulations are used to show that a test of QCD collinear factorization can be done at the lowest order by measuring scaling laws and angular distributions. The future measurement of the signal channel cross section with P¯ANDA will provide a new test of the perturbative QCD description of a novel class of hard

  18. The 'Higgs' amplitude mode at the two-dimensional superfluid/Mott insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Endres, Manuel; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Pekker, David; Cheneau, Marc; Schauss, Peter; Gross, Christian; Demler, Eugene; Kuhr, Stefan; Bloch, Immanuel

    2012-07-26

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking plays a key role in our understanding of nature. In relativistic quantum field theory, a broken continuous symmetry leads to the emergence of two types of fundamental excitation: massless Nambu-Goldstone modes and a massive 'Higgs' amplitude mode. An excitation of Higgs type is of crucial importance in the standard model of elementary particle physics, and also appears as a fundamental collective mode in quantum many-body systems. Whether such a mode exists in low-dimensional systems as a resonance-like feature, or whether it becomes overdamped through coupling to Nambu-Goldstone modes, has been a subject of debate. Here we experimentally find and study a Higgs mode in a two-dimensional neutral superfluid close to a quantum phase transition to a Mott insulating phase. We unambiguously identify the mode by observing the expected reduction in frequency of the onset of spectral response when approaching the transition point. In this regime, our system is described by an effective relativistic field theory with a two-component quantum field, which constitutes a minimal model for spontaneous breaking of a continuous symmetry. Additionally, all microscopic parameters of our system are known from first principles and the resolution of our measurement allows us to detect excited states of the many-body system at the level of individual quasiparticles. This allows for an in-depth study of Higgs excitations that also addresses the consequences of the reduced dimensionality and confinement of the system. Our work constitutes a step towards exploring emergent relativistic models with ultracold atomic gases. PMID:22837000

  19. Improved empirical parametrizations of the γ*N → N(1535) transition amplitudes and the Siegert's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, G.

    2016-08-01

    Some empirical parametrizations of the γ* N → N (1535) transition amplitudes violate the Siegert's theorem, that relates the longitudinal and the transverse amplitudes in the pseudo-threshold limit (nucleon and resonance at rest). In the case of the electromagnetic transition from the nucleon (mass M) to the resonance N (1525) (mass MR), the Siegert's theorem is sometimes expressed by the relation | q |A1/2 = λS1/2 in the pseudo-threshold limit, when the photon momentum | q | vanishes, and λ =√{ 2} (MR - M). In this article, we argue that the Siegert's theorem should be expressed by the relation A1/2 = λS1/2 / | q |, in the limit | q | → 0. This result is a consequence of the relation S1/2 ∝ | q |, when | q | → 0, as suggested by the analysis of the transition form factors and by the orthogonality between the nucleon and N (1535) states. We propose then new empirical parametrizations for the γ* N → N (1535) helicity amplitudes, that are consistent with the data and the Siegert's theorem. The proposed parametrizations follow closely the MAID2007 parametrization, except for a small deviation in the amplitudes A1/2 and S1/2 when Q2 < 1.5 GeV2.

  20. Finite amplitude folding: transition from exponential to layer length controlled growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Podladchikov, Yuri Yu.

    2000-06-01

    A new finite amplitude theory of folding has been developed by the combined application of analytical, asymptotic and numerical methods. The existing linear folding theory has been improved by considering nonlinear weakening of membrane stresses, which is caused by the stretching of the competent layer during folding. The resulting theory is simple and accurate for finite amplitude folding and is not restricted to infinitesimal amplitudes, as is the classical linear theory of folding. Two folding modes relevant to most natural settings were considered: (i) both membrane and fiber stresses are viscous during folding (the 'viscous' mode); (ii) membrane stresses are viscous whereas fiber stresses are elastic (the 'viscoelastic' mode). For these two modes, the new theory provided a nonlinear, ordinary differential equation for fold amplification during shortening and an estimate for crossover amplitude and strain where the linear theory breaks down. A new analytical relationship for amplitude versus strain was derived for strains much larger than the crossover strain. The new relationship agrees well with complete 2D numerical solutions for up to threefold shortening, whereas the exponential solution predicted by the linear theory is inaccurate by orders of magnitude for strains larger than the crossover value. Analysis of the crossover strain and amplitude as a function of the controlling parameters demonstrates that the linear theory is only applicable for a small range of amplitudes and strains. This renders unreliable the large strain prediction of wavelength selection based on the linear theory, especially for folding at high competence contrasts. To resolve this problem, the new finite amplitude theory is used to calculate the evolution of the growth rate spectra during progressive folding. The growth rate spectra exhibited splitting of a single maximum (predicted by the linear theory) into two maxima at large strains. This bifurcation occurred for both

  1. Finite amplitude folding: transition from exponential to layer length controlled growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Podladchikov, Yuri Yu.

    2000-09-01

    A new finite amplitude theory of folding has been developed by the combined application of analytical, asymptotic and numerical methods. The existing linear folding theory has been improved by considering nonlinear weakening of membrane stresses, which is caused by the stretching of the competent layer during folding. The resulting theory is simple and accurate for finite amplitude folding and is not restricted to infinitesimal amplitudes, as is the classical linear theory of folding. Two folding modes relevant to most natural settings were considered: (i) both membrane and fiber stresses are viscous during folding (the 'viscous' mode); (ii) membrane stresses are viscous whereas fiber stresses are elastic (the 'viscoelastic' mode). For these two modes, the new theory provided a nonlinear, ordinary differential equation for fold amplification during shortening and an estimate for crossover amplitude and strain where the linear theory breaks down. A new analytical relationship for amplitude versus strain was derived for strains much larger than the crossover strain. The new relationship agrees well with complete 2D numerical solutions for up to threefold shortening, whereas the exponential solution predicted by the linear theory is inaccurate by orders of magnitude for strains larger than the crossover value. Analysis of the crossover strain and amplitude as a function of the controlling parameters demonstrates that the linear theory is only applicable for a small range of amplitudes and strains. This renders unreliable the large strain prediction of wavelength selection based on the linear theory, especially for folding at high competence contrasts. To resolve this problem, the new finite amplitude theory is used to calculate the evolution of the growth rate spectra during progressive folding. The growth rate spectra exhibited splitting of a single maximum (predicted by the linear theory) into two maxima at large strains. This bifurcation occurred for both

  2. Functional aspects of distal oesophageal spasm: the role of onset velocity and contraction amplitude on bolus transit

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Daniel; Ciolino, Jody; Roberts, Jason; Savarino, Edoardo; Freeman, Janice; Nietert, Paul J; Tutuian, Radu; Castell, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Background Distal oesophageal spasm (DES) is a rare and under-investigated motility abnormality. Recent studies indicate effective bolus transit in varying percentages of DES patients. Aim Explore functional aspects including contraction onset velocity and contraction amplitude cut-off values for simultaneous contractions to predict complete bolus transit Methods We re-examined data from 107 impedance-manometry recordings with a diagnosis of DES. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted, regarding effects of onset velocity on bolus transit taking into account distal oesophageal amplitude (DEA) and correcting for intra-individual repeated measures. Results Mean area under the ROC curve for saline and viscous swallows were 0.84±0.05 and 0.84±0.04, respectively. Velocity criteria of >30cm/s when DEA>100mmHg and 8cm/s when DEA<100mmHg for saline and 32cm/s when DEA>100mmHg and >7cm/s when DEA<100mmHg for viscous had a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 80% to identify complete bolus transit. Using these criteria, final diagnosis changed in 44.9% of patients. Abnormal bolus transit was observed in 50.9% of newly diagnosed DES patients versus 7.5% of patients classified as normal. DES patients with DEA>100mmHg suffered twice as often from chest pain than those with DEA<100mmHg. Conclusion The proposed velocity cut-offs for diagnosing distal oesophageal spasm improve the ability to identify patients with spasm and abnormal bolus transit. PMID:22475443

  3. Nonlinear Interaction of Detuned Instability Waves in Boundary-Layer Transition: Amplitude Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sang Soo

    1998-01-01

    The non-equilibrium critical-layer analysis of a system of frequency-detuned resonant-triads is presented. In this part of the analysis, the system of partial differential critical-layer equations derived in Part I is solved analytically to yield the amplitude equations which are analyzed using a combination of asymptotic and numerical methods. Numerical solutions of the inviscid non-equilibrium oblique-mode amplitude equations show that the frequency-detuned self-interaction enhances the growth of the lower-frequency oblique modes more than the higher-frequency ones. All amplitudes become singular at the same finite downstream position. The frequency detuning delays the occurrence of the singularity. The spanwise-periodic mean-flow distortion and low-frequency nonlinear modes are generated by the critical-layer interaction between frequency-detuned oblique modes. The nonlinear mean flow and higher harmonics as well as the primary instabilities become as large as the base mean flow in the inviscid wall layer in the downstream region where the distance from the singularity is of the order of the wavelength scale.

  4. Single-cycle Terahertz Pulses with >0.2 V/A Field Amplitudes via Coherent Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Daranciang, Dan; Goodfellow, John; Fuchs, Matthias; Wen, Haidan; Ghimire, Shambhu; Reis, David A.; Loos, Henrik; Fisher, Alan S.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.; /Stanford U. Materials Sci. Dept. /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate terahertz pulses with field amplitudes exceeding 0.2 V/{angstrom} generated by coherent transition radiation. Femtosecond, relativistic electron bunches generated at the Linac Coherent Light Source are passed through a beryllium foil, and the emitted radiation is characterized as a function of the bunch duration and charge. Broadband pulses centered at a frequency of 10 THz with energies of 140 {mu}J are measured. These far-below-bandgap pulses drive a nonlinear optical response in a silicon photodiode, with which we perform nonlinear autocorrelations that yield information regarding the terahertz temporal profile. Simulations of the spatiotemporal profile agree well with experimental results.

  5. Ab initio calculations of forbidden transition amplitudes and lifetimes of the low-lying states in V{sup 4+}

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, Gopal; Majumder, Sonjoy; Sahoo, Bijaya K.; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.

    2007-10-15

    We report electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic dipole (M1) transition amplitudes of the first few low-lying states of quadruply ionized vanadium (V{sup 4+}), which are important in various experimental applications and astrophysics. To our knowledge, most of these presented results are determined for the first time in the literature. A relativistic multireference Fock-space coupled-cluster theory with single (S), double (D), and partial triple (T) excitations is employed to compute the forbidden transition probabilities and lifetimes of the low-lying states in V{sup 4+}. Estimations of different correlation effects arising through the above formalism have been highlighted by investigating core and valence electron excitations. A long lifetime is found for the first excited 3d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state, which suggests that V{sup 4+} may be one of the useful candidates for many important studies.

  6. Transition from amplitude to oscillation death in a network of oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Nandan, Mauparna; Hens, C. R.; Dana, Syamal K.; Pal, Pinaki

    2014-12-01

    We report a transition from a homogeneous steady state (HSS) to inhomogeneous steady states (IHSSs) in a network of globally coupled identical oscillators. We perturb a synchronized population of oscillators in the network with a few local negative or repulsive mean field links. The whole population splits into two clusters for a certain number of repulsive mean field links and a range of coupling strength. For further increase of the strength of interaction, these clusters collapse into a HSS followed by a transition to IHSSs where all the oscillators populate either of the two stable steady states. We analytically determine the origin of HSS and its transition to IHSS in relation to the number of repulsive mean-field links and the strength of interaction using a reductionism approach to the model network. We verify the results with numerical examples of the paradigmatic Landau-Stuart limit cycle system and the chaotic Rössler oscillator as dynamical nodes. During the transition from HSS to IHSSs, the network follows the Turing type symmetry breaking pitchfork or transcritical bifurcation depending upon the system dynamics.

  7. Transition from amplitude to oscillation death in a network of oscillators.

    PubMed

    Nandan, Mauparna; Hens, C R; Pal, Pinaki; Dana, Syamal K

    2014-12-01

    We report a transition from a homogeneous steady state (HSS) to inhomogeneous steady states (IHSSs) in a network of globally coupled identical oscillators. We perturb a synchronized population of oscillators in the network with a few local negative or repulsive mean field links. The whole population splits into two clusters for a certain number of repulsive mean field links and a range of coupling strength. For further increase of the strength of interaction, these clusters collapse into a HSS followed by a transition to IHSSs where all the oscillators populate either of the two stable steady states. We analytically determine the origin of HSS and its transition to IHSS in relation to the number of repulsive mean-field links and the strength of interaction using a reductionism approach to the model network. We verify the results with numerical examples of the paradigmatic Landau-Stuart limit cycle system and the chaotic Rössler oscillator as dynamical nodes. During the transition from HSS to IHSSs, the network follows the Turing type symmetry breaking pitchfork or transcritical bifurcation depending upon the system dynamics. PMID:25554023

  8. System Size Dependence of Finite-Amplitude Thresholds for Transition to Turbulence in Taylor-Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrero-Echeverrry, Daniel; Morrison, Benjamin; Peairs, Evan

    2015-11-01

    Despite centuries of study, fluid dynamicists are still unable to explain why a large class of flows, including pipe flow and plane Couette flow, become turbulent. Hydrodynamic stability theory predicts these flows should be stable to infinitesimal perturbations, which means finite-amplitude perturbations need to be applied to destabilize them. We present the results of a series of experiments studying such subcritical transitions to turbulence in linearly-stable configurations of Taylor-Couette flow. In particular, we discuss how the stability of these flows depends on the size and duration of the applied perturbation as the aspect ratio of the experimental apparatus is varied. We show that for experimental configurations where the end caps rotate with the outer cylinder, the stability of the flow is enhanced at small aspect ratios. We find that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers, perturbations must exceed a critical amplitude before the transition to turbulence can be triggered. The scaling of this threshold with Re appears to be different than that which has been reported for other linearly-stable shear flows. This work was supported by Reed College's Summer Scholarship Fund, the James Borders Physics Student Fellowship, and the Reed College Science Research Fellowship. We also thank H.L. Swinney, who kindly donated the apparatus used in these experiments.

  9. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  10. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: 2H NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high. PMID:24730877

  11. Argand-diagram representation of transition amplitudes for resonant reactive scattering: e+HCl and e+H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutrus, C. K.; Suck Salk, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Resonances for rearrangement collisions (reactive scattering) involving the two dissociative attachment processes, e+HCl-->H+Cl- and e+H2-->H+H-, are examined. It is shown from the Argand-diagram representation of transition amplitudes that strong resonance is present in the former but not in the latter. That is, the strong resonance is evidenced by the clear exhibition of a phase change by π in a counterclockwise direction in the Argand diagram as the collision energy increases. Such a manifest phase change is absent in the dissociative attachment process of e+H2-->H+H-. This is attributed to the presence of equally strong, direct, and resonant scattering processes, and to the strong influence of mutually destructive interference.

  12. Multichannel 0→2 and 1→2 transition amplitudes for arbitrary spin particles in a finite volume

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hansen, Maxwell; Briceno, Raul

    2015-10-01

    We present a model-independent, non-perturbative relation between finite-volume matrix elements and infinite-volumemore » $$\\textbf{0}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$$ and $$\\textbf{1}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$$ transition amplitudes. Our result accommodates theories in which the final two-particle state is coupled to any number of other two-body channels, with all angular momentum states included. The derivation uses generic, fully relativistic field theory, and is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections in the lightest particle mass times the box size. This work distinguishes itself from previous studies by accommodating particles with any intrinsic spin. To illustrate the utility of our general result, we discuss how it can be implemented for studies of $$N+\\mathcal{J}~\\rightarrow~(N\\pi,N\\eta,N\\eta',\\Sigma K,\\Lambda K)$$ transitions, where $$\\mathcal{J}$$ is a generic external current. The reduction of rotational symmetry, due to the cubic finite volume, manifests in this example through the mixing of S- and P-waves when the system has nonzero total momentum.« less

  13. Improved empirical parametrizations of the γ*N →Δ (1232 ) and γ*N →N (1520 ) transition amplitudes and Siegert's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, G.

    2016-06-01

    In the nucleon electroexcitation reactions, γ*N →R , where R is a nucleon resonance (N*), the electric amplitude E and the longitudinal amplitude S1 /2 are related by E ∝ω/|q | S1 /2, in the pseudothreshold limit (|q |→0 ), where ω and |q | are, respectively, the energy and the magnitude of 3-momentum of the photon. The previous relation is usually referred to as Siegert's theorem. The form of the electric amplitude, defined in terms of the transverse amplitudes A1 /2 and A3 /2, and the explicit coefficients of the relation depend on the angular momentum and parity (JP) of the resonance R . The Siegert's theorem is the consequence of the structure of the electromagnetic transition current, which induces constraints between the electromagnetic form factors in the pseudothreshold limit. In the present work, we study the implications of the Siegert's theorem for the γ*N →Δ (1232 ) and γ*N →N (1520 ) transitions. For the γ*N →N (1520 ) transition, in addition to the relation between the electric amplitude and longitudinal amplitude, we also obtain a relation between the two transverse amplitudes: A1 /2=A3 /2/√{3 }, at the pseudothreshold. The constraints at the pseudothreshold are tested for the MAID2007 parametrizations of the reactions under discussion. New parametrizations for the amplitudes A1 /2, A3 /2, and S1 /2 for the γ*N →Δ (1232 ) and γ*N →N (1520 ) transitions, valid for small and large Q2, are proposed. The new parametrizations are consistent with both: the pseudothreshold constraints (Siegert's theorem) and the empirical data.

  14. AN INDEPENDENT ANALYSIS OF THE BROWN DWARF ATMOSPHERE MONITORING (BAM) DATA: LARGE-AMPLITUDE VARIABILITY IS RARE OUTSIDE THE L/T TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Radigan, Jacqueline

    2014-12-20

    Observations of variability can provide valuable information about the processes of cloud formation and dissipation in brown dwarf atmospheres. Here we report the results of an independent analysis of archival data from the Brown dwarf Atmosphere Monitoring (BAM) program. Time series data for 14 L and T dwarfs reported to be significantly variable over timescales of hours were analyzed. We confirm large-amplitude variability (amplitudes >2%) for 4 out of 13 targets and place upper limits of 0.7%-1.6% on variability in the remaining sample. For two targets we find evidence of weak variability at amplitudes of 1.3% and 1.6%. Based on our revised classification of variable objects in the BAM study, we find strong variability outside the L/T transition to be rare at near infrared wavelengths. From a combined sample of 81 L0-T9 dwarfs from the revised BAM sample and the variability survey of Radigan et al., we infer an overall observed frequency for large-amplitude variability outside the L/T transition of 3.2{sub −1.8}{sup +2.8}%, in contrast to 24{sub −9}{sup +11}% for L9-T3.5 spectral types. We conclude that while strong variability is not limited to the L/T transition, it occurs more frequently in this spectral type range, indicative of larger or more highly contrasting cloud features at these spectral types.

  15. Amplitude and Transverse Quadrature Component Squeezing of Coherent Light in High Q Cavity by Injection of Atoms of Two-Photon Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Chang-Qi

    1996-01-01

    The amplitude and transverse quadrature component squeezing of coherent light in high Q cavity by injection of atoms of two-photon transition are studied. The Golubev-Sokolov master equation and generating function approach are utilized to derive the exact variances of photon number and of transverse quadrature component as function of t. The correlation functions and power spectrums of photon number noise and of output photon current noise are also investigated.

  16. The effect of large amplitude motions on the transition frequency redshift in hydrogen bonded complexes: A physical picture

    SciTech Connect

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.; Salmi, Teemu; Hänninen, Vesa; Halonen, Lauri

    2014-05-14

    We describe the vibrational transitions of the donor unit in water dimer with an approach that is based on a three-dimensional local mode model. We perform a perturbative treatment of the intermolecular vibrational modes to improve the transition wavenumber of the hydrogen bonded OH-stretching transition. The model accurately predicts the transition wavenumbers of the vibrations in water dimer compared to experimental values and provides a physical picture that explains the redshift of the hydrogen bonded OH-oscillator. We find that it is unnecessary to include all six intermolecular modes in the vibrational model and that their effect can, to a good approximation, be computed using a potential energy surface calculated at a lower level electronic structure method than that used for the unperturbed model.

  17. Changes in LH pulse frequency and amplitude in intact mares during the transition into the breeding season.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, B P; Affleck, K J; Barrows, S P; Murdoch, W L; Barker, K B; Loy, R G

    1987-03-01

    Two groups of mares were exposed to an abrupt, artificial increase or a natural increase in daylength. In both groups, mean LH pulse frequency increased with time of year and was accompanied by a reciprocal decrease in LH pulse amplitude. A non-pulsatile pattern of LH secretion was observed in some mares sampled close to the day of ovulation. Maximum mean LH pulse frequency and the onset of the breeding season occurred earlier in those mares exposed to an abrupt artificial increase in daylength. In blood samples collected frequently, mean serum LH concentrations increased in relation to time of year. However, during 60 days before ovulation, when LH pulse frequency increased, mean daily serum LH values only increased on Day -3 before ovulation. The magnitude of the periovulatory LH rise was greater before the second than the first ovulation of the breeding season. These results support the hypothesis that, in the mare, a photoperiod-induced seasonal alteration in LH pulse frequency and/or amplitude may play a role in the onset of the breeding season. PMID:3572880

  18. Development of the N1-P2 auditory evoked response to amplitude rise time and rate of formant transition of speech sounds.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Allen L; Shahin, Antoine J

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the development of weighting strategies for acoustic cues by examining the morphology of the N1-P2 auditory evoked potential (AEP) to changes in amplitude rise time (ART) and rate of formant transition (RFT) of consonant-vowel (CV) pairs in 4-6-year olds and adults. In the AEP session, individuals listened passively to the CVs /ba/, /wa/, and a /ba/ with a superimposed slower-rising /wa/ envelope (/ba/(wa)). In the behavioral session, individuals listened to the same stimuli and judged whether they heard a /ba/ or /wa/. We hypothesized that a developmental shift in weighting strategies should be reflected in a change in the morphology of the N1-P2 AEP. In 6-year olds and adults, the N1-P2 amplitude at the vertex reflected a change in RFT but not in ART. In contrast, in the 4-5-year olds, the vertex N1-P2 did not show specificity to changes in ART or RFT. In all groups, the N1-P2 amplitude at channel C4 (right hemisphere) reflected a change in ART but not in RFT. Behaviorally, 6-year olds and adults predominately utilized RFT cues (classified /ba/(wa) as /ba/) during phonetic judgments, as opposed to 4-5-year olds which utilized both cues equally. Our findings suggest that both ART and RFT are encoded in the auditory cortex, but an N1-P2 shift toward the vertex following age 4-5 indicates a shift toward an adult-like weighting strategy, such that, to utilize RFT to a greater extent. PMID:23570734

  19. LARGE-AMPLITUDE VARIATIONS OF AN L/T TRANSITION BROWN DWARF: MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF PATCHY, HIGH-CONTRAST CLOUD FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Radigan, Jacqueline; Jayawardhana, Ray; Lafreniere, David; Artigau, Etienne; Marley, Mark; Saumon, Didier

    2012-05-10

    We present multiple-epoch photometric monitoring in the J, H, and K{sub s} bands of the T1.5 dwarf 2MASS J21392676+0220226 (2M2139), revealing persistent, periodic (P = 7.721 {+-} 0.005 hr) variability with a peak-to-peak amplitude as high as 26% in the J band. The light curve shape varies on a timescale of days, suggesting that evolving atmospheric cloud features are responsible. Using interpolations between model atmospheres with differing cloud thicknesses to represent a heterogeneous surface, we find that the multi-wavelength variations and the near-infrared spectrum of 2M2139 can be reproduced by either (1) cool, thick cloud features sitting above a thinner cloud layer, or (2) warm regions of low condensate opacity in an otherwise cloudy atmosphere, possibly indicating the presence of holes or breaks in the cloud layer. We find that temperature contrasts between thick and thin cloud patches must be greater than 175 K and as high as 425 K. We also consider whether the observed variability could arise from an interacting binary system, but this scenario is ruled out. 2M2139 joins the T2.5 dwarf SIMP0136 discovered by Artigau and coworkers as the second L/T transition brown dwarf to display large-amplitude variability on rotational timescales, suggesting that the fragmentation of dust clouds at the L/T transition may contribute to the abrupt decline in condensate opacity and J-band brightening observed to occur over this regime.

  20. Variations in the reflectivity of the moho transition zone beneath the Midcontinent Rift System of North America: results from true amplitude analysis of GLIMPCE data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Lee, Myung W.; Behrendt, John C.; Cannon, William F.; Green, Adrian

    1992-01-01

    True amplitude processing of The Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program on Crustal Evolution seismic reflection data from the Midcontinent Rift System of North America shows large differences in the reflectivity of the Moho transition zone beneath the axial rift, beneath the rift flanks, and outside of the rift. The Moho reflection from the axial rift has a discontinuous, diffractive character marginally stronger (several decibels) than an otherwise transparent lower crust and upper mantle. Beneath the axial rift, Moho is interpreted to be a synrift igneous feature. Beneath the rift flanks, the reflectivity of the Moho transition is generally well developed with two identifiable boundaries, although in places it is weakly reflective to nonreflective, similar to Moho outside the rift. The two boundaries are interpreted as the base of essentially intact, although stretched, prerift Archean crust (upper boundary) and new synrift Moho 1-2 s (6-7 km) deeper (lower boundary). Beneath the rift flanks, the layered reflection Moho transition results from the preexisting crustal composition and fabric modified by synrift igneous processes and extensional tectonic/metamorphic processes. The geologic evidence for extensive basaltic magmatism in the rift is the basis for interpreting the Moho signature as a Keweenawan structure that has been preserved for 1.1 b.y. Extension and magmatism appear to enhance reflectivity in the lower crust and Moho transition zone only where stretching factors are moderate (rift flanks) and not where they are extreme (axial rift). This leads to the prediction that the reflectivity across analogous volcanic passive continental margins should be greatest beneath the moderately stretched continental shelves and should decrease towards the ocean-continent boundary.

  1. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  2. OPE for all helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Benjamin; Caetano, João; Córdova, Lucía; Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) for scattering amplitudes in planar SYM to account for all possible helicities of the external states. This is done by constructing a simple map between helicity configurations and so-called charged pentagon transitions. These OPE building blocks are generalizations of the bosonic pentagons entering MHV amplitudes and they can be bootstrapped at finite coupling from the integrable dynamics of the color flux tube. A byproduct of our map is a simple realization of parity in the super Wilson loop picture.

  3. Shape of Pion Distribution Amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly

    2009-11-01

    A scenario is investigated in which the leading-twist pion distribution amplitude $\\varphi_\\pi (x)$ is approximated by the pion decay constant $f_\\pi$ for all essential values of the light-cone fraction $x$. A model for the light-front wave function $\\Psi (x, k_\\perp)$ is proposed that produces such a distribution amplitude and has a rapidly decreasing (exponential for definiteness) dependence on the light-front energy combination $ k_\\perp^2/x(1-x)$. It is shown that this model easily reproduces the fit of recent large-$Q^2$ BaBar data on the photon-pion transition form factor. Some aspects of scenario with flat pion distribution amplitude are discussed.

  4. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  5. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  6. Calculating scattering amplitudes efficiently

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, L.

    1996-01-01

    We review techniques for more efficient computation of perturbative scattering amplitudes in gauge theory, in particular tree and one- loop multi-parton amplitudes in QCD. We emphasize the advantages of (1) using color and helicity information to decompose amplitudes into smaller gauge-invariant pieces, and (2) exploiting the analytic properties of these pieces, namely their cuts and poles. Other useful tools include recursion relations, special gauges and supersymmetric rearrangements. 46 refs., 11 figs.

  7. The amplitude of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, B.V. ); Pavlov, V.P.; Polivanov, M.K. ); Sukhanov, A.D. )

    1989-05-01

    General properties of the transition amplitude in axiomatic quantum field theory are discussed. Bogolyubov's axiomatic method is chosen as the variant of the theory. The axioms of this method are analyzed. In particular, the significance of the off-shell extension and of the various forms of the causality condition are examined. A complete proof is given of the existence of a single analytic function whose boundary values are the amplitudes of all channels of a process with given particle number.

  8. Thermal cracking and amplitude dependent attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.H.; Toksoez, M.N.

    1980-02-10

    The role of crack and grain boundary contacts in determining seismic wave attenuation in rock is investigated by examining Q as a function of thermal cycling (cracking) and wave strain amplitude. Q values are obtained using a longitudinal resonant bar technique in the 10- to 20-kHz range for maximum strain amplitudes varying from roughly 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/. The samples studied include the Berea and Navajo sandstones, Plexiglas, Westerly granite, Solenhofen limestone, and Frederick diabase, the latter two relatively crack free in their virgin state. Measurements were made at room temperature and pressure in air. Q values for both sandstones are constant at low strains (<10/sup -6/) but decrease rapidly with amplitude at higher strains. There is no hysteresis of Q with amplitude. Q values for Plexiglas show no indication of amplitude dependent behavior. The granite, limestone, and diabase are thermally cycled at both fast and slow heating rates in order to induce cracking. Samples slowly cycled at 400/sup 0/C show a marked increase in Q that cannot be entirely explained by outgassing of volatiles. Cycling may also widen thin cracks and grain boundaries, reducing contact areas. Samples heated beyond 400/sup 0/C, or rapidly heated, result in generally decreasing Q values. The amplitude dependence of Q is found to be coupled to the effects of thermal cycling. For rock slowly cycled 400)C or less, the transition from low-amplitude contant Q to high-amplitude variable Q behavior decreases to lower amplitudes as a function of maximum temperature. Above 400/sup 0/C, and possibly in th rapidly heated samples also, the transition moves to higher amplitudes.

  9. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYSERS

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, I.A.D.

    1956-05-15

    This patent pentains to an electrical pulse amplitude analyzer, capable of accepting input pulses having a separation between adjacent pulses in the order of one microsecond while providing a large number of channels of classification. In its broad aspect the described pulse amplitude analyzer utilizes a storage cathode ray tube und control circuitry whereby the amplitude of the analyzed pulses controls both the intensity and vertical defiection of the beam to charge particular spots in horizontal sectors of the tube face as the beam is moved horizontally across the tube face. As soon as the beam has swept the length of the tube the information stored therein is read out by scanning individually each horizontal sector corresponding to a certain range of pulse amplitudes and applying the output signal from each scan to separate indicating means.

  10. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  11. Topics in Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennen, Tristan Lucas

    In Part 1, we combine on-shell methods with the six-dimensional helicity formalism of Cheung and O'Connell to construct tree-level and multiloop scattering amplitudes. As a nontrivial multiloop example, we confirm that the recently constructed four-loop four-point amplitude of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory, including nonplanar contributions, is valid for dimensions less than or equal to six. We demonstrate that the tree-level amplitudes of maximal super-Yang-Mills theory in six dimensions, when stripped of their overall momentum and supermomentum delta functions, are covariant with respect to the six-dimensional dual conformal group. We demonstrate that this property is also present for loop amplitudes. In Part 2, we explore consequences of the recently discovered duality between color and kinematics, which states that kinematic numerators in a diagrammatic expansion of gauge-theory amplitudes can be arranged to satisfy Jacobi-like identities in one-to-one correspondence to the associated color factors. The related squaring relations express gravity amplitudes in terms of gauge-theory ingredients. We then present a Yang-Mills Lagrangian whose diagrams through five points manifestly satisfy the duality between color and kinematics. Finally, we compute the coefficient of the potential three-loop divergence in pure N=4 supergravity and show that it vanishes, contrary to expectations from symmetry arguments.

  12. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  13. Amplitude Modulator Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Erbert, G

    2009-09-01

    The Amplitude Modulator Chassis (AMC) is the final component in the MOR system and connects directly to the PAM input through a 100-meter fiber. The 48 AMCs temporally shape the 48 outputs of the MOR using an arbitrary waveform generator coupled to an amplitude modulator. The amplitude modulation element is a two stage, Lithium Niobate waveguide device, where the intensity of the light passing through the device is a function of the electrical drive applied. The first stage of the modulator is connected to a programmable high performance Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) consisting of 140 impulse generators space 250 ps apart. An arbitrary waveform is generated by independently varying the amplitude of each impulse generator and then summing the impulses together. In addition to the AWG a short pulse generator is also connected to the first stage of the modulator to provide a sub 100-ps pulse used for timing experiments. The second stage of the modulator is connect to a square pulse generator used to further attenuate any pre or post pulse light passing through the first stage of the modulator. The fast rise and fall time of the square pulse generator is also used to produce fast rise and fall times of the AWG by clipping the AWG pulse. For maximum extinction, a pulse bias voltage is applied to each stage of the modulator. A pulse voltage is applied as opposed to a DC voltage to prevent charge buildup on the modulator. Each bias voltage is adjustable to provide a minimum of 50-dB extinction. The AMC is controlled through ICCS to generate the desired temporal pulse shape. This process involves a closed-loop control algorithm, which compares the desired temporal waveform to the produced optical pulse, and iterates the programming of the AWG until the two waveforms agree within an allowable tolerance.

  14. China Amplitude Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Modern data from the China Bulletin and temporary network deployments has been used to update amplitude tomography using ML and MS seismic amplitudes. This work builds on the results of Hearn et al., 2008. ML attenuation estimates are much better resolved due to the inclusion of subnet data. We find that the trade-off between geometrical spreading and attenuation estimates are well constrained; however, both of these parameters have significant trade-off with the frequency dependence of attenuation. Maps of attenuation using the ML amplitudes are similar to those of Lg attenuation found by other authors suggesting that ML attenuation estimates form a suitable proxy for Lg attenuation estimates. We are now able to associate high attenuation directly with the Longmen Shan and the Qilian Shan mountains and also, where resolved, with the Kunlun Shan, Altyn Tag, and Tian Shan mountains. Grabens around the Ordos Platform also show high attenuation. Basins, however, do not in general show high attenuation. The main exception to this is the Bohai Basin. We conclude that the ML waveforms, like the Lg waveforms, interrogate the entire crustal column and are most sensitive to tectonically active structures and rapid changes in crustal structure. Data from MS data do not include subnet readings and do not have the resolution that was obtained with the ML data. Nonetheless, features are similar with the exception that basins appear more highly attenuative.

  15. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Gray, G.W.; Jensen, A.S.

    1957-10-22

    A pulse-height analyzer system of improved design for sorting and counting a series of pulses, such as provided by a scintillation detector in nuclear radiation measurements, is described. The analyzer comprises a main transmission line, a cathode-ray tube for each section of the line with its deflection plates acting as the line capacitance; means to bias the respective cathode ray tubes so that the beam strikes a target only when a prearranged pulse amplitude is applied, with each tube progressively biased to respond to smaller amplitudes; pulse generating and counting means associated with each tube to respond when the beam is deflected; a control transmission line having the same time constant as the first line per section with pulse generating means for each tube for initiating a pulse on the second transmission line when a pulse triggers the tube of corresponding amplitude response, the former pulse acting to prevent successive tubes from responding to the pulse under test. This arrangement permits greater deflection sensitivity in the cathode ray tube and overcomes many of the disadvantages of prior art pulse-height analyzer circuits.

  16. Theoretical study of some experimentally relevant states of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-05-15

    Configuration interaction method is used to calculate transition amplitudes and other properties of the low states of dysprosium which are used in cooling and in the study of the time variation of the fine structure constant and violation of fundamental symmetries. The branching ratio for the cooling state to decay to states other than ground states is found to be smaller than 10{sup -4}. The matrix element of the weak interaction between degenerate states at E=19797.96 cm{sup -1} is about 4 Hz which is consistent with the experimental limit |H{sub W}|=|2.3{+-}2.9(stat.){+-}0.7(syst.)| Hz [A. T. Nguyen, D. Budker, D. DeMille, and M. Zolotorev, Phys. Rev. A 56, 3453 (1997)] and points to feasibility of its experimental measurement. Applications include the search for physics beyond the standard model using the parity nonconservation (PNC) isotopic chain approach.

  17. A Low-Noise CsI Detector Array for the Precision Measurement of Parity Nonconservation in n + p --> d + gamma

    SciTech Connect

    M. T. Gericke; C. Blessinger; J. D. Bowman; R. D. Carlini; T. E. Chupp; K. P. Coulter; M. Dawkins; M. Dabaghyan; D. Desai; S. J. Freedman; T. R. Gentile; R. C. Gillis; G. L. Greene; J. Hartfield; F. W. Hersman; T. Ino; G. L. Jones; B. Lauss; M. Leuschner; B. Losowski; R. Mahurin; Y. Masuda; G. S. Mitchell; S. Muto; H. Nann; S. A. Page; S. I. Penttila; W. D. Ramsay; S. Santra; P.-N. Seo; E. T. Sharapov; T. B. Smith; W. M. Snow; J. Tasson; W. S. Wilburn; H. Zhu

    2004-09-26

    We have built a CsI(Tl) gamma-ray detector array for the NPDGamma experiment to search for a small parity-violating directional asymmetry in the angular distribution of 2.2 MeV gamma-rays from the capture of polarized cold neutrons by protons with a sensitivity of several ppb. The weak pion-nucleon coupling constant can be determined from this asymmetry. The small size of the asymmetry requires control of systematic errors at the ppb level, and the use of current-mode gamma-ray detection with vacuum photo diodes and low-noise solid-state preamplifiers. The detectors were tested for noise performance, sensitivity to magnetic fields, pedestal stability, and cosmic background. False asymmetries due to gain changes and electronic pickup in the detector system were measured to be consistent with zero to an accuracy of 10^–9 in a few hours. We show that the detector array operates at counting statistics and present asymmetry results for B_4C , CCl_4 , ^27Al, Cu, and In. B_4C ,^27Al, Cu, and In are used throughout the experimental apparatus.

  18. PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER

    DOEpatents

    Cowper, G.

    1958-08-12

    A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

  19. On the Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Examined are Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period relationships based on the cyclic behavior of the 12-month moving averages of monthly mean sunspot numbers for cycles 0.23, both in terms of Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 contingency tables and linear regression analyses. Concerning the Period-Amplitude relationship (same cycle), because cycle 23's maximum amplitude is known to be 120.8, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that its period will be 131 +/- 24 months (using all cycles) or 131 +/- 18 months (ignoring cycles 2 and 4, which have the extremes of period, 108 and 164 months, respectively). Because cycle 23 has already persisted for 142 months (May 1996 through February 2008), based on the latter prediction, it should end before September 2008. Concerning the Amplitude-Period relationship (following cycle maximum amplitude versus preceding cycle period), because cycle 23's period is known to be at least 142 months, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that cycle 24's maximum amplitude will be about less than or equal to 96.1 +/- 55.0 (using all cycle pairs) or less than or equal to 91.0 +/- 36.7 (ignoring statistical outlier cycle pairs). Hence, cycle 24's maximum amplitude is expected to be less than 151, perhaps even less than 128, unless cycle pair 23/24 proves to be a statistical outlier.

  20. Amplitudes of MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Cally, Paul; Baldner, Charles; Kleint, Lucia; Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart; Scherrer, Philip H.; Rajaguru, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of p-modes into MHD waves by strong magnetic fields occurs mainly in the sub-photospheric layers. The photospheric signatures of MHD waves are weak due to low amplitudes at the beta=1 equipartion level where mode-conversion occurs. We report on small amplitude oscillations observed in the photosphere with Hinode SOT/SP in which we analyze time series for sunspots ARs 12186 (11.10.2014) and 12434 (17.10.2015). No significant magnetic field oscillations are recovered in the umbra or penumbra in the ME inversion. However, periodicities in the inclination angle are found at the umbral/penumbral boundary with 5 minute periods. Upward propagating waves are indicated in the intensity signals correlated between HMI and AIA at different heights. We compare SP results with the oscillations observed in HMI data. Simultaneous IRIS data shows transition region brightening above the umbral core.

  1. Amplitude chimeras and chimera death in dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Anna; Kapeller, Marie; Schöll, Eckehard

    2016-06-01

    We find chimera states with respect to amplitude dynamics in a network of Stuart- Landau oscillators. These partially coherent and partially incoherent spatio-temporal patterns appear due to the interplay of nonlocal network topology and symmetry-breaking coupling. As the coupling range is increased, the oscillations are quenched, amplitude chimeras disappear and the network enters a symmetry-breaking stationary state. This particular regime is a novel pattern which we call chimera death. It is characterized by the coexistence of spatially coherent and incoherent inhomogeneous steady states and therefore combines the features of chimera state and oscillation death. Additionally, we show two different transition scenarios from amplitude chimera to chimera death. Moreover, for amplitude chimeras we uncover the mechanism of transition towards in-phase synchronized regime and discuss the role of initial conditions.

  2. Stochastic aspects of nuclear large amplitude motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomietz, V.M.

    1995-08-01

    A consistent description of the macroscopic large amplitude dynamics and processes of internal excitation of a nucleus is suggested. The cranking model approach is used for the calculation of the response function of the nucleus in a moving frame. Using spectral statistics smearing, the collective mass, friction, and diffusion coefficients are derived. The relation of the response function in a moving frame to the correlation function in a classical chaotic system is established. The rate of dissipation due to the Landau-Zener transitions and through the Kubo mechanism is considered.

  3. CHY formula and MHV amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Jian; Teng, Fei; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the relation between the Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula and the maximal-helicity-violating (MHV) amplitudes of Yang-Mills and gravity in four dimensions. We prove that only one special rational solution of the scattering equations found by Weinzierl supports the MHV amplitudes. Namely, localized at this solution, the integrated CHY formula produces the Parke-Taylor formula for MHV Yang-Mills amplitudes as well as the Hodges formula for MHV gravitational amplitudes, with an arbitrary number of external gluons/gravitons. This is achieved by developing techniques, in a manifestly Möbius covariant formalism, to explicitly compute relevant reduced Pfaffians/determinants. We observe and prove two interesting properties (or identities), which facilitate the computations. We also check that all the other ( n - 3)! - 1 solutions to the scattering equations do not support the MHV amplitudes, and prove analytically that this is indeed true for the other special rational solution proposed by Weinzierl, that actually supports the anti-MHV amplitudes. Our results reveal a mysterious feature of the CHY formalism that in Yang-Mills and gravity theory, solutions of scattering equations, involving only external momenta, somehow know about the configuration of external polarizations of the scattering amplitudes.

  4. Substorm statistics: Occurrences and amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, J.E.; Nemzek, R.J.

    1994-05-01

    The occurrences and amplitudes of substorms are statistically investigated with the use of three data sets: the AL index, the Los Alamos 3-satellite geosynchronous energetic-electron measurements, and the GOES-5 and -6 geosynchronous magnetic-field measurements. The investigation utilizes {approximately} 13,800 substorms in AL, {approximately} 1400 substorms in the energetic-electron flux, and {approximately} 100 substorms in the magnetic field. The rate of occurrence of substorms is determined as a function of the time of day, the time of year, the amount of magnetotail bending, the orientation of the geomagnetic dipole, the toward/away configuration of the IMF, and the parameters of the solar wind. The relative roles of dayside reconnection and viscous coupling in the production of substorms are assessed. Three amplitudes are defined for a substorms: the jump in the AL index, the peak of the >30-keV integral electron flux at geosynchronous orbit near midnight, and the angle of rotation of the geosynchronous magnetic field near midnight. The substorm amplitudes are statistically analyzed, the amplitude measurements are cross correlated with each other, and the substorm amplitudes are determined as functions of the solar-wind parameters. Periodically occurring and randomly occurring substorms are analyzed separately. The energetic-particle-flux amplitudes are consistent with unloading and the AL amplitudes are consistent with direct driving plus unloading.

  5. Off-shell CHY amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.; Yao, York-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula for on-shell scattering amplitudes is extended off-shell. The off-shell amplitudes (amputated Green's functions) are Möbius invariant, and have the same momentum poles as the on-shell amplitudes. The working principles which drive the modifications to the scattering equations are mainly Möbius covariance and energy momentum conservation in off-shell kinematics. The same technique is also used to obtain off-shell massive scalars. A simple off-shell extension of the CHY gauge formula which is Möbius invariant is proposed, but its true nature awaits further study.

  6. Positive amplitudes in the amplituhedron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Hodges, Andrew; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    The all-loop integrand for scattering amplitudes in planar SYM is determined by an "amplitude form" with logarithmic singularities on the boundary of the amplituhedron. In this note we provide strong evidence for a new striking property of the superamplitude, which we conjecture to be true to all loop orders: the amplitude form is positive when evaluated inside the amplituhedron. The statement is sensibly formulated thanks to the natural "bosonization" of the superamplitude associated with the amplituhedron geometry. However this positivity is not manifest in any of the current approaches to scattering amplitudes, and in particular not in the cellulations of the amplituhedron related to on-shell diagrams and the positive grassmannian. The surprising positivity of the form suggests the existence of a "dual amplituhedron" formulation where this feature would be made obvious. We also suggest that the positivity is associated with an extended picture of amplituhedron geometry, with the amplituhedron sitting inside a co-dimension one surface separating "legal" and "illegal" local singularities of the amplitude. We illustrate this in several simple examples, obtaining new expressions for amplitudes not associated with any triangulations, but following in a more invariant manner from a global view of the positive geometry.

  7. Combination frequencies in high-amplitude δ Scuti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Short-cadence observations of δ Scuti stars in the Kepler field are used to investigate the physical nature of high-amplitude δ Scuti stars (HADS). Although it is often mentioned that HADS are transition objects between classical Cepheids and δ Scuti stars, neither ground-based or space-based observations support this view. It is found that HADS occur randomly within the instability strip. The possibility that HADS may be defined by the presence of combination frequencies is discussed. There is a weak tendency for the number of combination frequencies to increase with increasing amplitude of the parent frequencies. However, even stars with very low amplitudes may have detectable combination frequencies. Very few parent modes have a period ratio appropriate to first-overtone and fundamental radial modes. It appears that a high amplitude, in itself, is not useful as a distinguishing feature of δ Scuti stars.

  8. Positivity of spin foam amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, John C.; Christensen, J. Daniel

    2002-04-01

    The amplitude for a spin foam in the Barrett-Crane model of Riemannian quantum gravity is given as a product over its vertices, edges and faces, with one factor of the Riemannian 10j symbols appearing for each vertex, and simpler factors for the edges and faces. We prove that these amplitudes are always nonnegative for closed spin foams. As a corollary, all open spin foams going between a fixed pair of spin networks have real amplitudes of the same sign. This means one can use the Metropolis algorithm to compute expectation values of observables in the Riemannian Barrett-Crane model, as in statistical mechanics, even though this theory is based on a real-time (eiS) rather than imaginary-time e-S path integral. Our proof uses the fact that when the Riemannian 10j symbols are nonzero, their sign is positive or negative depending on whether the sum of the ten spins is an integer or half-integer. For the product of 10j symbols appearing in the amplitude for a closed spin foam, these signs cancel. We conclude with some numerical evidence suggesting that the Lorentzian 10j symbols are always nonnegative, which would imply similar results for the Lorentzian Barrett-Crane model.

  9. Toward complete pion nucleon amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, V.; Danilkin, I. V.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Pennington, M. R.; Schott, D.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Fox, G.

    2015-10-01

    We compare the low-energy partial-wave analyses of π N scattering with high-energy data via finite-energy sum rules. We construct a new set of amplitudes by matching the imaginary part from the low-energy analysis with the high-energy, Regge parametrization and reconstruct the real parts using dispersion relations.

  10. Toward complete pion nucleon amplitudes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mathieu, Vincent; Danilkin, Igor V.; Fernández-Ramírez, Cesar; Pennington, Michael R.; Schott, Diane M.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Fox, G.

    2015-10-05

    We compare the low-energy partial wave analyses πN scattering with a high-energy data via finite energy sum rules. We also construct a new set of amplitudes by matching the imaginary part from the low-energy analysis with the high-energy, Regge parametrization and then reconstruct the real parts using dispersion relations.

  11. Large amplitude drop shape oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of large amplitude drop shape oscillation was conducted in immiscible liquids systems and with levitated free liquid drops in air. In liquid-liquid systems the results indicate the existence of familiar characteristics of nonlinear phenomena. The resonance frequency of the fundamental quadrupole mode of stationary, low viscosity Silicone oil drops acoustically levitated in water falls to noticeably low values as the amplitude of oscillation is increased. A typical, experimentally determined relative frequency decrease of a 0.5 cubic centimeters drop would be about 10% when the maximum deformed shape is characterized by a major to minor axial ratio of 1.9. On the other hand, no change in the fundamental mode frequency could be detected for 1 mm drops levitated in air. The experimental data for the decay constant of the quadrupole mode of drops immersed in a liquid host indicate a slight increase for larger oscillation amplitudes. A qualitative investigation of the internal fluid flows for such drops revealed the existence of steady internal circulation within drops oscillating in the fundamental and higher modes. The flow field configuration in the outer host liquid is also significantly altered when the drop oscillation amplitude becomes large.

  12. Constant-amplitude RC oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerwin, W. J.; Westbrook, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Sinusoidal oscillator has a frequency determined by resistance-capacitance /RC/ values of two charge control devices and a constant-amplitude voltage independent of frequency and RC values. RC elements provide either voltage-control, resistance-control, or capacitance-control of the frequency.

  13. N-loop string amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelstam, S.

    1986-06-01

    Work on the derivation of an explicit perturbation series for string and superstring amplitudes is reviewed. The light-cone approach is emphasized, but some work on the Polyakov approach is also mentioned, and the two methods are compared. The calculation of the measure factor is outlined in the interacting-string picture. (LEW)

  14. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-05-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d -dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for p p →H +0 , 1, 2 jets, p p →W /Z /γ +0 , 1, 2 jets, and p p →2 , 3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  15. Multichannel 02 and 12 transition amplitudes for arbitrary spin particles in a finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Maxwell; Briceno, Raul

    2015-10-01

    We present a model-independent, non-perturbative relation between finite-volume matrix elements and infinite-volume $\\textbf{0}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ and $\\textbf{1}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ transition amplitudes. Our result accommodates theories in which the final two-particle state is coupled to any number of other two-body channels, with all angular momentum states included. The derivation uses generic, fully relativistic field theory, and is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections in the lightest particle mass times the box size. This work distinguishes itself from previous studies by accommodating particles with any intrinsic spin. To illustrate the utility of our general result, we discuss how it can be implemented for studies of $N+\\mathcal{J}~\\rightarrow~(N\\pi,N\\eta,N\\eta',\\Sigma K,\\Lambda K)$ transitions, where $\\mathcal{J}$ is a generic external current. The reduction of rotational symmetry, due to the cubic finite volume, manifests in this example through the mixing of S- and P-waves when the system has nonzero total momentum.

  16. True amplitude prestack depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Feng

    Reliable analysis of amplitude variation with offset (or with angle) requires accurate amplitudes from prestack migration. In routine seismic data processing, amplitude balancing and automatic gain control are often used to reduce amplitude lateral variations. However, these methods are empirical and lack a solid physical basis; thus, there are uncertainties that might produce erroneous conclusions, and hence cause economic loss. During wavefield propagation, geometrical spreading, intrinsic attenuation, transmission losses and the energy conversion significantly distort the wavefield amplitude. Most current true-amplitude migrations usually compensate only for geometrical spreading. A new prestack depth migration based on the framework of reverse-time migration in the time-space domain was developed in this dissertation with the aim of compensating all of the propagation effects in one integrated algorithm. Geometrical spreading is automatically included because of the use of full two-way wave extrapolation. Viscoelastic wave equations are solved to handle the intrinsic attenuation with a priori quality factor. Transmission losses for both up- and down-going waves are compensated using a two-pass, recursive procedure based on extracting the angle-dependent reflection/transmission coefficients from prestack migration. The losses caused by the conversion of energy from one elastic model to another are accounted for through elastic wave extrapolation; the influence of the S wave velocity contrast on the P wave reflection coefficient is implicitly included by using the Zoeppritz equations to describe the reflection and transmission at an elastic interface. Only smooth background models are assumed to be known. The contrasts/ratios of the model parameters can be estimated by fitting the compensated angle-dependent reflection coefficients obtained from data for multiple sources. This is one useful by-product of the algorithm. Numerical tests on both 2D and 3D scalar

  17. Randomized gap and amplitude estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zintchenko, Ilia; Wiebe, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    We provide a method for estimating spectral gaps in low-dimensional systems. Unlike traditional phase estimation, our approach does not require ancillary qubits nor does it require well-characterized gates. Instead, it only requires the ability to perform approximate Haar random unitary operations, applying the unitary whose eigenspectrum is sought and performing measurements in the computational basis. We discuss application of these ideas to in-place amplitude estimation and quantum device calibration.

  18. Genus dependence of superstring amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Simon

    2006-11-15

    The problem of the consistency of the finiteness of the supermoduli space integral in the limit of vanishing super-fixed point distance and the genus-dependence of the integral over the super-Schottky coordinates in the fundamental region containing a neighborhood of |K{sub n}|=0 is resolved. Given a choice of the categories of isometric circles representing the integration region, the exponential form of bounds for superstring amplitudes is derived.

  19. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chlorophyll fluorometry may be used for detecting toxins in a sample because of changes in micro algae. A portable lab on a chip ("LOAC") based chlorophyll fluorometer may be used for toxin detection and environmental monitoring. In particular, the system may include a microfluidic pulse amplitude modulated ("PAM") chlorophyll fluorometer. The LOAC PAM chlorophyll fluorometer may analyze microalgae and cyanobacteria that grow naturally in source drinking water.

  20. Phase variation of hadronic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dedonder, J.-P.; Gibbs, W. R.; Nuseirat, Mutazz

    2008-04-15

    The phase variation with angle of hadronic amplitudes is studied with a view to understanding the underlying physical quantities that control it and how well it can be determined in free space. We find that unitarity forces a moderately accurate determination of the phase in standard amplitude analyses but that the nucleon-nucleon analyses done to date do not give the phase variation needed to achieve a good representation of the data in multiple scattering calculations. Models are examined that suggest its behavior near forward angles is related to the radii of the real and absorptive parts of the interaction. The dependence of this phase on model parameters is such that if these radii are modified in the nuclear medium (in combination with the change due to the shift in energy of the effective amplitude in the medium) then the larger magnitudes of the phase needed to fit the data might be attainable but only for negative values of the phase variation parameter.

  1. Origin of critical strain amplitude in periodically sheared suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong; Butler, Jason E.; Metzger, Bloen

    2016-06-01

    The role of solid-solid contacts on the transition between reversible and irreversible dynamics occurring in periodically sheared suspensions is investigated experimentally by modifying the particle roughness. Smoother particles lead to a larger critical strain amplitude. A geometrical model based on the assumption that colliding particles produce irreversibility is derived. The model, which considers a quasiparticle having a strain- and roughness-dependent effective volume, successfully reproduces the measured values of the critical strain amplitude as functions of the volume fraction and particle roughness.

  2. Constraints on string resonance amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kingman; Liu, Yueh-Feng

    2005-07-01

    We perform a global analysis of the tree-level open-string amplitudes in the limit s≪M2S. Based on the present data from the Tevatron, HERA, and LEP 2, we set a lower limit on the string scale MS≥0.69 1.96 TeV at 95% confidence level for the Chan-Paton factors |T|=0-4. We also estimate the expected sensitivities at the CERN LHC, which can be as high as 19 TeV for |T|=4.

  3. Gauge dependence in QED amplitudes in expanding de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaevici, Nistor

    2016-04-01

    We consider first-order transition amplitudes in external fields in QED in the expanding de Sitter space and point out that they are gauge dependent quantities. We examine the gauge variations of the amplitudes assuming a decoupling of the interaction at large times, which allows to conclude that the source of the problem lies in the fact that the frequencies of the modes in the infinite future become independent of the comoving momenta. We show that a possibility to assure the gauge invariance of the external field amplitudes is to restrict to potentials which vanish sufficiently fast at infinite times, and briefly discuss a number of options in the face of the possible gauge invariance violation in the full interacting theory.

  4. Time-asymptotic field amplitudes in nonlinear Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M.; Kirkitelos, P.; Dorning, J.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of an electrostatic plasma wave of initial amplitude Ei in a collisionless electron plasma depends crucially on the ratio [delta] = [gamma]L/[omega]B, where [gamma]L is the damping coefficient calculated from linear plasma kinetic theory and [omega]B = (ekEi/m)[sup 1/2] is the [open quotes]bounce[close quotes] frequency for trapped electrons. For sufficiently small E[sub i], i.e., [delta] [much gt] 1, the wave damps away completely; conversely, a wave of large initial amplitude, for which [delta] [much lt] 1, saturates at a finite final amplitude due to the nonlinear effects of particle trapping. In this paper, we report results concerning the transition region [delta] [approximately] 0(1), which separates these two regimes. For the case of weak damping, i.e., [vert bar][gamma]L/[omega]p[vert bar][much lt]1, where [omega]p is the plasma frequency, we calculate analytically the critical value [delta][sub i,e] below which complete damping occurs and derive the first explicit analytic relationship between E[sub i] and E[sub f], the time-asymptotic amplitude, for E[sub i] above the critical value E[sub i,c] = (m,ek)([gamma]L/[delta][sub i,c]). The results predict an interesting phenomenon - a finite jump [delta]E in the final field amplitude as E[sub i] is increased through E[sub i,c]. We have corroborated the reality of this phenomenon through large-scale numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Poisson system, carried out using the spectral splitting code of Klimas. These important new results establish a detailed picture of the fundamental transition between linear and nonlinear Landau damping and, in particular, show that the onset of essentially nonlinear behavior occurs very abruptly as the initial wave amplitude increases through its critical value.

  5. Magnetic dipole hyperfine interactions in {sup 137}Ba{sup +} and the accuracies of the neutral weak interaction matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Bijaya K.; Gopakumar, Geetha; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.; Das, B.P.; Merlitz, Holger; Mahapatra, Uttam Sinha; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2003-10-01

    The relativistic coupled-cluster method is applied to calculate the magnetic dipole hyperfine constant 'A' of the 6s{sub 1/2}, 6p{sub 1/2}, 6p{sub 3/2}, and 5d{sub 3/2} states of singly ionized barium. After the inclusion of two-body correlation effects into the computation of the hyperfine matrix elements, the accuracy of the obtained values was significantly increased compared to earlier computations. Based on these numbers and earlier calculations of the electric dipole transitions and excitation energies, an estimate for the accuracy of the vertical bar [5p{sup 6}]6s{sub 1/2}>{yields} vertical bar [5p{sup 6}]5d{sub 3/2}> parity-nonconserving electric dipole transition amplitude is carried out. The results suggest that for the first time, to our knowledge, a precision of better than 1% is feasible for this transition amplitude.

  6. Amplitude death of coupled hair bundles with stochastic channel noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Joong; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2014-04-01

    Hair cells conduct auditory transduction in vertebrates. In lower vertebrates such as frogs and turtles, due to the active mechanism in hair cells, hair bundles (stereocilia) can be spontaneously oscillating or quiescent. Recently an amplitude death phenomenon has been proposed [K.-H. Ahn, J. R. Soc. Interface, 10, 20130525 (2013)] as a mechanism for auditory transduction in frog hair-cell bundles, where sudden cessation of the oscillations arises due to the coupling between nonidentical hair bundles. The gating of the ion channel is intrinsically stochastic due to the stochastic nature of the configuration change of the channel. The strength of the noise due to the channel gating can be comparable to the thermal Brownian noise of hair bundles. Thus, we perform stochastic simulations of the elastically coupled hair bundles. In spite of stray noisy fluctuations due to its stochastic dynamics, our simulation shows the transition from collective oscillation to amplitude death as interbundle coupling strength increases. In its stochastic dynamics, the formation of the amplitude death state of coupled hair bundles can be seen as a sudden suppression of the displacement fluctuation of the hair bundles as the coupling strength increases. The enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio through the amplitude death phenomenon is clearly seen in the stochastic dynamics. Our numerical results demonstrate that the multiple number of transduction channels per hair bundle is an important factor to the amplitude death phenomenon, because the phenomenon may disappear for a small number of transduction channels due to strong gating noise.

  7. Constructing Amplitudes from Their Soft Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher-Veronneau, Camille; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The existence of universal soft limits for gauge-theory and gravity amplitudes has been known for a long time. The properties of the soft limits have been exploited in numerous ways; in particular for relating an n-point amplitude to an (n-1)-point amplitude by removing a soft particle. Recently, a procedure called inverse soft was developed by which 'soft' particles can be systematically added to an amplitude to construct a higher-point amplitude for generic kinematics. We review this procedure and relate it to Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion. We show that all tree-level amplitudes in gauge theory and gravity up through seven points can be constructed in this way, as well as certain classes of NMHV gauge-theory amplitudes with any number of external legs. This provides us with a systematic procedure for constructing amplitudes solely from their soft limits.

  8. Oscillator death induced by amplitude-dependent coupling in repulsively coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiqing; Xiao, Guibao; Zhu, Yun; Zhan, Meng; Xiao, Jinghua; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The effects of amplitude-dependent coupling on oscillator death (OD) are investigated for two repulsively coupled Lorenz oscillators. Based on numerical simulations, it is shown that as constraint strengths on the amplitude-dependent coupling change, an oscillatory state may undergo a transition to an OD state. The parameter regimes of the OD domain are theoretically determined, which coincide well with the numerical results. An electronic circuit is set up to exhibit the transition process to the OD state with an amplitude-dependent coupling. These findings may have practical importance on chaos control and oscillation depression. PMID:26066224

  9. New identities among gauge theory amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Feng, Bo; Søndergaard, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Color-ordered amplitudes in gauge theories satisfy non-linear identities involving amplitude products of different helicity configurations. We consider the origin of such identities and connect them to the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye (KLT) relations between gravity and gauge theory amplitudes. Extensions are made to one-loop order of the full N = 4 super Yang-Mills multiplet.

  10. Transition and laminar instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The linear stability theory was applied to the problem of boundary layer transition in incompressible flow. The theory was put into a form suitable for three-dimensional boundary layers; both the temporal and spatial theories were examined; and a generalized Gaster relation for three-dimensional boundary layers was derived. Numerical examples include the stability characteristics of Falkner-Skan boundary layers, the accuracy of the two-dimensional Gaster relation for these boundary layers, and the magnitude and direction of the group velocity for oblique waves in the Blasius boundary layer. Available experiments which bear on the validity of stability theory and its relation to transition are reviewed and the stability theory is applied to transition prediction. The amplitude method is described in which the wide band disturbance amplitude in the boundary layer is estimated from stability theory and an interaction relation for the initial amplitude density of the most unstable frequency.

  11. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  12. Leading Wave Amplitude of a Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, U.

    2015-12-01

    Okal and Synolakis (EGU General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts-Vol. 17-7622) recently discussed that why the maximum amplitude of a tsunami might not occur for the first wave. Okal and Synolakis list observations from 2011 Japan tsunami, which reached to Papeete, Tahiti with a fourth wave being largest and 72 min later after the first wave; 1960 Chilean tsunami reached Hilo, Hawaii with a maximum wave arriving 1 hour later with a height of 5m, first wave being only 1.2m. Largest later waves is a problem not only for local authorities both in terms of warning to the public and rescue efforts but also mislead the public thinking that it is safe to return shoreline or evacuated site after arrival of the first wave. Okal and Synolakis considered Hammack's (1972, Ph.D. Dissertation, Calif. Inst. Tech., 261 pp., Pasadena) linear dispersive analytical solution with a tsunami generation through an uplifting of a circular plug on the ocean floor. They performed parametric study for the radius of the plug and the depth of the ocean since these are the independent scaling lengths in the problem. They identified transition distance, as the second wave being larger, regarding the parameters of the problem. Here, we extend their analysis to an initial wave field with a finite crest length and, in addition, to a most common tsunami initial wave form of N-wave as presented by Tadepalli and Synolakis (1994, Proc. R. Soc. A: Math. Phys. Eng. Sci., 445, 99-112). We compare our results with non-dispersive linear shallow water wave results as presented by Kanoglu et al. (2013, Proc. R. Soc. A: Math. Phys. Eng. Sci., 469, 20130015), investigating focusing feature. We discuss the results both in terms of leading wave amplitude and tsunami focusing. Acknowledgment: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 603839 (Project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy and Risk

  13. S-duality and helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, Kitran; Terning, John

    2016-03-01

    We examine interacting Abelian theories at low energies and show that holomorphically normalized photon helicity amplitudes transform into dual amplitudes under SL(2, {Z} ) as modular forms with weights that depend on the number of positive and negative helicity photons and on the number of internal photon lines. Moreover, canonically normalized helicity amplitudes transform by a phase, so that even though the amplitudes are not duality invariant, their squares are duality invariant. We explicitly verify the duality transformation at one loop by comparing the amplitudes in the case of an electron and the dyon that is its SL(2, {Z} ) image, and extend the invariance of squared amplitudes order by order in perturbation theory. We demonstrate that S-duality is a property of all low-energy effective Abelian theories with electric and/or magnetic charges and see how the duality generically breaks down at high energies.

  14. Discontinuities of multi-Regge amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. S.

    2015-04-01

    In the BFKL approach, discontinuities of multiple production amplitudes in invariant masses of produced particles are discussed. It turns out that they are in evident contradiction with the BDS ansatz for n-gluon amplitudes in the planar N = 4 SYM at n ≥ 6. An explicit expression for the NLO discontinuity of the two-to-four amplitude in the invariant mass of two produced gluons is is presented.

  15. Gravity and Yang-Mills amplitude relations

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Soendergaard, Thomas; FengBo

    2010-11-15

    Using only general features of the S matrix and quantum field theory, we prove by induction the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye relations that link products of gauge theory amplitudes to gravity amplitudes at tree level. As a bonus of our analysis, we provide a novel and more symmetric form of these relations. We also establish an infinite tower of new identities between amplitudes in gauge theories.

  16. Minimal Basis for Gauge Theory Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2009-10-16

    Identities based on monodromy for integrations in string theory are used to derive relations between different color-ordered tree-level amplitudes in both bosonic and supersymmetric string theory. These relations imply that the color-ordered tree-level n-point gauge theory amplitudes can be expanded in a minimal basis of (n-3)exclamation amplitudes. This result holds for any choice of polarizations of the external states and in any number of dimensions.

  17. Cascaded phase-preserving multilevel amplitude regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roethlingshoefer, Tobias; Onishchukov, Georgy; Schmauss, Bernhard; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-12-29

    The performance of cascaded in-line phase-preserving amplitude regeneration using nonlinear amplifying loop mirrors has been studied in numerical simulations. As an example of a spectrally efficient modulation format with two amplitude states and multiple phase states, the regeneration performance of a star-16QAM format, basically an 8PSK format with two amplitude levels, was evaluated. An increased robustness against amplified spontaneous emission and nonlinear phase noise was observed resulting in a significantly increased transmission distance. PMID:25607142

  18. DVCS amplitude with kinematical twist-3 terms

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, A.V.; Weiss, C.

    2000-08-01

    The authors compute the amplitude of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) using the calculus of QCD string operators in coordinate representation. To restore the electromagnetic gauge invariance (transversality) of the twist-2 amplitude they include the operators of twist-3 which appear as total derivatives of twist-2 operators. The results are equivalent to a Wandzura-Wilczek approximation for twist-3 skewed parton distributions. They find that this approximation gives a finite result for the amplitude of a longitudinally polarized virtual photon, while the amplitude for transverse polarization is divergent, i.e., factorization breaks down in this term.

  19. A complex T-matrix derivation of a resonance amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Deutchman, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Time-dependent perturbation-theory techniques are used to derive a compact expression, valid to arbitrary order and displaying time dependence explicitly, for a quantum-mechanical transition amplitude applicable to the description of resonances. A solution representing a complex-energy generalization of the usual real-energy (nonresonant) amplitude is obtained and generalized to all orders by introducing a complex-energy T matrix. Applications to physical problems such as the extension of the Fermi golden rules to resonances (Norbury and Deutchman, 1984); pion production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions (Norbury et al., 1985); and the determination of resonant cross sections for nuclear, atomic, or molecular processes involving the formation and decay of intermediate discrete or continuum states are indicated.

  20. Photoinduced Enhancement of the Charge Density Wave Amplitude.

    PubMed

    Singer, A; Patel, S K K; Kukreja, R; Uhlíř, V; Wingert, J; Festersen, S; Zhu, D; Glownia, J M; Lemke, H T; Nelson, S; Kozina, M; Rossnagel, K; Bauer, M; Murphy, B M; Magnussen, O M; Fullerton, E E; Shpyrko, O G

    2016-07-29

    Symmetry breaking and the emergence of order is one of the most fascinating phenomena in condensed matter physics. It leads to a plethora of intriguing ground states found in antiferromagnets, Mott insulators, superconductors, and density-wave systems. Exploiting states of matter far from equilibrium can provide even more striking routes to symmetry-lowered, ordered states. Here, we demonstrate for the case of elemental chromium that moderate ultrafast photoexcitation can transiently enhance the charge-density-wave (CDW) amplitude by up to 30% above its equilibrium value, while strong excitations lead to an oscillating, large-amplitude CDW state that persists above the equilibrium transition temperature. Both effects result from dynamic electron-phonon interactions, providing an efficient mechanism to selectively transform a broad excitation of the electronic order into a well-defined, long-lived coherent lattice vibration. This mechanism may be exploited to transiently enhance order parameters in other systems with coupled degrees of freedom. PMID:27517781

  1. Photoinduced Enhancement of the Charge Density Wave Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, A.; Patel, S. K. K.; Kukreja, R.; Uhlíř, V.; Wingert, J.; Festersen, S.; Zhu, D.; Glownia, J. M.; Lemke, H. T.; Nelson, S.; Kozina, M.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.; Murphy, B. M.; Magnussen, O. M.; Fullerton, E. E.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking and the emergence of order is one of the most fascinating phenomena in condensed matter physics. It leads to a plethora of intriguing ground states found in antiferromagnets, Mott insulators, superconductors, and density-wave systems. Exploiting states of matter far from equilibrium can provide even more striking routes to symmetry-lowered, ordered states. Here, we demonstrate for the case of elemental chromium that moderate ultrafast photoexcitation can transiently enhance the charge-density-wave (CDW) amplitude by up to 30% above its equilibrium value, while strong excitations lead to an oscillating, large-amplitude CDW state that persists above the equilibrium transition temperature. Both effects result from dynamic electron-phonon interactions, providing an efficient mechanism to selectively transform a broad excitation of the electronic order into a well-defined, long-lived coherent lattice vibration. This mechanism may be exploited to transiently enhance order parameters in other systems with coupled degrees of freedom.

  2. On the relationship between power mode and pressure amplitude decorrelation.

    PubMed

    Adler, R S

    2001-09-01

    Estimation of mean transit time, along with tissue blood volume, are important factors in determining soft tissue perfusion. Recently, power mode decorrelation techniques have been successfully used to estimate mean transit time of red blood cells or contrast material through a region-of-interest (ROI) both in laminar flow phantoms and in vivo. The previously described theory for power mode decorrelation derives from a phenomenological stochastic differential equation (Langevin equation) based on conservation of matter, relating the detected signal power to the measured rate of decorrelation. Given the experimental support for power mode decorrelation as a method to estimate mean transit time, it becomes important to determine the relationship between the phenomenological parameters that appear in the corresponding stochastic equation and system parameters, such as the transducer point response function. With this equation as a starting point, and using the fact that the pressure amplitude is a Gaussianly distributed random process, the following stochastic differential equation for the pressure amplitude p(t) is derived, a necessary first step in establishing the relationship between the measured decorrelation rate and system parameters (i.e., point response function): dp(t)/dt = -(v/2+2ik x v)p(t)+f(t), where v/2 represents the rate of decorrelation, 2k x v is the Doppler shift for an insonating wave vector k and particle velocity v.f(t) is a stationary, white noise Gaussian random process. PMID:11597371

  3. Phase coherence and pairing amplitude in photo-excited superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetti, Luca; Piovera, Christian; Zhang, Zailan

    2016-05-01

    New data on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) reveal interesting aspects of photoexcited superconductors. The electrons dynamics show that inelastic scattering by nodal quasiparticles decreases when the temperature is lowered below the critical value of the superconducting phase transition. This drop of electronic dissipation is astonishingly robust and survives to photoexcitation densities much larger than the value sustained by long-range superconductivity. The unconventional behavior of quasiparticle scattering is ascribed to superconducting correlations extending on a length scale comparable to the inelastic mean-free path. Our measurements indicate that strongly driven superconductors enter in a regime without phase coherence but finite pairing amplitude.

  4. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  5. Helicity amplitudes on the light-front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Santiago, Christian A.

    Significant progress has been made recently in the field of helicity amplitudes. Currently there are on-shell recursion relations with shifted complex momenta, geometric interpretations of amplitudes and gauge invariant off-shell amplitudes. All this points to helicity amplitudes being a rich field with much more to say. In this work we take initial steps in understanding amplitudes through the light-front formalism for the first time. We begin by looking at crossing symmetry. In the light-front it is not obvious that crossing symmetry should be present as there are non-local energy denominators that mix energies of different states. Nevertheless, we develop a systematic approach to relate, for example, 1 → N gluon processes to 2 → N -- 1 processes. Using this method, we give a perturbative proof of crossing symmetry on the light-front. One important caveat is that the proof requires the amplitudes to be on-shell. We also saw that the analytic continuation from outgoing to incoming particle produces a phase that's dependent on the choice of polarizations. Next, we reproduce the Parke-Taylor amplitudes. For this purpose we found a recursion relation for an off-shell object called the fragmentation function. This recursion relies on the factorization property of the fragmentation functions, and it becomes apparent that this recursion is the light-front analog of the Berends-Giele recursion relation. We also found this object's connection to off-shell and on-shell amplitudes. The solution for the off-shell amplitude, which does reproduce the Parke-Taylor amplitudes in the on-shell limit, turns out to be very interesting. It can be written as a linear sum of off-shell objects with the same structure as MHV amplitudes. Finally, we look at the Wilson line approach to generate gauge invariant off-shell amplitudes. It turns out that the exact same recursion relation appears on both frameworks, thereby providing the interpretation that our recursion relation has it

  6. OPE for all helicity amplitudes II. Form factors and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Benjamin; Caetano, João; Córdova, Lucía; Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    We present the general flux tube integrand for MHV and non-MHV amplitudes, in planar N=4 SYM theory, up to a group theoretical rational factor. We find that the MHV and non-MHV cases only differ by simple form factors which we derive. This information allows us to run the operator product expansion program for all sorts of non-MHV amplitudes and to test the recently proposed map with the so called charged pentagons transitions. Perfect agreement is found, on a large sample of non-MHV amplitudes, with the perturbative data available in the literature.

  7. Form factor and boundary contribution of amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rijun; Jin, Qingjun; Feng, Bo

    2016-06-01

    The boundary contribution of an amplitude in the BCFW recursion relation can be considered as a form factor involving boundary operator and unshifted particles. At the tree-level, we show that by suitable construction of Lagrangian, one can relate the leading order term of boundary operators to some composite operators of mathcal{N} = 4 superYang-Mills theory, then the computation of form factors is translated to the computation of amplitudes. We compute the form factors of these composite operators through the computation of corresponding double trace amplitudes.

  8. A link representation for gravity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Song

    2013-10-01

    We derive a link representation for all tree amplitudes in supergravity, from a recent conjecture by Cachazo and Skinner. The new formula explicitly writes amplitudes as contour integrals over constrained link variables, with an integrand naturally expressed in terms of determinants, or equivalently tree diagrams. Important symmetries of the amplitude, such as supersymmetry, parity and (partial) permutation invariance, are kept manifest in the formulation. We also comment on rewriting the formula in a GL( k)-invariant manner, which may serve as a starting point for the generalization to possible Grassmannian contour integrals.

  9. Amplitude- and rise-time-compensated filters

    DOEpatents

    Nowlin, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    An amplitude-compensated rise-time-compensated filter for a pulse time-of-occurrence (TOOC) measurement system is disclosed. The filter converts an input pulse, having the characteristics of random amplitudes and random, non-zero rise times, to a bipolar output pulse wherein the output pulse has a zero-crossing time that is independent of the rise time and amplitude of the input pulse. The filter differentiates the input pulse, along the linear leading edge of the input pulse, and subtracts therefrom a pulse fractionally proportional to the input pulse. The filter of the present invention can use discrete circuit components and avoids the use of delay lines.

  10. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenberger, M. Kendl, A.; Madsen, J.

    2014-09-15

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line with conditions found in tokamak scrape-off-layers (SOL) regions. Varying the ion temperature, the initial blob width, and the initial amplitude, we found an FLR dominated regime where the blob behavior is significantly different from what is predicted by cold-ion models. The transition to this regime is very well described by the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the characteristic gradient scale length of the blob. We compare the global gyrofluid model with a partly linearized local model. For low ion temperatures, we find that simulations of the global model show more coherent blobs with an increased cross-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in the global simulations than in the local ones. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, global blob simulations show a reduced blob coherence and a decreased cross-field transport in comparison with local blob simulations.

  11. Amplitude Bistability in the Multimode Regime of Circuit-QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekakhlagh, Moein; Sundaresan, Neereja; Liu, Yanbing; Sadri, Darius; Houck, Andrew; Tureci, Hakan; Mesoscopic Quantum Optics Group Team; Quantum computing; condensed matter physics with microwave photons Team

    2015-03-01

    In theory of dynamical systems, bistability refers to a situation where the system has two possible stable equilibrium states. For certain optical devices, it is possible to have two resonant transmission states that only differ in amplitude and is referred as ``optical amplitude bistability.'' This phenomenon occurs due to nonlinear nature of light-matter interaction where the light absorption or blockade by the absorber strongly depends on the drive strength. The transition between these two bistable solutions happens when the absorber is saturated and no longer capable of blocking light. In this talk, we study the dynamics of a transmon qubit coupled to a large number of modes of a long superconducting resonator and driven by an external microwave drive. We introduce a generalized theory of multimode amplitude bistability first discussed by C.M. Savage and H.J. Carmichael for a resonant single mode cavity. We will demonstrate that bistability is a characteristic of the entire system including the qubit and all modes of the resonator and can be characterized analytically by the knowledge of two collective cooperativity parameters.

  12. Constant-amplitude, frequency- independent phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Electronic circuit using operational amplifiers provides output with constant phase shift amplitude, with respect to sinusoidal input, over wide range of frequencies. New circuit includes field effect transistor, Q, operational amplifiers, A1 and A2, and phase detector.

  13. Effective string theory and QCD scattering amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Makeenko, Yuri

    2011-01-15

    QCD string is formed at distances larger than the confinement scale and can be described by the Polchinski-Strominger effective string theory with a nonpolynomial action, which has nevertheless a well-defined semiclassical expansion around a long-string ground state. We utilize modern ideas about the Wilson-loop/scattering-amplitude duality to calculate scattering amplitudes and show that the expansion parameter in the effective string theory is small in the Regge kinematical regime. For the amplitudes we obtain the Regge behavior with a linear trajectory of the intercept (d-2)/24 in d dimensions, which is computed semiclassically as a momentum-space Luescher term, and discuss an application to meson scattering amplitudes in QCD.

  14. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics. PMID:27108847

  15. Nucleon Distribution Amplitudes from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckeler, Meinulf; Kaltenbrunner, Thomas; Warkentin, Nikolaus; Horsley, Roger; Zanotti, James M.; Nakamura, Yoshifumi; Pleiter, Dirk; Schierholz, Gerrit; Rakow, Paul E. L.; Schaefer, Andreas; Stueben, Hinnerk

    2008-09-12

    We calculate low moments of the leading-twist and next-to-leading-twist nucleon distribution amplitudes on the lattice using two flavors of clover fermions. The results are presented in the MS scheme at a scale of 2 GeV and can be immediately applied in phenomenological studies. We find that the deviation of the leading-twist nucleon distribution amplitude from its asymptotic form is less pronounced than sometimes claimed in the literature.

  16. Seismic directional beamforming using cosine amplitude distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Xu, X.; Song, J.; Jia, H.; Ge, L.

    2013-12-01

    o improve the signal-to-noise ratio in seismic exploration, we studied the method of time domain seismic beam-forming based on receiver array (TSBBRA). TSBBRA is useful to extract reflected waves from some target layers and decrease noise from other direction. When noise is strong enough, the control parameter of the method of TSBBRA need to be increased. It means that we have to use more raw records to form a directional seismic record. Therefore, the signal energy in beam is much denser, and the beam becomes narrower accordingly. When the beam can not cover the receiver array, the signal-to-noise ratios in different traces are quite unbalanced and average quality of data probably is still quite low. Therefore, this paper proposes seismic directional beamforming using the cosine amplitude distribution (SDBCAD). SDBCAD can adjust seismic beam shape by introducing cosine amplitude distribution, an amplitude weighting method, in the procedure of beamforming. We studied cosine amplitude weighting function, analyzed the characteristics of uniform and cosine amplitude distribution in beamforming, and compared directivity of beams from the two kind of amplitude pattern. It shows that the main beam of cosine-weighted amplitude is different from uniform distribution. The coverage of main beam from SDBCAD is wider than uniform amplitude, and the width of beam is varied with different number of cosine order. So we simulated the seismic raw record, and used TSBBRA and SDBCAD to process simulated data at the receiving array. The results show that SDBCAD can broaden directional beam, and the main beam from SDBCAD can cover the entire traces instead of partial coverage in TSBBRA. The average signal-to-noise ratio increased 0.2~4.5dB. It concludes that SDBCAD is competent to stretch beam reasonable, and it is useful to boost signal-to-noise ratio when beam from TSBBRA is too narrow to illuminate receiver array properly. Updated results will be presented at the meeting.

  17. Virtuality and transverse momentum dependence of the pion distribution amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We describe basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard exclusive processes. We develop it in application to the transition process γ*γ →π0 at the handbag level. Our starting point is coordinate representation for matrix elements of operators [in the simplest case, bilocal O (0 ,z ) ] describing a hadron with momentum p . Treated as functions of (p z ) and z2, they are parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitudes (VDA) Φ (x ,σ ) , with x being Fourier conjugate to (p z ) and σ Laplace conjugate to z2. For intervals with z+=0 , we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) Ψ (x ,k⊥), and write it in terms of VDA Φ (x ,σ ). The results of covariant calculations, written in terms of Φ (x ,σ ), are converted into expressions involving Ψ (x ,k⊥). Starting with scalar toy models, we extend the analysis onto the case of spin-1 /2 quarks and QCD. We propose simple models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BABAR and BELLE) data on the pion transition form factor. We also discuss how one can generate high-k⊥ tails from primordial soft distributions.

  18. Virtuality and transverse momentum dependence of the pion distribution amplitude

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2016-03-08

    We describe basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard exclusive processes. We develop it in application to the transition process γ*γ → π0 at the handbag level. Our starting point is coordinate representation for matrix elements of operators (in the simplest case, bilocal O (0,z)) describing a hadron with momentum p. Treated as functions of (pz) and z2, they are parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitudes (VDA) Φ(x,σ), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and σ Laplace-conjugate to z2. For intervals with z+ = 0, we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) ψ(x, k), and writemore » it in terms of VDA Φ(x,σ). The results of covariant calculations, written in terms of Φ(x, σ) are converted into expressions involving ψ(x, k). Starting with scalar toy models, we extend the analysis onto the case of spin-1/2 quarks and QCD. We propose simple models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data on the pion transition form factor. Furthermore, we discuss how one can generate high-k tails from primordial soft distributions.« less

  19. Twistor-strings and gravity tree amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Tim; Mason, Lionel

    2013-04-01

    Recently we discussed how Einstein supergravity tree amplitudes might be obtained from the original Witten and Berkovits twistor-string theory when external conformal gravitons are restricted to be Einstein gravitons. Here we obtain a more systematic understanding of the relationship between conformal and Einstein gravity amplitudes in that twistor-string theory. We show that although it does not in general yield Einstein amplitudes, we can nevertheless obtain some partial twistor-string interpretation of the remarkable formulae recently been found by Hodges and generalized to all tree amplitudes by Cachazo and Skinner. The Hodges matrix and its higher degree generalizations encode the world sheet correlators of the twistor string. These matrices control both Einstein amplitudes and those of the conformal gravity arising from the Witten and Berkovits twistor-string. Amplitudes in the latter case arise from products of the diagonal elements of the generalized Hodges matrices and reduced determinants give the former. The reduced determinants arise if the contractions in the worldsheet correlator are restricted to form connected trees at MHV. The (generalized) Hodges matrices arise as weighted Laplacian matrices for the graph of possible contractions in the correlators and the reduced determinants of these weighted Laplacian matrices give the sum of the connected tree contributions by an extension of the matrix-tree theorem.

  20. Relations between closed string amplitudes at higher-order tree level and open string amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Xin; Du, Yi-Jian; Ma, Qian

    2010-01-01

    KLT relations almost factorize closed string amplitudes on S by two open string tree amplitudes which correspond to the left- and the right-moving sectors. In this paper, we investigate string amplitudes on D and RP. We find that KLT factorization relations do not hold in these two cases. The relations between closed and open string amplitudes have new forms. On D and RP, the left- and the right-moving sectors are connected into a single sector. Then an amplitude with closed strings on D or RP can be given by one open string tree amplitude except for a phase factor. The relations depends on the topologies of the world-sheets. Under T-duality, the relations on D and RP give the amplitudes between closed strings scattering from D-brane and O-plane respectively by open string partial amplitudes. In the low energy limits of these two cases, the factorization relations for graviton amplitudes do not hold. The amplitudes for gravitons must be given by the new relations instead.

  1. Tectonic Tremor Source Amplitude in Northern Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Klaus, A. J.; Wech, A.

    2012-12-01

    Most studies of tectonic tremor have focused on tremor location and duration. We examine tremor source amplitude in northern Cascadia, and explore its importance in understanding the physical processes generating tremor and slow slip. In Cascadia, we observe a linear increase in tremor source amplitude during the approximately five-day initiation phase of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events, apparently associated with a linear increase in the area where tremor is occurring. There is also mounting evidence that tremor amplitude during ETS events is strongly modulated by tidal stresses (e.g. Rubinstein et al, Science, 2008), including the most recent northern Cascadia ETS events of 2010 and 2011. This suggests a low coefficient of friction on the subduction interface. We will extend our existing amplitude catalog of the 2010 and 2011 Cascadia ETS events to include all of 2006 to 2012, incorporating multiple data sets and providing more insight into the spatial distribution of tremor, the initiation phase of ETS events, and tidal forcing of ETS and inter-ETS tremor. Tremor source amplitudes are estimated with a method similar to Maeda and Obara (JGR, 2009), using the proportional relationship between source amplitude and the root-mean square of band-limited (1.5 to 5.5 Hz) ground velocity for every 5-minute window. We use horizontal component seismograms from the CAFE (2006-2008) and Array of Arrays (2009-2011) experiments, as well as permanent PNSN stations. Tremor locations were determined using a waveform envelope cross-correlation method (Wech and Creager, GRL, 2008). We perform an inversion using these tremor locations and station ground velocities to determine the tremor source amplitude and station statics, taking into account geometric spreading and seismic attenuation.

  2. Hysteresis in amplitudes of self-excited oscillations for co-axial electrode-geometry DC glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Narayanan, R.; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2014-12-15

    Hysteresis in amplitudes of the self-excited oscillations of the floating potential and discharge current is observed in an unmagnetized co-axial electrode-geometry DC glow discharge plasma system. The nonlinearities of these oscillations are studied using standard dynamical analysis tools. The characterization revealed the transition of low-amplitude high-frequency period-n oscillations to a large amplitude low frequency period-1 oscillations through a chaotic intermediate route. The transition of the low amplitude, high frequency period-n oscillations to chaotic type is observed to be linked to the dynamical change in the plasma system, i.e., after a negative differential resistance (NDR) region, whereas the transition from chaotic to period-1 is observed to be linked to a discharge current threshold.

  3. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the isovector, P-wave ππ scattering phase shift obtained by extrapolating recent lattice QCD results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using mπ = 236 MeV. The finite volume spectra are described using extensions of Lüscher's method to determine the infinite volume Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory scattering amplitude. We exploit the pion mass dependence of this effective theory to obtain the scattering amplitude at mπ = 140 MeV. The scattering phase shift is found to agree with experiment up to center of mass energies of 1.2 GeV. The analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude to the complex plane yields a ρ-resonance pole at Eρ = [ 755 (2) (1) (20 02) -i/2 129 (3) (1) (7 1) ] MeV. The techniques presented illustrate a possible pathway towards connecting lattice QCD observables of few-body, strongly interacting systems to experimentally accessible quantities.

  4. A description of seismic amplitude techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadlow, James

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of seismic data is a non-invasive technique used for determining the sub surface geology. Changes in lithology and fluid fill affect the seismic wavelet. Analysing seismic data for direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHIs), such as full stack amplitude anomalies, or amplitude variation with offset (AVO), can help a seismic interpreter relate the geophysical response to real geology and, more importantly, to distinguish the presence of hydrocarbons. Inversion is another commonly used technique that attempts to tie the seismic data back to the geology. Much has been written about these techniques, and attempting to gain an understanding on the theory and application of them by reading through various journals can be quite daunting. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline DHI analysis, including full stack amplitude anomalies, AVO and inversion and show the relationship between all three. The equations presented have been included for completeness, but the reader can pass over the mathematical detail.

  5. Periodic amplitude variations in Jovian continuum radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-12-01

    An analysis of periodic variations in the amplitude of continuum radiation near 3 kHz trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere shows structure with periods near both 5 and 10 horus. Contrary to a plausible initial idea, the continuum amplitudes are not organized by the position of the observer relative to the dense plasma sheet. Instead, there seem to be perferred orientations of system III longitude with respect to the direction to the sun which account for the peaks. This implies a clocklike modulation of the continuum radiation intensity as opposed to a searchlight effect. The importance of the dipole longitude solar wind alignment to the amplitude of the continuum radiation implies that the source region of the radiation is near the magnetopause and may indirectly tie the generation of the radio waves to the clocklike modulation of energetic electron fluxes from Jupiter.

  6. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the isovector, P-wave ππ scattering phase shift obtained by extrapolating recent lattice QCD results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using mπ = 236 MeV. The finite volume spectra are described using extensions of Lüscher's method to determine the infinite volume Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory scattering amplitude. We exploit the pion mass dependence of this effective theory to obtain the scattering amplitude at mπ = 140 MeV. The scattering phase shift is found to agree with experiment up to center of mass energies of 1.2 GeV. The analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude to the complex plane yields a ρ-resonance pole at Eρ = [ 755 (2) (1) (20 -i/2 129 (3) (1) 7 1) ] MeV. The techniques presented illustrate a possible pathway towards connecting lattice QCD observables of few-body, strongly interacting systems to experimentally accessible quantities.

  7. Cut-constructible part of QCD amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Ruth; Feng Bo; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo

    2006-05-15

    Unitarity cuts are widely used in analytic computation of loop amplitudes in gauge theories such as QCD. We expand upon the technique introduced in hep-ph/0503132 to carry out any finite unitarity cut integral. This technique naturally separates the contributions of bubble, triangle and box integrals in one-loop amplitudes and is not constrained to any particular helicity configurations. Loop momentum integration is reduced to a sequence of algebraic operations. We discuss the extraction of the residues at higher-order poles. Additionally, we offer concise algebraic formulas for expressing coefficients of three-mass triangle integrals. As an application, we compute all remaining coefficients of bubble and triangle integrals for nonsupersymmetric six-gluon amplitudes.

  8. Perturbative type II amplitudes for BPS interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban

    2016-02-01

    We consider the perturbative contributions to the {{ R }}4, {D}4{{ R }}4 and {D}6{{ R }}4 interactions in toroidally compactified type II string theory. These BPS interactions do not receive perturbative contributions beyond genus three. We derive Poisson equations satisfied by these moduli dependent string amplitudes. These T-duality invariant equations have eigenvalues that are completely determined by the structure of the integrands of the multi-loop amplitudes. The source terms are given by boundary terms of the moduli space of Riemann surfaces corresponding to both separating and non-separating nodes. These are determined directly from the string amplitudes, as well as from U-duality constraints and logarithmic divergences of maximal supergravity. We explicitly solve these Poisson equations in nine and eight-dimensions.

  9. The finite-amplitude behavior of the Joule mode under astrophysical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Massaglia, S.; Rosner, R.; Ferrari, A.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetized astrophysical plasmas reveal a great deal of structure when spatially resolved. One possible explanation for this structuring is based on the existence of filamenting instabilities driven by radiation. In this paper, previous linear calculations are extended by considering the weakly nonlinear (finite-amplitude) development of such filamenting instabilities in magnetized unstratified plasmas. It is shown that under most conditions these instabilities (in particular, the Jouse model) are unstable at finite amplitude; in particular, in the temperature and plasma-beta domains characteristic of, for example, much of the solar transition region, these modes - which can be linearly stable under these conditions - become unstable to finite-amplitude perturbations. The relevance of this to the problem of heating the solar low transition region by current dissipation is discussed.

  10. Amplitude for N-Gluon Superstring Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Stieberger, Stephan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2006-11-24

    We consider scattering processes involving N gluonic massless states of open superstrings with a certain Regge slope {alpha}{sup '}. At the semiclassical level, the string world-sheet sweeps a disk and N gluons are created or annihilated at the boundary. We present exact expressions for the corresponding amplitudes, valid to all orders in {alpha}{sup '}, for the so-called maximally helicity violating configurations, with N=4, 5 and N=6. We also obtain the leading O({alpha}{sup '2}) string corrections to the zero-slope N-gluon Yang-Mills amplitudes.

  11. Microstrip amplitude-weighted wilkinson power dividers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, K. D.

    1986-03-01

    Unequal-split reactive power dividers were examined for use in forming amplitude tapers for microstrip array antennas. Circuits with power ratios of up to 5.0 between arms were constructed on Rexolite substrate, for operation at 4.0 GHz and 7.5 GHz. The 4.0 GHz circuits were very accurate in forming the correct amplitude ratio between outputs, and in maintaining phase balance between outputs. Of those circuits designed for 7.5 GHz, only those with split ratios less than 2.5 worked correctly. This report includes a review of the theory, measured results, and recommendations for improved power dividers.

  12. Dual amplitude pulse generator for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hoggan, Jerry M.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.

    2001-01-01

    A pulsing circuit for producing an output signal having a high amplitude pulse and a low amplitude pulse may comprise a current source for providing a high current signal and a low current signal. A gate circuit connected to the current source includes a trigger signal input that is responsive to a first trigger signal and a second trigger signal. The first trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the high current signal to a pulse output terminal whereas the second trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the low current signal to the pulse output terminal.

  13. Particle Distribution Modification by Low Amplitude Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2009-08-28

    Modification of a high energy particle distribution by a spectrum of low amplitude modes is investigated using a guiding center code. Only through resonance are modes effective in modifying the distribution. Diagnostics are used to illustrate the mode-particle interaction and to find which effects are relevant in producing significant resonance, including kinetic Poincare plots and plots showing those orbits with time averaged mode-particle energy transfer. Effects of pitch angle scattering and drag are studied, as well as plasma rotation and time dependence of the equilibrium and mode frequencies. A specific example of changes observed in a DIII-D deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude experimentally validated Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes is examined in detail. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam profile modification, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold.

  14. Amplitude analyses of charmless B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We present recent results from the LHCb experiment of Amplitude Analyses of charmless decays of B0 and BS0 mesons to two vector mesons. Measurements obtained include the branching fractions and polarization fractions, as well as CP asymmetries. The analyses use the data recorded by the LHCb experiment during Run 1 of the LHC.

  15. Cardiac phase: Amplitude analysis using macro programming

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, K.W.; Hickey, K.A.

    1981-11-01

    The analysis of EKG gated radionuclide cardiac imaging data with Fourier amplitude and phase images is becoming a valuable clinical technique, demonstrating location, size, and severity of regional ventricular abnormalities. Not all commercially available nuclear medicine computer systems offer software for phase and amplitude analysis; however, many systems do have the capability of linear image arithmetic using simple macro commands which can easily be sequenced into stored macro-strings or programs. Using simple but accurate series approximations for the Fourier operations, macro programs have been written for a Digital Equipment Corporation Gamma-11 system to obtain phase and amplitude images from routine gated cardiac studies. In addition, dynamic cine-mode presentation of the onset of mechanical systole is generated from the phase data, using only a second set of macro programs. This approach is easily adapted to different data acquisition protocols, and can be used on any system with macro commands for image arithmetic. Key words: Fourier analysis, cardiac cycle, gated blood pool imaging, amplitude image, phase image

  16. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  17. Numerical simulation of transitional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, Sedat

    1986-01-01

    The applicability of active control of transition by periodic suction-blowing is investigated via direct simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The time-evolution of finite-amplitude disturbances in plane channel flow is compared in detail with and without control. The analysis indicates that, for relatively small three-dimensional amplitudes, a two-dimensional control effectively reduces disturbance growth rates even for linearly unstable Reynolds numbers. After the flow goes through secondary instability, three-dimensional control seems necessary to stabilize the flow. An investigation of the temperature field suggests that passive temperature contamination is operative to reflect the flow dynamics during transition.

  18. Primordial equation of state transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Aditya; Lorshbough, Dustin; Paban, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    We revisit the physics of transitions from a general equation of state parameter to the final stage of slow-roll inflation. We show that it is unlikely for the modes comprising the cosmic microwave background to contain imprints from a preinflationary equation of state transition and still be consistent with observations. We accomplish this by considering observational consistency bounds on the amplitude of excitations resulting from such a transition. As a result, the physics which initially led to inflation likely cannot be probed with observations of the cosmic microwave background. Furthermore, we show that it is unlikely that equation of state transitions may explain the observed low multipole power suppression anomaly.

  19. Symmetry breaking of nematic umbilical defects through an amplitude equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, Marcel G.; Vidal-Henriquez, Estefania; Davila, Juan Diego; Kowalczyk, Michał

    2014-07-01

    The existence, stability properties, and bifurcation diagram of the nematic umbilical defects is studied. Close to the Fréedericksz transition of nematic liquid crystals with negative anisotropic dielectric constant and homeotropic anchoring, an anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau equation for the amplitude of the tilt of the director away from the vertical axis is derived by taking the three-dimensional (3D) to 2D limit of the Frank-Oseen model. The anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau equation allows us to reveal the mechanism of symmetry breaking of nematic umbilical defects. The positive defect is fully characterized as a function of the anisotropy, while the negative defect is characterized perturbatively. Numerical simulations show quite good agreement with the analytical results.

  20. Absorption line CW EPR using an amplitude modulated longitudinal field.

    PubMed

    Fedin, Matvey; Gromov, Igor; Schweiger, Arthur

    2004-11-01

    In standard continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) experiments, the first derivative of absorption lines is detected. This type of a line shape is caused by the magnetic field modulation and is usually an undesired feature, since the sensitivity of CW-EPR drastically decreases with increasing linewidth. A new approach is introduced, which allows for the measurement of absorption line EPR spectra in systems with broad inhomogeneous lines. The method makes use of multiple-photon transitions that are induced in spin systems when a transverse microwave and a longitudinal radio frequency field are simultaneously applied. The absorption lines are obtained by using amplitude modulation of the radio frequency field and slight saturation of the spectral lines. The basics of the new approach are discussed and experimental examples are given. PMID:15504685

  1. A large-amplitude rotational wave in the Venusian ionosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, A. O.; Vaisberg, O. L.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Galeev, A. A.; Intriligator, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported of a preliminary analysis of a large-amplitude rotational wave in the Venusian ionosheath. The results are based on an analysis of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma and magnetic field observations from six orbits in the first (1979) tail season. This wave appears to be the standing super-Alfvenic wing. It is located within the shocked plasma flow outside the boundary of the tail. The rotation of the magnetic field by about 90 deg across the wave occurs through several successive cycles making the wave similar to the group velocity wing consisting of phase velocity waves. The transition through the wave is accompanied by the vector change of the plasma velocity with the magnitude of the plasma velocity jump comparable to the vector jump of the Alfven velocity. The observed super-Alfvenic wing appears to originate upstream and closer to the planet, possibly near the upper boundary of the magnetic barrier on the dayside.

  2. Single Polymer Dynamics under Large Amplitude Oscillatory Extensional (LAOE) Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuecheng; Schroeder, Charles M.

    Over the past two decades, advances in fluorescence imaging and particle manipulation have enabled the direct observation of single polymer dynamics in model flows such as shear flow and planar extensional flow. The vast majority of single polymer studies, however, has focused on chain dynamics using simple transient step forcing functions. In order to study single polymer dynamics in non-idealized model flows, there is a clear need to implement more complicated transient flow forcing functions. In bulk rheology, large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) was widely used to study the linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of materials, but not yet been applied to molecular rheology. In this work, we directly probe single polymer dynamics using oscillatory extensional flow in precisely controlled microfluidic devices. We are able to generate large and small amplitude sinusoidal oscillatory extensional flow in a cross-slot microfluidic device while imaging the conformational dynamics of a single polymer trapped at the stagnation point. In this flow, polymer chains are stretched, squeezed, and rotated between extensional/compressional axes in a highly dynamic and transient manner. Using this technique, we studied the dynamics and coil-stretch transition of a single λ-DNA as a function of the Weissenberg number (Wi) and Deborah number (De). Moreover, we use Brownian dynamics simulation to map a wide range of Pipkin space for polymers from linear steady-state conditions to non-linear unsteady-states. Our results reveal a critical Wi at the coil-stretch transition that is function of the De in LAOE flow. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

  3. Polaris: Amplitude, Period Change, and Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. R.; Sasselov, D. D.; Short, C. I.

    2000-12-01

    Amplitude: Polaris has presented us with the rare phenomenon of a Cepheid with a pulsation amplitude which has decreased over the last 50 years. In this study we investigate whether the amplitude decrease during the last 15 years has had any effect on upper atmosphere heating. We obtained IUE high and low resolution spectra but found no change in either the Mg II chromospheric emission or the flux at 1800 Å/ between 1978 and 1993 when the pulsation amplitude dropped by 50 % (from 2.8 to 1.6 km sec-1). The energy distribution from 1700 Å/ through V, B, R(KC), and I(KC) is like that of a nonvariable supergiant of the same color rather than a full amplitude Cepheid in that it has nonradiative flux at 1800 Å/ which the full amplitude Cepheid δ Cep lacks. Period Change: Polaris also has a rapidly changing period (3.2 sec/year), in common with other overtone pulsators. We argue that this is a natural consequence of the different envelope locations which dominate in growth rates in fundamental and overtone pulsation. In fundamental mode pulsators, the deeper envelope is more important in determining growth rates than for overtone pulsators. For fundamental mode pulsators, evolutionary changes in the radius produce approximately linear changes in period. In overtone pulsators, pulsation reacts to small evolutionary changes in a more unstable way because the modes are more sensitive to high envelope features such as opacity bumps, and the growth rates for the many closely spaced overtone modes change easily. Companions: The upper limit to the X-ray flux from an Einstein observation implies that the companion in the astrometric orbit is probably earlier than F4 V. The combination of upper and lower limits on the companion from IUE and Einstein respectively catch the companion mass between 1.7 and 1.4 M⊙ . The X-ray limit is consistent with the more distant companion α UMi B being a physical companion in a hierarchal triple system. However the X-ray limits imply that

  4. Multilayered models for electromagnetic reflection amplitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1976-01-01

    The remote sensing of snowpack characteristics with surface installations or with an airborne system could have important applications in water resource management and flood prediction. To derive some insight into such applications, the electromagnetic response of multilayer snow models is analyzed. Normally incident plane waves are assumed at frequencies ranging from 10 to the 6th power to 10 to the 10th power Hz, and amplitude reflection coefficients are calculated for models having various snow-layer combinations, including ice sheets. Layers are defined by a thickness, permittivity, and conductivity; the electrical parameters are constant or prescribed functions of frequency. To illustrate the effect of various layering combinations, results are given in the form of curves of amplitude reflection coefficients, versus frequency for a variety of models. Under simplifying assumptions, the snow thickness and effective dielectric constant can be estimated from the reflection coefficient variations as a function of frequency.

  5. Differential equations, associators, and recurrences for amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhlfürst, Georg; Stieberger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We provide new methods to straightforwardly obtain compact and analytic expressions for ɛ-expansions of functions appearing in both field and string theory amplitudes. An algebraic method is presented to explicitly solve for recurrence relations connecting different ɛ-orders of a power series solution in ɛ of a differential equation. This strategy generalizes the usual iteration by Picard's method. Our tools are demonstrated for generalized hypergeometric functions. Furthermore, we match the ɛ-expansion of specific generalized hypergeometric functions with the underlying Drinfeld associator with proper Lie algebra and monodromy representations. We also apply our tools for computing ɛ-expansions for solutions to generic first-order Fuchsian equations (Schlesinger system). Finally, we set up our methods to systematically get compact and explicit α‧-expansions of tree-level superstring amplitudes to any order in α‧.

  6. Flutter of articulated pipes at finite amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousselet, J.; Herrmann, G.

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies of the behavior of pipes conveying fluid have assumed that the fluid velocity relative to the pipe is a known quantity and is unaffected by the motion of the pipe. This approach eliminates the need to find the flow equations of motion, and is adequate for infinitesimal transverse amplitudes of motion of the pipe system, but is incapable of predicting what will be the effect of larger amplitudes. This last shortcoming may be of importance when flow velocities are near critical velocities, that is, velocities at which the system begins to flutter. It is the purpose of the present study to investigate in greater detail the dynamic behavior of pipes in the vicinity of critical velocities.

  7. The Construction of Spin Foam Vertex Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Hellmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Spin foam vertex amplitudes are the key ingredient of spin foam models for quantum gravity. These fall into the realm of discretized path integral, and can be seen as generalized lattice gauge theories. They can be seen as an attempt at a 4-dimensional generalization of the Ponzano-Regge model for 3d quantum gravity. We motivate and review the construction of the vertex amplitudes of recent spin foam models, giving two different and complementary perspectives of this construction. The first proceeds by extracting geometric configurations from a topological theory of the BF type, and can be seen to be in the tradition of the work of Barrett, Crane, Freidel and Krasnov. The second keeps closer contact to the structure of Loop Quantum Gravity and tries to identify an appropriate set of constraints to define a Lorentz-invariant interaction of its quanta of space. This approach is in the tradition of the work of Smolin, Markopoulous, Engle, Pereira, Rovelli and Livine.

  8. Delbrück amplitudes: new calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahane, Sylvian

    1992-06-01

    Calculations of the first-order Delbrück scattering amplitudes were parallelized in a medium-grain mode assuring a very efficient, equal-load implementation, on systems with a moderate number of processors. New numerical values were calculated in the energy range 7.92-28 MeV and in the angular range 0.001°-120° with an estimated accuracy of as good as 1%. The old tables of Bar-Noy and Kahane are improved by these new calculations especially the values of Re A+- amplitudes. Good agreement is found with the calculations of Turrini, Maino and Ventura with a smoother behaviour of the present values. The calculations were performed on a system of eight transputers.

  9. Understanding the amplitudes of noise correlation measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross correlation of ambient seismic noise is known to result in time series from which station-station travel-time measurements can be made. Part of the reason that these cross-correlation travel-time measurements are reliable is that there exists a theoretical framework that quantifies how these travel times depend on the features of the ambient noise. However, corresponding theoretical results do not currently exist to describe how the amplitudes of the cross correlation depend on such features. For example, currently it is not possible to take a given distribution of noise sources and calculate the cross correlation amplitudes one would expect from such a distribution. Here, we provide a ray-theoretical framework for calculating cross correlations. This framework differs from previous work in that it explicitly accounts for attenuation as well as the spatial distribution of sources and therefore can address the issue of quantifying amplitudes in noise correlation measurements. After introducing the general framework, we apply it to two specific problems. First, we show that we can quantify the amplitudes of coherency measurements, and find that the decay of coherency with station-station spacing depends crucially on the distribution of noise sources. We suggest that researchers interested in performing attenuation measurements from noise coherency should first determine how the dominant sources of noise are distributed. Second, we show that we can quantify the signal-to-noise ratio of noise correlations more precisely than previous work, and that these signal-to-noise ratios can be estimated for given situations prior to the deployment of seismometers. It is expected that there are applications of the theoretical framework beyond the two specific cases considered, but these applications await future work.

  10. Deep Inelastic Scattering at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-08-04

    The deep inelastic lepton scattering and deeply virtual Compton scattering cross sections can be interpreted in terms of the fundamental wavefunctions defined by the light-front Fock expansion, thus allowing tests of QCD at the amplitude level. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gauge theory and string theory provides remarkable new insights into QCD, including a model for hadronic wavefunctions which display conformal scaling at short distances and color confinement at large distances.

  11. Subleading soft factor for string disk amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Burkhard U. W.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the behavior of superstring disk scattering amplitudes in the presence of a soft external momentum at finite string tension. We prove that there are no α'-corrections to the field theory form of the subleading soft factor S (1). At the end of this work, we also comment on the possibility to find the corresponding subleading soft factors in closed string theory using our result and the KLT relations.

  12. Chiral extrapolation of SU(3) amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Gerhard

    2011-05-23

    Approximations of chiral SU(3) amplitudes at NNLO are proposed to facilitate the extrapolation of lattice data to the physical meson masses. Inclusion of NNLO terms is essential for investigating convergence properties of chiral SU(3) and for determining low-energy constants in a controllable fashion. The approximations are tested with recent lattice data for the ratio of decay constants F{sub K}/F{sub {pi}}.

  13. Attenuation of ground-motion spectral amplitudes in southeastern Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, T.I.; Cummins, P.R.; Dhu, T.; Schneider, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    A dataset comprising some 1200 weak- and strong-motion records from 84 earthquakes is compiled to develop a regional ground-motion model for southeastern Australia (SEA). Events were recorded from 1993 to 2004 and range in size from moment magnitude 2.0 ??? M ??? 4.7. The decay of vertical-component Fourier spectral amplitudes is modeled by trilinear geometrical spreading. The decay of low-frequency spectral amplitudes can be approximated by the coefficient of R-1.3 (where R is hypocentral distance) within 90 km of the seismic source. From approximately 90 to 160 km, we observe a transition zone in which the seismic coda are affected by postcritical reflections from midcrustal and Moho discontinuities. In this hypocentral distance range, geometrical spreading is approximately R+0.1. Beyond 160 km, low-frequency seismic energy attenuates rapidly with source-receiver distance, having a geometrical spreading coefficient of R-1.6. The associated regional seismic-quality factor can be expressed by the polynomial: log Q(f) = 3.66 - 1.44 log f + 0.768 (log f)2 + 0.058 (log f)3 for frequencies 0.78 ??? f ??? 19.9 Hz. Fourier spectral amplitudes, corrected for geometrical spreading and anelastic attenuation, are regressed with M to obtain quadratic source scaling coefficients. Modeled vertical-component displacement spectra fit the observed data well. Amplitude residuals are, on average, relatively small and do not vary with hypocentral distance. Predicted source spectra (i.e., at R = 1 km) are consistent with eastern North American (ENA) Models at low frequencies (f less than approximately 2 Hz) indicating that moment magnitudes calculated for SEA earthquakes are consistent with moment magnitude scales used in ENA over the observed magnitude range. The models presented represent the first spectral ground-motion prediction equations develooed for the southeastern Australian region. This work provides a useful framework for the development of regional ground-motion relations

  14. Continuous phase and amplitude holographic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing a phase hologram using e-beam lithography provides n-ary levels of phase and amplitude by first producing an amplitude hologram on a transparent substrate by e-beam exposure of a resist over a film of metal by exposing n is less than or equal to m x m spots of an array of spots for each pixel, where the spots are randomly selected in proportion to the amplitude assigned to each pixel, and then after developing and etching the metal film producing a phase hologram by e-beam lithography using a low contrast resist, such as PMMA, and n-ary levels of low doses less than approximately 200 micro-C/sq cm and preferably in the range of 20-200 micro-C/sq cm, and aggressive development using pure acetone for an empirically determined time (about 6 s) controlled to within 1/10 s to produce partial development of each pixel in proportion to the n-ary level of dose assigned to it.

  15. Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography in neonates.

    PubMed

    El-Dib, Mohamed; Chang, Taeun; Tsuchida, Tammy N; Clancy, Robert R

    2009-11-01

    Conventional electroencephalography (EEG) has been used for decades in the neonatal intensive care unit for formulating neurologic prognoses, demonstrating brain functional state and degree of maturation, revealing cerebral lesions, and identifying the presence and number of electrographic seizures. However, both the immediate availability of conventional EEG and the expertise with which it is interpreted are variable. Amplitude-integrated EEG provides simplified monitoring of cerebral function, and is rapidly gaining popularity among neonatologists, with growing use in bedside decision making and inclusion criteria for randomized clinical studies. Nonetheless, child neurologists and neurophysiologists remain cautious about relying solely on this tool and prefer interpreting conventional EEG. The present review examines the technical aspects of generating, recording, and interpreting amplitude-integrated EEG and contrasts this approach with conventional EEG. Finally, several proposed amplitude-integrated EEG classification schemes are reviewed. A clear understanding of this emerging technology of measuring brain health in the premature or sick neonate is critical in modern care of the newborn infant. PMID:19818932

  16. Amplitude equations for collective spatio-temporal dynamics in arrays of coupled systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yanchuk, S.; Wolfrum, M.; Perlikowski, P.; Stefański, A.; Kapitaniak, T.

    2015-03-15

    We study the coupling induced destabilization in an array of identical oscillators coupled in a ring structure where the number of oscillators in the ring is large. The coupling structure includes different types of interactions with several next neighbors. We derive an amplitude equation of Ginzburg-Landau type, which describes the destabilization of a uniform stationary state and close-by solutions in the limit of a large number of nodes. Studying numerically an example of unidirectionally coupled Duffing oscillators, we observe a coupling induced transition to collective spatio-temporal chaos, which can be understood using the derived amplitude equations.

  17. Polaris: Amplitude, Period Change, and Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Short, C. Ian

    2002-03-01

    Polaris has presented us with the rare phenomenon of a Cepheid with a pulsation amplitude that has decreased over the last 50 yr. In this study we have used this property to see whether the amplitude decrease during the last 15 yr has had any effect on upper atmosphere heating. We obtained IUE high- and low-resolution spectra but found no change in either the Mg II chromospheric emission or the flux at 1800 Å between 1978 and 1993 when the pulsation amplitude dropped by 50% (from 2.8 to 1.6 km s-1). The energy distribution from 1700 Å through V, B, R(KC), and I(KC) is like that of a nonvariable supergiant of the same color rather than a full amplitude Cepheid in that it has more flux at 1800 Å than the full amplitude Cepheid δ Cep. Polaris also has a rapidly changing period (3.2 s yr-1), in common with other overtone pulsators. We argue that this is a natural consequence of the different envelope locations that dominate pulsation growth rates in fundamental and overtone pulsation. In fundamental mode pulsators, the deeper envelope is more important in determining growth rates than for overtone pulsators. For fundamental mode pulsators, evolutionary changes in the radius produce approximately linear changes in period. In overtone pulsators, pulsation reacts to small evolutionary changes in a more unstable way because the modes are more sensitive to high envelope features such as opacity bumps, and the growth rates for the many closely spaced overtone modes change easily. Finally, the upper limit to the X-ray flux from an Einstein observation implies that the companion in the astrometric orbit is earlier than F4 V. The combination of upper and lower limits on the companion from IUE and Einstein respectively catch the companion mass between 1.7 and 1.4 Msolar. The X-ray limit is consistent with the more distant companion α UMi B being a physical companion in a hierarchal triple system. However the X-ray limits require that the even more distant companions α UMi

  18. All-optical phase-preserving multilevel amplitude regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roethlingshoefer, Tobias; Richter, Thomas; Schubert, Colja; Onishchukov, Georgy; Schmauss, Bernhard; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    The possibility of all-optical phase-preserving amplitude regeneration for star-8QAM is demonstrated using a modified nonlinear optical loop mirror. Experiments show a reduction in amplitude noise on both amplitude levels simultaneously, considering two different types of signal distortions: deterministic low-frequency amplitude modulation and broadband amplitude noise. Furthermore, using this amplitude regeneration, the robustness against nonlinear phase noise from fiber nonlinearity in a transmission line is increased. The scheme suppresses the conversion of amplitude noise to nonlinear phase noise. This is shown for simultaneous amplitude regeneration of the two amplitude states as well as for amplitude regeneration of the high-power states only. If the transmission is limited by nonlinear phase noise, single-level operation at the more critical higher-power state will benefit because of the wider plateau region. Numerical simulations confirm the experimental results. PMID:25401858

  19. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  20. The small amplitude magnetohydrodynamic Riemann problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. C.; Kennel, C. F.

    1993-01-01

    The small-amplitude MHD Riemann problem is studied using the Cohen-Kulsrud-Burgers equations. Unlike the coplanar Riemann problem, the evolution of noncoplanar Riemann problems is not self-similar and its flow structures could change in time. But its large-time behavior is very simple and a time-dependent 2 - 3 intermediate shock is always involved for the noncoplanar field rotations. The time-dependent 2 - 3 intermediate shock has a well-defined structure and exists for any degree of field rotation.

  1. Phase amplitude conformal symmetry in Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, S.

    2015-04-01

    For the Fourier transform ℑ : L2(R) → L2(R) of a complex-valued even or odd function ψ, it is found that the amplitude invariance |ℑψ| = |ψ| leads to a phase invariance or inversion as arg(ℑψ) = ±argψ + θ (θ = constant). The converse holds unless arg ψ = constant. The condition |ψ| = |ℑψ| is required in dealing with, for example, the minimum uncertainty relation between position and momentum. Without the evenness or oddness of ψ, |ℑψ| = |ψ| does not necessarily imply arg(ℑψ) = ±argψ + θ, nor is the converse.

  2. Fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidawi, Jihad A.

    1994-09-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on an Fe 510 E C-Mn steel and a submerged arc welded joint from the same material under constant, variable, and random loading amplitudes. Paris-Erdogan's crack growth rate law was tested for the evaluation of m and C using the stress intensity factor K, the J-integral, the effective stress intensity factor K(sub eff), and the root mean square stress intensity factor K(sub rms) fracture mechanics concepts. The effect of retardation and residual stresses resulting from welding was also considered. It was found that all concepts gave good life predictions in all cases.

  3. Information transfer for small-amplitude signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr

    2010-05-01

    We study the optimality conditions of information transfer in systems with memory in the low signal-to-noise ratio regime of vanishing input amplitude. We find that the optimal mutual information is represented by a maximum variance of the signal time course, with correlation structure determined by the Fisher information matrix. We provide illustration of the method on a simple biologically inspired model of electrosensory neuron. Our general results apply also to the study of information transfer in single neurons subject to weak stimulation, with implications to the problem of coding efficiency in biological systems.

  4. Time-dependent treatment of scattering - Integral equation approaches using the time-dependent amplitude density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David K.; Sharafeddin, Omar; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent form of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation is used as the basis of several new wave packet propagation schemes. These can be formulated in terms of either the time-dependent wave function or a time-dependent amplitude density. The latter is nonzero only in the region of configuratiaon space for which the potential is nonzero, thereby in principle obviating the necessity of large grids or the use of complex absorbing potentials when resonances cause long collision times (leading, consequently, to long propagation times). Transition amplitudes are obtained in terms of Fourier transforms of the amplitude density from the time to the energy domain. The approach is illustrated by an application to a standard potential scattering model problem where, as in previous studies, the action of the kinetic energy operator is evaluated by fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques.

  5. The large-amplitude combustion oscillation in a single-side expansion scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Liu, Weidong; Sun, Mingbo

    2015-12-01

    The combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor is believed not existing and ignored for a long time. Compared with the flame pulsation, the large-amplitude combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor is indeed unfamiliar and difficult to be observed. In this study, the specifically designed experiments are carried out to investigate this unusual phenomenon in a single-side expansion scramjet combustor. The entrance parameter of combustor corresponds to scramjet flight Mach number 4.0 with a total temperature of 947 K. The obtained results show that the large-amplitude combustion oscillation can exist in scramjet combustor, which is not occasional and can be reproduced. Under the given conditions of this study, moreover, the large-amplitude combustion oscillation is regular and periodic, whose principal frequency is about 126 Hz. The proceeding of the combustion oscillation is accompanied by the transformation of the flame-holding pattern and combustion mode transition between scramjet mode combustion and ramjet mode combustion.

  6. Scattering amplitudes with off-shell quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hameren, A.; Kutak, K.; Salwa, T.

    2013-11-01

    We present a prescription to calculate manifestly gauge invariant tree-level scattering amplitudes for arbitrary scattering processes with off-shell initial-state quarks within the kinematics of high-energy scattering. Consider the embedding of the process, in which the off-shell u-quark is replaced by an auxiliary quark qA, and an auxiliary photon γA is added in final state. The momentum flow is as if qA carries momentum k1 and the momentum of γA is identical to 0. γA only interacts via Eq. (3), and qA further only interacts with gluons via normal quark-gluon vertices. qA-line propagators are interpreted as iℓ̸1/(2ℓ1ṡp), and are diagonal in color space. Sum the squared amplitude over helicities of the auxiliary photon. For one helicity, simultaneously assign to the external qA-quark and to γA the spinor and polarization vector |ℓ1], {<ℓ1|γμ|ℓ2]}/{√{2}[ℓ1|ℓ2]}, and for the other helicity assign |ℓ1>, {<ℓ2|γμ|ℓ1]}/{√{2}<ℓ2|ℓ1>}. Multiply the amplitude with √{-x1k12/2}. For the rest, normal Feynman rules apply.Some remarks are at order. Regarding the momentum flow, we stress, as in [20], that momentum components proportional to k1 do not contribute in the eikonal propagators, and there is a freedom in the choice of the momenta flowing through qA-lines.Regarding the sum over helicities, one might argue that only one of them leads to a non-zero result for given helicity of the final-state quark, but there may, for example, be several identical such quarks in the final state with different helicities.In case of more than one quark in the final state with the same flavor as the off-shell quark, the rules as such admit graphs with γA-propagators. These must be omitted. They do not survive the limit Λ→∞ in the derivation, since the γA-propagators are suppressed by 1/Λ.The rules regarding the qA-line could be elaborated further like in [20], leading to simplified vertices for gluons attached to this line and reducing the

  7. Spurious cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling in nonstationary, nonlinear signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hu, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies of brain activities show that cross-frequency coupling (CFC) plays an important role in memory and learning. Many measures have been proposed to investigate the CFC phenomenon, including the correlation between the amplitude envelopes of two brain waves at different frequencies - cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling (AAC). In this short communication, we describe how nonstationary, nonlinear oscillatory signals may produce spurious cross-frequency AAC. Utilizing the empirical mode decomposition, we also propose a new method for assessment of AAC that can potentially reduce the effects of nonlinearity and nonstationarity and, thus, help to avoid the detection of artificial AACs. We compare the performances of this new method and the traditional Fourier-based AAC method. We also discuss the strategies to identify potential spurious AACs.

  8. Fatigue life prediction of rotor blade composites: Validation of constant amplitude formulations with variable amplitude experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, T.; Nijssen, R. P. L.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of Constant Life Diagram (CLD) formulation on the fatigue life prediction under variable amplitude (VA) loading was investigated based on variable amplitude tests using three different load spectra representative for wind turbine loading. Next to the Wisper and WisperX spectra, the recently developed NewWisper2 spectrum was used. Based on these variable amplitude fatigue results the prediction accuracy of 4 CLD formulations is investigated. In the study a piecewise linear CLD based on the S-N curves for 9 load ratios compares favourably in terms of prediction accuracy and conservativeness. For the specific laminate used in this study Boerstra's Multislope model provides a good alternative at reduced test effort.

  9. Resonant π+γ→π+π0 amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2015-12-08

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude formore » $$\\pi\\pi \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$$, as a function of the energy of the $$\\pi\\pi$$ pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where $$\\pi\\pi$$ couples strongly to the unstable $$\\rho$$ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to $$m_\\pi \\approx 400$$ MeV. As a result, we obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the $$\\rho$$ pole and identify from its residue the $$\\rho \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$$ form-factor.« less

  10. On the frequency and amplitude spectrum and the fluctuations at the output of a communication receiver.

    PubMed

    Planat, M; Eckert, C

    2000-01-01

    A mixer cascaded with a low-pass filter is the basic piece of any communication receiver. The frequency and amplitude fluctuations of beat signals recorded at the output of the mixer plus filter set-up are investigated experimentally and explained on the basis of number theory in relation to the Riemann problem concerning the distribution of prime numbers. The frequency of the beat signal is obtained from a diophantine approximation of the frequency ratio of the input oscillators. The amplitude is defined globally from the position of resolved fractions with respect to an equally spaced graduation. Time series analysis methods show that frequency fluctuations present a transition from white frequency noise to 1/f frequency noise close to resonance; the latter is compatible with an underlying fractal attractor. The same transition is observed in the case of time series computed from continued fraction expansions. PMID:18238658

  11. Resonant π+γ →π+π0 Amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.; Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within quantum chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude for π π →π γ⋆, as a function of the energy of the π π pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where π π couples strongly to the unstable ρ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to mπ≈400 MeV . We obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the ρ pole and identify from its residue the ρ →π γ⋆ form factor.

  12. Resonant π^{+}γ→π^{+}π^{0} Amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Raúl A; Dudek, Jozef J; Edwards, Robert G; Shultz, Christian J; Thomas, Christopher E; Wilson, David J

    2015-12-11

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within quantum chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude for ππ→πγ^{⋆}, as a function of the energy of the ππ pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where ππ couples strongly to the unstable ρ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to m_{π}≈400  MeV. We obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the ρ pole and identify from its residue the ρ→πγ^{⋆} form factor. PMID:26705626

  13. Oscillation quenching mechanisms: Amplitude vs. oscillation death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseska, Aneta; Volkov, Evgeny; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Oscillation quenching constitutes a fundamental emergent phenomenon in systems of coupled nonlinear oscillators. Its importance for various natural and man-made systems, ranging from climate, lasers, chemistry and a wide range of biological oscillators can be projected from two main aspects: (i) suppression of oscillations as a regulator of certain pathological cases and (ii) a general control mechanism for technical systems. We distinguish two structurally distinct oscillation quenching types: oscillation (OD) and amplitude death (AD) phenomena. In this review we aim to set clear boundaries between these two very different oscillation quenching manifestations and demonstrate the importance for their correct identification from the aspect of theory as well as of applications. Moreover, we pay special attention to the physiological interpretation of OD and AD in a large class of biological systems, further underlying their different properties. Several open issues and challenges that await further resolving are also highlighted.

  14. Flutter of articulated pipes at finite amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousselet, J.; Herrmann, G.

    1977-01-01

    The plane motion of an articulated pipe made of two segments is examined and the flow velocity at which flutter manifests itself is sought. The pressure in the reservoir feeding the pipe is kept constant. In contrast to previous works, the flow velocity is not taken as a prescribed parameter of the system but is left to follow the laws of motion. This approach requires a nonlinear formulation of the problem and the equations of motion are solved using Krylov-Bogoliubov's method. A graph of the amplitude of the limit cycles, as a function of the fluid-system mass ratio, is presented and conclusions are drawn as to the necessity of considering nonlinearities in the analysis.

  15. Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnov, Oksana; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Three existing and two new excitation magnitude scaling options for active separation control at Reynolds numbers below one Million. The physical background for the scaling options was discussed and their relevance was evaluated using two different sets of experimental data. For F+ approx. 1, 2D excitation: a) The traditional VR and C(mu) - do not scale the data. b) Only the Re*C(mu) is valid. This conclusion is also limited for positive lift increment.. For F+ > 10, 3D excitation, the Re corrected C(mu), the St corrected velocity ratio and the vorticity flux coefficient, all scale the amplitudes equally well. Therefore, the Reynolds weighted C(mu) is the preferred choice, relevant to both excitation modes. Incidence also considered, using Ue from local Cp.

  16. Experimental generation of amplitude squeezed vector beams.

    PubMed

    Chille, Vanessa; Berg-Johansen, Stefan; Semmler, Marion; Banzer, Peter; Aiello, Andrea; Leuchs, Gerd; Marquardt, Christoph

    2016-05-30

    We present an experimental method for the generation of amplitude squeezed high-order vector beams. The light is modified twice by a spatial light modulator such that the vector beam is created by means of a collinear interferometric technique. A major advantage of this approach is that it avoids systematic losses, which are detrimental as they cause decoherence in continuous-variable quantum systems. The utilisation of a spatial light modulator (SLM) gives the flexibility to switch between arbitrary mode orders. The conversion efficiency with our setup is only limited by the efficiency of the SLM. We show the experimental generation of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) modes with radial indices 0 or 1 and azimuthal indices up to 3 with complex polarization structures and a quantum noise reduction up to -0.9dB±0.1dB. The corresponding polarization structures are studied in detail by measuring the spatial distribution of the Stokes parameters. PMID:27410153

  17. Amplitude and phase modulation with waveguide optics

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, S.C.; Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.; Penko, F.A.

    1996-12-17

    We have developed amplitude and phase modulation systems for glass lasers using integrated electro-optic modulators and solid state high- speed electronics. The present and future generation of lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion require laser beams with complex temporal and phase shaping to compensate for laser gain saturation, mitigate parametric processes such as transverse stimulated Brillouin scattering in optics, and to provide specialized drive to the fusion targets. These functions can be performed using bulk optoelectronic modulators, however using high-speed electronics to drive low voltage integrated optical modulators has many practical advantages. In particular, we utilize microwave GaAs transistors to perform precision, 250 ps resolution temporal shaping. Optical bandwidth is generated using a microwave oscillator at 3 GHz amplified by a solid state amplifier. This drives an integrated electrooptic modulator to achieve laser bandwidths exceeding 30 GHz.

  18. Evaluation of new spin foam vertex amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2009-06-01

    The Christensen-Egan algorithm is extended and generalized to efficiently evaluate new spin foam vertex amplitudes proposed by Engle, Pereira and Rovelli and Freidel and Krasnov, with or without (factored) boundary states. A concrete pragmatic proposal is made for comparing the different models using uniform methodologies, applicable to the behavior of large spin asymptotics and of expectation values of specific semiclassical observables. The asymptotics of the new models exhibit non-oscillatory, power-law decay similar to that of the Barrett-Crane model, though with different exponents. Also, an analysis of the semiclassical wave packet propagation problem indicates that the Magliaro, Rovelli and Perini's conjecture of good semiclassical behavior of the new models does not hold for generic factored states, which neglect spin-spin correlations.

  19. Speech recognition with amplitude and frequency modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Nie, Kaibao; Stickney, Ginger S.; Kong, Ying-Yee; Vongphoe, Michael; Bhargave, Ashish; Wei, Chaogang; Cao, Keli

    2005-02-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are commonly used in communication, but their relative contributions to speech recognition have not been fully explored. To bridge this gap, we derived slowly varying AM and FM from speech sounds and conducted listening tests using stimuli with different modulations in normal-hearing and cochlear-implant subjects. We found that although AM from a limited number of spectral bands may be sufficient for speech recognition in quiet, FM significantly enhances speech recognition in noise, as well as speaker and tone recognition. Additional speech reception threshold measures revealed that FM is particularly critical for speech recognition with a competing voice and is independent of spectral resolution and similarity. These results suggest that AM and FM provide independent yet complementary contributions to support robust speech recognition under realistic listening situations. Encoding FM may improve auditory scene analysis, cochlear-implant, and audiocoding performance. auditory analysis | cochlear implant | neural code | phase | scene analysis

  20. Localized finite-amplitude disturbances and selection of solitary waves

    PubMed

    Kliakhandler; Porubov; Velarde

    2000-10-01

    It turns out that evolution of localized finite-amplitude disturbances in perturbed KdV equation is qualitatively different compared with conventional small-amplitude initial conditions. Namely, relatively fast solitary waves, with one and the same amplitude and velocity, are formed ahead of conventional chaotic-like irregular structures. The amplitude and velocity of the waves, obtained from the asymptotic theory, are in excellent agreement with numerics. PMID:11089043

  1. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Conway, Patrick H.

    1994-01-01

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The Phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system.

  2. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOEpatents

    Yu, D.U.L.; Conway, P.H.

    1994-11-15

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system. 11 figs.

  3. Large-amplitude quadrupole collective dynamics of shape coexistence phenomena in proton-rich Se and Kr isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2010-06-01

    The five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian for large-amplitude collective dynamics is microscopically constructed by the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (CHFB) method and local quasiparticle random phase approximation (LQRPA). The excitation spectra and the electric quadrupole transitions between the low-lying states in {sup 68}Se are calculated by solving the collective Schroedinger equation.

  4. New Fermionic Soft Theorems for Supergravity Amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ming; Huang, Yu-Tin; Wen, Congkao

    2015-07-10

    Soft limits of a massless S matrix are known to reflect the symmetries of the theory. In particular, for theories with Goldstone bosons, the double-soft limit of scalars reveals the coset structure of the vacuum manifold. In this Letter, we propose that such universal double-soft behavior is not only true for scalars, but also for spin-1/2 particles in four dimensions and fermions in three dimensions. We first consider the Akulov-Volkov theory and demonstrate that the double-soft limit of Goldstinos yields the supersymmetry algebra. More surprisingly, we also find that amplitudes in 4≤N≤8 supergravity theories in four dimensions as well as N=16 supergravity in three dimensions behave universally in the double-soft-fermion limit, analogous to the scalar ones. The validity of the new soft theorems at loop level is also studied. The results for supergravity are beyond what is implied by supersymmetry Ward identities and may impose nontrivial constraints on the possible counterterms for supergravity theories. PMID:26207460

  5. Sensitivity to changes in amplitude envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallun, Erick; Hafter, Ervin R.; Bonnel, Anne-Marie

    2002-05-01

    Detection of a brief increment in a tonal pedestal is less well predicted by energy-detection (e.g., Macmillan, 1973; Bonnel and Hafter, 1997) than by sensitivity to changes in the stimulus envelope. As this implies a mechanism similar to an envelope extractor (Viemeister, 1979), sinusoidal amplitude modulation was used to mask a single ramped increment (10, 45, or 70 ms) added to a 1000-ms pedestal with carrier frequency (cf)=477 Hz. As in informational masking (Neff, 1994) and ``modulation-detection interference'' (Yost and Sheft, 1989), interference occurred with masker cfs of 477 and 2013 Hz. While slight masking was found with modulation frequencies (mfs) from 16 to 96 Hz, masking grew inversely with still lower mfs, being greatest for mf=4 Hz. This division is reminiscent of that said to separate sensations of ``roughness'' and ``beats,'' respectively (Terhardt, 1974), with the latter also being related to durations associated with auditory groupings in music and speech. Importantly, this result held for all of the signal durations and onset-offset ramps tested, suggesting that an increment on a pedestal is treated as a single auditory object whose detection is most difficult in the presence of other objects (in this case, ``beats'').

  6. The pulsed amplitude unit for the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, J.; Browne, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.

    1987-02-01

    There is a recurring requirement in the SLC for the control of devices such as magnets, phase shifters, and attenuators on a beam-by-beam basis. The Pulsed Amplitude Unit (PAU) is a single width CAMAC module developed for this purpose. It provides digitally programmed analog output voltages on a beam-by-beam basis. Up to 32 preprogrammed values of output voltage are available from the single analog output of the module, and any of these values can be associated with any of the 256 possible SLC beam definitions. A 12-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) digitizes an analog input signal at the appropriate beam time and stores it in a buffer memory. This feature is normally used to monitor the response of the device being controlled by the PAU at each beam time. Initial application of the PAU is a part of the system that controls the output of Klystrons in the SLC. The PAU combines several different functions in a single module. In order to accommodate these functions in a single width CAMAC module, field programmed logic is used extensively. Field Programmable Logic Arrays, Programmed Array Logic, and a Field Programmable Logic Sequencer are employed.

  7. A new polarisation amplitude bias reduction method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Dickinson, C.

    2016-06-01

    Polarisation amplitude estimation is affected by a positive noise bias, particularly important in regions with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We present a new approach to correct for this bias in the case there is additional information about the polarisation angle. We develop the `known-angle estimator' that works in the special case when there is an independent and high signal-to-noise ratio (≳ 2σ) measurement of the polarisation angle. It is derived for the general case where the uncertainties in the Q, U Stokes parameters are not symmetric. This estimator completely corrects for the polarisation bias if the polarisation angle is perfectly known. In the realistic case, where the angle template has uncertainties, a small residual bias remains, but that is shown to be much smaller that the one left by other classical estimators. We also test our method with more realistic data, using the noise properties of the three lower frequency maps of WMAP. In this case, the known-angle estimator also produces better results than methods that do not include the angle information. This estimator is therefore useful in the case where the polarisation angle is expected to be constant over different data sets with different SNR.

  8. Automated phase/amplitude EHF measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, B. M.

    1981-05-01

    An automated, computer-controlled measurement system capable of conducting transmission and reflection measurements on components over the 40 to 47 GHz frequency range is described. The measurement system utilizes harmonic mixing in conjunction with a phase locked, dual channel receiver to downconvert signals in the 7 GHz bandwidth to a lower intermediate frequency (1 KHz) where phase and amplitude measurements are made. The system is capable of operating over a dynamic range in excess of 50 dB when used with an EHF source producing a minimum -10 dBm output. Following a description of the system and its operation, some performance characteristics are presented. The measurement system accuracy is demonstrated using two types of reference standards: (1) a rotary vane attenuator for the transmission measurements, and (2) a set of reduced-height waveguide VSWR standards for the return loss measurements. Results obtained using these standards have indicated that measurement accuracies of 0.25 dB and 3 deg are achievable over a 50 dB dynamic range.

  9. A generalized fidelity amplitude for open systems.

    PubMed

    Gorin, T; Moreno, H J; Seligman, T H

    2016-06-13

    We consider a central system which is coupled via dephasing to an open system, i.e. an intermediate system which in turn is coupled to another environment. Considering the intermediate and far environment as one composite system, the coherences in the central system are given in the form of fidelity amplitudes for a certain perturbed echo dynamics in the composite environment. On the basis of the Born-Markov approximation, we derive a master equation for the reduction of that dynamics to the intermediate system alone. In distinction to an earlier paper (Moreno et al 2015 Phys. Rev. A 92, 030104. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.92.030104)), where we discussed the stabilizing effect of the far environment on the decoherence in the central system, we focus here on the possibility of using the measurable coherences in the central system for probing the open quantum dynamics in the intermediate system. We illustrate our results for the case of chaotic dynamics in the near environment, where we compare random matrix simulations with our analytical result. PMID:27140969

  10. A new polarization amplitude bias reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Matias; Leahy, J. P.; Dickinson, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarization amplitude estimation is affected by a positive noise bias, particularly important in regions with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We present a new approach to correct for this bias in the case there is additional information about the polarization angle. We develop the `known-angle estimator' that works in the special case when there is an independent and high SNR (≳ 2σ) measurement of the polarization angle. It is derived for the general case where the uncertainties in the Q, U Stokes parameters are not symmetric. This estimator completely corrects for the polarization bias if the polarization angle is perfectly known. In the realistic case, where the angle template has uncertainties, a small residual bias remains, but that is shown to be much smaller that the one left by other classical estimators. We also test our method with more realistic data, using the noise properties of the three lower frequency maps of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. In this case, the known-angle estimator also produces better results than methods that do not include the angle information. This estimator is therefore useful in the case where the polarization angle is expected to be constant over different data sets with different SNR.

  11. Image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-bin; Wu, Zhi-qun; Zhu, Jian-ping; He, Jian-guo; Liu, Guang-min

    2013-10-01

    The paper proposes a method to measure vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn which is a very important component in the spindle for micro-electrical-chemical discharging machining. The method of image measuring amplitude on high frequency vibration is introduced. Non-contact measurement system based on vision technology is constructed. High precision location algorithm on image centroid, quadratic location algorithm, is presented to find the center of little light spot. Measurement experiments have been done to show the effect of image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn. In the experiments, precise calibration of the vision system is implemented using a normal graticule to obtain the scale factor between image pixel and real distance. The vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn is changed by modifying the voltage amplitude of pulse power supply. The image of feature on ultrasonic horn is captured and image processing is carried out. The vibration amplitudes are got at different voltages.

  12. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  13. Topological field theory amplitudes for A N-1 fibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Amer; Khan, Ahsan Z.; Qureshi, Babar A.; Shabbir, Khurram; Shehper, Muhammad A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the partition function N=1 5D U( N) gauge theory with g adjoint hypermultiplets and show that for massless adjoint hypermultiplets it is equal to the partition function of a two dimensional topological field on a genus g Riemann surface. We describe the topological field theory by its amplitudes associated with cap, propagator and pair of pants. These basic amplitudes are open topological string amplitudes associated with certain Calabi-Yau threefolds in the presence of Lagrangian branes.

  14. N >= 4 Supergravity Amplitudes from Gauge Theory at One Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Boucher-Veronneau, C.; Johansson, H.; /Saclay

    2011-08-19

    We expose simple and practical relations between the integrated four- and five-point one-loop amplitudes of N {ge} 4 supergravity and the corresponding (super-)Yang-Mills amplitudes. The link between the amplitudes is simply understood using the recently uncovered duality between color and kinematics that leads to a double-copy structure for gravity. These examples provide additional direct confirmations of the duality and double-copy properties at loop level for a sample of different theories.

  15. Amplitudes and Ultraviolet Behavior of N = 8 Supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Carrasco, John Joseph; Dixon, Lance J.; Johansson, Henrik; Roiban, Radu; /Penn State U.

    2011-05-20

    In this contribution we describe computational tools that permit the evaluation of multi-loop scattering amplitudes in N = 8 supergravity, in terms of amplitudes in N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. We also discuss the remarkable ultraviolet behavior of N = 8 supergravity, which follows from these amplitudes, and is as good as that of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory through at least four loops.

  16. Tree-level amplitudes in the nonlinear sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Karol; Novotný, Jirí; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2013-05-01

    We study in detail the general structure and further properties of the tree-level amplitudes in the SU( N) nonlinear sigma model. We construct the flavor-ordered Feynman rules for various parameterizations of the SU( N) fields U ( x), write down the Berends-Giele relations for the semi-on-shell currents and discuss their efficiency for the amplitude calculation in comparison with those of renormalizable theories. We also present an explicit form of the partial amplitudes up to ten external particles. It is well known that the standard BCFW recursive relations cannot be used for reconstruction of the the on-shell amplitudes of effective theories like the SU( N) nonlinear sigma model because of the inappropriate behavior of the deformed on-shell amplitudes at infinity. We discuss possible generalization of the BCFW approach introducing "BCFW formula with subtractions" and with help of Berends-Giele relations we prove particular scaling properties of the semi-on-shell amplitudes of the SU( N) nonlinear sigma model under specific shifts of the external momenta. These results allow us to define alternative deformation of the semi-on-shell amplitudes and derive BCFW-like recursion relations. These provide a systematic and effective tool for calculation of Goldstone bosons scattering amplitudes and it also shows the possible applicability of on-shell methods to effective field theories. We also use these BCFW-like relations for the investigation of the Adler zeroes and double soft limit of the semi-on-shell amplitudes.

  17. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  18. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  19. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  20. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  1. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  2. Achieving Seventh-Order Amplitude Accuracy in Leapfrog Integrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The leapfrog time-stepping scheme is commonly used in general circulation models of the atmosphere and ocean. The Robert-Asselin filter is used in conjunction with it, to damp the computational mode. Although the leapfrog scheme makes no amplitude errors when integrating linear oscillations, the Robert-Asselin filter introduces first-order amplitude errors. The RAW filter, which was recently proposed as an improvement, eliminates the first-order amplitude errors and yields third-order amplitude accuracy. This development has been shown to significantly increase the skill of medium-range weather forecasts. However, it has not previously been shown how to further improve the accuracy by eliminating the third- and higher-order amplitude errors. This presentation will show that leapfrogging over a suitably weighted blend of the filtered and unfiltered tendencies eliminates the third-order amplitude errors and yields fifth-order amplitude accuracy. It will also show that the use of a more discriminating (1, -4, 6, -4, 1) filter instead of a (1, -2, 1) filter eliminates the fifth-order amplitude errors and yields seventh-order amplitude accuracy. Other related schemes are obtained by varying the values of the filter parameters, and it is found that several combinations offer an appealing compromise of stability and accuracy. The proposed new schemes are shown to yield substantial forecast improvements in a medium-complexity atmospheric general circulation model. They appear to be attractive alternatives to the filtered leapfrog schemes currently used in many weather and climate models.

  3. Recurrence relations of Kummer functions and Regge string scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jen-Chi; Mitsuka, Yoshihiro

    2013-04-01

    We discover an infinite number of recurrence relations among Regge string scattering amplitudes [11, 30] of different string states at arbitrary mass levels in the open bosonic string theory. As a result, all Regge string scattering amplitudes can be algebraically solved up to multiplicative factors. Instead of decoupling zero-norm states in the fixed angle regime, the calculation is based on recurrence relations and addition theorem of Kummer functions of the second kind. These recurrence relations among Regge string scattering amplitudes are dual to linear relations or symmetries among high-energy fixed angle string scattering amplitudes discovered previously.

  4. Amplitude and phase noise of magnetic tunnel junction oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinsat, M.; Gusakova, D.; Sierra, J. F.; Michel, J. P.; Houssameddine, D.; Delaet, B.; Cyrille, M.-C.; Ebels, U.; Dieny, B.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.; Katine, J. A.; Mauri, D.; Zeltser, A.; Prigent, M.; Nallatamby, J.-C.; Sommet, R.

    2010-11-01

    The microwave emission linewidth of spin transfer torque nano-oscillators is closely related to their phase and amplitude noise that can be extracted from the magnetoresistive voltage signal V(t ) using single shot time domain techniques. Here we report on phase and amplitude noise studies for MgO based magnetic tunnel junction oscillators. The analysis of the power spectral densities allows one to separate the linear and nonlinear contributions to the phase noise, the nonlinear contribution being due to the coupling between phase and amplitude. The coupling strength as well as the amplitude relaxation rate can be directly extracted.

  5. On a study of optically coupled memristive Chua circuits-rhythmogenesis and amplitude death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arindam; Ray, Anirban; Basak, Sankar; Roy Chowdhury, A.

    2015-07-01

    Properties of memristive inductorless Chua circuits are studied when they are coupled optically to characterize the oscillation quenching phenomenon of amplitude death (AD) and oscillation generation procedure of rhythmogenesis. The behaviors of these systems, when studied under coupled condition, show some new features which are not seen previously. This phenomenon is really a novel one as it is the generation of oscillation due to the interaction of two such systems each at their respective steady states. The other event is amplitude death (AD) observed by increase in the coupling strength. The numerical simulation is supported with the data obtained via analogue circuit implementation of the system. Two circuits coupled through a LED (light emitting diode) and LDR (photo resistor) pair show transition to chaotic state under parameter variation. The experimental data was collected with the help of digital to analog converter system. Our data indicates that there exist two different routes to chaos-either through period doubling or without it.

  6. How a small noise generates large-amplitude oscillations of volcanic plug and provides high seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V.; Bashkirtseva, Irina A.; Ryashko, Lev B.

    2015-04-01

    A non-linear behavior of dynamic model of the magma-plug system under the action of N-shaped friction force and stochastic disturbances is studied. It is shown that the deterministic dynamics essentially depends on the mutual arrangement of an equilibrium point and the friction force branches. Variations of this arrangement imply bifurcations, birth and disappearance of stable limit cycles, changes of the stability of equilibria, system transformations between mono- and bistable regimes. A slope of the right increasing branch of the friction function is responsible for the formation of such regimes. In a bistable zone, the noise generates transitions between small and large amplitude stochastic oscillations. In a monostable zone with single stable equilibrium, a new dynamic phenomenon of noise-induced generation of large amplitude stochastic oscillations in the plug rate and pressure is revealed. A beat-type dynamics of the plug displacement under the influence of stochastic forcing is studied as well.

  7. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  8. Lifetime measurements in neutral alkalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diberardino, Diana

    1998-12-01

    Precision measurements of transition probabilities and energies provide a means for testing atomic structure calculations. The most accurate atomic structure calculations employ many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) and are used for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) measurements and for testing of quantum electrodynamics (QED). Our group's measurement of the 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium provides constraints for recent MBPT calculations in cesium and electric dipole (E1) matrix elements. These E1 matrix elements contribute a large fraction to the weak-interaction-induced 6S[-]7S transition amplitude in cesium. Part of this thesis has been motivated by our desire to reduce the uncertainties in the measured 6p/ 2P3/2,1/2 state lifetimes in atomic cesium using improvements in our fast-beam apparatus. Thus, a new fiber optic detector system is designed to provide better collection efficiency and reduce beam tracking errors. Also, a new method of measuring the atomic beam velocity using a solid etalon is demonstrated to improve the velocity precision by a factor of seven. Additionally, this thesis describes measurements of the cesium 5d/ 2D5/2,/ 5d/ 2D3/2, and 11s/ 2S1/2 state lifetimes using pulsed-dye laser excitation of cesium vapor. The 5d/ 2D3/2 lifetime measurement, along with its branching ratio, provides the electric dipole reduced matrix element between the 5d/ 2D3/2 state and the 6p/ 2P1/2 state. Furthermore, a previous 5d/ 2D5/2 experimental value is compared with our new value and recent theoretical calculations.

  9. Source-Space Cross-Frequency Amplitude-Amplitude Coupling in Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Zobay, Oliver; Adjamian, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    The thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD) model has been influential in the development of theoretical explanations for the neurological mechanisms of tinnitus. It asserts that thalamocortical oscillations lock a region in the auditory cortex into an ectopic slow-wave theta rhythm (4–8 Hz). The cortical area surrounding this region is hypothesized to generate abnormal gamma (>30 Hz) oscillations (“edge effect”) giving rise to the tinnitus percept. Consequently, the model predicts enhanced cross-frequency coherence in a broad range between theta and gamma. In this magnetoencephalography study involving tinnitus and control cohorts, we investigated this prediction. Using beamforming, cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling (AAC) was computed within the auditory cortices for frequencies (f1, f2) between 2 and 80 Hz. We find the AAC signal to decompose into two distinct components at low (f1, f2 < 30 Hz) and high (f1, f2 > 30 Hz) frequencies, respectively. Studying the correlation of AAC with several key covariates (age, hearing level (HL), tinnitus handicap and duration, and HL at tinnitus frequency), we observe a statistically significant association between age and low-frequency AAC. Contrary to the TCD predictions, however, we do not find any indication of statistical differences in AAC between tinnitus and controls and thus no evidence for the predicted enhancement of cross-frequency coupling in tinnitus. PMID:26665004

  10. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories: progress and outlook Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories: progress and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roiban, Radu; Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2011-11-01

    This issue aims to serve as an introduction to our current understanding of the structure of scattering amplitudes in gauge theory, an area which has seen particularly rapid advances in recent years following decades of steady progress. The articles contained herein provide a snapshot of the latest developments which we hope will serve as a valuable resource for graduate students and other scientists wishing to learn about the current state of the field, even if our continually evolving understanding of the subject might soon render this compilation incomplete. Why the fascination with scattering amplitudes, which have attracted the imagination and dedicated effort of so many physicists? Part of it stems from the belief, supported now by numerous examples, that unexpected simplifications of otherwise apparently complicated calculations do not happen by accident. Instead they provide a strong motivation to seek out an underlying explanation. The insight thereby gained can subsequently be used to make the next class of seemingly impossible calculations not only possible, but in some cases even trivial. This two-pronged strategy of exploring and exploiting the structure of gauge theory amplitudes appeals to a wide audience from formal theorists interested in mathematical structure for the sake of its own beauty to more phenomenologically-minded physicists eager to speed up the next generation of analysis software. Understandably it is the maximally supersymmetric 𝒩 = 4 Yang-Mills theory (SYM) which has the simplest structure and has correspondingly received the most attention. Rarely in theoretical physics are we fortunate enough to encounter a toy model which is simple enough to be solved completely yet rich enough to possess interesting non-trivial structure while simultaneously, and most importantly, being applicable (even if only as a good approximation) to a wide range of 'real' systems. The canonical example in quantum mechanics is of course the harmonic