Sample records for park central brazil

  1. @central park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Central Park Conservancy, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to restoring, improving, and managing Central Park's grounds and facilities, offers this "official" site, which contains a wealth of information about what is arguably the world's most famous city park. Each of the site's sections contains useful or interesting information; the Then & Now section, for instance, offers an overview of Central Park's history, a bibliography with 43 entries for those seeking further information, and a list of movies with scenes set in the park. Another highlight of the site is the Virtual Park, which consists of a set of clickable maps through which users can explore 72 points of interest, each described in the affectionate style of a travel guidebook. The site's other sections include such features as events schedules, press releases, information on when and where particular varieties of flowers bloom, and a section devoted entirely to activities for families and children. This site will be especially useful to those who are planning a visit to Central Park, but other users will likely find it informative and entertaining as well.

  2. Central Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) true-color image was acquired on October 19, 2000, over a region in Brazil large enough to show much of the country's diverse landscape. Spanning some 8.5 million square kilometers (3.2 million square miles), Brazil is by far the largest South American nation--both in terms of land and population. The region known as the Amazon Basin lies to the northwest (upper left) and extends well beyond the northern and western edges of this scene. Typically, from this perspective Amazonia appears as a lush, dark green carpet due to the thick canopy of vegetation growing there. Some of the Amazon Basin is visible in this image, but much is obscured by clouds (bright white pixels), as is the Amazon River. This region is home to countless plant and animal species and some 150,000 native South Americans. The clusters of square and rectangular patterns toward the center of the image (light green or reddish-brown pixels) are where people have cleared away trees and vegetation to make room for development and agriculture. Toward the western side of the scene there is considerable haze and smoke from widespread biomass burning in parts of Brazil and Bolivia, which shares its eastern border with Brazil. Toward the east in this image is the highland, or 'cerrado,' region, which is more sparsely vegetated and has a somewhat drier climate than the Amazon Basin. The capital city, Brasilia, lies within this region just southwest of the Geral de Goias Mountains (orangish pixels running north-south). There are two large water reservoirs visible in this scene--the Sobradinho Reservoir about 800 km (500 miles) northeast of Brasilia, and the Paranaiba about 500 km (300 miles) southwest of Brasilia. MODIS flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. Image courtesy Brian Montgomery, Reto Stockli, and Robert Simmon, based on data from the MODIS Science Team.

  3. Smithsonian National Zoological Park: Conservation Central

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Conservation Central is an online a habitat education program sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution's National Zoological Park. It explores the temperate forest, home of the giant panda and black bear. Site materials include online activities such as designing a habitat for giant pandas, a virtual trip to a forest reserve in China, and virtual exploration and research in a temperate forest. There is also a conservation curriculum for intermediate-level (middle school) students, suggestions for outdoor activities for families, and a gallery where users can share their conservation ideas with others.

  4. 6. CENTRAL PORTION OF SOUTH SIDE OF BUILDING, FROM PARKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CENTRAL PORTION OF SOUTH SIDE OF BUILDING, FROM PARKING LOT NORTH OF BERTH B-1 (WESTERN END OF G STREET), LOOKING NORTHEAST, WITH BUILDING 123 AT FAR RIGHT. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Pier Transit Shed, South of D Street between First & Second Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. Central Park East Secondary School: Teaching and Learning through Freire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyner-Mullings, Alia R.

    2012-01-01

    This article connects the theoretical perspective of Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed with the teaching and learning styles of teachers and students at Central Park East Secondary School (CPESS) in East Harlem, New York. It examines some of the ways the Freireian model has worked within the public school system and considers some of the…

  6. Inventory of marine and estuarine fishes in southeast and central Alaska National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arimitsu, M.L.; Litzow, M.A.; Piatt, J.F.; Robards, M.D.; Abookire, A.A.; Drew, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a national inventory program funded by the National Park Service, we conducted an inventory of marine and estuarine fishes in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Sitka National Historical Park, and Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in 2001 and 2002. In addition, marine fish data from a previous project that focused on forage fishes and marine predators during 1999 and 2000 in Glacier Bay proper were compiled for this study. Sampling was conducted with modified herring and Isaacs-Kidd midwater trawls, a plumb staff beam trawl, and beach seines. Species lists of relative abundance were generated for nearshore fishes in all parks, and for demersal and pelagic fishes in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve and Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. With a total sampling effort of 531 sets, we captured 100 species in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, 31 species in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, 23 species in Sitka National Historical Park, and 11 species in Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. We estimated that between 59 and 85 percent of the total marine fish species present were sampled by us in the various habitat-park units. We also combined these data with historical records and prepared an annotated species list of 160 marine and estuarine fishes known to occur in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Shannon-Wiener diversity index and catch per unit effort were used to assess the effects of depth and latitude (distance from tidewater glaciers) on marine fish community ecology in Glacier Bay proper. Our findings suggest that demersal fishes are more abundant and diverse with increased distance from tidewater glaciers, and that pelagic fishes sampled deeper than 50 m are more abundant in areas closer to tidewater glaciers. Fish, Marine, Estuarine, National Parks, Southeast Alaska, Central Alaska, Inventory, Monitoring, Diversity, Abundance, Glacier Bay

  7. Pupils and Parks: Environmental Education in National Parks of Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Susan K.; Padua, Suzana M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes two conservation education programs that target local primary schools and use national parks in Malaysian Borneo (Kinabalu Park) and central Brazil (Morro do Diabo Park). Both were designed using a comprehensive systems evaluation model and both resulted in cognitive and affective gains for students. (LB)

  8. Central America's "Peace Parks" and Regional Conflict Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weed, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the development of transborder conservation zones, known as "peace parks," in terms of their potential importance as proving grounds for international cooperation and sustainable development, and then in their role as symbols and outright manifestations of the peace process. Includes case studies of La Amistad Biosphere Reserve, Si-a-Paz,…

  9. [Toxocara sp. eggs and Ancylostoma sp. larva in public parks, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Antônio Marcos; Alves, Endrigo Gabellini Leonel; de Rezende, Glycia Ferreira; Rodrigues, Marcelo Costa

    2005-04-01

    Visceral and cutaneous larva migrans are parasitic zoonoses caused by the infection of larval nematodes Toxocara sp. and Ancylostoma sp. respectively. The objective of this study was to investigate the contamination by Toxocara sp. eggs and Ancylostoma sp. eggs and larva of soil samples collected from public parks and children's playground areas in state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using both Baermann's method and centrifugal flotation technique. Toxocara sp. and Ancylostoma sp. eggs were observed in soil samples collected from public squares in 17.4% (4/23) and 69.6 (16/23) respectively. In schools and child day care settings the contamination by Ancylostoma sp. larva in sand samples was 11.1% (2/18). Public parks are settings of more potential risk of Toxocara sp. eggs and Ancylostoma sp. infection. Stool parasitology testing of 174 stool samples showed 58% and 23% of Ancylostoma sp and Toxocara sp eggs infection respectively. PMID:15895151

  10. Soil Communities of Central Park, New York City: A Biodiversity Melting Pot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, K. S.; Leff, J. W.; Wall, D. H.; Fierer, N.

    2013-12-01

    The majority of earth's biodiversity lives in and makes up the soil, but the majority of soil biodiversity has yet to be characterized or even quantified. This may be especially true of urban soil systems. The last decade of advances in molecular, technical and bioinformatic techniques have contributed greatly to our understanding of belowground biodiversity, from global distribution to species counts. Yet, much of this work has been done in ';natural' systems and it is not known if established patterns of distribution, especially in relation to soil factors hold up in urban soils. Urban soils are intensively managed and disturbed, often by effects unique to urban settings. It remains unclear how urban pressures influence soil biodiversity, or if there is a defined or typical ';urban soil community'. Here we describe a study to examine the total soil biodiversity - Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya- of Central Park, New York City and test for patterns of distribution and relationships to soil characteristics. We then compare the biodiversity of Central Park to 57 global soils, spanning a number of biomes from Alaska to Antarctica. In this way we can identify similarities and differences in soil communities of Central Park to soils from ';natural' systems. To generate a broad-scale survey of total soil biodiversity, 596 soil samples were collected from across Central Park (3.41 km2). Soils varied greatly in vegetation cover and soil characteristics (pH, moisture, soil C and soil N). Using high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology we characterized the complete soil community from 16S rRNA (Bacteria and Archaea) and 18S rRNA gene sequences (Eukarya). Samples were rarified to 40,000 sequences per sample. To compare Central Park to the 57 global soils the complete soil community of the global soils was also characterized using Illumina sequencing technology. All samples were rarified to 40,000 sequences per sample. The total measured biodiversity in Central Park was high: >540,000 bacterial and archaeal species; and >97,000 eukaryotic species (as determined using a 97% sequence similarity cutoff). The most dominant bacterial phyla include Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia and Actinobacteria, and Archaea represent 1-8% of the sequences. Additionally, the distribution patterns of Acidobacteria and consequently beta-diversity, was strongly related to soil pH. The most dominant eukaryotic taxa include many Protists (Rhizara, Gregarinia), Fungi (Basidiomycota, Ascomycota), and Metazoa (Nematodes, Rotifers, Arthropods and Annelids). No single soil factor could predict eukaryotic distribution. Central Park soil diversity was strikingly similar to the diversity of the 57 global soils. Central Park and the global soils had similarities in alpha diversity, taxon abundances. Interestingly, there was significant overlap in a number of dominant species between Central Park and the global soils. Together these results represent the most comprehensive analysis of soil biodiversity conducted to date. Our data suggest that even well-studied locations like Central Park harbor very high levels of unexplored biodiversity, and that Central Park biodiversity is comparable to soil biodiversity found globally.

  11. Cultivating Urban Naturalists: Teaching Experiential, Place-Based Learning through Nature Journaling in Central Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warkentin, Traci

    2011-01-01

    Preservice educators engaged in experiential, place-based learning through a semester-long assignment in which they observed a specific place in Central Park in Manhattan, New York, and kept a nature journal. The assignment was organized around two pivotal elements: direct, sensory experience and time in place. Both elements added vital dimensions…

  12. Sustaining Change: The Struggle to Maintain Identity at Central Park East Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suiter, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Central Park East Secondary School (CPESS) in East Harlem was one of the most highly acclaimed and successful schools to come out of the period of school reform in the 1980s from which the Coalition of Essential Schools emerged. Noted progressive educator Deborah Meier founded CPESS in 1985 not as a reform model, but as a continuation of the…

  13. Geodiversity, Geoturism and Geoconservation: Trails in Serra da Bocaina National Park, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Filho, Raphael; Guerra, Antonio; Fullen, Michael; do Carmo Jorge, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The human being has always been concerned with the preservation of memory, of cultural heritage. Only now he started to protect its natural heritage and the immediate environment. It is time to learn how to protect the Earth's past and, through this protection and learn to know it. This memory comes before the human memory. It is a new asset: the geological heritage, a book written long before our appearance on the Planet (...)"(IPHAN, 2014). Since the XXth century, Brazilian geographers (GUERRA, 1980; AB'SABER, 2003 and others) dedicated to carry out research on the relationship of geographical knowledge between the environment and society. On the other hand, Brazil is a signatory of the Convention for the Protection of the World Heritage Cultural and Natural (UNESCO, 1972), where the nations recognize to keep under their responsibility the conservation, to the rest of humanity and future generations, goods of exceptional value situated within its territorial limits, considered as World Heritage. Under this perspective, it is proposed here a survey on the environmental impacts, resulting from the human activities that directly or indirectly affect the health, safety and welfare of the population; social and economic activities; the biota; the aesthetic and sanitary conditions of the environment; the quality of the environment (CONAMA Resolution 001/86) - and resulting geotourism practiced on trails - paths for pedestrians, cyclists and animals, existing in the protected area of the Serra da Bocaina National Park, in Rio de Janeiro State, such as unplanned use, erosive features, presence of litter, graffiti and burned, degraded areas on the trails indicating the need for recovery (drainage, etc.). This survey is based on research work of the environmental degradation and analysis undertaken by the Laboratory of Environmental Geomorphology and Soils Degradation (LAGESOLOS / UFRJ) in the area, in order to contribute to the geoconservation, so that the encountered results may guide towards conservation and management of the geologic and natural processes associated with it, preserving geodiversity at the local scale, without the interruption of the geotourism network at Serra da Bocaina National Park. REFERENCES AB'SABER, Aziz NacibBrazil:. The nature of domains in Brazil: Landscape Potentials. São Paulo: Studio Editorial. 2003. GUERRA, Antonio Teixeira. Natural resources of Brazil. 3. ed. Rio de Janeiro: IBGE, 1980. IPHAN. National Institute of Historical and Artistic Heritage. International Declaration of Rights to the Land of Memory. [Digne-Les-Bains, France, 1991] Available at: http://portal.iphan.gov.br. Accessed on: 03, January 2014. UNESCO. Convention for the Protection of the World Heritage Cultural and Natural. Paris: UNESCO, 1972.

  14. A 750-year fire history based on lake sediment records in central Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah H. Millspaugh; Cathy Whitlock

    1995-01-01

    A 750-year fire history was reconstructed for the Central Plateau of Yellowstone National Park from the deep-water sediments of five lakes. The charcoal record from a large lake provided a chronology of regional fires. Data from four small lakes were used to study local and extralocal fires. The co-occurrence of abundant charcoal and high magnetic-susceptibility values at the same stratigraphic

  15. Immature mosquitoes of Serra do Mar park, Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Jeronimo; Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maués; De Oliveira, Renata Freitas Nunes; Silva, Julia Dos Santos; Pacheco, Juliana Barreto; Guimarães, Anthony Erico

    2010-09-01

    With the objective of providing knowledge about the natural habitat of mosquito larvae, we conducted a study on the culicid fauna and identified larval habitat types at 3 different locations in the Serra do Mar State Park, Brazil, over the 12 months of 1991. We collected 1,425 larvae belonging to 23 species, of which the most frequent were Culex iridescens, Culex spp., Limatus durhami, and Trichoprosopon pallidiventer. The mosquito larval habitats presenting the greatest densities of specimens were bamboo, bromeliads, rubber boots, and streams. We observed that the culicids used a variety of containers as larval habitats and bred under a diversity of ecological conditions. Most of the habitats were natural, formed by bamboo, bromeliads, streams, and depressions in the ground and in rocks, along with artificial habitats consisting of rubber boots and abandoned metal cans. Seven species occurred preferentially in the internodes of closed bamboo stems, 6 in internodes of open stems, and 4 in bromeliads. PMID:21033051

  16. Mosquito communities in Nova Iguaçu Natural Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Correa, Fabiana F; Gleiser, Raquel M; Leite, Paulo J; Fagundes, Ezequias; Gil-Santana, Hélcio R; Mello, Cecilia F; Gredilha, Rodrigo; Alencar, Jeronimo

    2014-06-01

    ABSTRACT. In order to gather information on the culicid fauna of Nova Iguaçu Municipal Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, adult and immature stages were collected with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light traps, and dippers and suction tubes, respectively. In all, 828 adult and 990 immature specimens were collected belonging to 12 genera. Among the species collected were Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus, Ae. fluviatilis, Ae. scapularis, Haemagogus leucocelaenus, and Psorophora ferox that are considered of potential medical importance. Culicids used a variety of larval habitats and bred under diverse ecological conditions, mostly in natural water containers formed by bamboo, bromeliad, ground depression, rock pool, stream, tree hole, and in artificial containers such as abandoned bathtub, car carcass, abandoned sink, plastic cup, waste tire, and water tank. Species richness and diversity increased from lower to higher forest cover and was highest in sites with highest diversity and high number of larval habitats. PMID:25102590

  17. Vascular plant community composition from the campos rupestres of the Itacolomi State Park, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leyh, Werner; Miazaki, Angela S.; Meira-Neto, João A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Campos rupestres are rare and endangered ecosystems that accommodate a species-rich flora with a high degree of endemism. Here, we make available a dataset from phytosociological surveys carried out in the Itacolomi State Park, Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil. All species in a total of 30 plots of 10 x 10 m from two study sites were sampled. Their cardinality, a combination of cover and abundance, was estimated. Altogether, we registered occurrences from 161 different taxa from 114 genera and 47 families. The families with the most species were Poaceae and Asteraceae, followed by Cyperaceae. Abiotic descriptions, including soil properties such as type, acidity, nutrient or aluminum availability, cation exchange capacity, and saturation of bases, as well as the percentage of rocky outcrops and the mean inclination for each plot, are given. This dataset provides unique insights into the campo rupestre vegetation, its specific environment and the distribution of its diversity. PMID:25829858

  18. Blood meal sources of mosquitoes captured in municipal parks in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Gabriela Cristina; Malafronte, Rosely dos Santos; Miti Izumisawa, Clara; Souza Teixeira, Renildo; Natal, Licia; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate blood meal sources of mosquitoes captured in municipal parks in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, and to identify possible associations between mosquito species and their food preferences. Fourteen species of blood hosts of 510 engorged adult female mosquitoes were identified using PCR assays with a vertebrate-specific primer set based on cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA of the following vertebrates: birds, dogs, cats, rodents, humans, and other primates. Mosquitoes were captured using a manual aspirator, CDC traps in the canopy, CDC traps at ground level, and Shannon traps. With the exception of cats, all other vertebrates were used as hosts by mosquitoes in the parks. Statistical analysis failed to show any trend toward association between most culicid species captured and the sources of blood meals. Instead, they revealed random patterns, indicating that the mosquitoes fed on the most abundant or convenient blood meal sources. Although feeding preferences were observed in two species (birds in the case of Cx. nigripalpus and dogs in the case of Cx. quinquefasciatus), our results highlight the opportunistic feeding habits of the female mosquitoes in this study. PMID:24820567

  19. Acerola pollinators in the savanna of Central Brazil: temporal variations in oil-collecting bee richness

    E-print Network

    Acerola pollinators in the savanna of Central Brazil: temporal variations in oil-collecting bee pollinator visits to this fruit shrub in a Brazilian savanna and identified the pollinator's other food of cultivating Acerola in the savannas of Central Brazil and the importance of natural lands for providing

  20. Disturbance and recovery of the macroflora of a seagrass ( Halodule wrightii Ascherson) meadow in the Abrolhos Marine National Park, Brazil: an experimental evaluation of anchor damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel C Creed; Gilberto M Amado Filho

    1999-01-01

    Anchor damage due to tourist visitation is becoming increasingly intense in the Abrolhos Marine National Park, Brazil, and is probably detrimental to the biota associated with the seagrass beds. In this study the effects of anchor damage on an algal dominated seagrass (Halodule wrightii) bed in the national park were measured and assessed. The mean size of anchor scars was

  1. Nutritional status and growth of indigenous Xavante children, Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to characterize the nutritional status of Xavante Indian children less than 10 years of age in Central Brazil and to evaluate the hypothesis of an association between child nutrition and socioeconomic differentiation in this population. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in July 2006 that included all children under the age of 10 from the Xavante village Pimentel Barbosa in Mato Grosso, Brazil. The data collected included weight, height, and sociodemographic information. Sociodemographic data were used to generate two indices ("income" and "wealth") and to determine the proportion of adults in each household. Descriptive analyses were performed for weight-for-age (W/A), height-for-age (H/A), and weight-for-height (W/H) using the NCHS and the WHO growth references. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using H/A and W/A as a response variables. Results Of a total of 246 children under the age of ten residing in the village, 232 (94.3%) were evaluated. Following the NCHS reference, 5.6% of children under the age of ten presented low W/A and 14.7% presented low H/A. Among children under the age of five, deficit percentages for weight and height were 4.5% and 29.9%, respectively, following the WHO curves. Among children < 2 years of age, H/A index variability was found to be directly related to child's age and inversely related to the proportion of adults in the household. Maternal BMI was positively associated with growth for children from 2 to 4 years of age, explaining 11.5% of the z-score variability for the H/A index. For children 5 years of age and older, the wealth index and maternal height were positively associated with H/A. No significant associations were found using W/A as the dependent variable. Conclusion This study demonstrated that undernutrition, in particular linear growth deficit, is a notable health issue for Xavante children. These findings contrast with the nutritional profile observed among Brazilian children nationally, which is characterized by a sharp decline in child undernutrition in recent decades, even in the poorest regions of the country. This discrepancy calls attention to the persistent health disparities that exist between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Brazil. PMID:22236407

  2. Rhyacian crustal evolution of Brasília Belt's basement in central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Isabela; Emília Della Giustina, Maria; Oliveira, Claudinei

    2015-04-01

    The Brasília Belt, in central Brazil, is the thrust and fold belt developed during Neoproterozoic by convergence of three major cratonic landmasses: the São Francisco craton, the Amazonian craton and the Paranapanema craton. An ensemble of Paleoproterozoic rocks among Brasília Belt is understood as its basement and encompasses tonalites, granodiorites and granites intrusive in volcano-sedimentary sequences. This basement is considered a prolongation of the São Francisco craton underneath the thick sedimentary layers of the belt. U-Pb ages indicate an interval from 2.46 to 2.12 Ga for the igneous crystallization of the granitic basement and xenoliths from volcano-sedimentary rocks are found in the granites. From 2.46 to 2.12 Ga, four stages of magmatism are recognized: (i) the first, older than 2.3 Ga, (ii) the second, between 2.2 and 2.3 Ga, (iii) the third, between 2.16 and 2.18 Ga and (iv) the last between 2.12 and 2.15 Ga. Tonalites and granodiorites are the main products of the three first stages, whilst the fourth has essentially granites. Whole rock chemistry shows rocks from the first three stages evolved through a calc-alkaline trend, by enrichment in potassium. In contrast, geochemistry from the last magmatic stage indicates samples do not belong to a calc-alkaline trend, being plotted in a high potassium series. This happens not necessarily because they evolve through a high-K series, but because these rocks are product of crustal melting, incorporating high contents of LILE. Rocks from the fourth stage are strongly peraluminous and present the most negative ?Nd(t). The three first stages are metaluminous or slightly peraluminous with ?Nd(t) ranging around zero. The first three stages of magmatism are interpreted as developed in volcanic arc system, though it is still not clear whether one or more arcs developed during this period. The last stage of magmatism is attributed to the arc collision against another landmass, triggering crustal fusion and generating granites with S-type characteristics. Two possibilities are considered: the arc developed in the western margin of São Francisco craton during the convergence of another landmass or it started as an island arc and collided against the craton. This Rhyacian orogeny seen in Brazil is coeval with continental agglutination during the transition Paleo-Mesoproterozoic described in other parts of the world, and refered to as a supercontinent pre-Rodinia.

  3. Mapping Soil Erosion Factors and Potential Erosion Risk for the National Park "Central Balkan"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, Diliana; Malinov, Ilia

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion is widely recognised environmental problem. The report aims at presenting the main results from assessment and mapping of the factors of sheet water erosion and the potential erosion risk on the territory of National Park "Central Balkan". For this purpose, the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was used for predicting soil loss from erosion. The influence of topography (LS-factor) and soil erodibility (K-factor) was assessed using small-scale topographic and soil maps. Rainfall erosivity (R-factor) was calculated from data of rainfalls with amounts exceeding 9.5 mm from 14 hydro-meteorological stations. The values of the erosion factors (R, K and LS) were presented for the areas of forest, sub-alpine and alpine zones. Using the methods of GIS, maps were plotted presenting the area distribution among the classes of the soil erosion factors and the potential risk in the respective zones. The results can be used for making accurate decisions for soil conservation and sustainable land management in the park.

  4. Biogeographic patterns in below-ground diversity in New York City's Central Park are similar to those observed globally.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Kelly S; Leff, Jonathan W; Barberán, Albert; Bates, Scott Thomas; Betley, Jason; Crowther, Thomas W; Kelly, Eugene F; Oldfield, Emily E; Shaw, E Ashley; Steenbock, Christopher; Bradford, Mark A; Wall, Diana H; Fierer, Noah

    2014-11-22

    Soil biota play key roles in the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, however, compared to our knowledge of above-ground plant and animal diversity, the biodiversity found in soils remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we present an assessment of soil biodiversity and biogeographic patterns across Central Park in New York City that spanned all three domains of life, demonstrating that even an urban, managed system harbours large amounts of undescribed soil biodiversity. Despite high variability across the Park, below-ground diversity patterns were predictable based on soil characteristics, with prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities exhibiting overlapping biogeographic patterns. Further, Central Park soils harboured nearly as many distinct soil microbial phylotypes and types of soil communities as we found in biomes across the globe (including arctic, tropical and desert soils). This integrated cross-domain investigation highlights that the amount and patterning of novel and uncharacterized diversity at a single urban location matches that observed across natural ecosystems spanning multiple biomes and continents. PMID:25274366

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Post-Top Lighting at Central Park in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.; Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2012-09-30

    A review of five post-top light-emitting diode (LED) pedestrian luminaires installed in New York City's Central Park for possible replacement to the existing metal halide post-top luminaire. This report reviews the energy savings potential and lighting delivered by the LED post-top luminaires.

  6. Geographic distribution of phlebotomine sandfly species (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Central-West Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Paulo Silva de; Andrade, Andrey José de; Sciamarelli, Alan; Raizer, Josué; Menegatti, Jaqueline Aparecida; Hermes, Sandra Cristina Negreli Moreira; Carvalho, Maria do Socorro Laurentino de; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2015-06-01

    This study updates the geographic distributions of phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil and analyses the climatic factors associated with their occurrence. The data were obtained from the entomology services of the state departments of health in Central-West Brazil, scientific collections and a literature review of articles from 1962-2014. Ecological niche models were produced for sandfly species with more than 20 occurrences using the Maxent algorithm and eight climate variables. In all, 2,803 phlebotomine records for 127 species were analysed. Nyssomyia whitmani, Evandromyia lenti and Lutzomyia longipalpis were the species with the greatest number of records and were present in all the biomes in Central-West Brazil. The models, which were produced for 34 species, indicated that the Cerrado areas in the central and western regions of Central-West Brazil were climatically more suitable to sandflies. The variables with the greatest influence on the models were the temperature in the coldest months and the temperature seasonality. The results show that phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil have different geographical distribution patterns and that climate conditions in essentially the entire region favour the occurrence of at least one Leishmania vector species, highlighting the need to maintain or intensify vector control and surveillance strategies. PMID:26018450

  7. Geographic distribution of phlebotomine sandfly species (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Central-West Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Paulo Silva; de Andrade, Andrey José; Sciamarelli, Alan; Raizer, Josué; Menegatti, Jaqueline Aparecida; Hermes, Sandra Cristina Negreli Moreira; de Carvalho, Maria do Socorro Laurentino; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    This study updates the geographic distributions of phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil and analyses the climatic factors associated with their occurrence. The data were obtained from the entomology services of the state departments of health in Central-West Brazil, scientific collections and a literature review of articles from 1962-2014. Ecological niche models were produced for sandfly species with more than 20 occurrences using the Maxent algorithm and eight climate variables. In all, 2,803 phlebotomine records for 127 species were analysed. Nyssomyia whitmani, Evandromyia lenti and Lutzomyia longipalpis were the species with the greatest number of records and were present in all the biomes in Central-West Brazil. The models, which were produced for 34 species, indicated that the Cerrado areas in the central and western regions of Central-West Brazil were climatically more suitable to sandflies. The variables with the greatest influence on the models were the temperature in the coldest months and the temperature seasonality. The results show that phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil have different geographical distribution patterns and that climate conditions in essentially the entire region favour the occurrence of at least one Leishmania vector species, highlighting the need to maintain or intensify vector control and surveillance strategies. PMID:26018450

  8. Enterobacteriaceae in mouth and cloaca of podocnemis expansa and P. Unifilis (testudines: chelonia) populations of national park of araguaia plains, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Paula Benevides; de Souza, Denise Rodrigues; de Sousa, Francisca Maria Pinheiro; de Oliveira, Kleverson Wessel; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio

    2011-01-01

    Shigella flexnerii and Escherichia coli were the most frequent Gram-negative bacteria found in the mouth cavity and cloacae of the turtles Podocnemis expansa and P. unifilis on beaches in the National Park of Araguaia, Brazil. Reptiles are known as Salmonella carriers, despite rarely isolated in these turtles. PMID:24031664

  9. 3D Mapping of Glacially-Sculpted Bedrock in Central Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laderman, L.; Stark, C. P.; Creyts, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    The movement of glaciers and ice sheets through sliding over bedrock depends on the configuration of the subglacial hydrological system. Over time, the glacier erodes the bedrock, which in turn changes water drainage pathways, the overall interaction with the ice, and potentially sliding rates. Drainage can take many forms. At the largest scale, subglacial lakes tens of kilometers in length store water, but the individual pathways are often on the order of meters or smaller. Studies at such a fine scale are only possible by looking at deglaciated beds to infer water drainage. 3D mapping can resolve centimeter scale features and inform studies of the processes that created them. In this survey, Agisoft Photoscan's structure from motion algorithm is used to create a map of Umpire Rock in New York's Central Park from digital photographs. Over 3300 photographs are taken at a separation of roughly half a meter to cover the 1000 square meter survey area. The surface is imaged in separate sections and the resulting point clouds are each aligned with a central section using Photoscan's Align Chunks tool. This process allows additional areas to easily be added to the 3D map. The scale of the final model is accurate to 1mm across the survey area and 3D meshes with a surface resolution of up to 5mm can be created. The distribution of striation directions and sizes on surfaces across the outcrop gives the overall flow direction of the ice and, more locally, illustrates how ice deforms around bedrock features. In addition to striations, we identify cavities and subtle drainage features that are oblique to ice flow. This study demonstrates the relative ease of 3D mapping bedrock outcrops from digital photographs, and indicates the utility of applying this process to more recently deglaciated areas.

  10. The bimodal rift-related Juscelândia volcanosedimentary sequence in central Brazil: Mesoproterozoic extension and Neoproterozoic metamorphism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renato Moraes; Reinhardt A. Fuck; Márcio Martins Pimentel; Simone M. C. L. Gioia; Maria H. B. M. de Hollanda; Richard Armstrong

    2006-01-01

    The Barro Alto Complex and Juscelândia volcanosedimentary sequence are exposed in the central part of the Neoproterozoic Brasília belt of central Brazil. The former is a large (approximately 150km long), boomerang-shaped, mafic-ultramafic, layered complex formed by two different intrusions metamorphosed under granulite facies. These rocks are tectonically overlain by rocks of the Juscelândia volcanosedimentary sequence, represented mainly by biotite-gneiss and

  11. Deep seismic refraction and gravity crustal model and tectonic deformation in Tocantins Province, Central Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesus Berrocal; Yara Marangoni; Nelsí C. de Sá; Reinhardt Fuck; José E. P. Soares; E. Dantas; Fábio Perosi; Celia Fernandes

    2004-01-01

    Interpretation of seismic refraction data in the central sector of Tocantins Province, Central Brazil, has produced a seismic crustal model with well-defined upper, intermediate, and lower crust layers having smooth velocity gradient in each layer. The depths to Moho vary from 32 to 43 km, and mean crustal P velocity varies from 6.3 km\\/s, beneath Goiás magmatic arc on the

  12. Abstract The savannas (cerrado) of south-central Brazil are currently subjected to frequent anthropogenic burning,

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Abstract The savannas (cerrado) of south-central Brazil are currently subjected to frequent, seed- lings of a common Brazilian savanna tree, Keilmeyera coriacea, were grown at 350 ppm and 700 ppm of anthropogenic burning in the Brazilian savannas. Key words Savanna · Cerrado · Fire · Elevated CO2

  13. Diameter increment and growth patterns for individual tree growing in Central Amazon, Brazil

    E-print Network

    Chambers, Jeff

    Diameter increment and growth patterns for individual tree growing in Central Amazon, Brazil, Niro Higuchi* INPA, Tropical Forestry Department, National Institute for Amazon Research, Caixa Postal primarily to: (i) select tree species for logging; (ii) selecting tree species for protection; (iii

  14. The copper–gold and gold deposits of the Neoproterozoic Mara Rosa magmatic arc, central Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudinei G. de Oliveira; Márcio M. Pimentel; Luciana V. de Melo; Reinhardt A. Fuck

    2004-01-01

    Mineral exploration in the Neoproterozoic Goiás Magmatic Arc, central Brazil, dates back to the beginning of the 1970s. The Goiás Magmatic Arc extends for more than 1000 km in the western and northern parts of Goiás, into Tocantins, and disappears under the Phanerozoic Parna??ba Basin. Two main areas of Neoproterozoic juvenile crust, the Arenópolis and the Mara Rosa arcs, are

  15. Future drying of the southern Amazon5 and central Brazil6

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    1 1 2 3 4 Future drying of the southern Amazon5 and central Brazil6 7 8 Brian Cook1 , Ning Zeng1 processes. Firstly, a decline in precipitation of 24% in the29 southern Amazon's dry season reduces soil, further reducing soil moisture. The drying corresponds to a lengthening36 of the dry season by 11 days

  16. Notice From Security & Parking Services to those requiring Shift Parking

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Notice From Security & Parking Services to those requiring Shift Parking Shift parking is issued beyond the shuttle bus hours of operation. Shift parking allows a Lot M, N, O or P transponder holder to park on central campus after 2:30 pm. Shift parking is provided at no extra charge to employees who

  17. Changes in Determinants of Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Popa Mountain Park, Central Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Htun, Naing Zaw; Mizoue, Nobuya; Yoshida, Shigejiro

    2013-02-01

    Implementing effective conservation requires an understanding of factors affecting deforestation and forest degradation. Previous studies have investigated factors affecting deforestation, while few studies have examined the determinants of both of deforestation and forest degradation for more than one period. To address this gap, this study examined factors influencing deforestation and forest degradation during 1989-2000 and 2000-2005 in the Popa Mountain Park, Myanmar. We applied multinomial logistic regression (MNL) using land cover maps derived from Landsat images as the dependent variables as well as spatial and biophysical factors as the independent variables. The MNL models revealed influences of the determinants on deforestation and forest degradation changes over time. For example, during 1989-2000, deforestation from closed forest was positively correlated to the distance from the park boundary and was negatively correlated with distance from villages, roads, the park circular road, slope, western aspect and elevation. On the other hand, during 2000-2005, deforestation of closed forest was positively correlated with distance from villages, roads, the park circular road, slope and western aspect, and negatively correlated with distance from the park boundary and elevation. Similar scenarios were observed for the deforestation of open forest and forest degradation of closed forest. The study also found most of the determinants influenced deforestation and forest degradation differently. The changes in determinants of deforestation and forest degradation over time might be attributable to the general decrease in resource availability and to the effect of conservation measures conducted by the park.

  18. visitor parking rice village

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Central Campus Garage visitor parking tennis courts rice village apartments at 2410 shakespeare st visitor parking faculty, staff, student, contract parking Greenbriar Lot West Lot 4 W faculty, staff, student West Lot 2 faculty, staff, student West Lot 3 resident students faculty, staff, student parking SC

  19. Granites and the geodynamic history of the neoproterozoic Bras??lia belt, Central Brazil: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Márcio M Pimentel; Reinhardt A Fuck; Nilson F Botelho

    1999-01-01

    Recent field and geochronological studies have demonstrated the importance of granitic magmatism in the evolution of the Neoproterozoic Bras??lia Belt, in Central Brazil. This is an orogenic belt developed in response to the convergence between the Amazon, São Francisco–Congo and Paraná continental blocks. The presence of Neoproterozoic juvenile arc rocks and syn-collisional peraluminous granites challenged previous intracontinental evolution models for

  20. A Phase I Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Villa West Park in Central Brazos County, Texas

    E-print Network

    Moore, William

    2015-06-08

    An archaeological survey of a 10.592 acre tract, the site of the proposed Villa West Park, was conducted in February 1998 by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) of Bryan, Texas with William E. Moore acting as Principal Investigator under...

  1. Contamination of public parks and squares from Guarulhos (São Paulo State, Brazil ) by Toxocara spp. and Ancylostoma spp.

    PubMed

    Marques, Jacó Pereira; Guimarães, Catarina de Rezende; Boas, Ailton Vilas; Carnaúba, Paulo Usignolo; Moraes, Josué de

    2012-01-01

    The contaminated soil with mammal feces is an important factor of risk to infection with zoonotic diseases. Amongst these zoonoses are visceral larva migrans and cutaneous larva migrans caused by Toxocara spp. and Ancylostoma spp., respectively. The aim of this study was to assess the environmental contamination by Toxocara spp. eggs and hookworms (Ancylostoma spp.) in public parks and squares in the city of Guarulhos, a metropolitan area of São Paulo, São Paulo State, Brazil. Soil samples were collected, between September and December 2010, and examined using the centrifugal flotation technique with sodium dichromate and zinc sulphate as well as the modified Baermann method. Notably, 35 (74.5%) of the 47 districts surveyed in Guarulhos possessed samples contaminated with Toxocara spp. and/or eggs or larvae of Ancylostoma spp. The frequency of Toxocara spp. and Ancylostoma spp. in the samples from public areas was 68.1% and 46.8%, respectively. Overall, the eastern side of Guarulhos is the region with the highest occurrence of causative agents of larva migrans. In all collection sites, the presence of feces from dogs and cats accompanied by their owners and stray animals were observed. Notably, it is important to adopt measures to control dog and cat breeding, to treat infected animals, and provide health education to the population. PMID:22983290

  2. Parks Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Guy

    2013-10-05

    Research your park and convince me it is the best one. Choose your park and find at least 7 GREAT facts !!! Denali National Park Grand Canyon National Park Great Smoky Mountains National Park Mount Rainier National Park Olympic National Park Rocky Mountain National Park Yellowstone National Park Yosemite National Park Zion National Park Zion National Park 2 ...

  3. Pay Parking Permit Parking

    E-print Network

    Buildings Parkings Pay Parking Permit Parking Information(student) Legend Information(security) BusTower Building Richard Bolton Park Halpern Centre . CS e W.A.C . Bennett Library Campus Security Academic #2 Field #3 Field #4Townhouse Complex AQ NAHEENO PARK DISCO VERY RESEARCH PARK RESIDENCES ARTS

  4. Distribution and abundance of four caiman species (Crocodylia: Alligatoridae) in Jaú National Park, Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, G H; Lugli, L

    2001-01-01

    Jaú National Park is a large rain forest reserve that contains small populations of four caiman species. We sampled crocodilian populations during 30 surveys over a period of four years in five study areas. We found the mean abundance of caiman species to be very low (1.0 +/- 0.5 caiman/km of shoreline), independent of habitat type (river, stream or lake) and season. While abundance was almost equal, the species' composition varied in different waterbody and study areas. We analysed the structure similarity of this assemblage. Lake and river habitats were the most similar habitats, and inhabited by at least two species, mainly Caiman crocodilus and Melanosuchus niger. However, those species can also inhabit streams. Streams were the most dissimilar habitats studied and also had two other species: Paleosuchus trigonatus and P. palpebrosus. The structure of these assemblage does not suggest a pattern of species associated and separated by habitat. Trends in species relationships had a negative correlation with species of similar size, C. crocodilus and P. trigonatus, and an apparent complete exclusion of M. niger and P. trigonatus. Microhabitat analysis suggests a slender habitat partitioning. P. trigonatus was absent from river and lake Igapó (flooded forest), but frequent in stream Igapó. This species was the most terrestrial and found in microhabitats similar to C. crocodilus (shallow waters, slow current). Melanosuchus niger inhabits deep, fast moving waters in different study areas. Despite inhabiting the same waterbodies in many surveys, M. niger and C. crocodilus did not share the same microhabitats. Paleosuchus palpebrosus was observed only in running waters and never in stagnant lake habitats. Cluster analysis revealed three survey groups: two constitute a mosaic in floodplains, (a) a cluster with both M. niger and C. crocodilus, and another (b) with only C. crocodilus. A third cluster (c) included more species, and the presence of Paleosuchus species. There was no significant difference among wariness of caimans between disturbed and undisturbed localities. However, there was a clear trend to increase wariness during the course of consecutive surveys at four localities, suggesting that we, more than local inhabitants, had disturbed caimans. The factors that are limiting caiman populations can be independent of human exploitation. Currently in Amazonia, increased the pressure of hunting, habitat loss and habitat alteration, and there is no evidence of widespread recovery of caiman populations. In large reserves as Jaú without many disturbance, most caiman populations can be low density, suggesting that in blackwater environments their recovery from exploitation should be very slow. PMID:12189791

  5. Source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into Central Park Lake, New York City, over a century of deposition.

    PubMed

    Yan, Beizhan; Bopp, Richard F; Abrajano, Teofilo A; Chaky, Damon; Chillrud, Steven N

    2014-05-01

    Relative contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from combustion sources of wood, petroleum, and coal were computed in sediments from Central Park Lake in New York City (NY, USA) by chemical mass balance based on several reliable source indicators. These indicators are the ratio of retene to the sum of retene and chrysene, the ratio of 1,7-dimethylphenanthrene (DMP) to 1,7-DMP and 2,6-DMP, and the ratio of fluroanthene to fluroanthene and pyrene. The authors found that petroleum combustion-derived PAH fluxes generally followed the historical consumption data of New York State. Coal combustion-derived PAH flux peaked approximately in the late 1910s, remained at a relatively high level over the next 3 decades, then rapidly declined from the 1950s to the 1960s; according to historical New York State coal consumption data, however, there was a 2-peak trend, with peaks around the early 1920s and the mid-1940s. The 1940s peak was not observed in Central Park Lake, most likely because of the well-documented shift from coal to oil as the major residential heating fuel in New York City during the late 1930s. It was widely believed that the decreased PAH concentrations and fluxes in global sediments during the last century resulted from a major energy shift from coal to petroleum. The data, however, show that this shift occurred from 1945 through the 1960s and did not result in an obvious decline. The sharpest decrease, which occurred in the 1970s was not predominantly related to coal usage but rather was the result of multiple factors, including a decline in petroleum usage largely, the introduction of low sulfur-content fuel in New York City, and the introduction of emission-control technologies. PMID:24375577

  6. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHs) INTO CENTRAL PARK LAKE, NEW YORK CITY, OVER A CENTURY OF DEPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Beizhan; Bopp, Richard F.; Abrajano, Teofilo A.; Chaky, Damon; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    Relative contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from combustion sources of wood, petroleum, and coal were computed in sediments from Central Park Lake in New York City (NY, USA) by chemical mass balance based on several reliable source indicators. These indicators are the ratio of retene to the sum of retene and chrysene, the ratio of 1,7-dimethylphenanthrene (DMP) to 1,7-DMP and 2,6-DMP, and the ratio of fluroanthene to fluroanthene and pyrene. The authors found that petroleum combustion–derived PAH fluxes generally followed the historical consumption data of New York State. Coal combustion-derived PAH flux peaked approximately in the late 1910s, remained at a relatively high level over the next 3 decades, then rapidly declined from the 1950s to the 1960s; according to historical New York State coal consumption data, however, there was a 2-peak trend, with peaks around the early 1920s and the mid-1940s. The 1940s peak was not observed in Central Park Lake, most likely because of the well-documented shift from coal to oil as the major residential heating fuel in New York City during the late 1930s. It was widely believed that the decreased PAH concentrations and fluxes in global sediments during the last century resulted from a major energy shift from coal to petroleum. The data, however, show that this shift occurred from 1945 through the 1960s and did not result in an obvious decline. The sharpest decrease, which occurred in the 1970s was not predominantly related to coal usage but rather was the result of multiple factors, including a decline in petroleum usage largely, the introduction of low sulfur–content fuel in New York City, and the introduction of emission-control technologies. PMID:24375577

  7. Parking Information Center Student Parking

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    CP DBH MH CPAC TSU NPS SCPS B E CS PL VA H UH LH ECS KHS TG RH SH RGC GF SHCC TH EC G Parking Information Center Buildings Student Parking Faculty/Staff Parking Parking Permit Machine Park and Pay QUAD FULLERTON ARBORETUM TITAN SPORTS COMPLEX F PARKING E PARKING CPFS PARKING A PARKING A-South PARKING G

  8. Magnetic fabric of Araguainha complex impact structure (Central Brazil): Implications for deformation mechanisms and central uplift formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, E.; Trindade, R. I. F.; Lana, C.; Filho, C. R. Souza; Baratoux, D.; Marangoni, Y. R.; Tohver, E.

    2012-05-01

    The weakening mechanisms involved in the collapse of complex impact craters are controversial. The Araguainha impact crater, in Brazil, exposes a complex structure of 40 km in diameter, and is an excellent object to address this issue. Its core is dominated by granite. In addition to microstructural observations, magnetic studies reveal its internal fabric acquired during the collapse phase. All granite samples exhibit impact-related planar deformation features (PDFs) and planar fractures (PFs), which were overprinted by cataclasis. Cataclastic deformation has evolved from incipient brittle fracturing to the development of discrete shear bands in the center of the structure. Fracture planes are systematically decorated by tiny grains (< 10 ?m) of magnetite and hematite, and the orientation of magnetic lineation and magnetic foliation obtained by the anisotropies of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anhysteretic remanence (AAR) are perfectly coaxial in all studied sites. Therefore, we could track the orientation of deformation features which are decorated by iron oxides using the AMS and AAR. The magnetic fabrics show a regular pattern at the borders of the central peak, with orientations consistent with the fabric of sediments at the crater's inner collar and complex in the center of the structure. Both the cataclastic flow revealed from microstructural observations and the structural pattern of the magnetic anisotropy match the predictions from numerical models of complex impact structures. The widespread occurrence of cataclasis in the central peak, and its orientations revealed by magnetic studies indicate that acoustic fluidization likely operates at all scales, including the mineral scales. The cataclastic flow made possible by acoustic fluidization results in an apparent plastic deformation at the macroscopic scale in the core.

  9. Neutralization of crotaline snake venoms from Central and South America by antivenoms produced in Brazil and Costa Rica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guisella Bogar??n; Josefina Farina Morais; Ivone Kazuko Yamaguchi; Marco Antonio Stephano; José Roberto Marcelino; Amélia Keiko Nishikawa; Rosalvo Guidolin; Gustavo Rojas; Hisako Gondo Higashi; José Mar??a Gutiérrez

    2000-01-01

    A study was performed on the ability of antivenoms, produced in Brazil and Costa Rica, to neutralize lethal, hemorrhagic and coagulant activities of the venoms of 16 species of Central and South American snakes of the subfamily Crotalinae. Neutralization of lethality was studied by two different methods routinely used in the quality control of antivenoms at Instituto Butantan (IB) and

  10. The Aripuana Park and the Polonoroeste Programme. IWGIA Document No. 59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junqueira, Carmen; Mindlin, Betty

    The Polonoroeste program is a World Bank-funded colonization project in central Brazil. This document looks at the indigenous peoples of the Aripuana Park which lies in the path of the development plan. The main objective of the $1.5 billion project is to pave a highway from Cuiaba to Porto Velho. The project consists of the highway, colonization…

  11. Flexural Stresses are a Major Factor to Enhance Intraplate Seismicity in Central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assumpcao, M.; Sacek, V.

    2012-12-01

    Explaining intraplate seismic activity has been a challenging task. Several different models have been proposed combining weak crustal zones and mechanisms of stress concentration. Here we propose that stress concentration due to flexural deformation is one of the most important factors to explain seismicity in Central Brazil, especially the SW-NE oriented seismic zone between the Amazon and the São Francisco cratons, called "Goiás-Tocantins Seismic Zone" (GTSZ). This activity has been usually associated with the TransBrasiliano Lineament (TBL), a major Paleozoic transcontinental feature. However, two observations cast doubt on a direct relationship with the Lineament. First, the seismic activity in the Tocantins province is parallel but not coincident with the TBL; secondly, the continental scale TransBrasiliano Lineament shows no seismic activity further to the NE (beneath the Parnaíba basin), while to the SW, the seismic activity follows an E-W and then N-S direction, not coincident with the TBL. On the other hand, the seismic zone coincides exactly with the trend of high isostatic gravity anomalies (above -20 mGal), which were interpreted as due to high-density mantle rocks beneath a belt of thin crust (roughly beneath the Goiás Magmatic Arc and the Central Massif). Upper crustal stresses due to flexural deformation were calculated with finite-element methods assuming a visco-elastic lithosphere overlying a very soft asthenosphere. The lithospheric load due to the shallow, high-density mantle rocks produces compressional stresses up to 100 MPa in the 200 km wide GTSZ. Regional compressive stresses from plate boundary forces combine with the local flexural stresses to reach seismogenic levels in the GTSZ. Away from the central zone of horizontal compression, extensional stresses (related to the peripheral bulge) balance the regional compression, which explains the aseismic areas. Three other seismic clusters (the N-S belt along the Eastern border of the Amazon craton near Carajás, the cluster of seismicity at the northern border of the Parecis Basin (Porto dos Gauchos Seismic Zone), and the active Pantanal Basin overlying the Paraguay foldbelt) are also located in areas of predominantly positive isostatic anomalies. For this reason we propose that similar compressional flexural stresses enhance the regional, plate-wide stresses up to seismogenic levels in other areas and are an important factor to explain the mid-plate seismicity in Brazil.

  12. Parking Regulations PARKING POLICY STATEMENT

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1 Parking Regulations PARKING POLICY STATEMENT: 1. All employees and students of Rice University who park on campus are required to register their motor vehicles with the Rice Parking Office or park in designated *paid visitor parking facilities. 2. All visitors park in *visitor parking. 3. Only areas marked

  13. Indigenous Burning as Conservation Practice: Neotropical Savanna Recovery amid Agribusiness Deforestation in Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Welch, James R.; Brondízio, Eduardo S.; Hetrick, Scott S.; Coimbra, Carlos E. A.

    2013-01-01

    International efforts to address climate change by reducing tropical deforestation increasingly rely on indigenous reserves as conservation units and indigenous peoples as strategic partners. Considered win-win situations where global conservation measures also contribute to cultural preservation, such alliances also frame indigenous peoples in diverse ecological settings with the responsibility to offset global carbon budgets through fire suppression based on the presumed positive value of non-alteration of tropical landscapes. Anthropogenic fire associated with indigenous ceremonial and collective hunting practices in the Neotropical savannas (cerrado) of Central Brazil is routinely represented in public and scientific conservation discourse as a cause of deforestation and increased CO2 emissions despite a lack of supporting evidence. We evaluate this claim for the Xavante people of Pimentel Barbosa Indigenous Reserve, Brazil. Building upon 23 years of longitudinal interdisciplinary research in the area, we used multi-temporal spatial analyses to compare land cover change under indigenous and agribusiness management over the last four decades (1973–2010) and quantify the contemporary Xavante burning regime contributing to observed patterns based on a four year sample at the end of this sequence (2007–2010). The overall proportion of deforested land remained stable inside the reserve (0.6%) but increased sharply outside (1.5% to 26.0%). Vegetation recovery occurred where reserve boundary adjustments transferred lands previously deforested by agribusiness to indigenous management. Periodic traditional burning by the Xavante had a large spatial distribution but repeated burning in consecutive years was restricted. Our results suggest a need to reassess overreaching conservation narratives about the purported destructiveness of indigenous anthropogenic fire in the cerrado. The real challenge to conservation in the fire-adapted cerrado biome is the long-term sustainability of indigenous lands and other tropical conservation islands increasingly subsumed by agribusiness expansion rather than the localized subsistence practices of indigenous and other traditional peoples. PMID:24349045

  14. Car Park 31 Car Park 23

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    Car Park 31 CarPark30 Car Park 1 Car Park 2 Car Park 23 Car Park 20 CarPark19 Car Park 29 Car Park 17 Car Park 16 Car Park 3 CarPark35 CarPark15 Car Park 14 Car Park 9 Car Park 33 CarPark6 CarPark5 Car Park 18 Car Park 10 Car Park 7 CaCa 8rkCCCCC PaPa kkCaCarrr P Car Park 8 Car Park 8 CarPark 21 Car

  15. Seismic characteristics of central Brazil crust and upper mantle: A deep seismic refraction study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soares, J.E.; Berrocal, J.; Fuck, R.A.; Mooney, W.D.; Ventura, D.B.R.

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of the Brazilian central crust and upper mantle was obtained from the traveltime interpretation of deep seismic refraction data from the Porangatu and Cavalcante lines, each approximately 300 km long. When the lines were deployed, they overlapped by 50 km, forming an E-W transect approximately 530 km long across the Tocantins Province and western Sa??o Francisco Craton. The Tocantins Province formed during the Neoproterozoic when the Sa??o Francisco, the Paranapanema, and the Amazon cratons collided, following the subduction of the former Goia??s ocean basin. Average crustal VP and VP/VS ratios, Moho topography, and lateral discontinuities within crustal layers suggest that the crust beneath central Brazil can be associated with major geological domains recognized at the surface. The Moho is an irregular interface, between 36 and 44 km deep, that shows evidences of first-order tectonic structures. The 8.05 and 8.23 km s-1 P wave velocities identify the upper mantle beneath the Porangatu and Cavalcante lines, respectively. The observed seismic features allow for the identification of (1) the crust has largely felsic composition in the studied region, (2) the absence of the mafic-ultramafic root beneath the Goia??s magmatic arc, and (3) block tectonics in the foreland fold-and-thrust belt of the northern Brasi??lia Belt during the Neoproterozoic. Seismic data also suggested that the Bouguer gravimetric discontinuities are mainly compensated by differences in mass distribution within the lithospheric mantle. Finally, the Goia??s-Tocantins seismic belt can be interpreted as a natural seismic alignment related to the Neoproterozoic mantle domain. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Use of habitats by non-volant small mammals in Cerrado in Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos-Filho, M; Frieiro-Costa, F; Ignácio, Á R A; Silva, M N F

    2012-11-01

    Non-volant small mammals are organisms capable of yielding precise information on richness, abundance and species composition variations related to the use of habitats. The aim of this research was to compare these variations in Cerrado sensu stricto, Palm Forest, Gallery Forest and Rocky Field. From May 1999 to February 2000, we surveyed non-volant small mammals (hence small mammals) in Serra das Araras Ecological Station. We captured 218 individuals and recaptured 62 individuals, belonging to 21 taxa, 13 rodents and eight marsupials, in a total of 13200 trap-nights. Capture success was 1.7%. We observed higher richness of small mammals in forested areas (Gallery Forest and Palm Forest) than in open areas (Rocky Field and Cerrado sensu stricto). The Palm Forest had the highest richness of marsupials, possibly due to the quality of a specific niche. The Rocky Field had the smallest richness, but with very high abundance of few species, mainly Thrichomys pachyurus and Monodelphis domestica. Forest habitats had similar species composition. The open habitats, Cerrado sensu stricto and Rocky Field, had a distinct species composition between them, and also when compared to forested areas. Different species are exclusive or showed preference for specific habitats. The protection of horizontally heterogeneous biomes, such as Cerrado, has a fundamental importance to the maintenance of the regional diversity of the small mammal community of Central Brazil. PMID:23295519

  17. Deposition fluxes of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) above FLONA Tapajós in central Amazon rainforest, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Alves, E. G.; Batalha, S. S. A.; Seco, R.; Tota, J.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Guenther, A. B.; Kim, S.; Smith, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding of VOC deposition is highly uncertain due to a lack of direct flux measurements, but this loss process has been inferred to dominate the removal of VOC from the atmosphere. A recent study on ecosystem scale BVOC fluxes over Amazonian rainforest showed that some oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), which are photochemically produced above the canopy, were depositing measurably into the forest. However, that study was limited to only a few compounds due to the technical difficulties. Very recently (June and July 2014), we deployed a PTR-TOF-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction - Time of Flight - Mass Spectrometer) to apply eddy covariance flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) above the FLONA Tapajós (Floresta Nacional do Tapajós) in the central Amazon rainforest in Brazil. The main goal of this study is to quantify emissions and depositions of a wide range of VOCs and their oxidation products formed above and below canopy. In this presentation, data analysis will be focused on some depositing OVOCs into the forest. From preliminary results for the first 3 days of eddy covariance flux measurement, m/z 31 (CH2OH+), m/z 45 (C2H4OH+), m/z 61 (C2H4O2H+), m/z 71 (C4H6OH+), and m/z 113 (C5H4O3H+) were observed as uniformly depositing compounds during the daytime.

  18. The Mara Rosa Arch in the Tocantins Province: further evidence for Neoproterozoic crustal accretion in Central Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Márcio M. Pimentel; Martin J. Whitehouse; Maria das G. Viana; Reinhardt A. Fuck; Machado Nuno

    1997-01-01

    The Mara Rosa volcano-sedimentary sequence consists of several NNE-trending belts of metavolcanic (metabasalts to metarhyolites) and metasedimentary rocks (micaschists, quartzites, cherts), exposed over large areas of the Tocantins Province, a Neoproterozoic (Brasiliano) orogenic region in the central part of Brazil. The supracrustal belts are separated by terrains dominated by metatonalites and metadiorites and intruded by several post-orogenic granitic and dioritic

  19. Y-STR haplotype diversity and population data for Central Brazil: implications for environmental forensics and paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Vieira, T C; Gigonzac, M A D; Silva, D M; Rodovalho, R G; Santos, G S; da Cruz, A D

    2014-01-01

    The central region of Brazil was colonized by internal migration of individuals of different origins, who contributed to the genetic diversity existing in this population. This study determined the allele frequencies and haplotype diversity of Y-STRs in Goiás State, Central Brazil, and compared the data obtained with a sample of the Brazilian population, consisting of individuals from the five geographical regions of Brazil. A total of 353 males were typed for 12 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) markers. We selected males who had no degree of relatedness, from the five mesoregions of Goiás State. DNA was extracted from blood samples followed by the amplification of the 12 Y-chromosome loci. The products were analyzed to obtain the allele profiles on an ABI3500 automated sequencer using the Gene Mapper software. Allele frequencies and haplotype diversity were estimated by direct counting, and gene diversity for each locus was computed using the Arlequin software. The results are consistent with the history of miscegenation of the population of Central Brazil, in which we observed 321 different haplotypes. The average gene diversity at the 12 loci was 0.645. DYS385b and DYS389I showed the highest (0.704) and lowest (0.520) genetic diversity values, respectively. The FST value between the Brazilian and Goiás populations was 0.00951, showing no statistical significance. The results of this study allowed the establishment of haplotypes found in the forensic samples of Goiás State serving as a reference in the elucidation of criminal cases and paternity tests, as well as population and evolutionary inferences. PMID:24841785

  20. Soil chemical changes under irrigated mango production in the Central São Francisco River Valley, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Heck, R J; Tiessen, H; Salcedo, I H; Santos, M C

    2003-01-01

    Irrigated areas in Brazil's Central São Francisco River Valley have experienced declines in productivity, which may be a reflection of changes in soil chemical properties due to management. This study was conducted to compare the chemical composition of soil solutions and cation exchange complexes in a five-year-old grove of irrigated mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Tommy Atkins) with that of an adjacent clearing in the native caatinga vegetation. A detailed physiographic characterization of the area revealed a subsurface rock layer, which was more undulating than the current land surface, and identified the presence of a very saline and sodic (1045 microS cm(-1), sodium adsorption ratio [SAR] = 5.19) ground water table. While changes in concentrations of Ca, Mg, and K could be attributed to direct management inputs (fertilization and liming with dolomite), increases in Na suggested average annual capillary rise from the ground water table of 28 L m(-2). Accordingly, soil salinity levels appeared to be more dependent on surface elevation than the elevation of the rock layer or sediment thickness. The apparent influence of land surface curvature on water redistribution and the solution chemistry was more pronounced under irrigated mango production. In general, salinity levels had doubled in the mango grove and nearly tripled under the canopies, after only five years of irrigation. Though critical saline or sodic conditions were not encountered, the changes observed indicate a need for more adequate monitoring and management of water and salt inputs despite the excellent water quality of the São Francisco River. PMID:12931897

  1. Spatial variability of soil carbon stock in the Urucu river basin, Central Amazon-Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ceddia, Marcos Bacis; Villela, André Luis Oliveira; Pinheiro, Érika Flávia Machado; Wendroth, Ole

    2015-09-01

    The Amazon Forest plays a major role in C sequestration and release. However, few regional estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in this ecoregion exist. One of the barriers to improve SOC estimates is the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution, which hampers the application of new methods for mapping SOC stock. The aims of this work were: (i) to quantify SOC stock under undisturbed vegetation for the 0-30 and the 0-100cm under Amazon Forest; (ii) to correlate the SOC stock with soil mapping units and relief attributes and (iii) to evaluate three geostatistical techniques to generate maps of SOC stock (ordinary, isotopic and heterotopic cokriging). The study site is located in the Central region of Amazon State, Brazil. The soil survey covered the study site that has an area of 80km(2) and resulted in a 1:10,000 soil map. It consisted of 315 field observations (96 complete soil profiles and 219 boreholes). SOC stock was calculated by summing C stocks by horizon, determined as a product of BD, SOC and the horizon thickness. For each one of the 315 soil observations, relief attributes were derived from a topographic map to understand SOC dynamics. The SOC stocks across 30 and 100cm soil depth were 3.28 and 7.32kg C m(-2), respectively, which is, 34 and 16%, lower than other studies. The SOC stock is higher in soils developed in relief forms exhibiting well-drained soils, which are covered by Upland Dense Tropical Rainforest. Only SOC stock in the upper 100cm exhibited spatial dependence allowing the generation of spatial variability maps based on spatial (co)-regionalization. The CTI was inversely correlated with SOC stock and was the only auxiliary variable feasible to be used in cokriging interpolation. The heterotopic cokriging presented the best performance for mapping SOC stock. PMID:25918893

  2. Estimated Incidence and Genotypes of HIV-1 among Pregnant Women in Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Zelma Bernardes; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araujo; de Lima, Yanna Andressa Ramos; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; de Siqueira Filha, Noemia Teixeira; Turchi, Marilia Dalva; Borges, Walter Costa; Filho, Clidenor Gomes; Filho, Jose Vicente Macedo; Minuzzi, Ana Lucia; Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of HIV-1 infection among pregnant women from central-western Brazil. Design Observational cross-sectional study. Methods A total of 54,139 pregnant women received antenatal HIV screening from a network of public healthcare centers in 2011. The incidence of confirmed HIV-1 infection was estimated using the Serological Testing Algorithms for Recent HIV Seroconversion (STARHS) methodology and BED-capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA). The yearly incidence was calculated, and adjusted incidence rates were estimated. For a subgroup of patients, protease and partial reverse transcriptase regions were retrotranscribed from plasma HIV-1 RNA and sequenced after performing a nested polymerase chain reaction. Results Of the participants, 20% had a pregnancy before the age of 18 and approximately 40% were experiencing their first pregnancy. Of the 54,139 pregnant women screened, 86 had a confirmed HIV-1 diagnosis, yielding an overall prevalence of 1.59 cases per 1000 women (95% CI 1.27–1.96). A higher prevalence was detected in the older age groups, reflecting cumulative exposure to the virus over time. Among the infected pregnant women, 20% were considered recently infected according to the BED-CEIA. The estimated incidence of HIV infection was 0.61 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 0.33-0.89); the corrected incidence was 0.47 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 0.26-0.68). In a subgroup of patients, HIV-1 subtype C (16.7%) was the second most prevalent form after subtype B (66.7%); BF1 recombinants (11.1%) and one case of subtype F1 (5.5%) were also detected. Conclusion This study highlights the potential for deriving incidence estimates from a large antenatal screening program for HIV. The rate of recent HIV-1 infection among women in their early reproductive years is a public health warning to implement preventive measures. PMID:24223904

  3. PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Student Parking

    E-print Network

    Hofmann, Hans A.

    PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Student Parking 12/13 PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES #12;Student ParkingStudent Parking at a rate of $10/month by the PTS main office upon receipt of a letter. Alternative parking is provided for "D"permit holders unable to locate a space in the area preferred

  4. PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Student Parking

    E-print Network

    Johnston, Daniel

    PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Student Parking 13/14 PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES #12;Student ParkingStudent Parking at a rate of $10/month by the PTS main office upon receipt of a letter. Alternative parking is provided for "D"permit holders unable to locate a space in the area preferred

  5. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in central Brazil. A study of 1,211 individuals born to infected mothers

    PubMed Central

    Luquetti, Alejandro O; Tavares, Suelene Brito do Nascimento; Siriano, Liliane da Rocha; de Oliveira, Rozângela Amaral; Campos, Dayse Elizabeth; de Morais, Cicilio Alves; de Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi during pregnancy is estimated to occur in less than 20% of infected mothers; however, the etiopathogenesis is not completely understood. The Centre for Studies on Chagas Disease provides confirmation of T. cruzi infection for individuals living in central Brazil. In this retrospective hospital-based study, all requests for diagnosis of T. cruzi infection in individuals less than 21 years old from 1994-2014 were searched. We end with 1,211 individuals and their respective infected mothers. Congenital transmission of infection was confirmed in 24 individuals (2%) in central Brazil, an area where the main T. cruzi lineage circulating in humans is TcII. This low prevalence of congenital Chagas disease is discussed in relation to recent findings in the south region of Brazil, where TcV is the main lineage and congenital transmission has a higher prevalence (approximately 5%), similar to frequencies reported in Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia. This is the first report to show geographical differences in the rates of congenital transmission of T. cruzi and the relationship between the prevalence of congenital transmission and the type of Tc prevalent in each region. PMID:25993506

  6. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in central Brazil. A study of 1,211 individuals born to infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Luquetti, Alejandro O; Tavares, Suelene Brito do Nascimento; Siriano, Liliane da Rocha; Oliveira, Rozângela Amaral de; Campos, Dayse Elizabeth; Morais, Cicilio Alves de; Oliveira, Enio Chaves de

    2015-05-01

    Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi during pregnancy is estimated to occur in less than 20% of infected mothers; however, the etiopathogenesis is not completely understood. The Centre for Studies on Chagas Disease provides confirmation of T. cruzi infection for individuals living in central Brazil. In this retrospective hospital-based study, all requests for diagnosis of T. cruzi infection in individuals less than 21 years old from 1994-2014 were searched. We end with 1,211 individuals and their respective infected mothers. Congenital transmission of infection was confirmed in 24 individuals (2%) in central Brazil, an area where the main T. cruzi lineage circulating in humans is TcII. This low prevalence of congenital Chagas disease is discussed in relation to recent findings in the south region of Brazil, where TcV is the main lineage and congenital transmission has a higher prevalence (approximately 5%), similar to frequencies reported in Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia. This is the first report to show geographical differences in the rates of congenital transmission of T. cruzi and the relationship between the prevalence of congenital transmission and the type of Tc prevalent in each region. PMID:25993506

  7. Assessment of the BTEX concentrations and reactivity in a confined parking area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Barbara Prestes; de Souza Machado, Gladson; Bauerfeldt, Glauco Favila; Nunes Fortes, Julio Domingos; Martins, Eduardo Monteiro

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the contribution of evaporative emissions from light passenger vehicles to the degradation of the air quality was investigated on the basis of the indoor quantification of the monoaromatic volatile compounds Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene and Xylenes (BTEX), specifically, a confined shopping mall parking area in the northern zone of Rio de Janeiro, a site that represents the reality of the vehicular fleet of the Metropolitan Region of Rio de Janeiro. In order to evaluate the concentration of the BTEX compounds, samples were collected, by an active sampling system using charcoal cartridge as adsorbent. The samples were extracted with organic solvent and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The average results were 54.14 ?g m-3 (benzene), 209.24 ?g m-3 (toluene), 45.87 ?g m-3 (ethylbenzene) and 118.93 ?g m-3 (xylenes). These results are compared with results from the literature of vehicular emissions in confined spaces such as garages and tunnels. Possible correlations with emissions from moving vehicles, obtained from previous studies in a tunnel of large circulation and emissions obtained in other underground parkings, are also investigated. The results suggest different emission sources.

  8. Impacts of animal traffic on the Brazilian Amazon parrots (Amazona species) collection of the Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoological Park, Brazil, 1986-2007.

    PubMed

    Vanstreels, Ralph Eric Thijl; Teixeira, Rodrigo Hidalgo Friciello; Camargo, Luis Carlos; Nunes, Adauto Luis Veloso; Matushima, Eliana Reiko

    2010-01-01

    Eleven species of Amazon parrots (genus Amazona) are known to occur in Brazil, and nest poaching and illegal traffic pose serious conservation threats to these species. When the illegal owners realize these animals are incompatible with their expectations and lifestyle, or when the police arrests traders and owners, these trafficked animals are often considered unfit for release and sent to local zoos and captive breeders. A retrospective survey of animal and necropsy records from 1986 to 2007 was used to evaluate the impacts of animal traffic on the population composition and mortality patterns of Amazon parrots at the Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoological Park, Sorocaba, Brazil. Data were obtained for 374 Amazon parrots of ten Brazilian species, and there was evidence that the studied population could be split into two major groups: a majority belonging to the Amazona aestiva species and a minority belonging to the remaining species. In comparison, the animals of the first group were more frequently admitted from traffic-related origins (98 vs. 75%), had a shorter lifespan (median 301 days vs. 848 days) and a higher mortality within the first year postadmission (54 vs. 37%), were less likely to receive expensive treatments, and were more frequently housed off-exhibit. On an average, parrots were found to have a short postadmission lifespan (median 356 days), with 92.5% of the birds dying within their first five years in captivity. The paper discusses the difficult dilemmas these incoming traffic-related animals pose to zoo management and official anti-traffic policies. PMID:20069544

  9. Prevalence and incidence of dengue virus and antibody placental transfer during late pregnancy in central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal dengue antibodies are considered to play a significant role in dengue pathogenesis among infants. Determining the transplacental specific antibody transfer is invaluable for establishing the optimal vaccination age among infants in endemic regions. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among pairs of maternal and corresponding umbilical cord blood samples in public hospitals. The prevalence and incidence of dengue infection were determined in 505 pairs of pregnant women and neonates during a large outbreak (2009–2010) in central Brazil. The women were interviewed at late pregnancy to assess current or past symptoms of dengue. All parturients and their neonates were screened using Dengue IgG Indirect ELISA (Panbio) to assess previous dengue exposure. A semi-quantitative measurement of the IgG antibody expressed by the index ratio was calculated using optical density (OD) values according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The studied population of parturients and their offspring was also screened for recent dengue infection by the Dengue IgM-capture ELISA (Panbio). Those participants with history of fever and two or more symptoms of dengue at least 10 days before the delivery were also tested for the dengue NS1 antigen using the Dengue Early ELISA (Panbio) and RT-PCR. Results The mean maternal age was 25.8 (SD?=?6.4), and 83.6% of deliveries were between 37 and 41 weeks. Approximately half of the 505 women and neonates were IgG-seropositive, yielding 99.3% co-positive mother-child frequency of antibody transfer (Kappa?=?0.96). The incidence of dengue infection was 2.8% (95% CI 1.4–4.4%) among the women considering 14 IgM-positive results and one DENV2 detected by RT-PCR. The dengue NS1 antigen was undetectable in the matched pairs. Conclusion This study provides critical data on the prevalence of transplacental transferred maternal-infant anti-dengue antibodies and incidence of infection. The design of future vaccine trials should consider diverse regional epidemiological scenarios. PMID:23725365

  10. Magnetic Fabric of the Aquidauana Formation, western border of the Paraná Basin Central Brazil: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raposo, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    The glaciogenic sedimentation (Carboniferous-Permian) on the western border of the Paraná Basin is represented by reddish-brown strata of the Aquidauana Formation. Subsurface data suggest that this Formation is equivalent to the Itararé Group, which contains the most extensive lithological record of Gondwana glaciation in the world. The Aquidauna Formation crops out as an NNE-SSW-oriented elongated belt at the western portion of the Maracaju-Campo Grande Plateau in Mato Grosso do Sul State (Central part of Brazil), and extents to the north up to Mato Grosso and Goias states. This Formation is composed of a variety of types of sandstones, siltites, and mudstones. The magnetic studies were performed on sites of undeformed reddish-brown sandstones, siltites, and mudstones, which crop out mainly in Mato Grosso do Sul State. Magnetic fabrics were determined on oriented cylindrical specimens (2.54 cm x 2.2 cm) using anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Rock-magnetic analyses reveal that both magnetite and hematite are the main magnetic minerals in the majority of the analyzed sites. Regarding the eingenvector orientations, the sites usually gave good results. The analysis at the individual-site scale defines two AMS fabric types. The first type shows Kmin perpendicular to the bedding plane, while Kmax and Kint are scattered within the bedding plane itself. This fabric is usually interpreted as primary (sedimentary-compactional), typical of undeformed sediments and is dominant among the sites. The second type shows good clustering of the AMS principal axes with Kmin still either perpendicular or sub-perpendicular to the bedding plane. This fabric type could be interpreted as a combination of sedimentary-compactional and tectonic contributions if some strain markers or evidence for tectonic deformation had been found in the studied area. On the other hand, the tight Kmax grouping in this fabric type could be explained by the action of currents since they cause Kmax to be aligned sub-parallel to the paleocurrent direction.

  11. Screening for Intellectual Disability Using High-Resolution CMA Technology in a Retrospective Cohort from Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rodrigo Roncato; Pinto, Irene Plaza; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes; de Melo, Aldaires Vieira; da Cruz e Cunha, Damiana Mirian; Cruz, Alex Silva; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Cláudio Carlos; de Melo e Silva, Daniela; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability is a complex, variable, and heterogeneous disorder, representing a disabling condition diagnosed worldwide, and the etiologies are multiple and highly heterogeneous. Microscopic chromosomal abnormalities and well-characterized genetic conditions are the most common causes of intellectual disability. Chromosomal Microarray Analysis analyses have made it possible to identify putatively pathogenic copy number variation that could explain the molecular etiology of intellectual disability. The aim of the current study was to identify possible submicroscopic genomic alterations using a high-density chromosomal microarray in a retrospective cohort of patients with otherwise undiagnosable intellectual disabilities referred by doctors from the public health system in Central Brazil. The CytoScan HD technology was used to detect changes in the genome copy number variation of patients who had intellectual disability and a normal karyotype. The analysis detected 18 CNVs in 60% of patients. Pathogenic CNVs represented about 22%, so it was possible to propose the etiology of intellectual disability for these patients. Likely pathogenic and unknown clinical significance CNVs represented 28% and 50%, respectively. Inherited and de novo CNVs were equally distributed. We report the nature of CNVs in patients from Central Brazil, representing a population not yet screened by microarray technologies. PMID:25061755

  12. Factors associated with the occurrence of Triatoma sordida (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in rural localities of Central-West Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Juliana Chedid Nogared; Duarte, Elisabeth C; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    This study estimates the factors of artificial environments (houses and peridomestic areas) associated with Triatoma sordida occurrence. Manual searches for triatomines were performed in 136 domiciliary units (DUs) in two rural localities of Central-West Brazil. For each DU, 32 structural, 23 biotic and 28 management variables were obtained. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed in order to identify statistically significant variables associated with occurrence of T. sordida in the study areas. A total of 1,057 specimens (99% in peridomiciles, mainly chicken coops) of T. sordida were collected from 63 DUs (infestation: 47%; density: ~8 specimens/DU; crowding: ~17 specimens/infested DU; colonisation: 81%). Only six (0.6%) out of 945 specimens examined were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The final adjusted logistic regression model indicated that the probability of T. sordida occurrence was higher in DU with wooden chicken coops, presence of > 30 animals in wooden corrals, presence of wood piles and presence of food storeroom. The results show the persistence of T. sordida in peridomestic habitats in rural localities of Central-West Brazil. However, the observed low intradomestic colonisation and minimal triatomine infection rates indicate that T. sordida has low potential to sustain high rates of T. cruzi transmission to residents of these localities. PMID:25946242

  13. Soil-vegetation relationships in hyperseasonal cerrado, seasonal cerrado, and wet grassland in Emas National Park (central Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Priscilla Kobayashi; Batalha, Marco Antônio

    2007-11-01

    In South America, the largest savanna region is the Brazilian cerrado, in which there are few areas that become waterlogged in the rainy season. However, we found a small cerrado area in which the soil is poorly drained and becomes waterlogged at the end of the rainy season, allowing the appearance of a hyperseasonal cerrado. We investigated the soil-vegetation relationships in three vegetation forms: hyperseasonal cerrado, seasonal cerrado, and wet grassland. We collected vegetation and soil samples in these three vegetation forms and submitted obtained data to a canonical correspondence analysis. Our results showed a distinction among hyperseasonal cerrado, seasonal cerrado and wet grassland, which presented different floristic compositions and species abundances. The edaphic variables best related to the hyperseasonal and seasonal cerrados were sand, base saturation, pH, and magnesium. The wet grassland was related to higher concentrations of clay, organic matter, aluminium saturation, aluminium, phosphorus, and potassium. Although it is not possible to infer causal relationships based on our results, we hypothesize that the duration of waterlogging in the hyperseasonal cerrado may not be long enough to alter most of its soil characteristics, such as organic matter, phosphorus, and potassium, but may be long enough to alter some, such as pH and base saturation, as the soils under both cerrados were more similar to one another than to the soil under the wet grassland. Since waterlogging may alter soil characteristics and since these characteristics were enough to explain the plant community variation, we may conclude that water excess—permanent or seasonal—is one of the main factors to distinguish the three vegetation forms, which presented different floristic compositions and species abundances.

  14. Naturally occurring clay nanoparticles in Latosols of Brazil central region: detection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominika Dybowska, Agnieszka; Luciene Maltoni, Katia; Piella, Jordi; Najorka, Jens; Puntes, Victor; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2015-04-01

    Stability and reactivity of minerals change as a particle size function, which makes mineral nanoparticles (defined here as <100 nm) fundamentally distinct from the larger size materials. Naturally occurring mineral nanoparticles contribute to many biogeochemical processes, however much remains to be learnt about these materials, their size dependent behavior and environmental significance. Advances in analytical, imaging and spectroscopic techniques made it now possible to study such particles; however we still have limited knowledge of their chemical, structural and morphological identity and reactivity, in particular in soils. The aim of this research was to characterize the naturally occurring nanoparticles in three soils from Brazil central region. The samples were collected in the A horizon, treated with H2O2 to remove organic material, dispersed in ultrasonic bath and wet sieved (53 µm) to remove the sand fraction. The clay fraction was collected by siphoning the supernatant, conditioned in 1000 ml cylinder, according to the Stock's law. This fraction was further processed by re-suspension in water, sonication and repeated centrifugation, to separate the fraction smaller than 100nm. This material, called here the soil "nanofraction", was analyzed using a range of techniques: 1) nanoparticle size/morphology and crystallinity with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM operateing in scanning (HAADF-STEM) and High Resolution (HRTEM) mode), 2) size distribution in water with Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and surface charge estimated from electrophoretic mobility measurements 3) crystal phase and crystallite size with X-ray Diffraction (XRD) 4) Chemical composition by quantitative analysis of elements (e.g., Si, Fe, Al, Ti) and their spatial distribution with HRTEM/EDS elemental mappings. The nanofraction had an average hydrodynamic particle diameter ranging from 83 to 92nm with a low polydispersity index of 0.13-0.17 and was found highly stable in aqueous suspension (no change in average particle size up to several months of storage). Particle surface charge (in water) ranged from -31mV to -34.5mV (pH = 5.7 - 6.2), this reflects the predominantly negative surface charge of kaolinites in soil environment effectively screening the positive charge of Fe oxides. Kaolinites appeared as single crystals (pseudo hexagonal platelets) while Fe oxides occurred mostly as micro-aggregates, with individual particles often not morphologically distinct with particle size <10nm. In addition, several anatase (TiO2) nanoparticles were also found. Both kaolinites and Fe oxides nanoparticles were crystalline, as evidenced from XRD measurements and HRTEM imaging. Distinction between different crystalline forms of Fe oxides (mainly hematite and goethite) was only possible with XRD, which revealed also subtle differences in mineralogical composition of the clay fraction (<2µm) and nanofraction (<100nm). The kaolinite's crystallite size (calculated from XRD data) was found to range 14-17nm in the nanofraction and 26-50nm in the clay fraction. For hematite, it was 13nm in the nanofraction and ranged from 21-30nm in the clay fraction. Such small particles can be expected to play an important role in soil sorption processes with implications on nutrient and contaminant cycling. Identification and understanding of the properties of naturally occurring nanoparticles in soils can therefore help soil scientists to better understand retention/mobilization of nutrients and pollutants in soils.

  15. Occurrence of invertebrate-pathogenic fungi in a Cerrado ecosystem in Central Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological diversity of microorganisms in natural environments is threatened worldwide by human activities. In a protected area of Cerrado, Goiás State, Brazil, naturally occurring invertebrate-pathogenic fungi were isolated from soils, slurries and water samples collected during the dry season in 2...

  16. Comparison of Migrants in Two Rural and an Urban Area of Central Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkening, E. A.

    The goal of this study was to compare the migration and adaptation of settlers in urban areas with settlers in rural areas of Brazil. A sample of 1,255 families, divided into an urban group, a near-urban rural group, and a rural group were interviewed. The migration patterns of the groups were discussed and factors related to migration were…

  17. Ecological distribution of stream macroalgal communities from a drainage basin in the Serra da Canastra National Park, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Necchi-Júnior, O; Branco, L H Z; Branco, C C Z

    2003-11-01

    Twelve stream segments were sampled four times in 1998-1999 (one sampling per season) in the drainage basin of the upper São Francisco River (19 masculine 45'-21 masculine 25'S, 49 masculine 05'-51 masculine 30'W), situated in Serra da Canastra National Park, at altitudes ranging from 1,175 to 1,400 m. The macroalgae survey resulted in 30 species, with a predominance of Cyanophyta (12 species = 40%) and Chlorophyta (11 species = 36.5%) and a lower proportion of Rhodophyta (seven species = 23.5%). Two species, Klebsormidium rivulare (Chlorophyta) and Kyliniella latvica (Rhodophyta), were new records for Brazil. Capsosira sp. and Stigonema sp. (Cyanophyta) and the "Chantransia" stage of Batrachospermum (Rhodophyta) were the most widespread macroalgae, occurring in six sampling sites, whereas 11 species were found at only one site. The proportion of macroalgal morphological types were as follows: mats (33%), free filaments (27%), gelatinous filaments (27%), crusts (7%), tufts (3%), and gelatinous colonies (3%). The flora revealed few species in common (4%-8%) with stream macroalgae from other Brazilian regions. The macroalgal communities proved to have species richness values close to the highest values reported in previous studies. The patterns typical for stream macroalgal communities (patchy distribution and dominance of few species) were also found in this basin. However, the stream variables most influential in macroalgal distribution in this study (rocky substratum, low pH, high COD, water color, and current velocity) were essentially the same that best describe the limnological characteristics of this lotic ecosystem. In addition, this combination of variables differed sharply from results of previous studies in other Brazilian stream ecosystems. PMID:15029374

  18. Seismic Velocities and Thicknesses of Alluvial Deposits along Baker Creek in the Great Basin National Park, East-Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allander, Kip K.; Berger, David L.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how proposed large-scale water withdrawals in Snake Valley may affect the water resources and hydrologic processes in the Great Basin National Park, the National Park Service needs to have a better understanding of the relations between streamflow and groundwater flow through alluvium and karst topography of the Pole Canyon Limestone. Information that is critical to understanding these relations is the thickness of alluvial deposits that overlay the Pole Canyon Limestone. In mid-April 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service used seismic refraction along three profiles adjacent to Baker Creek to further refine understanding of the local geology. Two refractors and three distinct velocity layers were detected along two of the profiles and a single refractor and two distinct velocity layers were detected along a third profile. In the unsaturated alluvium, average velocity was 2,000 feet per second, thickness ranged from about 7 to 20 feet along two profiles downstream of the Narrows, and thickness was at least 100 feet along a single profile upstream of the Narrows. Saturated alluvium was only present downstream of the Narrows - average velocity was 4,400 feet per second, and thickness ranged from about 40 to 110 feet. The third layer probably represented Pole Canyon Limestone or Tertiary granitic rock units with an average velocity of 12,500 feet per second. Along the upstream and middle profiles (profiles 3 and 1, respectively), the depth to top of the third layer ranged from at least 60 to 110 feet below land surface and is most likely the Pole Canyon Limestone. The third layer at the farthest downstream profile (profile 2) may be a Tertiary granitic rock unit. Baker Creek is disconnected from the groundwater system along the upstream profile (profile 3) and streamflow losses infiltrate vertically downward to the Pole Canyon Limestone. Along the downstream and middle profiles (profiles 2 and 1, respectively), the presence of a shallow water table indicates that low permeability Tertiary granitic rock may extend across the Baker Creek Drainage intersecting the Pole Canyon Limestone. The Tertiary granitic rock may be acting as a barrier to groundwater flow within the Pole Canyon Limestone.

  19. Molecular and geographic analyses of vampire bat-transmitted cattle rabies in central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Sato, Go; Mochizuki, Nobuyuki; Hirano, Shinji; Itou, Takuya; Carvalho, Adolorata AB; Albas, Avelino; Santos, Hamilton P; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2008-01-01

    Background Vampire bats are important rabies virus vectors, causing critical problems in both the livestock industry and public health sector in Latin America. In order to assess the epidemiological characteristics of vampire bat-transmitted rabies, the authors conducted phylogenetic and geographical analyses using sequence data of a large number of cattle rabies isolates collected from a wide geographical area in Brazil. Methods Partial nucleoprotein genes of rabies viruses isolated from 666 cattle and 18 vampire bats between 1987 and 2006 were sequenced and used for phylogenetic analysis. The genetic variants were plotted on topographical maps of Brazil. Results In this study, 593 samples consisting of 24 genetic variants were analyzed. Regional localization of variants was observed, with the distribution of several variants found to be delimited by mountain ranges which served as geographic boundaries. The geographical distributions of vampire-bat and cattle isolates that were classified as the identical phylogenetic group were found to overlap with high certainty. Most of the samples analyzed in this study were isolated from adjacent areas linked by rivers. Conclusion This study revealed the existence of several dozen regional variants associated with vampire bats in Brazil, with the distribution patterns of these variants found to be affected by mountain ranges and rivers. These results suggest that epidemiological characteristics of vampire bat-related rabies appear to be associated with the topographical and geographical characteristics of areas where cattle are maintained, and the factors affecting vampire bat ecology. PMID:18983685

  20. Shrimp and conventional UPb age, Sm-Nd isotopic characteristics and tectonic significance of the K-rich Itapuranga suite in Goiás, Central Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MÁRCIO M. PIMENTEL; ELTON L. DANTAS; REINHARDT A. FUCK; RICHARD A. ARMSTRONG

    2003-01-01

    The Itapuranga alkali granite and Uruana quartz syenite are large K-rich EW-elongated intrusions, in the central part of the Neoproterozoic Brasília Belt, central Brazil. They are associated with Pireneus lineaments, which cut the regional NNW-SSE structures of the southern part of the belt. SHRIMP and conventional U-Pb data for the Itapuranga and Uruana intrusions indicate crystallization ages of 624 ±

  1. PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Faculty & Staff ParkingFaculty & Staff Parking

    E-print Network

    Hofmann, Hans A.

    PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Faculty & Staff ParkingFaculty & Staff Parking 12/13 PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES #12;Faculty & Staff ParkingFaculty & Staff Parking at a rate of $12/month by the PTS main is often congested, making commuting and parking difficult. Understanding your parking and transportation

  2. Evolutionary Relationships of the Triatoma matogrossensis Subcomplex, the Endemic Triatoma in Central-Western Brazil, Based on Mitochondrial DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gardim, Sueli; Rocha, Cláudia S.; Almeida, Carlos E.; Takiya, Daniela M.; da Silva, Marco T. A.; Ambrósio, Daniela L.; Cicarelli, Regina M. B.; da Rosa, João A.

    2013-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among species of Triatoma matogrossensis subcomplex ( T. baratai, T. guazu, T. matogrossensis, T. sordida, T. vandae, and T. williami) was addressed by using fragments of cytochrome oxidase I (COI), 16S rDNA (16S), and cytochrome b (Cytb) through Bayesian and parsimony analyses. We did not recover a monophyletic T. matogrossensis subcomplex, and their members were found clustered in three strongly supported clades, as follows: i) T. jurbergi + T. matogrossensis + T. vandae + T. garciabesi + T. sordida; ii) with T. guasayana as the sister group of clade (i); and iii) T. williami + T. guazu, however not closely related to the clade formed by the previously mentioned species. The other two endemic species from Central-Western Brazil, T. baratai and T. costalimai, were not recovered with strong clade support as related to other members of this subcomplex. Results call for a further revision in the classification of the subcomplexes within the genus Triatoma. PMID:24002487

  3. EFFECTS OF LAND USE CHANGES ON THE FUNCTIONING OF SOILS AND WATERSHEDS OF CENTRAL BRAZIL SAVANNAS: PHASE 2, IMPACTS ON NUTRIENT AND CARBON CYCLES AND TRACE GAS EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is funded through an interagency agreement with NASA. The research in this project is contributing to assessments of the effects of land use in central Brazil on: 1) the stocks and cycling rates of carbon and nutrient cycling; 2) the function and structure of soil ...

  4. HIV-1 primary and secondary antiretroviral drug resistance and genetic diversity among pregnant women from central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Pereira, Gisner Alves Souza; Viegas, Angela Alves; Schmaltz, Luiza Emylce Pelá Rosado; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araújo

    2010-03-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in HIV-1 may reduce the efficacy of prophylactic therapy to mother-to-child transmission and impact future treatment options. ARV resistance mutations and HIV-1 phylogenetic diversity in protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes were assessed among 77 pregnant women (35 naïve, 42 treated with ARV) from Goiânia/Goiás, central west Brazil. ARV mutations in PR/RT genes were analyzed against the Stanford Database, PR/RT HIV-1 subtypes were assigned by phylogenetic analysis and env/gag subtypes were identified by heteroduplex mobility analysis (HMA). Naïve patients had accessory mutations in the PR gene [A71T (1/6), L10V (2/6), L10I (3/6)] and in the RT gene [V118I (2/6), V179D (1/6), V106I (1/6), K101Q (1/6), H221Y (1/6)]. Seven patients (16.7%) under ARV presented drug resistance mutations, one of them to three ARV classes. Most isolates (67.5%) were subtype B, 11.7% subtype F1 and 3.9% subtype C. Recombinant B(PR)/F1(RT) viruses represented 10.4% while F1(PR)/B(RT) viruses made up 6.5%. HIV-1 envgag/PRRT genes were identified as 66.2% subtype B, 3.9% subtype C, 6.5% subtype F1 and approximately 25% B and F1 viruses. HIV-1 genetic diversity in envgag/PRRT genes indicates the spread and dissemination of BF1 recombinant viruses among a significant proportion of patients from central west Brazil. Moreover, discovery of HIV-1 secondary resistance among a considerable number of pregnant women under ARV therapy indicates the importance of genotypic testing during pregnancy for optimal prophylactic intervention. J. Med. Virol. 82:351-357, 2010. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20087934

  5. Species richness and floristic composition in four hectares in the Jaú National Park in upland forests in Central Amazonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leandro Valle Ferreira; Ghillean T. Prance

    1998-01-01

    Four hectares were inventoried for all trees with diameter at breast height (DBH) of 10cm or greater in a terra firme forest 200km Northeast of Manaus, Central Amazonia. The number of species varied from 137 to 168, the number of individuals from 639 to 713, total basal area from 32.8 to 40.2 and total biomass from 405 to 560 tons

  6. Intestinal Parasites in Gorillas, Chimpanzees, and Humans at Mondika Research Site, Dzanga-Ndoki National Park, Central African Republic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alecia A. Lilly; Patrick T. Mehlman; Diane Doran

    2002-01-01

    We report prevalences and eggs\\/protozoa per g (EPG; PPG) of helminths and protozoa in gorillas, chimpanzees, agile mangabeys, indigenous Ba'Aka and Bantu, and western researchers at a remote field site in the Central African Republic. We examined fecal samples for eggs, larvae, proglottids, cysts, amoeba, trophozoites, and flagellates. For helminths, strongylates were most prevalent, infecting 82–94% of nonhuman primates (NH)

  7. Use and Diversity of Palm (Arecaceae) Resources in Central Western Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Renata Corrêa; Filgueiras, Tarciso de Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Arecaceae Schultz-Sch. (Palmae Juss.), a member of the monocotyledon group, is considered one of the oldest extant angiosperm families on Earth. This family is highly valuable because of its species diversity, its occurrence in a wide range of habitats, and its status as an integral part of the culture and the family-based economy of many traditional and nontraditional communities. The main objectives of this study were to perform an ethnobotanical study involving these palms and a “Quilombola” (Maroon) community in the municipality of Cavalcante, GO, Brazil. The variables gender, age, and formal schooling had no influence on the number of species recognized and used by the Kalungas. Ethnobotanical studies based on traditional knowledge in addition to use and management of palms are fundamental aspects for planning and appliance of public policies directed to the use of natural resources and improvement of life quality. PMID:24772040

  8. Evaluation of Noise Pollution in Urban Parks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo Henrique Trombetta Zannin; Andressa Maria Coelho Ferreira; Bani Szeremetta

    2006-01-01

    The present study provides an evaluation of noise pollution in six Urban Parks located in the city of Curitiba, Brazil. Equivalent\\u000a noise levels (L\\u000a eq) were measured in 303 points (each point measured during 3 min) spread throughout the Parks. Measured values were confronted\\u000a with local legislation (Law 10625) allowed limits, and the Parks were thus classified as “acoustically polluted

  9. Reproductive parameters of female orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) 1971-2011, a 40-year study at Tanjung Puting National Park, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Galdikas, Biruté Mary; Ashbury, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This study presents reproductive parameter data gathered by direct observation over a 40-year period (1971-2011) of the provisioned free-ranging population of orangutans at Camp Leakey in Tanjung Puting National Park, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Age at first reproduction, interbirth interval (IBI), sex ratio at birth, and infant mortality for 19 female orangutans (11 first-generation wild-born ex-captive mothers and 8 second-generation mothers) are included in this analysis. Age at first reproduction among the first-generation mothers was similar to that among wild orangutans, while second-generation mothers had a significantly earlier age at first reproduction. IBIs were similar among first- and second-generation mothers and were significantly shorter than those recorded in studies of wild orangutan populations. There was an expected male-biased sex ratio at birth and a slightly higher than expected rate of infant mortality when compared to wild populations. Infant mortality was primarily seen among second-generation mothers who gave birth before the age of 12, and among first births of some first-generation mothers. These results lend support to the ecological energetics hypothesis, which predicts that increased diet quality leads to a faster rate of reproduction. PMID:23053615

  10. Habitat suitability mapping of Anopheles darlingi in the surroundings of the Manso hydropower plant reservoir, Mato Grosso, Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Zeilhofer, Peter; Santos, Emerson Soares dos; Ribeiro, Ana LM; Miyazaki, Rosina D; Santos, Marina Atanaka dos

    2007-01-01

    Background Hydropower plants provide more than 78 % of Brazil's electricity generation, but the country's reservoirs are potential new habitats for main vectors of malaria. In a case study in the surroundings of the Manso hydropower plant in Mato Grosso state, Central Brazil, habitat suitability of Anopheles darlingi was studied. Habitat profile was characterized by collecting environmental data. Remote sensing and GIS techniques were applied to extract additional spatial layers of land use, distance maps, and relief characteristics for spatial model building. Results Logistic regression analysis and ROC curves indicate significant relationships between the environment and presence of An. darlingi. Probabilities of presence strongly vary as a function of land cover and distance from the lake shoreline. Vector presence was associated with spatial proximity to reservoir and semi-deciduous forests followed by Cerrado woodland. Vector absence was associated with open vegetation formations such as grasslands and agricultural areas. We suppose that non-significant differences of vector incidences between rainy and dry seasons are associated with the availability of anthropogenic breeding habitat of the reservoir throughout the year. Conclusion Satellite image classification and multitemporal shoreline simulations through DEM-based GIS-analyses consist in a valuable tool for spatial modeling of A. darlingi habitats in the studied hydropower reservoir area. Vector presence is significantly increased in forested areas near reservoirs in bays protected from wind and wave action. Construction of new reservoirs under the tropical, sub-humid climatic conditions should therefore be accompanied by entomologic studies to predict the risk of malaria epidemics. PMID:17343728

  11. Molecular phylogeny of Neotropical bioluminescent beetles (Coleoptera: Elateroidea) in southern and central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Amaral, D T; Arnoldi, F G C; Rosa, S P; Viviani, V R

    2014-08-01

    Bioluminescence in beetles is found mainly in the Elateroidea superfamily (Elateridae, Lampyridae and Phengodidae). The Neotropical region accounts for the richest diversity of bioluminescent species in the world with about 500 described species, most occurring in the Amazon, Atlantic rainforest and Cerrado (savanna) ecosystems in Brazil. The origin and evolution of bioluminescence, as well as the taxonomic status of several Neotropical taxa in these families remains unclear. In order to contribute to a better understanding of the phylogeny and evolution of bioluminescent Elateroidea we sequenced and analyzed sequences of mitochondrial NADH2 and the nuclear 28S genes and of the cloned luciferase sequences of Brazilian species belonging to the following genera: (Lampyridae) Macrolampis, Photuris, Amydetes, Bicellonycha, Aspisoma, Lucidota, Cratomorphus; (Elateridae) Conoderus, Pyrophorus, Hapsodrilus, Pyrearinus, Fulgeochlizus; and (Phengodidae) Pseudophengodes, Phrixothrix, Euryopa and Brasilocerus. Our study supports a closer phylogenetic relationship between Elateridae and Phengodidae as other molecular studies, in contrast with previous morphologic and molecular studies that clustered Lampyridae/Phengodidae. Molecular data also supported division of the Phengodinae subfamily into the tribes Phengodini and Mastinocerini. The position of the genus Amydetes supports the status of the Amydetinae as a subfamily. The genus Euryopa is included in the Mastinocerini tribe within the Phengodinae/Phengodidae. PMID:23868199

  12. Sandflies (Diptera, Psychodidae) from forest areas in Botucatu municipality, central western São Paulo State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of the distribution and ecology of sandfly species is essential for epidemiological surveillance and estimation of the transmission risk of Leishmania spp. infection. Findings In the present study, sandflies were captured in native fragmented forest areas in Rubião Júnior district, Botucatu municipality, São Paulo state, Brazil, between September 2001 and January 2005. A minimum of two automatic light traps were installed per night from 6 pm to 8 am, in different months, resulting in approximately 900 collecting hours. During this period, 216 sandfly specimens of sixteen species were captured. Pintomyia monticola and Brumptomyia guimaraesi were the most abundant with 56 specimens (25.93%) captured per species, followed by Pintomyia fischeri 28 (12.96%) and Psathyromyia pascalei 18 (8.33%). Other captured species were Lutzomyia amarali, Sciopemyia sordellii, Psathyromyia aragaoi, Nyssomyia whitmani, Migonemyia migonei, Pintomyia bianchigalatiae, Pintomyia misionensis, Brumptomyia carvalheiroi, Brumptomyia cardosoi, Brumptomyia cunhai, Brumptomyia nitzulescui, Brumptomyia brumpti and Brumptomyia spp. represented by 58 (26.85%) specimens. Conclusions Although less frequently found, the presence of Pintomyia fischeri, Nyssomyia whitmani and Migonemyia migonei, known vectors of Leishmania braziliensis, indicates risk of American cutaneous leishmaniasis occurrence. Moreover, the absence of Lutzomyia longipalpis-the main vector of Leishmania infantum chagasi, which is the agent of American visceral leishmaniasis-suggests that there is no risk of introduction and establishment of this disease in the studied area. PMID:23849624

  13. Fluxes of isoprene and monoterpenes emitted by Tapajos National Forest, eastern central Amazonian rainforest, Santarem-PA, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. G.; Batalha, S. S. A.; Park, J. H.; Seco, R.; Tota, J.; Santana, R. A. S. D.; Guenther, A. B.; Kim, S.; Smith, J. N.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemical cycles. It is known that tropical forests are the biggest source of the dominant BVOCs (i.e. isoprene and monoterpenes) emitted to the atmosphere. Nevertheless, Amazonian rainforest, the world's largest tropical rainforest, has been poorly explored for isoprene and monoterpene emissions. Recently (June and July 2014), we deployed a PTR-TOF-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction - Time of Flight - Mass Spectrometer) to quantify isoprene and monoterpene emissions using the eddy covariance flux method at the FLONA Tapajos (Floresta Nacional do Tapajos; Tapajos National Forest) in the eastern central Amazon rainforest, Santarem-PA, Brazil. The sample inlet and a 3D-sonic anemometer were located above the forest canopy (~65m), and the air was sampled through a long Teflon tube (100m) with high flow rate (40L/min) to the PTR-TOF-MS. From preliminary results for the first 3 days, concentrations and fluxes of m/z 69 (isoprene; C5H8-H+) and m/z 137 (total monoterpenes; C10H16-H+) showed a clear circadian cycle (high during daytime and low at nighttime), suggesting the emissions of these compounds are light and temperature dependent. Our study provides the first PTR-TOF-MS flux observations of isoprene and total monoterpenes at the Flona Tapajos. Moreover, since there are variations on the emissions, when comparing different environments of the huge Amazon basin, these results from eastern central Amazonia will contribute to improving regional and global BVOC emission model estimates.

  14. Paleomagnetism of the Santa Fé Group, central Brazil: Implications for the late Paleozoic apparent polar wander path for South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Daniele; Ernesto, Marcia; Rocha-Campos, Antonio Carlos; Dos Santos, Paulo Roberto

    2009-02-01

    Paleomagnetic and rockmagnetic data are reported for the Floresta Formation (Santa Fé Group) of the Sanfranciscana Basin, central Brazil. This formation represents the Permo-Carboniferous glacial record of the basin and comprises the Brocotó (diamictites and flow diamictites), Brejo do Arroz (red sandstones and shales with dropstones and invertebrate trails), and Lavado (red sandstones) members, which crop out near the cities of Santa Fé de Minas and Canabrava, Minas Gerais State. Both Brejo do Arroz and Lavado members were sampled in the vicinities of the two localities. Alternating field and thermal demagnetizations of 268 samples from 76 sites revealed reversed components of magnetization in all samples in accordance with the Permo-Carboniferous Reversed Superchron. The magnetic carriers are magnetite and hematite with both minerals exhibiting the same magnetization component, suggesting a primary origin for the remanence. We use the high-quality paleomagnetic pole for the Santa Fé Group (330.9°E 65.7°S; N = 60; ?95 = 4.1°; k = 21) in a revised late Carboniferous to early Triassic apparent polar wander path for South America. On the basis of this result it is shown that an early Permian Pangea A-type fit is possible if better determined paleomagnetic poles become available.

  15. A study of weeds as potential inoculum sources for a tomato-infecting begomovirus in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barreto, S S; Hallwass, M; Aquino, O M; Inoue-Nagata, A K

    2013-05-01

    Tomato severe rugose virus (ToSRV) is the most important begomovirus species in Brazilian tomato production. Many weeds are associated with tomato, and some are hosts of begomoviruses. Only one species of weed, Nicandra physaloides, has been found to be infected with ToSRV. In this study, four weed species were investigated for their capacity to be infected by ToSRV and serve as a potential source of inoculum for tomato. Begomoviruses from naturally infected Crotalaria spp., Euphorbia heterophylla, N. physaloides, and Sida spp. were successfully transferred to tomato plants by biolistic inoculation. ToSRV was the major virus transferred to tomato. In contrast, other begomoviruses were transferred to weeds, such as Sida micrantha mosaic virus and Euphorbia yellow mosaic virus. Furthermore, a new strain of Sida micrantha mosaic virus is reported. We also confirmed that Crotalaria spp., E. heterophylla, and Sida spp. are infected with ToSRV but at low viral titers and in mixed infections with weed-infecting begomoviruses. Thus, it was demonstrated that weeds are potential sources of ToSRV for tomato in central Brazil. PMID:23489523

  16. Geology, petrology and geochronology of the layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Porto Nacional area, central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Humberto Alcântara Ferreira; Ferreira Filho, Cesar Fonseca; Pimentel, Márcio Martins; Dantas, Elton Luiz; de Araújo, Sylvia Maria

    2008-11-01

    Large layered intrusions of the Porto Nacional area include two distinctively different groups. Mafic intrusions located west of the Tocantins River (Group 1) follow a tholeiitic (Fenner-trend) fractionation trend characterized by olivine compositions from moderately primitive (Fo 68) to highly fractionated (Fo 07). Zircon fractions of an olivine gabbronorite from a Group 1 intrusion yield a U-Pb concordia age of 526 ± 5 Ma. Highly variable TDM ages and negative ?Nd(530 Ma) values of samples from this Group 1 intrusion indicate crystallization in ca. 530 Ma from a magma highly contaminated with older crustal rocks. The layered intrusions located east of the Tocantins River (Group 2) have a large proportion of ultramafics (mainly wehrlite) and follow an Opx-free crystallization sequence. The compositional variation of olivine (Fo 85-84) and Cpx (En 49-45) of cumulates from Group 2 intrusions indicates moderately primitive compositions and very limited fractionation. Sm-Nd isotopic data for Group 2 intrusions are highly scattered and do not yield a crystallization age. Highly variable TDM ages and negative ?Nd(530 Ma) values suggest that the parental magmas of Group 2 intrusions were heterogeneously contaminated with old crustal material. These two petrologically distinct groups of layered intrusions open new opportunities for exploration for Ni-PGE deposits in central Brazil.

  17. Floristic composition and similarity of 15 hectares in Central Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Kátia Emidio; Martins, Sebastião Venancio; Ribeiro, Carlos Antonio Alvares Soares; Santos, Nerilson Terra; de Azevedo, Celso Paulo; Matos, Francisca Dionizia de Almeida; do Amaral, Ieda Leão

    2011-12-01

    The Amazon region is one of the most diverse areas in the world. Research on high tropical forest diversity brings up relevant contributions to understand the mechanisms that result and support such diversity. In the present study we describe the species composition and diversity of 15 one-ha plots in the Amazonian terra firme dense forest in Brazil, and compare the floristic similarity of these plots with other nine one-ha plots. The 15 plots studied were randomly selected from permanent plots at the Embrapa Experimental site, Amazonas State in 2005. The diversity was analysed by using species richness and Shannon's index, and by applying the Sorensen's index for similarity and unweighted pair-group average (UPGMA) as clustering method. Mantel test was performed to study whether the differences in species composition between sites could be explained by the geographic distance between them. Overall, we identified 8 771 individuals, 264 species and 51 plant families. Most of the species were concentrated in few families and few had large number of individuals. Families presenting the highest species richness were Fabaceae (Faboideae: 22spp., Mimosoideae: 22spp.), Sapotaceae: 22spp., Lecythidaceae: 15 and Lauraceae: 13. Burseraceae had the largest number of individuals with 11.8% of the total. The ten most abundant species were: Protium hebetatum (1 037 individuals), Eschweilera coriacea (471), Licania oblongifolia (310), Pouteria minima (293), Ocotea cernua (258), Scleronema micranthum (197), Eschweilera collina (176), Licania apelata (172), Naucleopsis caloneura (170) and Psidium araca (152), which represented 36.5% of all individuals. Approximately 49% of species had up to ten individuals and 13% appeared only once in all sampled plots, showing a large occurrence of rare species. Our study area is on a forest presenting a high tree species diversity with Shannon's diversity index of 4.49. The dendrogram showed two groups of plots with low similarity between them (less than 0.25), and the closer the plots were one to another, more similar in species composition (Mantel R = 0.3627, p < 0.01). The 15 plots in our study area share more than 50% of their species composition and represent the group of plots that have the shortest distance between each other. Overall, our results highlight the high local and regional heterogeneity of environments in terra firme forests, and the high occurrence of rare species, which should be considered in management and conservation programs in the Amazon rainforest, in order to maintain its structure on the long run. PMID:22208103

  18. Investigation into the Epidemiology of African Swine Fever Virus at the Wildlife - Domestic Interface of the Gorongosa National Park, Central Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Quembo, C J; Jori, F; Heath, L; Pérez-Sánchez, R; Vosloo, W

    2014-12-01

    An epidemiological study of African swine fever (ASF) was conducted between March 2006 and September 2007 in a rural area adjacent to the Gorongosa National park (GNP) located in the Central Mozambique. Domestic pigs and warthogs were sampled to determine the prevalence of antibodies against ASF virus and the salivary antigens of Ornithodoros spp. ticks, while ticks collected from pig pens were tested for the presence of ASFV. In addition, 310 framers were interviewed to gain a better understanding of the pig value chain and potential practices that could impact on the spread of the virus. The sero-prevalence to ASFV was 12.6% on farms and 9.1% in pigs, while it reached 75% in warthogs. Approximately 33% of pigs and 78% of warthogs showed antibodies against salivary antigens of ticks. The differences in sero-prevalence between farms close to the GNP, where there is greater chance for the sylvatic cycle to cause outbreaks, and farms located in the rest of the district, where pig to pig transmission is more likely to occur, were marginally significant. Ornithodoros spp. ticks were found in only 2 of 20 pig pens outside the GNP, and both pens had ticks testing positive for ASFV DNA. Interviews carried out among farmers indicated that biosecurity measures were mostly absent. Herd sizes were small with pigs kept in a free-ranging husbandry system (65%). Only 1.6% of farmers slaughtered on their premises, but 51% acknowledged allowing visitors into their farms to purchase pigs. ASF outbreaks seemed to have a severe economic impact with nearly 36% of farmers ceasing pig farming for at least 1 year after a suspected ASF outbreak. This study provides the first evidence of the existence of a sylvatic cycle in Mozambique and confirms the presence of a permanent source of virus for the domestic pig value chain. PMID:25483914

  19. Geoelectric crustal structures off the SW border of the São Francisco craton, central Brazil, as inferred from a magnetotelluric survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bologna, Maurício S.; Padilha, Antonio L.; Vitorello, Ícaro

    2005-08-01

    A magnetotelluric (MT) survey of the crust beneath sedimentary basins and thrust sheets along the southwestern edge of the São Francisco craton, central Brazil, reveals intricate electrical characteristics that are interpreted in the context of Proterozoic collision tectonics and horizontal transport of allochthonous rock units, emplacement of Cretaceous hypabyssals, lavas and diatremes of ultrapotassic-mafic composition, and occurrence of induced seismicity. The data exhibit strong distortions represented by 3-D induction effects and galvanic disturbances resulting from shallow structures, frequency and site dependence of electrical strike, and inhomogeneous anisotropic layers with smoothly varying phase split, conductance and azimuth of the highly conductive direction. Geoelectrical and orthogonal phase difference directions, 2-D inversion, and forward modelling characterize three distinct subhorizontal sections showing two anisotropic conductors within a highly resistive crust, laterally segmented into unique blocks. The model for the uppermost crust section has E-W geoelectric directions and a 15-30 S anisotropic zone at a depth of approximately 1-2 km along the entire profile. This conducting layer is interpreted to represent a brine-filled fracture layer possibly controlled by the present-day state of crustal stresses, as disclosed from reservoir-triggered quakes. The mid-crust section presents a deeper conducting zone located at depths below 10 km. It is defined by stronger MT responses having phase split directions oscillating from WNW-ESE to E-W beneath sites in the central-western area (Paraná basin and allochthonous cover units) and NNE-SSW in the northeastern region (autochthonous platform units and Sanfranciscana basin). Anisotropy is greater than an order of magnitude in the highly conductive direction, with conductance in the range of 250-400 S. Conjecturally, the source of this anomalous feature would come from interconnected grain-boundary phases and hypersaline fluids, exsolved and precipitated from upwelling Cretaceous magma. In the central-western area, favourable trapping of conductors was constrained along a nearly E-W direction, feasibly associated with relic structures inherited from Brasiliano/Pan African continental collisions. Along the northeast, however, the coincidence with superficial NNE-SSW structural directions suggests a localized direct causal relationship with the trend of extension related to magma emplacement. The lower crust has a highly resistive quasi-1-D section along the entire profile that prevails also at uppermost mantle depths. Thus, whereas the brittle crust would have reconciled subhorizontal strain with fluid percolation related to uplift and magma emplacement, a mechanically coupled and stronger lower crust/upper mantle would have controlled the deep magma generation during Cretaceous distention pulses.

  20. Remote sensing and GIS investigation of glacial features in the region of Devil's Lake State Park, South-Central Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytwyn, Jennifer

    2010-11-01

    This study utilizes Landsat TM, ASTER and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)-derived DEMs in conjunction with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in order to reevaluate previously-published interpretations of glacial landforms in and around Devil's Lake State Park, south-central Wisconsin, USA. Devil's Lake sits in a gorge carved into the southern flank of a doubly-plunging syncline known as the Baraboo Hills through which the Wisconsin or some other river flowed prior to the last ice age. During the last glacial maximum about 18,000 B.P., an outlet glacier of the Laurentide Ice Sheet called the Green Bay Lobe extended southward into south-central Wisconsin and left behind extensive glacial landforms such as moraines, drumlins and eskers. During advance of the Green Bay Lobe into the region, Devil's Lake Gorge was plugged at both ends by glacial deposits and resulted in formation of Devil's Lake. The Wisconsin River, if it originally flowed through Devil's Lake Gorge, found a new course to the east of the Baraboo Hills Syncline. This study utilizes the aforementioned remote sensing data to spatially image the following features: (1) Original extent of the Green Bay Lobe, (2) Moraines and streamlined glacial landforms as indicators of ice-flow directions, and (3) Former path of the old Wisconsin or some other river prior to being rerouted by the Green Bay Lobe. GIS analysis is also performed in order to test published interpretations of the regional glacial history. This study confirms that glacial features observed today are consistent with the former advance of the Green Bay Lobe into the area, formation of glacial Lake Wisconsin, plugging of Devil's Lake Gorge by a moraine to form Devil's Lake, and subsequent glacial retreat leading to the breaching of an ice dam and catastrophic flooding by ~ 14,000 years ago. The large aerial coverage of satellite imagery with resolutions up to 15 m are valuable for reevaluating regional interpretations previously based on local field mapping and aerial photography of limited extent.

  1. OSU PARKING UTILIZATION NEIGHBORHOOD STREET PARKING

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    OSU PARKING UTILIZATION STUDY AND NEIGHBORHOOD STREET PARKING STUDY FALL TERM 2010 FACILITIES SERVICES CAMPUS PLANNING #12;Facilities Services- Campus Planning February, 2011 2010 OSU PARKING .............................................................................................................................3 Parking Permits

  2. National Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This online directory focuses on national parks throughout the country that offer educational opportunities. Where possible, it includes the following information for each: the type of support offered, including educational materials, access to a naturalist or specialists, and classes/workshops; and mailing address and contact information. In addition, a link to the National Park Service's Web site is included.

  3. Park It!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    2010-01-01

    Many artists visit national parks to draw, paint and take photographs of some of the most amazing scenery on earth. Raw nature is one of the greatest inspirations to an artist, and artists can be credited for helping inspire the government to create the National Park System. This article features Thomas Moran (1837-1926), one of the artists who…

  4. Visitor Information Center Student Parking

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Center Buildings Student Parking Faculty/Staff Parking Parking Permit Machine $5 0406 QUAD FULLERTON ARBORETUM SPORTS COMPLEX F PARKING E PARKING CPFS PARKING A PARKING G PARKING S PARKING C PARKING I PARKING/Titan Shops Becker Amphitheater Children's Center Carl's Jr. College Park Corporation Yard Computer Science

  5. A Storm-by-Storm Analysis of Alpine and Regional Precipitation Dynamics at the Mount Hunter Ice Core Site, Denali National Park, Central Alaska Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, P. L.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Winski, D.

    2014-12-01

    In May-June 2013, an NSF-funded team from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire collected two 1000-year ice cores to bedrock from the summit plateau of Mount Hunter in Denali National Park, Alaska (62.940291, -151.087616, 3912 m). The snow accumulation record from these ice cores will provide key insight into late Holocene precipitation variability in central Alaska, and compliment existing precipitation paleorecords from the Mt. Logan and Eclipse ice cores in coastal SE Alaska. However, correct interpretation of the Mt. Hunter accumulation record requires an understanding of the relationships between regional meteorological events and micrometeorological conditions at the Mt. Hunter ice core collection site. Here we analyze a three-month window of snow accumulation and meteorological conditions recorded by an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) at the Mt. Hunter site during the summer of 2013. Snow accumulation events are identified in the Mt. Hunter AWS dataset, and compared on a storm-by-storm basis to AWS data collected from the adjacent Kahiltna glacier 2000 m lower in elevation, and to regional National Weather Service (NWS) station data. We also evaluate the synoptic conditions associated with each Mt. Hunter accumulation event using NWS surface maps, NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis data, and the NOAA HYSPLIT back trajectory model. We categorize each Mt. Hunter accumulation event as pure snow accumulation, drifting, or blowing snow events based on snow accumulation, wind speed and temperature data using the method of Knuth et al (2009). We analyze the frequency and duration of events within each accumulation regime, in addition to the overall contribution of each event to the snowpack. Preliminary findings indicate that a majority of Mt. Hunter accumulation events are of pure accumulation nature (55.5%) whereas drifting (28.6%) and blowing (15.4%) snow events play a secondary role. Our results will characterize the local accumulation dynamics on Mt. Hunter and quantify the relationship between alpine micrometeorological and regional precipitation dynamics, providing key insights into the interpretation of the Mt. Hunter paleoprecipitation record.

  6. Kittlitz's and Marbled Murrelets in Kenai Fjords National Park, South-Central Alaska: At-Sea Distribution, Abundance, and Foraging Habitat, 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arimitsu, M.L.; Piatt, J.F.; Romano, Marc D.; Madison, E.N.; Conaway, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Kittlitz's murrelets (Brachyramphus brevirostris) and marbled murrelets (B. marmoratus) are small diving seabirds and are of management concern because of population declines in coastal Alaska. In 2006-08, we conducted a study in Kenai Fjords National Park, south-central Alaska, to estimate the recent population size of Brachyramphus murrelets, to evaluate productivity based on juvenile to adult ratios during the fledgling season, and to describe and compare their use of marine habitat. We also attempted a telemetry study to examine Kittlitz's murrelet nesting habitat requirements and at-sea movements. We estimated that the Kittlitz's murrelet population was 671 ? 144 birds, and the marbled murrelet population was 5,855 ? 1,163 birds. Kittlitz's murrelets were limited to the heads of three fjords with tidewater glaciers, whereas marbled murrelets were more widely distributed. Population estimates for both species were lower in 2007 than in 2006 and 2008, possibly because of anomalous oceanographic conditions that may have delayed breeding phenology. During late season surveys, we observed few hatch-year marbled murrelets and only a single hatch-year Kittlitz's murrelet over the course of the study. Using radio telemetry, we found a likely Kittlitz's murrelet breeding site on a mountainside bordering one of the fjords. We never observed radio-tagged Kittlitz's murrelets greater than 10 kilometer from their capture sites, suggesting that their foraging range during breeding is narrow. We observed differences in oceanography between fjords, reflecting differences in sill characteristics and orientation relative to oceanic influence. Acoustic biomass, a proxy for zooplankton and small schooling fish, generally decreased with distance from glaciers in Northwestern Lagoon, but was more variable in Aialik Bay where dense forage fish schools moved into glacial areas late in the summer. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), capelin (Mallotus villosus) and Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus) were important forage species for murrelets in Kenai Fjords. Euphausiids also may have been an important forage resource for Kittlitz's murrelets in turbid glacial outflows in shallow waters during daytime. Marbled murrelets generally were more tolerant to a wider range of foraging habitat conditions although they tended to avoid the ice-covered silty waters close to glaciers. In contrast, Kittlitz's murrelets preferred areas where the influence of tidewater glaciers was the greatest and where their distribution was determined largely by prey availability. This work highlights an important link between interannual variability in murrelet counts at sea and mesoscale oceanographic conditions that influence marine productivity and prey distribution.

  7. Information Valet Parking

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Information Directory Valet Parking Visitor Parking Emergency Parking Permit Parking Shuttle Stop Facilities Services 27 24 24A Imaging Services MSI 20 Parking Security33 Imaging Center Nikken Center 22B SeniorHealth Center Cardiovascular Center GCRC Medical Center Visitor Parking VisitorParking 73 Pavilion

  8. VISITOR PARKING MAP Visitor Pay Parking

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    VISITOR PARKING MAP Visitor Pay Parking Metered Parking Metered Motorcycle Parking Metered Visitor COMMUNITY SERVIC E BRANSO N STREET BUSINESS SCHOOL PARKING DECK KENAN CENTER KENAN- FLAGLER SCHOOL GYMNASIUM CARMICHAEL ARENA STUDENT RECREATION CENTER DANIELS STUDENT STORES HOUSE UNDER- GRAD. LIBRARY F. P

  9. Mapping distribution and thickness of supraglacial debris in the Central Karakoram National Park: main features and implications to model glacier meltwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minora, Umberto; Mayer, Christoph; Bocchiola, Daniele; D'Agata, Carlo; Maragno, Davide; Lambrecht, Astrid; Vuillermoz, Elisa; smiraglia, claudio; diolaiuti, guglielmina

    2014-05-01

    Supraglacial debris plays a not negligible role in controlling magnitude and rates of buried ice melt (Østrem, 1959; Mattson et al., 1993). Knowledge on rock debris is essential to model ice melt (and consequently meltwater discharge) upon wide glacierized areas, as melt rates are mainly driven by debris thickness variability. This is particularly important for the Pamir-Himalaya-Karakoram area (PHK), where debris-covered glaciers are frequent (Smiraglia et al., 2007; Scherler et al., 2011) and where melt water from glaciers supports agriculture and hydropower production. By means of remote sensing techniques and field data, supraglacial debris can be detected, and then quantified in area and thickness. Supervised classifications of satellite imagery can be used to map debris on glaciers. They use different algorithms to cluster an image based on its pixel values, and Region Of Interests (ROIs) previously selected by the human operator. This can be used to obtain a supraglacial debris mask by which surface extension can be calculated. Moreover, kinetic surface temperature data derived from satellites (such as ASTER and Landsat), can be used to quantify debris thicknesses (Mihalcea et al., 2008). Ground Control Points (GCPs) are essential to validate the obtained debris thicknesses. We took the Central Karakoram National Park (CKNP) as a representative sample for PHK area. The CKNP is 12,000 km2 wide, with more than 700 glaciers, mostly debris covered (Minora et al., 2013). Among those we find some of the widest glaciers of the World (e.g: Baltoro). To improve the knowledge on these glaciers and to better model their melt and water discharge we proceeded as follows. Firstly we ran a Supervised Maximum Likelihood (SML) classification on 2001 and 2010 Landsat images to detect debris presence and distribution. Secondly we analyzed kinetic surface temperature (from Landsat) to map debris depth. This latter attempt took also advantage from field data of debris thickness and surface rock temperatures acquired in the study area since the ablation season 2004 (see Mihalcea et al., 2006; 2008b). A mean debris thickness of ca. 5.6 cm was found, probably greater than the local "critical value" (sensu Mattson et al., 1993). Moreover, our field data indicate a local critical value of about 5 cm, above which supraglacial debris thickness would lower ice melt rates compared to that of bare ice (Mihalcea et al., 2006). These findings suggest that in the CKNP area the abundant and extensive debris coverage may result in an actual reduction of buried ice melt. Moreover, Minora et al. (2013) reported quite stable conditions of glaciers in the CKNP area in the time window 2001-2011. This glacier behavior is consistent with the largely known "Karakoram Anomaly" (Hewitt, 2005) and requires further investigations. Among other possible important factors driving such a unique glacier trend, debris depth and distribution have to be considered. This work was carried out under the umbrella of the PAPRIKA project funded and managed by EvK2CNR Committee. The authors are also grateful to the SEED project (funded by the Pakistani and Italian Governments and managed by EvK2CNR).

  10. Park Search

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Its never too early to begin planning your summer vacation, especially in the depths of winter; those with cabin fever can get a jump on their outdoor recreation plans at this site, provided by L.L. Bean. Users can search this database of over 1,400 state and national parks, forests, and wildlife refuges by state, region, and/or activities in which they are interested (including winter sports for all-season recreators). Search returns include contact information, an overview of the park/ forest and its highlights, photos, and a list of approved or available activities.

  11. Free Parking David Tarboton

    E-print Network

    Tarboton, David

    Free Parking David Tarboton Room 103 7973172 #12;2008 CH2 WEST STADIUM VILLA CLOSED BNR AG SCI ESLC ENG STL STL STANLAUBPRACTICE FACILITY 1 2 2 BBT 3 3 4 Student Parking Areas BLUE permit holders may park in any Blue or Yellow parking area. YELLOW permit holders may park in any Yellow parking area

  12. SOIL EMISSIONS OF CO2 AND CO IN TROPICAL SAVANNAS OF CENTRAL BRAZIL UNDER DIFFERENT FIRE REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cerrado is a tropical savanna in which herbaceous vegetation (mainly C4 grasses) coexists with trees and shrubs. It covers more than two million square kilometers and accounts for 22% of the total area of Brazil. In general, cerrado soils are old, deep, well drained, well s...

  13. Two new species of Hyphessobrycon (Teleostei: Characidae) from upper rio Tapajós basin on Chapada dos Parecis, central Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tiago Pinto Carvalho; Vinicius Araújo Bertaco

    2006-01-01

    Two new species of Hyphessobrycon are described from the upper rio Tapajós basin, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Hyphessobrycon melanostichos is distinguished from its congeners by the combination of a conspicuous longitudinal broad black band beginning on the posterior margin of orbit and reaching the tip of middle caudal fin rays, a distinct vertically elongate humeral spot, and 16 to 18 branched

  14. Land use effects on water quality in the urban agglomeration of Cuiabá and Várzea Grande, Mato Grosso State, central Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Zeilhofer; Eliana Beatriz Nunes Rondon Lima; Gilson Alberto Rosa Lima

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between spatial patterns of water quality and land occupation in the cities of Cuiabá and Várzea Grande, Mato Grosso state, Brazil, applying Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques and Polynomial Redundancy Analysis. The results show a strong relationship between water quality and population density, urbanization rate and regionalized low water runoff. Higher treatment rates improve oxygenation

  15. APHIDINA ALS HONIGTAUERZEUGER IN GRTEN UND PARKS MITTELEUROPAS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PRODUCERS IN GARDENS AND PARKS OF CENTRAL EUROPE WITH SPECIAL REGARD TO THE BOTANICAL GARDEN OF FREIBURG is directed to plantlice as honeydew producers in " artificial landscapes " (gardens and parks). While the so-called " wood-honeydew " is mainly a product of Lachnidae-Cinarinae, the honeydew in gardens and parks

  16. Motorcycle and Moped Parking Map Moped Parking Only

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    Motorcycle and Moped Parking Map Moped Parking Only Motorcycle and Moped Parking All motorcycles and mopeds are required to have a valid UVa Parking Permit to park in designated motorcycle and/or moped parking spaces. Motorcycles and Mopeds may also park in BLUE parking areas, such as the commuter parking

  17. POLICE, PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION Parking Services

    E-print Network

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    " Staff/Faculty, "G" General, and "DP" Discovery Park (Car and Motorcycle) permits o Select the "Parking Staff Permit - $180.00 o "G" General Permit - $115.00 o "MC" Motorcycle Permit - $93.00 o "DP" Discovery Park lots 3 & 4 ­ $36.00 (Both car and Discovery Park motorcycle permits) · If you currently do

  18. Theodore Roosevelt National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service website contains information on: the park history; park activities such as hiking and camping; and natural history such as the wildlife, geology and paleontology of the park. The kids' section contains coloring pages, a park trivia quiz, reference sections on the wildlife and natural history of the park, and information on Theodore Roosevelt and his involvement in the Badlands. There are also images of the wildlife and scenery of the park.

  19. A Phase I Archaeological Survey of a 20 Acre Tract, The Proposed Krum City Park Project in West Central County, Texas

    E-print Network

    Moore, William

    2015-06-09

    is depicted on the Sanger 7.5' topographic quadrangle dated 1960 and photorevised in 1978. Figure 2 depicts the project area on the Sanger quadrangle, while Figure 3 is a detailed map of the proposed park as prepared by the City of Krum. The current... are found in the project area (Ford and Pauls 1980:Sheet 14 and Sheet 20). These are the Sanger clay, 1 to 3 percent slopes and Sanger clay, 3 to 5 percent slopes (Ford and Pauls 1980:36). The project area, as depicted on the soils map, appears...

  20. Prospect Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Prospect Park (New York, N.Y.)

    While many readers may be aware that trees grow in Brooklyn, few may be cognizant of the fact that, yes, a forest grows in Brooklyn. This urban forest just happens to be in the boroughâ??s own lovely Prospect Park, designed by those giants of landscape architects, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. Often overlooked by some who are primarily concerned with that other large swath of green in the middle of Manhattan, Prospect Park contains a 90-acre meadow, a zoo, a celebrated performing arts festival, and a lake. Visitors to the Prospect Park Alliance website can learn all about these things, and also delve into the parkâ??s history. Those planning a visit may wish to look at the â??General Infoâ? and â??Places To Goâ? sections for a selection of brief descriptions and photographs. For those seeking a historical perspective the â??History & Natureâ? area is delightful. Here visitors can learn about the parkâ??s historical development and creation, and learn more about those individuals responsible for the parkâ??s design and aesthetic appeal. Finally, visitors should look at the online exhibit â??A Glimpse Of Prospect Parkâ? for a bit of visual perspective on the parkâ??s history.

  1. Moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance and high HIV-1 genetic diversity in patients from Mato Grosso State, Central Western Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriana Santarém; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araújo

    2011-08-01

    Few reports have described the molecular characteristics of the AIDS epidemic within the interior regions of Brazil, a country of continental dimensions. To help fill this gap, the prevalence of transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diversity in Mato Grosso State, central western Brazil are reported. Drug-naïve patients (n = 105) were recruited at a reference center in Cuiabá/Mato Grosso State located across the border with Bolivia and considered a southern gate to the Amazon forest. For 92 HIV-1 isolates, the protease and partial reverse transcriptase fragments were amplified by nested-PCR and sequenced. Drug resistance was analyzed by the Calibrated Population Resistance tool and the International AIDS Society-USA database. HIV-1 subtypes were determined by REGA and phylogenetic analyses. Recombinant viruses were analyzed by SIMPLOT. Drug resistance mutations were observed in 5.4%: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations M41L (n = 1), D67N (n?=?1), and K219E (n?=?1), the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation K103N (n?=?1) and the protease inhibitor mutation L90M (n?=?1). Around 20% of the isolates were recombinants: different patterns of B/F1 mosaics (n?=?11), four B/C, one F1/C/B, one F1/C, and one D/F1. Subtype B(PR) B(RT) represented 71.7%, 5.4% were of subtype C(PR) C(RT) and 3.3% were of subtype F1(PR) F1(RT) . A moderate prevalence of transmitted resistance and the co-circulation of subtypes B, F1, C, different recombinants, including the first report of subtype D, were found in Mato Grosso State, far from the epicenter of the epidemic. These results highlight the importance of monitoring transmitted drug resistance and HIV-1 genetic diversity in the interior regions of Brazil. PMID:21678433

  2. HIV type 1 molecular epidemiology in pol and gp41 genes among naive patients from Mato Grosso do Sul State, central western Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Alexsander Augusto; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Francisco, Roberta Barbosa Lopes; de Araújo Stefani, Mariane Martins

    2012-03-01

    Antiretroviral naive patients (n=49) were recruited in central western Brazil (Campo Grande City/Mato Grosso do Sul State, located across the Bolivia and Paraguay borders). HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and env gp41 HR1 fragments were sequenced. Genetic diversity was analyzed by REGA/phylogenetic analyses. Intersubtype recombinants were identified by SimPlot/phylogenetic trees. PR/RT resistance was analyzed by Calibrated Population Resistance/Stanford databases. T-20 resistance in gp41 was assessed by Stanford, Los Alamos, and other sources. Of HIV-1 subtypes 65.3% were B(PR)B(RT), 10.2% were C(PR)C(RT), and 8.2% were F1(PR)F1(RT). Intersubtype recombinants were 16.3%: four B/F1 and four B/C (two were "CRF31_BC-like"). The Pol-RT V75M mutation was detected in two homosexual partners; one patient had the T215S revertant mutation. T-20/gp41 resistance mutations were L44M (n=2) and V38A (n=1). The high percentage of non-B isolates (?35%) highlights the importance of molecular surveillance studies in settings distant from the origin of the epidemic. Our data help elaborate the molecular epidemiological map of HIV-1 in Brazil. PMID:21790471

  3. PARKING MAP // HOLIDAY INN

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    PARKING MAP // BALMORAL YOUNG LANGSIDE SPENCE GOOD ST. MARY ELLICE COLONY MEMORIAL COLONY VAUGHAN CENTRE UNIVERSITY OF WINNIPEG WINNIPEG CLINIC WALKING TRAFFIC ONLY PARKING LOT ENTRANCE ONE WAY PARKING LOT N AVAILABLE PARKING Underground, paid parking is available in the RecPlex. Surrounding surface

  4. Advice & Regulations for parking

    E-print Network

    Davies, Christopher

    Advice & Regulations for parking 2009-2010 C A M P U S PA RK I N G P L A N PARKING ZONES Pay and display, and permit zones are depicted on the Parking Plan overleaf. Westwood has Pay and Display parking of staff, other persons employed on campus, students resident off campus or visitors may park in the Pay

  5. Campsite impact management: A survey of National Park Service backcountry managers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Stubbs, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Though a central purpose for the creation and management of parks, visitation inevitably affects the natural resources of parks. This is particularly true at campsites, where visitation and its effects are concentrated. This paper presents partial results from a survey of National Park Service managers regarding general strategies and specific actions implemented by park managers to address campsite impact problems.

  6. Occurence of larval Culicidae (Diptera) in water retained in Aquascypha hydrophora (Fungus: Stereaceae) in Central Amazônia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R L; Oliveira, A F; Pereira, E S; Hamada, N

    2001-11-01

    The community structure of insects, especially mosquito larvae, in water held in the fungus Aquascypha hydrophora (Berk.) Reid (Stereaceae) is reported. The study was done in the Adolpho Ducke Forest Reserve, 26 km east of Manaus, AM, Brazil, from September 1998 through November 1999. The most abundant entomofauna were immature Culicidae (n = 121) 91.7%, followed by adult Dytiscidae (n = 3) 2.3%, immature Chironomidae (n = 5) 3.8% and immature Tipulidae (n = 3) 2.3%. Culicidae associated with A. hydrophora comprised species of the subfamilies Anophelinae and Culicinae. PMID:11784940

  7. National Environmental Research Parks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

  8. Car Parking and Access Car Parking

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    of vehicles are expected for an event, guidance and advice on producing a car parking management plan the campus at an early stage in the planning process, to check on the location of car parks and pedestrian, as part of such a visit. Where the University has deemed it necessary for a car parking management plan

  9. Effects of the duration of flooding on species richness and floristic composition in three hectares in the Jau´ National Park in floodplain forests in central Amazonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LEANDRO VALLE FERREIRA

    1997-01-01

    Rivers in Central Amazonia show annual water level fluctuations of up to 14m; the flooding period ranges from 50 to 270 days between the rising and falling phases. Differences in duration and type of flood in Amazonian floodplain forests result in a mosaic of habitats which include lakes, grasslands, forests, streams etc. To study the floristic composition, structure, variation on

  10. Does the Privatization of Publicly Owned Infrastructure Implicate the Public Trust Doctrine? Illinois Central and the Chicago Parking Meter Concession Agreement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan Kaplan

    2012-01-01

    During the nineteenth century, legislatures proved “excessively generous” in granting railroad corporations property rights in publicly owned, commercially vital municipal streets and harbors. Jacksonian jurists, suspicious of corporate influence, invoked the public trust doctrine to rescind grants of privilege inconsistent with the public interest. In Illinois Central Railroad Co. v. Illinois, the “lodestar” of the modern doctrine, the Supreme Court

  11. BR-319: Brazil's Manaus-Porto Velho highway and the potential impact of linking the arc of deforestation to central amazonia.

    PubMed

    Fearnside, Philip M; de Alencastro Graça, Paulo Maurício Lima

    2006-11-01

    Brazil's BR-319 Highway linked Manaus, in the state of Amazonas, to Porto Velho, Rondônia, until it became impassable in 1988. Now it is proposed for reconstruction and paving, which would facilitate migration from the "Arc of Deforestation" in the southern part of the Amazon region to new frontiers farther north. The purpose of the highway, which is to facilitate transport to São Paulo of products from factories in the Manaus Free Trade Zone, would be better served by sending the containers by ship to the port of Santos. The lack of a land connection to Manaus currently represents a significant barrier to migration to central and northern Amazonia. Discourse regarding the highway systematically overestimates the highway's benefits and underestimates its impacts. A variety of changes would be needed prior to paving the highway if these potential impacts are to be attenuated. These include zoning, reserve creation, and increased governance in various forms, including deforestation licensing and control programs. More fundamental changes are also needed, especially the abandonment of the long-standing tradition in Brazil of granting squatters' rights to those who invade public land. Organizing Amazonian occupation in such a way that road construction and improvement cease to lead to explosive and uncontrolled deforestation should be a prerequisite for approval of the BR-319 and other road projects for which major impacts are expected. These projects could provide the impetus that is needed to achieve the transition away from appropriation of public land by both small squatters and by grileiros (large-scale illegal claimants). A delay in reconstructing the highway is advisable until appropriate changes can be effected. PMID:16990982

  12. Political Economy of Compensatory Conservation: A Case Study of proposed Omkareshwar National Park Complex, India 

    E-print Network

    Goel, Abhineety

    2013-08-08

    Proposed Omkareshwar National Park Complex (ONPC), is a planned park in Madhya Pradesh (central India) that is being designed as a compensatory conservation plan to overcome the loss of wildlife and forest by the construction and submergence from...

  13. Parking Fees Thefollowingfeesapplyfortherampgarage

    E-print Network

    Portman, Douglas

    Parking Fees Thefollowingfeesapplyfortherampgarage and for all visitor lots: 0-30 Minutes Free 31 or misplaced parking tickets. How to pay for parking Takeyour entry ticket withyouwhen entering the hospital--this will give you the most optionsforpayment. You can pay for parking with cash, check, credit card

  14. University Parking & Transportation Services

    E-print Network

    Portman, Douglas

    Citation Appeals Guidelines University Parking & Transportation Services www.rochester.edu/parking For more information contact University Parking and Transportation Services Medical Center 273.4524 River/regulations · Other cars illegally/improperly parked · Late to appointment/class · Inability to pay the citation

  15. University Parking & Transportation Services

    E-print Network

    Portman, Douglas

    3-D Parking University Parking & Transportation Services Box 621 Rochester, NY 14692 (585) 275.4524 www.rochester.edu/parking If you misplace or lose your lock-box, there will be a replacement fee must drive an unregistered vehicle, call the Parking Office to inform them of the vehicle information

  16. Lane Avenue Parking Garage

    E-print Network

    Jones, Michelle

    Lane Avenue Parking Garage Neil Avenue Footbridge Sisson Hall Parking Lot Getting to campus From Avenue and go east. Continue with directions to Day One or Day Two parking. From the west: Take any major. Continue with directions to Day One or Day Two parking. From the east: Take any major highway to I-70 West

  17. Parking and Traffic Regulations

    E-print Network

    Tufts University

    Parking and Traffic Regulations July 2001 Edition Department of Public Safety Parking and Traffic Services 419 Boston Avenue Medford, MA 02155 (617) 627-3692 parking @tufts.edu Visit http and to operate a motor vehicle on the streets, drive- ways and parking lots of the campus. 4. DEFINITIONS A

  18. PARKING OFFICER Position Information

    E-print Network

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    PARKING OFFICER Position Information Full-time, permanent (probationary) position. Salary Range $2,456 - $3,682 mo. Commensurate with knowledge, skills, and experience. Responsibilities Issue parking citations in parking lots, structures and the core of campus for vehicles in violation of University parking

  19. Parking Services: 2010 2011

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    Regional Map: Parking Services: 2010 ­ 2011 Kent State University Traffic on campus is heavy. There is always competi- tion for parking in the areas closest to campus. If you need to bring your vehicle on campus... Non-visitors must purchase and display a valid parking permit obtained through Parking Services

  20. Oblique map showing maximum extent of 20,000-year-old (Tioga) glaciers, Yosemite National Park, central Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpha, T.R.; Wahrhaftig, Clyde; Huber, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    This map shows the alpine ice field and associated valley glaciers at their maximum extent during the Tioga glaciation. The Tioga glaciation, which peaked about 15,000-20,OOO years ago, was the last major glaciation in the Sierra Nevada. The Tuolumne ice field fed not only the trunk glacier that moved down the Tuolumne River canyon through the present-day Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, but it also overflowed major ridge crests into many adjoining drainage systems. Some of the ice flowed over low passes to augment the flows moving from the Merced basin down through little Yosemite Valley. Tuolumne ice flowed southwest down the Tuolumne River into the Tenaya Lake basin and then down Tenaya Canyon to join the Merced glacier in Yosemite Valley. During the Tioga glaciation, the glacier in Yosemite Valley reached only as far as Bridalveil Meadow, although during a much earlier glaciation, a glacier extended about 10 miles farther down the Merced River to the vicinity of El Portal. Ice of the Tioga glaciation also flowed eastward from the summit region to cascade down the canyons that cut into the eastern escarpment of the Sierra Nevada [see errata, below]. Southeast of the present-day Yosemite Park, glaciers formed in the Mount Lyell region flowed east onto the Mono lowland and southeast and south down the Middle and North Forks of the San Joaquin River. In the southern part of the park, glaciers nearly reached to the present-day site of Wawona along the South Fork of the Merced River. At the time of the maximum extent of the Tioga glaciation, Lake Russell (Pleistocene Mono Lake) had a surface elevation of 6,800 feet, 425 feet higher than the 1980 elevation and 400 feet lower than its maximum level at the end of the Tioga glaciation. Only a few volcanic domes of the Mono Craters existed at the time of the Tioga glaciation. The distribution of vegetation, as suggested by the green overprint, is based on our interpretation. Forests were restricted to lower elevations than present day, but alpine plant species probably thrived where snow was seasonal, much as they occur today. Erratum The branching arrow on the map showing ice flowing from the basin east of Kuna Crest both northeastward around Mount Dana into the Mono Lake drainage and westward to the Tuolumne River is in error. No ice flowed northeastward from this basin through the site of Tioga Pass into the Mono Lake drainage. Although such an interpretation might be possible on the basis oJ the estimated elevation of the ice surface, the field evidence does not support it. A large and persistent boulder train of metamorphic rocks derived from Mount Dana and the mountain (Mount Gibbs) immediately to the south of Mount Dana has been mapped from near the base of Mount Dana westward toward the ice-filled gorge between Pettit Peak and Double Rock (the present Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne), indicating that ice from the west flank of Mount Dana flowed westward down the Tuolumne. In addition, glacial erratics of Cathedral Peak Granodiorite were observed near Tioga Pass (near the head of the erroneous arrow between Mount Dana and Mount Conness). These boulders must have come from the east face of Mount Conness or the mountain south of Mount Conness (White Mountain) and been transported by ice' flowing toward the Tioga Pass area, although the main mass of that ice turned eastward and flowed into the Mono Lake drainage. Tioga Pass was then the site of more-or-less stagnant ice between the Tuolumne drainage and that east of Mount Conness. Both the metamorphic boulder train and the glacial erratics of Cathedral Peak Granodiorite are incompatible with any flow of ice northeastward from the basin east of Kuna Crest into the Mono Lake drainage north of Mount Dana.

  1. Glacier National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of Glacier National Park. Users can access materials on the park's ecology and environment (plants and animals, biodiversity and air quality, geology, and fires), the culture and history of the park, park activities, and publications on naturalist activities. There are also video clips of park wildlife and scenery, a photo gallery, and live webcams. Links are provided to additional information, such as research activities on bear DNA and global climate change.

  2. Fungal Microbiota in Air-Conditioning Installed in Both Adult and Neonatal Intensive Treatment Units and Their Impact in Two University Hospitals of the Central Western Region, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara de Almeida Alves Simões; Diniz Pereira Leite Júnior; Rosane Christine Hahn

    To evaluate fungal microbiota in air-conditioning units installed in intensive care units in two university hospitals in Cuiaba\\u000a city, Mato Grosso, central western region of Brazil, 525 solid environmental samples were collected, 285 from Hospital A and\\u000a 240 from Hospital B. Collections were performed using sterile swabs on air-conditioning unit components: cooling coils, ventilators,\\u000a and filters. Mycelial fungi identification was

  3. Fruit consumption and seed dispersal of Dimorphandra mollis Benth. (Leguminosae) by the lowland tapir in the cerrado of Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bizerril, M X A; Rodrigues, F H G; Hass, A

    2005-08-01

    Fruit phenology observations and consumption of Dimorphandra mollis (Leguminosae) were analyzed during seven months in an area of cerrado stricto sensu. We analysed 81 fecal samples collected at six different places of lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) in central Brazilian cerrado. In addition, from the feces of five tapirs at the Brasília Zoo to which fruit had been offered, seeds were collected and used in germination tests. The results suggest that the tapir is an important fruit consumer and a potential seed disperser of D. mollis. In the field, however, fruit consumption was found to be very low, probably because of both fruit palatability and the low density of frugivores, especially tapirs. The possibility that the original dispersal agents of D. mollis seeds belonged to the South American Pleistocene megafauna is discussed. PMID:16341418

  4. Identification of pathogens and virulence profile of Rhodococcus equi and Escherichia coli strains obtained from sand of parks

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M.C.; Takai, S.; Leite, D.S.; Pinto, J.P.A.N.; Brandão, P.E.; Santarém, V.A.; Listoni, F.J.P.; Da Silva, A.V.; Ribeiro, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of pathogens of viral (Rotavirus, Coronavirus), parasitic (Toxocara spp.) and bacterial (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Rhodococcus equi) origin shed in feces, and the virulence profile of R. equi and E. coli isolates were investigated in 200 samples of sand obtained from 40 parks, located in central region of state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, using different diagnostic methods. From 200 samples analyzed, 23 (11.5%) strains of R. equi were isolated. None of the R. equi isolates showed a virulent (vapA gene) or intermediately virulent (vapB gene) profiles. Sixty-three (31.5%) strains of E. coli were identified. The following genes encoding virulence factors were identified in E. coli: eae, bfp, saa, iucD, papGI, sfa and hly. Phylogenetic classification showed that 63 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B1 (52.4%), A (25.4%) and B2 (22.2%). No E. coli serotype O157:H7 was identified. Eggs of Toxocara sp. were found in three parks and genetic material of bovine Coronavirus was identified in one sample of one park. No Salmonella spp. and Rotavirus isolates were identified in the samples of sand. The presence of R. equi, Toxocara sp, bovine Coronavirus and virulent E. coli isolates in the environment of parks indicates that the sanitary conditions of the sand should be improved in order to reduce the risks of fecal transmission of pathogens of zoonotic potential to humans in these places. PMID:24294244

  5. National Park Service: Tour of Park Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The tour of Park geologic resources includes pages specific to individual National Parks, Monuments, Recreation Areas, Preserves, Seacoasts, Reserves, and Recreation Areas. These pages are indexed by park name, state, or by one of the following topics: basin and range, caves, Colorado Plateau, fossils, glaciers, hot springs, human use, mountain building, oldest rocks, plate tectonics, river systems, sand dunes, shoreline geology, or volcanoes. Organization of each of the pages typically follows a NPS template with categories for park geology, maps, photographs, geologic research, related links, visitor information, multimedia, and "teacher features" (educational resources and links for teaching geology with National Park examples.) Common subjects that are addressed at various park sites include: minerals, rocks, fossils, cave and karst systems, coastlines, glaciers, volcanoes, faults, landforms, landslides, structures, fluvial systems, sediments, soils, stratigraphic relations, processes that form or act on geologic features and their chemical compositions, and the history of the planet and its life forms.

  6. Paleoproterozoic accretionary and collisional processes and the build-up of the Borborema Province (NE Brazil): Geochronological and geochemical evidence from the Central Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Sérgio P.; Lages, Geysson A.; Brasilino, Roberta G.; Miranda, Alan W. A.

    2015-03-01

    Several Brasiliano-Pan-African belts consist of large areas of reworked Paleoproterozoic rocks. Characterization of these rocks is needed to place better controls on Precambrian paleogeographic reconstructions. The Borborema Province, northeastern Brazil, occupies a central position in West Gondwana configuration, and knowledge of its geological evolution is crucial to infer relationships between Paleoproterozoic units in South America and Africa. Here, we report U-Pb ages, major- and trace-elements analyses and Sm-Nd isotopic data for orthogneisses in the eastern portion of Central Domain. The dominant basement units in the study area are banded gneisses of intermediate composition and relatively juvenile character, and migmatitic gneisses of granitic composition with Archean Nd TDM model ages. One sample of the banded gneiss yielded a weighted 207Pb/206Pb age of 2096 ± 23 Ma and an upper intercept age of 2044 ± 27 Ma, which we interpret, respectively, as ages of crystallization and metamorphism. Two large units of migmatitic gneiss in the southern and central parts of the area gave ages of, respectively, 2057 ± 20 Ma and 2055 ± 23 Ma; an orthoamphibolite associated with the latter yielded crystallization age of 2042 ± 11 Ma and metamorphic age of 1996 ± 13 Ma. All these rocks have geochemical signatures typical of subduction zone-related magmas. Combined with evidence provided by previous studies, we suggest that the evolution of the study area starts with island arc construction around 2.2 Ga, leading to an expressive volcanic arc edifice by 2.13-2.10 Ga. By 2.06 Ga, the crust had evolved enough to become intruded by magmas formed at the mantle wedge of the now largely continental magmatic arc, which continued to be intruded by mantle melts until at least 2.04 Ga. An augen gneiss in the northern part of the area, with an age of 2109 ± 15 Ma, and a migmatitic gneiss with a much older age (2183 ± 9 Ma), both of which have geochemical characteristics akin to intraplate magmas, suggest that crustal reworking also took place. The 1981 ± 23 Ma age of a small body of peraluminous felsic gneiss may be related to regional metamorphism and syncollisional magmatism at c. 2.0-1.98 Ga.

  7. Acadia National Park: Teachers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service website contains information on: saving the habitats of peregrine falcons; the water cycle; becoming a junior ranger; and ranger-led school programs, which contain student field activities about the history, biology and geology of the park. Teacher resources include information on a library for educators at the visitor center of the park and teacher guides for preparing to visit the park. The kids' section explains what rangers do, gives tips on leaving no trace in the park, provides a history of Mount Desert Island, and contains an activity to match some park animals to their habitats.

  8. Geology, petrology and geochemistry of the "Americano do Brasil" layered intrusion, central Brazil, and its Ni-Cu sulfide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E Silva, Jonas Mota; Ferreira Filho, Cesar Fonseca; Bühn, Bernhard; Dantas, Elton Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The "Americano do Brasil" Complex (ABC) is part of a cluster of coeval synorogenic mafic-ultramafic intrusions emplaced during the Brasiliano/Pan-African Orogenic Cycle in Brazil. The medium-sized ABC consists of interlayered dunite, peridotite, websterite, and gabbronorite. High Fo values of olivine (up to Fo88) and the crystallization sequence of the ABC (Ol + Chr ? Ol + Opx + Chr ? Cpx + Opx ? Opx + Pl + Cpx ? Opx + Pl + Cpx + Ilm + Mag) suggest crystallization from tholeiitic high-MgO parental magmas. Light rare earth element (REE)-enriched mantle-normalized REE profiles and ?Nd(T) values of +2.4 for cumulate rocks from the ABC suggest a depleted mantle source for the parental magma. The ABC Ni-Cu sulfide deposit (3.1 Mt at 1.12 wt.% Ni and 1.02 wt.% Cu) consists of three distinctively different orebodies (S1, S2, and G2). The S2 orebody, an unusual occurrence of stratiform massive sulfide hosted by dunite and peridotite in the interior of a layered intrusion, results from sulfides accumulated at the transient base of the magma chamber following a new influx of parental magma. The G2 orebody has an irregular and roughly cylindrical shape, consisting mainly of net-textured sulfides. The G2 orebody is hosted by peridotite and pyroxenite and located stratigraphically below the S1 orebody. S2 and G2 orebodies are characterized by low Cu/Cu + Ni ratios (mainly below 0.4). The S1 orebody, hosted by websterite and gabbronorite in the more fractionated sequence of the ABC, is a cluster of several irregular discontinuous orebodies of Ni-Cu disseminated sulfides. The sulfides of the S1 orebody have high Cu/Cu + Ni ratios (mainly between 0.5 and 0.8) and are highly depleted in PGE. The S1 orebody is interpreted to result from a later event of sulfide segregation in the magma chamber, possibly following the event that originated the G2 orebody. The bulk of ?34S values for sulfides of the ABC orebodies and their host rocks fall in the range of 0 ± 2‰. Higher ?34S values (between 3‰ and 5‰) are restricted to pyrite from xenoliths of gneiss located close to the S1 orebody and sulfides from the S1 orebody. Crustal xenoliths and chemical data (lithogeochemistry and sulfur isotope composition) provide evidence of crustal contamination of the igneous rocks hosting the S1 orebody, suggesting that sulfur saturation was induced by contamination with sulfide-bearing crustal rocks. The ABC deposit is an example of Ni-Cu sulfide mineralization hosted by synorogenic mafic-ultramafic intrusions. The S2 orebody is the first documented example of an economic stratiform massive sulfide orebody located within layered intrusions, expanding the opportunities for exploration of Ni-Cu sulfides in orogenic regions worldwide.

  9. Visitor and Contractor Parking Policy

    E-print Network

    Facilities Visitor and Contractor Parking Policy #12;#12;Visitor and Contractor Parking Policy 1 Facilities Visitor and Contractor Parking Policy Contents Page 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 2.6 Sports Centre Visitor Car Parking

  10. Selected Parking Types Resident Parking,Permit Required

    E-print Network

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Selected Parking Types Resident Parking,Permit Required Commuter Parking,Permit Required Metered Parking Lot Night/Weekend Restricted Permit Area 10 Minute Parking,No Permit Required Parkmobile Pay-by-Cell Parking Lot North Campus B Lot Sage Hall Campus-to-Campus Stops A B C ©2013This map replaces previous

  11. Yellowstone Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Thirteen years after devastating forest fires burned over 1.6 million acres in Yellowstone National Park, the scars are still evident. In this simulated natural color ASTER image, burned areas appear gray, in contrast to the dark green of unburned forests. The image covers an area of 60 x 63 km. This image was acquired on July 2, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic decision-makers so as to better life here, while developing the technologies needed to explore the universe and search for life beyond our home planet.

    Size: 60 x 63 km (37.2 x 39.1 miles) Location: 44.7 deg. North lat., 110.7 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: July 2, 2001

  12. DELINEATING KARST RECHARGE AREAS AT ONONDAGA CAVE STATE PARK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onondaga Cave State Park is located in the north central portion of the Ozarks near Leasburg, Missouri. The park is known for two extensive cave systems, Onondaga Cave and Cathedral Cave. Both of these cave systems have active streams (1-2 cfs at baseflow) which have unknown recharge areas. As a man...

  13. Alaska Park Science National Park Service

    E-print Network

    Birkedal, Team Leader for Cultural Resources; Alex Carter, Team Manager for Biological Resources Team; Joy Geiselman, Deputy Chief, Biological Science Office USGS Alaska Science Center; Sue Huse, Natural Resources;Alaska Park Science Connections to Natural and Cultural Resource Studies in Alaska's National Parks

  14. PEABODY PARK TAYLOR GARDEN

    E-print Network

    Saidak, Filip

    FOUST PARK PEABODY PARK TAYLOR GARDEN KAPLAN COMMONS Start- Peabody Park Trail Start Golf Course TOWER VILLAGE MOORE-STRONG SOUTH SPENCER SPRING GARDEN APARTMENTS PRINT SHOP CHEMICAL SAFETY CARMICHEAL BASEBALL SEATING CAMPUS MINISTRIES 1605 SPRING GARDEN 117 MCIVER VISITOR CENTER SOFTBALL FIELD CAMPUS

  15. NATIONAL PARK BOUNDARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Park Service has produced a data base of boundaries for its National Parks. A copy of this data was downloaded from the National Parks Service ftp site by Region 10. These digital boundaries represent the best guess and data that could be collected in a short time....

  16. Name That Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Park Service

    2013-05-15

    In this online interactive, learners are introduced to the basic function of Geographic Information System (GIS) maps in relation to national parks. Recognizable park boundaries are presented and learners are given the option to add layers such as lakes, rivers and visitor centers, until the learner is able to identify the park map from a list of choices.

  17. Parking Procedures GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    Grant, Gregory

    Parking Procedures GUIDELINES: Issued: Date Issued ­ January 9, 2014 Revised: Date Revised ­ June 10, 2014 PURPOSE: To establish guidelines for the regulation of parking on the Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine campus to ensure fair and equitable parking arrangements while

  18. The Neoproterozoic Ceará Group, Ceará Central domain, NE Brazil: Depositional age and provenance of detrital material. New insights from U–Pb and Sm–Nd geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthaud, M. H.; Fuck, R. A.; Dantas, E. L.; Santos, T. J. S.; Caby, R.; Armstrong, R.

    2015-03-01

    From the Archean to the end of the Neoproterozoic the Borborema Province, northeast Brazil went through a complex polycyclic geologic evolution, ending, between 660 and 570 Ma, with the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogeny that led to West Gondwana amalgamation. Evolution of the metasedimentary covers of the Province, from the beginning of their deposition up to their involvement in the Brasiliano/Pan-African collision, is a key element in understanding formation of Gondwana and in attempts in pre-drift correlation between South America and West Africa. One of these covers, the Ceará Group, is exposed in the Ceará Central domain. Aiming to unravel the history of the Ceará Group, we carried out a geochronologic study of representative samples, combining Sm-Nd isotopic data, conventional U-Pb TIMS dating of zircon and U-Pb SHRIMP age determination of detrital zircon grains. Our results show that sedimentation of the Ceará Group started around 750 Ma, following rifting of the Archean/Paleoproterozoic basement, associated with bimodal volcanism. The interlayered basic volcanic rocks, re-crystallized into garnet amphibolites, show a concordant age of 749 ± 5 Ma interpreted as the age of crystallization. About 90% of calculated Sm-Nd TDM model ages of metasedimentary rocks are Paleoproterozoic and more than 50% of the analyzed samples have TDM between 1.95 and 2.4 Ma, with strongly negative ?Nd, consistent with provenance mainly from the Paleoproterozoic basement. Strong contrast between Paleoproterozoic TDM with negative ?Nd and young TDM (Mesoproterozoic) with slightly positive ?Nd is interpreted as a consequence of changes in detritus provenance induced by geomorphologic alterations resulting from tectonic activity during rifting. Ages of detrital zircon grains obtained by SHRIMP U-Pb analyses show three main groups: about 1800 Ma, 1000-1100 Ma and ca. 800 Ma which corresponds to the bimodal magmatism associated, respectively to the Orós-Jaguaribe domain, Cariris Velhos event and Independência Group.

  19. Identity and relationships of the Arboreal Caatinga among other floristic units of seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs) of north-eastern and Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rubens M; Oliveira-Filho, Ary T; Eisenlohr, Pedro V; Queiroz, Luciano P; Cardoso, Domingos B O S; Rodal, Maria J N

    2012-02-01

    The tree species composition of seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTF) in north-eastern and central Brazil is analyzed to address the following hypotheses: (1) variations in species composition are related to both environment (climate and substrate) and spatial proximity; (2) SDTF floristic units may be recognized based on peculiar composition and environment; and (3) the Arboreal Caatinga, a deciduous forest occurring along the hinterland borders of the Caatinga Domain, is one of these units and its flora is more strongly related to the caatinga vegetation than to outlying forests. The study region is framed by the Brazilian coastline, 50th meridian west and 21st parallel south, including the Caatinga Domain and extensions into the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado Domains. Multivariate and geostatistic analyses were performed on a database containing 16,226 occurrence records of 1332 tree species in 187 georeferenced SDTF areas and respective environmental variables. Tree species composition varied significantly with both environmental variables and spatial proximity. Eight SDTF floristic units were recognized in the region, including the Arboreal Caatinga. In terms of species composition, its tree flora showed a stronger link with that of the Cerrado Dry Forest Enclaves. On the other hand, in terms of species frequency across sample areas, the links were stronger with two other units: Rock Outcrops Caatinga and Agreste and Brejo Dry Forests. There is a role for niche-based control of tree species composition across the SDTFs of the region determined primarily by the availability of ground water across time and secondarily by the amount of soil mineral nutrients. Spatial proximity also contributes significantly to the floristic cohesion of SDTF units suggesting a highly dispersal-limited tree flora. These units should be given the status of eco-regions to help driving the conservation policy regarding the protection of their biodiversity. PMID:22423333

  20. Diagenesis of Paleozoic playa-lake and ephemeral-stream deposits from the Pimenta Bueno Formation, Siluro-Devonian (?) of the Parecis Basin, central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, K.; Morad, S.; Al-Aasm, I. S.; De Ros, L. F.

    2011-07-01

    The Parecis Basin is a large intracratonic rift located in central Brazil and filled with Paleozoic carbonate, evaporite and siliciclastic sediments. The occurrence of gas seeps has recently attracted significant exploration interest by the Brazilian petroleum agency and by Petrobras. The continuously cored PB-01-RO well provided the first opportunity to study the depositional environments, diagenetic evolution and hydrocarbon potential of the largely unknown sedimentary successions of the Parecis Basin. The cored lithologies, belonging to the Siluro-Devonian (?) Pimenta Bueno Formation, are interpreted as deposited in playa-lake and ephemeral-stream environments. The deposits display a strong facies control on the diagenetic mineral assemblages and evolution. Diagenetic minerals in the ephemeral-stream deposits include eogenetic hematite and smectitic clay coats and quartz cement, and the mesogenetic process includes precipitation of sulfates (anhydrite and barite) and carbonates (calcite, dolomite and kutnahorite-ankerite-huntite), followed by partial dissolution of these carbonates and sulfates, and of feldspar grains. Telogenetic processes include the precipitation of hematite and kaolinite within secondary pores, and the replacement of anhydrite by gypsum. A second burial phase and mesodiagenesis is indicated by the precipitation of discrete K-feldspar crystals within moldic pores after dissolved feldspars, and by the illitization of etched, telogenetic kaolinite. The playa-lake deposits show early diagenetic dolomitization of lime mud, precipitation of anhydrite nodules and extensive silicification. The anhydrite nodules were replaced by gypsum and chalcedony during telodiagenesis. Potential source rocks are locally represented by organic shales. The fluvial sandstones show fair reservoir quality and limited compaction, as indicated by their intergranular volume, suggesting that the succession has undergone moderate burial. Potential seals for hydrocarbon accumulations are provided by the evaporites and playa-lake mudstones. The presence of an active petroleum system in the basin, as indicated by the gas seeps, suggests a good hydrocarbon exploration potential for the Parecis Basin, gas and stresses the importance of studying the depositional and diagenetic evolution of its sedimentary successions.

  1. National Association for Olmsted Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1980, the National Association for Olmsted Parks (NAOP) is a coalition of various design and preservation professionals concerned with the legacy of landscape work left by noted landscape designer Frederick Law Olmsted Sr. and his colleagues. On their website, visitors can learn about Olmsted's primary works via a master list of design projects by his firm and some profiles of some of his most prominent work, including Central Park and the landscape at the Biltmore Estate. Scholars will want to look through the "Research" area for resources that include a set of suggested links and an extensive bibliography. Visitors will also want to look at the "News and Publications" area for more details about the NAOP's work and their newsletter.

  2. Great Basin National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service site describes the biology of Great Basin's plants and animals; geology and ecology of the Lehman Caves; air quality of the park; and past human activities in the Great Basin such as farming, ranching, and gold mining. There is a list of historical, geological, and archeological dates important to the park and an instructor guide containing activities such as creating a nature notebook and adopting a tree. There is also information on: planning a visit to the park and the Lehman Caves, park projects such as weeding out non-native plants and the reintroduction of Bonneville Cutthroat Trout, and a self-guided geology field trip.

  3. Theme Park Insider

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Niles, Robert.

    As summer enters full swing, more and more people will travel to America's numerous amusement parks and traveling carnivals. Quite a few of these people would do well to take a look at the Theme Park Insider website for reviews of various parks and the best (and worst) attractions at each particular place of amusement before they venture onto the open road. Edited by Robert Niles, the site contains reviews of new amusement park rides, an "Accident Watch" (which documents the latest accidents at each park), and reviews of theme park hotels as well. The site also has a number of discussion boards for visitors to chime in with their own take on a number of topics, such as which rides have the longest rides and general amusement park lore.

  4. Chicago Park District

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-01-01

    The Chicago Park District is one of the largest municipal park systems in the United States, containing over 8,100 acres of green space. All told, the District has 580 parks, including two city conservatories, a number of historic lagoons, and the iconic Clarence Buckingham Memorial Fountain. This website allows visitors the opportunity to learn about the District's mission, history, and long-range planning for existing parks and potential new sites. On the homepage, visitors can use the Find a Park feature to learn about these diverse spaces. Additionally, they can use the I Want To area to learn about park permits, volunteering, and reporting problems within the park system. The Events area is quite a find, as visitors can learn about some of the hundreds of events sponsored each year by the District. Finally, visitors can also use the Doing Business area to learn about the various entrepreneurial activities which are possible via the District.

  5. MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY PARKING REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY PARKING REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES 2012-2013 CONTENTS 1. General Regulations ­ Driving and Parking 10. Handicapped Parking 11. Motorcycle Regulations 12. Reserved Spaces 13. Specific Parking Regulations 14. Parking Violations Penalties, Fines and Fees 15. Appeals of Parking

  6. PARKING LOT 164 PARKING LOT 114

    E-print Network

    Wilmers, Chris

    N IN E &TEN APTS BLDG 1 GANDHIHOUSE AMNESTY HOUSE Disabled parking space Disabled access path shuttle stop Santa Cruz Metro bus stop Stairs Elevator Restrooms NINE &TEN APTSBLDG3 NINE &TEN APTS BLDG 2

  7. PARKING LOT 164 PARKING LOT 114

    E-print Network

    Wilmers, Chris

    LIVINGCENTERINTERNATIONAL BLDG 5 N IN E &TEN APTS BLDG 1 GANDHIHOUSE AMNESTY HOUSE Disabled parking space Disabled access Campus shuttle stop Santa Cruz Metro bus stop Stairs Elevator Restrooms NINE &TEN APTSBLDG3 NINE &TEN

  8. Urban Parks: Constraints on Park Visitation

    E-print Network

    Scott, David

    2006-12-19

    Research shows that women, older people, members of some ethnic groups, and people with low educational and income levels are less likely than others to participate in leisure activities or visit parks. This publication explores the constraints...

  9. VISITOR PARKING Pay station parking meters are available around

    E-print Network

    VISITOR PARKING Pay station parking meters are available around campus for visitors and other temporary parking needs. Daily scratch-off permits are available in advance from Parking Services. LOT METER PAY STATION RATES (SUMMER RATES MAY BE DISCOUNTED) HOW DO I GET A PERMIT? When parking on campus

  10. Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy

    E-print Network

    Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy Category: Facilities, Campus Life 1. PURPOSE To standardise and manage parking and transport on the Curtin Bentley campus including Technology Park. 2. POLICY STATEMENT 2.1 Curtin University will provide an appropriate number of parking bays

  11. U-Pb SHRIMP and Sm-Nd geochronology of granite-gneiss complexes and implications for the evolution of the Central Brazil Archean Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, Cláudia Lima; Jost, Hardy; da Silva, Luiz Carlos; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2008-07-01

    The paper is a first attempt to unravel the Archean multi-stage metaplutonic assemblage of the Meso/Neoarchean terrane of the State of Goiás, Central Brazil, by means of the U-Pb SHRIMP zircon and Sm-Nd techniques. Two stages of granitic plutonism, spanning ca. 140 m.y., were precisely established for the accretion of the gneiss protoliths. The earliest stage embraces tonalitic to granodioritic and minor granitic orthogneisses with Nd juvenile signature, emplaced from ca. 2845 to ca. 2785 Ma, interpreted as the roots of an early arc. Inherited zircon xenocrysts and Nd isotopic data indicate that the juvenile magmas underwent contamination from a sialic crust as old as 3.3 Ga, from which there are, so far, no recognizable exposures. The second stage comprises granodioritic to granitic gneisses and lasted from ca. 2711 to 2707 Ma. Based on their Nd isotopic signatures and on inherited zircon crystals, their protoliths are interpreted as dominantly crustal-derived. The SHRIMP data from zircon crystals did not depict a Paleoproterozoic overprinting on the Archean gneisses, which is due to geological processes with prevailing temperatures below the isotopic stability of the U/Pb/Th system in the mineral. These processes comprise crustal extension and intrusion of a mafic dike swarm at ca. 2.3 Ga, followed by low grade events mostly related to shear zones between ca. 2.15 and 2.0 Ga. The study also revealed the extent of the Pan- African tectono-thermal overprinting on the Archean orthogneisses. Most of the zircon populations show morphological evidence of metamorphic peripheral recrystallization dated between ca. 750 and 550 Ma. One of the banded gneisses with a crystallization age of ca. 2700 Ma (2 ?) has a more complex zircon population including magmatic new grains, which yielded a precise 206Pb/238U crystallization age of 590 ± 10 Ma (2 ?). These new grains are interpreted to have grown in anatectic veins injected within strongly sheared gneiss.The data characterize a widespread Pan-African-aged metamorphic overprinting, culminating with localized anatexis of the Archean orthogneisses.

  12. Parks, Recreation and Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ching-Hua; Payne, Laura; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Reviews what current research says about the holistic health benefits of park and recreation services, focusing on: health benefits according to park users; physical activities in parks; stress reduction benefits of park use; social support, self-determination, and stress reduction; observing nature in parks and associated benefits; and the…

  13. Dead Mans Run parking for

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Dead ManÕs Run 44THSTREET parking for state vehicles Dead ManÕs Run East Campus Recr eation Fields of the University of Nebraska parking map is intended for web distribution only. Further information, including parking regulations, permit information, etc., is available at Parking and Transit Services website, http://parking

  14. Mapping the National Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website contains a collection of maps documenting the history, cultural aspects and geological formations of areas that eventually became National Parks. The areas highlighted are Acadia National Park, Yellowstone National Park, the Grand Canyon, and the Great Smoky Mountains. The collection consists of approximately 200 maps dating from the 17th century to the present, reflecting early mapping of these areas. This database is searchable by keyword, geographic location, subject, map creator, or title.

  15. 1. PARKING LOT BEFORE SOUTH ENTRANCE STATION, FACING N. PARK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PARKING LOT BEFORE SOUTH ENTRANCE STATION, FACING N. PARK ENTRANCE SIGN IS IN TREES IN CENTER. - South Entrance Road, Between South park boundary & Village Loop Road, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  16. F72-6 PARKING (PARKING COMMITTEE ABOLISHED AND REPLACED BY PARKING ADVISORY BOARD)

    E-print Network

    Gleixner, Stacy

    F72-6 PARKING (PARKING COMMITTEE ABOLISHED AND REPLACED BY PARKING ADVISORY BOARD) Legislative Committee. ACTION BY UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT: "Approved." Signed: John H. Bunzel, January 22, 1973. PARKING Parking Committee be abolished. 2. The Academic Council recommend that the Director of Business Affairs

  17. Downtown-parking policy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuner, R.

    1983-10-01

    This article outlines a framework for recognizing city parking policy alternatives and evaluating their effectiveness or desirability for solving parking problems. The techniques are useful for making parking policy decisions. 6 references, 1 table.

  18. Yellowstone National Park Interactive Map

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NPS Source: CENSUS

    This Yellowstone National Park Map is a handy way to quickly find locations and buildings located in the park. It is currently the most detailed map of Yellowstone national park that can be viewed online. The pull down menu has Yellowstone features such as geyser basins, campgrounds, trails, mountains, and historical points and park structures. Popular geysers, and park locations such as Norris geyser basin, Yellowstone visitor centers, park housing, lodging, and park dining can be easily found. All Yellowstone National Park named structures are indexed so you can easily find the sites that you want to locate.

  19. Active England `Park Life'

    E-print Network

    Active England `Park Life' ­ Greenwood Community Forest Liz O'Brien and Jake Morris Social Life: Design and implementation 6 3. Results: on site surveying and project monitoring 9 3 funded project, `Park Life', within Greenwood Community Forest (hereafter `Greenwood'), and the results

  20. Visitor's Car Parking Information

    E-print Network

    Visitor's Car Parking Information What do I need to do? If you're coming to campus by car, then you to the University and provide them with your name and car registration details). Please ensure you receive from one of our machines which are situated in the car parks. Do I need to pay? Yes, 30p per hour or £2

  1. Moongyu Park's Recent Papers

    E-print Network

    (M. Park) Stability analysis and error estimate of flowfield-dependent ... for first order linear hyperbolic equations, Journal of Computational and Applied ... (M. Park, D. O'Malley and J.H. Cushman) Generalized Similarity/Renormalization Groups ... "Stability Analysis of VEISV Propagation Modeling for Network Worm Attach", ...

  2. Splendor In The Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anthony Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Civilization is more and more intruding on the esthetic and recreational resources of the National Park System. Increased attention must be paid to controlling noise, pollution, and even the effects of urban lighting which detract from the enjoyment of the parks. (RE)

  3. Florida State Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The modern Florida State Parks system was created in 1935, and their programs include parks all the way from the St. Augustine area to the Keys. Their homepage brings together cultural, historical, and scientific materials related to the various sites in the state system. The website includes information on each park, along with interactive features on African American sites in the state and notable battlegrounds. Along the top of the page, visitors can use sections such as "Find a Park" and "Stay the Night" to plan their journey through the state. Each park entry also contains information about the site's history, along with detailed information about ranger programs, special music events, and so on. Finally, visitors can stay in touch via Twitter and other social media.

  4. Geochemistry of Jamari complex, central-eastern Rondônia: Andean-type magmatic arc and Paleoproterozoic crustal growth of the southwestern Amazonian Craton, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandolara, Jaime E.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.; Dantas, Elton L.; Souza, Valmir S.

    2013-10-01

    The Jamari complex (gabbro-diorite-tonalite/enderbite-granodiorite/charnoenderbite) represents a Paleoproterozoic (ca. 1.76-1.74 Ga) magmatic arc emplaced along the southwestern Amazonian Craton in central-eastern Rondônia, Brazil. Comprising metaplutonic and metasedimentary rocks, the Jamari complex constitutes the polydeformed Paleoproterozoic basement of Rondônia state. Together with regional data from the Rondônia-Juruena Province, our findings suggest that the southwestern border of the Amazonian Craton was the site of magmatic arc evolution from at least ca. 1.78 to 1.63 Ga. Elemental geochemical data show that intermediate/acid orthogneisses are metaluminous to mildly peraluminous, and have a medium to high-K, calc-alkaline signature, suggesting that they were formed in an immature Andean-type magmatic arc. Gabbros have signatures similar to tholeiites of active continental margin and diorites show characteristics compatible with rocks of tholeiite/calc-alkaline active continental margin volcanic arc. The chemical data of the Jamari complex felsic plutonic rocks show general trends of increasing contents of incompatible elements (K2O, Rb, Nb, Th, La, Ba and Sr) and decreasing contents of compatible elements (Ni, V, Sc, MgO, Fe2O3, Al2O3, CaO and TiO2) with increasing SiO2. Although these variations are consistent with closed system fractional crystallization processes, the wide variation of Rb/Zr, La/Sm, K/Rb, Nb/Y, Th/Y and Th/Yb in the felsic rocks may indicate random crustal contamination during the evolution of these rocks. Normalized trace element patterns show enrichment in LILEs (Rb, Ba, K, Th and Ce) relative to HFSEs (Nb, Zr, P and Ti) and are very similar to calc-alkaline subduction-related rocks from orogenic belts. The Jamari complex represents the western extension of similar metaplutonic rocks (Juruena Complex, Mato Grosso), occurring along some 500 km of the Paleoproterozoic Madeirinha orogen (1.78-1.63 Ga). During this event the rocks were metamorphosed under upper amphibolite to granulite facies conditions that only mildly disturbed their igneous characteristics. Zircon U-Pb crystallization ages (ID-TIMS, SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS) set the acretional phase of the magmatic arc in Rondônia between 1.76 and 1.74 Ga. Metamorphic mineral paragenesis and textural features in these rocks, combined with geochronologic data, indicate that metamorphic conditions in the study area reached the granulite facies (T = ca. 750-800 °C, P = 7 to 8 kbar) in a tectonothermal collisional event that occurred between 1.67 and 1.63 Ga. The Jamari complex in this region was subsequently reworked during the Rondonian-San Ignácio Orogeny (1.50-1.30 Ga), a tectonic episode characterized by crytical metamorphic mineral assemblages and anatexis, suggesting upper-amphibolite-facies metamorphism. The youngest tectonic event recognized in the Jamari complex is associated with tectonic reactivation, deformation, thermal overprint, and magmatism related to the Sunsás Orogeny (1.30-0.95 Ga). Its effects are represented by extensive development of shear zones (Ji-Paraná system), mylonitic belts, rifts and sedimentary deposits, and post-collisional A-type intrusions. Nd isotopic data of the high-grade orthogneisses show a wide range of ?Nd values (-1.5 to +5.6) and a wide spectrum of TDM model-ages, from 1.79 to 2.2 Ga. These values demonstrate that the crustal generation processes involved juvenile mantle sources and variable proportions of older recycled crust.

  5. Parking Arrangements for Special Events Parking & Transportation Services: T-1400

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Parking Arrangements for Special Events Parking & Transportation Services: T-1400 Phone: (657) 278(s) & number of spaces below in additional notes section) Yes No · Will you require parking permits in advance? (Cost to guest $8.00 per vehicle) Yes No · Would you require a parking attendant to issue permits

  6. UVA Parking and Transportation Student Parking Application Form

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    UVA Parking and Transportation Student Parking Application Form Please Print Clearly: Primary other than yourself, a parent, or spouse. Only one vehicle per family or carpool may park in permit areas at the same time unless full fees have been paid for each vehicle. Please notify Parking

  7. FORESTS FORTHE WORLD PARK RESERVATIONS

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    ETIQUETTE s Stoop and Scoop s Share the Park s Train Your Dog s Licence Your Dog s Respect the WildlifeFORESTS FORTHE WORLD PARK RESERVATIONS Park sites are perfect for special events, such as group picnics, community events, weddings, and photos. A park use permit reserves your date, time, and place, so

  8. PARKING PERMITS Conditions of Issue

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    PARKING PERMITS Conditions of Issue 1. Parking permits for the Academic year 2012/2013 will cease to be valid on 1 st October 2013. Parking permits for the Academic year 2013/2014 will be valid immediately with the car parking regulations and conditions of issue of the University and may be withdrawn by the Director

  9. Parking Services VEHICLE OPERATOR REGISTRATION

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Parking Services VEHICLE OPERATOR REGISTRATION PLEASE PRINT AND COMPLETE BOTH SIDES. Last name-School Volunteer NOTE: Registration decal and/or parking permit must be displayed in accordance with the parking of Binghamton University, which are available at the Parking Services Office, the Information Booth, and on

  10. Post-Brasiliano (Pan-African) high-K granitic magmatism in Central Brazil: the role of late Precambrian-early Palaeozoic extension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Márcio M. Pimentel; Reinhardt A. Fuck; Carlos JoséSouza de Alvarenga

    1996-01-01

    In western Goiás, Brazil, the emplacement of large, high-K postorogenic granites and associated small gabbro-dioritic intrusions, followed immediately after the last deformational events of the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogeny at ?600 Ma. Well-fitted whole-rock Rb?Sr isochrons indicate ages which suggest two discrete intrusive events: the older between ?588 and 560 Ma and the younger between ?508 and 485 Ma. The older granites

  11. Kruger National Park

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    ... above and to the right of image center is the Palabora Copper Mine, and the water body near upper right is Lake Massingir in ... South Africa showing Kruger Park, the Palabora Copper Mine, and Lake Massingir. project:  MISR ...

  12. High School Parking Lots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Thomas G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the reorganization of the site of Ben Davis High School in Wayne Township, Indiana as an example of improvements to school parking lot design and vehicle/pedestrian traffic flow and security. Includes design drawings. (EV)

  13. Jurassic Park Safety Audit

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Using the first 30 minutes of the film Jurassic Park, the student will audit it for violations of safety rules and regulations, OSHA violations, and violations of HASP's. Access to the activity required free and quick registration with ATEEC.

  14. Inequities in access to health care in different health systems: a study in municipalities of central Colombia and north-eastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Health system reforms are undertaken with the aim of improving equity of access to health care. Their impact is generally analyzed based on health care utilization, without distinguishing between levels of care. This study aims to analyze inequities in access to the continuum of care in municipalities of Brazil and Colombia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted based on a survey of a multistage probability sample of people who had had at least one health problem in the prior three months (2,163 in Colombia and 2,167 in Brazil). The outcome variables were dichotomous variables on the utilization of curative and preventive services. The main independent variables were income, being the holder of a private health plan and, in Colombia, type of insurance scheme of the General System of Social Security in Health (SGSSS). For each country, the prevalence of the outcome variables was calculated overall and stratified by levels of per capita income, SGSSS insurance schemes and private health plan. Prevalence ratios were computed by means of Poisson regression models with robust variance, controlling for health care need. Results There are inequities in favor of individuals of a higher socioeconomic status: in Colombia, in the three different care levels (primary, outpatient secondary and emergency care) and preventive activities; and in Brazil, in the use of outpatient secondary care services and preventive activities, whilst lower-income individuals make greater use of the primary care services. In both countries, inequity in the use of outpatient secondary care is more pronounced than in the other care levels. Income in both countries, insurance scheme enrollment in Colombia and holding a private health plan in Brazil all contribute to the presence of inequities in utilization. Conclusions Twenty years after the introduction of reforms implemented to improve equity in access to health care, inequities, defined in terms of unequal use for equal need, are still present in both countries. The design of the health systems appears to determine access to the health services: two insurance schemes in Colombia with different benefits packages and a segmented system in Brazil, with a significant private component. PMID:24479581

  15. Geology Fieldnotes: Great Basin National Park, Nevada

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Great Basin National Park site contains park geology information, park maps, visitor information, and teacher features (educational resources and links for teaching geology using National Park examples). The park geology section discusses the region's biogeography, glacial history, and the Lehman Caves. A park map and a features/relief map of the Great Basin National Park are included.

  16. PARKING POLICY FOR THE LOWER PARKING DECK IN FENSTER HALL The parking garage located in the lower level of the parking structure below Fenster Hall

    E-print Network

    PARKING POLICY FOR THE LOWER PARKING DECK IN FENSTER HALL The parking garage located in the lower level of the parking structure below Fenster Hall will consist of both assigned and open parking spaces. Parking spaces in this facility shall be allocated in the following manner: 1. Assigned parking spaces

  17. updated August 1, 2012 -Motorcycle Parking

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    11 updated August 1, 2012 - Motorcycle Parking - Loading Dock Area - Parking Pay Station - Disabled Parking - Metered Parking Campus Districts Academics Athletics Residence Halls R&D Park Health Services Support Services Daily/Visitor Parking Hourly Parking 18B Varsity Tennis Courts Stadium STA Softball

  18. Tour of Park Geology: Oldest Rocks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This park geology site provides links to tours of individual National Parks, Monuments, and Recreation Areas with the oldest known rocks. The parks are divided at this site into East and West. Where appropriate, for each park, links are provided to park geology, maps, photographs, geologic research, visitor information, multimedia resources, and teacher features (resources for teaching geology using National Park examples). Parks listed include: Voyaguers National Park, Keweenaw National Historic Park, Lake Meade National Recreation Area, and many more.

  19. Park Geology: Tour of Basin and Range Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides links to tours of individual National Parks within the Basin and Range region. Where appropriate for each park, links are provided to park geology, maps, photographs, geologic research, related links, visitor information, multimedia resources, and teacher features. Some of the parks have an expanded geology page that features the geologic time, history, plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, and a virtual field trip of the park. Of particular note is the teacher feature section, which provides educational resources and links for teaching geology with National Park examples.

  20. Terrain Park Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Craig; McIntosh, Scott; Bringhurst, Jade; Danenhauer, Karen; Gilmore, Nathan; Hopkins, Christy L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined demographics, injury pattern, and hospital outcome in patients injured in winter resort terrain parks. Methods: The study included patients ?12 years of age who presented to a regional trauma center with an acute injury sustained at a winter resort. Emergency department (ED) research assistants collected patient injury and helmet use information using a prospectively designed questionnaire. ED and hospital data were obtained from trauma registry and hospital records. Results: Seventy-two patients were injured in a terrain park, and 263 patients were injured on non-terrain park slopes. Patients injured in terrain parks were more likely to be male [68/72 (94%) vs. 176/263 (67%), p<0.0001], younger in age [23 ± 7 vs. 36 ± 17, p<0.0001], live locally [47/72 (65%) vs. 124/263 (47%), p=0.006], use a snowboard [50/72 (69%) vs. 91/263 (35%), p<0.0001], hold a season pass [46/66 (70%) vs. 98/253 (39%), p<0.0001], and sustain an upper extremity injury [29/72 (40%) vs. 52/263 (20%), p<0.001] when compared to patients injured on non-terrain park slopes. There were no differences between the groups in terms of EMS transport to hospital, helmet use, admission rate, hospital length of stay, and patients requiring specialty consultation in the ED. Conclusions: Patients injured in terrain parks represent a unique demographic within winter resort patrons. Injury severity appears to be similar to those patients injured on non-terrain park slopes. PMID:20046245

  1. Centralized Copying Saves Time and Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Describes how Deer Park School District, Long Island, New York, is saving money while boosting efficiency by centralizing its high-volume printing and duplicating operations. The new arrangement saves space, time, and expenses. (LMI)

  2. Parking management tactics. Volume 3: reference guide. [Parking

    SciTech Connect

    DiRenzo, J.F.; Cima, B.; Barber, E.

    1981-06-01

    Information contained in this guide was formulated from parking management experiences of 20 cities previously investigated and documented. The guide provides information on the planning, implementation, and operation of six types of parking management tactics: on-street parking supply tactics, off-street parking supply tactics for activity centers, fringe and corridor parking facilities, pricing tactics, enforcement and adjudication tactics, and marketing tactics. The guide assesses the essential aspects of the tactics as well as presents some useful analysis procedures for evaluating parking management actions. The Reference Guide is a stand-alone document for use by transportation planners and traffic engineers. It is the third volume of a three-volume series of reports on parking management. The first volume, entitled Overview, is designed for management. The second volume, entitled Overview and Case Studies, is designed for technical staff or managers who want detailed city-by-city information on parking management tactics.

  3. Garage Parking n Visitors may park in garages

    E-print Network

    Raizen, Mark G.

    kcolluBboB etatSsaxeT yrotsiH muesuM etatSsaxeT lotipaC Garage Parking n Visitors may park in garages at the hourly rate n All parking garages are open 24/7 on a space-available basis for visitors and students and do not require a permit Garage Parking Rates* 0 - 30 minutes No Charge 30 minutes - 1 hour $ 3

  4. Parking Structures and the Space Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2000-01-01

    Presents some solutions to overcrowded parking on college campuses. Tips on selecting sites for parking garages, making parking decks blend with adjacent communities, and turning parking garages into multi use facilities are addressed. (GR)

  5. Geology of National Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Have you ever wondered what it would be like to take a historic tour of the Colorado River Canyon? Wonder no more, as this site from the U.S. Geological Survey makes just such a sojourn possible. Drawing on thousands of historic and contemporary photographs, views, documents, and other items, the USGS has created these fine 3D and photographic tours of dozens of national parks. On the site, visitors will find an alphabetical list of the parks, along with links to the 3D image galleries, standard image galleries, and selected online field guides. There's a great deal to recommend here, but visitors should definitely look at the stereograph images from the Powell Survey Expeditions of the Colorado River from 1871 and 1872 (in the "Other park-related resources" section) and the guidebook titled "Where's the San Andreas Fault?" Along with providing entertaining edification, this site might also spark some ideas for an upcoming trip.

  6. Finding Pulsars at Parkes

    E-print Network

    R. N. Manchester

    2000-09-26

    There are many reasons why it is important to increase the number of known pulsars. Not only do pulsar searches continue to improve statistical estimates of, for example, pulsar birthrates, lifetimes and the Galactic distribution, but they continue to turn up interesting and, in some cases, unique individual pulsars. In the early days of pulsar astronomy, the Molonglo radio telescope led the world as a pulsar detection instrument. However, the Parkes radio telescope, with its frequency versatility and greater tracking ablility, combined with sensitive receivers and powerful computer detection algorithms, is now the world's most successful telescope at finding pulsars. The Parkes multibeam survey, begun in 1997, by itself will come close to doubling the number of known pulsars. Parkes has also been very successful at finding millisecond pulsars, especially in globular clusters. One third of the known millisecond pulsars have been found in just one cluster, 47 Tucanae.

  7. 2012-13 UT Basketball Parking Information Campus Parking: On weekdays, the majority of parking on campus requires a basketball

    E-print Network

    Tennessee, University of

    2012-13 UT Basketball Parking Information Campus Parking: On weekdays, the majority of parking on campus requires a basketball parking permit beginning at 4:00pm.* On weekends, the same is true but times will vary depending on the tip-off time for the game. Public Parking: Free public parking with shuttle

  8. Hawaii hydrogen power park Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park

    E-print Network

    Hawaii hydrogen power park H Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park 2003 Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Merit Review Meeting 19-22 May 2003 Maurice Kaya, PI, State of Hawaii Dr. Rick Rocheleau, PI, University of Hawaii Mitch Ewan, Project Manager, University of Hawaii #12;Hawaii hydrogen power park H Objectives

  9. MIDDLE PARK Conservation Action Plan

    E-print Network

    MIDDLE PARK Conservation Action Plan 2011 Update Plant Species of Focus: Kremmling milkvetch Conservation Initiative Workshop dates: June 26, 2008 and July 6, 2010 Report date: August 25, 2011 Middle Park................................................................................................................... 6 A. Conservation Targets

  10. NASA Research Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A massive addition to the NASA Ames Research Park is detailed on this site. Although the project is not scheduled to be completed until 2015, it has been in the planning stages for several years and 2003 marks the beginning of Phase 1. The 98-page NASA Ames Development Plan is available for public viewing online. The new facilities will be designed to accommodate research in "information technology, nanotechnology, biotechnology, and astrobiology." Several other news articles and formal documents about the project can be downloaded as well. The design, construction, and staffing of the new research park will reportedly generate 7,000 high-tech jobs.

  11. Plant food resources exploited by Blue-and-Yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna, Linnaeus 1758) at an urban area in Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, A A; Ragusa-Netto, J

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we described the food plants available to Blue-and-Yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna), its feeding habits and the relationship between these parameters with feeding niche breadth. We established four transects, each one 12 km long, to sample fruiting plants and the feeding habits of this macaw (monthly 40 h, of observations), at the urban areas of Três Lagoas (Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil). During all studied months, macaws foraged for palm fruits, mainly Syagrus oleracea and Acrocomia aculeata fruit pulp, both available all year, as well as Caryocar brasiliense and Anacardium occidentale seeds, in the wet season. The year-round feeding activity of macaws suggests Três Lagoas city as an adequate feeding area. The permanent availability of plant food resources, potentially, resulted from the diverse fruiting patterns of exotic and, mainly, native plant species, which provided a variety of suitable fruit patches. PMID:25166327

  12. UPb SHRIMP and Sm-Nd geochronology of the Silvânia Volcanics and Jurubatuba Granite: juvenile Paleoproterozoic crust in the basement of the Neoproterozoic Brasília Belt, Goiás, central Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DANIELLE P. FISCHEL; MÁRCIO M. PIMENTEL; REINHARDT A. FUCK; RICHARD ARMSTRONG

    2001-01-01

    U-Pb SHRIMP and Sm-Nd isotopic ages were determined for felsic metavolcanic rocks from the Silvânia Sequence and Jurubatuba Granite in the central part of the Brasília Belt. Zircon grains from a metavolcanic sample yielded 2115 ± 23 Ma and from the granite yielded 2089 ± 14 Ma, interpreted as crystallization ages of these rocks. Six metavolcanic samples of the Silvânia

  13. Threat of rapid extermination of the lion (Panthera leo leo) in Waza National Park, Northern Cameroon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. N. Tumenta; J. S. Kok; J. C. van Rijssel; R. Buij; B. M. Croes; P. J. Funston; H. H. de Iongh; H. A. Udo de Haes

    Lion populations in West and Central Africa are small and fragmented. In areas where park management is weak, threats will likely facilitate the extinction of the lion. Wildlife management requires knowledge of the popula- tion estimate. The population of lions in Waza National Park (Waza NP) was assessed by individual identification of members in the population. The population was assessed

  14. Wireless Ad Hoc Discovery of Parking Meters1 P. Basu and T.D.C. Little

    E-print Network

    Wireless Ad Hoc Discovery of Parking Meters1 P. Basu and T.D.C. Little Department of Electrical on an in-car display almost immediately. The user might select and reserve a parking spot of choice using image processing methods and then sharing that information via a centralized wired or wireless

  15. Himalayan Semnopithecus entellus at Langtang National Park, Nepal: Diet, Activity Patterns,

    E-print Network

    Norconk, Marilyn A.

    Himalayan Semnopithecus entellus at Langtang National Park, Nepal: Diet, Activity Patterns provide foraging data from a field study of Himalayan langurs in Langtang National Park, Nepal at 3000. Bishop (1975, 1979) investigated langur social behavior at Melemchi, north-central Nepal (2442­ 3050 m

  16. Download the Campus Parking Map

    E-print Network

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    Download the Campus Parking Map to your Smartphone B C D E F 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 A E. Speedway Blvd. EAve. ParkAve. South Campus Dr. Enke Dr. EuclidAve. ParkAve. ONE WAY VineAve. CherryAve.CherryAve. WarrenAve.WarrenAve. CherryAve. MartinAve. ParkAve. MountainAve. HighlandAve. VineAve. TyndallAve.TyndallAve. Warren

  17. Pay-N-Display Surface Lot Parking

    E-print Network

    Pay-N-Display Surface Lot Parking Ohio Stadium Tuttle Park Place Garage · Participants will be asked to park at either Tuttle Park Place Garage or on the southeast side of Ohio Stadium. Both parking. · If choosing to park in the Tuttle garage, participants will be charged an hourly rate, which

  18. Visitor Parking at the Gilman Parking Structure The UC San Diego visitor parking lot closest to the workshop is the Gilman Parking Structure, located at

    E-print Network

    Visitor Parking at the Gilman Parking Structure The UC San Diego visitor parking lot closest to the workshop is the Gilman Parking Structure, located at the corner of Gilman Drive and Russell Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093. http://wikimapia.org/523784/GilmanParkingStructure The Gilman Parking Structure has Pay

  19. Parking Pass Move-In 2014

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    Parking Pass Move-In 2014 This Parking Pass is for students moving into the Residence Halls for Fall 2014. · This parking pass is only valid in designated UniveRsiTy locaTions. · Do noT leave. · Drivers must obey all parking regulations (e.g. only drivers with a disabled parking permit may park

  20. UC Berkeley 1 Bancroft Center Parking

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    PP UC Berkeley 2 2 3 3 4 4 1 1 Bancroft Center Parking Inkstone Parking Garage Anna Head West Lot With 436 Spaces, this parking structure contains the most parking available next to campus. A cashier and parking machine is located on the bottom level, with most Telegraph merchants offering parking validation

  1. SouthCampus Clinic Parking

    E-print Network

    Oh, Kwang W.

    SouthCampus To Dow ntow n Cam pus Clinic Parking Zipcar space EOC M.W. Kapoor Hall Child Care-645-3943 · 106 Spaulding Quad Allen Hall Sherman Annex Allen Lot Foster Lot Squire Loop NFTA Park & Ride Lot) 6. Roswell Park Cancer Institute 5. Buffalo General 4. Parker Lot 3. Main Circle 2. Goodyear 1. Main

  2. Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service (NPS) publication discusses Dry Tortugas National Park in Florida. This system consists of 7 small islands off the coast of Key West. The site discusses the history of this area, as well as the marine setting of the park.

  3. Parking Services Rules and Regulations

    E-print Network

    Moore, Paul A.

    Parking Services Rules and Regulations 2013 ­ 2014 Academic Year / Summer #12;Table of Contents 1 Authority 3 1.1 Manager of Parking Services 3 1.2 Discretion and Authority 3 1.3 Authorization 3 1.4 Liability 3 2 Two Wheeled Vehicles 4 2.1 Motorcycles / Mopeds / Scooters 4 3 Parking Permits 4 3.1 General

  4. GOLER HOUSE/ WHIPPLE PARK

    E-print Network

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    permits will not be allowed in the Goler House lot with the exception of the short-term spaces. Short-term spaces will be "30 minutes with flasher" parking ONLY for unloading pur- poses. Violators will be subject know your pick-up location when you call. Please be aware that shuttle response times may vary

  5. ( Underground ) TRW Parking

    E-print Network

    Maurer, Frank

    Lot 6 ( Public ) Lot 1 ( Public ) Lot 4 Lot 8a ( Public ) Lot 7 ( Staff ) Lot 10 ( Underground ) TRW Parking ( Underground ) Lot3(Staff) Lot 8 (Staff) HMRB TRW H R IC H SC MT PP SSB TBCC GW ST NT FMC Health Centre McCaig Tower North Tower PP SSB ST TBCC Physical Plant Special Services Building South

  6. The Clover Park Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Don

    1974-01-01

    Describes an aviation trades training program offered by the Clover Park schools in Washington which exposes students to all facets of the aviation industry from record keeping to air traffic control in addition to the specific skill of piloting the aircraft. (BR)

  7. Access into Campus & Parking

    E-print Network

    Bus Stops Sub Station Active Construction - No public access: Livingston Housing Construction SiteLSC Lot 105 Phase A Access into Campus & Parking Scarlet Lot RAC Livingston Campus Construction Informational Map May 2012 Livingston Housing Construction Site Road 3 Road Closed SSW Route18 Exit LSC Access

  8. KALELE ROAD Parking Office

    E-print Network

    Environ. Health Transportation Services Landscaping No Vehicle Access No Public Vehicle Access No Public High School 1 Everly Hall UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute Exit Stairs Pond Law Library Henke Vehicle Access Maile Kiosk Waialae Kiosk Office of Procurement, & Real Property Mgmt Lower Campus Entrance

  9. Yellowstone National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brieske, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park was established on March 1, 1872, as the first national park in the world. The overwhelming and unique beauty found in this natural wonder is truly difficult to describe.This Topic In Depth begin with the excellent National Park Service's (1) official Yellowstone Web Site, which contains the park's history, virtual field trips, park information, visitor guides, web cams, kids pages, and more. The next site offered by EarthTalk Studios is called Yellowstone Geographic. This extensive and graphically reliant site contains superb interactive activities related to the park and comes close to its goal of being "the best Yellowstone Web Site on the planet." The third site from UnMuseum.org called Weird Geology: Geysers explores the workings of Yellowstone's famous geysers with descriptions, photographs, illustrations, and a movie of an eruption. The next site from Exploratorium is a learning activity called Geyser: Cyclic Hot Water Fountain. With the help of their teacher, students build a working model of a geyser from common chemical equipment. From the University of Michigan, Meg Streepey's Geysers and the Earth's Plumbing Systems Web Site describes (for more advanced students) how geysers work, including how to analyze their thermal and hydrologic regimes. Another research site, from the University of Utah's College of Mines and Earth Sciences, is the GPS Surveys of the Yellowstone Hotspot and the Wasatch Fault, Utah. Objectives of the study are "to measure and understand the spatial and temporal variations of the crustal deformation produced by the interaction between lithospheric plate motion and the asthenospheric hotspot." The last two sites are from the USGS, the first of which is the Yellowstone River Basin National Water-Quality Assessment Program site. It contains a project description, available data, and other relevant information. The last site, Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, is a facility that is designed for observing volcanic and earthquake activity in the park. This site also contains a project description, volcanic data, maps, descriptions of volcanic rock, a frequently asked questions link, and more.

  10. Neoproterozoic granulite facies metamorphism and coeval granitic magmatism in the Brasilia Belt, Central Brazil: regional implications of new SHRIMP U–Pb and Sm–Nd data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danielle Piuzana; Márcio Martins Pimentel; Reinhardt A Fuck; Richard Armstrong

    2003-01-01

    New SHRIMP U–Pb zircon ages combined with Sm–Nd isotopic characteristics of granulites and associated granitic rocks of the Anápolis–Itauçu Complex in the central-southern part of the Bras??lia Belt are presented and discussed in this study. Igneous crystallization ages obtained in zircon grains of orthogranulite and granites vary between 760 and 650Ma. Growth of new zircon at ca. 650–640Ma dates the

  11. Men's Basketball Parking 2011-2012 Free parking on a first come,

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    Men's Basketball Parking 2011-2012 The Park Free parking on a first come, first served basis. Park and walk (20 min.), or ride free shuttle. Shuttleis accessible. Emmet/Ivy Parking Garage Park and Walk - 10 Minutes $5.00 per game as available. Parking Available on a first come, first served basis. Lots open 1

  12. USGS: Geology in the Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey Geology in the Parks Web site is a cooperative project of the USGS Western Earth Surface Processes Team and the National Park Service. This extensive site covers geologic maps, plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, geologic time, US geologic provinces, park geology of the Mojave, Sunset Crater, Lake Mead, North Cascades, Death Valley, Yosemite National Park, and much more. Descriptions, graphics, photographs, and animations all contribute to this informative and interesting Web site making it a one stop, all encompassing, resource for everything geology and US national park related.

  13. A Severe Accident Caused by an Ocellate River Stingray (Potamotrygon motoro) in Central Brazil: How Well Do We Really Understand Stingray Venom Chemistry, Envenomation, and Therapeutics?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nelson Jorge; Clementino Ferreira, Kalley Ricardo; Leite Pinto, Raimundo Nonato; Aird, Steven Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater stingrays cause many serious human injuries, but identification of the offending species is uncommon. The present case involved a large freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae), in the Araguaia River in Tocantins, Brazil. Appropriate first aid was administered within ~15 min, except that an ice pack was applied. Analgesics provided no pain relief, although hot compresses did. Ciprofloxacin therapy commenced after ~18 h and continued seven days. Then antibiotic was suspended; however, after two more days and additional tests, cephalosporin therapy was initiated, and proved successful. Pain worsened despite increasingly powerful analgesics, until debridement of the wound was performed after one month. The wound finally closed ~70 days after the accident, but the patient continued to have problems wearing shoes even eight months later. Chemistry and pharmacology of Potamotrygon venom and mucus, and clinical management of freshwater stingray envenomations are reviewed in light of the present case. Bacterial infections of stingray puncture wounds may account for more long-term morbidity than stingray venom. Simultaneous prophylactic use of multiple antibiotics is recommended for all but the most superficial stingray wounds. Distinguishing relative contributions of venom, mucus, and bacteria will require careful genomic and transcriptomic investigations of stingray tissues and contaminating bacteria. PMID:26094699

  14. 77 FR 53826 - Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System, Yellowstone National Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ...Box 168, Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190. ...Office, Headquarters Building, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. All...Office, Headquarters Building, Yellowstone National Park,...

  15. Beyond parks as monoliths: Spatially differentiating park-people relationships in the Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harini Nagendra; Duccio Rocchini; Rucha Ghate

    2010-01-01

    Parks represent spatially and socially heterogeneous conservation units, yet are often assessed and managed using spatially homogeneous approaches. This paper represents an effort to focus on the larger social–ecological landscapes within which protected areas are embedded, to understand why conservation succeeds and fails in different parts of the landscape. In a wildlife sanctuary in the central plains of India (Tadoba

  16. Comment on “some evidence of a date of first humans to arrive in Brazil”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marvin W Rowe; Karen L Steelman

    2003-01-01

    J Archaeol Sci 30 (2003) 351 reported extremely interesting dates on a calcite layer covering a pictograph at the Toca da Bastiana rock shelter within the Serra da Capivara National Park, Piaui, Brazil. Thermoluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance ages indicate that humans were present in Brazil prior to 35 ky ago. We report radiocarbon dates for rock paintings at the

  17. Deltamethrin resistance in Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), a pest of stored grain in Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I Lorini; D. J Galley

    1999-01-01

    The failure to control Rhyzopertha dominica in Brazil has been recorded in many storage units where the insecticide deltamethrin was used to protect grains. Samples from these and other pest populations were taken to investigate their tolerance. Ten strains from Brazil (BR1–10) and one laboratory strain from Imperial College at Silwood Park (UK1), were exposed to deltamethrin on filter paper.

  18. Lincoln Park Architectural Photographs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Harold, Wanda

    2012-01-13

    The Lincoln Park neighborhood in Chicago is home to a number of architectural landmarks, including 19th century mansions with bold mansard roofs, a former seminary on the grounds of DePaul University, and other delights. In 2000, DePaul sociologist Wanda Harold set out to photograph a number of these unique structures. This digital collection includes 200 of her images, and this project was made possible in part through a grant from the Library Services and Technology Act. First-time visitors can get started by using a clickable map of Lincoln Park to explore the photos, and they can also browse around by architect or street. Visitors shouldn't miss the photos of the workers' cottages at 1756 N. Clybourn and 2715 N. Kenmore Avenue. Overall, the site is a nice resource for students of Chicago architecture and urban geography.

  19. Mars parking orbit selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Braun, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    For a Mars mission, the selection of a parking orbit is greatly influenced by the precession caused by the oblateness of the planet. This affects the departure condition for earth return, and therefore, the mass required in LEO for a Mars mission. In this investigation, minimum LEO mass penalties were observed for parking orbits characterized by having near-equatorial inclinations, high eccentricities, and requiring a three-dimensional departure burn. However, because near-equatorial inclination orbits have poor planetary coverage characteristics, they are not desirable from a science viewpoint. To enhance these science requirements along with landing-site accessibility, a penalty in initial LEO mass is required. This study shows that this initial LEO mass penalty is reduced for orbits characterized with low to moderate eccentricities, nonequatorial inclinations, and a tangential periapsis arrival and departure burn.

  20. SAN PEDRO PARKS WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Santos, Elmer S.; Weisner, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    The San Pedro Parks Wilderness occupies 62. 7 sq mi of the Santa Fe National Forest in north-central New Mexico. Several copper mines, many copper prospects, and a few uranium prospects occur in sedimentary units in the vicinity of the wilderness. These units, where they extend into the wilderness, constitute only a small volume of rock and, judging from analyses of samples and from field observations, are devoid of copper and uranium concentration. Prospects on several of about 65 mining claims within the wilderness revealed concentrations of manganese or barite but only in volumes too small to be considered a demonstrated resource.

  1. National Park Service: Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    This resource from the National Park Service contains a wealth of information central to the growing field of environmental toxicology. The site consists of a searchable encyclopedia of 118 environmental contaminants, from Acenaphthene to Zinc. With information on chemical elements, compounds, and products, the EC Encyclopedia also serves as a reference for determining the potential impact of the concentration of a certain substance. Entries are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format and include background information, specific threats, and other related material. Complete reference information (the Referenc.pdf file) is also available.

  2. Neighborhood Park Use by Children

    PubMed Central

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Almanza, Estela; Jerrett, Michael; Wolch, Jennifer; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Background While having a greater number of neighborhood parks may be associated with greater overall physical activity in children, information is lacking about the extent to which children actually use parks for physical activity. Purpose This study combined accelerometer, GPS, GIS, and self-report methods to examine neighborhood park availability, perceived proximity, and use for physical activity in children. Methods Low-to-middle income children (aged 8–14 years) (n=135) from suburban communities in Southern California wore an Actigraph accelerometer and GlobalSat BT-335 GPS device across 7 days to measure physical activity and park use, respectively. ArcGIS identified parks within a 500m residential buffer of children’s homes. Parents reported perceptions of neighborhood park proximity through the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Survey (NEWS). Data were collected from March 2009 to December 2010, and analyzed in 2013. Results Fifty-four percent of families lived within 500m of a park. Of these children, GPS data indicated that 16% used it more than 15 minutes and an additional 11% of children used it between 5 and 15 minutes during the 7-day study period. The odds of extended park use (>15 minutes) increased fourfold when the distance between home and the nearest neighborhood park decreased by 100 meters. Additionally, the odds of any park use (>5 minutes) doubled when moving from the 25th to the 75th percentile for park greenness/vegetation density. Conclusions Although children’s use of neighborhood parks was generally low, it increased substantially when parks were closer to children’s homes and had greater vegetation density. PMID:24439346

  3. BECN1 is involved in the initiation of mitophagy: it facilitates PARK2 translocation to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Choubey, Vinay; Cagalinec, Michal; Liiv, Joanna; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Hickey, Miriam A; Kuum, Malle; Liiv, Mailis; Anwar, Tahira; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Kaasik, Allen

    2014-06-01

    The autophagy protein BECN1/Beclin 1 is known to play a central role in autophagosome formation and maturation. The results presented here demonstrate that BECN1 interacts with the Parkinson disease-related protein PARK2. This interaction does not require PARK2 translocation to mitochondria and occurs mostly in cytosol. However, our results suggest that BECN1 is involved in PARK2 translocation to mitochondria because loss of BECN1 inhibits CCCP- or PINK1 overexpression-induced PARK2 translocation. Our results also demonstrate that the observed PARK2-BECN1 interaction is functionally important. Measurements of the level of MFN2 (mitofusin 2), a PARK2 substrate, demonstrate that depletion of BECN1 prevents PARK2 translocation-induced MFN2 ubiquitination and loss. BECN1 depletion also rescues the MFN2 loss-induced suppression of mitochondrial fusion. In sum, our results demonstrate that BECN1 interacts with PARK2 and regulates PARK2 translocation to mitochondria as well as PARK2-induced mitophagy prior to autophagosome formation. PMID:24879156

  4. 1.94-1.93 Ga charnockitic magmatism from the central part of the Guyana Shield, Roraima, Brazil: Single-zircon evaporation data and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Lêda Maria; Macambira, Moacir Jose Buenano; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Costa, João Batista Sena

    2009-04-01

    Age and origin of the charnockitic rocks of the central part of the Guyana Shield have been a matter of discussion. These rocks have been interpreted either as Transamazonian granulites metamorphosed around 2.02 Ga or as 1.56 Ga old igneous charnockites. Recently, most of the Roraima charnockitic rocks have been recognized as igneous rocks and included into the Serra da Prata Suite (SPS). Five Pb-Pb single-zircon evaporation ages were obtained for samples representative of different facies of the SPS and these constrained the age of the charnockitic magmatism between 1943 ± 5 Ma and 1933 ± 2 Ma. This charnockitic magmatism may be related to a post-collisional setting after the evolution of the Cauarane-Coeroeni Belt (˜2.00 Ga), or may represent a post-collisional (or intracontinental?) magmatism related to orogenic activities along the plate margins around 1.95-1.94 Ga.

  5. An exploration of the relationship between use of parks and access, park appeal, and communication effectiveness 

    E-print Network

    Walker, Jamie Rae

    2009-05-15

    Understanding what variables influence park use would assist park providers and policy makers in acquiring, designing, managing, and funding initiatives which encourage or support park use. Previous studies indicate that access to parks (measured...

  6. Parking Policies 1. The University's Parking Regulations, Policies and Procedures ("Policies")

    E-print Network

    Hong, Jason I.

    Policies - 1 - Parking Policies 1. The University's Parking Regulations, Policies and Procedures or operated on University property. The Parking & Transportation Office issues permits only to members the fees charged for parking permits and all costs or penalties associated with violations

  7. Tour of Park Geology: Human Use Sites

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service (NPS) site provides links to geolgy field notes about National Parks, National Monuments, and National Recreation Areas having to do with geology and human use (such as mining). Information includes geology, photographs, multimedia tools, park maps, visitor information, geologic research, and additional links. Parks covered include Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park, Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument, and more.

  8. Terrein / car park: Inleveren bij / submit to

    E-print Network

    Galis, Frietson

    Procedure: Terrein / car park: Inleveren bij / submit to: Info: Vul a.u.b. uw gegevens in / please terrein, voor de duur van: Requests access to the car park(s) mentioned above for the period of voorbehoud kan van toepassing zijn. You can request access rights for the local car park(s) on one campus

  9. Parking Details! MARCH BREAK OPEN HOUSE 2014

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Randy

    ! Parking Details! MARCH BREAK OPEN HOUSE 2014 There will be free parking on all Queen's University parking will be available, however please note these options will require payment and are not covered by our free event parking policy. Accessible parking is available upon request, please note this when

  10. Canyonlands National Park, UT, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Desert and mountain scenery along the Utah/Colorado border are displayed in this scene of the Canyonlands National Park, UT (39.0N, 110.0W). The Park occuppies the near center of the image, displaying spectacular incised meanders and the bulls-eye structure of Upheaval Dome (a salt dome). The Green River and the Colorado River flow southward to join off scene before flowing through the Grand Canyon National Park.

  11. Canyonlands National Park, UT, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Desert and mountain scenery along the Utah/Colorado border are displayed in this scene of the Canyonlands National Park, UT (39.0N, 110.0W). The park occupies the near center of the image, displaying spectacular incised meanders and the bulls-eye structure of Upheaval Dome (a salt dome). The Green River and the Colorado River flow southward to join (off scene) before flowing through the Grand Canyon National Park.

  12. Geology of Badlands National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Park Service (NPS)

    This page is an introduction to the 75 million years of accumulation and intermittent periods of erosion that has resulted in the Badlands National Park. The history of the Oglicene beds of the Park, one of the world's richest vertebrate fossil sites, is also described. A downloadable PDF that describes the erosion that is responsible for the geology of the Park in more detail is linked to the site.

  13. Visits to national parks: Effects of park characteristics and spatial demand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marjo Neuvonen; Eija Pouta; Jenni Puustinen; Tuija Sievänen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between the number of visits to national parks and their characteristics is crucial for park planning and management. Visitation has a key role in existing national parks, but also in assessing the social and economic impacts of new parks. This study examined how the natural characteristics of a park, the recreation facilities and services inside a park

  14. Parking & Security Information UniPark: Phone 6488 1229 and 6488 7184

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    Centre for Aboriginal Programmes Parking & Security Information UniPark: Phone 6488 1229 and 6488.................................................................. Shuttle Bus Terminus.............................................. T CAR PARKS AND FACILITIES Please read the signs before you park your vehicle! Permit Parking Yellow (student) Car Parks 1, 4, 8, 9, 14, 21, 31, 35

  15. Automated Car Park Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  16. In search of traditional bio-ecological knowledge useful for fisheries co-management: the case of jaraquis Semaprochilodus spp. (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae) in Central Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Batista, Vandick S; Lima, Liane G

    2010-01-01

    The jaraquis (Semaprochilodus spp.) are the most abundant group in the fishing landing in Manaus. However, just command and control management strategies have been used by the fishery governmental agency in the region without the power to enforce centralized decisions. The fishermen and their culture represent a source of information on dynamics of the resources and aquatic environments, fundamental in making possible the co-management of the fishing resources. The present study aims to contribute to management through identification of common information available in scientific and traditional knowledge about the jaraquis' bio-ecology. There were 57 semi-structured interviews recorded with fishermen of Manaus and rural areas of Manacapuru in 2002 concerning biological and ecological aspects. Similarity was observed between scientific and traditional knowledge in the following items: size of first sexual maturation, spawning type, parental care, trophic relationships and migratory behavior, as well as in some aspects of the mortality and growth of the species. However, there was less ethnoicthyological information on fecundity and the determination of the age and growth of adult fish. Common information would be used preferably by agencies to start an effective and technical dialogue with commercial and riverine fishermen to design management plans in a decentralized strategy. PMID:20525294

  17. Urban parking. January 1970-September 1988 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the problems and proposed solutions associated with vehicle parking in urban areas. The use of park-and-ride facilities and satellite parking for public-transportation systems, airports, and central business districts is discussed. Management aspects, and studies performed at specific locations are also described. (This updated bibliography contains 279 citations, 10 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  18. 49 CFR 397.7 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Parking. 397.7 Section 397.7 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; DRIVING AND PARKING RULES General § 397.7 Parking. (a) A motor vehicle which contains...

  19. New Challenges in Campus Parking Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mah, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Examines the challenges campus parking professionals face from the increased demands of organizations to improve parking service levels with diminishing resources. Campus parking operations are explored with an awareness of the needs, attitudes, and demands of customers in mind. (GR)

  20. 23 CFR 1235.6 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parking. 1235.6 Section 1235.6 Highways...TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES UNIFORM SYSTEM FOR PARKING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES § 1235.6 Parking. Special license plates,...

  1. 49 CFR 397.7 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Parking. 397.7 Section 397.7 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; DRIVING AND PARKING RULES General § 397.7 Parking. (a) A motor vehicle which contains...

  2. 23 CFR 1235.6 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parking. 1235.6 Section 1235.6 Highways...TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES UNIFORM SYSTEM FOR PARKING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES § 1235.6 Parking. Special license plates,...

  3. OSU PARKING UTILIZATION FALL TERM 2008

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    OSU PARKING UTILIZATION STUDY FALL TERM 2008 FACILITIES SERVICES CAMPUS PLANNING #12;Facilities Services- Campus Planning March, 2009 2008 OSU PARKING UTILIZATION STUDY Table of Contents Purpose.....................................................................................................3 OSU Main Campus Parking Survey

  4. 23 CFR 1235.6 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parking. 1235.6 Section 1235.6 Highways...TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES UNIFORM SYSTEM FOR PARKING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES § 1235.6 Parking. Special license plates,...

  5. 23 CFR 1235.6 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parking. 1235.6 Section 1235.6 Highways...TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES UNIFORM SYSTEM FOR PARKING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES § 1235.6 Parking. Special license plates,...

  6. 23 CFR 1235.6 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parking. 1235.6 Section 1235.6 Highways...TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES UNIFORM SYSTEM FOR PARKING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES § 1235.6 Parking. Special license plates,...

  7. 49 CFR 397.7 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Parking. 397.7 Section 397.7 Transportation...TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; DRIVING AND PARKING RULES General § 397.7 Parking. (a) A motor vehicle which contains...

  8. Geology Fieldnotes: Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Petrified Forest National Park was established to preserve large deposits of petrified wood and to prevent removal of the wood by the public. Site featues include park geology information, maps, photographs, related links, visitor information, multimedia resources, and resources for teaching geology with National Park examples. The park geology section discusses the park's geologic history, structural geology, petrified wood, and dinosaur fossils. The maps section includes a map of the park itself and the surrounding area.

  9. National Park Service: Nature and Science

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the nature and science portal for the National Park Service. Visitors can access information on air quality in the national parks, wildlife health and management, invasive species, threatened and endangered species, and others. Geologic materials include park geology tours, minerals management in and adjacent to parks, disturbed lands restoration, and others. Water-related materials include wetlands in parks, fisheries, water quality and flow issues, and others. Additional materials include park soundscapes, laws and regulations, publications, and news articles.

  10. INVESTIGATION OF SERUM MICROCYSTIN CONCENTRATIONS AMONG DIALYSIS PATIENTS, BRAZIL, 1996

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of Serum Microcystin Concentrations Among Dialysis Patients, Brazil, 1996 Elizabeth D. Hilborn 1, Wayne W. Carmichael 2, Sandra M.F.O. Azevedo 3 1- USEPA/ORD/NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC 2- Wright State University, Dayton, OH 3- Federal Univers...

  11. Microbiology in Yellowstone National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ward David

    This site describes how Yellowstone National Park is a focal point for cutting-edge microbiology research and how it provides a valuable setting for outreach education. Topics include questions for park officials, extremophiles, microbe diversity and evolution, educational outreach, and suggested reading.

  12. California Community Colleges Parking Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Chuck

    In 1990, a representative sample of 25 California community colleges was contacted by telephone to determine their parking policies and practices. The colleges were sampled on the basis of location and size. Study findings included the following: (1) 17 of the colleges reported that they had insufficient numbers of on-campus parking spaces; (2)…

  13. Cardinal Soccer Clinic Peckham Park

    E-print Network

    Devoto, Stephen H.

    Cardinal Soccer Clinic at Peckham Park Middlefield, CT Dates: July 25-29, 2011 Time: 6:00-8:00 pm Who: Boys and Girls ­ Ages 5-12 (Grades K-6) Coaches: Geoff Wheeler ­ Wesleyan Men's Soccer Coach Why: Come enjoy a great week of soccer focused on individual skills, teamwork and fun! Where: Peckham Park

  14. PARKiNG iNfoRmAtioN CAMPUS PARkING LOTS and ARRANGEMENTS ______________________________________

    E-print Network

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Parking Garage for visits of less than 2 hours. For visits of more than 2 hours, UNLV· daily and weekly and the Parking Garage on the extreme northeast end of the campus.Travel south on Maryland Parkway; take Avenue can also be accessed by turning right from eastbound Flamingo Road at the Claymont Avenue traffic

  15. Procedure for Citation Payment at Parking Online 1. Go to Parking Services webpage at http://www.uaf.edu/parking.

    E-print Network

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Procedure for Citation Payment at Parking Online 1. Go to Parking Services webpage at http://www.uaf.edu/parking. 2. Select Citation Payment under the Parking Online Logo. 3. Select Citation Payment from the Menu. 4. Enter the citation number (a letter followed by seven digit number, ex. A0000000) 5. Enter

  16. Procedure for Citation Appeal at Parking Online 1. Go to Parking Services webpage at http://www.uaf.edu/parking.

    E-print Network

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Procedure for Citation Appeal at Parking Online 1. Go to Parking Services webpage at http://www.uaf.edu/parking. 2. Select Appeal Citation under the Parking Online Logo. 3. Select Appeal Citation from the Menu. 4 the citation number (a letter followed by seven digit number, ex. A0000000) 6. Enter the vehicle plate

  17. General view looking from the west of the central section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view looking from the west of the central section to the porte cochere - National Park Seminary, Aloha House, North of Linden Lane near corner of Beech Drive, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  18. Amusement Park Physics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    It's one thing to learn about physics in a lab, but it can be quite another thing to make a pilgrimage to an amusement park to take in the laws of physics. Users will have to supply their own corn dogs and popcorn, but this rather nice educational resource from Annenberg Media will be quite useful for budding physicists and their teachers. The resource allows users to design their own roller coaster, and along the way they will learn a thing or two about the laws of gravity, pendulums, and kinetic energy. Along with explanatory essays, this resource contains interactive graphics and a glossary of terms. Sit back and enjoy the virtual roller coaster ride, as this site provides a rather novel way of introducing students to physics.

  19. Aftermath of Griffith Park Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In mid-May 2007, wind-driven flames raced through Griffith Park in Los Angeles, forcing hasty evacuations and threatening numerous famous landmarks and tourist spots, such as the Los Angeles Zoo and the Hollywood Sign. Ultimately, no one was injured in the fire, which may have been started by a cigarette. About 800 acres burned in the urban park, which is itself a Hollywood landmark, having been the location for several movies, including Rebel Without A Cause. This image of the park was captured by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on June 6, 2007, about a month after the fire. ASTER detects both visible and infrared wavelengths of light, and both kinds have been used to make this image. Vegetation appears in various shades of red, while the burned areas appear charcoal. Roads and dense urban areas appear purplish-gray or white. Water is dark blue. Large burned areas are evident in the northwest and southeast parts of the park, with scattered smaller patches along the southern margin. Some botanical gardens and parts of a bird sanctuary, as well as some park structures like restrooms, were destroyed. The park's unburned, natural vegetation appears brick red, while the irrigated golf courses adjacent to the park are bright red. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  20. Park and chill : redesign parking garage in Hong Kong

    E-print Network

    Ting, Sze Ngai

    2011-01-01

    What are the aesthetics of urban infrastructure? Urban infrastructure has remained isolated to human activities. We all share memory and experience with urban infrastructure, e.g. we drive on the same roads and park our ...

  1. 1.OA At the Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: There were 7 children at the park. Then 4 more showed up. How many children were at the park all together? There were 7 children at the park. Some more...

  2. Logistics park development in Slovak Republic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marián Šulgan

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with the actual situation in the Slovak Republic concerning the logistics parks development. It presents the theoretical base of the logistics park development, i.e. the comparative analysis, SWOT analysis, transport infrastructure survey, marketing study and marketing plan for logistics park. It also presents the basic characteristic of logistics park, logistics chains and activities connected with the transport,

  3. Planning and Design for Industry Logistics Park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guo Yi; Zhang Xinxin

    2011-01-01

    Regarding a single industry as the target, industry logistics park is the professional logistics park that is specially planned according to industry characteristics. Considering that the industry logistics park has special functions, such as economize on resources, improvement of logistics efficiency and service quality, protection of the environment and so on, industry logistics park's planning and design is different from

  4. Parkes Integer Programming 1 Integer Programming

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yiling

    formulation of an IP we can use primal-dual based methods to design iterative mechanisms. #12;Parkes IntegerParkes Integer Programming 1 ' & $ % Integer Programming David C. Parkes Division of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University CS 286r­Spring 2002 #12;Parkes Integer Programming 2

  5. Burning cars in a parking Jean Bertoin

    E-print Network

    Burning cars in a parking Jean Bertoin Abstract Knuth's parking scheme is a model in computer science for hashing with linear probing. One may imagine a circular parking with n sites; cars arrive at each site with unit rate. When a car arrives at a vacant site, it parks there; otherwise it turns

  6. The international politics of national parks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen M. O'Neill

    1996-01-01

    National parks are the keystone institutions of environmental conservation. Because national parks make certain lands part of the state itself, international agencies and nongovernmental organizations that promote national parks propose, in effect, to alter the state, as well as the local economy and state relations with social groups. Has international political pressure caused states to create national parks? I consider

  7. February 2014 STUDENT APPLICATION FOR CAR PARKING

    E-print Network

    Davies, Christopher

    February 2014 STUDENT APPLICATION FOR CAR PARKING Car Parks Office Security & Portering Services@cardiff.ac.uk Limited spaces are available in the Cranbrook car parks for students living at Senghennydd Court only. The charge for car parking for session 2013/14 is £132.00, exclusive of VAT, payable in advance. CHEQUES

  8. February 2014 STAFF APPLICATION FOR CAR PARKING

    E-print Network

    Davies, Christopher

    February 2014 STAFF APPLICATION FOR CAR PARKING Car Parks Office Security & Portering Services@cardiff.ac.uk The 2014 fee for staff car parking is 0.75% of gross annual salary or £192.00, whichever is lower. Changes) Model (Focus) Colour 1. 2. Car Parks In Order Of Preference 1st : 2nd : 3rd : The following

  9. Standard structures For roadside, car parks,

    E-print Network

    Standard structures For roadside, car parks, visitor information, wayfinding & waymarking Forestry visitor centres. Suitable locations At road entrance to car park/driveway Symbols Up to 5 symbols is for Entrances to medium-sized car parks Suitable locations At road entrance to car park Symbols Up to 3 symbols

  10. Accessibility Application Blue Badge Car Park UK

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    i Accessibility Application Blue Badge Car Park UK Konstantinos Grassos H00113751 August 2012. In this project, Blue Badge Car Park (BBCP) is presented which is actually a mobile-based park finder application. It specifically focuses on finding parking spaces for wheelchair users, which are indicated by the blue badge

  11. Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Smithsonian Parking

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Smithsonian Parking I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: Smithsonian Parking System 2. System Sponsor Unit: OFEO Office of Protection Services (OPS) Parking Office 3 Parking Office 5. IT System Manager: Michelle T. Gooch, Manager, OCIO FMS Systems Manager 6. PIA Author

  12. EXTENDED PARKING REQUEST COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES

    E-print Network

    EXTENDED PARKING REQUEST COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES FACILITIES MANAGEMENT DEPT PARKING SERVICES to Parking Services allows a CSM student or employee to leave his/her vehicle within the campus boundaries for an extended period of time. Vehicle registration and a valid CSM parking permit must be current and visible

  13. PARKING & TRANSPORTATION OFFICE USE ONLY _____Request Approved

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    PARKING & TRANSPORTATION OFFICE USE ONLY _____Request Approved Form last updated 4/19/2010E-UID: C-UID: HEALTH SYSTEM PARKING OFFICE USE ONLY _____Request Denied Parking and Transportation University of Virginia Department of Parking and Transportation Phone: 434-924-7231 Fax: 434-924-3980 Health System

  14. PARKING MASTER PLAN UPDATE BOISE STATE

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    PARKING MASTER PLAN UPDATE BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY BOISE, IDAHO Prepared for: Boise State University, Department of Transportation and Parking Services August 6, 2010 #12;WALKER PARKING CONSULTANTS 5350 S.walkerparking.com J:\\23-7222-00-BSU_Parking_MasterPlan_09\\Reports\\rpt20100806-Boise_State.doc August 6, 2010 Mr. Jared

  15. Yellowstone National Park: Historic 3-D Photographs Featuring Park Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stoffer Phil

    This source provides a series of 34 historic photographs of well-known geologic landmarks in Yellowstone National Park. The photographs can be viewed individually or as part of a tour that begins at Old Faithful and proceeds in a clockwise route around the park. The images were created by digital manipulation of antique stereographs and they may be viewed as black and white photos or in 3-D using special stereographic glasses.

  16. Association of Park Size, Distance, and Features With Physical Activity in Neighborhood Parks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew T. Kaczynski; Luke R. Potwarka; Brian E. Saelens

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We studied whether park size, number of features in the park, and distance to a park from participants' homes were related to a park being used for physical activity. Methods. We collected observational data on 28 specific features from 33 parks. Adult residents in surrounding areas (n = 380) completed 7-day physical activity logs that included the location of

  17. University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy 1.0 Why have a car parking policy?

    E-print Network

    Pym, David J.

    Document1 University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy 1.0 Why have a car parking policy to such an extent that its current car park capacity is not sufficient to provide parking for all staff to improve and develop the University further, there is a need to control our car parking facilities

  18. Criteria for Car Parking Allocation System Criteria for Car Parking Allocation System

    E-print Network

    Mottram, Nigel

    Criteria for Car Parking Allocation System Criteria for Car Parking Allocation System 2014-15 Criteria for Car Parking All #12;The issue and control of car parking permits is vested in Estates Services. The annual charges are incorporated in the application form. The car parking charges will be deducted from

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.270 - Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...102-74.270 Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...designated visitor or service areas must display a parking permit. This requirement...

  20. 41 CFR 102-74.270 - Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...102-74.270 Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...designated visitor or service areas must display a parking permit. This requirement...

  1. 41 CFR 102-74.270 - Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...102-74.270 Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...designated visitor or service areas must display a parking permit. This requirement...

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.270 - Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...102-74.270 Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...designated visitor or service areas must display a parking permit. This requirement...

  3. 41 CFR 102-74.270 - Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...102-74.270 Are vehicles required to display parking permits in parking facilities...designated visitor or service areas must display a parking permit. This requirement...

  4. The quandary of local people---Park relations in Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl E. Weber

    1995-01-01

    This paper analyzes five major causes of park-people conflicts that have occurred in Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park. The causes include illegal transactions of forest products from the park, livestock grazing in the park, illegal hunting and fishing, crop damage, and threats to human and animal life caused by wild animals from the park. The conflicts indicate a reciprocal relationship

  5. Notice to Post on Queen's Parking Website Questions & Answers about Queen's New Parking Rates

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Randy

    Notice to Post on Queen's Parking Website Questions & Answers about Queen's New Parking Rates Q. What are the new parking rates? A. Parking rate increases happen every year, but given the financial situation of our parking facilities, a larger than average increase will happen this year. The university

  6. PARKING INFORMATION The College of Engineering will no longer offer reduced parking permits for Engineering

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    PARKING INFORMATION The College of Engineering will no longer offer reduced parking permits listed below. Daytime Parking: Please go to the Parking Services Office and purchase a pass for the time period you need. Permits may be purchased daily, weekly or monthly. Evening Exam Parking: Online students

  7. PARKING TIPS Parking is tight at the beginning of each semester

    E-print Network

    Howitt, Ivan

    ­ 1 ­ PARKING TIPS Parking is tight at the beginning of each semester Expect parking to be at near of classes, traffic and parking patterns settle down. Permit enforcement begins on the first day of class on the first day of class: · plantopaytoparkinaVisitordeckormeteredlot.Youwill not be allowed to park in main

  8. The Science Behind Jurassic Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    "The Science Behind Jurassic Park" is an html document describing how world renowned paleontologist Jack Horner is using computers and CAT scan machines to peer inside 30 million year old dinosaur fossils.

  9. Dead Mans Run parking for

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Dead ManÕs Run 44THSTREET parking for state vehicles Dead ManÕs Run East Campus Recr eation Fields Industry Complex C.Y. Thompson Library Biochemistry Hall Kiesselbach Crops Research Lab Water Sciences Lab

  10. Dead Mans Run parking for

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Dead ManÕs Run 44THSTREET parking for state vehicles Dead ManÕs Run East Campus Recr eation Fields Biochemistry Hall Kiesselbach Crops Research Lab Water Sciences Lab Forestry Hall USDA Insect Lab Insectary

  11. Dead Mans Run parking for

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Dead ManÕs Run 44THSTREET parking for state vehicles Dead ManÕs Run East Campus Recr eation Fields Water Sciences Lab Forestry Hall USDA Insect Lab Insectary College of Dentistry Barkley Memorial Center

  12. Arches National Park - Nature and Science

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service (NPS) website highlights the natural resources of Arches National Park, in addition to the sandstone arches for which the park is famous. Details about the park include the animals that inhabit the area (amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles), natural features (deserts, geologic formations, pools, potholes and soils), environmental factors facing the park (invasive species, perigrine falcons, bighorn sheep), and plants (cacti, grasses, lichens, mosses, liverworts, trees, shrubs and wildflowers).

  13. Urban Parks: Volunteers and Civic Engagement 

    E-print Network

    Schuett, Michael A.

    2007-03-02

    citizens in local efforts and events. ParkScan ? San Francisco, California ParkScan is a partnership of the San Francis- co Recreation and Park Department and the Neighborhood Parks Council, an advocacy group. Trained observers track park and play...- ground maintenance issues in San Francisco and in the surrounding county and use a Web- based reporting system. Maintenance condi- tions are made public and can be tracked at www.parkscansf.org/parkscan.aspx. ACE ? Arlington, Texas The ACE (Action...

  14. Geochronological constraints on the age of a Permo-Triassic impact event: U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar results for the 40 km Araguainha structure of central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, E.; Lana, C.; Cawood, P. A.; Fletcher, I. R.; Jourdan, F.; Sherlock, S.; Rasmussen, B.; Trindade, R. I. F.; Yokoyama, E.; Souza Filho, C. R.; Marangoni, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Impact cratering has been a fundamental geological process in Earth history with major ramifications for the biosphere. The complexity of shocked and melted rocks within impact structures presents difficulties for accurate and precise radiogenic isotope age determination, hampering the assessment of the effects of an individual event in the geological record. We demonstrate the utility of a multi-chronometer approach in our study of samples from the 40 km diameter Araguainha impact structure of central Brazil. Samples of uplifted basement granite display abundant evidence of shock deformation, but U/Pb ages of shocked zircons and the 40Ar/39Ar ages of feldspar from the granite largely preserve the igneous crystallization and cooling history. Mixed results are obtained from in situ40Ar/39Ar spot analyses of shocked igneous biotites in the granite, with deformation along kink-bands resulting in highly localized, partial resetting in these grains. Likewise, spot analyses of perlitic glass from pseudotachylitic breccia samples reflect a combination of argon inheritance from wall rock material, the age of the glass itself, and post-impact devitrification. The timing of crater formation is better assessed using samples of impact-generated melt rock where isotopic resetting is associated with textural evidence of melting and in situ crystallization. Granular aggregates of neocrystallized zircon form a cluster of ten U-Pb ages that yield a “Concordia” age of 247.8 ± 3.8 Ma. The possibility of Pb loss from this population suggests that this is a minimum age for the impact event. The best evidence for the age of the impact comes from the U-Th-Pb dating of neocrystallized monazite and 40Ar/39Ar step heating of three separate populations of post-impact, inclusion-rich quartz grains that are derived from the infill of miarolitic cavities. The 206Pb/238U age of 254.5 ± 3.2 Ma (2? error) and 208Pb/232Th age of 255.2 ± 4.8 Ma (2? error) of monazite, together with the inverse, 18 point isochron age of 254 ± 10 Ma (MSWD = 0.52) for the inclusion-rich quartz grains yield a weighted mean age of 254.7 ± 2.5 Ma (0.99%, 2? error) for the impact event. The age of the Araguainha crater overlaps with the timing of the Permo-Triassic boundary, within error, but the calculated energy released by the Araguainha impact is insufficient to be a direct cause of the global mass extinction. However, the regional effects of the Araguainha impact event in the Paraná-Karoo Basin may have been substantial.

  15. Importance of land use update during the calibration period and simulation of water balance response to land use change in the upper Rio das Mortes Catchment (Cerrado Biome, Central-Western Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamparter, Gabriele; Kovacs, Kristof; Nobrega, Rodolfo; Gerold, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Changes in the hydrological balance and following degradation of the water ecosystem services due to large scale land use changes are reported from agricultural frontiers all over the world. Traditionally, hydrological models including vegetation and land use as a part of the hydrological cycle use a fixed distribution of land use for the calibration period. We believe that a meaningful calibration - especially when investigating the effects of land use change on hydrology - demands the inclusion of land use change during the calibration period into the calibration procedure. The SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model is a process-based, semi-distributed model calculating the different components of the water balance. The model bases on the definition of hydrological response units (HRUs) which are based on soil, vegetation and slope distribution. It specifically emphasises the role of land use and land management on the water balance. The Central-Western region of Brazil is one of the leading agricultural frontiers, which experienced rapid and radical deforestation and agricultural intensification in the last 40 years (from natural Cerrado savannah to cattle grazing to intensive corn and soya cropland). The land use history of the upper Rio das Mortes catchment (with 17500 km²) is reasonably well documented since the 1970th. At the same time there are almost continuous climate and runoff data available for the period between 1988 and 2011. Therefore, the work presented here shows the model calibration and validation of the SWAT model with the land use update function for three different periods (1988 to 1998, 1998 to 2007 and 2007 to 2011) in comparison with the same calibration periods using a steady state land use distribution. The use of the land use update function allows a clearer identification which changes in the discharge are due to climatic variability and which are due to changes in the vegetation cover. With land use update included into the calibration procedure, the impact of land use change on overall modelled runoff was more pronounced. For example, the accordance of modelled peak discharge improved for the period from 1988 to 1998 (with a decrease of primary Cerrado from 60 to 30 %) with the use of the land use update function compared to the steady state calibration. The effect for the following two periods 1998 to 2007 and 2007 to 2011 (with a decrease of primary Cerrado from 30 to 24 % and 24 to 19 % respectively) show only a small improvement of the model fit.

  16. Parking permit rate changes set at Homewood and Eastern

    E-print Network

    Worley, Paul

    Parking permit rate changes set at Homewood and Eastern New permit parking rates go into effect on July 1 for parking lots and garages on the Homewood and Eastern campuses. Since parking is paid. Faculty hangtag parking and general garage parking are $94 per month. Reserved parking spaces at the West

  17. Contribution of Public Parks to Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Sehgal, Amber; Williamson, Stephanie; Golinelli, Daniela; Lurie, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. Parks provide places for people to experience nature, engage in physical activity, and relax. We studied how residents in low-income, minority communities use public, urban neighborhood parks and how parks contribute to physical activity. Methods. In 8 public parks, we used direct observation to document the number, gender, race/ethnicity, age group, and activity level of park users 4 times per day, 7 days per week. We also interviewed 713 park users and 605 area residents living within 2 miles of each park. Results. On average, over 2000 individuals were counted in each park, and about two thirds were sedentary when observed. More males than females used the parks, and males were twice as likely to be vigorously active. Interviewees identified the park as the most common place they exercised. Both park use and exercise levels of individuals were predicted by proximity of their residence to the park. Conclusions. Public parks are critical resources for physical activity in minority communities. Because residential proximity is strongly associated with physical activity and park use, the number and location of parks are currently insufficient to serve local populations well. PMID:17267728

  18. Sustainable Housing for Park Rangers in Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-print Network

    Garrison, M.; Griswold, S.

    1996-01-01

    the direction of Associate Professor Glenn Hill, have designed environmentally friendly "green" homes for park rangers in Big Bend National Park, Texas. With funding from the National Park Foundation and a construction commitment of 1.2 million dollars...

  19. Multinational underground nuclear parks

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C.W. [Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F650, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Giraud, K.M. [Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, 1550 Oxen Lane NE, P.O. Box 411, Burlington, KS 66839-0411 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Newcomer countries expected to develop new nuclear power programs by 2030 are being encouraged by the International Atomic Energy Agency to explore the use of shared facilities for spent fuel storage and geologic disposal. Multinational underground nuclear parks (M-UNPs) are an option for sharing such facilities. Newcomer countries with suitable bedrock conditions could volunteer to host M-UNPs. M-UNPs would include back-end fuel cycle facilities, in open or closed fuel cycle configurations, with sufficient capacity to enable M-UNP host countries to provide for-fee waste management services to partner countries, and to manage waste from the M-UNP power reactors. M-UNP potential advantages include: the option for decades of spent fuel storage; fuel-cycle policy flexibility; increased proliferation resistance; high margin of physical security against attack; and high margin of containment capability in the event of beyond-design-basis accidents, thereby reducing the risk of Fukushima-like radiological contamination of surface lands. A hypothetical M-UNP in crystalline rock with facilities for small modular reactors, spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and geologic disposal is described using a room-and-pillar reference-design cavern. Underground construction cost is judged tractable through use of modern excavation technology and careful site selection. (authors)

  20. An analysis of Utah State Park visitors 

    E-print Network

    Burns, Dennis C.

    1988-01-01

    studies Approach 3 7 3. RESULTS 15 Average Length of Stay Day-users Versus Campers Activities in State Parks Type of Group and Origin Decision to Visit State Parks Attitudinal Questions 4. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS 15 17 19 25 31 37 42... of vehicle counts used to calculate activities 13 3 Average length of stay, by park 16 4 Numbers and percentages of day-users and campers, by park 18 5 Statewide summary of activities in the state parks 21 6 Summary matrix of activities by park; Rank...

  1. Tour of Park Geology: Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service (NPS) site provides links to geology field notes providing information about National Parks, National Monuments, and National Recreation Areas that have to do with plate tectonics. The site also has illustrations and descriptions of different plate boundaries. The parks are divided into categories depending on which type of plate boundary they are located on. This includes divergent boundaries(active and ancient), convergent boundaries (ocean-ocean, continent-continent, continent-ocean), transform faults, hot spots, and accreted terrains. Parks referenced include Virgin Islands National Park, Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, and many more.

  2. Geology Fieldnotes: Badlands National Park, South Dakota

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Badlands National Park, located in southwestern South Dakota, consists of 244,000 acres of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles and spires blended with the largest, protected mixed grass prairie in the United States. Features include information on park geology, maps, photographs, visitor information, links to related publications, and lesson plans for teaching geology with National Park examples. The park geology section discusses the Park's geologic history during the Eocene and Oligocene epochs and the rich fossil deposits found there. Maps of the park and the surrounding area are included.

  3. Eco-hydrologic role of urban parks in Queretaro City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina Frutos, S.; Gonzalez-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C. A.; Gutierrez-Lopez, M. A.; Ciaq

    2010-12-01

    Urban parks are essential for the well-being and comfort of urban zones, vegetation plays an important role in the water balance, but these areas rarely are considered as urban infrastructure, this is why studies are necessary to assess the eco-hydrological role of urban parks and the micro climate effect of them in adjacent areas. The study is carried out during the raining seasons of 2010 and 2011 in six urban parks located in the central area of the Queretaro valley: Alameda Centro, Alamos, Alcanfores Norte, Arboledas, Cerro de las campanas and Queretaro 2000. This work aims to measure and modeling the rainfall interception process from measuring some random plots into the urban parks, also to evaluate the water balance and the runoff that is spilled to the drainage system. According to previous studies it is expected that vegetation intercepts more than 60% of total rainfall so the runoff in urban areas decrease, also to quantify the available water volume to infiltrate to aquifer recharge.

  4. Disabled Parking & Access Plan Campus Disabled Persons (DP)

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Disabled Parking & Access Plan Campus Disabled Persons (DP) Parking and Access Plan For CSU Executive Deans Meeting Stanislaus Campus June 2007 #12;Disabled Parking & Access Plan Core Team: · Michael & Construction · Paul Miller, Director ­ Disabled Student Services · Joe Ferrer, Director ­ Parking

  5. PARKING SERVICES SERVICE REQUEST FORM Form revised 21March 2011

    E-print Network

    PARKING SERVICES SERVICE REQUEST FORM Form revised 21March 2011 Request for (please check one): Contact Phone No. Fax No. __ Parking Scripts - __________ (specify quantity) Supv, Parking Services 24832 25386 __ Campus Maps - __________ (specify quantity) Supv Parking Services 24832 25386 __ Visitors

  6. The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements

    E-print Network

    Shoup, Donald

    2012-01-01

    charging electric cars. If the solar energy is being storedcars can feel green when they park in the shade of solarSolar canopies over parking lots can provide some of the electricity needed for these cars

  7. Parking & Transportation Department RESIDENT -PERSONAL INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Parking & Transportation Department RESIDENT - PERSONAL INFORMATION Date know if you are interested in: Public Transportation Car Pool Van Pool _____________________________________________________________________________________ Please be sure to contact the Parking & Transportation Department with any changes to your information, i

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts........................................................................................................................ 16 TABLE OF FIGURES Figure 1 - Site location at Deer Island Parking Lot site................

  9. Parking on a Random Tree

    E-print Network

    H. Dehling; S. R. Fleurke; C. Kuelske

    2007-11-26

    Consider an infinite tree with random degrees, i.i.d. over the sites, with a prescribed probability distribution with generating function G(s). We consider the following variation of Renyi's parking problem, alternatively called blocking RSA: at every vertex of the tree a particle (or car) arrives with rate one. The particle sticks to the vertex whenever the vertex and all of its nearest neighbors are not occupied yet. We provide an explicit expression for the so-called parking constant in terms of the generating function.

  10. White -Parking Services Yellow Parking Services, return to appellant with reply Pink -Appellant's initial copy PLEASE READ REVERSE SIDE

    E-print Network

    White - Parking Services Yellow ­ Parking Services, return to appellant with reply Pink - Appellant's initial copy PLEASE READ REVERSE SIDE SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY PARKING SERVICES NOTICE OF APPEAL Section 1 - to be completed by Parking Services Date Appeal Received: ______________________________ Received by

  11. Overview of The Ariel Sharon (Ayalon) Park PARK ARIEL SHARON TEL AVIV METROPOLITAN GEM

    E-print Network

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    , the drainage and park design and programming were developed into an integrated master plan by a world classOverview of The Ariel Sharon (Ayalon) Park PARK ARIEL SHARON ­ TEL AVIV METROPOLITAN GEM The Ariel Sharon Park, a world class leading environmental project, was initiated by the Tel-Aviv District

  12. Welcome to Diamond Light Source Parking Visitors can park outside Diamond

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    Welcome to Diamond Light Source Parking ­ Visitors can park outside Diamond House, or if that is full, in the Visitor car park. Users should park around the ring. On Arrival ­ Diamond does not have 8500). Then take a seat 2 and wait for your Diamond contact to collect you. Users ­ Fast track users

  13. University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy -v2 0.docx University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy

    E-print Network

    Levi, Ran

    University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy - v2 0.docx University of Aberdeen Car Parking Policy 1.0 Why have a car parking policy? The University of Aberdeen is aware of the importance of corporate. The University has developed to such an extent that its current car park capacity is not sufficient to provide

  14. Modeling Support for National Park Planning: Initial Results from Glacier National Park

    E-print Network

    Ford, Andrew

    1 Modeling Support for National Park Planning: Initial Results from Glacier National Park Andrew. The main case study simulates operational issues at Glacier National Park. The model simulates vehicles is used to show the simulated impacts from the park's shuttle system. The Glacier study demonstrates

  15. Parking Violation Policy Outline the policy regarding parking violations issued to operators in University of Michigan

    E-print Network

    Kirschner, Denise

    Parking Violation Policy Objective Outline the policy regarding parking violations issued. It is the responsibility of the vehicle operator to comply with all state and local parking ordinances. 2. It is the responsibility of the vehicle operator to secure the U-M vehicle when it is parked to deter theft or vandalism. 3

  16. Parking for admissions interviews The Office of Undergraduate Admissions has two parking

    E-print Network

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    Parking for admissions interviews The Office of Undergraduate Admissions has two parking spots next to the Howe Center that are reserved for admis- sions interview visitors. Please park in one of these spaces. If the admissions spaces are taken when you arrive, tempo- rarily park in front of the Howe Center and visit

  17. PARKING CHARGE NOTICE Swansea University operate a Car Parking Management Scheme which is administered by Total

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    PARKING CHARGE NOTICE Swansea University operate a Car Parking Management Scheme which is administered by Total Parking Solutions in order to control unauthorised vehicular access and inappropriate parking. Providing such control is essential to ensure that the campus functions safely and efficiently

  18. CrowdPark: A Crowdsourcing-based Parking Reservation System for Mobile Phones

    E-print Network

    Shenoy, Prashant

    , and braking behav- ior while circling has significant impact on automobile emissions [2]. Parking issues alsoCrowdPark: A Crowdsourcing-based Parking Reservation System for Mobile Phones Tingxin Yan§ , Baik. A reservation system that enables individuals to buy park- ing spots prior to leaving their home would

  19. Selected Parking Types Resident Parking,Permit Required

    E-print Network

    Lipson, Michal

    1 2 4 A B C ND ND WD WD WD SW SW ND FH FH FH ND/SC FH SC SC SC SC SC SC SC/B CAMPUS MAP NORTH,will be posted at www.parking.cornell.edu. FH,ND,SW,WD B,SC 1 - Hoy Road 4 - Campus Road 2 - Tower Road Info

  20. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  1. Acadia National Park - Nature and Science

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service (NPS) website highlights the natural resources of Acadia National Park. Resources discussed include animals (amphibians, birds and fish), plants (ferns, freshwater plants, grasses, mosses, liverworts and wildflowers), environmental factors (fire regime, pests, nonnative species, weather, water quality and air quality), and natural features of the park (beaches, coastline, forests, geologic formations, intertidal and subtidal zones, mountains, and wetlands). There are related documents about the park's air and water quality available to download.

  2. Geology Fieldnotes: Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Capitol Reef National Park site contains park geology information, park maps, photographs, visitor information, and a teacher feature (resources for teaching geology with National Park examples). Geologic data includes descriptions of the Waterpocket Fold, a monocline formed in the Laramide Orogeny and made of sedimentary rock. Also covered is erosion, and details about the Cathedral Valley outcrop of gypsum. This formation is Permian to Cretaceous in age (270-80 million years old).

  3. Geology Fieldnotes: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Visitors can access park geology information, photographs, related links, visitor information, multimedia resources, and resources for teaching geology with National Park examples. The park geology section discusses the Grand Canyon's geologic history, structural geology, and features a question-and-answer section about the canyon. The history of the canyon as a park and environmental issues surrounding it are also discussed. A geologic cross section of the canyon showing the various rock layers is included.

  4. Geology Fieldnotes: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service resource includes information about geology, park maps, visitor information, photographs, and links to other sites about this park. Geologic information spans the entire history of the park, beginning 2.5 billion years ago (Precambrian) to the present. Details about the different rock types and their formation, mountain building through plate tectonics and the Laramide Orogeny, formation of valleys and canyons, volcanism in the area, and erosion by glaciers are all covered.

  5. Nature and Science at Canyonlands National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service (NPS) website highlights the environment and ecosystems found in Canyonlands National Park. Topics include animals in the park (amphibians, reptiles, birds, fish and mammals), plant life (cacti, grasses, lichens, mosses, liverworts, trees, shrubs and wildflowers), environmental factors (air quality, invasive species, endangered fish, noise pollution, peregrine falcons and bighorn sheep), and natural features (deserts, pools, rivers and stream, geology). Links are provided to downloadable brochures and reports on park research activities and additional information on wildlife and plants.

  6. The vascular plant flora of Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Ross County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Course, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    HopewellCulture National Historical Park, a unit of the United States National Park Service located in Ross County in south central Ohio, was created to restore, protect, and interpret the legacy of the mound building Hopewell prehistoric peoples. The vascular flora of the park had been estimated to be only 20% known prior to the undertaking of this project. During the spring, summer, and fall of 1995, almost 700 plant specimens were collected by three investigators from five units of the park. Totals of 438 species, 281 genera, and 93 families of vascular plants were discovered, representing 40% of the flora of Ross County, and 17% of the flora of Ohio. Introduced species constituted 32% of the flora. Sixty-five species are new records for Ross County. Two species of special concern, Spiranthes ovalis and Eleocharis ovata, are on the state's threatened and endangered species list. The Hopewell unit had the highest plant diversity of the five units.

  7. WF 070016 BERKELEY.EDU/TRANSPORTATION UC BERKELEY PARKING & TRANSPORTATION

    E-print Network

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    available. Parking for Special Events must be pre-arranged and authorized by Parking & Transportation parking needs, staffing and service costs may be assessed. Making Special Event parking reservations WhenWF 070016 BERKELEY.EDU/TRANSPORTATION UC BERKELEY PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SPECIAL EVENT PARKING

  8. Tour of Park Geology: Hot Springs/Geothermal

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service (NPS) site provides links to National Parks with hot springs or geothermal activity. Where appropriate, links are provided to geology, visitor information, photographs, park maps, multimedia resources, geologic research, and additional links. Parks at this site include Hot Springs National Park, Lassen Volcano National Park, and more.

  9. Queen's Parking Regulations for Motor Vehicles Message from the Manager

    E-print Network

    Graham, Nick

    Queen's Parking Regulations for Motor Vehicles Contents Message from the Manager Section 1 Definitions Section 2 Jurisdiction Section 3 Parking Permit Information Section 4 - Parking Areas and Parking Restrictions Section 5: Parking for Visitors and Guests to Campus Section 6 Motorcycle Parking Regulations

  10. KU Parking &Transit | 1501 Irving Hill Road | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-PARK | Fax: (785) 864-5220 | parking.ku.edu | kupark@ku.edu 2014-2015 Parking Regulations

    E-print Network

    KU Parking &Transit | 1501 Irving Hill Road | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-PARK | Fax: (785) 864-5220 | parking.ku.edu | kupark@ku.edu 2014-2015 Parking Regulations Page 1 Parking & Transit strives to provide for the University community and its visitors. The regulation of parking is a service to the university

  11. ASRC Report: Photovoltaic Covered Parking Lots

    E-print Network

    Perez, Richard R.

    ASRC Report: Photovoltaic Covered Parking Lots --- A Survey of Deployable Space In the Hudson River, parking lots represent an opportunity for the deployment of Photovoltaics (PV) on already built demand mitigation (2, 4.) At a time when technologies for parking lot deployment are being readied

  12. The planning of environmental logistics park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ping Guo; Desheng Zhang

    2010-01-01

    With the opening of China's efforts to increase, the service levels of logistics industry should be improved and more powerful logistics park should be built. Logistics park is important infrastructures to modern logistics industry, at present, logistics parks is land development hot issue own to its superiority on accumulative and radiation effect. For the railway as a less polluting in

  13. Performance Modeling of Intelligent Car Parking Systems

    E-print Network

    Telek, Miklós

    Performance Modeling of Intelligent Car Parking Systems K´aroly Farkas1,3 , G´abor Horv´ath1 Abstract. The performance analysis of the car parking process in a parking lot with various levels the average time necessary for the user to reach the desired destination, the amount of cars moving

  14. RESEARCH & OUTREACH CENTER AT UMORE PARK

    E-print Network

    Weiblen, George D

    ROSEMOUNT RESEARCH & OUTREACH CENTER AT UMORE PARK UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA ROSEMOUNT ROC OFFICE ROCK TRAIL TRAILHEAD ROSEMOUNT ROC AT UMORE PARK ROSEMOUNT ROC AT UMORE PARK ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE AND CONFERENCE CENTER 1605 160TH ST. WEST - ROSEMOUNT, MN 55068 PHONE: 651.423.2455 FAX: 651.423.1491 WEB: www

  15. 78 FR 24323 - National Park Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ...Proclamation 8961 of April 19, 2013 National Park Week, 2013 By the President of the United States...to be passed on. During National Park Week, we celebrate the wonders entrusted to...summon us to experience it firsthand. This week, the National Park Service will make...

  16. Alluvial Fan, Rocky Mountain National Park

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Alluvial Fan is a fan-shaped area of disturbance in Rocky Mountain National Park. It was created on July 15, 1982, when the earthen Lawn Lake Dam above the area gave way, flooding the Park and nearby town of Estes Park with more than 200 million gallons of water. Enormous boulders were displaced...

  17. Yellowstone National Park Online Slide File

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Yellowstone National Park

    This Yellowstone National Park website contains thousands of photographs of the Park. Images are organized by category including fire, thermal features, mammals, park structures, petrified trees, water, weather, scenics, and more. The photographs may be freely downloaded and more are being added through time.

  18. Metrics Report McMaster Parking Services

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    1 Metrics Report McMaster Parking Services Monthly Report September 2014 #12;2 MISSION STATEMENT Security & Parking Services strive to provide our University Community and visitors, with safe and well through information resources, polite and knowledgeable staff, and convenient parking facilities. We

  19. Lean thinking implementation at a safari park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denyse M. Julien; Benny Tjahjono

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project at a safari park in Buckinghamshire, UK. The aim is to introduce lean principles to the park, to enable the park to increase profits through eliminating waste and improving the efficiency of key processes whilst concurrently increasing customer satisfaction. The research is based on a case

  20. UTS ACCESSIBLE PARKING PERMIT APPLICATION FOR STAFF

    E-print Network

    University of Technology, Sydney

    UTS ACCESSIBLE PARKING PERMIT APPLICATION FOR STAFF Accessible parking is available these parking spaces. Permits are issued to staff through the Equity and Diversity Unit, to students through, or is seriously compromised in their ability to use public transport to travel to the University (e.g. anxiety

  1. Geology Fieldnotes: Isle Royale National Park, Michigan

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service (NPS) website examines the geology of Isle Royale National Park in Michigan. It looks at the geologic history of this archipelago, beginning 1.2 billion years ago and progressing through volcanics, rock formations and copper deposits, to the Ice Age. There are links to park maps, visitor information, and additional resources.

  2. Moon Park: A research and educational facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriki, Kyoichi; Saito, Takao; Ogawa, Yukimasa

    1992-01-01

    Moon Park has been proposed as an International Space Year (ISY) event for international cooperative efforts. Moon Park will serve as a terrestrial demonstration of a prototype lunar base and provide research and educational opportunities. The kind of data that can be obtained in the Moon Park facilities is examined taking the minimum number of lunar base residents as an example.

  3. 32 CFR 634.31 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Parking. 634.31 Section 634.31 National... Traffic Supervision § 634.31 Parking. (a) The most efficient use of existing on- and off-street parking space should be stressed on a...

  4. PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES November 15, 2012

    E-print Network

    PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES November 15, 2012 Attendees: Steve Schrock, Andrew Shoemaker, Eddie parking permits, and the auto-gold list. With the planning for the renovation of Jayhawk Boulevard, the question of whether or not to remove parking spaces is under discussion again. In order to reduce

  5. 32 CFR 636.14 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Parking. 636.14 Section 636.14 National... Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.14 Parking. In addition to the requirements in... (a) Military Police will enforce parking in handicapped and Commanding...

  6. 15 CFR 265.17 - Parking permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parking permits. 265.17 Section 265.17...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.17 Parking permits. No person, except visitors...vehicle on the site without having a valid parking permit displayed on such motor...

  7. 15 CFR 265.17 - Parking permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parking permits. 265.17 Section 265.17...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.17 Parking permits. No person, except visitors...vehicle on the site without having a valid parking permit displayed on such motor...

  8. Helen C. White Garage Visitor Parking

    E-print Network

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    Helen C. White Garage Visitor Parking Effective Monday, April 8, 2013 Daytime and Evening visitor parking is "pay on exit". Visitors pull a ticket on entry and then pay at a Pay on Foot Station or at the exit lane column upon leaving. Visitor Parking available on Street Level: · All day, Sunday through

  9. 32 CFR 636.14 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Parking. 636.14 Section 636.14 National... Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.14 Parking. In addition to the requirements in... (a) Military Police will enforce parking in handicapped and Commanding...

  10. 15 CFR 265.16 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parking. 265.16 Section 265.16 Commerce...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.16 Parking. No person, unless otherwise authorized...would obstruct traffic; (h) In a parking space marked as not intended for his...

  11. 32 CFR 263.10 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Parking. 263.10 Section 263.10 National...DEFENSE MAPPING AGENCY SITES § 263.10 Parking. (a) No person, unless otherwise...would obstruct traffic. (8) In a parking space marked as not intended for his...

  12. PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES March 5, 2013

    E-print Network

    PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES March 5, 2013 Attendees: Steve Schrock, Eddie Munoz, Margaret Mahoney). There was also discussion about the 50-year-contract for concession of Ohio State University parking parking software company, which will simplify and automate our ticket identification process. This changes

  13. 32 CFR 263.10 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Parking. 263.10 Section 263.10 National...DEFENSE MAPPING AGENCY SITES § 263.10 Parking. (a) No person, unless otherwise...would obstruct traffic. (8) In a parking space marked as not intended for his...

  14. Parking Customer Services 523 S. Division

    E-print Network

    Kirschner, Denise

    Parking Customer Services 523 S. Division Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2912 Phone: (734) 764-8291 Fax: (734 daily Guest parking permit(s) to be charged to your department by SUB. This form must be used by all guest permits are for surface lots only. Prior authorization is required for access to structure parking

  15. 32 CFR 263.10 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Parking. 263.10 Section 263.10 National...DEFENSE MAPPING AGENCY SITES § 263.10 Parking. (a) No person, unless otherwise...would obstruct traffic. (8) In a parking space marked as not intended for his...

  16. Parking Options 2011/12 Reserved Permits

    E-print Network

    Parking Options 2011/12 Reserved Permits A Reserved permit is $275 this fiscal year and is only available to faculty and staff through payroll deduction. Individuals issued a Reserved permit may park in any space in the lot they are assigned. Reserved parking will not be oversold, so if the lot

  17. Department of Public Safety Parking and

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    Department of Public Safety Parking and Traffic Regulations SY 2012-2013 Edition Department of Public Safety Administrative Services 419 Boston Avenue Medford, MA 02155 (617) 627-3692 Visit http://publicsafety.tufts.edu/parking and to operate a motor vehicle on the streets, driveways and parking lots of the campus. 4. DEFINITIONS 4

  18. 32 CFR 636.14 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Parking. 636.14 Section 636.14 National... Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.14 Parking. In addition to the requirements in... (a) Military Police will enforce parking in handicapped and Commanding...

  19. PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES April 2, 2013

    E-print Network

    PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES April 2, 2013 Attendees: Steve Schrock, Eddie Munoz, Margaret Mahoney to apply to only 50 parking spaces and allow remainder to be "open" rest of the day, to allow overnight parking. Students who live close by have to get up to move their cars somewhere else, and possibly have

  20. Parking and Transportation Services ANNUAL REPORT

    E-print Network

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Parking and Transportation Services ANNUAL REPORT October 2003 The University of Texas at Austin to present to you our Annual Report for September 1, 2002 to August 31, 2003 (FY 02-03). Parking to become the national leader of quality campus parking services that are customer focused, economically

  1. 15 CFR 265.17 - Parking permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parking permits. 265.17 Section 265.17...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.17 Parking permits. No person, except visitors...vehicle on the site without having a valid parking permit displayed on such motor...

  2. 15 CFR 265.17 - Parking permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parking permits. 265.17 Section 265.17...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.17 Parking permits. No person, except visitors...vehicle on the site without having a valid parking permit displayed on such motor...

  3. PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES November 29, 2012

    E-print Network

    PARKING COMMISSION MINUTES November 29, 2012 Attendees: Steve Schrock, Eddie Munoz, Margaret include a move to assigned parking and/or market-based pricing. Transit Kaiser said that there is not much to parking lots. These are big numbers because of other commitments that were decisions made outside of our

  4. 15 CFR 265.16 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parking. 265.16 Section 265.16 Commerce...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.16 Parking. No person, unless otherwise authorized...would obstruct traffic; (h) In a parking space marked as not intended for his...

  5. 15 CFR 265.16 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parking. 265.16 Section 265.16 Commerce...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.16 Parking. No person, unless otherwise authorized...would obstruct traffic; (h) In a parking space marked as not intended for his...

  6. 15 CFR 265.17 - Parking permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parking permits. 265.17 Section 265.17...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.17 Parking permits. No person, except visitors...vehicle on the site without having a valid parking permit displayed on such motor...

  7. 15 CFR 265.16 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parking. 265.16 Section 265.16 Commerce...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.16 Parking. No person, unless otherwise authorized...would obstruct traffic; (h) In a parking space marked as not intended for his...

  8. 15 CFR 265.16 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parking. 265.16 Section 265.16 Commerce...and Vehicular Regulations § 265.16 Parking. No person, unless otherwise authorized...would obstruct traffic; (h) In a parking space marked as not intended for his...

  9. Student Parking at Pitt Helpful Hint

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    Student Parking at Pitt Helpful Hint Evening students: Don't wait until the last minute to request your permit. The Parking Services Office can provide you with your permit well in advance of the first day of classes. Hours of Operation Monday­Friday 8:30 a.m.­5 p.m. Parking Services Office 204

  10. Parking Plus SBF 04/08/09 Application to withdraw from ParkingPlus.

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Parking Plus SBF 04/08/09 Application to withdraw from ParkingPlus. As a current participant of the ParkingPlus scheme you have the right to opt out of the scheme at the point you renew your Parking Permit. Complete this form if you wish to OPT OUT of ParkingPlus for the year 2010/11 and send it to the Payroll

  11. The quandary of local people—Park relations in Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl E. Weber

    1995-01-01

    This paper analyzes five major causes of park-people conflicts that have occurred in Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park.\\u000a The causes include illegal transactions of forest products from the park, livestock grazing in the park, illegal hunting and\\u000a fishing, crop damage, and threats to human and animal life caused by wild animals from the park. The conflicts indicate a\\u000a reciprocal relationship

  12. DIPLOSTOMOSIS IN NORTH PARK, COLORADO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROBERT B. DAVIES; WALTER T. BURKHARDE; CHARLES P. HIBLER

    1973-01-01

    The life cycle of Diplostoinuni spathaceuni (Rudobfi 1819), as it exists in North Park, Colorado, is elucidated. California gulls (Larus californicus), common mergansers (Mergus merganser) and Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) act as definitive hosts. Two species of water snails, Phvsa gvrina and Lvnzneae elodes, act as first intermediate hosts with seven species of fish as second intermediate hosts: brassy minnows

  13. Violations & Enforcement Parking Violation Definitions

    E-print Network

    Hong, Jason I.

    zone Only authorized vehicles are allowed to actively load and unload in loading zones. · Parking for students who need to load or unload heavy equipment, projects or packages. · Failure to display hazard (flashing) lights while in a loading zone Vehicles must have hazard lights on while loading and unloading

  14. Staunton State Park Biological Inventory

    E-print Network

    Staunton State Park Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Biological Inventory Prepared by: Susan Spackman, David Anderson, Jeremy Siemers, Phyllis Pineda, and Jill. The information management staff with CNHP was responsible for integrating the data resulting from the inventory

  15. National Park Glaciers Knowledge Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-08-01

    This interactive resource explains what glaciers are, where they are found, how they form, and how they move. The types and parts of glaciers are discussed, as well as ice ages, the different types of landforms that may result from glaciation, and how scientists monitor glaciers. Examples from our national parks are also highlighted as case studies to illustrate how glaciers have created landscapes.

  16. 2010 TRANSPORTATION & PARKING SERVICES ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    E-print Network

    Mills, Allen P.

    subheadings such as Best Practice or Strategic Alliance to describe how we focused our actions toward Improvement Reduce/Recycle/Reuse Strategic Alliance Traffic control Training Trees #12;UC Riverside from remote wireless card-based parking dispensers. Lot 10 Pay By Space Quality Best Practice Processed

  17. UV - RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brewer 087 is located in Research Triangle Park NC, measuring ultraviolet solar radiation. Irradiance and column ozone are derived from this data. Ultraviolet solar radiation is measured with a Brewer Mark IV, single-monochrometer, spectrophotometer manufactured by SCI-TEC Instru...

  18. Visitor/Patient Parking Information

    E-print Network

    Portman, Douglas

    with locating your vehicle. If you are unable to locate your vehicle in the garage, please take the elevator/patients on each level of the garage, near the elevators. Upon request, Parking will provide jump starts, tire inflation and lock de-icer (free of charge). Lobby Automated Pay Stations (APS) Automatic Pay Stations

  19. Symmetry in the Car Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a lesson on rotational symmetry which she developed for her students. The aim of the lesson was "to identify objects with rotational symmetry in the staff car park" and the success criteria were "pictures or sketches of at least six objects with different orders of rotation". After finding examples of…

  20. HOURGLASS FIRE Pingree Park Vicinity

    E-print Network

    . Initial attack was conducted by personnel of the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest who arrived at the fire Forest Service and Larimer County had arrived on the scene along with crews from several local fire and resulting fire intensity, successful defensive fire suppression activities at the Pingree Park campus were

  1. National Zoological Park Branch Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Kay A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the functions of the National Zoological Park Branch of the Smithsonian Institution Libraries, which is dedicated to supporting the special information needs of the zoo. Topics covered include the library's history, collection, programs, services, future plans, and relations with other zoo libraries. (two references) (Author/CLB)

  2. Association of Park Size, Distance, and Features With Physical Activity in Neighborhood Parks

    PubMed Central

    Kaczynski, Andrew T.; Potwarka, Luke R.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We studied whether park size, number of features in the park, and distance to a park from participants’ homes were related to a park being used for physical activity. Methods. We collected observational data on 28 specific features from 33 parks. Adult residents in surrounding areas (n=380) completed 7-day physical activity logs that included the location of their activities. We used logistic regression to examine the relative importance of park size, features, and distance to participants’ homes in predicting whether a park was used for physical activity, with control for perceived neighborhood safety and aesthetics. Results. Parks with more features were more likely to be used for physical activity; size and distance were not significant predictors. Park facilities were more important than were park amenities. Of the park facilities, trails had the strongest relationship with park use for physical activity. Conclusions. Specific park features may have significant implications for park-based physical activity. Future research should explore these factors in diverse neighborhoods and diverse parks among both younger and older populations. PMID:18556600

  3. Procedure for Managing Account Information at Parking Online 1. Go to Parking Services webpage at http://www.uaf.edu/parking.

    E-print Network

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Procedure for Managing Account Information at Parking Online 1. Go to Parking Services webpage at http://www.uaf.edu/parking. 2. Select Manage My Account under the Parking Online Logo. 3. Select Manage My Parking Account from the Menu. 4. Log in by using your Network, Google mail or Black Board account

  4. Parks as a tool for HIV management.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Enbal; Hipp, J Aaron; Scheuermann, Mary; Önen, Nur; Overton, E Turner

    2015-01-01

    Access to parks improves overall health outcomes in the general population. Given that HIV infection has become a chronic disease to manage, among populations engaged in medical care, parks may be promoted as physical activity opportunities in order to manage chronic comorbid conditions. We conducted a cross-sectional examination of the relationships between sociodemographic and biomedical characteristics to park proximity among 635 individuals receiving outpatient HIV care. The data collected included HIV-related biomarkers, depression, and diagnoses of other chronic diseases. The total acres of parks an individual is exposed within one-quarter mile from their home were assessed. The cohort included 635 individuals (67% men, 73% black, and 21% white, mean age 42 years). Unemployment was negatively associated with park availability. Park proximity was not associated with depression or HIV biomarkers. As yet, little effort has been committed to promoting park usage as a low-cost, sustainable method to addressing comorbidities among individuals with HIV. PMID:23995296

  5. Wild pig populations in the National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Francis J.

    1981-05-01

    Populations of introduced European wild boar, feral pigs, and combinations of both types (all Sus scrola L.) inhabit thirteen areas in the National Park Service system. All parks have relatively stable populations, with the exception of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which reported a rapidly expanding wild boar population. Suspected and documented impacts were apparently related to pig densities and sensitivity of the ecosystem; the three largest units with dense wild pig populations reported the most damage. Overall, wild pigs are a relatively minor problem for the Park Service; however, problems are severe in at least three parks, and there is potential for invasion of wild boars into several additional parks in the Appalachian Mountains. More specific information is needed on numbers of wild pigs and their impacts in the various parks.

  6. Species in Parks: Flora and Fauna Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    The Information Center of the Environment and the US National Park Service (NPS) have developed a "preliminary" data base of vascular plants and vertebrates located on National Park Service Lands. Although the database is not a complete list of species residing on NPS lands, it contains relatively complete lists for both small and large parks. Users can search for plants and animals by species or park name. Within each park, one can search a list of species by taxa (e.g., birds, mammals, fish, etc.) and then learn in what other parks that species is found. Links to the home pages for all NPS property (from American Samoa to Zion National Park) are featured. Both plant and animal databases are available for downloading for Windows or DOS users (.exe).

  7. Trail Impacts and Trail Impact Management Related to Visitation at Torres del Paine National Park, Chile

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy A. Farrell; Jeffrey L. Marion

    2001-01-01

    Protected area visitation and ecotourism in Central and South America are largely dependent upon a relatively undisturbed quality of natural resources. However, visitation may impact vegetation, soil, water, and wildlife resources, and degrade visitor facilities such as recreation sites and trails. Findings are reported from trail impact research conducted at Torres del Paine National Park in Patagonia, Chile. The frequency

  8. Wolf Recovery in Yellowstone: Park Visitor Attitudes Expenditures and Economic Impacts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W. Duffield; Chris J. Neher; David A. Patterson

    2008-01-01

    Greater Yellowstone ecosystem and to the Central Idaho area in an attempt to restore the endangered gray wolf to the Rocky Mountains. The restoration of wolves to Yellowstone National Park has become one of the most successful wildlife conservation programs in the history of endangered species conservation. Yellowstone is now considered one of the best places in the world to

  9. Assessing Channel Change and Bank Stability Downstream From Hog Park Reservoir, Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Gilliam; E. Wohl

    2008-01-01

    Transbasin diversions in the arid and semi-arid West play an important role in the complicated story of water provisions and channel adjustments due to changes in flow regime. Analysis of geomorphic form and function is necessary for water resource managers to effectively support their needs while minimizing resource impacts. Hog Park Creek, in south central Wyoming, is a subalpine channel

  10. Oregon State Parks and Recreation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    What can you do in the great Oregon outdoors? From the world of Cannon Beach to the wild and rugged Snake River, the experiences are diverse, to say the least. The homepage features dramatic vistas, isolated lighthouses, and a whole range of wonderful images to entice visitors. In the Visit area, there is an interactive map of the state that will help plan any trip. Here visitors can select Activities and Facilities to look for specific amenities. Moving along, the Event Calendar area allows visitors to look for upcoming events at a specific park or by category. Policy folks will appreciate the About Us area, as it includes detailed information on the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's budget, their annual report, information about upcoming initiatives, and construction projects.

  11. Hyde Park Herald Digital Collections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hyde Park is a well-known urban neighborhood eight miles south of Chicago's Loop, and residents in and around the neighborhood have a long tradition of independent journalism. The Hyde Park Herald was started in 1882, and it documented the community's earliest history, including the years before the neighborhood was annexed to Chicago. Recently, a group of concerned citizens donated money to digitize the newspaper's back issues, and it was done to celebrate the leadership of Bruce Sagan, who has published the newspaper since 1953. Visitors can view the newspaper from 1882 to the present day, and despite a gap between the years 1889 and 1918, the coverage is quite good. Some good starting points include the WWII years and the late 1950s, which was when the first urban renewal project started in the neighborhood. Also, visitors may wish to perform a detailed search across the entire collection and then can also learn a bit more about the paper's history here.

  12. The Bronx Park Postcard Collection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Over the years since its origins in the late 1880s, the Bronx Park has been expanded several times. In 1891, the city of New York allotted 250 acres of the park to the New York Botanical Garden, and in 1897 assigned 250 more to the Bronx Zoo. This particular digital collection brings together postcards of the grounds held by the Wildlife Conservation Society Library and the Garden's LuEsther T. Mertz Library. The collection here includes over 450 postcards, which visitors can browse by subject headings, including Zoo animals, Paths and walkways, and Bronx River. The Zoo animals area is well worth a look, as it features a range of animals, including a Noah's Ark exhibit, camels, and Indian elephants. It's an amazing archive of documents related to one of the most famous zoos in the United States, and historians and others will find it quite marvelous.

  13. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-print Network

    R N Manchester

    2006-04-13

    Given sufficient sensitivity, pulsar timing observations can make a direct detection of gravitational waves passing over the Earth. Pulsar timing is most sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies in the nanoHertz region, with the most likely astronomical sources being binary super-massive black holes in galaxy cores. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to make precision timing observations of a sample of about 20 millisecond pulsars with a principal goal of making a direct detection of gravitational waves. Observations commenced about one year ago and so far sub-microsecond timing residuals have been achieved for more than half of these pulsars. New receiver and software systems are being developed with the aim of reducing these residuals to the level believed necessary for a positive detection of gravitational waves.

  14. The Potential for Pocket Parks to Increase Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Golinelli, Daniella; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the use of new pocket parks in low-income neighborhoods. Setting Los Angeles Subjects Parks users and residents living within ½ mile of 3 pocket parks and 15 neighborhood parks Intervention The creation of pocket parks Design Quasi-experimental post-only comparison Measures We used the System of Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to measure park use and park-based physical activity and surveyed park users and residents about their park use. Analysis We surveyed 392 and 432 household members within one-half mile of the 3 pocket parks before and after park construction, respectively, as well as 71 pocket park users and compared them to 992 neighborhood park users and 342 residents living within ½ mile of other neighborhood parks. We compared pocket park use to playground area use in the larger neighborhood parks. We used descriptive statistics and Generalized Estimating Equations for the analysis. Results Overall, pocket park use compared favorably in promoting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with that of existing playground space in nearby parks and they were cost-effective at $0.73/MET hour gained. Pocket park visitors walked an average of 0.25 miles to get there. Conclusions Pocket parks, when perceived as attractive and safe destinations, may increase physical activity by encouraging families with children to walk there. Additional strategies and programs may be needed to encourage more residents to use the parks. PMID:24380461

  15. Mycorrhizae from Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Treu; G. A. Laursen; S. L. Stephenson; J. C. Landolt; R. Densmore

    1995-01-01

    Roots of 40 taxa of higher plants (Pteridophyta, Spermatophyta) from two alpine study sites in Denali National Park and Preserve\\u000a in central Alaska were examined for their mycorrhizal colonization. We observed ectomycorrhizae on six species: Betula\\u000a nana, Salix\\u000a reticulata, Salix\\u000a polaris, Salix\\u000a arctica, Polygonum\\u000a viviparum, and Dryas\\u000a octopetala. Seven taxa, Cassiope\\u000a tetragona, Empetrum\\u000a nigrum, Ledum\\u000a palustre subsp. decumbens, Ledum\\u000a palustre

  16. Yellowstone National Park Online Tours

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Yellowstone National Park

    This Yellowstone National Park website provides an array of online tours, videos, and other information. Nature and history tours are among those featured on the site. The nature tours cover the Old Faithful area, the Norris Geyser Basin, the Fountain Paint Pots, the Mammoth Hot Springs, and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. Each of these tours highlights prominent natural features with photos and descriptions.

  17. Determining visitors' dispositions toward the designation of a Greek National Park.

    PubMed

    Machairas, Ioannis; Hovardas, Tasos

    2005-07-01

    This article presents the findings of the first major visitor survey conducted at the Central Rhodope Mountain Complex, situated in northern Greece. The study area is one of a number of sites planned to become National Parks under a recent initiative of the Greek government. We used a logistic regression method to define significant predictors of visitors' awareness and attitude toward park designation, as well as their willingness to pay a conditional entrance fee. Study findings demonstrated that the probability of being aware of the park designation initiative is higher for visitors who obtained information from travel agencies or media to make their destination choice, compared to visitors who resorted to word-of-mouth recommendations. Knowledge and attitudes toward animals living in the study area revealed a limited influence on visitors' dispositions toward park designation. The results of this study call for action to implement education programs for National Park users. These programs should aim at rendering the environmental characteristics of the Central Rhodope Mountain Complex to be significant predictors of visitors' dispositions toward the study area. This would favor its uniqueness as a destination, as well as contribute to its long-term economic sustainability. PMID:16132450

  18. [Annotated list of the plants of the Tortuguero National Park].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Hernández, Priscilla M; González-Ramírez, José A

    2013-09-01

    The floodplains of Tortuguero, in northeastern Costa Rica, stand as one of the richest plant-species regions in Central America. In this paper, we present the annotated check-list of vascular plants that are present within the rainforest of Tortuguero National Park (TNP), a 26 604h land that protects most of the biological diversity of these plains. Our list resulted from collections made in 2012, as well as the examination of material mantained at the Herbarium of the National Biodiversity Institute of Costa Rica, INBio (ATTA Database) and in the TROPICOS database. A total of 732 vascular plant species included in 413 genera are known to the Park. Two of these species have limited distributions and are endemic to Costa Rica: Pseuderanthemum pittieri (Acanthaceae) and Paullinia austin-smithii (Sapindaceae). Ninety species have known ethnobotanical uses. The high diversity in plant species reported here for the forest environments of Tortuguero contrasts with the low species diversity previously reported in the palm-swamps that characterize the riverine habitats within the Park. PMID:24459756

  19. Geology Fieldnotes: Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Theodore Roosevelt National Park site contains park geology information, park maps, photographs, related links, visitor information, and teacher features (resources for teaching geology with National Park examples). The park geology section discusses the Park's geologic history and the region's role in shaping Theodore Roosevelt's conservation efforts while he was President. The section also contains a link to information on the geology of Theodore Roosevelt National Park. The park maps section contains an area map as well as two maps detailing the North and South Units of the Park.

  20. National Park Service, Nature & Science: Teacher Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Park Service has developed this exemplary set of educational resources which draws on their greatest assets, namely national parks from Maine to Utah. The materials are specifically designed for teaching geology, but it's easy to see how these items could be incorporated into general science classes. The main area on their homepage features over a dozen teacher guides and park programs that feature detailed geology lessons that draw on the landscapes of Yosemite National Park and the dynamic volcanoes of Hawaii. On the right side of the page, visitors can scan through the "Highlights" area to learn more about online park images, park maps, and even peruse a calendar of upcoming educator workshops. The site is rounded out by the "Geology Books and Media" area, which features information about technical reports, textbooks, and geology-themed children's books.

  1. Galvez Lot Event Parking Guidelines Effective: December 1, 2012

    E-print Network

    Straight, Aaron

    Galvez Lot Event Parking Guidelines Effective: December 1, 2012 Event parking at the improved Galvez Lot The Galvez Lot (L-96) will remain an "event" parking lot, with a maximum parking capacity to be free of charge. Event sponsors arrange for use of the Galvez Lot through Parking & Transportation

  2. Key to car parking (check signs for latest information)

    E-print Network

    Albrecht, David

    Car Pool parking Area 1 parking Key to car parking (check signs for latest information) H J S N K s To Clayton campus and Dandenong Members No.1 car park, entry from the western side of Smith Street. Ticket Street Dandenong Road Princes Highway (Dandenong Road) MRC Guineas Car Park Sir John Monash Drive Main

  3. Status of biotic inventories in US national parks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary S. Waggoner

    1995-01-01

    It is the policy and obligation of the National Park Service to conduct baseline inventories of natural resources preserved in its 32 million hectare National Park System. We evaluated the status of natural resources information in 252 national parks and monuments: those park units that contain significant natural resources. Results show that few parks contain relatively complete systematic inventories for

  4. Real time car parking system using image processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sayanti Banerjee; Pallavi Choudekar; M. K. Muju

    2011-01-01

    Car parking lots are an important object class in many traffic and civilian applications. With the problems of increasing urban traffic congestion and the ever increasing shortage of space, these car parking lots are needed to be well equipped with automatic parking Information and Guidance systems. Goals of intelligent parking lot management include counting the number of parked cars, and

  5. Parking and Transportation Services 622 W. Fayette St.

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    Parking and Transportation Services 622 W. Fayette St. Baltimore, MD 21201 410 706 6603 / Fax 410 706 4342 www.parking.umaryland.edu ATTENTION ALL PARKERS Parking Rules and Regulations Enforcement In order to use parking resources efficiently, maintain parking courtesy, and ensure a safe environment

  6. Parking Information Reserving a Visitor Spot at the Law School

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    Parking Information Reserving a Visitor Spot at the Law School Two visitor parking spots and four Office, you can contact lawadmissions@memphis.edu to arrange for the complimentary parking pass for one of the visitor parking spots. If you are a nonAdmissions visitor and wish to request visitor parking, please

  7. Guest Parking at The UGA Hotel and Conference Center

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Guest Parking at The UGA Hotel and Conference Center During your visit, parking is available in the University's South Campus Parking Deck, located adjacent to the UGA Hotel. Parking Rates: · Dailyfeesare$4forthefirsthour · $1foreachadditionalhour · Maximumof$10foreach24-hour period parked · Specialratesareineffectfor

  8. Geology Fieldnotes: Death Valley National Park, California/Nevada

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Death Valley National Park site contains park geology information, park maps, photographs, visitor information, and teacher features (resources for teaching geology using National Park examples). The Park Geology section contains an exaggerated cross-section showing the vertical rise within Death Valley. A link is provided to Death Valley's expanded geology page.

  9. Public Parking is available at an hourly rate at the University Square car park.

    E-print Network

    Heiser, Gernot

    Public Parking is available at an hourly rate at the University Square car park. Enter via Bouverie for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts &Sciences (AAAS

  10. Public Parking is available at an hourly rate at the University Square car park.

    E-print Network

    Heiser, Gernot

    Public Parking is available at an hourly rate at the University Square car park. Enter via Bouverie software systems is often considered an art rather than an engineering task. The practical consequences

  11. Public Parking is available at an hourly rate at the University Square car park.

    E-print Network

    Heiser, Gernot

    Public Parking is available at an hourly rate at the University Square car park. Enter via Bouverie's long been interested in medieval and renaissance art and architecture, and has recently been trying

  12. STANFORD UNIVERSITY PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 2013-14 CONTRACTOR PARKING PERMIT SPONSORSHIP/APPLICATION

    E-print Network

    ______________________________________ ___________________________________ _______________ PRIMARY SU PROJECT MANAGER PRINT NAME DATESTANFORD UNIVERSITY PARKING & TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 2013-14 CONTRACTOR PARKING PERMIT SPONSORSHIP department) Sponsoring SU department SU Project Manager Campus phone (required) ( ) I am sponsoring applicant

  13. Geologic Map of the Shenandoah National Park Region, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southworth, Scott; Aleinikoff, John N.; Bailey, Christopher M.; Burton, William C.; Crider, E.A.; Hackley, Paul C.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Tollo, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    The geology of the Shenandoah National Park region of Virginia was studied from 1995 to 2008. The focus of the study was the park and surrounding areas to provide the National Park Service with modern geologic data for resource management. Additional geologic data of the adjacent areas are included to provide regional context. The geologic map can be used to support activities such as ecosystem delineation, land-use planning, soil mapping, groundwater availability and quality studies, aggregate resources assessment, and engineering and environmental studies. The study area is centered on the Shenandoah National Park, which is mostly situated in the western part of the Blue Ridge province. The map covers the central section and western limb of the Blue Ridge-South Mountain anticlinorium. The Skyline Drive and Appalachian National Scenic Trail straddle the drainage divide of the Blue Ridge highlands. Water drains northwestward to the South Fork of the Shenandoah River and southeastward to the James and Rappahannock Rivers. East of the park, the Blue Ridge is an area of low relief similar to the physiography of the Piedmont province. The Great Valley section of the Valley and Ridge province is west of Blue Ridge and consists of Page Valley and Massanutten Mountain. The distribution and types of surficial deposits and landforms closely correspond to the different physiographic provinces and their respective bedrock. The Shenandoah National Park is underlain by three general groups of rock units: (1) Mesoproterozoic granitic gneisses and granitoids, (2) Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Swift Run Formation and metabasalt of the Catoctin Formation, and (3) siliciclastic rocks of the Lower Cambrian Chilhowee Group. The gneisses and granitoids mostly underlie the lowlands east of Blue Ridge but also rugged peaks like Old Rag Mountain (996 meter). Metabasalt underlies much of the highlands, like Stony Man (1,200 meters). The siliciclastic rocks underlie linear ridges from 800 to 400 meters in altitude. The Page Valley is underlain by Cambrian and Ordovician carbonate rocks. Siliciclastic rocks are mostly west of the South Fork of the Shenandoah River and underlie Massanutten Mountain. Surficial deposits in the highlands include colluvium and debris fans. The lowlands have broad alluvial fans, alluvial plains, and fluvial terraces. Ridges underlain by siliciclastic rocks have abundant boulder fields. Numerous sinkholes and caves are due to the dissolution of the carbonate bedrock.

  14. Synthesis of thirty years of surface water quality and aquatic biota data in Shenandoah National Park: collaboration between the US Geological Survey and the National Park Service

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Karen C.; Jastram, John D.; Wofford, John E.B.; Schaberl, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The eastern United States has been the recipient of acidic atmospheric deposition (hereinafter, “acid rain”) for many decades. Deleterious effects of acid rain on natural resources have been well documented for surface water (e.g., Likens et al. 1996; Stoddard et al. 2001), soils (Bailey et al. 2005), forest health (Long et al. 2009), and habitat suitability for stream biota (Baker et al. 1993). Shenandoah National Park (SNP) is located in northern and central Virginia and consists of a long, narrow strip of land straddling the Blue Ridge Mountains (Figure 1). The park’s elevated topography and location downwind of the Ohio River valley, where many acidic emissions to the atmosphere are generated (NSTC 2005), have made it a target for acid rain. Characterizing the link between air quality and water quality as related to acid rain, contaminants, soil conditions, and forest health is a high priority for research and monitoring in SNP. The US Geological Survey (USGS) and SNP have had a long history of collaboration on documenting acid rain effects on the park’s natural resources, starting in 1985 and continuing to the present (Lynch and Dise 1985; Rice et al. 2001, 2004, 2005, 2007; Deviney et al. 2006, 2012; Jastram et al. 2013).

  15. USGS Repeat Photography Project: Glacier National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This project, conducted by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), documents changes over time in the landscape of Glacier National Park, particularly the retreat of the park's glaciers. The project involves pairing historic photos from the park's archives with recent photos to illustrate how the landscape has changed. Users can view and download the photos in pairs with dates and a caption describing the scene and the changes that have taken place.

  16. A case study of the implementation of a parking fee at R. A. Apffel Park in Galveston, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Albers, Sheryl Druggan

    1982-01-01

    Park in Galveston, Texas. . (May 1982) Sheryl Druggan Albers B. A. , University of' Kentucky Chairman of Advisory Committeei Dr. Robert B. Ditton In the summer o. 1980 the Galveston park Board o Trustees passed a parking fee policy at a previously... the summer of i980 (May - September) when the Galveston Park Board of Trustees implemented a paid parking policy at a previously free beach park - R. A. Apffel Park. Texas State Senator A. R. Schwartz was opposed to the parking fee at the park. He...

  17. ParkNet: drive-by sensing of road-side parking statistics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suhas Mathur; Tong Jin; Nikhil Kasturirangan; Janani Chandrashekharan; Wenzhi Xue; Marco Gruteser; Wade Trappe

    2010-01-01

    Urban street-parking availability statistics are challenging to obtain in real-time but would greatly benefit society by reducing traffic congestion. In this paper we present the design, implementation and evaluation of ParkNet, a mobile system comprising vehicles that collect parking space occupancy information while driving by. Each ParkNet vehicle is equipped with a GPS receiver and a passenger-side-facing ultrasonic range-finder to

  18. 75 FR 20885 - National Park Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ...Proclamation 8498--National Park Week, 2010 Proclamation 8499--National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2010 Proclamation 8500--National Volunteer Week, 2010 Proclamation 8501--National Day of Service and...

  19. Minsoo Park INFSCI 3923 Independent Study Paper

    E-print Network

    Brusilovsky, Peter

    Minsoo Park INFSCI 3923 Independent Study Paper Cognitive Factors in Adaptive Information Access of information access for many people worldwide in electronic environments. Hypermedia users are freed from

  20. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Spraberry sandstones, Parks field, Midland County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Yale, Mark William

    1986-01-01

    the Spraberry Deep field contains approximately 300 ft (91 m) of closure due to a Pennsylvanian reef buildup underlying the Permian. The second exception is the Benedum field in east-central Upton County. 14 WS NORTH SHS 0' 2oZS 2. PARKS.... Structure-contour map of Spraberry Format1on. Contour datum is the top of the upper Spraberry. Locat1on of Parks field shown, as are the locations of the Benedum and Spraber ry Deep fields (modified from Wilkinson, 1953). This field exhibits 195 ft (59 m...

  1. Threats to beach resources and park boundaries caused by shoreline migration in an urban estuarine park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl F. Nordstrom; Nancy L. Jackson; John P. Tiefenbacher

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation of coastal processes, shoreline erosion, and shore management options for Conference House Park, New York, USA, reveals the problems associated with lack of congruence between jurisdictional boundaries and boundaries required for maintenance of beaches and shorefront park land. Rates of shoreline change are high despite low wave energies because bay beaches contain small amounts of sand. The park

  2. Petrobras role in Brazil's economy disputed

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-14

    Brazil's state oil company is embroiled in a national dispute over its role in the country. The central issue is whether to continue the monopoly established for Petroleos Brasileiro SA on Oct. 3, 1954 or continue moves toward privatization and free market reform. The new president of Petrobras, Eduardo de Freitas Teixeira, at 36 the company's youngest head ever, has continued the tone of his embattled predecessor by attacking the state oil monopoly concept and defending the return of risk contracts for private domestic and foreign companies. Risk contracts were abolished under Brazil's new constitution in 1988. Although a wave of deregulation and economic reform swept President Fernando Collor de Mello to power last year, monoply is still a sacred cow in Brazil, supported by powerful interests.

  3. Soil properties in urban parks and city population in Tel Aviv-Jaffa: Mutual effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, A.; Sarah, P.; Zhevelev, H.

    2012-04-01

    Urban parks are man-made open spaces, located in the city area and having two major functions: conservation of natural resources and optimization of the physical and social environment. This study aimed to investigate the relations between the soil properties and the socioeconomic profile of the populations in the parks in Tel Aviv. The city of Tel Aviv was divided into three geographical regions: South, Central and North. This division reflects the course of development of the city from south to north, and encompasses differing socio-economic levels of residents. In each geographical region 15 parks were randomly chosen, and were divided into three groups by size (2-10, 10-20 and 20-50 acres). In each park soil was sampled in two microenvironments (lawn and path), from three points and from three depth layers (0-2, 5-10 and 10-20 cm) in July-August 2011. Before the sampling, penetration depth was determined at all the points. Each of the soil samples was analyzed for organic matter content, pH, electrical conductivity, and sodium and chlorine contents. For each type of microenvironment, the results were analyzed with respect to three factors: size of park, region of city, and soil depth. It was found that the urban park soil properties varied widely: sodium and chlorine contents from 1.8 to 12 and from 1.9 to 7.8 meq/kg, respectively; and electrical conductivity from 0.40 to 1.47 dS/m. In the lawn microenvironment, electrical conductivity, chlorine and sodium increased in all depths with park size. This trend was significant only in the upper layer. In the path microenvironment no such trend was seen. In the center of the city lower values of soil properties than in the other regions were found at all depths. Soil properties decreased with depth in all three geographical regions, in all three sizes of park, and in both microenvironments. For all sizes of park, in all geographical regions, and in both microenvironments, penetration depths were found be similar. We suggest that the above results can be attributed to variations in the intensity of park use by visitors, and to the type of anthropogenic activity, both of which depend on the socioeconomic status of the park area.

  4. 36 CFR 7.13 - Yellowstone National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...appropriate snow cover, public safety, avalanche conditions, resource protection, park...appropriate snow cover, public safety, avalanche conditions, resource protection, park...appropriate snow cover, public safety, avalanche conditions, park operations,...

  5. UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project University of Minnesota

    E-print Network

    Netoff, Theoden

    UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project University of Minnesota Public Comment Forum and Open ­ Steven Lott, Co-project manager, UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project 6:40 The UMore Park Sand

  6. 76 FR 77552 - Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...Service [4400-SZM] Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission AGENCY: National...September 6, 2012 of the Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission. DATES: The...Education Center in the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center,...

  7. 76 FR 70483 - Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ...Service [4400-SZM] Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission AGENCY: National...September 6, 2012 of the Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission. DATES: The...Education Center in the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center,...

  8. 115. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of roadway alignment around ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of roadway alignment around alligator back and parking overlook in foreground. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  9. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.37 Jean Lafitte National Historical Park. (a...ii) Will not be detrimental to other park wildlife or the reproductive potential of the species to be taken; and (iii)...

  10. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.37 Jean Lafitte National Historical Park. (a...ii) Will not be detrimental to other park wildlife or the reproductive potential of the species to be taken; and (iii)...

  11. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.37 Jean Lafitte National Historical Park. (a...ii) Will not be detrimental to other park wildlife or the reproductive potential of the species to be taken; and (iii)...

  12. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.37 Jean Lafitte National Historical Park. (a...ii) Will not be detrimental to other park wildlife or the reproductive potential of the species to be taken; and (iii)...

  13. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.37 Jean Lafitte National Historical Park. (a...ii) Will not be detrimental to other park wildlife or the reproductive potential of the species to be taken; and (iii)...

  14. 32 CFR 228.5 - Enforcement of parking regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Enforcement of parking regulations. 228.5 Section 228.5...PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.5 Enforcement of parking regulations. For reasons of security, parking regulations shall be strictly...

  15. 32 CFR 228.5 - Enforcement of parking regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Enforcement of parking regulations. 228.5 Section 228.5...PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.5 Enforcement of parking regulations. For reasons of security, parking regulations shall be strictly...

  16. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Regulation for parking freeze. 52.1135 Section 52.1135...Massachusetts § 52.1135 Regulation for parking freeze. (a) Definitions: (1...land filling specifically designed for a parking facility in preparation for...

  17. 32 CFR 228.5 - Enforcement of parking regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Enforcement of parking regulations. 228.5 Section 228.5...PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.5 Enforcement of parking regulations. For reasons of security, parking regulations shall be strictly...

  18. 32 CFR 228.5 - Enforcement of parking regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Enforcement of parking regulations. 228.5 Section 228.5...PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.5 Enforcement of parking regulations. For reasons of security, parking regulations shall be strictly...

  19. Parking Permit Application for Emeritus College Members (Please print legibly)

    E-print Network

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Parking Permit Application for Emeritus College Members (Please print legibly/day/year_______/_______/_______ I agree to abide by the Clemson University Parking Regulations and be responsible for all parking citations bearing a permit number issued to me. I

  20. 32 CFR 228.5 - Enforcement of parking regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Enforcement of parking regulations. 228.5 Section 228.5...PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.5 Enforcement of parking regulations. For reasons of security, parking regulations shall be strictly...

  1. Jurassic Park Institute: Dino Lab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created as a "science-based and educationally focused program," the Jurassic Park Institute (JPI) aims to provide "kids, families, educators and scientists with the ultimate resource for dinosaur learning and fun." As would be expected from a project of Universal Studios, the JPI Dino Lab Web site is packed with cool computer animation and other multimedia features. Visitors to this site become virtual dinosaur paleontologists, interpreting discoveries and solving problems along the way. Educators can register for JPI Dino Lab's free Teacher Resources, which includes lesson plans, assessment tools, and teaching strategy tips. This site is best accessed with a high-speed connection.

  2. U-M DEPARTMENT PARKING APPLICATION Use this application to request department parking options (annual or Department Pre-Paid Daily Parking). Please read the policies for

    E-print Network

    Kirschner, Denise

    2010­2011 U-M DEPARTMENT PARKING APPLICATION Use this application to request department parking options (annual or Department Pre-Paid Daily Parking). Please read the policies for Permit Use certify that the parking permits will be used in accordance with the Permit Use and Restrictions stated

  3. 78 FR 51207 - Kobuk Valley National Park Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) and the Denali National Park SRC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ...Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) and the Denali National Park SRC; Meetings AGENCY...Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) and the Denali National Park SRC will hold meetings to...nps.gov/kova/contacts.htm. Denali National Park SRC Meeting Date and...

  4. GATOR GROWL PARKING IMPACTS AND LOT CLOSURES

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    GATOR GROWL PARKING IMPACTS AND LOT CLOSURES In support of staging and celebrating Gator Growl, the following parking lots adjacent to Flavet Field will be closed. These lots will re-open on Saturday October 18. Red One lot south of Keys Closed Tuesday October 14 at midnight. Keys residents will receive more

  5. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-01-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park

  6. Logistics service quality evaluation on logistics park

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng Ning; Zhang Mingli; Tang Saili

    2011-01-01

    Logistics parks as infrastructures promoting modern logistics, have an extremely important role in the modern logistics system. This article firstly analyses the logistics services process of logistics parks, and finds out the elements of logistics services quality. Then, the paper designs a service quality evaluation model through analytic hierarchy process and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation methods. The evaluation model could help

  7. University of Maryland College Park Physics Department

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    University of Maryland­ College Park Physics Department Physics Summer Girls Program Application Mail to: Bernie Kozlowski 1120 Physics Building University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 NAME why you are interested in the summer physics program at the University of Maryland. NO APPLICATION

  8. Geology Fieldnotes: Keweenaw National Historic Park, Michigan

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service site provides geological history, visitor information, maps, and selected links for further details. This park is located on the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior in Michigan, situated on a 1.1 billion year old (Precambrian) continental rift. The history is traced back to the days of copper mining by the Calumet and Hecla Mining Company.

  9. P University car park Public footpath

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    40 41 15 42 32 23 22 20 21 46 26 25 47 55 52 56 58 59 60 P University car park Public footpath Railway station Bus station University colleges University buildings Car parkP Hill Colleges to Market Honours in Arts and Social Sciences E3 22 Music C3 25 Community and Youth Work Studies E3 15 Natural

  10. Directions & Parking for Calit2 Building at

    E-print Network

    George, Steven C.

    the toll road begins) and turn left onto Bison. Turn right onto East Peltason. Turn left at Anteater Drive into Anteater Parking Structure. Exit structure by foot to East Peltason and follow pedestrian signs to Calit2 East Peltason. Turn right at Anteater Drive into Anteater Parking Structure. Exit structure by foot

  11. Estimating Peak Demand for Beach Parking Spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher F. Dumas; John C. Whitehead; James H. Herstine; Robert B. Buerger; Jeffery M. Hill

    2006-01-01

    The United States Army Corps of Engineers planning guidance stipulates that in order for local beach communities to qualify for Federal cost share funds for Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction beach renourishment projects, the community must provide public beach access and parking to satisfy peak demand. This study presents a method for estimating peak demand for beach parking spaces in

  12. Wetland Resources of Yellowstone National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elliott Charles

    This Yellowstone National Park online report provides an overview of the park's wetlands and associated flora and fauna. Chapters include wetland plants, wetlands and wildlife, wetlands and people, thermal wetlands, a wetland inventory, wetland classification and acreage, and others. Information is presented as text, photos, graphs, tables, and maps.

  13. Communication and Recycling in Park Campgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Sam H.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of the Canby Washington State Park campground recycling program by determining whether campers (N=147) read and followed the provided instructions when disposing of garbage, understood the sorting and disposal instructions, and arrived at the park equipped with receptacles for recyclables and non-recyclables.…

  14. Asulkan Valley Avalanche Track, Glacier National Park

    E-print Network

    Smith, Dan

    Asulkan Valley Avalanche Track, Glacier National Park Penelope Simpson, Jessica Paramio Maciej with the use of these trails ranges from bear encounters to triggering an avalanche. As in many mountainous regions, a high avalanche risk exists in the park during the winter due to the steep, rugged terrain

  15. Parking and Traffic regulaTions

    E-print Network

    Kulp, Mark

    15. Fine Arts Bldg. 16. Geology & Psychology Bldg. 17. Homer L. Hitt Alumni Center 18. Human. Athletic Center B. East Campus Utilities C. Lakefront Arena D. Privateer Park­Baseball E. Tennis Center at any time while operating or parking on university-owned or controlled property. Taking personal

  16. Geology Fieldnotes: Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In addition to offering visitor information, photographs, and links, this site traces the geologic history of this park to its beginnings as sedimentary rocks 1-2 billion years ago (Precambrian). It covers episodes of mountain building and erosion, the presence of dinosaurs and volcanoes, and glaciation, ending with the park's present geological state.

  17. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-print Network

    DRIVE No Public Vehicle Access No Public Vehicle Access Magoon Facility No Vehicle Access Entrance KioskUH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute Exit M¯anoa Innovation Center and Kau`iokahaloa Faculty Bachman Annex 2 Entrance Kiosk Krauss UH Parking Access St. Francis School y Legacy Path E A S T-W EST R O

  18. Big Bend National Park Virtual Field Trip

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cain Neal

    Big Bend National Park Virtual Field Trip is a guide to the features and geological history of the Big Bend National Park area through the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras. The site explains igneous (intrusive, extrusive, and pyroclastic), sedimentary (erosional and depositional), metamorphic and structural processes. There is also a virtual hike of the Lost Mine Trail.

  19. Yellowstone National Park Region Seismicity Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University of Utah Seismograph Stations

    This University of Utah website provides numerous maps of the Yellowstone National Park area that show the location and magnitude of historical earthquakes. Time intervals include the previous day, week, 30-days, 90-days, year, 1973 to present, 1973-1981, and 1983 to present. The maps also include latitude and longitude, park boundary, and fault information.

  20. Private Sector Thinking Saves Park U.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breckon, Donald; Gibb, John

    2000-01-01

    Recounts the restructuring and resulting survival of Park University (Missouri) over the last decade. A process of evaluating the university's competitive strategy resulted in changes in tuition pricing; development of the Park School of Distance Learning, which serves primarily military installations; minority student marketing; and development…

  1. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-print Network

    R. N. Manchester

    2007-11-12

    Detection and study of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is a major goal of current astrophysics. Ground-based laser-interferometer systems such as LIGO and VIRGO are sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies of order 100 Hz, whereas space-based systems such as LISA are sensitive in the millihertz regime. Precise timing observations of a sample of millisecond pulsars widely distributed on the sky have the potential to detect gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Potential sources of such waves include binary super-massive black holes in the cores of galaxies, relic radiation from the inflationary era and oscillations of cosmic strings. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of such a system in which 20 millisecond pulsars have been observed using the Parkes radio telescope at three frequencies at intervals of two -- three weeks for more than two years. Analysis of these data has been used to limit the gravitational wave background in our Galaxy and to constrain some models for its generation. The data have also been used to investigate fluctuations in the interstellar and Solar-wind electron density and have the potential to investigate the stability of terrestrial time standards and the accuracy of solar-system ephemerides.

  2. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-print Network

    Manchester, R N

    2007-01-01

    Detection and study of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is a major goal of current astrophysics. Ground-based laser-interferometer systems such as LIGO and VIRGO are sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies of order 100 Hz, whereas space-based systems such as LISA are sensitive in the millihertz regime. Precise timing observations of a sample of millisecond pulsars widely distributed on the sky have the potential to detect gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Potential sources of such waves include binary super-massive black holes in the cores of galaxies, relic radiation from the inflationary era and oscillations of cosmic strings. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of such a system in which 20 millisecond pulsars have been observed using the Parkes radio telescope at three frequencies at intervals of two -- three weeks for more than two years. Analysis of these data has been used to limit the gravitational wave background in our Galaxy and to constrain...

  3. The Development of the College Park Tornado of 24 September 2001

    E-print Network

    Pryor, K

    2006-01-01

    The 24 September 2001 College Park, Maryland, tornado was remarkable because of its long-track that passed within a close range of two Doppler radars. This tornado featured many similarities to previous significant tornado events that resulted in widespread damage in urban areas, such as the Oklahoma City tornado of 3 May 1999. The College Park tornado was the third in a series of three tornadoes associated with a supercell storm that developed over central Virginia. This paper presents a synoptic and mesoscale overview of favorable conditions and forcing mechanisms that resulted in the severe convective outbreak associated with the College Park tornado. Convective morphology will be examined in terms of Doppler radar and satellite imagery. This study concludes with a discussion of the effectiveness of using MM5 guidance in conjunction with satellite and radar imagery in the operational environment of forecasting severe convection.

  4. A OROGÊNESE BRASILIANA NO SEGMENTO CENTRAL DA FAIXA RIBEIRA, BRASIL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MONICA HEILBRON; CLÁUDIO DE MORISSON VALERIANO; CLÁUDIA SAYÃO VALLADARES; NUNO MACHADO; Revista Brasileira de Geociências

    THE BRASILIANO OROGENY AT THE CENTRAL SEGMENT OF RIBEIRA BELT, BRAZIL The structure of the central segment of the Ribeira belt is defined by three large thrust sheets (Lower, Intermediate and Upper) which override the autochthonous domain, towards the southern portion of the São Francisco Craton. Four lithotectonic associations are individualized within the domains: basement rocks (pré-1,8 Ga rocks); orthogneisses

  5. Geologic Heritage in the National Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-03-22

    What is geologic heritage, you ask? In short, it "encompasses the significant geologic features, landforms, and landscapes characteristic of our Nation." The National Park Service has a special program to document these sites and to provide the public with resources about these unique destinations. The materials here are divided into four featured programs: Fossil Resources, Geologic Heritage Conservation, Park Geology Tour, and Cave and Karst Resources. Using the Park Geology Tour, visitors can search through thematic areas such as glaciers, fossils, and plate tectonics to find highlights from a vast array of National Park units. The Cave and Karst Resources program brings together resources on some of the over 4,900 caves in the National Park system, along with detailed photo galleries, newsletters, and brochures. Finally, under Fossil Resources visitors can find information about National Fossil Day and even helpful lesson plans for teachers.

  6. National Park Service: Air Resources Division

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the National Park Service's Air Resources Division. Materials featured here address issues of visibility protection, air quality standards, and air pollution throughout the National Park System, the National Wildlife Refuge System, and Wilderness areas. Information on air quality trends for specific parks is also provided. Remote cameras allow for real-time webcasts of air quality in a selection of parks. Additional materials include law and policy information, monitoring data, and maps and GIS products. An educational page for students and teachers features posters, videos, lesson plans, games, and basic air quality information including raw monitoring data. A link is also provided to a list of publications including reports, factsheets, newsletters, videos, lesson plans, and interpretive products for park visitors.

  7. A natural experiment to examine the impact of park renewal on park-use and park-based physical activity in a disadvantaged neighbourhood: the REVAMP study methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Modifying the built environment by improving parks is potentially a sustainable way to increase population level physical activity. Despite considerable investment in parks and park renovations, few natural experiments on the impact of improving amenities on park use and park-based physical activity have been conducted. REVAMP is a natural experiment that aims to examine whether park improvement increases overall park usage, park-based physical activity and active travel to and from the park in the intervention compared with the control park over a two-year period; and to identify which specific aspects of the park refurbishment attracts park visitors and encourages park users to be more active. This paper describes the methods of the REVAMP study. Methods The intervention park is a large regional park (329 hectares) located in a low socio-economic status (SES) area in the north-eastern suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. The control park is a regional park (120 hectares) located in a high SES area in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. Multiple methodologies to evaluate the impact of the park renovation are being employed including: cross-sectional surveys of local residents living near the two parks, direct observations of park users, intercept surveys with park users, and electronic monitoring of path usage and car traffic within the parks. Baseline measures were conducted in April-May 2013 (T1), and an innovative play space suitable for children of all ages and abilities was installed at the intervention park between September 2013 and February 2014. Follow-up measures will be repeated in April-May 2014 (T2) and April-May 2015 (T3). All methodologies will be completed at both the intervention and control parks at all three time-points, with the exception of the cross-sectional survey of local residents which will only be conducted at T1 and T3. Conclusion This research will inform future park developments, and will contribute to creating an evidence base of the impact of park refurbishment, and the development of natural experiment methodology. Trial Registration Current controlled trial ISRCTN50745547, registration date 11.1.2014. PMID:24924919

  8. Fire and restoration of the largest urban forest of the world in Rio de Janeiro City, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Silva Matos; C. Junius F. Santos; D. de R. Chevalier

    2002-01-01

    National Park of Tijuca in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) is about 3,300 ha and considered the largest urban forest in the world. Its floristic composition is typical of Atlantic Rain Forest. The reserve is being altered because of fire occurrences and urban expansion. This study identified locations and causes of forest fires, and makes management recommendations to restore damaged areas.

  9. Fire and restoration of the largest urban forest of the world in Rio de Janeiro City, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. SILVA MATOS; Depto de Ci

    2003-01-01

    National Park of Tijuca in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) is about 3,300 ha and considered the largest urban forest in the world. Its floristic composition is typical of Atlantic Rain Forest. The reserve is being altered because of fire occurrences and urban expansion. This study identified locations and causes of forest fires, and makes management recommendations to restore damaged areas.

  10. Mining and the national park system

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, E.

    1982-01-01

    The Mining in the Parks Act of 1976 closes National Park Service lands to new mineral claims and requires strict monitoring of mineral extraction to preserve them in their natural condition. The number of valid claims has diminished each year as a result, and production is concentrated in areas where the value of deposits warrants mining. Recent political trends emphasizing economic and mineral needs over long-term environmental goals, however, are disturbing. It remains for a diligent public to ensure that the rights in the Mining in the Parks Act do not abuse the environment because of administrative efforts to undercut its enforcement. 62 references.

  11. National Park Coastal Geology Knowledge Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-08-01

    This resource presents information on topics such as the uniqueness of coastal environments, the variety of coastal sediments, human modifications to shorelines, and hazards associated with coastlines. There are also are several interactive opportunities to explore the coasts and shores of nearly 100 national parks. Through extensive imagery and detailed case studies of national parks, many of the landscape features associated with coastlines are described and explained. There is also a discussion of the processes at work on coastlines and how they produce prominent features at different national parks.

  12. Suggestions for China's Logistics Parks Based on Japan's Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fuhua Wang

    2009-01-01

    Japan, as one of the most developed country in logistics field in the world, has developed its logistics parks earlier. This paper takes Japan's logistics park as the subject in research. By analyzing Japan's experiences of developing logistics parks, this paper tempts to find out problems in China's logistics parks and put forward suggestions for further development and construction .The

  13. Study on the Layout Planning of Logistics Park Using SLP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhang Changsen

    2010-01-01

    Logistics park is a product of modem Logistics. One of the most important and fundamental problems about logistics park is the planning of logistics park. The reasonable layout planning of logistics park would effectively lower the work intensity and difficulty of internal logistics, which also would improve the competitive ability of enterprise. The influence of logistics sequence and amount of

  14. Old People in Urban Parks: An Exploratory Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbey, Geoffrey; Blazey, Michael

    1983-01-01

    A study examined how older adults in five large American cities use their local parks. Specifically, the study examined: (1) user motivation and satisfaction; (2) logistics of park use; (3) onsite behavior and attitudes; and (4) criticisms of the park environment. Implications for park management are given. (Author/PP)

  15. Analysis of China's Logistics Parks Based on Germany's Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fuhua Wang

    2009-01-01

    Germany, as one of the most developed country in logistics field in the world, has developed its logistics parks earlier. This paper takes Germany's logistics park as the subject in research. By analyzing Germany's experiences of developing logistics parks, this paper tempts to find out problems in China's logistics parks and put forward suggestions for further development and construction.

  16. Induced volition: Resettlement from the Limpopo National Park, Mozambique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica Milgroom; Marja Spierenburg

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the resettlement process taking place in the context of the creation of the Limpopo National Park in Mozambique, which is part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park. About 26,000 people are currently living in the park; 7000 of whom will be resettled to an area southeast of the park. The Mozambican government and donors funding the

  17. 36 CFR 7.54 - Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Theodore Roosevelt National Park. 7.54 Section 7...NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.54 Theodore Roosevelt National Park. (a) Snowmobiles...passes through both units of Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Ingress and...

  18. 1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, FROM PARK AND MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, FROM PARK AND MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS, ALONG 20TH STREET NORTH TOWARDS THE BIRMINGHAM CITY CENTER WITH BIRMINGHAM MUSEUM OF ART (BOTTOM LEFT), BIRMINGHAM MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM (BOTTOM RIGHT), BIRMINGHAM CITY HALL (CENTER RIGHT), JEFFERSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE (CENTER LEFT) AND LINN PARK (CENTER) - Linn Park, Bounded by Park Place, Eighth Avenue, Short Twentieth & Twenty-first Streets, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Handicap Parking: A Demographic Study of Legal and Illegal Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordeaux, Monica N.; And Others

    Studies on handicap parking reveal the existence of a significant problem of unauthorized use of designated handicap spaces. This study examined various demographic variables involved in the illegal use of handicap parking spaces. Subjects (N=266) were drivers of vehicles observed in handicap parking spaces in three grocery store parking lots.…

  20. 9. VIEW FROM MANY PARKS CURVE (ON TRAIL RIDGE ROAD) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW FROM MANY PARKS CURVE (ON TRAIL RIDGE ROAD) OF HORSESHOE PARK, SHOWING FALL RIVER ROAD FAINTLY AT LEFT AT BASE OF SHEEP MOUNTAIN AND CROSSING ALLUVIAL FAN FROM LAWN LAKE FLOOD. - Fall River Road, Between Estes Park & Fall River Pass, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO