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1

Central Brazil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) true-color image was acquired on October 19, 2000, over a region in Brazil large enough to show much of the country's diverse landscape. Spanning some 8.5 million square kilometers (3.2 million square miles), Brazil is by far the largest South American nation--both in terms of land and population. The region known as the Amazon Basin lies to the northwest (upper left) and extends well beyond the northern and western edges of this scene. Typically, from this perspective Amazonia appears as a lush, dark green carpet due to the thick canopy of vegetation growing there. Some of the Amazon Basin is visible in this image, but much is obscured by clouds (bright white pixels), as is the Amazon River. This region is home to countless plant and animal species and some 150,000 native South Americans. The clusters of square and rectangular patterns toward the center of the image (light green or reddish-brown pixels) are where people have cleared away trees and vegetation to make room for development and agriculture. Toward the western side of the scene there is considerable haze and smoke from widespread biomass burning in parts of Brazil and Bolivia, which shares its eastern border with Brazil. Toward the east in this image is the highland, or 'cerrado,' region, which is more sparsely vegetated and has a somewhat drier climate than the Amazon Basin. The capital city, Brasilia, lies within this region just southwest of the Geral de Goias Mountains (orangish pixels running north-south). There are two large water reservoirs visible in this scene--the Sobradinho Reservoir about 800 km (500 miles) northeast of Brasilia, and the Paranaiba about 500 km (300 miles) southwest of Brasilia. MODIS flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. Image courtesy Brian Montgomery, Reto Stockli, and Robert Simmon, based on data from the MODIS Science Team.

2002-01-01

2

Smithsonian National Zoological Park: Conservation Central  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Conservation Central is an online a habitat education program sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution's National Zoological Park. It explores the temperate forest, home of the giant panda and black bear. Site materials include online activities such as designing a habitat for giant pandas, a virtual trip to a forest reserve in China, and virtual exploration and research in a temperate forest. There is also a conservation curriculum for intermediate-level (middle school) students, suggestions for outdoor activities for families, and a gallery where users can share their conservation ideas with others.

3

Smithsonian National Zoological Park: Conservation Central  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Presented by the Smithsonian National Zoological Park and Fujifilm, this website offers a suite of fun, online activities designed to educate middle school students about habitat conservation. In one site activity, participants travel to central China to "help make decisions about a fictional forest reserve." In another activity, visitors conduct scientific research in an eastern US forest using a variety of tools and methods. A third activity enables site visitors to design a zoo habitat for giant pandas. For educators, the website supplies a cohesive curriculum which aligns with national science standards. For families, the site offers a collection of downloadable activity ideas such as Nature Drawing, and creating a Family Conservation Action Plan.

4

Central portion of front (south side) from west parking area ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Central portion of front (south side) from west parking area - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Main Hospital Building, Charlie Kelly Boulevard, North side, at intersection of Sharon A. Lane Drive, Aurora, Adams County, CO

5

Reptiles from Lençóis Maranhenses National Park, Maranhão, northeastern Brazil  

PubMed Central

Abstract We are presenting a list of the reptile species from Lençóis Maranhenses National Park (LMNP), Maranhão, Brazil, obtained during 235 days of field work. The study area is located in the contact zone between three major Neotropical ecosystems: Amazonia, Caatinga, and Cerrado. The PNLM encompasses the largest dune fields in Brazil, wide shrubby areas (restingas), lakes, mangroves, and many freshwater lagoons. We have recorded 42 species of reptiles in the area: 24 snakes, 12 lizards, two worm lizards, three turtles, and one alligator. About 81 % of the recorded species occurred only in restinga areas. Our data highlights the uniqueness of the PNLM in the context of the biomes that surround it and shows the importance of efforts to improve the conservation of reptiles living in the restinga, which currently comprise only about 20 % of the total area protected by the park, but which are the mesohabitat containing most of the reptile species in the Lençóis Maranhenses complex of habitats. PMID:23275751

Miranda, Jivanildo Pinheiro; Costa, João Carlos Lopes; Rocha, Carlos Frederico D.

2012-01-01

6

Central Park East Secondary School: Teaching and Learning through Freire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article connects the theoretical perspective of Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed with the teaching and learning styles of teachers and students at Central Park East Secondary School (CPESS) in East Harlem, New York. It examines some of the ways the Freireian model has worked within the public school system and considers some of the…

Tyner-Mullings, Alia R.

2012-01-01

7

The Canela Indians of Northeastern Central Brazil  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based largely on the pioneering research of Bill Crocker, this site on the Canela Indians of Central Brazil is hosted by the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Designed to educate a general audience about the life and activities of the Canela, the site contains numerous sections that allow visitors to explore a world that few persons will be able to visit. First-time visitors will want to read the short essay ("About the Canela") before proceeding to the Daily Life chronology, which lists the activities of the Canela on an average day, including a men's council meeting and sing-dancing. A literature section offers numerous papers written by Bill Crocker on various aspects of Canela life, such as their initiation festivals and their relationships with ghosts. Finally, visitors will want to check out a short video showing Canela men engaging in one of their most unique daily activities, log racing.

2002-01-01

8

Micropropagation and germplasm conservation of Central Park Splendor Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq. 'A/Ross Central Park') trees.  

PubMed

Micropropagation offers opportunities to propagate, preserve and ship tree germplasm. It also reduces the risk of moving pathogens and insects with the germplasm due to built-in pathogen detection capabilities of aseptic cultures. For the past few decades, our laboratory has been involved in a project to preserve and restore a large, cold hardy, and historically important Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq. 'A/Ross Central Park') tree. Here we present three simple and efficient systems for its micropropagation, germplasm conservation and distribution: (1) in vitro plant formation from meristematic nodules (MNs), (2) plantlet generation from axillary buds, and (3) in vitro rooting of micro-cuttings from 20-years-old hedged stock plants. Newly flushed nodal segments were used as explants. WPM with 0.5 mg/l BA was found to be the best medium for meristematic shoot development and WPM supplemented with 2.0 mg/l 4-CPPU and 0.5 mg/l TDZ was best for meristematic nodule formation. Rhizogenesis of regenerants and micro-cuttings was best achieved on WPM with 1.0 mg/l NAA and 2% sucrose. Rooted plants were readily acclimatized to the greenhouse ambient environment and continued to grow well under greenhouse conditions. The survival rate of acclimatized plantlets under ex vitro conditions was 100% after 4 weeks. Plants looked healthy with no visually detectable phenotypic variation based on observation of about 1,000 plants. Cycling of shoot explants and MNs through repetitive cultures was effective in scaling-up propagules. PMID:17431632

Thakur, R C; Karnosky, D F

2007-08-01

9

Evaluation of the noise pollution in urban parks of Curitiba, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work shows a study about the noise pollution found in six urban parks of Curitiba, Paran, Brazil. The equivalent noise levels (Leq) have been measured in points spread throughout the park, and interviews have been conducted with some park visitors. It has been found out that 52.48% out of the measurement sites did not satisfy the Municipal Law no. 10,625, which states the noise emission level of 55 dB(A) as the limit value for green areas. The results of the questionnaires applied to the local visitors have showed that 39% out of the interviewed people used to visit the park every day and that 75% out of them seek for the realization of a physical activity. During the realization of their activities in the parks, 22% out of the interviewed people pointed to the noise pollution as the source of annoyance and 28% out of them pointed the local security. In this sense, it has been verified that half of the analyzed parks were inserted in acoustically polluted areas, which incurs a real state depreciation in their vicinities.

Ferreira, Andressa C.; Diniz, Fabiano B.; Paz, Elaine C.; Zannin, Paulo T.

2001-05-01

10

Central Park: A Humanities Curriculum for Children with Learning Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual reflects the highlights of an urban park study developed and tested over a 6-year period at the Churchill School, an elementary school for children with learning disabilities. This book makes possible an integrated study that develops understandings in natural science and the social studies along with reading, writing, and language…

Wurtzel, Claire

11

Soil Communities of Central Park, New York City: A Biodiversity Melting Pot  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The majority of earth's biodiversity lives in and makes up the soil, but the majority of soil biodiversity has yet to be characterized or even quantified. This may be especially true of urban soil systems. The last decade of advances in molecular, technical and bioinformatic techniques have contributed greatly to our understanding of belowground biodiversity, from global distribution to species counts. Yet, much of this work has been done in ';natural' systems and it is not known if established patterns of distribution, especially in relation to soil factors hold up in urban soils. Urban soils are intensively managed and disturbed, often by effects unique to urban settings. It remains unclear how urban pressures influence soil biodiversity, or if there is a defined or typical ';urban soil community'. Here we describe a study to examine the total soil biodiversity - Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya- of Central Park, New York City and test for patterns of distribution and relationships to soil characteristics. We then compare the biodiversity of Central Park to 57 global soils, spanning a number of biomes from Alaska to Antarctica. In this way we can identify similarities and differences in soil communities of Central Park to soils from ';natural' systems. To generate a broad-scale survey of total soil biodiversity, 596 soil samples were collected from across Central Park (3.41 km2). Soils varied greatly in vegetation cover and soil characteristics (pH, moisture, soil C and soil N). Using high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology we characterized the complete soil community from 16S rRNA (Bacteria and Archaea) and 18S rRNA gene sequences (Eukarya). Samples were rarified to 40,000 sequences per sample. To compare Central Park to the 57 global soils the complete soil community of the global soils was also characterized using Illumina sequencing technology. All samples were rarified to 40,000 sequences per sample. The total measured biodiversity in Central Park was high: >540,000 bacterial and archaeal species; and >97,000 eukaryotic species (as determined using a 97% sequence similarity cutoff). The most dominant bacterial phyla include Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia and Actinobacteria, and Archaea represent 1-8% of the sequences. Additionally, the distribution patterns of Acidobacteria and consequently beta-diversity, was strongly related to soil pH. The most dominant eukaryotic taxa include many Protists (Rhizara, Gregarinia), Fungi (Basidiomycota, Ascomycota), and Metazoa (Nematodes, Rotifers, Arthropods and Annelids). No single soil factor could predict eukaryotic distribution. Central Park soil diversity was strikingly similar to the diversity of the 57 global soils. Central Park and the global soils had similarities in alpha diversity, taxon abundances. Interestingly, there was significant overlap in a number of dominant species between Central Park and the global soils. Together these results represent the most comprehensive analysis of soil biodiversity conducted to date. Our data suggest that even well-studied locations like Central Park harbor very high levels of unexplored biodiversity, and that Central Park biodiversity is comparable to soil biodiversity found globally.

Ramirez, K. S.; Leff, J. W.; Wall, D. H.; Fierer, N.

2013-12-01

12

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons assessment in sediment of national parks in southeast Brazil.  

PubMed

The aim of this work was to assess the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment and their sources found in protected regions of southeastern Brazil. Samples of sediments were collected at four National Parks: Itatiaia National Park (PNIT), Serra da Bocaina National Park (PNSB), Serra dos Orgãos National Park (PNSO) and Jurubatiba National Park (PNJUB). The National Parks studied comprise rainforests, altitudinal fields and 'restinga' environments located in the Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo states. The sampling was conducted between 2002 and 2004 from June to September. In general, the environmental levels of PAHs found were similar to those in other remote areas around the globe. PNIT exhibited the highest median values of total PAHs in sediment (97 ng g(-1)), followed by PNJUB (89 ng g(-1)), PNSO (57 ng g(-1)) and PNSB (27 ng g(-1)). The highest levels of total PAHs (576 and 24430 ng g(-1)) could be associated to a point source contamination where are characterized for human activities. At PNSB and PNIT the PAH profiles were richer in 2 and 3 ring compounds, whereas at PNSO and PNJUB, the profiles exhibited 3 and 4 ring compounds. The phenanthrene predominance in most samples could indicate the influence of biogenic synthesis. The samples with a petrogenic pattern found in this study might be associated with the vicinity of major urban areas, highway traffic and/or industrial activities close to PNSO and PNIT. At PNIT and PNJUB, forest fires and slash and burn agricultural practices may drive the results towards a pyrolytic pattern. PMID:18472130

Meire, Rodrigo Ornellas; Azeredo, Antonio; Pereira, Márcia de Souza; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Malm, Olaf

2008-08-01

13

POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS ASSESSMENT IN SEDIMENT OF NATIONAL PARKS IN SOUTHEAST BRAZIL  

PubMed Central

The aim of this work was to assess the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment and their sources found in protected regions of southeastern Brazil. Samples of sediments were collected at four National Parks: Itatiaia National Park (PNIT), Serra da Bocaina National Park (PNSB), Serra dos Orgãos National Park (PNSO) and Jurubatiba National Park (PNJUB). The National Parks studied comprise rainforests, altitudinal fields and ‘restinga’ environments located in the Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo states. The sampling was conducted between 2002 and 2004 from June to September. In general, the environmental levels of PAHs found were similar to those in other remote areas around the globe. PNIT exhibited the highest median values of total PAHs in sediment (97 ng·g?1), followed by PNJUB (89 ng·g?1), PNSO (57 ng·g?1) and PNSB (27 ng·g?1). The highest levels of total PAHs (576 and 24430 ng·g?1) could be associated to a point source contamination where are characterizated for human activities. At PNSB and PNIT the PAH profiles were richer in 2 and 3 ring compounds, whereas at PNSO and PNJUB, the profiles exhibited 3 and 4 ring compounds. The phenanthrene predominance in most samples could indicate the influence of biogenic synthesis. The samples with a petrogenic pattern found in this study might be associated with the vicinity of major urban areas, highway traffic and/or industrial activities close to PNSO and PNIT. At PNIT and PNJUB, forest fires and slash and burn agricultural practices may drive the results towards a pyrolytic pattern. PMID:18472130

Meire, Rodrigo Ornellas; Azeredo, Antonio; de Souza Pereira, Márcia; Paulo, João; Torres, Machado; Malm, Olaf

2008-01-01

14

Sustaining Change: The Struggle to Maintain Identity at Central Park East Secondary School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Central Park East Secondary School (CPESS) in East Harlem was one of the most highly acclaimed and successful schools to come out of the period of school reform in the 1980s from which the Coalition of Essential Schools emerged. Noted progressive educator Deborah Meier founded CPESS in 1985 not as a reform model, but as a continuation of the…

Suiter, Diane

2009-01-01

15

Direct Assessment of a Progressive Public Elementary School: Graduates of Central Park East.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides an assessment of the Central Park East (CPE) elementary school (in New York City) effort, an effort by teachers who believed that the "progressive education" that worked for the children of the wealthy and privileged in many private and suburban schools could work equally well for poor and working-class children. Study data…

Bensman, David

16

Pupils and Parks: Environmental Education in National Parks of Developing Countries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two conservation education programs that target local primary schools and use national parks in Malaysian Borneo (Kinabalu Park) and central Brazil (Morro do Diabo Park). Both were designed using a comprehensive systems evaluation model and both resulted in cognitive and affective gains for students. (LB)

Jacobson, Susan K.; Padua, Suzana M.

1992-01-01

17

Climatic factors influencing triatomine occurrence in Central-West Brazil  

PubMed Central

We estimated the geographic distributions of triatomine species in Central-West Region of Brazil (CW) and analysed the climatic factors influencing their occurrence. A total of 3,396 records of 27 triatomine species were analysed. Using the maximum entropy method, ecological niche models were produced for eight species occurring in at least 20 municipalities based on 13 climatic variables and elevation. Triatoma sordida and Rhodnius neglectus were the species with the broadest geographic distributions in CW Brazil. The Cerrado areas in the state of Goiás were found to be more suitable for the occurrence of synanthropic triatomines than the Amazon forest areas in the northern part of the state of Mato Grosso. The variable that best explains the evaluated models is temperature seasonality. The results indicate that almost the entire region presents climatic conditions that are appropriate for at least one triatomine species. Therefore, it is recommended that entomological surveillance be reinforced in CW Brazil. PMID:23778666

Pereira, Joyce Mendes; de Almeida, Paulo Silva; de Sousa, Adair Vieira; de Paula, Aécio Moraes; Machado, Ricardo Bomfim; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

2013-01-01

18

Seasonal reproduction in Mexican cottontail rabbits Sylvilagus cunicularius in La Malinche National Park, central Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mexico has the largest number of leporid species in the world but most have been little studied. The endemic Mexican cottontailSylvilagus cunicularius (Waterhouse, 1848) is the largest Mexican rabbit, and although not in danger of extinction, it is increasingly threatened.\\u000a Since little is known about its annual pattern of reproduction, we studied this species in La Malinche National Park, central

Jorge Vázquez; Armando J. Martínez Chacón; Robyn Hudson; Luisa Rodríguez-Martínez; Margarita Martínez-Gómez

2007-01-01

19

Parasites of domestic and wild canids in the region of Serra do Cipó National Park, Brazil.  

PubMed

Over recent decades, diseases have been shown to be important causes of extinctions among wild species. Greater emphasis has been given to diseases transmitted by domestic animals, which have been increasing in numbers in natural areas, along with human populations. This study had the aim of investigating the presence of intestinal helminths in wild canids (maned wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, and crab-eating fox, Cerdocyon thous) in the Serra do Cipó National Park (43-44º W and 19-20º S) and endo and ectoparasites of domestic dogs in the Morro da Pedreira Environmental Protection Area (an area surrounding the National Park). The Serra do Cipó is located in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Among the enteroparasites found in domestic and wild canids, the following taxons were identified: Ancylostomidae, Trichuridae, Toxocara sp., Spirocerca sp., Physaloptera sp., Strongyloides sp., Cestoda, Dipylidium caninum, Diphyllobothriidae, Hymenolepidae, Anoplocephalidae, Trematoda, Acanthocephala and Isospora sp. Domestic dogs were positive for leishmaniasis and Babesia canis in serological tests. Among the ectoparasites, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Amblyomma cajennense and Ctenocephalides felis felis were observed in domestic dogs. Variations in the chaetotaxy of the meta-episternum and posterior tibia were observed in some specimens of C. felis felis. PMID:23070438

Santos, Juliana Lúcia Costa; Magalhães, Noele Borges; Dos Santos, Hudson Andrade; Ribeiro, Raul Rio; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi

2012-01-01

20

Mosquito communities in Nova Iguaçu Natural Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT. In order to gather information on the culicid fauna of Nova Iguaçu Municipal Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, adult and immature stages were collected with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light traps, and dippers and suction tubes, respectively. In all, 828 adult and 990 immature specimens were collected belonging to 12 genera. Among the species collected were Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus, Ae. fluviatilis, Ae. scapularis, Haemagogus leucocelaenus, and Psorophora ferox that are considered of potential medical importance. Culicids used a variety of larval habitats and bred under diverse ecological conditions, mostly in natural water containers formed by bamboo, bromeliad, ground depression, rock pool, stream, tree hole, and in artificial containers such as abandoned bathtub, car carcass, abandoned sink, plastic cup, waste tire, and water tank. Species richness and diversity increased from lower to higher forest cover and was highest in sites with highest diversity and high number of larval habitats. PMID:25102590

Correa, Fabiana F; Gleiser, Raquel M; Leite, Paulo J; Fagundes, Ezequias; Gil-Santana, Hélcio R; Mello, Cecilia F; Gredilha, Rodrigo; Alencar, Jeronimo

2014-06-01

21

Local perceptions of jaguars ( Panthera onca) and pumas ( Puma concolor) in the Iguaçu National Park area, south Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jaguars (Panthera onca) have been killed by local residents within the boundaries and lands surrounding Iguaçu National Park (INP), Brazil. Both jaguars and pumas (Puma concolor) occur in the region, however, livestock predation by pumas has rarely been reported. Our objective was to assess the local perceptions about jaguars and pumas. We identified two major factors that distinguished the perceptions

Valéria Amorim Conforti; Fernando Cesar Cascelli de Azevedo

2003-01-01

22

Aluminium accumulation by some cerrado native species of central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Among thirty species belonging to seventeen families common in the cerrado region of central Brazil, eight species belonging\\u000a to three families were found to accumulate aluminium in their leaves in considerable amounts (4,310 to 14,120 mg\\/kg on dry\\u000a weight basis) from a dark red latossol which is strongly-acid and low in available nutrient cations. The aluminium-accumulating\\u000a species areMiconia ferruginata (DC.)

M. Haridasan

1982-01-01

23

Seismic waveforms inversion of earthquakes in the Central Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the central region of Brazil, Tocantins (TO) province, the distribution of tectonic stresses are not well known; there is only a measurement of stress and no data from focal mechanisms.To understand the processes that occur during an earthquake, it is necessary to have a precise knowledge of the earthquake source parameters. This work shows that the focal mechanism of an earthquake can be obtained in reliable way using only information contained in its band-pass-filtered waveforms registered at a few stations.The inversion for the focal mechanism was made using the package ISOLA (Zahradnik et al., 2005, Sokos & Zahradnik, 2008) and MATLAB. The seismicity is associated with the Goiás -Tocantins (GO-TO) Seismic Range (SR) that crosses the central part of Brazil in a NE-SW direction. The obtained focal mechanisms are in agreement with the results obtained by Barros et al. (2012) for 5.0 mb earthquake in this region.The Green functions were calculated using the 1-D velocity model determined by Soares et al (2006) for a model of point source located above and below the hypocenter. Ten hypocenters were tested, 5 above and 5 below to the given hypocenter. All seismograms were corrected for instrument response, band-pass-filtered, integrated to obtain displacement, and finally inverted for the DC (double couple) focal mechanism. The optimal solution produced the best correlation between the observed and synthetic seismograms, in one of the 10 points tested. However, a new search was attempted for each point source located on a plane passing through the hypocenter's optimal previous solution. This plane is divided into a rectangular grid, whose separation depends on the physical dimensions of the source investigated. The centroid (center of gravity of the fault displaced), corresponds to the solution that produces the best fit between the observed data and synthetics.We can conclude that the resulting consistency and the stability of the solutions indicate that this inversion method can be applied in other regions, especially in Brazil, where the earthquakes are rare and usually recorded by few stations. the best fit between the observed data and synthetics.We can conclude that the resulting consistency and the stability of the solutions indicate that this inversion method can be applied in other regions, especially in Brazil, where the earthquakes are rare and usually recorded by few stations.

Sayao, E. A.; Barros, L. V.; Maffia, N.; Schmidt, K.; Quintero, R.

2013-05-01

24

Mapping Soil Erosion Factors and Potential Erosion Risk for the National Park "Central Balkan"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil erosion is widely recognised environmental problem. The report aims at presenting the main results from assessment and mapping of the factors of sheet water erosion and the potential erosion risk on the territory of National Park "Central Balkan". For this purpose, the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was used for predicting soil loss from erosion. The influence of topography (LS-factor) and soil erodibility (K-factor) was assessed using small-scale topographic and soil maps. Rainfall erosivity (R-factor) was calculated from data of rainfalls with amounts exceeding 9.5 mm from 14 hydro-meteorological stations. The values of the erosion factors (R, K and LS) were presented for the areas of forest, sub-alpine and alpine zones. Using the methods of GIS, maps were plotted presenting the area distribution among the classes of the soil erosion factors and the potential risk in the respective zones. The results can be used for making accurate decisions for soil conservation and sustainable land management in the park.

Ilieva, Diliana; Malinov, Ilia

2014-05-01

25

Nutritional status and growth of indigenous Xavante children, Central Brazil  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to characterize the nutritional status of Xavante Indian children less than 10 years of age in Central Brazil and to evaluate the hypothesis of an association between child nutrition and socioeconomic differentiation in this population. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in July 2006 that included all children under the age of 10 from the Xavante village Pimentel Barbosa in Mato Grosso, Brazil. The data collected included weight, height, and sociodemographic information. Sociodemographic data were used to generate two indices ("income" and "wealth") and to determine the proportion of adults in each household. Descriptive analyses were performed for weight-for-age (W/A), height-for-age (H/A), and weight-for-height (W/H) using the NCHS and the WHO growth references. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using H/A and W/A as a response variables. Results Of a total of 246 children under the age of ten residing in the village, 232 (94.3%) were evaluated. Following the NCHS reference, 5.6% of children under the age of ten presented low W/A and 14.7% presented low H/A. Among children under the age of five, deficit percentages for weight and height were 4.5% and 29.9%, respectively, following the WHO curves. Among children < 2 years of age, H/A index variability was found to be directly related to child's age and inversely related to the proportion of adults in the household. Maternal BMI was positively associated with growth for children from 2 to 4 years of age, explaining 11.5% of the z-score variability for the H/A index. For children 5 years of age and older, the wealth index and maternal height were positively associated with H/A. No significant associations were found using W/A as the dependent variable. Conclusion This study demonstrated that undernutrition, in particular linear growth deficit, is a notable health issue for Xavante children. These findings contrast with the nutritional profile observed among Brazilian children nationally, which is characterized by a sharp decline in child undernutrition in recent decades, even in the poorest regions of the country. This discrepancy calls attention to the persistent health disparities that exist between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Brazil. PMID:22236407

2012-01-01

26

Acerola pollinators in the savanna of Central Brazil: temporal variations in oil-collecting bee richness  

E-print Network

Acerola pollinators in the savanna of Central Brazil: temporal variations in oil-collecting bee pollinator visits to this fruit shrub in a Brazilian savanna and identified the pollinator's other food of cultivating Acerola in the savannas of Central Brazil and the importance of natural lands for providing

27

Deforestation trends of tropical dry forests in central Brazil  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tropical dry forests are the most threatened forest type in the world yet a paucity of research about them stymies development of appropriate conservation actions. The Paranã River Basin has the most significant dry forest formations in the Cerrado biome of central Brazil and is threatened by intense land conversion to pastures and agriculture. We examined changes in Paranã River Basin deforestation rates and fragmentation across three time intervals that covered 31 yr using Landsat imagery. Our results indicated a 66.3 percent decrease in forest extent between 1977 and 2008, with an annual rate of forest cover change of 3.5 percent. Landscape metrics further indicated severe forest loss and fragmentation, resulting in an increase in the number of fragments and reduction in patch sizes. Forest fragments in flatlands have virtually disappeared and the only significant forest remnants are mostly found over limestone outcrops in the eastern part of the basin. If current patterns persist, we project that these forests will likely disappear within 25 yr. These patterns may be reversed with creation of protected areas and involvement of local people to preserve small fragments that can be managed for restoration.

Bianchi, Carlos A.; Haig, Susan M.

2013-01-01

28

Paleovegetation and paleoclimate of ``Vereda de Águas Emendadas'', central Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The palynological analysis from an extensive palm swamp on top of a plateau, close to the city of Bras?´lia (15°34'S and 47°35'W), has shown a sequence of vegetational and climatic changes in the last 30,500 years. The area is the headwater of tributaries of the main Brazilian hydrographic basins: Amazonian (north), Paraná (south), and São Francisco (east). At the base of the analysed core there is a clay deposit devoid of palynomorphs. At 30,480±100 yr BP, peat started to form in the area. Between 25,790±70 and ca. 24,200 yr BP, pollen grains and algal remains are abundant, indicating a marsh surrounded by open cerrado and patches of gallery forest on top of the plateau. Between ca. 24,000 and 21,450±100 yr BP, vegetation was denser than at present, with abundant marsh plants and the occurrence of some trees of a cooler climate, suggesting a climate more humid than at present and probably cooler. The absence of Mauritia pollen during that time indicates the palm swamp ("vereda") characteristic of the present-day area did not occur. The drastic decrease in concentration and diversity of palynomorphs from ca. 21,000 yr BP until 7,220±50 yr BP suggests a dry climatic phase that resulted in drier, more seasonal climate and the desertification on top of the plateau. Shortly after 7,000 yr BP, the abundance of pollen grains and spores increased and Mauritia pollen occurred in the sediments, suggesting increased humidity and the beginning of the palm swamp; from ca. 5,600 yr BP onwards, the present types of vegetation grew on top of the plateau: arboreal cerrado, gallery forest, and palm swamp. The climate of this phase was similar to that of the present. Charcoal particles are found throughout the record but they increase mainly after 2,600 yr BP, suggesting at least three extensive episodes when the local vegetation was burned. The sequence of events found here follows, in general, the same pattern described for other areas in central Brazil. However, the dry climatic phase is more strongly marked in Vereda de Águas Emendadas, probably due to its location on top of a plateau.

Barberi, Maira; Salgado-Labouriau, Maria Lea; Suguio, Kenitiro

2000-07-01

29

Twentieth Century Atmospheric Metal Fluxes into Central Park Lake, New York City  

PubMed Central

It is generally assumed that declining atmospheric lead concentrations in urban centers during the 1970s and 1980s were due almost entirely to the progressive introduction of unleaded gasoline. However, most environmental data are from monitoring programs that began only two to three decades ago, which limits their usefulness. Here, trace metal and radionuclide data from sediment cores in Central Park Lake provide a record of atmospheric pollutant deposition in New York City through the 20th century, which suggests that leaded gasoline combustion was not the dominant source of atmospheric lead for NYC. Lead deposition rates, normalized to known Pb-210 atmospheric influxes, were extremely high, reaching maximum values (>70 ?g cm?2 yr?1) from the late 1930s to early 1960s, decades before maximum emissions from combustion of leaded gasoline. Temporal trends of lead, zinc, and tin deposition derived from the lake sediments closely resemble the history of solid waste incineration in New York City. Furthermore, widespread use of solid waste incinerators in the United States and Europe over the last century suggests that solid waste incineration may have provided the dominant source of atmospheric lead and several other metals to many urban centers. PMID:21850150

CHILLRUD, STEVEN N.; BOPP, RICHARD F.; SIMPSON, H. JAMES; ROSS, JAMES M.; SHUSTER, EDWARD L.; CHAKY, DAMON A.; WALSH, DAN C.; CHOY, CRISTINE CHIN; TOLLEY, LAEL-RUTH; YARME, ALLISON

2011-01-01

30

Molecular Tracers of Saturated and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Inputs into Central Park Lake, New York City  

PubMed Central

Saturated hydrocarbons (SH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been quantified in a sediment core obtained from Central Park Lake, New York City. Radionuclides 210Pb and 137Cs were used to assign approximate dates to each individual section in the core. The dating profile based on 210Pb matches very well with the time constraints provided by 137Cs. Radionuclide-derived depositional dates are consistent with temporal information from the petroleum-indicator ratio U/R [the ratio of unresolved complex mixture (UCM) to saturated hydrocarbons in the aliphatic fraction] and the history of fuel use in the NYC area. Ratios of 1,7-dimethylphenanthrane (DMP) to 1,7-DMP plus 2,6-DMP [1,7/(1,7 + 2,6)-DMP], retene to retene plus chrysene [Ret/(Ret + Chy)], and fluoranthene to fluoranthene plus pyrene [Fl/(Fl + Py)] provide additional source discrimination throughout the core. Results show that the ratio U/R is sensitive to petroleum inputs and Ret/(Ret + Chy) is responsive to contributions from softwood combustion, whereas both Fl/(Fl + Py) and 1,7/(1,7 + 2,6)-DMP can be used to discriminate among wood, coal, and petroleum combustion sources. Combined use of these ratios suggests that in New York City, wood combustion dominated 100 years ago, with a shift to coal combustion occurring from the 1900s to the 1950s. Petroleum use began around the 1920s and has dominated since the 1940s. PMID:16201624

YAN, BEIZHAN; ABRAJANO, TEOFILO A.; BOPP, RICHARD F.; CHAKY, DAMON A.; BENEDICT, LUCILLE A.; CHILLRUD, STEVEN N.

2011-01-01

31

Molecular tracers of saturated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon inputs into Central Park Lake, New York City.  

PubMed

Saturated hydrocarbons (SH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been quantified in a sediment core obtained from Central Park Lake, New York City. Radionuclides 210Pb and 137Cs were used to assign approximate dates to each individual section in the core. The dating profile based on 210Pb matches very well with the time constraints provided by 137Cs. Radionuclide-derived depositional dates are consistent with temporal information from the petroleum-indicator ratio U/R [the ratio of unresolved complex mixture (UCM)to saturated hydrocarbons in the aliphatic fraction] and the history of fuel use in the NYC area. Ratios of 1,7-dimethylphenanthrane (DMP) to 1,7-DMP plus 2,6-DMP [1,7/(1,7 + 2,6)-DMP], retene to retene plus chrysene [Ret/(Ret + Chy)], and fluoranthene to fluoranthene plus pyrene [FI/(FI + Py)] provide additional source discrimination throughoutthe core. Results show that the ratio U/R is sensitive to petroleum inputs and Ret/(Ret + Chy) is responsive to contributions from softwood combustion, whereas both FI/(FI + Py) and 1,7/ (1,7 + 2,6)-DMP can be used to discriminate among wood, coal, and petroleum combustion sources. Combined use of these ratios suggests that in New York City, wood combustion dominated 100 years ago, with a shift to coal combustion occurring from the 1900s to the 1950s. Petroleum use began around the 1920s and has dominated since the 1940s. PMID:16201624

Yan, Beizhan; Abrajano, Teofilo A; Bopp, Richard F; Chaky, Damon A; Benedict, Lucille A; Chillrud, Steven N

2005-09-15

32

Checklist of butterflies (Insecta: Lepidoptera) from Serra do Intendente State Park - Minas Gerais, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Abstract In order to contribute to the butterflies’ biodiversity knowledge at Serra do Intendente State Park - Minas Gerais, a study based on collections using Van Someren-Rydon traps and active search was performed. In this study, a total of 395 butterflies were collected, of which 327 were identified to species or morphospecies. 263 specimens were collected by the traps and 64 were collected using entomological hand-nets; 43 genera and 60 species were collected and identified.

Nery, Izabella; Carvalho, Natalia

2014-01-01

33

Molluscan fauna from core 25B, Whipray Basin, central Florida Bay, Everglades National Park  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Molluscan assemblages preserved in an 80-cm core from Whipray Basin in central Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, illustrate changes in the environmental conditions within the basin over the last two centuries. Salinity remained polyhaline to euhaline throughout the time of deposition (1800-1997), with alternating periods of stability and increased fluctuations. Since 1800, a Brachidontes assemblage has characterized Whipray Basin and the dominant faunal components have remained the same in terms of presence and absence of species. However, patterns of dominance and diversity within the Brachidontes assemblage have changed and these changes indicate fluctuations in the environment. The period from 1815 to 1857 was distinguished by an abundance of molluscs dwelling on seagrass and sub-aquatic vegetation. Faunal richness and abundance were high and stable, and epiphytic molluscs flourished. Polyhaline conditions existed, although periods of slightly lower salinities occurred. The period from 1862 to 1894 appears unstable based on fluctuations in molluscan faunal richness, abundance, and dominant species. The epiphytic molluscs experienced significant shifts (? >30%) associated with changes in sub-aquatic vegetation. The changes in epiphytic molluscs from 1871 to 1913 may be indicative of a seagrass die-off. The period from 1899 to 1950 was the most stable section of the core in terms of changes in the molluscan fauna. Faunal richness and abundance reached highs of 31 groups and 726 individuals per sample during this period and epiphytic molluscs were prevalent. Beginning in 1955, faunal groups experienced high amplitude fluctuations in abundance; this pattern continued through the second half of the 20th century. Fluctuating salinity, changes in vegetation, and reduced water quality (low O2, increased nutrients and/or reduced clarity) oxygen supply) have characterized the past 50 years. These changes preceded a seagrass die-off in 1987-88 and may be related to the causes of the die-off. Whether the cause of the changes seen in Whipray Basin is natural or a combination of natural and anthropogenic factors, the amount of change in the molluscan fauna in the last 50 years clearly exceeds the preceding 150 years.

Trappe, Carleigh A.; Brewster-Wingard, G. Lynn

2001-01-01

34

HEMATOLOGY AND BLOOD CHEMISTRY PARAMETERS DIFFER IN FREE-RANGING MANED WOLVES (CHRYSOCYON BRACHYURUS) LIVING IN THE SERRA DA CANASTRA NATIONAL PARK VERSUS ADJACENT FARMLANDS, BRAZIL  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been growing interest in the specific impacts of anthropogenic factors on the health of wildlife. This study examined hematology and serum chemistry status of a prominent carnivore, the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), living in, on the boundaries to, or on adjacent farmlands to the Serra da Canastra National Park, Brazil. Twenty-eighty wolves were captured, and values were compared

J. A. May-Junior; N. Songsasen; F. C. Azevedo; J. P. Santos; R. C. Paula; F. H. G. Rodrigues; M. D. Rodden; D. E. Wildt; R. G. Morato

35

Enterobacteriaceae in mouth and cloaca of podocnemis expansa and P. Unifilis (testudines: chelonia) populations of national park of araguaia plains, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Shigella flexnerii and Escherichia coli were the most frequent Gram-negative bacteria found in the mouth cavity and cloacae of the turtles Podocnemis expansa and P. unifilis on beaches in the National Park of Araguaia, Brazil. Reptiles are known as Salmonella carriers, despite rarely isolated in these turtles. PMID:24031664

de Morais, Paula Benevides; de Souza, Denise Rodrigues; de Sousa, Francisca Maria Pinheiro; de Oliveira, Kleverson Wessel; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio

2011-01-01

36

[Mosquito (Diptera, Culicidae) ecology in the Iguaçu National Park, Brazil: 1 Habitat distribution].  

PubMed

A study of the mosquito fauna in the Iguaçu National Park focused on population behavior in four biotopes with different types of plant cover inside the Park. Systematic bimonthly diurnal and nocturnal human bait and Shannon trap captures were conducted in both forest and domiciliary environments over the course of 24 months. A total of 20,273 adult mosquito specimens belonging to 44 species were collected: Ochlerotatus serratus (10.3%), Haemagogus leucocelaenus (9.7%), Mansonia titillans (9.6%), and Chagasia fajardoi (8.8%) were the most frequently captured mosquitoes. Anopheles cruzii, Runchomyia theobaldi, Wyeomyia aporonoma, and Wy. confusa were captured almost exclusively in well-preserved areas with dense forest cover. Culex nigripalpus, Oc. pennai, Oc. serratus, Sabethes purpureus, and Sa. albiprivus were captured in three essentially sylvatic biotopes. Species captured in the forest areas around a dam were: An. albitarsis s.l., An. galvaoi, An. evansae, An. fluminensis, Coquillettidia venezuelensis, Cq. juxtamansonia, Wy. quasilongirostris, and Onirion personatum, Ch. fajardoi, Cq. fasciolata, Cq nitens, and Ma. titillans were the most frequently captured species in a residential area. PMID:12973575

Guimarães, Anthony Erico; Lopes, Catarina Macedo; de Mello, Rubens Pinto; Alencar, Jeronimo

2003-01-01

37

Land and Water Conservation; Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; Little Rock Central High School; and Arches National Park. Hearing on S. 1333, S. 2106, S. 2129, S. 2232, H.R. 2283 before the Subcommittee on National Parks, Historic Preservation, and Recreation of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Senate hearing considered five bills related to the national parks. Of interest to the education community is S. 2232, which would establish Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site in Arkansas as a unit of the National Park Service. In 1957 the school became a center of controversy over school desegregation when nine African…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

38

Hematology and blood chemistry parameters differ in free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) living in the Serra da Canastra National Park versus adjacent farmlands, Brazil.  

PubMed

There has been growing interest in the specific impacts of anthropogenic factors on the health of wildlife. This study examined hematology and serum chemistry status of a prominent carnivore, the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), living in, on the boundaries to, or on adjacent farmlands to the Serra da Canastra National Park, Brazil. Twenty-eighty wolves were captured, and values were compared 1) between subadults (n=8 animals) and adults (n=20 animals), 2) males (n=12 animals) and females (n=16 animals), and 3) among wolves living inside the park (n=11), near the park border (n=11 animals), and in neighboring farming areas (n=6 animals). Age, gender, and wolf locations influenced (P<0.05) hematology and serum biochemistry values. Specifically, adults had lower (P<0.05) circulating phosphorus than subadults. Males had lower (P<0.05) serum glucose, creatinine phosphokinase, and cholesterol and higher (P<0.05) potassium than females. Erythrocyte count and serum cholinesterase were lower (P<0.05) in wolves living within the park compared with near the park border or on farmlands. Mean corpuscular volume was lower (P<0.05) in wolves living near the park border than those ranging within the park and on farmlands. Aspartate transaminase and chloride were higher (P<0.05) in wolves living inside the park compared with those ranging near the park border. Creatinine phosphokinase was lower (P<0.05) in wolves living on farmland compared with the other two locations. These results clearly reveal a relationship between age and gender on hematology and serum biochemistry values in free-living maned wolves. More importantly, certain traits indicative of health are potentially compromised in wolves living in areas under anthropogenic pressure. These data lay a foundation for examining the influence of farming and local domestic species on disease susceptibility and fitness in the maned wolf. PMID:19204338

May-Júnior, J A; Songsasen, N; Azevedo, F C; Santos, J P; Paula, R C; Rodrigues, F H G; Rodden, M D; Wildt, D E; Morato, R G

2009-01-01

39

Presence of Fasciola hepatica in feral nutria (Myocastor coypus) living in a public park in Brazil.  

PubMed

Sixteen nutria (Myocastor coypus) from a protected area in Curitiba, Brazil, were sampled to determine the prevalence of Fasciola hepatica eggs and intestinal parasites and the presence of snails in the habitat used by nutria. The overall prevalence rates were 56.25% (9) for F. hepatica eggs, 87.50% (14) for cestode eggs, 56.25% (9) for ascarid eggs, 50% (8) for coccidian (Eimeriidae) oocysts, and 56.25% (9) for Strongyloidea eggs. Fasciola hepatica eggs had an average size of 138 microm x 72 microm. The following mollusks were found: Physa cubensis, Physa marmorata, and Biomphalaria tenagophyla. These results suggest that the infected nutria could serve as a source of contamination for other animals, humans, and surface water. This is the first report about parasites in nutria in the state of Paraná, Brazil. PMID:19368247

El-Kouba, Maysa M A N; Marques, Sandra M T; Pilati, Célso; Hamann, Waldir

2009-03-01

40

Deep seismic refraction and gravity crustal model and tectonic deformation in Tocantins Province, Central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interpretation of seismic refraction data in the central sector of Tocantins Province, Central Brazil, has produced a seismic crustal model with well-defined upper, intermediate, and lower crust layers having smooth velocity gradient in each layer. The depths to Moho vary from 32 to 43 km, and mean crustal P velocity varies from 6.3 km\\/s, beneath Goiás magmatic arc on the

Jesus Berrocal; Yara Marangoni; Nelsí C. de Sá; Reinhardt Fuck; José E. P. Soares; E. Dantas; Fábio Perosi; Celia Fernandes

2004-01-01

41

The bimodal rift-related Juscelândia volcanosedimentary sequence in central Brazil: Mesoproterozoic extension and Neoproterozoic metamorphism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Barro Alto Complex and Juscelândia volcanosedimentary sequence are exposed in the central part of the Neoproterozoic Brasília belt of central Brazil. The former is a large (approximately 150km long), boomerang-shaped, mafic-ultramafic, layered complex formed by two different intrusions metamorphosed under granulite facies. These rocks are tectonically overlain by rocks of the Juscelândia volcanosedimentary sequence, represented mainly by biotite-gneiss and

Renato Moraes; Reinhardt A. Fuck; Márcio Martins Pimentel; Simone M. C. L. Gioia; Maria H. B. M. de Hollanda; Richard Armstrong

2006-01-01

42

Numerical assessments of geological CO2 sequestration in the Changhua Coastal Industrial Park, Central Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coal-fired power plants of the Taiwan Power Company are the main sources of CO2 emission in Taiwan. Due to the importation of coal mine and the need of cooling water circulation, power plants were built on the coast. Geological CO2 sequestration has been recognized as one of solutions for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emission by injecting CO2 captured from fossil fuel power plants into deep saline geologic formations. The Changhua Coastal Industrial Park (CCIP; 120.38° E, 24.11° N) in central Taiwan has been preliminary evaluated as one of potential sites for geological CO2 sequestration. The CCIP site has a sloping, layered heterogeneity formation with stagnant groundwater flow. Layers of sandstone and shale sequentially appeared to be the major components of geological formations with seaward transgression. Thickness of sedimentary formations gradually becomes thinner from east to west. Previous investigations [Chiao et al., 2010; Yu et al, 2011] did not find significant faults around this site. The TOUGHREACT/ECO2N model was employed with external mesh generator developed in this study to proceed to comprehensive assessments for CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers (salinity of 3%, pH of 7.2) at the CCIP site. A series of numerical experiments for investigating the physical, geochemical and its interactions included the deep saline-aquifer responses, CO2 plume migration, leakage risks, hydrogeochemistry processes, reservoir capacity and trapping mechanisms (i.e. hydrodynamics, capillarity, solubility, and mineral trapping) during and post CO2 injection were assessed. A 3-D lithological model applied in this study was conceptualized with two seismic profiles (along shore and cross shore) and one geological well nearby the study area. A total of 32 vertical layers was built with different porosities and permeabilities estimated from the TCDP-A borehole log samples adjusted with effects in geopressure differences. Cross-platform open source libraries of the CGAL and MathGL were integrated with wxDev-C++ and implemented in C/C++ programming languages that were aided in nested mesh generation and simulation result visualization. Two mesh systems were demonstrated in this study that including the relatively coarse (200 m resolution in horizontal) and 3-leve refinement (from 200 to 50 m resolution in horizontal) mesh systems. Assuming a single injection well located at the centroid point of simulation domain and injected as a depth of about 2700 meters beneath the mean sea level under isothermal condition (ambient temperature of 70°C) with a constant injection rate of 1 Mt/yr for the first 50 years. Geochemical system setting (i.e. initial mineral abundances, and their geochemistry kinetic properties) was adopted from Xu et al. [2006]. Preliminary simulation results shows that (1) CO2 plume cannot penetrate the caprock, (2) 3-level refinement mesh systems can reduce the numerical dispersion, (3) formation tilt (about 3.5 degree) not only generated the approximately round shape of the CO2 plume spreading but result the asymmetric patterns of the CO2 plume profile, and (4) capillarity trapping was not significant under stagnant groundwater flow condition.

Sung, R.; Li, M.

2012-12-01

43

Nature and Culture in Central Brazil: Panará Natural Resource Concepts and Tropical Forest Conservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Panará, a Gê tribe of Central Brazil, were nearly exterminated when the government opened a road through the center of their territory in the early 1970s. The survivors were relocated, and 15 yr later returned to reoccupy their remaining territory. The story of the Panará is representative of the Brazilian Indians of the Amazon, who since the 1970s have

Stephan Schwartzman

2010-01-01

44

THE LBA PROJECT: NUTRIENT CYCLES AND TRACE GAS EXCHANGE IN SAVANNAS OF CENTRAL BRAZIL  

EPA Science Inventory

The Cerrado of central Brazil is one of the largest savannah regions on Earth. The stressors affecting ecosystems in this region, including deforestation, fire, soil degradation, unwise agricultural practices, climate change, and urbanization, are all experienced in many U. S. ec...

45

Abstract The savannas (cerrado) of south-central Brazil are currently subjected to frequent anthropogenic burning,  

E-print Network

Abstract The savannas (cerrado) of south-central Brazil are currently subjected to frequent, seed- lings of a common Brazilian savanna tree, Keilmeyera coriacea, were grown at 350 ppm and 700 ppm of anthropogenic burning in the Brazilian savannas. Key words Savanna · Cerrado · Fire · Elevated CO2

Jackson, Robert B.

46

Source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into Central Park Lake, New York City, over a century of deposition.  

PubMed

Relative contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from combustion sources of wood, petroleum, and coal were computed in sediments from Central Park Lake in New York City (NY, USA) by chemical mass balance based on several reliable source indicators. These indicators are the ratio of retene to the sum of retene and chrysene, the ratio of 1,7-dimethylphenanthrene (DMP) to 1,7-DMP and 2,6-DMP, and the ratio of fluroanthene to fluroanthene and pyrene. The authors found that petroleum combustion-derived PAH fluxes generally followed the historical consumption data of New York State. Coal combustion-derived PAH flux peaked approximately in the late 1910s, remained at a relatively high level over the next 3 decades, then rapidly declined from the 1950s to the 1960s; according to historical New York State coal consumption data, however, there was a 2-peak trend, with peaks around the early 1920s and the mid-1940s. The 1940s peak was not observed in Central Park Lake, most likely because of the well-documented shift from coal to oil as the major residential heating fuel in New York City during the late 1930s. It was widely believed that the decreased PAH concentrations and fluxes in global sediments during the last century resulted from a major energy shift from coal to petroleum. The data, however, show that this shift occurred from 1945 through the 1960s and did not result in an obvious decline. The sharpest decrease, which occurred in the 1970s was not predominantly related to coal usage but rather was the result of multiple factors, including a decline in petroleum usage largely, the introduction of low sulfur-content fuel in New York City, and the introduction of emission-control technologies. PMID:24375577

Yan, Beizhan; Bopp, Richard F; Abrajano, Teofilo A; Chaky, Damon; Chillrud, Steven N

2014-05-01

47

SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHs) INTO CENTRAL PARK LAKE, NEW YORK CITY, OVER A CENTURY OF DEPOSITION  

PubMed Central

Relative contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from combustion sources of wood, petroleum, and coal were computed in sediments from Central Park Lake in New York City (NY, USA) by chemical mass balance based on several reliable source indicators. These indicators are the ratio of retene to the sum of retene and chrysene, the ratio of 1,7-dimethylphenanthrene (DMP) to 1,7-DMP and 2,6-DMP, and the ratio of fluroanthene to fluroanthene and pyrene. The authors found that petroleum combustion–derived PAH fluxes generally followed the historical consumption data of New York State. Coal combustion-derived PAH flux peaked approximately in the late 1910s, remained at a relatively high level over the next 3 decades, then rapidly declined from the 1950s to the 1960s; according to historical New York State coal consumption data, however, there was a 2-peak trend, with peaks around the early 1920s and the mid-1940s. The 1940s peak was not observed in Central Park Lake, most likely because of the well-documented shift from coal to oil as the major residential heating fuel in New York City during the late 1930s. It was widely believed that the decreased PAH concentrations and fluxes in global sediments during the last century resulted from a major energy shift from coal to petroleum. The data, however, show that this shift occurred from 1945 through the 1960s and did not result in an obvious decline. The sharpest decrease, which occurred in the 1970s was not predominantly related to coal usage but rather was the result of multiple factors, including a decline in petroleum usage largely, the introduction of low sulfur–content fuel in New York City, and the introduction of emission-control technologies. PMID:24375577

Yan, Beizhan; Bopp, Richard F.; Abrajano, Teofilo A.; Chaky, Damon; Chillrud, Steven N.

2014-01-01

48

Cattle depredation by puma ( Puma concolor) and jaguar ( Panthera onca) in central-western Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, data on cattle depredation by puma (Puma concolor) and jaguar (Panthera onca) were recorded for six years (1998–2003) in a cattle ranch in central-western Brazil. Depredation represented 18.9% of the overall cattle mortality, being predominant on calves. In biomass, kills represented 0.4% (63.8kg\\/km2) of the ranch’s annual stock. In economic loss, kills represented 0.3% of the cattle

Francesca B. L. Palmeira; Peter G. Crawshaw; Claudio M. Haddad; Luciano M. Verdade

2008-01-01

49

Granites and the geodynamic history of the neoproterozoic Bras??lia belt, Central Brazil: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent field and geochronological studies have demonstrated the importance of granitic magmatism in the evolution of the Neoproterozoic Bras??lia Belt, in Central Brazil. This is an orogenic belt developed in response to the convergence between the Amazon, São Francisco–Congo and Paraná continental blocks. The presence of Neoproterozoic juvenile arc rocks and syn-collisional peraluminous granites challenged previous intracontinental evolution models for

Márcio M Pimentel; Reinhardt A Fuck; Nilson F Botelho

1999-01-01

50

Photogeologic mapping in central southwest Bahia, using LANDSAT-1 multispectral images. [Brazil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The interpretation of LANDSAT multispectral imagery for geologic mapping of central southwest Bahia, Brazil is described. Surface features such as drainage, topography, vegetation and land use are identified. The area is composed of low grade Precambrian rocks covered by Mezozoic and Cenozoic sediments. The principal mineral prospects of economic value are fluorite and calcareous rocks. Gold, calcite, rock crystal, copper, potassium nitrate and alumina were also identified.

Dejesusparada, N. (principal investigator); Ohara, T.

1981-01-01

51

Geologic Map of the Estes Park 30' x 60' Quadrangle, North-Central Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The rocks and landforms of the Estes Park 30 x 60 minute quadrangle display an exceptionally complete record of geologic history in the northern Front Range of Colorado. The Proterozoic basement rocks exposed in the core of the range preserve evidence of Paleoproterozoic marine sedimentation, volcanism, and regional soft-sediment deformation, followed by regional folding and gradational metamorphism. The metasedimentary rocks of the Estes Park quadrangle are distinct within northern Colorado for preserving the complete metamorphic zonation from low-grade chlorite-muscovite phyllites, through middle greenschist-grade rocks with sequential aluminous porphyroblasts, to partially melted gneisses that contain high-grade cordierite and garnet in the non-melted residues. Regional and textural evidence shows that the widespread metamorphism was essentially concurrent with intrusion of the Boulder Creek Granodiorite and related magmas and with the peak of deformation in the partially melted high-grade rocks. The metamorphic thermal pulse arrived later following the peak of deformation in the physically higher, cooler, low-grade terrane. Mesoproterozoic time was marked by intrusion of biotite granite in the Longs Peak-St Vrain batholith, a complex, irregular body that occupies nearly half of the core of the Front Range in this quadrangle. The magma was dry and viscous as it invaded the metamorphic rocks and caused wholesale plastic folding of the wall rock structure. Steep metamorphic foliation that resulted from the Paleoproterozoic deformations was bowed upward and re-oriented into flat-lying attitudes as the crystal-rich magma rose buoyantly and spread out in the middle crust. Magma invaded the schists and gneisses along weak foliation planes and produced a characteristic sill-upon-sill intrusive fabric, particularly in the higher parts of the batholith. Broad, open arches and swales that are defined by the flow-aligned feldspar foliation of the granite, as well as by compositional banding in the intruded and included metamorphic rocks, formed late during batholith emplacement due to rising, buoyant magma and sinking, dense wall rocks. The Longs Peak-St Vrain batholith was intruded into crust that was structurally neutral or moderately extending in an east-northeast direction. A broad zone of mylonite, the Moose Mountain shear zone, formed within the batholith during the final stages of consolidation as a result of differential buoyancy between the magma and dense wall rock, not as a result of regional tectonic deformation.

Cole, James C.; Braddock, William A.

2009-01-01

52

Seasonal abundance and the re-establishment of iwana charr Salvelinus leucomaenis f. pluvius after excessive sediment loading by road construction in the Hakusan National Park, central Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synopsis  Seasonal abundance and the re-establishment of stocks of iwana charr, Salvelinus leucomaenis f. pluvius were studied in the Jadani Stream, Hakusan National Park, central Japan, between 1984 and 1989 after the introduction of\\u000a a moratorium on fishing. Stream conditions were severely damaged by dumped materials from the construction of a mountain road\\u000a between 1967 and 1977. The densities of iwana

Tomoyuki Nakamura; Takashi Maruyama; Eikichi Nozaki

1994-01-01

53

Ecology of anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Central Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Corridor, southeastern Brazil.  

PubMed

Knowledge of the fauna composition of anopheline mosquitoes, their ecological aspects and behavior, and influence of climatic variables on their population dynamics can help in understanding the transmission of Plasmodium parasites and thus develop more efficient strategies for the control of malaria. In the Central Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Corridor, southeastern Brazil, foci of introduced malaria have been reported among people returning from the Amazon region, north Brazil. Our objective was to evaluate and compare the anopheline fauna from a preserved environment and an adjacent peridomiciliary modified environment at the Central Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Corridor. We collected anopheline mosquitoes on a monthly basis from June 2004 to May 2006 from both these environments to understand the ecological aspects and their association with the occurrence of malaria. We captured 5,491 anopheline mosquitoes belonging to two subgenera and 11 species and studied the correlations between anopheline mosquito species and climatic variables. We considered Anopheles darlingi (Root) as the principal malaria vector and Anopheles albitarsis s. l. (Arribalzaga) as the secondary vector. PMID:23427648

Da Silva, Kleber S; Pinto, Israel De S; Leite, Gustavo R; Das Virgens, Thieres M; Dos Santos, Claudiney B; Falqueto, Aloísio

2013-01-01

54

Uvá complex, the oldest orthogneisses of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic terrane of central Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Archean-Paleoproterozoic terrane of central Brazil is an exotic and allochthonous part of the Tocantins Province, a large Brasiliano/Pan-African orogen of the South American Platform formed during the Brasiliano orogeny. The terrane amalgamated to the province during the late stages of the orogeny as a crustal segment consisting of six Archean orthogneiss complexes and five low-grade metamorphic, in part Paleoproterozoic (Rhyacian) greenstone belts. The Uvá complex is the southernmost orthogneiss association of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic terrane of central Brazil. New U-Pb LA-ICP-MS data from zircon crystals show that the complex formed at least during two magmatic stages. The older consists of polydeformed tonalite and granodiorite batholitic and diorite stock protoliths with igneous age of 3040 Ma to 2930 Ma. The youngest comprises tonalite, monzogranite and granodiorite tabular bodies formed between 2876 and 2846 Ma. As compared to the orthogneisses of the northern portion of the terrane, both the oldest and youngest granitogenesis stages of the Uvá complex are, in average, about 150 Ma older. This suggests that the northern and southern orthogneisses formed during different times as independent crustal segments, but when and why they amalgamated is still under investigation.

Jost, Hardy; Junior, Farid Chemale; Fuck, Reinhardt Adolfo; Dussin, Ivo Antônio

2013-11-01

55

Ecotoxicological assessment of sediments from an urban marine protected area (Xixová-Japuí State Park, SP, Brazil).  

PubMed

This study aimed to evaluate the environmental quality of the marine portion of Xixová-Japuí State Park (XJSP), an urban marine protected area, which is influenced by multiple contamination sources, by using ecotoxicological and geochemical analyses. Sediments were predominantly sandy, with low CaCO3 and organic matter contents, and presented contamination by metals (Cd,Cu,Zn). Acute toxicity was detected in three tested samples, and copepod exposed to sediments from four stations exhibited lower fecundities, despite the absence of significant effects. Contamination and toxicity seemed to be associated, suggesting that the environment is degraded and presents risks to the biota. Whole sediment TIE indicated ammonia as a main responsible for toxicity, suggesting sewage is a main contributor to sediment degradation. As external contamination sources seem to be negatively influencing the sediment quality, the park conservation objectives are not being fully reached, demanding actions to mitigate impacts. PMID:23993072

Araujo, G S; Moreira, L B; Morais, R D; Davanso, M B; Garcia, T F; Cruz, A C F; Abessa, D M S

2013-10-15

56

The utilization of orbital images as an adequate form of control of preserved areas. [Araguaia National Park, Brazil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The synoptic view and the repetitive acquisition of LANDSAT imagery provide precise information, in real-time, for monitoring preserved areas based on spectral, temporal and spatial properties. The purpose of this study was to monitor, with the use of multispectral imagery, the systematic annual burning, which causes the degradation of ecosystems in the National Park of Araguaia. LANDSAT imagery of channel 5 (0.6 a 0.7 microns) and 7 (0.8 a 1.1 microns), at the scale of 1:250.000, were used to identify and delimit vegetation units and burned area, based on photointerpretation parameter of tonality. The results show that the gallery forest can be discriminated from the seasonally flooded 'campo cerrado', and that 4,14% of the study area was burned. Conclusions point out that the LANDSAT images can be used for the implementation of environmental protection in national parks.

Dejesusparada, N. (principal investigator); Dossantos, J. R.

1981-01-01

57

Prevalence of crown trauma in free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) in central Brazil.  

PubMed

Nineteen free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) were captured in central Brazil from April through November 2003. Oral cavity examination revealed 34 teeth with crown trauma in twelve animals. Canine teeth were most commonly affected (44.2%), followed by premolar (29.4%) and incisor teeth (26.5%). Trauma to maxillary teeth (67.7%) was more frequent compared with mandibular teeth (32.3 %). The majority of dental fractures were located at the cuspid portion of the crown (56.0%). Slab fractures were the most frequent type (37.0%), followed by horizontal (24.0%), oblique (24.0%) and longitudinal fractures (15.0%). Complicated crown fracture (pulp exposure) was diagnosed in 13 (38.2%) of these teeth while pulpitis noted by tooth discoloration was diagnosed in 8 (23.5%) teeth. PMID:18309856

Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; Kashivakura, Cyntia Kayo; Ferro, Claudia; Jácomo, Anah Tereza de Almeida; Silveira, Leandro; Astete, Samuel; Lopes, Fernanda Maria

2007-12-01

58

Detection of Ehrlichia canis in domestic cats in the central-western region of Brazil.  

PubMed

Ehrlichiosis is a worldwide distributed disease caused by different bacteria of the Ehrlichia genus that are transmitted by arthropod vectors. Its occurrence in dogs is considered endemic in several regions of Brazil. Regarding cats, however, few studies have been done and, consequently, there is not enough data available. In order to detect Ehrlichia spp. in cats from the central-western region of Brazil, blood and serum samples were collected from a regional population of 212 individuals originated from the cities of Cuiabá and Várzea Grande. These animals were tested by the Immunofluorescence Assay (IFA) and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) designed to amplify a 409 bp fragment of the dsb gene. The results obtained show that 88 (41.5%) cats were seropositive by IFA and 20 (9.4%) cats were positive by PCR. The partial DNA sequence obtained from PCR products yielded twenty samples that were found to match perfectly the Ehrlichia canis sequences deposited on GenBank. The natural transmission of Ehrlichia in cats has not been fully established. Furthermore, tick infestation was not observed in the evaluated cats and was not observed any association between age, gender and positivity of cats in both tests. The present study reports the first serological and molecular detection of E. canis in domestic cats located in the endemic area previously mentioned. PMID:25242952

Braga, Ísis Assis; dos Santos, Luana Gabriela Ferreira; de Souza Ramos, Dirceu Guilherme; Melo, Andréia Lima Tomé; da Cruz Mestre, Gustavo Leandro; de Aguiar, Daniel Moura

2014-01-01

59

Detection of Ehrlichia canis in domestic cats in the central-western region of Brazil  

PubMed Central

Ehrlichiosis is a worldwide distributed disease caused by different bacteria of the Ehrlichia genus that are transmitted by arthropod vectors. Its occurrence in dogs is considered endemic in several regions of Brazil. Regarding cats, however, few studies have been done and, consequently, there is not enough data available. In order to detect Ehrlichia spp. in cats from the central-western region of Brazil, blood and serum samples were collected from a regional population of 212 individuals originated from the cities of Cuiabá and Várzea Grande. These animals were tested by the Immunofluorescence Assay (IFA) and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) designed to amplify a 409 bp fragment of the dsb gene. The results obtained show that 88 (41.5%) cats were seropositive by IFA and 20 (9.4%) cats were positive by PCR. The partial DNA sequence obtained from PCR products yielded twenty samples that were found to match perfectly the Ehrlichia canis sequences deposited on GenBank. The natural transmission of Ehrlichia in cats has not been fully established. Furthermore, tick infestation was not observed in the evaluated cats and was not observed any association between age, gender and positivity of cats in both tests. The present study reports the first serological and molecular detection of E. canis in domestic cats located in the endemic area previously mentioned. PMID:25242952

Braga, Ísis Assis; dos Santos, Luana Gabriela Ferreira; de Souza Ramos, Dirceu Guilherme; Melo, Andréia Lima Tomé; da Cruz Mestre, Gustavo Leandro; de Aguiar, Daniel Moura

2014-01-01

60

Temperate and semi-arid tufas in the Pleistocene to Recent fluvial barrage system in the Mediterranean area: The Ruidera Lakes Natural Park (Central Spain)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ruidera Lakes Natural Park, in Central Spain, contains a well-exposed Pleistocene to Recent freshwater carbonate (tufa) succession dominated by fluvial barrages and lacustrine deposits. The majority of exposed tufas are Holocene to Recent in age. Today, carbonate accumulation is currently manifested as active phytoherm barrage constructions, marginal lacustrine stromatolitic terraces, lacustrine lime muds (all produced mainly by precipitation) and sand-size detrital tufa. The depositional history of the Ruidera Park sites has been interpreted from natural outcrops, rotary drill and percussion auger cores. These reveal a long Quaternary record of microbially dominated barrage framework developments and associated lacustrine carbonates. These alternate with frost weathering deposits and detrital tufa episodes, especially during cooler conditions. U-series dating of several earlier tufa deposits within the park indicates four distinct episodes of tufa development at 190-250 ka B.P., 90-130 ka B.P., 30-40 ka B.P. and 16 ka B.P.-Present. The three oldest episodes appear to be related to cyclic tufa-building events associated with warm periods of Oxygen Isotope Stages (OIS): 7, 5 and 3. Growth under present conditions is slow and several barrages have been damaged by human activity and drought events.

Ordóñez, S.; González Martín, J. A.; García del Cura, M. A.; Pedley, H. M.

2005-07-01

61

Indigenous Burning as Conservation Practice: Neotropical Savanna Recovery amid Agribusiness Deforestation in Central Brazil  

PubMed Central

International efforts to address climate change by reducing tropical deforestation increasingly rely on indigenous reserves as conservation units and indigenous peoples as strategic partners. Considered win-win situations where global conservation measures also contribute to cultural preservation, such alliances also frame indigenous peoples in diverse ecological settings with the responsibility to offset global carbon budgets through fire suppression based on the presumed positive value of non-alteration of tropical landscapes. Anthropogenic fire associated with indigenous ceremonial and collective hunting practices in the Neotropical savannas (cerrado) of Central Brazil is routinely represented in public and scientific conservation discourse as a cause of deforestation and increased CO2 emissions despite a lack of supporting evidence. We evaluate this claim for the Xavante people of Pimentel Barbosa Indigenous Reserve, Brazil. Building upon 23 years of longitudinal interdisciplinary research in the area, we used multi-temporal spatial analyses to compare land cover change under indigenous and agribusiness management over the last four decades (1973–2010) and quantify the contemporary Xavante burning regime contributing to observed patterns based on a four year sample at the end of this sequence (2007–2010). The overall proportion of deforested land remained stable inside the reserve (0.6%) but increased sharply outside (1.5% to 26.0%). Vegetation recovery occurred where reserve boundary adjustments transferred lands previously deforested by agribusiness to indigenous management. Periodic traditional burning by the Xavante had a large spatial distribution but repeated burning in consecutive years was restricted. Our results suggest a need to reassess overreaching conservation narratives about the purported destructiveness of indigenous anthropogenic fire in the cerrado. The real challenge to conservation in the fire-adapted cerrado biome is the long-term sustainability of indigenous lands and other tropical conservation islands increasingly subsumed by agribusiness expansion rather than the localized subsistence practices of indigenous and other traditional peoples. PMID:24349045

Welch, James R.; Brondízio, Eduardo S.; Hetrick, Scott S.; Coimbra, Carlos E. A.

2013-01-01

62

Indigenous burning as conservation practice: neotropical savanna recovery amid agribusiness deforestation in Central Brazil.  

PubMed

International efforts to address climate change by reducing tropical deforestation increasingly rely on indigenous reserves as conservation units and indigenous peoples as strategic partners. Considered win-win situations where global conservation measures also contribute to cultural preservation, such alliances also frame indigenous peoples in diverse ecological settings with the responsibility to offset global carbon budgets through fire suppression based on the presumed positive value of non-alteration of tropical landscapes. Anthropogenic fire associated with indigenous ceremonial and collective hunting practices in the Neotropical savannas (cerrado) of Central Brazil is routinely represented in public and scientific conservation discourse as a cause of deforestation and increased CO2 emissions despite a lack of supporting evidence. We evaluate this claim for the Xavante people of Pimentel Barbosa Indigenous Reserve, Brazil. Building upon 23 years of longitudinal interdisciplinary research in the area, we used multi-temporal spatial analyses to compare land cover change under indigenous and agribusiness management over the last four decades (1973-2010) and quantify the contemporary Xavante burning regime contributing to observed patterns based on a four year sample at the end of this sequence (2007-2010). The overall proportion of deforested land remained stable inside the reserve (0.6%) but increased sharply outside (1.5% to 26.0%). Vegetation recovery occurred where reserve boundary adjustments transferred lands previously deforested by agribusiness to indigenous management. Periodic traditional burning by the Xavante had a large spatial distribution but repeated burning in consecutive years was restricted. Our results suggest a need to reassess overreaching conservation narratives about the purported destructiveness of indigenous anthropogenic fire in the cerrado. The real challenge to conservation in the fire-adapted cerrado biome is the long-term sustainability of indigenous lands and other tropical conservation islands increasingly subsumed by agribusiness expansion rather than the localized subsistence practices of indigenous and other traditional peoples. PMID:24349045

Welch, James R; Brondízio, Eduardo S; Hetrick, Scott S; Coimbra, Carlos E A

2013-01-01

63

Synthesis of the Hydrogeologic Framework of the Floridan Aquifer System and Delineation of a Major Avon Park Permeable Zone in Central and Southern Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The carbonate Floridan aquifer system of central and southern Florida (south of a latitude of about 29 degrees north) is an invaluable resource with a complex framework that has previously been mapped and managed primarily in a subregional context according to geopolitical boundaries. As interest and use of the Floridan aquifer system in this area increase, a consistent regional hydrogeologic framework is needed for effective management across these boundaries. This study synthesizes previous studies on the Floridan aquifer system and introduces a new regional hydrogeologic conceptual framework, linking physical relations between central and southern Florida and between the west and east coastal areas. The differences in hydrogeologic nomenclature and interpretation across the study area from previous studies were identified and resolved. The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, middle confining unit, and Lower Floridan aquifer. This study introduces and delineates a new major, regional productive zone or subaquifer, referred to as the Avon Park permeable zone. This zone is contained within the middle confining unit and synthesizes an extensive zone that has been referred to differently in different parts of the study area in previous studies. The name of this zone derives from the description of this zone as the ?Avon Park highly permeable zone? in west-central Florida in a previous study. Additionally, this zone has been identified previously in southeastern Florida as the ?middle Floridan aquifer.? An approximately correlative or approximate time-stratigraphic framework was developed and was used to provide guidance in the identification and determination of aquifers, subaquifers, and confining units within the Floridan aquifer system and to determine their structural relations. Two stratigraphic marker horizons within the Floridan aquifer system and a marker unit near the top of the aquifer system were delineated or mapped. The marker horizons are correlative points in the stratigraphic section rather than a unit with upper and lower boundaries. The two marker horizons and the marker unit originated from previous studies, wherein they were based on lithology and correlation of geophysical log signatures observed in boreholes. The depths of these marker horizons and the marker unit were extended throughout the study area by correlation of natural gamma-ray logs between wells. The Floridan aquifer system includes, in ascending order, the upper part of the Cedar Keys Formation, Oldsmar Formation, Avon Park Formation, Ocala Limestone, Suwannee Limestone, and in some areas the lower part of the Hawthorn Group. The first marker horizon is in the lower part of the aquifer system near the top of the Oldsmar Formation and is associated with the top of distinctive glauconitic limestone beds that are present in some regions; the second marker horizon is near the middle of the aquifer system in the middle part of the Avon Park Formation. The marker unit lies at the top of a basal unit in the Hawthorn Group and provides a stratigraphic constraint for the top of the Floridan aquifer system. The marker horizons do not have distinguishing lithologic characteristics or a characteristic gamma-ray log pattern in all areas but are still thought to be valid because of correlation of the entire section and correlation of all sufficiently deep wells with gamma-ray logs. The Avon Park permeable zone is contained entirely within the Avon Park Formation; its position within the section is either near the middle Avon Park marker horizon or within a thick part of the section that extends several hundred feet above the marker horizon. This subaquifer is present over most of the study area and characteristically consists of thick units of dolostone and interbedded limestone, and limestone in its upper part. Permeability is primarily associated with fracturing. This subaquifer is well developed in west-cen

Reese, Ronald S.; Richardson, Emily

2008-01-01

64

Seismic characteristics of central Brazil crust and upper mantle: A deep seismic refraction study  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A two-dimensional model of the Brazilian central crust and upper mantle was obtained from the traveltime interpretation of deep seismic refraction data from the Porangatu and Cavalcante lines, each approximately 300 km long. When the lines were deployed, they overlapped by 50 km, forming an E-W transect approximately 530 km long across the Tocantins Province and western Sa??o Francisco Craton. The Tocantins Province formed during the Neoproterozoic when the Sa??o Francisco, the Paranapanema, and the Amazon cratons collided, following the subduction of the former Goia??s ocean basin. Average crustal VP and VP/VS ratios, Moho topography, and lateral discontinuities within crustal layers suggest that the crust beneath central Brazil can be associated with major geological domains recognized at the surface. The Moho is an irregular interface, between 36 and 44 km deep, that shows evidences of first-order tectonic structures. The 8.05 and 8.23 km s-1 P wave velocities identify the upper mantle beneath the Porangatu and Cavalcante lines, respectively. The observed seismic features allow for the identification of (1) the crust has largely felsic composition in the studied region, (2) the absence of the mafic-ultramafic root beneath the Goia??s magmatic arc, and (3) block tectonics in the foreland fold-and-thrust belt of the northern Brasi??lia Belt during the Neoproterozoic. Seismic data also suggested that the Bouguer gravimetric discontinuities are mainly compensated by differences in mass distribution within the lithospheric mantle. Finally, the Goia??s-Tocantins seismic belt can be interpreted as a natural seismic alignment related to the Neoproterozoic mantle domain. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

Soares, J.E.; Berrocal, J.; Fuck, R.A.; Mooney, W.D.; Ventura, D.B.R.

2006-01-01

65

A new focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the central area of Paraná State, southern Brazil.  

PubMed

We report a new endemic zone of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in the central area of the State of Paraná (Municipality of Prudentópolis), in southern Brazil. This region was not previously considered endemic for CL, and this work constitutes the first report of CL endemicity there. Leishmaniasis was confirmed by smear, culture, and ELISA. Parasites were isolated and identified by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (PCR-RAPD). Phylogeographical analysis, based on two different criteria, was able to distinguish between RAPD profiles from different geographical regions. In total, 100 patients were diagnosed with leishmaniasis by culture and serology methods. The reported incidence rate was 4.32%. Of the 100 patients, 92% of the patients had single lesions, and 79.98% of these lesions were located on their limbs. The fact that 61% of patients were male rural workers points to an extradomiciliar type of transmission. In houses where human leishmaniasis was diagnosed, 29% of the dogs presented anti-Leishmania antibodies. A total of 1663 phlebotomines, representing 5 species, were captured in the studied area with CDC-like light minitraps. Lutzomyia intermedia s.l. was the most prevalent species (94.40%). The isolated parasites were grouped with Leishmania (V.) braziliensis. The epidemiological implications are discussed in the present article. PMID:19482000

Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; de Castro, Edilene Alcântara; Schnell e Schühli, Guilherme; de Carvalho, Yanê; Marques, Ellen; Pereira, Elisângela de Fátima; Alcantara, Fernanda de Souza; Machado, Angela Maria; Kowalthuk, Wolodymir; Membrive, Norberto; Luz, Ennio

2009-09-01

66

Decrease in hepatitis B prevalence among blood donors in Central-West Brazil  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of the present study was to estimate hepatitis B virus seroprevalence among first-time blood donors in the city of Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul State, in the central-western region of Brazil. Findings A retrospective analysis of first-time voluntary blood donor records, from January 2010 to December 2010, was conducted at the Hematology Center of Mato Grosso do Sul. The prevalence of the HBsAg and anti-HBc serological markers and their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Chi-square analysis was performed between the seroprevalence previously found in 2001 and the one determined by the current study. Results were considered statistically significant if p < 0.05. Among 8,840 subjects, 269 (3.04%, 95% CI: 2.7-3.4) were positive for HBV markers. The prevalence rate of HBsAg was 0.19% (95% CI: 0.1-0.3) and anti-HBc alone was 2.85% (95% CI: 2.5-3.2). Conclusions There was no statistically significant difference regarding gender. However, an important association was observed between HBV infection and older age (p < 0.01). The seroprevalence of HBV infection in first-time blood donors diminished from 2001 to 2010 (p < 0.01). Such decrease suggests an improvement in the recruitment of safe donors, the positive impact of vaccination programs and the decreasing of HBV infection prevalence in the general population. PMID:23849137

2013-01-01

67

The narrow, shallow, low-accommodation shelf of central Brazil: Sedimentology, evolution, and human uses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continental shelf off the coast of central Brazil, extending from 10 to 16°S, is unusually narrow (~ 20 km) and rests on the São Francisco craton. The shelf break is located between the 45 and 50 m isobaths and coincides with major hinge-lines of the marginal basins. The shelf was exposed for most of the Quaternary period, particularly during the last 1 my, when the average sea level was - 62 m. Submarine geomorphology is strongly influenced by this extended sub-aerial exposure and reduced subsidence, resulting in widespread incisions on the shelf. During the limited episodes of shelf inundation, as is the case today, a few meters of non-framework grain assemblages dominated by coralline algae accumulated on the outer shelf, while quartz sands were restricted to water depths of less than 10-15 m. Mud accumulation on this unusually shallow shelf is aided by additional accommodation space provided by incisions and canyon heads indenting the shelf. Artisanal fisheries, targeting high-value commercial species associated with hard bottoms located on the outer shelf and shelf break, are the most important human use of this shelf. Data used in this study have been compiled from theses and previously conducted surveys and consist of four piston cores, 509 km of chirp subbottom profiles and side scan recordings, and 711 bottom grab samples that have been analyzed for various textural and compositional aspects.

Dominguez, José Maria Landim; da Silva, Rian Pereira; Nunes, Alina Sá; Freire, Antonio Fernando Menezes

2013-12-01

68

The Aripuana Park and the Polonoroeste Programme. IWGIA Document No. 59.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Polonoroeste program is a World Bank-funded colonization project in central Brazil. This document looks at the indigenous peoples of the Aripuana Park which lies in the path of the development plan. The main objective of the $1.5 billion project is to pave a highway from Cuiaba to Porto Velho. The project consists of the highway, colonization…

Junqueira, Carmen; Mindlin, Betty

69

Soil chemical changes under irrigated mango production in the Central São Francisco River Valley, Brazil.  

PubMed

Irrigated areas in Brazil's Central São Francisco River Valley have experienced declines in productivity, which may be a reflection of changes in soil chemical properties due to management. This study was conducted to compare the chemical composition of soil solutions and cation exchange complexes in a five-year-old grove of irrigated mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Tommy Atkins) with that of an adjacent clearing in the native caatinga vegetation. A detailed physiographic characterization of the area revealed a subsurface rock layer, which was more undulating than the current land surface, and identified the presence of a very saline and sodic (1045 microS cm(-1), sodium adsorption ratio [SAR] = 5.19) ground water table. While changes in concentrations of Ca, Mg, and K could be attributed to direct management inputs (fertilization and liming with dolomite), increases in Na suggested average annual capillary rise from the ground water table of 28 L m(-2). Accordingly, soil salinity levels appeared to be more dependent on surface elevation than the elevation of the rock layer or sediment thickness. The apparent influence of land surface curvature on water redistribution and the solution chemistry was more pronounced under irrigated mango production. In general, salinity levels had doubled in the mango grove and nearly tripled under the canopies, after only five years of irrigation. Though critical saline or sodic conditions were not encountered, the changes observed indicate a need for more adequate monitoring and management of water and salt inputs despite the excellent water quality of the São Francisco River. PMID:12931897

Heck, R J; Tiessen, H; Salcedo, I H; Santos, M C

2003-01-01

70

Linking Community Communication to Conservation of the Maned Wolf in Central Brazil  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the environmental education (EE) program developed in the neighboring community of Serra da Canastra National Park based on a research project focused on the maned wolf conservation. The article assesses three tools used to foster the community's participation in discussing local issues: (1) communal production of a book…

Bizerril, Marcelo Ximenes A.; Soares, Carla Cruz; Santos, Jean Pierre

2011-01-01

71

Nd isotopes and the provenance of detrital sediments of the Neoproterozoic Bras??lia Belt, central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Neoproterozoic Bras??lia Belt, in central Brazil, includes in its eastern part a thick pile of sediments deposited and deformed along the western margin of the São Francisco–Congo Craton. Several lithostratigraphic units are identified (the Ara??, Paranoá, Serra da Mesa, Araxá, Ibiá, Vazante, Canastra and Bambu?? groups) and have been traditionally interpreted as part of a passive margin association (<1.2Ga),

M. M. Pimentel; M. A. Dardenne; R. A. Fuck; M. G. Viana; S. L. Junges; D. P. Fischel; H. J. Seer; E. L. Dantas

2001-01-01

72

The Mara Rosa Arch in the Tocantins Province: further evidence for Neoproterozoic crustal accretion in Central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mara Rosa volcano-sedimentary sequence consists of several NNE-trending belts of metavolcanic (metabasalts to metarhyolites) and metasedimentary rocks (micaschists, quartzites, cherts), exposed over large areas of the Tocantins Province, a Neoproterozoic (Brasiliano) orogenic region in the central part of Brazil. The supracrustal belts are separated by terrains dominated by metatonalites and metadiorites and intruded by several post-orogenic granitic and dioritic

Márcio M. Pimentel; Martin J. Whitehouse; Maria das G. Viana; Reinhardt A. Fuck; Machado Nuno

1997-01-01

73

Do Latin American Central Bankers Behave NonLinearly? The Experience of Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

This papers estimates unrestricted monetary reaction functions for four Latin American countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico) and tests for the presence of non-linear eects in central bank behaviour. The analysis covers the post-1999 ination-targetin g period. We deal with the presence of unit roots in the data by es- timating the policy rules in a cointegration setting. We test

Luiz de Mello; Diego Moccero; Matteo Mogliani

74

Secondary metabolites from Pinus mugo Turra subsp. mugo growing in the Majella National Park (Central Apennines, Italy).  

PubMed

In this study, we examined the composition regarding secondary metabolites of P. mugo Turra ssp. mugo growing in the protected area of Majella National Park, which is the southernmost station of the habitat of this species. Both the nonpolar and polar fractions were considered. In particular, the essential-oil composition showed a high variety of compounds, and 109 compounds were detected, and 101 were identified, among which abietane-type compounds have a taxonomic relevance. Abietanes were also isolated from the polar fraction, together with an acylated flavonol and a remarkably high amount of shikimic acid. PMID:24243617

Venditti, Alessandro; Serrilli, Anna Maria; Vittori, Sauro; Papa, Fabrizio; Maggi, Filippo; Di Cecco, Mirella; Ciaschetti, Gianpiero; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Bianco, Amandodoriano

2013-11-01

75

Magnetic Fabric of the Aquidauana Formation, western border of the Paraná Basin Central Brazil: Preliminary Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The glaciogenic sedimentation (Carboniferous-Permian) on the western border of the Paraná Basin is represented by reddish-brown strata of the Aquidauana Formation. Subsurface data suggest that this Formation is equivalent to the Itararé Group, which contains the most extensive lithological record of Gondwana glaciation in the world. The Aquidauna Formation crops out as an NNE-SSW-oriented elongated belt at the western portion of the Maracaju-Campo Grande Plateau in Mato Grosso do Sul State (Central part of Brazil), and extents to the north up to Mato Grosso and Goias states. This Formation is composed of a variety of types of sandstones, siltites, and mudstones. The magnetic studies were performed on sites of undeformed reddish-brown sandstones, siltites, and mudstones, which crop out mainly in Mato Grosso do Sul State. Magnetic fabrics were determined on oriented cylindrical specimens (2.54 cm x 2.2 cm) using anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Rock-magnetic analyses reveal that both magnetite and hematite are the main magnetic minerals in the majority of the analyzed sites. Regarding the eingenvector orientations, the sites usually gave good results. The analysis at the individual-site scale defines two AMS fabric types. The first type shows Kmin perpendicular to the bedding plane, while Kmax and Kint are scattered within the bedding plane itself. This fabric is usually interpreted as primary (sedimentary-compactional), typical of undeformed sediments and is dominant among the sites. The second type shows good clustering of the AMS principal axes with Kmin still either perpendicular or sub-perpendicular to the bedding plane. This fabric type could be interpreted as a combination of sedimentary-compactional and tectonic contributions if some strain markers or evidence for tectonic deformation had been found in the studied area. On the other hand, the tight Kmax grouping in this fabric type could be explained by the action of currents since they cause Kmax to be aligned sub-parallel to the paleocurrent direction.

Raposo, M. B.

2013-05-01

76

Nitrous oxide fluxes and nitrogen cycling along a pasture chronosequence in Central Amazonia, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes and soil nitrogen (N) cycling following forest conversion to pasture in the central Amazon near Santarém, Pará, Brazil. Two undisturbed forest sites and 27 pasture sites of 0.5 to 60 years were sampled once each during wet and dry seasons. In addition to soil-atmosphere fluxes of N2O we measured 27 soil chemical, soil microbiological and soil physical variables.

Soil N2O fluxes were higher in the wet season than in the dry season. Fluxes of N2O from forest soils always exceeded fluxes from pasture soils and showed no consistent trend with pasture age. At our forest sites, nitrate was the dominant form of inorganic N both during wet and dry season. At our pasture sites nitrate generally dominated the inorganic N pools during the wet season and ammonium dominated during the dry season. Net mineralization and nitrification rates displayed large variations. During the dry season net immobilization of N was observed in some pastures. Compared to forest sites, young pasture sites (?2 years) had low microbial biomass N and protease activities. Protease activity and microbial biomass N peaked in pastures of intermediate age (4 to 8 years) followed by consistently lower values in older pasture (10 to 60 years). The C/N ratio of litter was low at the forest sites (~25) and rapidly increased with pasture age reaching values of 60-70 at pastures of 15 years and older.

Nitrous oxide emissions at our sites were controlled by C and N availability and soil aeration. Fluxes of N2O were negatively correlated to leaf litter C/N ratio, NH4+-N and the ratio of NO3--N to the sum of NO3--N + NH4+-N (indicators of N availability), and methane fluxes and bulk density (indicators of soil aeration status) during the wet season. During the dry season fluxes of N2O were positively correlated to microbial biomass N, ?-glucosidase activity, total inorganic N stocks and NH4+-N. In our study region, pastures of all age emitted less N2O than old-growth forests, because of a progressive decline in N availability with pasture age combined with strongly anaerobic conditions in some pastures during the wet season.

Wick, B.; Veldkamp, E.; de Mello, W. Z.; Keller, M.; Crill, P.

2005-05-01

77

Ecological distribution of stream macroalgal communities from a drainage basin in the Serra da Canastra National Park, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil.  

PubMed

Twelve stream segments were sampled four times in 1998-1999 (one sampling per season) in the drainage basin of the upper São Francisco River (19 masculine 45'-21 masculine 25'S, 49 masculine 05'-51 masculine 30'W), situated in Serra da Canastra National Park, at altitudes ranging from 1,175 to 1,400 m. The macroalgae survey resulted in 30 species, with a predominance of Cyanophyta (12 species = 40%) and Chlorophyta (11 species = 36.5%) and a lower proportion of Rhodophyta (seven species = 23.5%). Two species, Klebsormidium rivulare (Chlorophyta) and Kyliniella latvica (Rhodophyta), were new records for Brazil. Capsosira sp. and Stigonema sp. (Cyanophyta) and the "Chantransia" stage of Batrachospermum (Rhodophyta) were the most widespread macroalgae, occurring in six sampling sites, whereas 11 species were found at only one site. The proportion of macroalgal morphological types were as follows: mats (33%), free filaments (27%), gelatinous filaments (27%), crusts (7%), tufts (3%), and gelatinous colonies (3%). The flora revealed few species in common (4%-8%) with stream macroalgae from other Brazilian regions. The macroalgal communities proved to have species richness values close to the highest values reported in previous studies. The patterns typical for stream macroalgal communities (patchy distribution and dominance of few species) were also found in this basin. However, the stream variables most influential in macroalgal distribution in this study (rocky substratum, low pH, high COD, water color, and current velocity) were essentially the same that best describe the limnological characteristics of this lotic ecosystem. In addition, this combination of variables differed sharply from results of previous studies in other Brazilian stream ecosystems. PMID:15029374

Necchi-Júnior, O; Branco, L H Z; Branco, C C Z

2003-11-01

78

Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from central Amazon, Brazil.  

PubMed

Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen in aquatic mammals and its presence in these animals may indicate the water contamination of aquatic environment by oocysts. Serum samples from 95 free-living Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) from the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve (RDSM), Tefé, Amazonas, Central Amazon, Brazil were tested for T. gondii antibodies using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Antibodies (MAT ? 25) to T. gondii were found in 82 (86.3%) dolphins with titers of 1:25 in 24, 1:50 in 56, and 1:500 in 2. Results suggest a high level contamination of the aquatic environment of the home range of these animals. PMID:21764516

Santos, P S; Albuquerque, G R; da Silva, V M F; Martin, A R; Marvulo, M F V; Souza, S L P; Ragozo, A M A; Nascimento, C C; Gennari, S M; Dubey, J P; Silva, J C R

2011-12-29

79

An evaluation of direct seeding for reforestation of degraded lands in central São Paulo state, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a larger study evaluating several silvicultural techniques for restoring tropical moist forests on abandoned agricultural lands in southeastern Brazil, direct seeding with five early-successional Atlantic forest species was tested at three degraded sites, characterized by different soil types and land-use histories, within the Environmental Protection Area at Botucatu, SP. The species used in this study were Chorisia

Vera Lex Engel; John A Parrotta

2001-01-01

80

Screening for Intellectual Disability Using High-Resolution CMA Technology in a Retrospective Cohort from Central Brazil  

PubMed Central

Intellectual disability is a complex, variable, and heterogeneous disorder, representing a disabling condition diagnosed worldwide, and the etiologies are multiple and highly heterogeneous. Microscopic chromosomal abnormalities and well-characterized genetic conditions are the most common causes of intellectual disability. Chromosomal Microarray Analysis analyses have made it possible to identify putatively pathogenic copy number variation that could explain the molecular etiology of intellectual disability. The aim of the current study was to identify possible submicroscopic genomic alterations using a high-density chromosomal microarray in a retrospective cohort of patients with otherwise undiagnosable intellectual disabilities referred by doctors from the public health system in Central Brazil. The CytoScan HD technology was used to detect changes in the genome copy number variation of patients who had intellectual disability and a normal karyotype. The analysis detected 18 CNVs in 60% of patients. Pathogenic CNVs represented about 22%, so it was possible to propose the etiology of intellectual disability for these patients. Likely pathogenic and unknown clinical significance CNVs represented 28% and 50%, respectively. Inherited and de novo CNVs were equally distributed. We report the nature of CNVs in patients from Central Brazil, representing a population not yet screened by microarray technologies. PMID:25061755

Pereira, Rodrigo Roncato; Pinto, Irene Plaza; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes; de Melo, Aldaires Vieira; da Cruz e Cunha, Damiana Mirian; Cruz, Alex Silva; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Cláudio Carlos; de Melo e Silva, Daniela; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino

2014-01-01

81

Migration among individuals with leprosy: a population-based study in central Brazil.  

PubMed

This study investigates social and clinical factors associated with migration among individuals affected by leprosy. A cross-sectional study was conducted among those newly diagnosed with leprosy (2006-2008), in 79 endemic municipalities in the state of Tocantins, Brazil (N = 1,074). In total, 76.2% were born in a municipality different from their current residence. In the five years before diagnosis 16.7% migrated, and 3.6% migrated after leprosy diagnosis. Findings reflect aspects associated with historical rural-urban population movement in Brazil. Indicators of poverty were prominent among before-diagnosis migrants but not after-diagnosis migrants. Migration after diagnosis was associated with prior migration. The association of multibacillary leprosy with migration indicates healthcare access may be an obstacle to early diagnosis among before-diagnosis migrants, which may also be related to the high mobility of this group. PMID:24714939

Murto, Christine; Ariza, Liana; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Chichava, Olga André; Oliveira, Alexcian Rodrigues; Kaplan, Charles; Silva, Luciana Ferreira Marques da; Heukelbach, Jorg

2014-03-01

82

Formic and acetic acid over the central Amazon region, Brazil 1. Dry season  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have determined the atmospheric concentrations of formic and acetic acid in the gas phase, in aerosols, and in rain during the dry season (July--August 1985) in the Amazonia region of Brazil. At ground level the average concentrations of gas phase formic and acetic acid were 1.6 +- 0.6 and 2.2 +- 1.0 ppb, respectively. The diurnal behavior of both

M. O. Andreae; R. W. Talbot; T. W. Andreae; R. C. Harriss

1988-01-01

83

Mineralogy of Latosols along a regional toposequence across the Central Plateau (Brazil): First results.  

E-print Network

. Latosols cover about 40% of the Central Plateau surface area. Most Latosols in the Brazilian Soil Taxonomy correspond to Oxisols in the Soil Taxonomy and to Ferralsols in the International Reference Base System (L5 to L10). Samples were collected in the diagnostic horizon (Bw) of these Latosols. Basic soil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

Reproductive parameters of female orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) 1971-2011, a 40-year study at Tanjung Puting National Park, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.  

PubMed

This study presents reproductive parameter data gathered by direct observation over a 40-year period (1971-2011) of the provisioned free-ranging population of orangutans at Camp Leakey in Tanjung Puting National Park, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Age at first reproduction, interbirth interval (IBI), sex ratio at birth, and infant mortality for 19 female orangutans (11 first-generation wild-born ex-captive mothers and 8 second-generation mothers) are included in this analysis. Age at first reproduction among the first-generation mothers was similar to that among wild orangutans, while second-generation mothers had a significantly earlier age at first reproduction. IBIs were similar among first- and second-generation mothers and were significantly shorter than those recorded in studies of wild orangutan populations. There was an expected male-biased sex ratio at birth and a slightly higher than expected rate of infant mortality when compared to wild populations. Infant mortality was primarily seen among second-generation mothers who gave birth before the age of 12, and among first births of some first-generation mothers. These results lend support to the ecological energetics hypothesis, which predicts that increased diet quality leads to a faster rate of reproduction. PMID:23053615

Galdikas, Biruté Mary; Ashbury, Alison

2013-01-01

85

Use and diversity of palm (Arecaceae) resources in Central Western Brazil.  

PubMed

Arecaceae Schultz-Sch. (Palmae Juss.), a member of the monocotyledon group, is considered one of the oldest extant angiosperm families on Earth. This family is highly valuable because of its species diversity, its occurrence in a wide range of habitats, and its status as an integral part of the culture and the family-based economy of many traditional and nontraditional communities. The main objectives of this study were to perform an ethnobotanical study involving these palms and a "Quilombola" (Maroon) community in the municipality of Cavalcante, GO, Brazil. The variables gender, age, and formal schooling had no influence on the number of species recognized and used by the Kalungas. Ethnobotanical studies based on traditional knowledge in addition to use and management of palms are fundamental aspects for planning and appliance of public policies directed to the use of natural resources and improvement of life quality. PMID:24772040

Martins, Renata Corrêa; Filgueiras, Tarciso de Sousa; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

2014-01-01

86

Use and Diversity of Palm (Arecaceae) Resources in Central Western Brazil  

PubMed Central

Arecaceae Schultz-Sch. (Palmae Juss.), a member of the monocotyledon group, is considered one of the oldest extant angiosperm families on Earth. This family is highly valuable because of its species diversity, its occurrence in a wide range of habitats, and its status as an integral part of the culture and the family-based economy of many traditional and nontraditional communities. The main objectives of this study were to perform an ethnobotanical study involving these palms and a “Quilombola” (Maroon) community in the municipality of Cavalcante, GO, Brazil. The variables gender, age, and formal schooling had no influence on the number of species recognized and used by the Kalungas. Ethnobotanical studies based on traditional knowledge in addition to use and management of palms are fundamental aspects for planning and appliance of public policies directed to the use of natural resources and improvement of life quality. PMID:24772040

Martins, Renata Corrêa; Filgueiras, Tarciso de Sousa

2014-01-01

87

HIV seroprevalence and high-risk sexual behavior among female sex workers in Central Brazil.  

PubMed

Female sex workers (FSWs) are considered a high-risk group for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection due to their social vulnerability and factors associated with their work. We estimated the prevalence of HIV, and identified viral subtypes and risk factors among FSWs. A cross-sectional study using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) method was conducted among 402 FSWs in Campo Grande city, Brazil, from 2009 to 2011. Participants were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire about sociodemograpic characteristics and risk behavior. Blood samples were collected for serological testing of HIV. Of the 402 FSWs, median age and age of initiating sex work were 25 years (Interquartile range [IQR]: 9) and 20 years (IQR: 6), respectively. The majority reported use of alcohol (88.5%), had 5-9 years (median: 9; IQR: 3) of schooling (54.5%), 68.6% had tattoos/body piercings, and 45.1% had more than seven clients per week (median: 7; IQR: 10). Only 32.9% of FSW reported using a condom with nonpaying partners in the last sexual contact. Prevalence of HIV infection was 1.0% (95% CI: 0.1-2.6%). Genotyping for HIV-1 performed on three samples detected subtypes B, C, and F1. Sex work in the Midwestern region of Brazil is characterized by reduced education, large numbers of clients per week, and inconsistent condom use, mainly with nonpaying partners. Although prevalence of HIV infection is currently low, elevated levels of high-risk sexual behavior confirm a need to implement prevention measures. Specific interventions targeting FSWs must emphasize the risk associated with both clients and nonpaying partners while providing knowledge about HIV prevention. PMID:24617659

Fernandes, Fernanda R P; Mousquer, Gina J; Castro, Lisie S; Puga, Marco A; Tanaka, Tayana S O; Rezende, Grazielli R; Pinto, Clarice S; Bandeira, Larissa M; Martins, Regina M B; Francisco, Roberta B L; Teles, Sheila A; Motta-Castro, Ana R C

2014-01-01

88

Spirocerca lupi granulomatous pneumonia in two free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) from central Brazil.  

PubMed

The current report describes granulomatous pneumonia due to Spirocerca lupi in 2 free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus). Both wolves had multiple, white, 1-1.5 cm in diameter, soft, encapsulated granulomas in the caudal lung lobes, which contained centrally placed parasites on cut sections. Microscopically, there was granulomatous inflammation with numerous intralesional sections of spirurid nematodes. Representative complete adult specimens of nematodes derived from these lesions were submitted for parasitological exam and identified as the spirurid S. lupi. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no published reports of S. lupi in maned wolves. PMID:25319031

Blume, Guilherme R; Reis Junior, Janildo L; Gardiner, Chris H; Hoberg, Eric P; Pilitt, Patricia A; Monteiro, Rafael Veríssimo; de Sant'Ana, Fabiano J F

2014-11-01

89

Prospect Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While many readers may be aware that trees grow in Brooklyn, few may be cognizant of the fact that, yes, a forest grows in Brooklyn. This urban forest just happens to be in the boroughâÂÂs own lovely Prospect Park, designed by those giants of landscape architects, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. Often overlooked by some who are primarily concerned with that other large swath of green in the middle of Manhattan, Prospect Park contains a 90-acre meadow, a zoo, a celebrated performing arts festival, and a lake. Visitors to the Prospect Park Alliance website can learn all about these things, and also delve into the parkâÂÂs history. Those planning a visit may wish to look at the âÂÂGeneral Infoâ and âÂÂPlaces To Goâ sections for a selection of brief descriptions and photographs. For those seeking a historical perspective the âÂÂHistory & Natureâ area is delightful. Here visitors can learn about the parkâÂÂs historical development and creation, and learn more about those individuals responsible for the parkâÂÂs design and aesthetic appeal. Finally, visitors should look at the online exhibit âÂÂA Glimpse Of Prospect Parkâ for a bit of visual perspective on the parkâÂÂs history.

Prospect Park (New York, N.Y.)

90

National Parks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online directory focuses on national parks throughout the country that offer educational opportunities. Where possible, it includes the following information for each: the type of support offered, including educational materials, access to a naturalist or specialists, and classes/workshops; and mailing address and contact information. In addition, a link to the National Park Service's Web site is included.

91

Neutralization of crotaline snake venoms from Central and South America by antivenoms produced in Brazil and Costa Rica.  

PubMed

A study was performed on the ability of antivenoms, produced in Brazil and Costa Rica, to neutralize lethal, hemorrhagic and coagulant activities of the venoms of 16 species of Central and South American snakes of the subfamily Crotalinae. Neutralization of lethality was studied by two different methods routinely used in the quality control of antivenoms at Instituto Butantan (IB) and Instituto Clodomiro Picado (ICP). Both antivenoms neutralized the majority of the venoms studied, but the values of effective doses 50% (ED(50)) differed markedly depending on the method used. In general, higher potencies were obtained with the method of ICP, where a challenge dose corresponding to 4 LD(50)s is used, than with the method of IB, where a challenge dose of 5 LD(50)s is employed. All venoms induced hemorrhagic activity in the mouse skin test, which was effectively neutralized by the two antivenoms. All venoms, except those of Porthidium nasutum and Bothriechis lateralis, induced coagulation of human plasma in vitro and both antivenoms were effective in the neutralization of this activity. In conclusion, our results provide evidence of an extensive cross reactivity between these antivenoms and Central and South American crotaline snake venoms. PMID:10758277

Bogarín, G; Morais, J F; Yamaguchi, I K; Stephano, M A; Marcelino, J R; Nishikawa, A K; Guidolin, R; Rojas, G; Higashi, H G; Gutiérrez, J M

2000-10-01

92

Evaluation of central supply units in public dental medicine colleges in Brazil.  

PubMed

A guarantee of quality of all steps involved in processing dental materials is essential to achieve security. A descriptive study was made of how Public Dental Medicine Colleges in Brazil process critical materials and determine the patterns of physical, chemical and biological control in their use of hot air ovens and autoclaves to sterilize these materials. The data were obtained with a questionnaire, sent by mail and analyzed with the software EPI-INFO 6.04. Among the 40 Brazilian public Dental Medicine Colleges, only 16 returned the questionnaire. In eight of these, the individuals responsible for the materials and sterilization center had a college degree in a human health field. In 14 institutions, the students were responsible for the cleaning of the instruments, but in six of these they did so outside of the materials and sterilization center. Both the autoclave and the dry heat oven were the method of choice in 13 of the 16 schools. The sterilization routine was routinely monitored by 11 of the institutions. Chemical control through the tape test in the autoclave was used by 13 of the schools, three institutions reported preventive maintenance, and biological indicators were used by seven of the 16 schools. Autoclaves are widely used because of the degree of biological security that this method offers, however physical, chemical and biological controls have not been routinely implemented by most of the institutions. PMID:15880236

Sasamoto, Sandra Aragão de Almeida; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Silva e Souza, Adenícia Custódia; Paiva, Enilza Maria M de; Paula e Souza, Carlos de; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina

2004-12-01

93

Vulnerability to AIDS among the elderly in an urban center in central Brazil  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: As the world population ages with an improved quality of life and sexual longevity, the prevalence of AIDS is rising among the elderly. The purpose of this study was to estimate the vulnerability to AIDS among individuals attending senior community centers in Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. METHOD: This descriptive, exploratory investigation included 329 subjects selected in a probabilistic manner. Individuals with scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination indicating cognitive impairment were excluded from the analyses. Barthel's and Lawton's functional assessment scales were applied. Interviews were conducted to evaluate the presence of cognitive and behavioral factors associated with HIV transmission. RESULTS: Most subjects were non-dependent, fell within the 60- to 69-year age bracket and were female. A majority of individuals reported having knowledge about AIDS and were aware that the elderly are vulnerable to the disease. More than a quarter (26.9%) of the sample reported previous HIV testing. No participants reported drug use, homosexual orientation, or alcohol abuse. A minority of participants reported using medication for erectile dysfunction. Casual and multiple partners accounted for 12% and 34% of reported intercourse experiences, respectively. Condom use was reported by 14% of respondents. CONCLUSION: Unprotected sex was the primary factor accounting for vulnerability to AIDS among the elderly. PMID:22249476

Driemeier, Marta; Maria Oliveira de Andrade, Sônia; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Mello Miranda Paniago, Anamaria; Venâncio da Cunha, Rivaldo

2012-01-01

94

Formic and acetic acid over the central Amazon region, Brazil 1. Dry season  

SciTech Connect

We have determined the atmospheric concentrations of formic and acetic acid in the gas phase, in aerosols, and in rain during the dry season (July--August 1985) in the Amazonia region of Brazil. At ground level the average concentrations of gas phase formic and acetic acid were 1.6 +- 0.6 and 2.2 +- 1.0 ppb, respectively. The diurnal behavior of both acids at ground level and their vertical distribution in the forest canopy point to the existence of vegetative sources as well as to production by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Dry deposition of the gaseous acids appears to be a major sink. The concentrations of formic and acetic acid in the gas phase were about 2 orders of magnitude higher than concentrations of the corresponding species in the atmospheric aerosol. About 50--60%/sub 0/ of the aerosol (total) formate and acetate were in the size fraction below 1.0 ..mu..m diameter.

Andreae, M.O.; Talbot, R.W.; Andreae, T.W.; Harriss, R.C.

1988-02-20

95

Shrimp and conventional UPb age, Sm-Nd isotopic characteristics and tectonic significance of the K-rich Itapuranga suite in Goiás, Central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Itapuranga alkali granite and Uruana quartz syenite are large K-rich EW-elongated intrusions, in the central part of the Neoproterozoic Brasília Belt, central Brazil. They are associated with Pireneus lineaments, which cut the regional NNW-SSE structures of the southern part of the belt. SHRIMP and conventional U-Pb data for the Itapuranga and Uruana intrusions indicate crystallization ages of 624 ±

MÁRCIO M. PIMENTEL; ELTON L. DANTAS; REINHARDT A. FUCK; RICHARD A. ARMSTRONG

2003-01-01

96

CENTRAL AVENUE CENTRAL AVENUE  

E-print Network

., 10 am­4 pm 2 China Moon Restaurant 121 Central Park Sq. 662-2883 Chinese, Thai, and vegetarian. Mon am­3 pm Sat.­Sun., 7 am­3 pm 8 El Parasol 1903 Central Avenue 661-0303 Native New Mexican food. Mon, hamburgers, and New Mexican food. Tues.­Fri., 6 am­1 pm Sat., 7 am­noon Closed Sunday & Monday 11 Sonic Drive

97

CENTRAL AVENUE CENTRAL AVENUE  

E-print Network

Sun., 10 am­4 pm 2 China Moon Restaurant 121 Central Park Sq. 662-2883 Chinese, Thai, and vegetarian Mexican food. Mon.­Fri., 7 am­6 pm Sat., 8 am­2 pm; Sun., 9 am­2 pm 9 Home Run Pizza 1627 Central Avenue-7591 Breakfast burritos, hamburgers, and New Mexican food. Tues.­Fri., 6 am­1 pm Sat., 7 am­noon Closed Sunday

98

New geological and single-zircon Pb evaporation data from the Central Guyana Domain, southeastern Roraima, Brazil: Tectonic implications for the central region of the Guyana Shield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metagranitoid rocks, mylonites, leucogneisses and granulites occur in the Central Guyana Domain (CGD) near the UatumÖAnauá Domain (UAD) boundary, southeastern Roraima (Brazil). These rocks are oriented along NE-SW and E-W trends and dip to NW and N, respectively. Single-zircon Pb evaporation results yielded 1724 ± 14 Ma and 1889 ± 3 Ma for a syn-kinematic foliated hornblende-biotite monzogranite and a granodioritic mylonite, respectively. These results point to a new tectonic event (Itã Event) in the area in addition to the 1.94-1.93 Ga (late- to post-Transamazonian) and the 1.35-0.98 Ga (K'Mudku) thermal tectonic events. This new event may be related, at least locally, with the evolution of the Columbia Supercontinent. In addition, the Itã Fault System is younger than 1.89 Ga (granodioritic mylonite age), contrasting with the Barauana high-grade lineament and 1.94 Ga polydeformed rocks, pointing to the needs of a major revision of lithostratigraphic column currently proposed for the CGD as well as the CGD and UAD boundary.

Almeida, Marcelo E.; Macambira, Moacir J. B.; Valente, Sérgio de C.

2008-11-01

99

Litter manipulation and associated invertebrate fauna in secondary forest, central Amazonia, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plant litter from selected tree species has been used for improving soil productivity in low-input systems of secondary vegetation in Central Amazon, leading to different conditions for invertebrates. Soil invertebrate assemblages were monitored to test the effects of adding litter types of contrasting nutritional quality and periods of exposure on the development of the community. We established four second growth plots with 80 subplots of 3 m 2 from which the original litter was removed and replaced in 60 subplots. Twenty subplots received Hevea brasiliensis leaves, 20 others Carapa guianensis leaves, and another 20 an equal mixture of H. brasiliensis, C. guianensis and Vismia guianensis. Twenty subplots were left with the original litter. Litter and mineral soil (5 cm deep) sub-horizons were collected after 45, 100, 160, 240 and 300 days of exposure. The invertebrates were extracted using Kempson apparatus. At the day 210, the litter was replenished to match the surrounding litter. Regression analyses showed no significant effect of litter type, but the period of exposure did affect the community in both sub-horizons. Only after the litter replenishment, the type of litter and periods of exposure affected the community in the litter sub-horizon. Because we tried to isolate the effects of litter composition from other large-scale phenomena, several factors interfered in the experiment and potential problems were identified to optimize the investigation. The sampling design must be improved by using a larger number of subsamples for each kind of litter within each plot. Coarse parameters of Order and Family were suited to detect major environmental patterns on soil invertebrates, but taxonomic resolution to species and/or morphospecies is required to detect more subtle effects. Future manipulations should also be done on a longer time scale, and the replicates need to be spread over larger areas to capture the natural variations within the ecosystems.

Santos, Evanira M. R.; Franklin, Elizabeth; Luizão, Flávio J.

2008-11-01

100

EFFECTS OF LAND USE CHANGES ON THE FUNCTIONING OF SOILS AND WATERSHEDS OF CENTRAL BRAZIL SAVANNAS: PHASE 2, IMPACTS ON NUTRIENT AND CARBON CYCLES AND TRACE GAS EXCHANGE  

EPA Science Inventory

This research is funded through an interagency agreement with NASA. The research in this project is contributing to assessments of the effects of land use in central Brazil on: 1) the stocks and cycling rates of carbon and nutrient cycling; 2) the function and structure of soil ...

101

Radiometric, magnetic, and gravity study of the Quixadá batholith, central Ceará domain (NE Brazil): evidence for Pan-African\\/Brasiliano extension-controlled emplacement  

Microsoft Academic Search

A geophysical survey was conducted in the central Ceará domain of the Borborema Province (NE Brazil). The aim of this investigation was to find geophysical evidence for the emplacement of the Quixadá batholith, which is a granitic body probably situated in the local extensional site in the oblique collisional regime of the Pan-African\\/Brasiliano collage. Remote sensing and airborne geophysical data

David Lopes de Castro; Raimundo Mariano Gomes Castelo Branco; Guttenberg Martins; Neivaldo Araújo de Castro

2002-01-01

102

Habitat suitability mapping of Anopheles darlingi in the surroundings of the Manso hydropower plant reservoir, Mato Grosso, Central Brazil  

PubMed Central

Background Hydropower plants provide more than 78 % of Brazil's electricity generation, but the country's reservoirs are potential new habitats for main vectors of malaria. In a case study in the surroundings of the Manso hydropower plant in Mato Grosso state, Central Brazil, habitat suitability of Anopheles darlingi was studied. Habitat profile was characterized by collecting environmental data. Remote sensing and GIS techniques were applied to extract additional spatial layers of land use, distance maps, and relief characteristics for spatial model building. Results Logistic regression analysis and ROC curves indicate significant relationships between the environment and presence of An. darlingi. Probabilities of presence strongly vary as a function of land cover and distance from the lake shoreline. Vector presence was associated with spatial proximity to reservoir and semi-deciduous forests followed by Cerrado woodland. Vector absence was associated with open vegetation formations such as grasslands and agricultural areas. We suppose that non-significant differences of vector incidences between rainy and dry seasons are associated with the availability of anthropogenic breeding habitat of the reservoir throughout the year. Conclusion Satellite image classification and multitemporal shoreline simulations through DEM-based GIS-analyses consist in a valuable tool for spatial modeling of A. darlingi habitats in the studied hydropower reservoir area. Vector presence is significantly increased in forested areas near reservoirs in bays protected from wind and wave action. Construction of new reservoirs under the tropical, sub-humid climatic conditions should therefore be accompanied by entomologic studies to predict the risk of malaria epidemics. PMID:17343728

Zeilhofer, Peter; Santos, Emerson Soares dos; Ribeiro, Ana LM; Miyazaki, Rosina D; Santos, Marina Atanaka dos

2007-01-01

103

A new species of Rock-Dwelling Scinax Wagler (Anura: Hylidae) from Chapada dos Veadeiros, Central Brazil.  

PubMed

A new species of the Scinax ruber clade is described from Chapada dos Veadeiros region, Central Brazil. The new species is diagnosed by having SVL 21.9-27.7 mm in males and 26.7-31.7 mm in females; snout acuminate in dorsal view and rounded in profile; medium-sized tympanum; vocal sac single, median, subgular, that does not reach the pectoral region; iris iridescent yellow, with some thin, darker reticulations; tadpoles with ventral oral disc; P-3 regular and unmodified as a labial arm; absence of keratinized and colored plates on the sides of the lower jaw-sheath; presence of a keratinized and colored spur on each side behind the lower jaw-sheath; dorsolateral eyes, ventrally invisible; and advertisement call composed of 8-14 notes each with 4-18 pulses, and duration of 290-420 ms. The new species uses temporary creeks in rock meadows above 1.000 m a.s.l. and males calls from rock outcrops. The dorsal color pattern enables this species to camouflage in this kind of surfaces.  PMID:25662110

Araujo-Vieira, Katyuscia; Brandão, Reuber Albuquerque; Faria, Daniele Carvalho Do Carmo

2015-01-01

104

Analysis of moisture content, acidity and contamination by yeast and molds in Apis mellifera L. honey from central Brazil  

PubMed Central

The development of mold of environmental origin in honey affects its quality and leads to its deterioration, so yeasts and molds counts have been used as an important indicator of hygiene levels during its processing, transportation and storage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of yeasts and molds contamination and their correlation with moisture and acidity levels in Apis mellifera L. honey from central Brazil. In 20% of the samples, the yeasts and molds counts exceeded the limit established by legislation for the marketing of honey in the MERCOSUR, while 42.8% and 5.7% presented above-standard acidity and moisture levels, respectively. Although samples showed yeasts and molds counts over 1.0 × 102 UFC.g?1, there was no correlation between moisture content and the number of microorganisms, since, in part of the samples with above-standard counts, the moisture level was below 20%. In some samples the acidity level was higher than that established by legislation, but only one sample presented a yeasts and molds count above the limit established by MERCOSUR, which would suggest the influence of the floral source on this parameter. In general, of the 35 samples analyzed, the quality was considered inadequate in 45.7% of cases. PMID:24516434

Ananias, Karla Rubia; de Melo, Adriane Alexandre Machado; de Moura, Celso José

2013-01-01

105

Relationship between land use/cover and surface temperatures in the urban agglomeration of Cuiabá-Várzea Grande, Central Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We focus on the surface urban heat island (SUHI) and the spatiotemporal relationship between land use and surface temperatures (Ts) in Cuiabá-Várzea Grande, Mato Grosso, one of the major urban agglomerations of central-western Brazil, which has suffered intense urbanization processes since the 1960s. Supervised maximum likelihood classifications of optical bands of Landsat Thematic Mapper (Landsat TM) imagery from 1986 and 2007 are applied to generate land use/cover maps. Surface emissivity is determined using the logarithmic transformation of the normalized difference vegetation index. The Ts is retrieved from the thermal bands utilizing a radiative transfer equation. In both cities, urban expansion followed two main development axes, which are reflected in the spatial patterns of Ts. The highest values of Ts were found in bare soil and urbanized areas. Between 1986 and 2007, Ts increased 0.96°C on average and a maximum of 5.49°C in the urban agglomeration. The SUHI in Várzea Grande suffered intensification with an increase of 1.34°C in the downtown area. This tendency was stronger in the center of Cuiabá, where Ts increased 3.12°C. Slowing this rapid rate of temperature increase would demand decisive intervention by municipal authorities, such as restricting annual occupation taxes, reducing the occupation coefficient in new districts, preserving native vegetation, and designating new green areas.

Callejas, Ivan Júlio Apolônio; de Oliveira, Angela Santana; de Moura Santos, Flávia Maria; Durante, Luciane Cleonice; de Jesus Albuquerque Nogueira, Marta Cristina; Zeilhofer, Peter

2011-01-01

106

Risk assessment of pesticides for soils of the Central Amazon, Brazil: comparing outcomes with temperate and tropical data.  

PubMed

The risk of 11 pesticides to the soil environment was assessed in a 3-tiered approach at 4 sites located in Central Amazon, near Manaus, the capital of the Amazonas State in Brazil. Toxicity-exposure ratios (TERs), as routinely used for the registration of pesticides in the European Union, were calculated. First, the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) values in soil on the basis of real application rates and soil properties but temperate DT50 (degradation time of 50%) values were compared with temperate effect values (earthworm LC50s; median lethal concentrations), both gained from literature. Second, the risk assessment was refined by the use of DT50 values from tropical soils (measured for 7 compounds and estimated for 4) but still with temperate effect values because only a few results from tests performed under tropical conditions are available. Third, the outcome of this exercise was evaluated in a plausibility check with the use of the few results of effect tests, which were performed under tropical conditions. However, the lack of such data allowed this check only for 6 of 11 pesticides. The results are discussed in light of pesticide use in the Amazon in general, as well as compared with the registration status of these pesticides in other countries. Finally, suggestions are given for which kinds of studies are needed to improve the environmental risk assessment of pesticides in tropical regions. PMID:17973565

Römbke, Jörg; Waichman, Andrea V; Garcia, Marcos V B

2008-01-01

107

Late Holocene Phytolith and Carbon-Isotope Record from a Latosol at Salitre, South-Central Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reliability of paleovegetation records inferred from soil phytolith assemblages and SOM (soil organic matter) carbon isotope analysis was examined in light of previous pollen and charcoal reconstructions. The sampled latosol is located in south-central Brazil (Salitre), at a boundary between forest and cerrado. The derived mean age of phytoliths and SOM at each level is the result of a balance between continuous translocation and selective dissolution. It increases with depth in a regular, quantifiable fashion that allows paleoenvironmental interpretation. Phytoliths and SOM tracers first record a savanna phase, associated with the last Holocene long dry period occurring between ca. 5500 and 4500 yr B.P. Two periods of tree community development followed, between ca. 4000 and 3000 and after ca. 970 yr. B.P., leading to the present cerrado/forest association. The dry spell interrupted this trend about 970 ± 60 yr B.P. The second development of woody elements was contemporaneous with an increase in anthropogenic fires. Therefore, climate was more important than fires and human activities in constraining the growth of vegetation during the last nine centuries at Salitre. More generally, despite pedogenic processes, soil phytoliths and ? 13C values of the SOM may be accurate tracers of vegetation changes.

Alexandre, Anne; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Mariotti, Andre; Soubies, Francois

1999-03-01

108

Energy balance with Landsat images in irrigated central pivots with corn crop in the São Paulo State, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The energy balance (EB) components were quantified in a commercial farm with corn crop, irrigated by central pivots, in the Northwestern side of São Paulo state, Southeast Brazil. The SAFER (Simple Algorithm For Evapotranspiration Retrieving) was applied to retrieve the latent heat flux (?E), considering six pivots, covering irrigated areas from 74 to 108 ha. With ?E quantified and considering soil heat flux (G) as a fraction of net radiation (Rn), the sensible heat flux (H) was acquired as a residual in the energy balance equation. Seven Landsat satellite images, covering all corn crop stages from 23 April 2010 to 29 August 2010, allowed relating the energy balance components according to the accumulated degree-days (DDac) from the planting to harvest dates. The average Rn values ranging from 5.2 to 7.2 MJ m-2 day-1, represented 30 to 45% of global solar radiation (RG). Considering the variation of the energy balance components along the corn crop growing seasons, the average ranges for ?E, H and G were respectively 0.0 to 6.4 MJ m-2 day-1, -1.5 to 6.7 MJ m-2 day-1 and 0.1 to 0.6 MJ m-2 day-1. The fraction of the available energy (Rn - G) used as ?E was from 0.0 to 1.3 indicated a good irrigation management, insuring that the water deficit could not be the reason of any yield reduction. Although Rn did not reflected well the crop stages, its partition strongly depended on these stages. ?E higher than Rn and the negative H/Rn, happening sometimes along the corn growing seasons, occurred after the vegetative growth and before the harvest times, indicated heat advection from the surrounding areas to the irrigation pivots, which represented an additional energy source for the evaporative process. The models applied here with only the visible and infrared bands of the Landsat sensor are very useful for the energy balance analyses, considering the size of the corn crop irrigation pivots in Southeast Brazil, when subsidizing a rational irrigation water application in corn crop.

Teixeira, Antônio H. d. C.; Hernandez, Fernando B. T.; Andrade, Ricardo G.; Leivas, Janice F.; Bolfe, Edson L.

2014-10-01

109

Distribution of throughfall and stemflow in multi-strata agroforestry, perennial monoculture, fallow and primary forest in central Amazonia, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The partitioning of rain water into throughfall, stemflow and interception loss when passing through plant canopies depends on properties of the respective plant species, such as leaf area and branch angles. In heterogeneous vegetation, such as tropical forest or polycultural systems, the presence of different plant species may consequently result in a mosaic of situations with respect to quantity and quality of water inputs into the soil. As these processes influence not only the water availability for the plants, but also water infiltration and nutrient leaching, the understanding of plant effects on the repartitioning of rain water may help in the optimization of land use systems and management practices. We measured throughfall and stemflow in a perennial polyculture (multi-strata agroforestry), monocultures of peach palm (Bactris gasipaes) for fruit and for palmito, a monoculture of cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum), spontaneous fallow and primary forest during one year in central Amazonia, Brazil. The effect on rain water partitioning was measured separately for four useful tree species in the polyculture and for two tree species in the primary forest. Throughfall at two stem distances, and stemflow, differed significantly between tree species, resulting in pronounced spatial patterns of water input into the soil in the polyculture system. For two tree species, peach palm for fruit (Bactris gasipaes) and Brazil nut trees (Bertholletia excelsa), the water input into the soil near the stem was significantly higher than the open-area rainfall. This could lead to increased nutrient leaching when fertilizer is applied close to the stem of these trees. In the primary forest, such spatial patterns could also be detected, with significantly higher water input near a palm (Oenocarpus bacaba) than near a dicotyledonous tree species (Eschweilera sp.). Interception losses were 6·4% in the polyculture, 13·9 and 12·3% in the peach palm monocultures for fruit and for palmito, respectively, 0·5% in the cupuaçu monoculture and 3·1% in the fallow. With more than 20% of the open-area rainfall, the highest stemflow contributions to the water input into the soil were measured in the palm monocultures and in the fallow.

Schroth, Götz; Ferreira da Silva, Luciana; Wolf, Marc-Andree; Geraldes Teixeira, Wenceslau; Zech, Wolfgang

1999-07-01

110

Park Search  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Its never too early to begin planning your summer vacation, especially in the depths of winter; those with cabin fever can get a jump on their outdoor recreation plans at this site, provided by L.L. Bean. Users can search this database of over 1,400 state and national parks, forests, and wildlife refuges by state, region, and/or activities in which they are interested (including winter sports for all-season recreators). Search returns include contact information, an overview of the park/ forest and its highlights, photos, and a list of approved or available activities.

111

Upper-mantle seismic structure beneath SE and Central Brazil from P- and S-wave regional traveltime tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present models for the upper-mantle velocity structure beneath SE and Central Brazil using independent tomographic inversions of P- and S-wave relative arrival-time residuals (including core phases) from teleseismic earthquakes. The events were recorded by a total of 92 stations deployed through different projects, institutions and time periods during the years 1992-2004. Our results show correlations with the main tectonic structures and reveal new anomalies not yet observed in previous works. All interpretations are based on robust anomalies, which appear in the different inversions for P- and S-waves. The resolution is variable through our study volume and has been analyzed through different theoretical test inversions. High-velocity anomalies are observed in the western portion of the São Francisco Craton, supporting the hypothesis that this Craton was part of a major Neoproterozoic plate (San Franciscan Plate). Low-velocity anomalies beneath the Tocantins Province (mainly fold belts between the Amazon and São Francisco Cratons) are interpreted as due to lithospheric thinning, which is consistent with the good correlation between intraplate seismicity and low-velocity anomalies in this region. Our results show that the basement of the Paraná Basin is formed by several blocks, separated by suture zones, according to model of Milani & Ramos. The slab of the Nazca Plate can be observed as a high-velocity anomaly beneath the Paraná Basin, between the depths of 700 and 1200 km. Further, we confirm the low-velocity anomaly in the NE area of the Paraná Basin which has been interpreted by VanDecar et al. as a fossil conduct of the Tristan da Cunha Plume related to the Paraná flood basalt eruptions during the opening of the South Atlantic.

Rocha, Marcelo Peres; Schimmel, Martin; Assumpção, Marcelo

2011-01-01

112

Relationships among vegetation, geomorphology and hydrology in the Bananal Island tropical wetlands, Araguaia River basin, Central Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bananal Plain spreading on the Middle Araguaia River basin in Central Brazil at the Cerrado-Amazonia ecotone is a unique system that sustains the largest seasonal wetlands of the Cerrado biome. The huge Bananal Plain is an intracratonic sedimentary basin filled with Pleistocene sediments of the Araguaia formation. Covering approximately two million hectares, the Bananal Island is a major geomorphologic feature of the Bananal plain. Fieldwork and the analysis of a temporal series of MODIS-VI and Landsat ETM images allowed us to discriminate Cerrado phyto-physiognomies on the Bananal Island. Maps of vegetation and geomorphologic units were created, and from the correlation between landforms and vegetation types we identified morpho-vegetation units. Our approach allowed us to postulate that Pleistocene landforms strongly influence, if not dominate, the distribution of vegetation units. For example, the distribution of current gallery forest is not only controlled by active floodplains, but also by alluvial belts abandoned by avulsion. Additionally, arboreal Cerrado vegetation is supported by laterite developed on the sediments of the Araguaia Formation. Some of these inactive landforms are in part modified by the present day geomorphologic processes and colonized by successional vegetation that varies from alluvial forest to Cerrado. Characterized by a very flat landscape with a hindered drainage, the muddy sediments of the Araguaia Formation and the high seasonal rainfall favor the development of regional seasonal wetlands. The Bananal plain is a key area for understanding the Quaternary climatic and biogeographic changes in tropical South America. The control exerted by relict Quaternary landforms on the current vegetation units demonstrates the strong links between geomorphologic aspects of the landscape and ecological patterns. This multidisciplinary approach provides a better understanding of the biogeographic patterns in the Cerrado-Amazon ecotone, which is useful for identifying and designing areas for conservation.

Valente, C. R.; Latrubesse, E. M.; Ferreira, L. G.

2013-10-01

113

Mapping distribution and thickness of supraglacial debris in the Central Karakoram National Park: main features and implications to model glacier meltwater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Supraglacial debris plays a not negligible role in controlling magnitude and rates of buried ice melt (Østrem, 1959; Mattson et al., 1993). Knowledge on rock debris is essential to model ice melt (and consequently meltwater discharge) upon wide glacierized areas, as melt rates are mainly driven by debris thickness variability. This is particularly important for the Pamir-Himalaya-Karakoram area (PHK), where debris-covered glaciers are frequent (Smiraglia et al., 2007; Scherler et al., 2011) and where melt water from glaciers supports agriculture and hydropower production. By means of remote sensing techniques and field data, supraglacial debris can be detected, and then quantified in area and thickness. Supervised classifications of satellite imagery can be used to map debris on glaciers. They use different algorithms to cluster an image based on its pixel values, and Region Of Interests (ROIs) previously selected by the human operator. This can be used to obtain a supraglacial debris mask by which surface extension can be calculated. Moreover, kinetic surface temperature data derived from satellites (such as ASTER and Landsat), can be used to quantify debris thicknesses (Mihalcea et al., 2008). Ground Control Points (GCPs) are essential to validate the obtained debris thicknesses. We took the Central Karakoram National Park (CKNP) as a representative sample for PHK area. The CKNP is 12,000 km2 wide, with more than 700 glaciers, mostly debris covered (Minora et al., 2013). Among those we find some of the widest glaciers of the World (e.g: Baltoro). To improve the knowledge on these glaciers and to better model their melt and water discharge we proceeded as follows. Firstly we ran a Supervised Maximum Likelihood (SML) classification on 2001 and 2010 Landsat images to detect debris presence and distribution. Secondly we analyzed kinetic surface temperature (from Landsat) to map debris depth. This latter attempt took also advantage from field data of debris thickness and surface rock temperatures acquired in the study area since the ablation season 2004 (see Mihalcea et al., 2006; 2008b). A mean debris thickness of ca. 5.6 cm was found, probably greater than the local "critical value" (sensu Mattson et al., 1993). Moreover, our field data indicate a local critical value of about 5 cm, above which supraglacial debris thickness would lower ice melt rates compared to that of bare ice (Mihalcea et al., 2006). These findings suggest that in the CKNP area the abundant and extensive debris coverage may result in an actual reduction of buried ice melt. Moreover, Minora et al. (2013) reported quite stable conditions of glaciers in the CKNP area in the time window 2001-2011. This glacier behavior is consistent with the largely known "Karakoram Anomaly" (Hewitt, 2005) and requires further investigations. Among other possible important factors driving such a unique glacier trend, debris depth and distribution have to be considered. This work was carried out under the umbrella of the PAPRIKA project funded and managed by EvK2CNR Committee. The authors are also grateful to the SEED project (funded by the Pakistani and Italian Governments and managed by EvK2CNR).

Minora, Umberto; Mayer, Christoph; Bocchiola, Daniele; D'Agata, Carlo; Maragno, Davide; Lambrecht, Astrid; Vuillermoz, Elisa; smiraglia, claudio; diolaiuti, guglielmina

2014-05-01

114

Prevalence and genetic characterisation of HTLV-1 and 2 dual infections in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Central-West Brazil  

PubMed Central

Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) may impact the clinical course of tuberculosis (TB). Both infections are highly endemic in Brazil. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of HTLV-1/2 in TB patients in Central-West Brazil and to perform a genetic characterisation of the respective isolates. Of the 402 patients, six (1.49%) were positive for anti-HTLV and five (1.24%; 95% confidence interval: 0.46-3.05) were infected with HTLV-1/2. Genetic characterisation demonstrated that the four HTLV-1 isolates belonged to the Transcontinental subgroup A of the Cosmopolitan subtype a and that the HTLV-2 isolate belonged to subtype a (HTLV-2a/c). The prevalence of HTLV infection observed in this study is higher than that observed in local blood donors and the HTLV-1 and 2 subtypes identified are consistent with those circulating in Brazil. PMID:24141955

Kozlowski, Aline Garcia; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida dos Santos; de Matos, Márcia Alves Dias; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Araújo, João Alves; Otsuki, Koko; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

2013-01-01

115

Generation, mobilization and crystallization of impact-induced alkali-rich melts in granitic target rocks: Evidence from the Araguainha impact structure, central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides important insights into the generation, extraction and crystallization of clast-laden impact melt rocks from the Araguainha impact structure, central Brazil. Despite the mixed nature of the Araguainha target rocks (comprising a 2km thick sequence of sedimentary rocks and underlying granitic basement), the exposed melt bodies are characterised by an alkali-rich granitic matrix embedding mineral and rock fragments

R. Machado; C. Lana; G. Stevens; C. R. S. Filho; W. U. Reimold; Iain McDonald

2009-01-01

116

Park Smart  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Parking Garage Automation System (PGAS) is based on a technology developed by a NASA-sponsored project called Robot sensorSkin(TM). Merritt Systems, Inc., of Orlando, Florida, teamed up with NASA to improve robots working with critical flight hardware at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system, containing smart sensor modules and flexible printed circuit board skin, help robots to steer clear of obstacles using a proximity sensing system. Advancements in the sensor designs are being applied to various commercial applications, including the PGAS. The system includes a smartSensor(TM) network installed around and within public parking garages to autonomously guide motorists to open facilities, and once within, to free parking spaces. The sensors use non-invasive reflective-ultrasonic technology for high accuracy, high reliability, and low maintenance. The system is remotely programmable: it can be tuned to site-specific requirements, has variable range capability, and allows remote configuration, monitoring, and diagnostics. The sensors are immune to interference from metallic construction materials, such as rebar and steel beams. Inside the garage, smart routing signs mounted overhead or on poles in front of each row of parking spots guide the motorist precisely to free spaces.

1999-01-01

117

Airborne geophysical surveys in the north-central region of Goias (Brazil): implications for radiometric characterization of tropical soils.  

PubMed

Progress obtained in analysis aerogammaspectrometric and aeromagnetic survey data for the north-central region of the state of Goias (Brazil) are presented. The results obtained have allowed not only determination of the abundances of naturally radioactive elements but also new insights into the processes that determine the radiometric characteristics of the main soil types. There are indications that the radioelement abundances of soils are not only related to their physical properties, but also chemical characteristics of source rocks from which they are derived. For example, oxisol soils derived from the felsic source rocks of the Mara Rosa and Green stone belts have equivalent uranium (eU) values higher than 1.7 ppm, while those derived from source rocks of the relatively more basic Uruaçu Group and sediment sequences of Proterozoic age are characterized by eU contents of less than 1 ppm. Oxisol soils of the Median massif, ultisol soils of the Paranoá, Canastra and Araxá Groups, cambisol soils of the Araí Group and plintosol soils of the Bambuí Group constitute an intermediate class with eU contents in the range of 1-1.3 ppm. Equivalent thorium abundances of soil types display similar trends, the range of variation being 4-16 ppm. Potassium abundances on the other hand are rather uniform with values in the range of 1-1.3%, the only exception being the sedimentary sequences of Proterozoic age, which has a mean value of 0.7%. These observations have been considered as indicative of characteristic features of tropical soils in the study area. In this context, we point out the possibility of using results of aerogammaspectrometry surveys as a convenient complementary tool in identifying geochemical zoning of soils in tropical environments. The ratios of eU/K are found to fall in the range of 1-1.7, which is typical of common soils. The ratios of eTh/K exhibit a relatively wide interval, with values in the range of 4-16. The ratios of eTh/eU are found to have values in the range of 2-12. Also, there appears to be a rather reasonable association between the spatial distributions of positive anomalies of the radioelement ratios with the lineaments derived from the vertical derivative of the magnetic field. The map of the analytic signal of the magnetic field also reveals a similar association. Such associations imply that the processes which determine evolutionary trends of soil types are somehow related to the events that control the development of structural features in subsurface layers. PMID:23085188

Guimaraes, Suze Nei P; Hamza, Valiya M; da Silva, Joney Justo

2013-02-01

118

Analysis of the feeding habits of the swallow-tailed hummingbird, Eupetomena macroura (Gmelin, 1788), in an urban park in southeastern Brazil.  

PubMed

The aim of this work was to observe and describe the feeding habits and available food resources of the swallow-tailed hummingbird, Eupetomena macroura. The study was carried out in a municipal park located in the city of Taubaté, in the state of São Paulo. The observations took place between December 2003 and October 2004, recording the following variables: 1) the plant species visited for feeding and territorial defense; 2) the kinds of food resources; and 3) the kinds of flight to procure and obtain food. E. macroura visited 12 plant species. For territorial defense, Mangifera indica was the most visited, whereas Malvaviscus arboreus was most visited for feeding. The foliage was the plant part that received the most frequent visits. In order to obtain nectar, the only species visited was M. arboreus; to obtain arthropods, the species most visited were Mangifera indica and Hymenaea stilbocarpa. In the dry season, the hummingbirds visited flowers, whereas in the rainy season they visited leaves to acquire food. The arthropod groups most frequently found on leafy branches were Homoptera and Psocoptera. Finally, the results of the type of flight analysis showed that flight used to capture food was more often observed than were flights to search for food. In conclusion, these observations suggest that E. macroura shows plasticity in feeding behavior, which can help it to persist in urban areas. PMID:18660974

Toledo, M C B; Moreira, D M

2008-05-01

119

APHIDINA ALS HONIGTAUERZEUGER IN GRTEN UND PARKS MITTELEUROPAS  

E-print Network

PRODUCERS IN GARDENS AND PARKS OF CENTRAL EUROPE WITH SPECIAL REGARD TO THE BOTANICAL GARDEN OF FREIBURG is directed to plantlice as honeydew producers in " artificial landscapes " (gardens and parks). While the so-called " wood-honeydew " is mainly a product of Lachnidae-Cinarinae, the honeydew in gardens and parks

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

120

Theodore Roosevelt National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service website contains information on: the park history; park activities such as hiking and camping; and natural history such as the wildlife, geology and paleontology of the park. The kids' section contains coloring pages, a park trivia quiz, reference sections on the wildlife and natural history of the park, and information on Theodore Roosevelt and his involvement in the Badlands. There are also images of the wildlife and scenery of the park.

121

Osteobiographic analysis of skeleton I, Sítio Toca dos Coqueiros, Serra da Capivara National Park, Brazil, 11,060 BP: first results.  

PubMed

This paper presents an osteobiographic analysis of a single skeleton found in a small rock shelter known as Toca dos Coqueiros, Piauí, Brazil. This find is of interest because of an exceptionally old radiocarbon date associated with it. The date (11,060 BP) was obtained from charcoal associated directly with the skeleton. This is an interesting find because of the rarity of osteobiographic studies of skeletons of such antiquity. Despite the existence of two projectile points in association with the burial, the morphological and molecular analyses of the skeleton demonstrated that this was a female. She was about 35-45 years of age at death. The skeleton exhibited acute and chronic bone lesions. Oral pathology was also observed, including an interproximal dental groove, probably caused by the therapeutic use of a cactus thorn. This could be one of the oldest cases of an analgesic plant used in the prehistoric Americas. PMID:12012362

Lessa, Andrea; Guidon, Niéde

2002-06-01

122

What the United States can learn from Brazil in response to HIV/AIDS: international reputation and strategic centralization in a context of health policy devolution.  

PubMed

Contrary to what many may expect, this article argues that Brazil did a better job than the USA when it came to responding to HIV/AIDS. Because of the Brazilian government's concern about its international reputation and the partnerships it has forged with international donors and civil society, the government has been committed to strengthening decentralization processes by introducing both formal and informal re-centralization measures that strengthen health policy devolution, while effectively targeting the biggest at-risk groups. The US, in contrast, has not achieved these objectives, due to its lack of interest in increasing its international reputation and its focus on bi-lateral aid rather than investing in domestic policy. The paper closes by explaining the lessons that Brazil can teach the US and other large federations seeking to ensure that decentralization and prevention policy work more effectively. PMID:20884619

Gómez, Eduardo J

2010-11-01

123

Park It!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The difference between an architect and an engineer is sometimes confusing because their roles in building design can be similar. Students experience a bit of both professions by following a set of requirements and meeting given constraints as they create a model parking garage. They experience the engineering design process first-hand as they design, build and test their models. They draw a blueprint for their design, select the construction materials and budget their expenditures. They also test their structures for strength and find their maximum loads.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program And Laboratory

124

National Environmental Research Parks  

SciTech Connect

The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

Not Available

1994-07-01

125

Environmental and geochemical record of human-induced changes in C storage during the last millennium in a temperate wetland (Las Tablas de Daimiel National Park, central Spain)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Las Tablas de Daimiel National Park has experienced many hydrological and ecological modifications through out its history, both of natural as well as anthropogenic origin, which have affected its carbon storage capacity and carbon fluxes. The study of those variations has been carried out by the analysis of its sedimentary record (geochemistry and pollen) and historical data. The natural changes have a wider variation range than the anthropogenic ones, show repetitive patterns and the system reacts readjusting the equilibrium among its components. Anthropogenic effects depend on the direct or indirect impact on the wetlands of change and its intensity. In addition, the anthropogenic impacts have the capacity of breaking the natural balance of the ecosystem and the internal interactions. ?? 2006 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2006 Blackwell Munksgaard.

Dominguez-Castro, F.; Santisteban, J.I.; Mediavilla, R.; Dean, W.E.; Lopez-Pamo, E.; Gil-Garcia, M. J.; Ruiz-Zapata, M. B.

2006-01-01

126

Local discourses and international initiatives: sociocultural sustainability of tourism in Oulanka National Park, Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

National parks have become important tourist attractions and tools for regional development. New international initiatives, such as PAN (Protected Area Network) Parks in Europe, now promote sustainable tourism in protected areas. This paper examines the sociocultural sustainability of tourism perceived by local stakeholders of Oulanka National Park in northeastern Finland. The central question concerns the role of PAN Parks certification

Riikka Puhakka; Simo Sarkki; Stuart P. Cottrell; Pirkko Siikamäki

2009-01-01

127

Campsite impact management: A survey of National Park Service backcountry managers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Though a central purpose for the creation and management of parks, visitation inevitably affects the natural resources of parks. This is particularly true at campsites, where visitation and its effects are concentrated. This paper presents partial results from a survey of National Park Service managers regarding general strategies and specific actions implemented by park managers to address campsite impact problems.

Marion, J.L.; Stubbs, C.J.

1993-01-01

128

SOIL EMISSIONS OF CO2 AND CO IN TROPICAL SAVANNAS OF CENTRAL BRAZIL UNDER DIFFERENT FIRE REGIMES  

EPA Science Inventory

The Cerrado is a tropical savanna in which herbaceous vegetation (mainly C4 grasses) coexists with trees and shrubs. It covers more than two million square kilometers and accounts for 22% of the total area of Brazil. In general, cerrado soils are old, deep, well drained, well s...

129

Population-based surveillance of pediatric pneumonia: use of spatial analysis in an urban area of Central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the spatial distribution of childhood community-acquired pneumonia de- tected through prospective surveillance in Goiâ- nia, Brazil. Three spatial analysis techniques were applied to detect intra-urban geographic aggregation of pneumonia cases: Kernel method, nearest neighbor hierarchical technique, and spatial scan statistic. A total of 724 pneumonia cases confirmed by chest radiography were iden- tified from May 2000 to

Lúcia Sampaio; Simonne Almeida; Celina Maria Turchi Martelli; Renato Maurício de Oliveira

130

Associations between forest fragmentation patterns and geneticstructure in Pfrimer’s Parakeet (Pyrrhura pfrimeri), an endangered endemic to central Brazil’s dry forests  

USGS Publications Warehouse

When habitat becomes fragmented, populations of species may become increasingly isolated. In the absence of habitat corridors, genetic structure may develop and populations risk reductions in genetic diversity from increased genetic drift and inbreeding. Deforestation of the Cerrado biome of Brazil, particularly of the dry forests within the Parana˜ River Basin, has incrementally occurred since the 1970s and increased forest fragmentation within the region. We performed landscape genetic analyses of Pfrimer’s parakeet (Pyrrhura pfrimeri), a globally endangered endemic to the region, to determine if forest fragmentation patterns were associated with genetic structuring in this species. We used previously generated satellite imagery that identified the locations of Parana˜ River Basin forest fragments in 1977, 1993/94, and 2008. Behavioral data quantifying the affinity of Pfrimer’s parakeet for forest habitat was used to parameterize empirically derived landscape conductance surfaces. Though genetic structure was observed among Pfrimer’s parakeet populations, no association between genetic and geographic distance was detected. Likewise, least cost path lengths, circuit theorybased resistance distances, and a new measure of least cost path length complexity could not be conclusively associated with genetic structure patterns. Instead, a new quantity that encapsulated connection redundancy from the 1977 forest fragmentation data provided the clearest associations with pairwise genetic differentiation patterns (Jost’s D: r = 0.72, P = 0.006; FST: r = 0.741, P = 0.001). Our analyses suggest a 35-year or more lag between deforestation and its effect on genetic structure. Because 66 % of the Parana˜ River Basin has been deforested since 1977, we expect that genetic structure will increase substantially among Pfrimer’s Parakeet populations in the future, especially if fragmentation continues at its current pace.

Haig, Susan M.; Miller, Leonard F.; Bianchi, Carlos; Mullins, Tom

2012-01-01

131

POLICE, PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION Parking Services  

E-print Network

-tax. There will not be an automatic rollover this year): Fill in, print, and sign Faculty/Staff Vehicle Registration form. Send PARKING PERMITS ONLINE button, then select the PURCHASE PERMITS link, sign in and then select the PAY YOUR CITATION ONLINE button or the BUY PARKING PERMITS ONLINE button, then the MANAGE MY PARKING

Mohanty, Saraju P.

132

Does the Privatization of Publicly Owned Infrastructure Implicate the Public Trust Doctrine? Illinois Central and the Chicago Parking Meter Concession Agreement  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the nineteenth century, legislatures proved “excessively generous” in granting railroad corporations property rights in publicly owned, commercially vital municipal streets and harbors. Jacksonian jurists, suspicious of corporate influence, invoked the public trust doctrine to rescind grants of privilege inconsistent with the public interest. In Illinois Central Railroad Co. v. Illinois, the “lodestar” of the modern doctrine, the Supreme Court

Ivan Kaplan

2012-01-01

133

CLAYTONCLAYTON FOREST PARK  

E-print Network

TAYLOR TAYLOR FOREST PARK FOREST PARK EUCLID EUCLID KINGSHIGHWAY KINGSHIGHWAY EUCLID EUCLID FOREST PARK 4480 Clayton [HR] (45) 103 Grassy wedge at the corner of Clayton & Euclid Ave. Shriner's (8), BCL (7 Clayton (27) 105 Northeast corner of Hudlin Park (near corner of Euclid & BJH Plaza) South Bldg.(3

Subramanian, Venkat

134

PARKING PROGRAMS FOR UNIVERSITIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

PARKING FACILITIES WERE SURVEYED AT 83 REPRESENTATIVE UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES, AND THE METHODS USED IN ADMINISTERING, CONTROLLING AND FINANCING WERE EVALUTED. GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS WERE MADE CONCERNING (1) THE LOCATION AND DESIGN OF PARKING LOTS AND GARAGES, (2) THE PRACTICE OF CURB PARKING ON CAMPUS, AND (3) THE FINANCING OF PARKING

KINNE, W.S., JR.

135

PARKING AND BACKING BASICS  

E-print Network

the real number is most likely much higher. For fleets, parking lot crashes are one of the most commonly: THURSDAY Parking lot incidents are typically low- speed collisions, but they can still lead to expensive in parking lots. Since many parking lot collisions involve only property damage, many often go unreported, so

Kirschner, Denise

136

Grand Teton National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service website provides a trip planner, information on natural and cultural history, publications, a park fact sheet for students, park maps, student bibliography, and a newspaper for kids. There is information on the geology, rock formations, mountain building, volcanism, and glaciation of the Teton Range. Educational resources for students and teachers consist of links to other National Park Service sites.

137

36 CFR 200.1 - Central organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01...Central organization. 200.1 Section 200.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION,...

2012-07-01

138

36 CFR 200.1 - Central organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01...Central organization. 200.1 Section 200.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION,...

2011-07-01

139

36 CFR 200.1 - Central organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01...Central organization. 200.1 Section 200.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION,...

2010-07-01

140

36 CFR 200.1 - Central organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01...Central organization. 200.1 Section 200.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION,...

2013-07-01

141

Landscape dynamics of Amazonian deforestation between 1984 and 2002 in central Rondônia, Brazil: assessment and future scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

Central Rondônia is one of the most deforested regions in the Brazilian Amazon and contains areas at different stages of degradation forming a gradient from mature forest to highly urbanized and built-up areas. Regional data from satellite imagery are available from the 1980s, but apart from studies that quantify deforestation, the broad-scale landscape dynamics of Rondônia have not been examined

Silvio Frosini de Barros Ferraz; Carlos Alberto Vettorazzi; David M. Theobald; Maria Victoria Ramos Ballester

2005-01-01

142

Political Economy of Compensatory Conservation: A Case Study of proposed Omkareshwar National Park Complex, India  

E-print Network

Proposed Omkareshwar National Park Complex (ONPC), is a planned park in Madhya Pradesh (central India) that is being designed as a compensatory conservation plan to overcome the loss of wildlife and forest by the construction and submergence from...

Goel, Abhineety

2013-08-08

143

77 FR 19702 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Carruthers, NAGPRA Coordinator, California Department of Parks and Recreation...items under the control of the California Department of Parks and Recreation...along the New River in northern Baja California. The central and southern...

2012-04-02

144

77 FR 19689 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation...SUMMARY: The California Department of Parks and Recreation...along the New River in northern Baja California. The central and southern...

2012-04-02

145

National Park Service: Tour of Park Geology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The tour of Park geologic resources includes pages specific to individual National Parks, Monuments, Recreation Areas, Preserves, Seacoasts, Reserves, and Recreation Areas. These pages are indexed by park name, state, or by one of the following topics: basin and range, caves, Colorado Plateau, fossils, glaciers, hot springs, human use, mountain building, oldest rocks, plate tectonics, river systems, sand dunes, shoreline geology, or volcanoes. Organization of each of the pages typically follows a NPS template with categories for park geology, maps, photographs, geologic research, related links, visitor information, multimedia, and "teacher features" (educational resources and links for teaching geology with National Park examples.) Common subjects that are addressed at various park sites include: minerals, rocks, fossils, cave and karst systems, coastlines, glaciers, volcanoes, faults, landforms, landslides, structures, fluvial systems, sediments, soils, stratigraphic relations, processes that form or act on geologic features and their chemical compositions, and the history of the planet and its life forms.

146

The tadpole of Amazophrynella manaos Rojas, Carvalho, Gordo, Ávila, Farias and Hrbek, 2014 (Anura, Bufonidae) from the type locality and adjacent regions at Central Amazonia, Brazil.  

PubMed

The genus Amazophrynella, as currently recognized (Fouquet et al. 2012a, b), is represented by four nominal species (Frost 2014; Rojas et al. 2014) but the tadpoles of only one species, Amazophrynella minuta (Melin) from Ecuador, have been described (Duellman & Lynch 1969; Duellman 1978). Amazophrynella manaos Rojas, Carvalho, Gordo, Ávila, Farias and Hrbek, 2014 occurs in the leaf litter of terra firme forest in the southwestern part of the Brazilian Guiana region (Rojas et al. 2014). The tadpole of this species was briefly described in diagrammatic drawings by Hero (1990) as Dendrophryniscus minutus. Herein, we provide a detailed description of this tadpole based on individuals at 12 stages of development collected in five different sites, including the type locality, at Central Amazonia, Brazil.  PMID:24990056

Menin, Marcelo; Pegorini, Reysi Jhayne; De Carvalho, Vinicius Tadeu; Rojas, Rommel Roberto; Gordo, Marcelo

2014-01-01

147

HIV type 1 molecular epidemiology in pol and gp41 genes among naive patients from Mato Grosso do Sul State, central western Brazil.  

PubMed

Antiretroviral naive patients (n=49) were recruited in central western Brazil (Campo Grande City/Mato Grosso do Sul State, located across the Bolivia and Paraguay borders). HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and env gp41 HR1 fragments were sequenced. Genetic diversity was analyzed by REGA/phylogenetic analyses. Intersubtype recombinants were identified by SimPlot/phylogenetic trees. PR/RT resistance was analyzed by Calibrated Population Resistance/Stanford databases. T-20 resistance in gp41 was assessed by Stanford, Los Alamos, and other sources. Of HIV-1 subtypes 65.3% were B(PR)B(RT), 10.2% were C(PR)C(RT), and 8.2% were F1(PR)F1(RT). Intersubtype recombinants were 16.3%: four B/F1 and four B/C (two were "CRF31_BC-like"). The Pol-RT V75M mutation was detected in two homosexual partners; one patient had the T215S revertant mutation. T-20/gp41 resistance mutations were L44M (n=2) and V38A (n=1). The high percentage of non-B isolates (?35%) highlights the importance of molecular surveillance studies in settings distant from the origin of the epidemic. Our data help elaborate the molecular epidemiological map of HIV-1 in Brazil. PMID:21790471

da Silveira, Alexsander Augusto; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Francisco, Roberta Barbosa Lopes; de Araújo Stefani, Mariane Martins

2012-03-01

148

Acadia National Park: Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service website contains information on: saving the habitats of peregrine falcons; the water cycle; becoming a junior ranger; and ranger-led school programs, which contain student field activities about the history, biology and geology of the park. Teacher resources include information on a library for educators at the visitor center of the park and teacher guides for preparing to visit the park. The kids' section explains what rangers do, gives tips on leaving no trace in the park, provides a history of Mount Desert Island, and contains an activity to match some park animals to their habitats.

149

Yellowstone Park  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thirteen years after devastating forest fires burned over 1.6 million acres in Yellowstone National Park, the scars are still evident. In this simulated natural color ASTER image, burned areas appear gray, in contrast to the dark green of unburned forests. The image covers an area of 60 x 63 km. This image was acquired on July 2, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic decision-makers so as to better life here, while developing the technologies needed to explore the universe and search for life beyond our home planet.

Size: 60 x 63 km (37.2 x 39.1 miles) Location: 44.7 deg. North lat., 110.7 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: July 2, 2001

2002-01-01

150

Fruit consumption and seed dispersal of Dimorphandra mollis Benth. (Leguminosae) by the lowland tapir in the cerrado of Central Brazil.  

PubMed

Fruit phenology observations and consumption of Dimorphandra mollis (Leguminosae) were analyzed during seven months in an area of cerrado stricto sensu. We analysed 81 fecal samples collected at six different places of lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) in central Brazilian cerrado. In addition, from the feces of five tapirs at the Brasília Zoo to which fruit had been offered, seeds were collected and used in germination tests. The results suggest that the tapir is an important fruit consumer and a potential seed disperser of D. mollis. In the field, however, fruit consumption was found to be very low, probably because of both fruit palatability and the low density of frugivores, especially tapirs. The possibility that the original dispersal agents of D. mollis seeds belonged to the South American Pleistocene megafauna is discussed. PMID:16341418

Bizerril, M X A; Rodrigues, F H G; Hass, A

2005-08-01

151

Endemic and threatened tetrapods in the restingas of the biodiversity corridors of Serra do Mar and of the Central da Mata Atlântica in eastern Brazil.  

PubMed

Biodiversity corridors comprise a mosaic of land uses connecting fragments of natural forest across a landscape. Two such corridors have been established along the eastern coast of Brazil: the Serra do Mar and the Central da Mata Atlântica corridors, along which most of the coastal plains are restinga areas. In this study, we analyze the present status of the endemic and endangered terrestrial vertebrates of both corridors. We sampled 10 restingas in both corridors, recording species of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Some restingas harbor a relatively large number of endemic species,and two main regions of endemism can be identified along the restingas of both corridors: the coastal restingas from northern Espirito Santo State to southern Bahia State (between Linhares, ES, and Tarancoso, BA), and the coastal region between the restingas of Maricá and Jurubatiba, Rio de Janeiro State. Six species of terrestrial vertebrates considered threatened with extinction are found in the restingas of Serra do Mar and Central da Mata Atlântica biodiversity corridors (Liolaemus lutzae, Formicivora littoralis, Mimus gilvus, Schistochlamys melanopis, and Trinomys eliasi). The region located between the restinga of Maricá and that of Jurubatiba is of special relevance for the conservation of vertebrate species of the restingas of the corridors because a considerable number of threatened species of terrestrial vertebrates are found there. We strongly recommend efforts to develop checklists of threatened faunas for the States of Espirito Santo and Bahia. PMID:16025914

Rocha, C F D; Van Sluys, M; Bergallo, H G; Alves, M A S

2005-02-01

152

Sm-Nd studies at Mina III gold deposit, Crixás greenstone belt, central Brazil: implications for the depositional age of the upper metasedimentary rocks and associated Au mineralization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Crixás greenstone belt, central Brazil, is a volcanosedimentary sequence comprised of ultramafic and mafic metavolcanic rocks at the base and detrital and chemical metasedimentary rocks at the top. The sequence is part of the Archean sialic block exposed in the central part of the Neoproterozoic Bras?´lia belt and therefore is strongly affected by the Brasiliano orogeny. Important gold deposits, such as Mina III, are mainly associated with carbonaceous and Fe- and Al-rich metasedimentary rocks of the upper unit. Sm-Nd isochron data for the basal metakomatiites and metabasalts indicate an age of 3.00±0.07 Ga. However, Nd isotopes for the upper metasedimentary rocks show TDM model ages of mostly 2.33-2.49 Ga, which indicates that neither they nor the associated Au mineralization are Archean. Also, garnet whole-rock dating for a Au-bearing chlorite-garnet schist yields an age of 505±7 Ma, suggesting that the mineralization is Neoproterozoic. The Nd model ages suggest that the metasedimentary sequence of Crixás represents a thrust sheet of Proterozoic rocks emplaced over the Archean terrains during the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano orogeny.

de Tarso Ferro de Oliveira Fortes, Paulo; Martins Pimentel, Márcio; Ventura Santos, Roberto; Luiz Junges, Sérgio

2003-12-01

153

Molecular Detection and Characterization of Gastroenteritis Viruses Occurring Naturally in the Stream Waters of Manaus, Central Amazônia, Brazil?  

PubMed Central

To assess the presence of the four main viruses responsible for human acute gastroenteritis in a hydrographic network impacted by a disordered urbanization process, a 1-year study was performed involving water sample collection from streams in the hydrographic basin surrounding the city of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Thirteen surface water sample collection sites, including different areas of human settlement characterized as urban, rural, and primary forest, located in the Tarumã-Açu, São Raimundo, Educandos, and Puraquequara microbasins, were defined with a global positioning system. At least one virus was detected in 59.6% (31/52) of the water samples analyzed, and rotavirus was the most frequent (44.2%), followed by human adenovirus (30.8%), human astrovirus (15.4%), and norovirus (5.8%). The viral contamination observed mainly in the urban streams reflected the presence of a local high-density population and indicated the gastroenteritis burden from pathogenic viruses in the water, principally due to recreational activities such as bathing. The presence of viral genomes in areas where fecal contamination was not demonstrated by bacterial indicators suggests prolonged virus persistence in aquatic environments and emphasizes the enteric virus group as the most reliable for environmental monitoring. PMID:18065620

Miagostovich, Marize P.; Ferreira, Fabiana F. M.; Guimarães, Flávia R.; Fumian, Túlio M.; Diniz-Mendes, Leonardo; Luz, Sérgio Luiz B.; Silva, Luciete A.; Leite, José Paulo G.

2008-01-01

154

Seasonal variation in energy balance and canopy conductance for a tropical savanna ecosystem of south central Mato Grosso, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

savanna (locally known as cerrado) composes 24% of Brazil and is characterized by high climatic variation; however, patterns of energy exchange are poorly understood, especially for mixed grasslands (locally known as campo sujo). We used eddy covariance to measure latent (Le) and sensible (H) heat flux of a mixed grassland and linked meteorological and remote sensing data to determine the controls on these fluxes. We hypothesized that (1) seasonal variations in H and Le would be large due to variations in precipitation; (2) ecosystem phenology, estimated using the enhanced vegetation index (EVI), would be the best predictor of seasonal variation in Le; and (3) cerrado, transitional, and humid evergreen forests would have similar rates of average annual Le despite large seasonal variation in cerrado Le. Our data suggest that campo sujo exhibits large seasonal fluctuations in energy balance that are driven by rainfall and that responses to rainfall pulses are rapid and dynamic, especially during the dry season. Path analysis indicated that temporal variations in the EVI did not significantly affect Le or Gc, but this was because all three variables (EVI, Le, and Gc) responded similarly to temporal variations in surface water availability. Compared to other tropical ecosystems, wetter sites had higher rates of Le during the dry season but similar rates during the wet season when water was not limiting. Over annual time periods, average rates of Le increased significantly as average annual rainfall increased, due to dry-season water limitations in the more seasonal tropical ecosystems.

Rodrigues, Thiago R.; Vourlitis, George L.; Lobo, Francisco de A.; Oliveira, Renan G.; Nogueira, José de S.

2014-01-01

155

Environmental implications of jatropha biofuel from a silvi-pastoral production system in central-west Brazil.  

PubMed

We present a life cycle assessment of synthetic paraffinic kerosene produced from Jatropha curcas. The feedstock is grown in an intercropping arrangement with pasture grasses so that Jatropha is coproduced with cattle. Additional innovations are introduced including hybrid seeds, detoxification of jatropha seedcake, and cogeneration. Two fuel pathways are examined including a newly developed catalytic decarboxylation process. Sensitivities are examined including higher planting density at the expense of cattle production as well as 50% lower yields. Intercropping with pasture and detoxifying seedcake yield coproducts that are expected to relieve pressure on Brazil's forests and indirectly reduce environmental impacts of biofuel production. Other innovations also reduce impacts. Results of the baseline assessment indicate that innovations would reduce impacts relative to the fossil fuel reference scenario in most categories including 62-75% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, 64-82% reduction in release of ozone depleting chemicals, 33-52% reduction in smog-forming pollutants, 6-25% reduction in acidification, and 60-72% reduction in use of nonrenewable energy. System expansion, which explicitly accounts for avoided deforestation, results in larger improvements. Results are robust across allocation methodologies, improve with higher planting density, and persist if yield is reduced by half. PMID:23713609

Bailis, Rob; Kavlak, Goksin

2013-07-16

156

Descriptive ecology of bat flies (Diptera: Hippoboscoidea) associated with vampire bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) in the cerrado of Central Brazil.  

PubMed

We studied the ectoparasitic bat flies of three phyllostomid vampire bat species. Bats were collected monthly from April 2004-March 2005 in caves within the Cafuringa Environmental Protection Area in the Federal District of Brazil. A total of 1,259 specimens from six species in the Streblidae family were collected from 332 bats. High host affinity from the sampled bat fly species and high prevalence of bat flies confirms the primary fly-host associations (Strebla wiedemanni, Trichobius parasiticus and Trichobius furmani with Desmodus, Trichobius diaemi and Strebla diaemi with Diaemus and T. furmani with Diphylla). Male flies outnumbered females in several associations. Some of the observed associations (e.g., Strebla mirabilis with Desmodus and S. mirabilis, Trichobius uniformis and S. wiedemanni with Diphylla) were inconclusive and the causes of the associations were unclear. There are several explanations for these associations, including (i) accidental contamination during sampling, (ii) simultaneous capture of several host species in the same net or (iii) genuine, but rare, ecological associations. Although various species of vampire bats share roosts, have similar feeding habits and are close phylogenetic relatives, they generally do not share ectoparasitic streblid bat flies. T. diaemi and S. diaemi associations with Diaemus youngi have not been previously reported in this region. PMID:21537676

Aguiar, Ludmilla Moura de Souza; Antonini, Yasmine

2011-03-01

157

Generation, mobilization and crystallization of impact-induced alkali-rich melts in granitic target rocks: Evidence from the Araguainha impact structure, central Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper provides important insights into the generation, extraction and crystallization of clast-laden impact melt rocks from the Araguainha impact structure, central Brazil. Despite the mixed nature of the Araguainha target rocks (comprising a 2 km thick sequence of sedimentary rocks and underlying granitic basement), the exposed melt bodies are characterised by an alkali-rich granitic matrix embedding mineral and rock fragments derived only from the target granite. The melt rocks occur in the form of a massive impact melt sheet overlying the eroded central uplift structure, and as melt veins in the granite of the core of the central uplift. Bulk-rock major and trace element data (including platinum group elements) indicate that the precursor melts were generated locally, principally by partial melting of the target granite, without any contribution from the sedimentary sequence or the projectile. The dense network of melt veins was formed in isolation, by selective melting of plagioclase and alkali feldspar within the granite target. Plagioclase and alkali feldspar melted discretely and congruently, producing domains in the matrix of the melt veins, which closely match the stoichiometry of these minerals. The compositionally discrete initial melt phases migrated through a dense network of microfractures before being assembled into larger melt veins. Freezing of the melt veins was substantially fast, and the melt components were quenched in the form of alkali-feldspar and plagioclase schlieren in the matrix of the melt veins. The overlying impact melt rock is, in contrast, characterised by a granophyric matrix consisting of albite, sanidine, quartz, biotite and chlorite. In this case, melt components appear to have been more mobile and to have mixed completely to form a granitic parental melt. We relate the melting of the minerals to post-shock temperatures that exceeded the melting point of feldspars.

Machado, R.; Lana, C.; Stevens, G.; Filho, C. R. S.; Reimold, W. U.; McDonald, Iain

2009-12-01

158

Carlsbad Caverns National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service (NPS) website contains details about Carlsbad Caverns National Park in New Mexico. It highlights the natural resources of the park, such as the wilderness, wildlife and caves. The geologic history and formation of caves is covered in detail. There is a teacher's guide with activities, field trip ideas, and factsheets about the park. Topics covered include rocks, erosion, speleothems, mapping caves, fossils, plants and animals, cave bats and fire. Links are provided for more information.

159

Name That Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this online interactive, learners are introduced to the basic function of Geographic Information System (GIS) maps in relation to national parks. Recognizable park boundaries are presented and learners are given the option to add layers such as lakes, rivers and visitor centers, until the learner is able to identify the park map from a list of choices.

2013-05-15

160

The Paradox of Parks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article focuses on the Fort Circle Parks of Washington, DC, and also provides examples from other cities to explore the histories, problems, and possibilities of urban parks. As public space, parks are crucial to community and identity. They provide important natural habitats and healthful environments, but they can also become toxic sites. Planners have tried to organize how they

Brett Williams

2006-01-01

161

Parks In Partnership.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than 50 National Park Service (NPS) sites interpret Native cultures or early Native contact with Europeans. In about 30 of those, American Indians, Alaska Natives, or Native Hawaiians, in partnership with the NPS, present their own heritage and issues. Describes Native-run aspects of Sitka National Historical Park, Glacier National Park, and…

Bowman, Sally-Jo

1998-01-01

162

NATIONAL PARK BOUNDARIES  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Park Service has produced a data base of boundaries for its National Parks. A copy of this data was downloaded from the National Parks Service ftp site by Region 10. These digital boundaries represent the best guess and data that could be collected in a short time....

163

Access into Campus & Parking  

E-print Network

Informational Map May 2012 Livingston Housing Construction Site Road 3 Road Closed SSW Route18 Exit LSC AccessLSC Lot 105 Phase A Access into Campus & Parking Scarlet Lot RAC Livingston Campus Construction into Parking & Day Care From Road 3 Access to Parking Only No Thru Access to Campus Foot path is available

164

How to Park: Teen Drivers  

E-print Network

is important to master because: · Almost 70% of vehicular crashes happen while parking. · 14% of all insurance claims for auto damage involve parking lot collisions. · 80% of bumper scratches occur during parkingHow to Park: The Must- Read Manual for Teen Drivers I 2PARK #12;Welcome to Parking Ed! We know

Das, Suman

165

Geology, petrology and geochemistry of the "Americano do Brasil" layered intrusion, central Brazil, and its Ni-Cu sulfide deposits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The "Americano do Brasil" Complex (ABC) is part of a cluster of coeval synorogenic mafic-ultramafic intrusions emplaced during the Brasiliano/Pan-African Orogenic Cycle in Brazil. The medium-sized ABC consists of interlayered dunite, peridotite, websterite, and gabbronorite. High Fo values of olivine (up to Fo88) and the crystallization sequence of the ABC (Ol + Chr ? Ol + Opx + Chr ? Cpx + Opx ? Opx + Pl + Cpx ? Opx + Pl + Cpx + Ilm + Mag) suggest crystallization from tholeiitic high-MgO parental magmas. Light rare earth element (REE)-enriched mantle-normalized REE profiles and ?Nd(T) values of +2.4 for cumulate rocks from the ABC suggest a depleted mantle source for the parental magma. The ABC Ni-Cu sulfide deposit (3.1 Mt at 1.12 wt.% Ni and 1.02 wt.% Cu) consists of three distinctively different orebodies (S1, S2, and G2). The S2 orebody, an unusual occurrence of stratiform massive sulfide hosted by dunite and peridotite in the interior of a layered intrusion, results from sulfides accumulated at the transient base of the magma chamber following a new influx of parental magma. The G2 orebody has an irregular and roughly cylindrical shape, consisting mainly of net-textured sulfides. The G2 orebody is hosted by peridotite and pyroxenite and located stratigraphically below the S1 orebody. S2 and G2 orebodies are characterized by low Cu/Cu + Ni ratios (mainly below 0.4). The S1 orebody, hosted by websterite and gabbronorite in the more fractionated sequence of the ABC, is a cluster of several irregular discontinuous orebodies of Ni-Cu disseminated sulfides. The sulfides of the S1 orebody have high Cu/Cu + Ni ratios (mainly between 0.5 and 0.8) and are highly depleted in PGE. The S1 orebody is interpreted to result from a later event of sulfide segregation in the magma chamber, possibly following the event that originated the G2 orebody. The bulk of ?34S values for sulfides of the ABC orebodies and their host rocks fall in the range of 0 ± 2‰. Higher ?34S values (between 3‰ and 5‰) are restricted to pyrite from xenoliths of gneiss located close to the S1 orebody and sulfides from the S1 orebody. Crustal xenoliths and chemical data (lithogeochemistry and sulfur isotope composition) provide evidence of crustal contamination of the igneous rocks hosting the S1 orebody, suggesting that sulfur saturation was induced by contamination with sulfide-bearing crustal rocks. The ABC deposit is an example of Ni-Cu sulfide mineralization hosted by synorogenic mafic-ultramafic intrusions. The S2 orebody is the first documented example of an economic stratiform massive sulfide orebody located within layered intrusions, expanding the opportunities for exploration of Ni-Cu sulfides in orogenic regions worldwide.

E Silva, Jonas Mota; Ferreira Filho, Cesar Fonseca; Bühn, Bernhard; Dantas, Elton Luiz

2011-01-01

166

The Pangea conundrum: Implications of new Paleomagnetic data from Permo-Triassic Araguainha Impact Crater (Central Brazil)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a new Permo-Triassic paleomagnetic pole for South America based on impact-related material from the Araguainha Dome. The relative position of southern and northern continents in Pangea between the Carboniferous and the Triassic has been a topic of intense debate for almost half a century, since when T. Irving has shown dramatic inconsistencies between the original A. Wegener's Pangea and the then-available paleomagnetic data. Recent compilations of paleomagnetic poles for both hemispheres of Pangea (Laurussia and Gondwana) seem to concur that part of those inconsistencies are related to the quality of the Carboniferous to Triassic paleomagnetic record and emphasize the urgent need for high-quality data for this time period. Permo-Triassic paleomagnetic data for South America were obtained mainly from sedimentary rocks, which are inherently affected by several recording problems such as inclination shallowing or remagnetization, also presenting large uncertainties in their ages. Thus, it is necessary to improve the database with paleomagnetic poles derived from igneous rocks carrying stable thermoremanent magnetization that can be easily dated. However, volcanic rocks are scarce for this time period at the central part of the continent. In this way, we targeted the well-dated melt impact material from the Araguainha dome. The Araguainha Dome is the biggest and oldest complex impact structure yet recognized in South America. It is 40 km wide and has excavated about 2500 meters of the sedimentary rocks of the Paraná basin, reaching the basement crystalline rocks. A multi-method dating of the impact melts provided a precise age for the impact at 254.7 ± 2.5 Ma overlapping the Permo-Triassic limit. The same impact-related melt sheets and dykes were sampled for paleomagnetic studies in 23 sites (138 specimens). Alternating field and thermal demagnetization indicate stable, usually univectorial magnetizations carried by magnetite and hematite. All sites but one show coherent directions along the same normal polarity with a resulting mean at Dec = 356.4°; Inc = -38.7°; N = 22; k = 95.6; ?95 = 3.2°, and a paleomagnetic pole at Lat= -83.7; Lon=340.2; K=87.6; A95=3.3°; SB=8.1°. The pole matches the apparent polar wander path built from a selection of high-quality poles from the West Gondwana (Domeier et al., 2012, Tectonophysics, doi:10.1016/j.tecto.2011.10.021). Our result provides a strong constraint on the position of Gondwana at the Permo-Triassic boundary and favors the Pangea A reconstruction.

Brandt, D.; Yokoyama, E.; Trindade, R. I.; Tohver, E.

2013-05-01

167

Capitol Reef National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service (NPS) website provides an in-depth look at Capitol Reef National Park in Utah. Specifically, this covers the geology and natural resources of the park. There is a general overview of the geology of this area including the Waterpocket fold, Colorado Plateau, Cathedral Valley and erosion. There is a description of various rock colors and how they form, as well as a detailed stratigraphic column illustrating the names, thicknesses, and ancient environments of rocks and formations that exist in the park. The Natural Resources section discusses some of the history and archeology of the park, as well as birds, mammals, plants, reptiles and environmental problems.

168

The National Park Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the National Park Service. It features links to subpages on special topics such as Parks and Recreation, which inludes links to individual national park pages, and History and Culture, which includes archeological, anthropological, and historical material. The Nature and Science pages feature classroom materials and information on the uses of science in protecting and restoring park ecosystems and research projects which are being conducted in the park system. The Interpretation and Education pages include games, online activities, and material for younger students who are researching park topics, as well as classroom materials for teachers. There are also links to the Park Service online bookshop, news articles, and special features.

169

Theme Park Insider  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As summer enters full swing, more and more people will travel to America's numerous amusement parks and traveling carnivals. Quite a few of these people would do well to take a look at the Theme Park Insider website for reviews of various parks and the best (and worst) attractions at each particular place of amusement before they venture onto the open road. Edited by Robert Niles, the site contains reviews of new amusement park rides, an "Accident Watch" (which documents the latest accidents at each park), and reviews of theme park hotels as well. The site also has a number of discussion boards for visitors to chime in with their own take on a number of topics, such as which rides have the longest rides and general amusement park lore.

Niles, Robert.

170

3. VIEW OF PARKING APRON LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM SOUTH RUNWAY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. VIEW OF PARKING APRON LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM SOUTH RUNWAY OBSERVATION BUILDING TOWARD BUILDING 8280 (DOUBLE CANTILEVER HANGAR). - Loring Air Force Base, Airfield, Central portion of base, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

171

RockyMountainParkInn.com 888.465.4329  

E-print Network

-central Colorado sacred. Anthropologists and historians consider Old Man Mountain (on the western end of current-day Estes Park) an ancient native Vision Quest site; and many artifacts exist to bolster this claim. However

Rutledge, Steven

172

Urban Parks: Constraints on Park Visitation  

E-print Network

Research shows that women, older people, members of some ethnic groups, and people with low educational and income levels are less likely than others to participate in leisure activities or visit parks. This publication explores the constraints...

Scott, David

2006-12-19

173

Tennessee State Parks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

People might know Tennessee for its fabulous Great Smoky Mountains, but have you ever heard of the Cedars of Lebanon or Fall Creek Falls? Oh yes, those two gems are just a small part of the Tennessee State Park system. After looking at some of the beautiful images on the Tennessee State Parks homepage, visitors can explore the Popular Places People Want to Go section to get a taste of the diverse hiking trails, restaurants, camp sites, and other features that are contained throughout the park system. Visitors can also look over over a dozen topical areas, including What to do?, Park Information, and Resource Management. Policy enthusiasts will appreciate the "Estimated Economic Impacts of Tennessee State Parks" report, that is also featured on the homepage, and travelers will love the "Upcoming Events at Tennessee State Parks" area, as it provides a taste of what they might expect on a visit to the Volunteer State.

174

Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

1985-01-01

175

Utah Park Brochure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You have been asked to create a brochure for one of Utah\\'s many state or national parks to advertise to potential visitors. Overview: After reading Deathwatch, you have now become somewhat of an expert on desert life and survival. Because of your knowledge, you have been asked to create a brochure for one of the state or national parks here in Utah. First, you will select the park or ...

Mrs. Kingsford

2007-01-26

176

Mapping the National Parks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a collection of maps documenting the history, cultural aspects and geological formations of areas that eventually became National Parks. The areas highlighted are Acadia National Park, Yellowstone National Park, the Grand Canyon, and the Great Smoky Mountains. The collection consists of approximately 200 maps dating from the 17th century to the present, reflecting early mapping of these areas. This database is searchable by keyword, geographic location, subject, map creator, or title.

177

Parks, Recreation and Public Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews what current research says about the holistic health benefits of park and recreation services, focusing on: health benefits according to park users; physical activities in parks; stress reduction benefits of park use; social support, self-determination, and stress reduction; observing nature in parks and associated benefits; and the…

Ho, Ching-Hua; Payne, Laura; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey

2003-01-01

178

ARTS & SCIENCES Paradise Park  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES Paradise Park Moderation in Belief The Attraction of Sedimentary Rocks SCIENCES Gauging Protein Activity in Cancer Treatment ... The Attraction of Sedimentary Rocks ... Davis

Napier, Terrence

179

Petrified Forest National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service website offers reference sections on: park wildlife such as reptiles, pronghorns, and the Gunnison prairie dog; the archaeology of park petroglyphs, including some that may be solar calendars; the geology and main features of the Painted Desert; paleontology, which describes dinosaurs of the area; and petrified wood, which explains the petrification process and how the different colors of petrified wood are produced. There are also tips for avoiding diseases such as hantavirus, the plague, and rabies while in the park.

180

Identification of pathogens and virulence profile of Rhodococcus equi and Escherichia coli strains obtained from sand of parks  

PubMed Central

The identification of pathogens of viral (Rotavirus, Coronavirus), parasitic (Toxocara spp.) and bacterial (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Rhodococcus equi) origin shed in feces, and the virulence profile of R. equi and E. coli isolates were investigated in 200 samples of sand obtained from 40 parks, located in central region of state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, using different diagnostic methods. From 200 samples analyzed, 23 (11.5%) strains of R. equi were isolated. None of the R. equi isolates showed a virulent (vapA gene) or intermediately virulent (vapB gene) profiles. Sixty-three (31.5%) strains of E. coli were identified. The following genes encoding virulence factors were identified in E. coli: eae, bfp, saa, iucD, papGI, sfa and hly. Phylogenetic classification showed that 63 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B1 (52.4%), A (25.4%) and B2 (22.2%). No E. coli serotype O157:H7 was identified. Eggs of Toxocara sp. were found in three parks and genetic material of bovine Coronavirus was identified in one sample of one park. No Salmonella spp. and Rotavirus isolates were identified in the samples of sand. The presence of R. equi, Toxocara sp, bovine Coronavirus and virulent E. coli isolates in the environment of parks indicates that the sanitary conditions of the sand should be improved in order to reduce the risks of fecal transmission of pathogens of zoonotic potential to humans in these places. PMID:24294244

Fernandes, M.C.; Takai, S.; Leite, D.S.; Pinto, J.P.A.N.; Brandão, P.E.; Santarém, V.A.; Listoni, F.J.P.; Da Silva, A.V.; Ribeiro, M.G.

2013-01-01

181

Acadia National Park Panorama  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A panorama of Acadia National Park with Dorr and Cadillac Mountains on the right side, taken from Cadillac Mountain Road. At 1,528 feet in elevation, Cadillac Mountain is the highest point in Acadia National Park, and is composed of a unique granite, the Cadillac Mountain granite unit....

182

Mammoth Cave National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The homepage of Mammoth Cave National Park provides visitors with information on tour schedules, surface activities, lodging and camping, and tips on touring caves. Teachers can access an extensive selection of curricular materials, fact sheets and activities for kids, a glossary, and links to other educational programs and sites. Other materials include maps and publications, an image gallery, and links to the park's newsletter.

183

Active England `Park Life'  

E-print Network

Active England `Park Life' ­ Greenwood Community Forest Liz O'Brien and Jake Morris Social Life: Design and implementation 6 3. Results: on site surveying and project monitoring 9 3 funded project, `Park Life', within Greenwood Community Forest (hereafter `Greenwood'), and the results

184

Amusement Park Physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will research various types of amusement park rides and use their findings to design a feasible ride of their own. They will summarize their findings and present their ride design to the class. Each student will then write a persuasive letter to a local amusement park describing the reasons their ride design is the best.

Janet Fox

2012-06-25

185

Splendor In The Parks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Civilization is more and more intruding on the esthetic and recreational resources of the National Park System. Increased attention must be paid to controlling noise, pollution, and even the effects of urban lighting which detract from the enjoyment of the parks. (RE)

Smith, Anthony Wayne

1979-01-01

186

THE SCHOOL PARK.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

TO ASSIST IN DESEGREGATION, VARIOUS MODELS FOR THE SCHOOL PARK ARE PROPOSED--(1) ASSEMBLING ALL STUDENTS AND SCHOOLS OF A SMALL OR MEDIUM-SIZED COMMUNITY ON A SINGLE CAMPUS, (2) SERVING ONE SECTION OF A LARGE CITY, (3) CENTERING ALL SCHOOL FACILITIES FOR A SINGLE LEVEL OF EDUCATION ON A SINGLE SITE, AND (4) ESTABLISHING RINGS OF SCHOOL PARKS ABOUT…

FISCHER, JOHN H.

187

Geology Fieldnotes: Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This park and preserve extends nearly 200 miles from east to west, including some 8.1 million acres in the central Brooks Range in north central Alaska. Included on the website are details about park geology, flora and fauna, climate, and taiga forest, as well as photographs, visitor information, and selected links.

188

Inflation targeting in Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Inflation Targeting (IT) framework as it is applied in the case of Brazil since its adoption in June 1999. For this purpose we first summarize the macroeconometric model utilized by the Central Bank of Brazil (BCB) in its pursuit of the IT framework. While the focus of this paper is on

Philip Arestis; Luiz Fernando de Paula

2011-01-01

189

VISITOR PARKING MAP Visitor Pay Parking  

E-print Network

SOUTHCOLUMBIASTREET 134 1/2 FRANKLIN STREET BUILDING HILL COMMERCIAL BUILDING PORTHOLE EAST FRANKLIN STREET CHAPEL COMMUNITY SERVIC E BRANSO N STREET BUSINESS SCHOOL PARKING DECK KENAN CENTER KENAN- FLAGLER SCHOOL RESEARCH BLDG. UNIVERSITY DR. BAITY LABS PITTSBORO STREET VANCE STREET M cG AVR AN -G R EEN BER G RO SENAU

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

190

Design a Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners are invited to imagine the park of their dreams! In small groups, learners place moveable pieces on a grid, iterating on their plan together to create a plan for a community park. A variety of park features are offered as choices to include on the map, including a playground, skate park, water features, picnic areas, trails, and more. Like real-world projects, the plan is limited by the realities of space and funds. For younger learners, groups are limited to choosing less than 10 features. Learners ages 9 and up are limited not by the number of features, but by their cost in terms of points: They are challenged to keep track of the points on the park features cards and use less than 250 total points. Some park features, including a natural wetland and ice cream shop, promise to provide revenue back to the community and are worth points. Others, like a skate park or swimming pool, "cost" points. This activity is part of a curriculum designed to engage learners in hands-on engineering challenges.

2014-07-11

191

U-Pb SHRIMP and Sm-Nd geochronology of granite-gneiss complexes and implications for the evolution of the Central Brazil Archean Terrain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper is a first attempt to unravel the Archean multi-stage metaplutonic assemblage of the Meso/Neoarchean terrane of the State of Goiás, Central Brazil, by means of the U-Pb SHRIMP zircon and Sm-Nd techniques. Two stages of granitic plutonism, spanning ca. 140 m.y., were precisely established for the accretion of the gneiss protoliths. The earliest stage embraces tonalitic to granodioritic and minor granitic orthogneisses with Nd juvenile signature, emplaced from ca. 2845 to ca. 2785 Ma, interpreted as the roots of an early arc. Inherited zircon xenocrysts and Nd isotopic data indicate that the juvenile magmas underwent contamination from a sialic crust as old as 3.3 Ga, from which there are, so far, no recognizable exposures. The second stage comprises granodioritic to granitic gneisses and lasted from ca. 2711 to 2707 Ma. Based on their Nd isotopic signatures and on inherited zircon crystals, their protoliths are interpreted as dominantly crustal-derived. The SHRIMP data from zircon crystals did not depict a Paleoproterozoic overprinting on the Archean gneisses, which is due to geological processes with prevailing temperatures below the isotopic stability of the U/Pb/Th system in the mineral. These processes comprise crustal extension and intrusion of a mafic dike swarm at ca. 2.3 Ga, followed by low grade events mostly related to shear zones between ca. 2.15 and 2.0 Ga. The study also revealed the extent of the Pan- African tectono-thermal overprinting on the Archean orthogneisses. Most of the zircon populations show morphological evidence of metamorphic peripheral recrystallization dated between ca. 750 and 550 Ma. One of the banded gneisses with a crystallization age of ca. 2700 Ma (2 ?) has a more complex zircon population including magmatic new grains, which yielded a precise 206Pb/238U crystallization age of 590 ± 10 Ma (2 ?). These new grains are interpreted to have grown in anatectic veins injected within strongly sheared gneiss.The data characterize a widespread Pan-African-aged metamorphic overprinting, culminating with localized anatexis of the Archean orthogneisses.

Queiroz, Cláudia Lima; Jost, Hardy; da Silva, Luiz Carlos; McNaughton, Neal J.

2008-07-01

192

Project: BEVATRON Parking Bldg. #: 51  

E-print Network

Project: BEVATRON Parking Bldg. #: 51 Parking Impacts: + 202 spaces Date: 8/2013 Project: Seismic Phase II Bldg. #: 74 Parking Impact: - 5 spaces Dates: 10/2009 ­ 12/2012 TRAFFICSAFETYIMPACTS DUE TO CONSTRUCTION AS OF 1/22/2013 Current/Approved Projects Project: SERC Bldg. #: TBD Parking Impact: - 64 spaces

Eisen, Michael

193

Saint Paul Energy Park: the potential for district heating  

SciTech Connect

The results of ANL's study of the energy and economic aspects of using district heating in the St. Paul Energy Park are summarized. The Energy Park is a 6 million ft/sup 2/ residential, commercial office, and light industrial complex to be built in the midway area of St. Paul, Minnesota. Space heating and cooling design loads for the park were calculated assuming that the ASHRAE's 90-75 energy-conserving construction standards would be used in constructing the park's buildings. Based in part on this assumption, ANL estimated the costs and energy use characteristics of six possible energy system options for supplying Energy Park's space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water heating needs. The results indicate that in today's economy, a central heating and cooling plant with natural gas boilers and electrically driven centrifugal chillers with thermal storage has good potential for energy and economic savings and clearly merits further consideration.

Lee, C.; Kron, R.; Davis, H.

1980-03-01

194

The Swallow Park Sundials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hermanus Astronomy Centre recently erected a pair of back-to-back sundials in Swallow Park in the centre of Hermanus as part of the upgrading of this historical public park by the Ward committee. Since these two are intended to be the first of many different design sundials to be erected in Hermanus by the HAC, the designs were purposefully chosen to be "unusual" to illustrate the point that even unfamiliar designs and orientations give the same end result....

De Villiers, P.

2014-02-01

195

The National Park Service: Park Geology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A National Park Service (NPS) site primarily composed of three main sections corresponding to the following program areas within the Geologic Resources Division (GRD): Disturbed Lands Restoration and Abandoned Mineral Lands (AML), Mineral Management Programs, and Geology and Soils Programs. Of these, the first two consist principally of textual resources pertaining to Park System procedures, policies, and regulations - as well as reports on example restoration projects with a focus on stream corridor restoration, bioengineering, riparian management, and revegetation. Perhaps of most interest to educators will be the third main program area, the Geology and Soils Programs section. Here are included textual resources pertaining to NPS-GRD programs on cave and karst formations, coastal and shoreline geology, paleontology, soils (e.g., soil biology and soil surveying), geological indicators (geoindicators), and stratigraphy. Lastly, a searchable photographic collection and geologic glossary are available.

196

News and Views: Perspectives for Nuclear Energy in Brazil After Fukushima  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

More than two decades after the Chernobyl accident, the world was experiencing a nuclear renaissance when an earthquake followed by a tsunami, both of uncommon proportions, led to major releases of radiation at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear central. Many countries are now reevaluating decisions to expand their nuclear parks, a change of course motivated by a number of considerations. Combined with the same premises, lessons learned from the history of its nuclear program compel Brazil to turn to the renewable sources of energy at its disposal.

Goldemberg, José

2011-09-01

197

The Brazilian Indigenous Problem and Policy: The Aripuana Park. AMAZIND/IWGIA Document No. 19.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aripuana Park was established in 1969 to give the still isolated Surui and other Broad-Belt Indians a chance of survival at the time when Brazil was launching its "conquest of the Amazon". The Park is situated on both sides of the Upper Aripuana and extends to the Roosevelt and Juruena rivers. The Indians are located at the sources of the…

Chiappino, Jean

198

Tour of Park Geology: Oldest Rocks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This park geology site provides links to tours of individual National Parks, Monuments, and Recreation Areas with the oldest known rocks. The parks are divided at this site into East and West. Where appropriate, for each park, links are provided to park geology, maps, photographs, geologic research, visitor information, multimedia resources, and teacher features (resources for teaching geology using National Park examples). Parks listed include: Voyaguers National Park, Keweenaw National Historic Park, Lake Meade National Recreation Area, and many more.

199

FACING NORTHWEST TOWARD NORTHERN END OF PARK Candler Park ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FACING NORTHWEST TOWARD NORTHERN END OF PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

200

FACING NORTHEAST OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF PARK Candler Park ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FACING NORTHEAST OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

201

NASA Research Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A massive addition to the NASA Ames Research Park is detailed on this site. Although the project is not scheduled to be completed until 2015, it has been in the planning stages for several years and 2003 marks the beginning of Phase 1. The 98-page NASA Ames Development Plan is available for public viewing online. The new facilities will be designed to accommodate research in "information technology, nanotechnology, biotechnology, and astrobiology." Several other news articles and formal documents about the project can be downloaded as well. The design, construction, and staffing of the new research park will reportedly generate 7,000 high-tech jobs.

2000-01-01

202

Glacier (?) National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity engages learners in examining data pertaining to the disappearing glaciers in Glacier National Park. After calculating percentage change of the number of glaciers from 1850 (150) to 1968 (50) and 2009 (26), students move on to the main glacier-monitoring content of the module--area vs. time data for the Grinnell Glacier, one of 26 glaciers that remain in the park. Using a second-order polynomial (quadratic function) fitted to the data, they extrapolate to estimate when there will be no Grinnell Glacier remaining (illustrating the relevance of the question mark in the title of the module).

Mcllrath, University O.; Curriculum/serc, Spreadsheets A.

203

UVA Parking and Transportation Student Parking Application Form  

E-print Network

UVA Parking and Transportation Student Parking Application Form Please Print Clearly: Primary. UVA Parking and Transportation, P.O. Box 400000, Charlottesville, Va. 22904 Attn: Permit Operations Initial: Complete Dorm Address: Complete Home Address: Phone Number: UVA Email Address (Computing ID

Acton, Scott

204

HE -Mof tt Employee Parking WB -Mof tt Employee Parking  

E-print Network

Only E Eye Patients Parking Only Mof tt Patients Parking Only Hope Lodge Parking Only Mof tt Valet Athletics Center ATH Recreation Center REC Sun Dome SUN SE Chiller Plant SEC Library LIB David C. Anchin BEH Faculty Of ce Building FAO C.W. Bill Young Hall CWY Baptist Student Center BPT Catholic Center CTH

Meyers, Steven D.

205

Parking Structures and the Space Race.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents some solutions to overcrowded parking on college campuses. Tips on selecting sites for parking garages, making parking decks blend with adjacent communities, and turning parking garages into multi use facilities are addressed. (GR)

Milshtein, Amy

2000-01-01

206

MIDDLE PARK Conservation Action Plan  

E-print Network

MIDDLE PARK Conservation Action Plan 2011 Update Plant Species of Focus: Kremmling milkvetch Conservation Initiative Workshop dates: June 26, 2008 and July 6, 2010 Report date: August 25, 2011 Middle Park................................................................................................................... 6 A. Conservation Targets

207

Lake Manyara Park / Ngorongoro Highlands  

E-print Network

Park (B,L,D) Baobab trees, look for herds of elephants, more than 260 bird species Day 5: Lake ManyaraTanzania. Kikoti Safari Camp (Tarangire National Park)­Thisprivatecampissurroundedbya landscapeofancientboulders,baobab

Shapiro, Benjamin

208

SouthCampus Clinic Parking  

E-print Network

) 6. Roswell Park Cancer Institute 5. Buffalo General 4. Parker Lot 3. Main Circle 2. Goodyear 1. Main. Virginia St. Allen St. NFTA Metro Station at Allen Roswell Park Cancer Institute Buffalo General Hospital

Oh, Kwang W.

209

Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment  

E-print Network

of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

210

The Spatial Logic of Parks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urban parks are usually studied as discrete, green public open spaces. Less studied is how parks are geographically distributed from a ‘spatial logic’ point of view, i.e. how they ought to be geographically distributed across the urban landscape. This paper evaluates the degree to which normative principles about park distribution are in evidence from the standpoint of three spatial goals:

Emily Talen

2010-01-01

211

Parking systems analysis: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

The availability and quality of parking plays an important role in shaping the overall service provided by the highway system. The usefulness of the automobile can be impaired if the driver is unable to find convenient and reasonably priced parking in the vicinity of his final destination. Further, the design of the parking system can significantly influence the quality of

Raymond H. Ellis; John C. Bennett; Paul R. Rassam

1974-01-01

212

Parking for Fans with Disabilities  

E-print Network

Parking for Fans with Disabilities UVA D3 Lot at Massie and Arlington Welcome to the dedicated parking area for fans with disabilities at Massie and Arlington, also known as the UVA D3 lot! This FREE parking area is provided for fans attending UVA football games. It is adjacent to UVA's Law School and J

Acton, Scott

213

Geology Fieldnotes: Catoctin Mountain Park, Maryland  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains Catoctin Mountain Park information, a park map, and visitor information. A general cultural history of the park is given, from the first human inhabitants to its development into a park. Also mentioned are recreational attractions and Cunningham Falls State Park, located next to Catoctin. This park lies in the Appalachian Mountain chain.

214

Post-Brasiliano (Pan-African) high-K granitic magmatism in Central Brazil: the role of late Precambrian-early Palaeozoic extension  

Microsoft Academic Search

In western Goiás, Brazil, the emplacement of large, high-K postorogenic granites and associated small gabbro-dioritic intrusions, followed immediately after the last deformational events of the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogeny at ?600 Ma. Well-fitted whole-rock Rb?Sr isochrons indicate ages which suggest two discrete intrusive events: the older between ?588 and 560 Ma and the younger between ?508 and 485 Ma. The older granites

Márcio M. Pimentel; Reinhardt A. Fuck; Carlos JoséSouza de Alvarenga

1996-01-01

215

Amusement Park Physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Amusement Park Physics Website helps the user to learn more about how physics laws affect the designs of roller coasters, bumper car collisions, carousels, free fall rides, and pendulum rides. A highlight of the site is the opportunity to design a roller coaster and experiment with bumper car collisions.

Annenberg/CPB

2007-12-12

216

Toilet Theme Park  

E-print Network

of the world's first toilet culture park centered around a toilet-shaped building that was once the home of Sim Jae-duck, founder of the World Toilet Association, a group dedicated to bringing hygienic bathrooms to all world citizens. Famously born in his poor...

Hacker, Randi

2013-02-27

217

PARKING AND TRAFFIC REGULATIONS  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY POLICE #12;1 THE PARKING AND TRAFFIC REGULATIONS FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS ARE IN EFFECT regulations which are in effect 24 hours a day/seven days a week. Pedestrians have the right of way; all will reduce the number of crimes on campus. Motor vehicle accidents must be reported to University Police

Li, X. Rong

218

Summer 2013 Pingree Park  

E-print Network

Summer 2013 Pingree Park NR 220-Natural Resource Ecology & Measurements REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 1. Registration will occur through RamWeb. Registration for summer courses begins March 26. (Make sure you choose the Summer Session as RamWeb may default to Fall semeseter.) 2. Registration priority is as follows: Fish

219

The Clover Park Story  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an aviation trades training program offered by the Clover Park schools in Washington which exposes students to all facets of the aviation industry from record keeping to air traffic control in addition to the specific skill of piloting the aircraft. (BR)

Norris, Don

1974-01-01

220

Disabled Visitor Parking Only  

E-print Network

SOUTHCOLUMBIASTREET 134 1/2 FRANKLIN STREET BUILDING HILL COMMERCIAL BUILDING PORTHOLE EAST FRANKLIN STREET CHAPEL E BRANSO N STREET BUSINESS SCHOOL PARKING DECK KENAN CENTER KENAN- FLAGLER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS DEAN E DR. BAITY LABS PITTSBORO STREET VANCE STREET M cG AVR AN -G R EEN BER G RO SENAU PUBLIC HEALTH SOCIA

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

221

Advice & Regulations for parking  

E-print Network

in the following areas by : Willow, Arden,Avon Road,Avon Building, rear of Lifelong Learning ELIGIBILITY Members of staff, other persons employed on campus, students resident off campus or visitors may park in the Pay REPLACEMENT VEHICLE Staff who have the use of a second vehicle must ensure that the details of the vehicle

Davies, Christopher

222

Yellowstone National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Yellowstone National Park was established on March 1, 1872, as the first national park in the world. The overwhelming and unique beauty found in this natural wonder is truly difficult to describe.This Topic In Depth begin with the excellent National Park Service's (1) official Yellowstone Web Site, which contains the park's history, virtual field trips, park information, visitor guides, web cams, kids pages, and more. The next site offered by EarthTalk Studios is called Yellowstone Geographic. This extensive and graphically reliant site contains superb interactive activities related to the park and comes close to its goal of being "the best Yellowstone Web Site on the planet." The third site from UnMuseum.org called Weird Geology: Geysers explores the workings of Yellowstone's famous geysers with descriptions, photographs, illustrations, and a movie of an eruption. The next site from Exploratorium is a learning activity called Geyser: Cyclic Hot Water Fountain. With the help of their teacher, students build a working model of a geyser from common chemical equipment. From the University of Michigan, Meg Streepey's Geysers and the Earth's Plumbing Systems Web Site describes (for more advanced students) how geysers work, including how to analyze their thermal and hydrologic regimes. Another research site, from the University of Utah's College of Mines and Earth Sciences, is the GPS Surveys of the Yellowstone Hotspot and the Wasatch Fault, Utah. Objectives of the study are "to measure and understand the spatial and temporal variations of the crustal deformation produced by the interaction between lithospheric plate motion and the asthenospheric hotspot." The last two sites are from the USGS, the first of which is the Yellowstone River Basin National Water-Quality Assessment Program site. It contains a project description, available data, and other relevant information. The last site, Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, is a facility that is designed for observing volcanic and earthquake activity in the park. This site also contains a project description, volcanic data, maps, descriptions of volcanic rock, a frequently asked questions link, and more.

Brieske, Joel A.

2002-01-01

223

Inequities in access to health care in different health systems: a study in municipalities of central Colombia and north-eastern Brazil  

PubMed Central

Introduction Health system reforms are undertaken with the aim of improving equity of access to health care. Their impact is generally analyzed based on health care utilization, without distinguishing between levels of care. This study aims to analyze inequities in access to the continuum of care in municipalities of Brazil and Colombia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted based on a survey of a multistage probability sample of people who had had at least one health problem in the prior three months (2,163 in Colombia and 2,167 in Brazil). The outcome variables were dichotomous variables on the utilization of curative and preventive services. The main independent variables were income, being the holder of a private health plan and, in Colombia, type of insurance scheme of the General System of Social Security in Health (SGSSS). For each country, the prevalence of the outcome variables was calculated overall and stratified by levels of per capita income, SGSSS insurance schemes and private health plan. Prevalence ratios were computed by means of Poisson regression models with robust variance, controlling for health care need. Results There are inequities in favor of individuals of a higher socioeconomic status: in Colombia, in the three different care levels (primary, outpatient secondary and emergency care) and preventive activities; and in Brazil, in the use of outpatient secondary care services and preventive activities, whilst lower-income individuals make greater use of the primary care services. In both countries, inequity in the use of outpatient secondary care is more pronounced than in the other care levels. Income in both countries, insurance scheme enrollment in Colombia and holding a private health plan in Brazil all contribute to the presence of inequities in utilization. Conclusions Twenty years after the introduction of reforms implemented to improve equity in access to health care, inequities, defined in terms of unequal use for equal need, are still present in both countries. The design of the health systems appears to determine access to the health services: two insurance schemes in Colombia with different benefits packages and a segmented system in Brazil, with a significant private component. PMID:24479581

2014-01-01

224

UPb SHRIMP and Sm-Nd geochronology of the Silvânia Volcanics and Jurubatuba Granite: juvenile Paleoproterozoic crust in the basement of the Neoproterozoic Brasília Belt, Goiás, central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

U-Pb SHRIMP and Sm-Nd isotopic ages were determined for felsic metavolcanic rocks from the Silvânia Sequence and Jurubatuba Granite in the central part of the Brasília Belt. Zircon grains from a metavolcanic sample yielded 2115 ± 23 Ma and from the granite yielded 2089 ± 14 Ma, interpreted as crystallization ages of these rocks. Six metavolcanic samples of the Silvânia

DANIELLE P. FISCHEL; MÁRCIO M. PIMENTEL; REINHARDT A. FUCK; RICHARD ARMSTRONG

2001-01-01

225

Biological assessment of Three Beauties of the Gobi National Conservation Park, Mongolia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three Beauties of the Gobi National Conservation Park was established in south central Mongolia in 1994. We performed a biological assessment of the parks wildlife and other biological\\/ecological resources from 1995-to assist in conservation management initiatives. Ground and aerial surveys collected data on 130 vertebrate species, several of which are listed as threatened or endangered globally or in Mongolia. We

R. P. Reading; S. Amgalanbaatar; L. Lhagvasuren

1999-01-01

226

MYUNGHWAN PARK 6200 Westchester Park Drive, APT 1510, College Park, Maryland 20740  

E-print Network

MYUNGHWAN PARK 6200 Westchester Park Drive, APT 1510, College Park, Maryland 20740 MOBILE : (+1 interested in the analysis of RF coupling on IC circuit. EDUCATION University of Maryland Sep 2008 - May 2013(expected) Ph.D. Candidate in Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Maryland May 2012 M

Lathrop, Daniel P.

227

The relationship between normal and strike-slip faults in Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, and its implications for stress rotation and partitioning of deformation in the east-central Basin and Range  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study expands on our earlier studies of the evolution of fracturing and faulting in the Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone exposed over a large area in the Valley of Fire State Park, southeastern Nevada. Based on a nearly three-dimensional data set collected from 200-m-high cliff-face exposures with stair-case morphology composed of steep and flat parts, we find that a series of inclined, relatively low-angle normal faults and their splay fractures are precursors of the strike-slip fault network that we previously documented. We discuss the significance of this finding in terms of the tectonics of the broader area, stress rotation, partitioning of deformation, and the development of fracture clusters with compartmentalization of the structures as a function of spatial, depositional and deformational domains.

Aydin, Atilla; de Joussineau, Ghislain

2014-06-01

228

Neoproterozoic granulite facies metamorphism and coeval granitic magmatism in the Brasilia Belt, Central Brazil: regional implications of new SHRIMP U–Pb and Sm–Nd data  

Microsoft Academic Search

New SHRIMP U–Pb zircon ages combined with Sm–Nd isotopic characteristics of granulites and associated granitic rocks of the Anápolis–Itauçu Complex in the central-southern part of the Bras??lia Belt are presented and discussed in this study. Igneous crystallization ages obtained in zircon grains of orthogranulite and granites vary between 760 and 650Ma. Growth of new zircon at ca. 650–640Ma dates the

Danielle Piuzana; Márcio Martins Pimentel; Reinhardt A Fuck; Richard Armstrong

2003-01-01

229

Bike parking LEEGHWATERSTRAATDREBBELWEG  

E-print Network

Stork - B.3 L Huub van Doorne - B.2 R Emile Truijen - A.0 S Bernd Schierbeek - D.1 T Joost van der PARKING CARPARKING CARPARKING CARPARKING EH E CA A D E B C AD H K L J G G F F F B C Lecture roomsStudy places Facilities Services laboratories Departments Levels A Leonardo da Vinci - A.0 B Isaac Newton - A.0

Lindken, Ralph

230

The energy Park  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If world development is to continue, per capita energy use in the developing world must increase to levels in the developed world. Restrictions on how much CO2 mankind can responsibly put into the atmosphere complicate the task further. Studies show that by 2050 the world will require an additional 10-30 terawatts (TW) of carbon free power, at least as much additional, as the 10 TW generated today with fossil fuel. Neither mined uranium nor renewable energy is capable of sustained power production at this level. This paper proposes, an "energy park", a self contained unit a square mile or two in area which supplies about 7 GW of electrical power or hydrogen, emits no CO2, has little or no proliferation problem, and cleans up its own waste. Most of the energy is supplied by conventional nuclear power plants. However the nuclear fuel is bred by a fusion reactor, which is the key to the energy park. The waste cleanup is done by a combination of fission, fusion, and patience. There is neither long time storage nor long distance travel for materials with proliferation risk or long lived radio nuclides. Thus only thorium comes into the park, and only electricity and hydrogen go out.

Manheimer, Wallace

2005-10-01

231

An Apparatus to Simulate an Amusement Park Rotor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The rotor is a device that can be found in many amusement parks. In the literature there are various articles about this topic. The rotor is a hollow cylindrical room, covered inside with canvas and which can be rotated about the central vertical axis. People stand upright, with their backs against the internal face of the device. When it reaches…

Saraiva, Carlos

2010-01-01

232

Plant food resources exploited by Blue-and-Yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna, Linnaeus 1758) at an urban area in Central Brazil.  

PubMed

In this study, we described the food plants available to Blue-and-Yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna), its feeding habits and the relationship between these parameters with feeding niche breadth. We established four transects, each one 12 km long, to sample fruiting plants and the feeding habits of this macaw (monthly 40 h, of observations), at the urban areas of Três Lagoas (Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil). During all studied months, macaws foraged for palm fruits, mainly Syagrus oleracea and Acrocomia aculeata fruit pulp, both available all year, as well as Caryocar brasiliense and Anacardium occidentale seeds, in the wet season. The year-round feeding activity of macaws suggests Três Lagoas city as an adequate feeding area. The permanent availability of plant food resources, potentially, resulted from the diverse fruiting patterns of exotic and, mainly, native plant species, which provided a variety of suitable fruit patches. PMID:25166327

Santos, A A; Ragusa-Netto, J

2014-05-01

233

Fruit and Spice Park Park n r a n  

E-print Network

1 Fruit and Spice Park Park n r a n 24801 S.W. 187th Avenue Homestead, Florida 33031 Main: 305 of the Redland is a non-pro t group formed to promote exo c fruits and the Miami- ade Count Fruit & Spice Park. The Societ originated in 1981 when a small group of enthusiasts egan mee ng regularl at the Fruit & Spice

Koptur, Suzanne

234

SAN PEDRO PARKS WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The San Pedro Parks Wilderness occupies 62. 7 sq mi of the Santa Fe National Forest in north-central New Mexico. Several copper mines, many copper prospects, and a few uranium prospects occur in sedimentary units in the vicinity of the wilderness. These units, where they extend into the wilderness, constitute only a small volume of rock and, judging from analyses of samples and from field observations, are devoid of copper and uranium concentration. Prospects on several of about 65 mining claims within the wilderness revealed concentrations of manganese or barite but only in volumes too small to be considered a demonstrated resource.

Santos, Elmer S.; Weisner, Robert C.

1984-01-01

235

National Park Service: Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource from the National Park Service contains a wealth of information central to the growing field of environmental toxicology. The site consists of a searchable encyclopedia of 118 environmental contaminants, from Acenaphthene to Zinc. With information on chemical elements, compounds, and products, the EC Encyclopedia also serves as a reference for determining the potential impact of the concentration of a certain substance. Entries are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format and include background information, specific threats, and other related material. Complete reference information (the Referenc.pdf file) is also available.

2005-11-29

236

National Park Service: Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource from the National Park Service contains a wealth of information central to the growing field of environmental toxicology. The site consists of a searchable encyclopedia of 118 environmental contaminants, from Acenaphthene to Zinc. With information on chemical elements, compounds, and products, the EC Encyclopedia also serves as a reference for determining the potential impact of the concentration of a certain substance. Entries are in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format and include background information, specific threats, and other related material. Complete reference information (the Referenc.pdf file) is also available.

1998-01-01

237

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park  

E-print Network

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park ETTP was originally built to the East Tennessee Technology Park. Environmental management and remediation operations consist the "East Tennessee Technology Park" to

Pennycook, Steve

238

Sedimentology of mid Permian strata of the Sublett Range, South-Central Idaho  

E-print Network

REGIONAL STRATIGRAPHY. 20 Park City Group. West-Central Utah, Northeastern Nevada, and South- Central Idaho. Kaibab Limestone Formation. Grandeur Formation vs. Grandeur Member. . . . . . . , . . . . . Grandeur Formation Plympton Formation Murdock... in Utah, Nevada, and south-central Idaho 23 Figure 8 Fence diagram showing distribution of Park City and Phosphoria Formations in southeastern Idaho and northeastern Utah. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 9 Diagramatic dip section...

Duree, Dana Kay

2012-06-07

239

Canyonlands National Park, UT, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Desert and mountain scenery along the Utah/Colorado border are displayed in this scene of the Canyonlands National Park, UT (39.0N, 110.0W). The park occupies the near center of the image, displaying spectacular incised meanders and the bulls-eye structure of Upheaval Dome (a salt dome). The Green River and the Colorado River flow southward to join (off scene) before flowing through the Grand Canyon National Park.

1973-01-01

240

Canyonlands National Park, UT, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Desert and mountain scenery along the Utah/Colorado border are displayed in this scene of the Canyonlands National Park, UT (39.0N, 110.0W). The Park occuppies the near center of the image, displaying spectacular incised meanders and the bulls-eye structure of Upheaval Dome (a salt dome). The Green River and the Colorado River flow southward to join off scene before flowing through the Grand Canyon National Park.

1992-01-01

241

Changwon Park Postdoc Research Associates  

E-print Network

structure and phase transition of (GeTe)n(Sb 2Te3)m used for phase-change memory" Im, J., Eom, J.-H., Park for a phase-change memory device" Eom, J.-H., Yoon, Y.-G., Park, C., Lee, H., Im, J., Suh, D.-S., Noh, J transport in carbon nanotubes" Eom, J.-H., Lee, H., Im, J., Park, C., Wook Jeong, B., Kim, S., Ihm, J

Pennycook, Steve

242

National Parks WebQuest  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web-based activity challenges students to use a variety of internet resources to learn about several dimensions of national parks. Each student's research assignment focuses on one component of a park, such as its history, biology, geology, or tourist appeal. Students must keep track of important points and their references. Once research is complete, students come together and teach each other about their specific research domain, culminating in a holistic understanding of the park features.

Mrs. Phillip

243

Brazil: Rondonia  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

... From the Forest to the Sky: Smoke over Rondonia, Brazil     View Larger Image ... extend into Bolivia, where more fires are burning near the Brazil-Bolivia border. Clearer skies in the southeast corner of the image area ...

2013-04-18

244

1.94-1.93 Ga charnockitic magmatism from the central part of the Guyana Shield, Roraima, Brazil: Single-zircon evaporation data and tectonic implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Age and origin of the charnockitic rocks of the central part of the Guyana Shield have been a matter of discussion. These rocks have been interpreted either as Transamazonian granulites metamorphosed around 2.02 Ga or as 1.56 Ga old igneous charnockites. Recently, most of the Roraima charnockitic rocks have been recognized as igneous rocks and included into the Serra da Prata Suite (SPS). Five Pb-Pb single-zircon evaporation ages were obtained for samples representative of different facies of the SPS and these constrained the age of the charnockitic magmatism between 1943 ± 5 Ma and 1933 ± 2 Ma. This charnockitic magmatism may be related to a post-collisional setting after the evolution of the Cauarane-Coeroeni Belt (˜2.00 Ga), or may represent a post-collisional (or intracontinental?) magmatism related to orogenic activities along the plate margins around 1.95-1.94 Ga.

Fraga, Lêda Maria; Macambira, Moacir Jose Buenano; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Costa, João Batista Sena

2009-04-01

245

Association between primary open angle glaucoma and genetic polymorphisms GSTM1/GSTT1 in patients from Goiânia Central-West Region of Brazil.  

PubMed

In this study, we evaluated the genotype profile of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms in patient carriers of primary open-angle glaucoma in the population of Goiânia, GO, Brazil. This case-control study included 100 Brazilian patients with glaucoma and 53 patients without glaucoma. Blood samples were genotyped for polymorphisms in GST genes using polymerase chain reaction-based methods. Polymorphism frequencies were compared using the X(2) test and odds ratio (? = 0.05). The GSTM1-present genotype was 40% in the glaucoma group and 71.6% in the control group, while the GSTM1 null genotype was 60 and 28.3% in the same groups, respectively. The GSTT1-present genotype was 52% in the primary open-angle glaucoma group and 66% in the control group; the null genotype was 48% in the case group and 34% in the control group. The GSTM1 null genotype was more frequent in the glaucoma group than in the control group (P = 0.0004; odds ratio = 6.7; 95% confidence interval = 2.7- 20.3). The combined GSTM1 null and GSTT1-present genotypes were more frequent in the primary open-angle glaucoma group compared to the control group (P = 0.02; odds ratio = 3.1; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-7.9). PMID:25366778

Silva, C T X; Costa, N B; Silva, K S F; Silva, R E; Moura, K K V O

2014-01-01

246

Diet and feeding behavior of the White-naped Jay, Cyanocorax cyanopogon (Wied, 1821) (Aves, Passeriformes, Corvidae) in a disturbed environment in central Brazil.  

PubMed

The White-naped Jay Cyanocorax cyanopogon (Wied, 1821) is an omnivorous and opportunistic species, with a multifarious diet. In view of the scarcity of available data in the literature, the aim was to investigate and describe the bird's diet, location of food items, foraging tactics, actual feeding behavior and intraspecific interactions, as a means of defining the items consumed. The study was carried out in a Cerrado area in the Araguaia Campus of the Federal University of Mato Grosso - UFMT, in Pontal do Araguaia, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, from August to December, 2006, and from April to October, 2010. All the feeding events were recorded through 136 hours of animal focal sampling, whereby it was shown that these birds predominantly consume animal nutrients, replenished by vegetable items and human food-waste. Arthropods were predominant in the diet, with ants as the most abundant and frequent item. The fruits, flowers and seeds of eleven plant species were also consumed. Food-waste, representing about 1/10 of the total, was constantly consumed even when other food sources were available. Although active among the various strata, foraging is mainly on the ground. In the event of food-scarcity, the strategy employed is the hierarchical deployment of the members of various-sized groups, with the avoidance of direct competition. This versatility during all seasons, confirms total adaptation to the anthropic environment surrounded by native habitats that characterized the study site. PMID:25627601

Barros, Ram; Costa, Ca; Pascotto, Mc

2014-11-01

247

The Glória quartz-monzodiorite: isotopic and chemical evidence of arc-related magmatism in the central part of the Paleoproterozoic Mineiro belt, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.  

PubMed

The Glória quartz-monzodiorite, one of the mafic plutons of the Paleoproterozoic Mineiro belt, is intrusive into banded gneisses, amphibolites, schists and phyllites of the Rio das Mortes greenstone belt, in the southern portion of the São Francisco Craton, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The Glória quartz-monzodiorite yields a SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 2188 +/- 29 Ma, suggesting a tectonic relationship with the pre-collisional phase of the Mineiro belt. According to the Nd isotopic evidence (epsilonNd(T) = -3.4; T DM = 2.68 Ga) the original magmas was formed by a mixture among Archean crustal material and Paleoproterozoic juvenile magma. The Glória quartz-monzodiorite shows metaluminous and calc-alkaline tendency with intermediate K content, comparable to that of volcanic-arc rocks. The primary mineralogical assemblage was partly modified by metamorphism, dated between 2131-2121 Ma in nearby coeval plutons. Such metamorphism is significantly older than the reported metamorphic episodes of the Mineiro belt in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero region (2059-2041 Ma) in the eastern portion of the study area. This evidence, together with chemical and isotopic data from other mafic and felsic plutons coeval with the Glória quartz-monzodiorite, indicate a tectonic and magmatic migration within the Mineiro belt from west to east. PMID:16936942

Avila, Ciro A; Teixeira, Wilson; Cordani, Umberto G; Barrueto, Héctor R; Pereira, Ronaldo M; Martins, Veridiana T S; Dunyi, Liu

2006-09-01

248

Hawaii hydrogen power park Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park  

E-print Network

& learning channel cable TV. #12;Hawaii hydrogen power park H Technology Transfer/Collaborations California Demonstrate an integrated Hydrogen Power Park comprised of the following: Electrolyzer powered by a renewable on hydrogen technologies. (Barrier S­Siting) Economic analysis of hydrogen infrastructure using actual data

249

PARKING FACILITY PROJECTIONS BASED ON THE 1968 STUDENT PARKING SURVEY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

RESPONSES FROM 1,309 STUDENTS AND 121 CAMPUS EMPLOYEES AT CUYAHOGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE WERE USED TO PROJECT REQUIREMENTS FOR PARKING FACILITIES AT THE INSTITUTION BY 1971. STUDENTS INDICATED WHETHER OR NOT THEY CURRENTLY DROVE TO SCHOOL AND, IF NOT, IF THEY WOULD INTEND TO DRIVE IF PARKING FACILITIES WERE PROVIDED AT A NOMINAL FEE. FINDINGS SHOWED…

DALBY, J. PHILIP; KENDRA, LAWRENCE M.

250

Designing for ecology : the ecological park  

E-print Network

This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

Power, Andres M

2006-01-01

251

In search of traditional bio-ecological knowledge useful for fisheries co-management: the case of jaraquis Semaprochilodus spp. (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae) in Central Amazon, Brazil  

PubMed Central

The jaraquis (Semaprochilodus spp.) are the most abundant group in the fishing landing in Manaus. However, just command and control management strategies have been used by the fishery governmental agency in the region without the power to enforce centralized decisions. The fishermen and their culture represent a source of information on dynamics of the resources and aquatic environments, fundamental in making possible the co-management of the fishing resources. The present study aims to contribute to management through identification of common information available in scientific and traditional knowledge about the jaraquis' bio-ecology. There were 57 semi-structured interviews recorded with fishermen of Manaus and rural areas of Manacapuru in 2002 concerning biological and ecological aspects. Similarity was observed between scientific and traditional knowledge in the following items: size of first sexual maturation, spawning type, parental care, trophic relationships and migratory behavior, as well as in some aspects of the mortality and growth of the species. However, there was less ethnoicthyological information on fecundity and the determination of the age and growth of adult fish. Common information would be used preferably by agencies to start an effective and technical dialogue with commercial and riverine fishermen to design management plans in a decentralized strategy. PMID:20525294

2010-01-01

252

In search of traditional bio-ecological knowledge useful for fisheries co-management: the case of jaraquis Semaprochilodus spp. (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae) in Central Amazon, Brazil.  

PubMed

The jaraquis (Semaprochilodus spp.) are the most abundant group in the fishing landing in Manaus. However, just command and control management strategies have been used by the fishery governmental agency in the region without the power to enforce centralized decisions. The fishermen and their culture represent a source of information on dynamics of the resources and aquatic environments, fundamental in making possible the co-management of the fishing resources. The present study aims to contribute to management through identification of common information available in scientific and traditional knowledge about the jaraquis' bio-ecology. There were 57 semi-structured interviews recorded with fishermen of Manaus and rural areas of Manacapuru in 2002 concerning biological and ecological aspects. Similarity was observed between scientific and traditional knowledge in the following items: size of first sexual maturation, spawning type, parental care, trophic relationships and migratory behavior, as well as in some aspects of the mortality and growth of the species. However, there was less ethnoicthyological information on fecundity and the determination of the age and growth of adult fish. Common information would be used preferably by agencies to start an effective and technical dialogue with commercial and riverine fishermen to design management plans in a decentralized strategy. PMID:20525294

Batista, Vandick S; Lima, Liane G

2010-01-01

253

Molecular detection of Leishmania spp. in road-killed wild mammals in the Central Western area of the State of São Paulo, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Background Road-killed wild animals have been classified as sentinels for detecting such zoonotic pathogens as Leishmania spp., offering new opportunities for epidemiological studies of this infection. Methods This study aimed to evaluate the presence of Leishmania spp. and Leishmania chagasi DNA by PCR in tissue samples (lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, mesenteric lymph node and adrenal gland) from 70 road-killed wild animals. Results DNA was detected in tissues of one Cavia aperea (Brazilian guinea pig), five Cerdocyon thous (crab-eating fox), one Dasypus septemcinctus (seven-banded armadillo), two Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossum), one Hydrochoerus hydrochoeris (capybara), two Myrmecophaga tridactyla (giant anteater), one Procyon cancrivorus (crab-eating raccoon), two Sphiggurus spinosus (porcupine) and one Tamandua tetradactyla (lesser anteater) from different locations in the Central Western part of São Paulo state. The Leishmania chagasi DNA were confirmed in mesenteric lymph node of one Cerdocyon thous. Results indicated common infection in wild animals. Conclusions The approach employed herein proved useful for detecting the environmental occurrence of Leishmania spp. and L. chagasi, as well as determining natural wild reservoirs and contributing to understand the host-parasite interaction. PMID:24963288

2014-01-01

254

Geology Fieldnotes: Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Petrified Forest National Park was established to preserve large deposits of petrified wood and to prevent removal of the wood by the public. Site featues include park geology information, maps, photographs, related links, visitor information, multimedia resources, and resources for teaching geology with National Park examples. The park geology section discusses the park's geologic history, structural geology, petrified wood, and dinosaur fossils. The maps section includes a map of the park itself and the surrounding area.

255

Young Eun Park Vanderbilt University  

E-print Network

1 Young Eun Park Vanderbilt University Department of Psychology 111 21st Ave South 301 Wilson Hall Nashville, TN 37240 (615) 322-2835 youngeun.park@vanderbilt.edu EDUCATION 2004 ­ 2009 Korea University, Seoul, Korea B.A. in Psychology Advisor: Dr. Yang Seok Cho 2009 ­ 2011 Korea University, Seoul, Korea M

Tong, Frank

256

Microbiology in Yellowstone National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site describes how Yellowstone National Park is a focal point for cutting-edge microbiology research and how it provides a valuable setting for outreach education. Topics include questions for park officials, extremophiles, microbe diversity and evolution, educational outreach, and suggested reading.

Ward David

257

National Park Service Geologic Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of images shows geologic features in many of the country's national parks. The collection is searchable by park name, state, year, or by the name of the photograph. Each photo is accompanied by a brief caption that provides the photographer's name, the date, and a description of the photo.

258

HOURGLASS FIRE Pingree Park Vicinity  

E-print Network

HOURGLASS FIRE Pingree Park Vicinity July 1-July 7, 1994 P.N. Omi Pingree Park overview, September, 1994, showing campus facilities in relation to area burned in the Houglass Fire. Summary narrative: The Hourglass Fire was first reported via 911 call to the Larimer County Sheriff on Friday, July 1 1994 at 10

259

Nevada Division of State Parks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based in Carson City, the Nevada Division of State Parks helps to preserve and promote notable parts of the Nevada natural and cultural environment. One of the goals of their website is to provide visitors with "an introduction to the other side of Nevada, the side that is wild scenic and full of western history." First-time visitors may wish to click on the "State parks map" area to learn more about the location of the state parks, and the interactive map also includes direct links to each site. Scholars and students of park management will want to click on over to the "Park General and Resource Management Plans" area. Here they can learn about the completed general management plans for parks such as the Mormon Station and the Valley of Fire, and learn about plans that are currently under review. Visitors looking for helpful information about upcoming events can look over the "Other Park News!" area on the right hand side of the homepage. Finally, there's also detailed information about park fees, several photo galleries, and news releases.

260

Directions & Parking for Engineering Plaza  

E-print Network

the toll road begins) and turn left onto Bison. Turn right onto East Peltason. Turn left at Anteater Drive into Anteater Parking Structure. Exit structure by foot to East Peltason and follow pedestrian Campus Drive. Turn right onto East Peltason. Turn right at Anteater Drive into Anteater Parking

Loudon, Catherine

261

Initial analysis from a lidar observation campaign of sugar cane fires in the central and western portion of the São Paulo State, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The central and western portion of the Sao Paulo State has large areas of sugar cane plantations, and due to the growing demand for biofuels, the production is increasing every year. During the harvest period some plantation areas are burnt a few hours before the manual cutting, causing significant quantities of biomass burning aerosol to be injected into the atmosphere. During August 2010, a field campaign has been carried out in Ourinhos, situated in the south-western region of Sao Paulo State. A 2-channel Raman Lidar system and two meteorological S-Band Doppler Radars are used to indentify and quantify the biomass burning plumes. In addiction, CALIPSO Satellite observations were used to compare the aerosol optical properties detected in that region with those retrieved by Raman Lidar system. Although the campaign yielded 30 days of measurements, this paper will be focusing only one case study, when aerosols released from nearby sugar cane fires were detected by the Lidar system during a CALIPSO overpass. The meteorological radar, installed in Bauru, approximately 110 km northeast from the experimental site, had recorded "echoes" (dense smoke comprising aerosols) from several fires occurring close to the Raman Lidar system, which also detected an intense load of aerosol in the atmosphere. HYSPLIT model forward trajectories presented a strong indication that both instruments have measured the same air masss parcels, corroborated with the Lidar Ratio values from the 532 nm elastic and 607 nm Raman N2 channel analyses and data retrieved from CALIPSO have indicated the predominance of aerosol from biomass burning sources.

da Silva Lopes, Fábio Juliano; Held, Gerhard; Nakaema, Walter M.; Rodrigues, Patricia F.; Bassan, Jose M.; Landulfo, Eduardo

2011-11-01

262

The geochemistry of mercury in central Amazonian soils developed on the Alter-do-Chão formation of the lower Tapajós River Valley, Pará state, Brazil.  

PubMed

In an oxisol-spodosol system developed on the terrestrial surface of the lower Tapajós Valley, the determination of total mercury (Hg), organic carbon (C), iron and aluminum oxy-hydroxide (Fe(cdb) and Al(cdb)) concentrations in the surface soil horizons are used to characterise the geochemical processes controlling the accumulation of Hg in soils under natural vegetation cover and in deforested and cultivated sites. Oxisols from the plateau have homogeneous and relatively high background Hg contents and burdens constituting an important natural reservoir of Hg for the region (90-210 ng/g dry wt. and 19-33 mg/m2 for the first 20 cm). The Fe(cdb) and Al(cdb) contents associated with the fine fraction (< 63 microns) of the soil suggest that oxy-hydroxides and, particularly Al-substituted Fe oxy-hydroxides, control the Hg concentrations observed in all of the soils of the study region. Consequently, the geochemistry of these minerals along the slopes governs the accumulation or the release of the Hg according to the natural evolution of the soil cover and/or following the degradation of soils by erosion after deforestation and cultivation. These observations have important implications for the interpretation of Hg contamination patterns observed in Amazonian aquatic systems that could be linked to different drainage sources of Hg from the terrestrial surface. The sandification and podzolisation that is characteristic of the evolution of numerous pedological systems in the equatorial Amazon could be responsible for exportation of the naturally accumulated Hg, as for other metals, by acidic complexation and migration to the black waters of the Amazon. In the central Amazon region, as a result of the fragility of the soil cover, deforestation and cultivation, affecting principally the superficial soil, promote the selective erosion of fine particles enriched in oxides and Hg. The erosion of soil could be responsible for an important release of Hg, transported in particulate form by drainage waters. PMID:9850600

Roulet, M; Lucotte, M; Saint-Aubin, A; Tran, S; Rhéault, I; Farella, N; De Jesus Da silva, E; Dezencourt, J; Sousa Passos, C J; Santos Soares, G; Guimarães, J R; Mergler, D; Amorim, M

1998-11-01

263

Study on public parking problems and countermeasures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the rapid growth of motorization, public parking has become a distinct problem influences urban development and people's life quality. Unscientific method of urban planning and lagging of related studies lead to parking problem becoming more and more seriously day by day. The propose of this paper is to put forward several solutions for public parking problem, including parking management policies, building with construction parking policies, regional differentiation policy, parking industrial policy, self-parking policy and so on, from the point of regulatory plan and related policy. It is significant to guide new urban areas construction and improve the parking situation.

Hu, Hongbing; Wen, Zhaokang

2011-12-01

264

Lincoln Park Neighborhood Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today, the Lincoln Park neighborhood on Chicago's North Side is a relatively affluent area, complete with Victorian mansions and rather tony elevator apartment buildings. By the late 1940s, the area was experiencing the same type of urban disinvestment as other inner-city neighborhoods throughout the United States. In the early 1960s, the city of Chicago, working with funds from the federal government, began an ambitious urban renewal program designed to reduce the density of the built environment in the community and to remove "blighted" properties. This excellent collection from the DePaul University Libraries Digital Collections contains over 400 documents related to this ambitious project, including maps, zoning documents, policy statements, neighborhood organization planning documents, and photographs. First-time visitors may wish to start with the first document here, "A Brief Explanation of the Urban Community Conservation Act." Moving on, visitors can view the rest of the documents by title, thumbnail, subject, and brief description.

265

Chicago Public Library: Millennium Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The transformation of the area east of Michigan Avenue from an industrial wasteland into the vibrant and heavily-used Millennium Park is truly a remarkable tale in Chicago's recent history. The apocryphal tale says that Mayor Richard M. Daley looked out from his dentist's office and envisioned a public park that would be comparable to other grand spaces in the city. The construction of Millennium Park took quite some time, but when the park was finished in 2004, most people were quite happy with it. This digital collection from the Chicago Public Library brings together over 5,100 images of the park at various phases of its construction. Visitors can view a highlights file of 154 images, and they can wander through topical areas like Cloud Gate, Crown Fountain, and Lurie Garden. Visitors interested in broad vistas of the entire setting should click on Full Park. Finally, visitors can use the tabs on the left-hand side of the page to look at architectural renderings and models of the park's various sections.

2012-03-16

266

Perception of urban park soundscape.  

PubMed

A number of studies have been initiated to explore how to improve the soundscape quality in urban parks. However, good soundscape quality in parks cannot be provided without a thorough understanding of the complex relationships among sound, environment, and individuals. As acoustic comfort is considered to be an important outcome of soundscape quality, this study investigates the relative impacts of the factors influencing acoustic comfort evaluation by formulating a multivariate ordered logit model. This study also explores the inter-relationships among acoustic comfort evaluation, acceptability of the environment, and preference to stay in a park using a path model. A total of 595 valid responses were obtained from interview surveys administered in four parks in Hong Kong while objective sound measurements were carried out at the survey spots concurrently. The findings unveil that acoustic comfort evaluation, besides visual comfort evaluation of landscape, also plays an important role on users' acceptability of the urban park environment. Compared with all the studied acoustic related factors, acoustic comfort evaluation serves as a better proxy for park users' preference to stay in urban parks. Hearing the breeze will significantly increase the likelihood of individuals in giving high acoustic comfort evaluation. Conversely, hearing the sounds from heavy vehicles or sounds from bikes will significantly reduce the likelihood in giving a high acoustic evaluation. PMID:22501055

Tse, Man Sze; Chau, Chi Kwan; Choy, Yat Sze; Tsui, Wai Keung; Chan, Chak Ngai; Tang, Shiu Keung

2012-04-01

267

Aftermath of Griffith Park Fire  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In mid-May 2007, wind-driven flames raced through Griffith Park in Los Angeles, forcing hasty evacuations and threatening numerous famous landmarks and tourist spots, such as the Los Angeles Zoo and the Hollywood Sign. Ultimately, no one was injured in the fire, which may have been started by a cigarette. About 800 acres burned in the urban park, which is itself a Hollywood landmark, having been the location for several movies, including Rebel Without A Cause. This image of the park was captured by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on June 6, 2007, about a month after the fire. ASTER detects both visible and infrared wavelengths of light, and both kinds have been used to make this image. Vegetation appears in various shades of red, while the burned areas appear charcoal. Roads and dense urban areas appear purplish-gray or white. Water is dark blue. Large burned areas are evident in the northwest and southeast parts of the park, with scattered smaller patches along the southern margin. Some botanical gardens and parts of a bird sanctuary, as well as some park structures like restrooms, were destroyed. The park's unburned, natural vegetation appears brick red, while the irrigated golf courses adjacent to the park are bright red. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

2007-01-01

268

Cape Baleia, Caravelas, Brazil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cape Baleia (17.5N, 39.0W), on the north central coast of Brazil illustrates a good example of multiple coastal sand spits. Over a several thousand year time period, shifting regimes of wave and current patterns have piled up sand onto a series of beach ridges and tidal lagoons. Offshore, several prominent reefs and sandbanks can be seen paralleling the coast. The largest is the Recife da Pedra Grande (Big Rocks Reef).

1993-01-01

269

Park and chill : redesign parking garage in Hong Kong  

E-print Network

What are the aesthetics of urban infrastructure? Urban infrastructure has remained isolated to human activities. We all share memory and experience with urban infrastructure, e.g. we drive on the same roads and park our ...

Ting, Sze Ngai

2011-01-01

270

1.OA At the Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: There were 7 children at the park. Then 4 more showed up. How many children were at the park all together? There were 7 children at the park. Some more...

271

Yellowstone National Park: Historic 3-D Photographs Featuring Park Geology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This source provides a series of 34 historic photographs of well-known geologic landmarks in Yellowstone National Park. The photographs can be viewed individually or as part of a tour that begins at Old Faithful and proceeds in a clockwise route around the park. The images were created by digital manipulation of antique stereographs and they may be viewed as black and white photos or in 3-D using special stereographic glasses.

Stoffer Phil

272

Fungal microbiota in air-conditioning installed in both adult and neonatal intensive treatment units and their impact in two university hospitals of the central western region, Mato Grosso, Brazil.  

PubMed

To evaluate fungal microbiota in air-conditioning units installed in intensive care units in two university hospitals in Cuiaba city, Mato Grosso, central western region of Brazil, 525 solid environmental samples were collected, 285 from Hospital A and 240 from Hospital B. Collections were performed using sterile swabs on air-conditioning unit components: cooling coils, ventilators, and filters. Mycelial fungi identification was achieved by observation of the macroscopic and micromorphological characteristics in different culture mediums (maize meal, oatmeal and potato dextrose agars and malt extract) using the Ridell technique. Eleven genera and 27 distinct species belonging to the hyphomycetes and ascomycetes classes were isolated and identified. The most frequently detected genera in both hospitals were Aspergillus spp, Penicillium spp, and Cladosporium spp. Values for colony-forming units per gram were 64 and 75%, well above the limits recommended by Health Ministry resolution 176/00 at the locations selected for analysis in Hospitals A and B, respectively. In conclusion, evaluation of fungal microbiota in the air-conditioning units indirectly determined that the air quality was compromised in both university hospitals analyzed, which constitutes a risk factor for the acquisition of infection in the intensive care units. PMID:21424438

Simões, Sara de Almeida Alves; Leite Júnior, Diniz Pereira; Hahn, Rosane Christine

2011-08-01

273

Man Sik Park Symmetry and Separability In  

E-print Network

Man Sik Park Symmetry and Separability In Spatial-Temporal Processes Man Sik Park, Montserrat Fuentes Symmetry and Separability In Spatial-Temporal Processes 1 #12;Man Sik Park Motivation · In general-pollution data. Symmetry and Separability In Spatial-Temporal Processes 2 #12;Man Sik Park Research Objectives 1

274

Parking Citation Appeal UVA Parking and Transportation, P.O. Box 400000, Charlottesville, Va. 229044000  

E-print Network

Parking Citation Appeal UVA Parking and Transportation, P.O. Box 400000.virginia.edu/parking UNACCEPTABLE GROUNDS FOR APPEAL ARE: Parking for SHORT periods, parking in a nearly empty lot, not knowing regulations, not seeing the signs. *If you appeal to the Traffic Appeals Committee, please note

Acton, Scott

275

Morris Park Ave Rhinelander Ave  

E-print Network

Albert Einstein College of Medicine ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS Building 19. Einstein Boiler Plant JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER 20. Nurses' Residence MEDICAL PARK EINSTEIN PROGRAM LOCATIONS Glass Building Ob/Gyn Private Practice

Kenny, Paraic

276

Arches National Park - Nature and Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service (NPS) website highlights the natural resources of Arches National Park, in addition to the sandstone arches for which the park is famous. Details about the park include the animals that inhabit the area (amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles), natural features (deserts, geologic formations, pools, potholes and soils), environmental factors facing the park (invasive species, perigrine falcons, bighorn sheep), and plants (cacti, grasses, lichens, mosses, liverworts, trees, shrubs and wildflowers).

277

Multinational underground nuclear parks  

SciTech Connect

Newcomer countries expected to develop new nuclear power programs by 2030 are being encouraged by the International Atomic Energy Agency to explore the use of shared facilities for spent fuel storage and geologic disposal. Multinational underground nuclear parks (M-UNPs) are an option for sharing such facilities. Newcomer countries with suitable bedrock conditions could volunteer to host M-UNPs. M-UNPs would include back-end fuel cycle facilities, in open or closed fuel cycle configurations, with sufficient capacity to enable M-UNP host countries to provide for-fee waste management services to partner countries, and to manage waste from the M-UNP power reactors. M-UNP potential advantages include: the option for decades of spent fuel storage; fuel-cycle policy flexibility; increased proliferation resistance; high margin of physical security against attack; and high margin of containment capability in the event of beyond-design-basis accidents, thereby reducing the risk of Fukushima-like radiological contamination of surface lands. A hypothetical M-UNP in crystalline rock with facilities for small modular reactors, spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and geologic disposal is described using a room-and-pillar reference-design cavern. Underground construction cost is judged tractable through use of modern excavation technology and careful site selection. (authors)

Myers, C.W. [Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F650, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Giraud, K.M. [Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, 1550 Oxen Lane NE, P.O. Box 411, Burlington, KS 66839-0411 (United States)

2013-07-01

278

Elk winter foraging at fine scale in Yellowstone National Park  

Microsoft Academic Search

The link between landscape properties and foraging decisions by herbivores remains unclear, but such knowledge is central\\u000a to the understanding of plant–herbivore dynamics. Our goal was to determine whether fine-scale foraging paths of free-ranging\\u000a elk (Cervus canadensis) respond to spatial structure of habitats in Yellowstone National Park. During winter 2002 we gathered elk-foraging information\\u000a by following snow tracks in open

Daniel Fortin; Juan M. Morales; Mark S. Boyce

2005-01-01

279

U-Pb LA-MC-ICPMS geochronology of Cambro-Ordovician post-collisional granites of the Ribeira belt, southeast Brazil: Terminal Brasiliano magmatism in central Gondwana supercontinent  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New U-Pb ages for zircon and titanite obtained by LA-MC-ICPMS are reported for post-collisional granites from the central Ribeira belt (Rio de Janeiro State, southeast Brazil). These post-collisional, I-type, megaporphyritic and equigranular leucogranite plutons and dykes intrude high-grade metasedimentary units, orthogneisses, and migmatites within the root zone of the deeply eroded Neoproterozoic-Cambrian Ribeira belt. The ages obtained are: 511.2 ± 6.9 Ma (zircon) for the Suruí Granite; 490.3 ± 8.7 Ma (zircon) for a cross-cutting dyke of the pegmatitic facies of the Andorinha Granite from the same outcrop; 480.7 ± 6.1 Ma (zircon) for the Frades Granite; 488.7 ± 4.2 Ma (titanite) for the Nova Friburgo Granite; and 490.9 ± 9.8 Ma (zircon) for the Sana Granite. These new U-Pb ages and those compiled from the literature for post-orogenic intrusions distributed ˜400 km along the strike of the orogen (Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo States), define two separate intervals for magmatic activity, which are consistent with mineralogical and structural signatures. The magmatic intervals consist of an older Cambrian magmatic pulse occurred at ca.512 Ma (Pedra Branca, Suruí and Buarama plutons), and a younger Ordovician event at ca. 486 Ma (Mangaratiba, Favela, Andorinha, Frades, Nova Friburgo and Sana granites). The Cambrian pulse post-dates the end of the first and main collisional phase by ca. 35 m.y. It also post-dates the onset of the second collisional episode by ca. 20 m.y. The late-Ordovician magmatic pulse post-dates the end of the second collisional episode by ca. 25 m.y. In map view, the alignment of the post-collisional plutons and stocks depicts a sinuous belt running along the eroded roots of central/northern Ribeira and Araçuaí belts. This granite belt probably marks the zone where preferential heating and melting of lower continental crust took place, either caused by breaking off of subducted slab, or by the extensional collapse of hot, overthickened continental crust.

Valeriano, Claudio de Morisson; Tupinambá, Miguel; Simonetti, Antonio; Heilbron, Monica; de Almeida, Julio Cesar Horta; do Eirado, Luiz Guilherme

2011-12-01

280

Geology Fieldnotes: Badlands National Park, South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Badlands National Park, located in southwestern South Dakota, consists of 244,000 acres of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles and spires blended with the largest, protected mixed grass prairie in the United States. Features include information on park geology, maps, photographs, visitor information, links to related publications, and lesson plans for teaching geology with National Park examples. The park geology section discusses the Park's geologic history during the Eocene and Oligocene epochs and the rich fossil deposits found there. Maps of the park and the surrounding area are included.

281

Bibliography of Doctor Chul Park  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains a comprehensive bibliography of the published works, and a short biography, of Dr. Chul Park. The contents of this bibliography were compiled primarily from the NASA RECON data base. The RECON citations have been modified to appear in a uniform format with all other listed citations . These other citations were located by computer searches in the INSPEC, NTIS, COMPENDEX, and Chemical Abstracts data bases, as well as through the cooperation of Dr. Chul Park, and his associates in the Reacting Flow Environments Branch at NASA Ames Research Center. All citations are presented in an approximate reverse chronological order from the present date. This work was created to honor the occasion of Dr. Chul Park's retirement on December 14, 1994, after 27 years of distinguished government service at the NASA Ames Research Center.

Gochberg, Lawrence A.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Park, Chul

1995-01-01

282

Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

Ruehrwein, Dick

283

City of New York Parks & Recreation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

New York City's Department of Parks & Recreation oversees 29,000 acres of land, and more than 1,700 parks, playgrounds, and recreation facilities located throughout the five boroughs. Their website provides a great starting point for a virtual visit undaunted by weather. Take a virtual tour along the Bronx River, watch video clips from "It's My Park" (also aired every weekday at 11:00 a.m. on NYC life (channel 25)), and browse the photo gallery, which includes selections from the Parks Photo Archive, dating back to 1856, and the Parks' Flickr Group, with visitor-contributed photos. There are also seasonal features: for February, Black History Month, there's an events listing, an inventory of permanent sculptures honoring African-Americans in the Parks, African American Namesake Parks, and a photo gallery entitled The African American Experience. And of course, there's a Groundhog Day page, presenting the history of weather prediction by the rodent in the NYC Parks.

284

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park  

E-print Network

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park ETTP was originally built to the East Tennessee Technology Park. Environmental management and remediation operations consist, the K-25 Site was renamed the "East Tennessee Technology Park" to reflect its new mission. Figure 3

Pennycook, Steve

285

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park  

E-print Network

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park The East Tennessee Technology was changed to the East Tennessee Technology Park. Environmental management and remediation operations consist Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), originally known as the K-25 site, began in 1943 as part of the World War

Pennycook, Steve

286

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park  

E-print Network

1 East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park ETTP was originally built to the "East Tennessee Technology Park." Environmental management and remediation operations consist the start of D&D activities. In 1997, the K-25 Site was renamed the "East Tennessee Technology Park

Pennycook, Steve

287

Welcome to Diamond Light Source Parking Visitors can park outside Diamond  

E-print Network

Welcome to Diamond Light Source Parking ­ Visitors can park outside Diamond House, or if that is full, in the Visitor car park. Users should park around the ring. On Arrival ­ Diamond does not have 8500). Then take a seat 2 and wait for your Diamond contact to collect you. Users ­ Fast track users

Crowther, Paul

288

Acadia National Park - Nature and Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service (NPS) website highlights the natural resources of Acadia National Park. Resources discussed include animals (amphibians, birds and fish), plants (ferns, freshwater plants, grasses, mosses, liverworts and wildflowers), environmental factors (fire regime, pests, nonnative species, weather, water quality and air quality), and natural features of the park (beaches, coastline, forests, geologic formations, intertidal and subtidal zones, mountains, and wetlands). There are related documents about the park's air and water quality available to download.

289

Geology Fieldnotes: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors can access park geology information, photographs, related links, visitor information, multimedia resources, and resources for teaching geology with National Park examples. The park geology section discusses the Grand Canyon's geologic history, structural geology, and features a question-and-answer section about the canyon. The history of the canyon as a park and environmental issues surrounding it are also discussed. A geologic cross section of the canyon showing the various rock layers is included.

290

Geology Fieldnotes: Acadia National Park, Maine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service website highlights the geology of Acadia National Park. The story begins 500 million years ago, and goes through rock cycles, formations (Ellsworth, Bar Harbor, and Cranberry formations), intrusions, the Ice Age, glacial features, and development of shore patterns. There are area and park maps, photos, and links to additional information.

291

Geology Fieldnotes: Glacier National Park, Montana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Glaciers have played an important role in shaping this park, which is part of the Rocky Mountain chain and shares a border with Canada's Waterton Lakes National Park. Information on this site includes park geology, visitor information, photographs, and links to other resources.

292

Moon Park: A research and educational facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Moon Park has been proposed as an International Space Year (ISY) event for international cooperative efforts. Moon Park will serve as a terrestrial demonstration of a prototype lunar base and provide research and educational opportunities. The kind of data that can be obtained in the Moon Park facilities is examined taking the minimum number of lunar base residents as an example.

Kuriki, Kyoichi; Saito, Takao; Ogawa, Yukimasa

1992-01-01

293

Yellowstone National Park Online Slide File  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Yellowstone National Park website contains thousands of photographs of the Park. Images are organized by category including fire, thermal features, mammals, park structures, petrified trees, water, weather, scenics, and more. The photographs may be freely downloaded and more are being added through time.

Yellowstone National Park

294

Alluvial Fan, Rocky Mountain National Park  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The Alluvial Fan is a fan-shaped area of disturbance in Rocky Mountain National Park. It was created on July 15, 1982, when the earthen Lawn Lake Dam above the area gave way, flooding the Park and nearby town of Estes Park with more than 200 million gallons of water. Enormous boulders were displaced...

295

"The Rosa Parks Story": Guide for Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks, a black seamstress, refused to give up her seat to a white man on a public bus in Montgomery, Alabama, and she was arrested. On that day, Rosa Parks became the mother of the modern civil rights movement. This study guide may be used as a companion to "The Rosa Parks Story" video which aired on CBS television…

Onish, Liane B.

296

78 FR 24323 - National Park Week, 2013  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Proclamation 8961 of April 19, 2013 National Park Week, 2013 By the President of the United States...to be passed on. During National Park Week, we celebrate the wonders entrusted to...summon us to experience it firsthand. This week, the National Park Service will make...

2013-04-24

297

Where Innovation Is Tradition Parking & Transportation  

E-print Network

Cantor · Parking Services Coordinator: Ann Moran · Transportation Coordinator: Marina Budimir · Parking & Transportation Budget · Self-funded auxiliary · Receives no tuition dollars nor general funds · Must pay for all expenses with parking revenue and some student fee(about $88/student) · Overall budget nearly $15

298

Oak Park Village, Illinois Community Profile  

E-print Network

Oak Park Village, Illinois Community Profile William Gillespie UPP 502 · Drucker · November 28 for the village of Oak Park, Illinois. It is intended to highlight important information about the community a variety of sources, including the U.S. Census Bureau, the Village of Oak Park, and the Chicago

Illinois at Chicago, University of

299

Tour of Park Geology: Hot Springs/Geothermal  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service (NPS) site provides links to National Parks with hot springs or geothermal activity. Where appropriate, links are provided to geology, visitor information, photographs, park maps, multimedia resources, geologic research, and additional links. Parks at this site include Hot Springs National Park, Lassen Volcano National Park, and more.

300

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

business meals (excluding alcohol beverages and tobacco) charged to a Procurement Card Directive 11 in the estimated amount for only mileage, parking, toll, and business meals charged to a Procurement Card. #12 business meals (excluding alcohol beverages and tobacco) charged to a Procurement Card Directive 11

de Lijser, Peter

301

Symmetry in the Car Park  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author presents a lesson on rotational symmetry which she developed for her students. The aim of the lesson was "to identify objects with rotational symmetry in the staff car park" and the success criteria were "pictures or sketches of at least six objects with different orders of rotation". After finding examples of…

Hancock, Karen

2007-01-01

302

National Park Glaciers Knowledge Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive resource explains what glaciers are, where they are found, how they form, and how they move. The types and parts of glaciers are discussed, as well as ice ages, the different types of landforms that may result from glaciation, and how scientists monitor glaciers. Examples from our national parks are also highlighted as case studies to illustrate how glaciers have created landscapes.

2005-08-01

303

Vehicle Operation and Parking Policy  

E-print Network

Vehicle Operation and Parking Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration in this policy. 2.0 POLICY STATEMENT This policy is intended to promote safe driving by operators of all vehicles are in effect at all times and apply to all persons and vehicles physically present on the CSM campus

304

Vehicle Operation and Parking Policy  

E-print Network

Vehicle Operation and Parking Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration STATEMENT This policy is intended to promote safe driving by operators of all vehicles utilizing streets and apply to all persons and vehicles physically present on the CSM campus. For the purpose of this policy

305

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

approval. Office of University Risk Management will notify department. Travel Prepayment for RegistrationTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu Business Travel and Prepayment Request Employee Travel Policy and Procedures Page 1 of 12 Revised 9/1/2013 If the traveler is currently

de Lijser, Peter

306

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

(including U.S. Possessions). Contact Risk Management at extension 7346 to obtain foreign travel liabilityTravel Operations College Park 300 Em ail: travel@fu llerton .edu EMPLOYEE TRAVEL (travel on or after 4/1/11) Policy and Procedures for Business Travel and Prepayment Request Page 1 of 12 Revised 4

de Lijser, Peter

307

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

approval. Office of University Risk Management will notify department. Travel Prepayment for RegistrationTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu Business Travel and Prepayment Request Employee Travel Policy and Procedures Page 1 of 12 Revised 1/1/2014 If the traveler is currently

de Lijser, Peter

308

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

is required for most international travel (including U.S. Possessions). Contact Risk Management at extensionTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu EMPLOYEE TRAVEL (travel on or after 4/1/11) Policy and Procedures for Travel Authorization and Prepayment Request Page 1 of 11 Revised 8

de Lijser, Peter

309

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

is required for most international travel (including U.S. Possessions). Contact Risk Management at extensionTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu EMPLOYEE TRAVEL (travel on or after 4/1/11) Checklist for the Travel Authorization Page 1 of 11 Revised 4/19/2011 If the traveler

de Lijser, Peter

310

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

(including U.S. Possessions). Contact Risk Management at extension 7346 to obtain foreign travel liabilityTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu EMPLOYEE TRAVEL (travel on or after 4/1/11) Policy and Procedures for Business Travel and Prepayment Request Page 1 of 12 Revised 5

de Lijser, Peter

311

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

travel (including U.S. Possessions). Contact Risk Management at extension 7346 to obtain foreign travelTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu EMPLOYEE TRAVEL (travel on or after 4/1/11) Policy and Procedures for Business Travel and Prepayment Request Page 1 of 13 Revised 11

de Lijser, Peter

312

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

the required foreign travel liability insurance from the Office of University Risk Management? · Select one high hazard; travel will require Chancellor's Office approval. Office of University Risk ManagementTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu EMPLOYEE TRAVEL (travel on or after

de Lijser, Peter

313

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

approval. Office of University Risk Management will notify department. Travel Prepayment for RegistrationTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu Business Travel and Prepayment Request Employee Travel Policy and Procedures Page 1 of 12 Revised 8/21/2014 If the traveler is currently

de Lijser, Peter

314

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

approval. Office of University Risk Management will notify department. Travel Prepayment for RegistrationTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu Business Travel and Prepayment Request Employee Travel Policy and Procedures Page 1 of 12 Revised 1/22/2013 If the traveler is currently

de Lijser, Peter

315

Travel Operations College Park 300  

E-print Network

approval. Office of University Risk Management will notify department. Travel Prepayment for RegistrationTravel Operations College Park 300 Email: travel@fullerton.edu Business Travel and Prepayment Request Employee Travel Policy and Procedures Page 1 of 12 Revised 6/14/2013 If the traveler is currently

de Lijser, Peter

316

Rosa Parks: The Movement Organizes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This biography for younger readers describes the life of Rosa Parks, the Alabama black woman whose refusal to give up her seat on a segregated bus helped establish the civil rights movement. The book is introduced by an overview of the movement by Andrew Young and a timeline indicating major historical events from 1954 through 1968. Highlights in…

Friese, Kai

317

Romanticism and American National Parks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The national park idea was conceived at a time when nature romanticism dominated Americans' sense of landscape aesthetics. Among the basic tenets of romantic philosophy discussed are the specific definitions of the picturesque and the sublime, importance of historical and romantic associations, role of emotional response to natural scenery, perception of God in nature, restorative powers of nature, and perceptions

Stanford E. Demars

1990-01-01

318

Egmont National Park, New Zealand  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lush forests of Egmont National Park, on New Zealand's North Island, contrast with the pasturelands outside the circular park boundaries. The unique shape of the park results from its first protection in 1881, which specified that a forest reserve would extend in a 9.6 km radius from the summit of Mt. Taranaki (named Mt. Egmont by Captain Cook). The park covers about 33,500 hectares and Mt. Egmont stands at 2518 m. The volcano began forming 70,000 years ago, and last erupted in 1755. A series of montane habitats occur in procession up the flanks of the volcano-from rainforest, to shrubs, to alpine, and finally snow cover. Image STS110-726-6, was taken by Space Shuttle crewmembers on 9 April 2002 using a Hasselblad film camera. Image provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

2002-01-01

319

Blue Spring State Park Immunization  

E-print Network

Park is 2,600 acres about 45 minutes from Gainesville. In the winter, you can see manatees but unfortunately, you can't swim with them. This weekend, since the manatees aren't there yet we will go swimming

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

320

Forest Park Academic Advising Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to facilitate the academic counseling and advising process, this handbook provides comprehensive information pertaining to all transfer and career programs offered at the Forest Park Campus of St. Louis Community College. Section I provides general information on placement, tests, selective or restrictive programs, student status, summer…

Kapraun, E. Daniel

321

The vascular plant flora of Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Ross County, Ohio  

USGS Publications Warehouse

HopewellCulture National Historical Park, a unit of the United States National Park Service located in Ross County in south central Ohio, was created to restore, protect, and interpret the legacy of the mound building Hopewell prehistoric peoples. The vascular flora of the park had been estimated to be only 20% known prior to the undertaking of this project. During the spring, summer, and fall of 1995, almost 700 plant specimens were collected by three investigators from five units of the park. Totals of 438 species, 281 genera, and 93 families of vascular plants were discovered, representing 40% of the flora of Ross County, and 17% of the flora of Ohio. Introduced species constituted 32% of the flora. Sixty-five species are new records for Ross County. Two species of special concern, Spiranthes ovalis and Eleocharis ovata, are on the state's threatened and endangered species list. The Hopewell unit had the highest plant diversity of the five units.

Bennett, J.P.; Course, J.E.

1996-01-01

322

Atmospheric mercury speciation in Yellowstone National Park  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atmospheric concentrations of elemental mercury (Hg0), reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and particulate Hg (pHg) concentrations were measured in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), U.S.A. using high resolution, real time atmospheric mercury analyzers (Tekran 2537A, 1130, and 1135). A survey of Hg0 concentrations at various locations within YNP showed that concentrations generally reflect global background concentrations of 1.5-2.0 ng m- 3, but a few specific locations associated with concentrated geothermal activity showed distinctly elevated Hg0 concentrations (about 9.0 ng m- 3). At the site of intensive study located centrally in YNP (Canyon Village), Hg0 concentrations did not exceed 2.5 ng m- 3; concentrations of RGM were generally below detection limits of 0.88 pg m- 3 and never exceeded 5 pg m- 3. Concentrations of pHg ranged from below detection limits to close to 30 pg m-3. RGM and pHg concentrations were not correlated with any criteria gases (SO2, NOx, O3); however pHg was weakly correlated with the concentration of atmospheric particles. We investigated three likely sources of Hg at the intensive monitoring site: numerous geothermal features scattered throughout YNP, re-suspended soils, and wildfires near or in YNP. We examined relationships between the chemical properties of aerosols (as measured using real time, single particle mass spectrometry; aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer; ATOFMS) and concentrations of atmospheric pHg. Based on the presence of particles with distinct chemical signatures of the wildfires, and the absence of signatures associated with the other sources, we concluded that wildfires in the park were the main source of aerosols and associated pHg to our sampling site. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Hall, B.D.; Olson, M.L.; Rutter, A.P.; Frontiera, R.R.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Gross, D.S.; Yuen, M.; Rudolph, T.M.; Schauer, J.J.

2006-01-01

323

Micropropagation and germplasm conservation of Central Park Splendor Chinese elm ( Ulmus parvifolia Jacq. ‘A\\/Ross Central Park’) trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Micropropagation offers opportunities to propagate, preserve and ship tree germplasm. It also reduces the risk of moving pathogens\\u000a and insects with the germplasm due to built-in pathogen detection capabilities of aseptic cultures. For the past few decades,\\u000a our laboratory has been involved in a project to preserve and restore a large, cold hardy, and historically important Chinese\\u000a elm (Ulmus parvifolia

R. C. Thakur; D. F. Karnosky

2007-01-01

324

Fertile Ground for Astronomy in National Parks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Light pollution has relegated the non-virtual experience of seeing a starry sky to national parks and other remote areas. Thus, national parks offer an excellent opportunity to advance understanding of and inspiration for astronomical sciences. We relate the experiences of a park ranger, a park scientist, and an astronomy professor who attest to the tremendous public interest in seeing the starry night sky and learning about the cosmos, not in a lab or classroom, but in the natural setting of a park. We review an overall strategy for sustaining this source of inspiration, enhancing public understanding through interpretation, and focusing partnerships toward this untapped potential.

Nordgren, T. E.; Richman, A. M.; Moore, C. A.

2010-08-01

325

Parks as a Tool for HIV Management.  

PubMed

Access to parks improves overall health outcomes in the general population. Given that HIV infection has become a chronic disease to manage, among populations engaged in medical care, parks may be promoted as physical activity opportunities in order to manage chronic comorbid conditions. We conducted a cross-sectional examination of the relationships between sociodemographic and biomedical characteristics to park proximity among 635 individuals receiving outpatient HIV care. The data collected included HIV-related biomarkers, depression, and diagnoses of other chronic diseases. The total acres of parks an individual is exposed within one-quarter mile from their home were assessed. The cohort included 635 individuals (67% men, 73% black, and 21% white, mean age 42 years). Unemployment was negatively associated with park availability. Park proximity was not associated with depression or HIV biomarkers. As yet, little effort has been committed to promoting park usage as a low-cost, sustainable method to addressing comorbidities among individuals with HIV. PMID:23995296

Shacham, Enbal; Hipp, J Aaron; Scheuermann, Mary; Önen, Nur; Overton, E Turner

2015-01-01

326

Seattle Parks & Recreation Sherwood History Files  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Seattle Parks & Recreation Sherwood History Files are the work of one Donald N. Sherwood, who worked as an engineer for the department for 22 years. In the course of his work, he began compiling sketch maps of the parks, and annotating them with historical tidbits and other pieces of information. Also, he began writing individual histories for each facility when the information didn't quite fit on the maps. This site afford interested parties access to these remarkable and truly unusual documents. All told, there are over 80 separate files here, documenting unique pieces of the Seattle parks landscape, including Alki Beach Park, Golden Gardens Park, and the celebrated Gas Works Park on Lake Union. For anyone with an interest in parks and recreation management or the Emerald City, this site will be a most welcome find.

2012-02-14

327

Species in Parks: Flora and Fauna Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Information Center of the Environment and the US National Park Service (NPS) have developed a "preliminary" data base of vascular plants and vertebrates located on National Park Service Lands. Although the database is not a complete list of species residing on NPS lands, it contains relatively complete lists for both small and large parks. Users can search for plants and animals by species or park name. Within each park, one can search a list of species by taxa (e.g., birds, mammals, fish, etc.) and then learn in what other parks that species is found. Links to the home pages for all NPS property (from American Samoa to Zion National Park) are featured. Both plant and animal databases are available for downloading for Windows or DOS users (.exe).

1997-01-01

328

INVESTIGATION OF SERUM MICROCYSTIN CONCENTRATIONS AMONG DIALYSIS PATIENTS, BRAZIL, 1996  

EPA Science Inventory

Investigation of Serum Microcystin Concentrations Among Dialysis Patients, Brazil, 1996 Elizabeth D. Hilborn 1, Wayne W. Carmichael 2, Sandra M.F.O. Azevedo 3 1- USEPA/ORD/NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC 2- Wright State University, Dayton, OH 3- Federal Univers...

329

Distance Education and Corporate Training in Brazil: Regulations and Interrelationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Distance education in Brazil has evolved more slowly than distance education offerings in other developing countries. This is because all aspects of Brazil's publicly-funded educational system are excessively regulated, highly bureaucratic, and tightly centralized. Such highly centralized bureaucracy and strict control has resulted in tremendous…

Porto, Stella C. S.; Berge, Zane L.

2008-01-01

330

Hyde Park Herald Digital Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hyde Park is a well-known urban neighborhood eight miles south of Chicago's Loop, and residents in and around the neighborhood have a long tradition of independent journalism. The Hyde Park Herald was started in 1882, and it documented the community's earliest history, including the years before the neighborhood was annexed to Chicago. Recently, a group of concerned citizens donated money to digitize the newspaper's back issues, and it was done to celebrate the leadership of Bruce Sagan, who has published the newspaper since 1953. Visitors can view the newspaper from 1882 to the present day, and despite a gap between the years 1889 and 1918, the coverage is quite good. Some good starting points include the WWII years and the late 1950s, which was when the first urban renewal project started in the neighborhood. Also, visitors may wish to perform a detailed search across the entire collection and then can also learn a bit more about the paper's history here.

331

National Park Service Web Cameras  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Park Service (NPS) operates digital cameras at many parks in the lower 48 states, Alaska, and Hawaii to help educate the public on air quality issues. These cameras often show the effects of air pollution, especially visibility impairment. Because the cameras are typically located near air quality monitoring sites, their web pages display other information along with the photo, such as current levels of ozone, particulate matter, or sulfur dioxide, visual range, and weather conditions. The digital photos are usually updated every 15 minutes, while air quality data values are revised hourly. Charts of the last ten days of hourly weather, ozone, particulate matter, or sulfur dioxide data are also available. The cameras are accessible by clicking on an interactive map.

332

Oregon State Parks and Recreation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What can you do in the great Oregon outdoors? From the world of Cannon Beach to the wild and rugged Snake River, the experiences are diverse, to say the least. The homepage features dramatic vistas, isolated lighthouses, and a whole range of wonderful images to entice visitors. In the Visit area, there is an interactive map of the state that will help plan any trip. Here visitors can select Activities and Facilities to look for specific amenities. Moving along, the Event Calendar area allows visitors to look for upcoming events at a specific park or by category. Policy folks will appreciate the About Us area, as it includes detailed information on the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's budget, their annual report, information about upcoming initiatives, and construction projects.

333

Yellowstone National Park Online Tours  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Yellowstone National Park website provides an array of online tours, videos, and other information. Nature and history tours are among those featured on the site. The nature tours cover the Old Faithful area, the Norris Geyser Basin, the Fountain Paint Pots, the Mammoth Hot Springs, and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. Each of these tours highlights prominent natural features with photos and descriptions.

Park, Yellowstone N.

334

Coordinating OBS Parks in Europe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within Europe there are more than 380 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) distributed across 10 instrument parks in 6 countries. At least 120 of these OBS are wideband or broadband, over 260 can be deployed for at least 6 months at a time and 140 for at least one year. New parks are planned in two other European countries, which should add over 70 OBSs to this "fleet". However, these parks are under the control of individual countries or universities and hence to date this has made it difficult to organize large-scale experiments, especially for seismologists without marine experience. There has recently been an initiative to coordinate the use of these distributed instruments and their data products, to encourage large-scale experiments, possibly with onshore and offshore components, by seismologists who have not necessarily used OBSs before. The ongoing or planned developments include: Helping scientists with marine-specific formalities such as ship requests; clearer explanations of the noise floors of OBS instrumentation; improved clarity of instrument pricing and availability; standardized data output formats and data validation; and archiving in established seismological data centers. These efforts should allow improved experiment design in scientifically interesting regions with an offshore component and an easier, clearer way to organize large-scale, multi-country experiments. We will present details of this initiative to help organize large-scale experiments, the particularities of OBS sensors and marine deployments, the available instrumentation and new developments.

Crawford, W.; Brisbourne, A.; D'Anna, G.; Flüh, E. R.; Galve, A.; Graindorge, D.; Harmon, N.; Henstock, T.; Klingelhöfer, F.; Mangano, G.; Matias, L.; Peirce, C.; Sallares, V.; Schmidt-Aursch, M.; Tilmann, F.; Voss, P.

2012-04-01

335

THE NATIVE BEES OF GUADALUPE MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A preliminary inventory of the bees of Guadalupe Mountains National Park yielded 145 species in 39 genera. Thirteen species are undescribed; one species is the first U.S. record of a Dufourea previously known only from central Mexico. As an indication of the preliminary nature of this study, thirt...

336

The Potential for Pocket Parks to Increase Physical Activity  

PubMed Central

Purpose To assess the use of new pocket parks in low-income neighborhoods. Setting Los Angeles Subjects Parks users and residents living within ½ mile of 3 pocket parks and 15 neighborhood parks Intervention The creation of pocket parks Design Quasi-experimental post-only comparison Measures We used the System of Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to measure park use and park-based physical activity and surveyed park users and residents about their park use. Analysis We surveyed 392 and 432 household members within one-half mile of the 3 pocket parks before and after park construction, respectively, as well as 71 pocket park users and compared them to 992 neighborhood park users and 342 residents living within ½ mile of other neighborhood parks. We compared pocket park use to playground area use in the larger neighborhood parks. We used descriptive statistics and Generalized Estimating Equations for the analysis. Results Overall, pocket park use compared favorably in promoting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with that of existing playground space in nearby parks and they were cost-effective at $0.73/MET hour gained. Pocket park visitors walked an average of 0.25 miles to get there. Conclusions Pocket parks, when perceived as attractive and safe destinations, may increase physical activity by encouraging families with children to walk there. Additional strategies and programs may be needed to encourage more residents to use the parks. PMID:24380461

Cohen, Deborah A.; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Golinelli, Daniella; McKenzie, Thomas L.

2014-01-01

337

An apparatus to simulate an amusement park rotor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rotor is a device that can be found in many amusement parks. In the literature there are various articles about this topic. The rotor is a hollow cylindrical room, covered inside with canvas and which can be rotated about the central vertical axis. People stand upright, with their backs against the internal face of the device. When it reaches a certain angular speed, the floor moves down and people don't fall; they are apparently stuck to the walls of the rotating cylinder.

Saraiva, Carlos

2010-04-01

338

Geology Fieldnotes: Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Theodore Roosevelt National Park site contains park geology information, park maps, photographs, related links, visitor information, and teacher features (resources for teaching geology with National Park examples). The park geology section discusses the Park's geologic history and the region's role in shaping Theodore Roosevelt's conservation efforts while he was President. The section also contains a link to information on the geology of Theodore Roosevelt National Park. The park maps section contains an area map as well as two maps detailing the North and South Units of the Park.

339

[Annotated list of the plants of the Tortuguero National Park].  

PubMed

The floodplains of Tortuguero, in northeastern Costa Rica, stand as one of the richest plant-species regions in Central America. In this paper, we present the annotated check-list of vascular plants that are present within the rainforest of Tortuguero National Park (TNP), a 26 604h land that protects most of the biological diversity of these plains. Our list resulted from collections made in 2012, as well as the examination of material mantained at the Herbarium of the National Biodiversity Institute of Costa Rica, INBio (ATTA Database) and in the TROPICOS database. A total of 732 vascular plant species included in 413 genera are known to the Park. Two of these species have limited distributions and are endemic to Costa Rica: Pseuderanthemum pittieri (Acanthaceae) and Paullinia austin-smithii (Sapindaceae). Ninety species have known ethnobotanical uses. The high diversity in plant species reported here for the forest environments of Tortuguero contrasts with the low species diversity previously reported in the palm-swamps that characterize the riverine habitats within the Park. PMID:24459756

Hurtado-Hernández, Priscilla M; González-Ramírez, José A

2013-09-01

340

The fishes of Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas, 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fish communities were sampled from eight sites within Hot Springs National Park. Fish were collected by seining and electrofishing during base-flow periods in July and October 2003. All individuals were identified to species. More than 1,020 individuals were collected, representing 24 species. The number of species collected at the sites ranged from 5 to 19. Central stoneroller, orangebelly darter, and longear sunfish were among the more abundant fish species at most sites. These species are typical of small streams in this area. An expected species list incorrectly listed 35 species because of incorrect species range or habitat requirements. Upon revising this list, the inventory yielded 24 of the 51 expected species (47 percent). No species collected in 2003 were federally-listed threatened or endangered species. However, two species collected at Hot Springs National Park may be of special interest to National Park Service managers and others. The Ouachita madtom is endemic to the Ouachita Mountains and is listed as a species of special concern by the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission. The grass carp, which is a native of eastern Asia, is present in Ricks Pond; one individual was collected and no other grass carp were observed. The introduction of grass carp into the United States is a controversial issue because of possible (but undocumented) harmful effects on native species and habitats.

Petersen, James C.; Justus, B.G.

2005-01-01

341

Tourism climatology for camping: a case study of two Ontario parks (Canada)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate and weather act as central motivators for the travel decisions of tourists. Due to their seasonality, these factors determine the availability and quality of certain outdoor recreational activities. Park visitation in Ontario, Canada, has been identified as a weather sensitive tourism and recreation activity. This study used a survey-based approach to identify and compare stated weather preferences and thresholds, as well as weather-related decision-making for campers at two provincial parks in Ontario, Canada. The two parks were selected for differing physical and environmental characteristics (forested lake versus coastal beach). Statistically significant differences were detected between the two parks in relation to the importance of weather and weather-based decision-making. Specific temperatures that were considered ideal and thresholds that were too cool and too warm were identified for both parks, both during the day and the night. Heavy rain and strong winds were the most influential factors in weather-related decision-making and on-site behavioural adaptations. Beach campers placed greater importance on the absence of rain and the presence of comfortable temperatures compared to forest campers. In addition, beach campers were more likely to leave the park early due to incremental weather changes. The results of this study suggest that beach campers are more sensitive to weather than forest campers.

Hewer, Micah J.; Scott, Daniel; Gough, William A.

2014-08-01

342

Geology Fieldnotes: Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service (NPS) site provides information about Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado, including geology, visitor information, illustrations, and additional links for more details. This park was home to the Anasazi people who were cliff dwellers in this area. Today you can see artifacts, native dwellings made of sandstone bricks, and learn about the Anasazi way of life, dating back to around 550 AD.

343

updated August 1, 2012 -Motorcycle Parking  

E-print Network

Parking Only Hope Lodge Parking Only Moffitt Valet Parking Only 38B 38C 38G 43A 12 38D 38E38B 38F 38T 38A Library LIB David C. Anchin Center DAC Theatre II THR Theatre I TAT Dance FAD Fine Arts Studio FAS Art Center BPT Catholic Center CTH Hillel Jewish Student Center HIL Chapel Center CHA Crosswinds Wesley

Meyers, Steven D.

344

Disabled Parking & Access Plan Campus Disabled Persons (DP)  

E-print Network

· Develop and Maintain DP Parking Campus Map on Web and in Handouts · Define, Document and Prioritize AllDisabled Parking & Access Plan Campus Disabled Persons (DP) Parking and Access Plan For CSU Parking Spaces = 10,873 · Total DP Parking Spaces = 201 (1.8%) ­ Total Van Accessible Spaces = 37 (0

de Lijser, Peter

345

Geology Fieldnotes: Death Valley National Park, California/Nevada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Death Valley National Park site contains park geology information, park maps, photographs, visitor information, and teacher features (resources for teaching geology using National Park examples). The Park Geology section contains an exaggerated cross-section showing the vertical rise within Death Valley. A link is provided to Death Valley's expanded geology page.

346

75 FR 20885 - National Park Week, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Proclamation 8498--National Park Week, 2010 Proclamation 8499--National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2010 Proclamation 8500--National Volunteer Week, 2010 Proclamation 8501--National Day of Service and...

2010-04-21

347

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot  

E-print Network

............................................................................................................................ 1 Table of Figures............................................................................................................. 4 SECTION 4 - Significant Meteorological Events........................................................................................................................ 16 TABLE OF FIGURES Figure 1 - Site location at Deer Island Parking Lot site................

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

348

Geologic Map of the Shenandoah National Park Region, Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geology of the Shenandoah National Park region of Virginia was studied from 1995 to 2008. The focus of the study was the park and surrounding areas to provide the National Park Service with modern geologic data for resource management. Additional geologic data of the adjacent areas are included to provide regional context. The geologic map can be used to support activities such as ecosystem delineation, land-use planning, soil mapping, groundwater availability and quality studies, aggregate resources assessment, and engineering and environmental studies. The study area is centered on the Shenandoah National Park, which is mostly situated in the western part of the Blue Ridge province. The map covers the central section and western limb of the Blue Ridge-South Mountain anticlinorium. The Skyline Drive and Appalachian National Scenic Trail straddle the drainage divide of the Blue Ridge highlands. Water drains northwestward to the South Fork of the Shenandoah River and southeastward to the James and Rappahannock Rivers. East of the park, the Blue Ridge is an area of low relief similar to the physiography of the Piedmont province. The Great Valley section of the Valley and Ridge province is west of Blue Ridge and consists of Page Valley and Massanutten Mountain. The distribution and types of surficial deposits and landforms closely correspond to the different physiographic provinces and their respective bedrock. The Shenandoah National Park is underlain by three general groups of rock units: (1) Mesoproterozoic granitic gneisses and granitoids, (2) Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Swift Run Formation and metabasalt of the Catoctin Formation, and (3) siliciclastic rocks of the Lower Cambrian Chilhowee Group. The gneisses and granitoids mostly underlie the lowlands east of Blue Ridge but also rugged peaks like Old Rag Mountain (996 meter). Metabasalt underlies much of the highlands, like Stony Man (1,200 meters). The siliciclastic rocks underlie linear ridges from 800 to 400 meters in altitude. The Page Valley is underlain by Cambrian and Ordovician carbonate rocks. Siliciclastic rocks are mostly west of the South Fork of the Shenandoah River and underlie Massanutten Mountain. Surficial deposits in the highlands include colluvium and debris fans. The lowlands have broad alluvial fans, alluvial plains, and fluvial terraces. Ridges underlain by siliciclastic rocks have abundant boulder fields. Numerous sinkholes and caves are due to the dissolution of the carbonate bedrock.

Southworth, Scott; Aleinikoff, John N.; Bailey, Christopher M.; Burton, William C.; Crider, E.A.; Hackley, Paul C.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Tollo, Richard P.

2009-01-01

349

Isle Royale National Park Bibliography of Publications 1 Isle Royale National Park  

E-print Network

Isle Royale National Park Bibliography of Publications 1 Isle Royale National Park Bibliography of Publications From National Park Service NatureBib Abrams, T. 1931. Mapping Isle Royale by air. Magazine. 1909. An ecological survey of Isle Royale, Lake Superior. Wynkoop Hallenbeck Crawford Co (state

350

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park  

E-print Network

East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park The ETTP was originally built to environmental management and restoration operations, and the name was changed to the East Tennessee Technology, the K-25 Site was named the "East Tennessee Technology Park" to reflect its new mission

Pennycook, Steve

351

INEEL Vadose Zone Research Park  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Vadose Zone Research Park was developed to address mission critical issues related to operations, waste management, and environmental restoration at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites that are located over thick vadose zones. The research park provides instrumentation and facilities for scientists to address vadose zone processes that are important in assessing operational activities, remedial measures, and long-term stewardship of DOE lands. The park, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is strategically located along the Big Lost River, an intermittent river, and around two new percolation ponds. This location provides the opportunity to study variable recharge from the river, continuous recharge from the ponds, and the interactions between the two sources. Drilling began in September 2000 and was completed in June 2001. Thirty one wells and instrumented boreholes have been installed at the park to monitor perched water, measure moisture movement, collect water and gas samples, and study intra-well geophysical properties. Nine of the boreholes, ranging in depth from 150 ft to 504 ft below land surface (bls), are instrumented to monitor moisture in the vadose zone. Instruments include: tensiometers, moisture content sensors, suction lysimeters, temperature sensors, gas ports and electrodes for electrical resistance tomography. Electrodes are evenly spaced throughout the borehole with hydrologic instruments concentrated in and near the sedimentary interbeds-discontinuous layers of silts and clays that occur between some basalt flows. Eighteen monitoring wells, ranging in depth from 60 ft to 250 ft bls, are completed with 4 or 6 inch PVC casing, and generally include an electrical resistivity electrode array attached to the casing. Three bore holes are constructed for testing cross-hole ground penetrating radar as well as for testing new nuclear logging tools being designed at the INEEL. The remaining borehole contains only an electrical resistivity electrode array. Moisture potential, temperature, and water level data are collected automatically by data loggers and transmitted by radio to a computer linked to the INEEL network. Researchers can view the data via the computer network. We are initiating studies of in-situ moisture content - matric potential curves, relative migration rates of sodium and chloride, development of preferred flow paths through the vadose zone, and imaging of background moisture movement using electrical resistivity tomography. Data collection, processing and imagery will all be automated. Imaging of all data types will be draped over the geology for correlation purposes.

Heath, G.; Hull, L.; Ansley, S.; Versteeg, R.; Scott, C.; Street, L.

2003-12-01

352

Amphibians of Olympic National Park  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Amphibians evolved from fishes about 360 million years ago and were the first vertebrates adapted to life on land. The word amphibian means "double life." It refers to the life history of many amphibians, which spend part of their life in water and part on land. There are three major groups of amphibians: salamanders, frogs, and toads, and caecilians. Salamanders, frogs, and toads can be found in Olympic National Park (ONP), but caecilians live only in tropical regions. Many amphibians are generalist predators, eating almost any prey they can fit into their mouths.

U.S. Geological Survey

2000-01-01

353

Rural Latino youth park use: characteristics, park amenities, and physical activity.  

PubMed

Less than half of youth engage in sufficient physical activity to achieve health benefits. Key environmental factors of park and recreation spaces may influence youth physical activity. We sought to ascertain youth characteristics and behaviors that attract youth to parks with specific amenities and encourage physical activity while at the parks in a rural, predominantly Latino community. We examined the quality of amenities in the 13 parks and recreation spaces that middle school aged youth have access to in their community using the Environmental Assessment of Parks and Recreation Spaces (EAPRS) tool. Middle school students completed surveys in the school classroom (n = 1,102) regarding park use, physical activity, and intrapersonal characteristics (e.g., motivators). We used logistic regression to identify correlates of any park use, use of higher quality field and court parks, and active and sedentary park use. Younger age, participation in an after school activity, and identification of a team as a motivator were positively associated with any park use. Use of higher quality court and field parks was associated with participation in an after school activity and being Latino. The odds of being active in the parks were greater for boys and Latinos. Older age and alcohol use are correlated with being sedentary at the park, while odds of being sedentary at the park were lower for boys and youth who met physical activity guidelines. Organized team activities may encourage active use of higher quality fields and courts parks by Latino youth; thereby, increasing their level of physical activity. PMID:20924779

Perry, Cynthia K; Saelens, Brain E; Thompson, Beti

2011-06-01

354

115. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of roadway alignment around ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

115. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of roadway alignment around alligator back and parking overlook in foreground. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

355

UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project University of Minnesota  

E-print Network

UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project University of Minnesota Public Comment Forum and Open ­ Steven Lott, Co-project manager, UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project 6:40 The UMore Park Sand

Netoff, Theoden

356

FACING NORTH ALONG CANDLER PARK DRIVE TOWARD NORTHWEST CORNER OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FACING NORTH ALONG CANDLER PARK DRIVE TOWARD NORTHWEST CORNER OF PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

357

FACING NORTH ALONG CANDLER PARK DRIVE (WESTERN BOUNDARY OF CANDLER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FACING NORTH ALONG CANDLER PARK DRIVE (WESTERN BOUNDARY OF CANDLER PARK IS RIGHT SIDE OF ROAD IN PHOTOGRAPH) - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

358

YWCA building near the corner of Grand Central Avenue and Plant Avenue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Black and white photograph of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) building in Tampa's Hyde Park neighborhood. The two-storey building is framed by palm trees, and the street sign for Grand Central Avenue is visible.

Burgert Brothers

1921-01-01

359

PUBLIC CAR PARKS Social Sciences P1  

E-print Network

South Car Park P5 East Car Park P6 Botanic Gardens P7 Registration Center P8 Dental School P9 Mitchell PCeS Botanical Gardens 23 Terry and Lawrence Bessner Building for Zoological Research 10 Jack Green Building LAw Trubowicz Building of Law 34 W.A. Minkoff Building of Law 48 medICIne Maurice and Gabriela

Einat, Aharonov

360

Proposed Parking Changes June 1, 2010  

E-print Network

and patching of parking facilities), Electricity for headbolts, and off-campus lease costs for some parking. This would change a meter violation to $25.00 from the current $20.00. A violation for blocking a walkway or stairway would change from the current $30 to $35. Vehicle Immobilization (Boot Fee) Increase from

Wagner, Diane

361

University of Maryland College Park Physics Department  

E-print Network

University of Maryland­ College Park Physics Department Physics Summer Girls Program Application Mail to: Bernie Kozlowski 1120 Physics Building University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 NAME why you are interested in the summer physics program at the University of Maryland. NO APPLICATION

Lathrop, Daniel P.

362

Parks, Buffer Zones, and Costly Enforcement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reality of protected area management is that enforcing forest and park boundaries is costly and so most likely incomplete, due in part to the pressures exerted on the boundaries by local people who often have traditionally relied on the park resources. Buffer zones are increasingly being proposed and implemented to protect both forest resources and livelihoods. Developing a spatially-explicit

Elizabeth J. Z. Robinson; Heidi J. Albers

2006-01-01

363

Geology Fieldnotes: Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In addition to offering visitor information, photographs, and links, this site traces the geologic history of this park to its beginnings as sedimentary rocks 1-2 billion years ago (Precambrian). It covers episodes of mountain building and erosion, the presence of dinosaurs and volcanoes, and glaciation, ending with the park's present geological state.

364

Measurement Properties of a Park Use Questionnaire  

PubMed Central

We determined the criterion validity and test-retest reliability of a brief park use questionnaire. From five US locations, 232 adults completed a brief survey four times and wore a global positioning system (GPS) monitor for three weeks. We assessed validity for park visits during the past week and during a usual week by examining agreement between frequency and duration of park visits reported in the questionnaire to the GPS monitor results. Spearman correlation coefficients (SCC) were used to measure agreement. For past week park visit frequency and duration, the SCC were 0.62–0.65 and 0.62–0.67, respectively. For usual week park visit frequency and duration, the SCC were 0.40–0.50 and 0.50–0.53, respectively. Usual park visit frequency reliability was 0.78–0.88 (percent agreement 69%–82%) and usual park visit duration was 0.75–0.84 (percent agreement 64%–73%). These results suggest that the questionnaire to assess usual and past week park use had acceptable validity and reliability. PMID:23853386

Evenson, Kelly R.; Wen, Fang; Golinelli, Daniela; Rodríguez, Daniel A.; Cohen, Deborah A.

2012-01-01

365

Geology Fieldnotes: Keweenaw National Historic Park, Michigan  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service site provides geological history, visitor information, maps, and selected links for further details. This park is located on the Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior in Michigan, situated on a 1.1 billion year old (Precambrian) continental rift. The history is traced back to the days of copper mining by the Calumet and Hecla Mining Company.

366

Discovery Park Impact Network for Photovoltaic Technology  

E-print Network

Discovery Park Impact Network for Photovoltaic Technology NEED Discovery Park provides for Photovoltaic Technology (NPT). The NPT is designed to be a unique venue for industry-directed, university aims to become an international center of gravity for photovoltaic research that connects islands

Holland, Jeffrey

367

Big Bend National Park Virtual Field Trip  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Big Bend National Park Virtual Field Trip is a guide to the features and geological history of the Big Bend National Park area through the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras. The site explains igneous (intrusive, extrusive, and pyroclastic), sedimentary (erosional and depositional), metamorphic and structural processes. There is also a virtual hike of the Lost Mine Trail.

Neal, Cain; Neal, Leslie

368

The Arrest Records of Rosa Parks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on the arrest of Rosa Parks and the effects this event had on the Civil Rights Movement. Offers a collection of teaching activities in which the students examine the arrest records of Rosa Parks and explains that these activities are designed to accompany a unit on racial segregation. (CMK)

Bredhoff, Stacey; Schamel, Wynell; Potter, Lee Ann

1999-01-01

369

PARKING MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING AUTOMOBILE EMISSIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

This report defines the concept of parking management and explores how parking management can be used to improve air quality, support mass transit, reduce energy consumption and improve the amenities of life in urban areas. Specific aspects of this analysis were developments of a...

370

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-01-01

371

Asulkan Valley Avalanche Track, Glacier National Park  

E-print Network

Asulkan Valley Avalanche Track, Glacier National Park Penelope Simpson, Jessica Paramio Maciej with the use of these trails ranges from bear encounters to triggering an avalanche. As in many mountainous regions, a high avalanche risk exists in the park during the winter due to the steep, rugged terrain

Smith, Dan

372

Design of Parking Lots and Garages.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Layout, control, and sign posting in the design of parking facilities is discussed emphasizing self parking and automated control. Considerations such as site, traffic, function of the facility, city codes, and sizes are related to design considerations. Traffic control factors are related to the direction and placement of cars and the collection…

McConochie, William R.

373

1Nanomaterials for Energy Group Byungwoo Park  

E-print Network

-Dot- and Dye- Sensitized Solar Cells DSSC SONY DSSC KIST #12;5Nanomaterials for Energy Group e-e- h' for DSSC J-V Curve C. Nahm, H. Choi, J. Kim, S. Byun, S. Kang, T. Hwang, H. H. Park, J. Ko, and B. Park

Cho, Jaephil

374

Directions & Parking for Calit2 Building at  

E-print Network

the toll road begins) and turn left onto Bison. Turn right onto East Peltason. Turn left at Anteater Drive into Anteater Parking Structure. Exit structure by foot to East Peltason and follow pedestrian signs to Calit2 East Peltason. Turn right at Anteater Drive into Anteater Parking Structure. Exit structure by foot

George, Steven C.

375

Yellowstone National Park Region Seismicity Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This University of Utah website provides numerous maps of the Yellowstone National Park area that show the location and magnitude of historical earthquakes. Time intervals include the previous day, week, 30-days, 90-days, year, 1973 to present, 1973-1981, and 1983 to present. The maps also include latitude and longitude, park boundary, and fault information.

Stations, University O.

376

Wetland Resources of Yellowstone National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Yellowstone National Park online report provides an overview of the park's wetlands and associated flora and fauna. Chapters include wetland plants, wetlands and wildlife, wetlands and people, thermal wetlands, a wetland inventory, wetland classification and acreage, and others. Information is presented as text, photos, graphs, tables, and maps.

Elliott Charles

377

Geology of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mount Rainier National Park includes 378 square miles of rugged terrain on the west slope of the Cascade Mountains in central Washington. Its mast imposing topographic and geologic feature is glacier-clad Mount Rainier. This volcano, composed chiefly of flows of pyroxene andesite, was built upon alt earlier mountainous surface, carved from altered volcanic and sedimentary rocks invaded by plutonic and hypabyssal igneous rocks of great complexity. The oldest rocks in the park area are those that make up the Olmnapecosh Formation of late Eocene age. This formation is more than 10,000 feet thick, and consists almost entirely of volcanic debris. It includes some lensoid accumulations of lava and coarse mudflows, heaped around volcanic centers., but these are surrounded by vastly greater volumes of volcanic clastic rocks, in which beds of unstratified coarse tuff-breccia, about 30 feet in average thickness, alternate with thin-bedded breccias, sandstones, and siltstones composed entirely of volcanic debris. The coarser tuff-breccias were probably deposited from subaqueous volcanic mudflows generated when eruption clouds were discharged directly into water, or when subaerial ash flows and mudflows entered bodies of water. The less mobile mudflows and viscous lavas built islands surrounded by this sea of thinner bedded water-laid clastics. In compostion the lava flows and coarse lava fragments of the Ohanapecosh Formation are mostly andesite, but they include less abundant dacite, basalt, and rhyolite. The Ohanapecosh Formation was folded, regionally altered to minerals characteristic of the zeolite facies of metamorphism, uplifted, and deeply eroded before the overlying Stevens Ridge Formation of Oligocene or early Miocene age was deposited upon it. The Stevens Ridge rocks, which are about 3,000 feet in maximum total thickness, consist mainly of massive ash flows. These are now devitrified and altered, but they originally consisted of rhyodacite pumice lapilli and glass shards, which compacted and welded into thick massive units during emplacement and cooling. Subordinate water-laid clastic rocks occur t(ward the top of the formation, and thin-bedded pyroclastic layers occur between some of the ash flows. Exposures on Backbone Ridge and on Carbon River below the mouth of Cataract Creek show that in places the thick basal Stevens Ridge ash flows swept with great violence over an old erosion surface developed on rocks of the Ohanapecosh Formation. Masses of mud, tree trunks, and other surface debris were swirled upward into the base of the lowermost ash fiery, and lobes and tongues of hot ash were forced downward into. the saprolitic mud. The Stevens Ridge Formation is concordantly overlain by the Fifes Peak Formation of probable early Miocene age, which consists of lava flows, subordinate mudflows, and minor quantities of tuffaceous clastic rocks. The lavas are predominantly olivine basalt and basaltic andesite, but they include a little rhyolite. They are slightly to moderately altered: the ferromagnesian phenocrysts are generally replaced by saponite, chiprite, or carbonate ; the glass is devitrified ; and the rocks are locally permeated by veinlets of zeolite. Swarms of diabase sills and dikes are probably intrusive equivalents of the Fifes Peak lavas. The upper part of the Fifes Peak Formation has been mostly eroded from Mount Rainier National Park, but farther north, in the Cedar Lake quadrangle, it attains a thickness of more than 5,000 feet. The Fifes Peak and earlier formations were gently folded, faulted, uplifted, and eroded before the. late Miocene Tatoosh pluton worked its way upward to shallow depths and eventually broke through to the surface. The rise of the pluton was accompanied by .the injection of a complicated melange of satellitic stocks, sills, and dikes. A favored horizon for intrusion of sills was along or near the unconfo

Fiske, Richard S.; Hopson, Clifford Andrae; Waters, Aaron Clement

1963-01-01

378

Brazil & the Latin American Economy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week's In the News follows repercussions of world financial crises in the key Latin American economy of Brazil. The nine resources discussed provide background information, press coverage, and economic data on Brazil and related economies. With a population of 164 million and GDP of $480 billion, Brazil represents Latin America's largest economic force. Heavy US financial investments, however, tie Brazil directly to Dow Jones Industrial Average falls (reviewed in the September 10, 1998 Scout for Business & Economics) and their Asian and Russian causes (reviewed in the July 16, 1998 _Scout Report for Business & Economics_--http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/report/bus-econ/1998/be-980716txt.html#22). International concern for Latin America grew when Brazil lost $1.8 billion in foreign capital following drops in the Dow, September 10, 1998--a decisive factor in stock tumbles in Mexico and Venezuela as well. Such damaging results led to a bold rise in interest rates from the Banco Central do Brasil and negotiations with the IMF. A US and Brazilian market rally since September 11, however, leaves many officials hopeful for a stable Latin American future.

Waters, Megan.

1998-01-01

379

The Parkes Observatory Pulsar Data Archive  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Parkes pulsar data archive currently provides access to 144044 data files obtained from observations carried out at the Parkes observatory since the year 1991. Around 105 files are from surveys of the sky, the remainder are observations of 775 individual pulsars and their corresponding calibration signals. Survey observations are included from the Parkes 70cm and the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude surveys. Individual pulsar observations are included from young pulsar timing projects, the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array and from the PULSE@Parkes outreach program. The data files and access methods are compatible with Virtual Observatory protocols. This paper describes the data currently stored in the archive and presents ways in which these data can be searched and downloaded.

Hobbs, G.; Miller, D.; Manchester, R. N.; Dempsey, J.; Chapman, J. M.; Khoo, J.; Applegate, J.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bridle, R.; Borg, A.; Brown, A.; Burnett, C.; Camilo, F.; Cattalini, C.; Chaudhary, A.; Chen, R.; D'Amico, N.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Cornwell, T.; George, R.; Hampson, G.; Hepburn, M.; Jameson, A.; Keith, M.; Kelly, T.; Kosmynin, A.; Lenc, E.; Lorimer, D.; Love, C.; Lyne, A.; McIntyre, V.; Morrissey, J.; Pienaar, M.; Reynolds, J.; Ryder, G.; Sarkissian, J.; Stevenson, A.; Treloar, A.; van Straten, W.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, G.

2011-08-01

380

Geologic Heritage in the National Parks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What is geologic heritage, you ask? In short, it "encompasses the significant geologic features, landforms, and landscapes characteristic of our Nation." The National Park Service has a special program to document these sites and to provide the public with resources about these unique destinations. The materials here are divided into four featured programs: Fossil Resources, Geologic Heritage Conservation, Park Geology Tour, and Cave and Karst Resources. Using the Park Geology Tour, visitors can search through thematic areas such as glaciers, fossils, and plate tectonics to find highlights from a vast array of National Park units. The Cave and Karst Resources program brings together resources on some of the over 4,900 caves in the National Park system, along with detailed photo galleries, newsletters, and brochures. Finally, under Fossil Resources visitors can find information about National Fossil Day and even helpful lesson plans for teachers.

2013-03-22

381

Elk Monitoring Protocol for Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Version 1.0  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Maintaining elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) herds that frequent Lewis and Clark National Historical Park (NHP) is central to the park’s purpose of preserving the historic, cultural, scenic, and natural resources. Elk were critical to sustaining the members of the Lewis and Clark expedition by providing food and clothing over the winter of 1805-1806. Today, elk viewing opportunities in the park and surrounding region generate broad appeal with the visiting public, which number over 250,000 per year at the Fort Clatsop visitor center. This protocol describes procedures for monitoring trends in the use of the Fort Clatsop area by Roosevelt elk. Specific objectives of elk monitoring in Lewis and Clark NHP are to measure the relative use and proportion of area used by elk during winter in the Fort Clatsop Unit of the park, and the rate at which elk are sighted from roads in and around the park. Relative use and the proportion of area used by elk are determined from elk fecal pellet surveys conducted every other year in the Fort Clatsop park unit. Pairs of observers visit a systematic array of permanent plots in the fall to clear them of elk fecal pellets, and return to the plots in late winter to count elk fecal pellets that have accumulated during winter. Half of the subplots are counted by two independent observers, which allows for the estimation of relative use and proportion of area occupied by elk with analyses of detection biases that account for unseen elk pellet groups. Standardized road surveys are conducted in and near the Fort Clatsop park unit three or four times monthly during alternate months. Data from road surveys are used to quantify the rate that park visitors would be expected to see elk, when driving the selected set of routes. The monitoring protocol is based on three field seasons of development and testing. The protocol narrative describes the background, rationale, sampling design, field methods, analytical methods, data management, reporting, personnel requirements, and operational requirements for elk monitoring in Lewis and Clark NHP. The sampling design reflects tradeoffs between statistical and ecological considerations, safety, and current budget considerations. The protocol provides adequate power to detect a doubling or halving of elk use in the Fort Clatsop unit and surrounding areas within 15 years. Step-by-step guidance for planning and completing the monitoring tasks are in the attached standard operating procedures (SOPs). Information on the status and trends of elk use in Lewis and Clark NHP will allow park managers to assess the effects on elk of restoration programs within the park, build community partnerships, and identify potential linkages between regional land use changes and elk use of the Park. Lewis and Clark NHP has an active ecological restoration program that aims to recreate, where possible, ecological conditions that Lewis and Clark encountered. The restoration program includes an extensive exotic plant removal program, wetland restoration, and silvicultural treatments that will hasten development of late-seral conditions in recently acquired forest lands of the Fort Clatsop park unit. In the future, monitoring results can be used to test for spatial associations between ecological restoration treatments and relative use by elk. The park also plans to feature results from elk monitoring prominently in its educational outreach activities to help interpret the historical and current ecological context of the Lewis and Clark story, and engender public support for the park mission and management activities. Although NPS does not manage non-park lands, information about trends in the distribution of elk use will be valuable in public outreach and discussions with other partnering agencies and regional private landowners.

Jenkins, Kurt J.; Griffin, Paul; Boetsch, John R.; Cole, Carla

2011-01-01

382

The Development of the College Park Tornado of 24 September 2001  

E-print Network

The 24 September 2001 College Park, Maryland, tornado was remarkable because of its long-track that passed within a close range of two Doppler radars. This tornado featured many similarities to previous significant tornado events that resulted in widespread damage in urban areas, such as the Oklahoma City tornado of 3 May 1999. The College Park tornado was the third in a series of three tornadoes associated with a supercell storm that developed over central Virginia. This paper presents a synoptic and mesoscale overview of favorable conditions and forcing mechanisms that resulted in the severe convective outbreak associated with the College Park tornado. Convective morphology will be examined in terms of Doppler radar and satellite imagery. This study concludes with a discussion of the effectiveness of using MM5 guidance in conjunction with satellite and radar imagery in the operational environment of forecasting severe convection.

Pryor, K

2006-01-01

383

Manaus, Brazil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The junctions of the Amazon and the Rio Negro Rivers at Manaus, Brazil. The Rio Negro flows 2300 km from Columbia, and is the dark current forming the north side of the river. It gets its color from the high tannin content in the water. The Amazon is sediment laden, appearing brown in this simulated natural color image. Manaus is the capital of Amazonas state, and has a population in excess of one million. The ASTER image covers an area of 60 x 45 km. This image was acquired on July 16, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

Size: 60 x 45 km (37 x 27 miles) Location: 3.1 deg. South lat., 60.0 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: July 16, 2000

2002-01-01

384

Happy Hollow Park and Zoo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Happy Hollow Park and Zoo participates in conservation and propagation of rare and endangered species by providing hands-on experience with many animals along with the education that's necessary to secure the future of endangered species. The Zoo is in partnership with a number of organizations, including the Belize Audubon Society, the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force, the Center for Ecosystem Survival, the Orangutan Conservancy, and the Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary, to help educate the public and raise funds to protect endangered species. The interactive exhibit, Backyard Habitat, was constructed in partnership with Watershed Watch by the Happy Hollow staff using conservation grant dollars. It provides visitors with ideas on how they might turn their own backyard into wildlife habitats. Guests may also obtain a handy pamphlet at this exhibit, Invite Wildlife Into Your Backyard. Educational programs also include Pre-K classes, teacher/classroom programs, camps, Scouts programs and Zoofaris guided tours.

385

Saltfjellet-Svartisen Park, Norway  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Arctic Circle cuts through the western coast of Norway and the Saltfjellet-Svartisen National Park. This area features many glacial fjords, alpine mountain formations with glacier tongues, as well as gently sloping mountain plateaus and forested lowland valleys. The largest city here is Mo I Rana, (just off the image to the east) with a population of 25,000 (26th most populous city in Norway). Once supported entirely by the town's steel mill, the area has developed into a tourist center.

The image covers an area of 51 x 57 km, was acquired on August 23, 2006, and is located near 66.6 degrees north latitude, 13 degrees east longitude.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

2007-01-01

386

A natural experiment to examine the impact of park renewal on park-use and park-based physical activity in a disadvantaged neighbourhood: the REVAMP study methods  

PubMed Central

Background Modifying the built environment by improving parks is potentially a sustainable way to increase population level physical activity. Despite considerable investment in parks and park renovations, few natural experiments on the impact of improving amenities on park use and park-based physical activity have been conducted. REVAMP is a natural experiment that aims to examine whether park improvement increases overall park usage, park-based physical activity and active travel to and from the park in the intervention compared with the control park over a two-year period; and to identify which specific aspects of the park refurbishment attracts park visitors and encourages park users to be more active. This paper describes the methods of the REVAMP study. Methods The intervention park is a large regional park (329 hectares) located in a low socio-economic status (SES) area in the north-eastern suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. The control park is a regional park (120 hectares) located in a high SES area in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. Multiple methodologies to evaluate the impact of the park renovation are being employed including: cross-sectional surveys of local residents living near the two parks, direct observations of park users, intercept surveys with park users, and electronic monitoring of path usage and car traffic within the parks. Baseline measures were conducted in April-May 2013 (T1), and an innovative play space suitable for children of all ages and abilities was installed at the intervention park between September 2013 and February 2014. Follow-up measures will be repeated in April-May 2014 (T2) and April-May 2015 (T3). All methodologies will be completed at both the intervention and control parks at all three time-points, with the exception of the cross-sectional survey of local residents which will only be conducted at T1 and T3. Conclusion This research will inform future park developments, and will contribute to creating an evidence base of the impact of park refurbishment, and the development of natural experiment methodology. Trial Registration Current controlled trial ISRCTN50745547, registration date 11.1.2014. PMID:24924919

2014-01-01

387

Digging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks  

PubMed Central

In urban environments, green roofs provide a number of benefits, including decreased urban heat island effects and reduced energy costs for buildings. However, little research has been done on the non-plant biota associated with green roofs, which likely affect their functionality. For the current study, we evaluated whether or not green roofs planted with two native plant communities in New York City functioned as habitats for soil fungal communities, and compared fungal communities in green roof growing media to soil microbial composition in five city parks, including Central Park and the High Line. Ten replicate roofs were sampled one year after planting; three of these roofs were more intensively sampled and compared to nearby city parks. Using Illumina sequencing of the fungal ITS region we found that green roofs supported a diverse fungal community, with numerous taxa belonging to fungal groups capable of surviving in disturbed and polluted habitats. Across roofs, there was significant biogeographical clustering of fungal communities, indicating that community assembly of roof microbes across the greater New York City area is locally variable. Green roof fungal communities were compositionally distinct from city parks and only 54% of the green roof taxa were also found in the park soils. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis revealed that park soils had greater microbial biomass and higher bacterial to fungal ratios than green roof substrates. City park soils were also more enriched with heavy metals, had lower pH, and lower quantities of total bases (Ca, K, and Mg) compared to green roof substrates. While fungal communities were compositionally distinct across green roofs, they did not differentiate by plant community. Together, these results suggest that fungi living in the growing medium of green roofs may be an underestimated component of these biotic systems functioning to support some of the valued ecological services of green roofs. PMID:23469260

McGuire, Krista L.; Payne, Sara G.; Palmer, Matthew I.; Gillikin, Caitlyn M.; Keefe, Dominique; Kim, Su Jin; Gedallovich, Seren M.; Discenza, Julia; Rangamannar, Ramya; Koshner, Jennifer A.; Massmann, Audrey L.; Orazi, Giulia; Essene, Adam; Leff, Jonathan W.; Fierer, Noah

2013-01-01

388

Geology Fieldnotes: Yosemite National Park, California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Park Service (NPS) site details Yosemite National Park in California with information such as geology, photographs, links to maps and other facts, and visitor information. Yosemite's landscape is shaped by alpine glaciation landforms such as moraines, plucking, scouring, and U-shaped valleys. Part of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, formation of the area began 500 million years ago (Cambrian). This site details the geologic history of the park up to the present time with continued evolution through weathering and erosion. Also discussed are the wilderness and vegetation (sub-alpine and Sequoia groves).

389

Geology of Death Valley National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site of the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS) highlights the geologic history of Death Valley National Park in Nevada and California. The story begins 1.8 billion years ago with the formation of rocks and continues through uplift, faulting, volcanism, early animals of the area, glaciers, and the making of deserts and dunes. A geologic timescale connects to specific events in the history of Death Valley. There are topographic maps of the area, a field trip of the park, an image gallery, and technical papers available to download.

390

The quandary of local people—Park relations in Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper analyzes five major causes of park-people conflicts that have occurred in Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park. The causes include illegal transactions of forest products from the park, livestock grazing in the park, illegal hunting and fishing, crop damage, and threats to human and animal life caused by wild animals from the park. The conflicts indicate a reciprocal relationship between the park and local people. They reflect the attitudes of local people and representatives of the park authority whose priorities and objectives largely diverge. The results show that people settled adjacent to the park are heavily dependent on its resources. Even in places where some, albeit few alternative sources exist, local people continue to trespass the park boundary as these sources are inadequate to ensure the fulfillment of local people's resource needs. Illegal transactions of resources continue throughout the year; however, they are less intense during summer due to flooding caused by the Rapti River, which forms the park boundary towards the northern section where this study is conducted. The frequency of local people's visits to the park is mainly determined by their age, distance between homesteads and park, and volume of crop loss caused by wild animals. Crop damage is the function of size of landholding, distance, and frequency of crop raid. Local people claim that they have no intention of letting their livestock graze in the park; however, the dense vegetation of the park attracts livestock grazing on riverbanks just outside the open park boundary. Many head of livestock are killed by carnivores of the park. Human casualties are mainly caused by sloth bear ( Melursus ursinus), tiger ( Panthera tigris), wild pig ( Sug scrofa), and rhinoceros ( Rhinoceros unicornis). There had been some earlier attempts to reconcile the conflicts by offering local people different kinds of compensations; however, these were unsuccessful measures. An integrated approach is essential if efforts to resolve the park-people conflicts are to succeed. The government is in the process of launching a project that aims to resolve the inherent problems with such an approach. Suggestions are made to incorporate some key elements, such as maintaining effective communication between various parties and the potential for wildlife conservation among local people.

Nepal, Sanjay K.; Weber, Karl E.

1995-11-01

391

BRAZIL RESEARCH INITIATIVES  

E-print Network

BRAZIL RESEARCH INITIATIVES Michigan State University (MSU) identifies Brazil as a global priority and challenges become increasingly part of the U.S.-Brazil agenda, MSU desires partnerships aimed at producing in the U.S. and one in Brazil, to share research strategies and explore joint projects in several research

Liu, Taosheng

392

Rotary car park (pallet design) computer aided design analysis study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increment of vehicle in UiTM main campus had contributed to parking problem because of limited parking space. Hence, rotary parking system could be one of alternative solution. Since it is a big system, this research focuses only on the platform (where cars will be parked on top of it) upper pallet structure. Initial design process stage [1] (conceptual, embodiement

Nursalbiah Nasir; Helmi Rashid; Abdul Halim Abdullah; Muhammad Azzeim Mat Jusoh

2011-01-01

393

36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2...THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May...

2010-07-01

394

36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2...THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May...

2012-07-01

395

36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2...THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May...

2014-07-01

396

1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, FROM PARK AND MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, FROM PARK AND MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS, ALONG 20TH STREET NORTH TOWARDS THE BIRMINGHAM CITY CENTER WITH BIRMINGHAM MUSEUM OF ART (BOTTOM LEFT), BIRMINGHAM MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM (BOTTOM RIGHT), BIRMINGHAM CITY HALL (CENTER RIGHT), JEFFERSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE (CENTER LEFT) AND LINN PARK (CENTER) - Linn Park, Bounded by Park Place, Eighth Avenue, Short Twentieth & Twenty-first Streets, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

397

36 CFR 7.66 - North Cascades National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false North Cascades National Park. 7.66 ...PARK SYSTEM § 7.66 North Cascades National Park. (a) Bait...superintendent may designate as open to the use of snowmobiles...National Park: (1) The Cascade River Road between the...

2010-07-01

398

9. VIEW FROM MANY PARKS CURVE (ON TRAIL RIDGE ROAD) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. VIEW FROM MANY PARKS CURVE (ON TRAIL RIDGE ROAD) OF HORSESHOE PARK, SHOWING FALL RIVER ROAD FAINTLY AT LEFT AT BASE OF SHEEP MOUNTAIN AND CROSSING ALLUVIAL FAN FROM LAWN LAKE FLOOD. - Fall River Road, Between Estes Park & Fall River Pass, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO

399

36 CFR 7.41 - Big Bend National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Big Bend National Park. 7.41 Section 7.41 Parks, Forests...REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.41 Big Bend National Park. (a) Fishing; closed waters....

2010-07-01

400

36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests...REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park. (a) Fishing. (1) Fishing...

2013-07-01

401

36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests...REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park. (a) Fishing. (1) Fishing...

2012-07-01

402

36 CFR 7.93 - Guadalupe Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guadalupe Mountains National Park. 7.93 Section 7.93 Parks, Forests...AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.93 Guadalupe Mountains National Park. (a) Cave entry. No person shall...

2013-07-01

403

36 CFR 7.93 - Guadalupe Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guadalupe Mountains National Park. 7.93 Section 7.93 Parks, Forests...AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.93 Guadalupe Mountains National Park. (a) Cave entry. No person shall...

2012-07-01

404

36 CFR 7.93 - Guadalupe Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guadalupe Mountains National Park. 7.93 Section 7.93 Parks, Forests...AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.93 Guadalupe Mountains National Park. (a) Cave entry. No person shall...

2010-07-01

405

36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests...REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park. (a) Fishing. (1) Fishing...

2014-07-01

406

36 CFR 7.93 - Guadalupe Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guadalupe Mountains National Park. 7.93 Section 7.93 Parks, Forests...AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.93 Guadalupe Mountains National Park. (a) Cave entry. No person shall...

2014-07-01

407

36 CFR 7.93 - Guadalupe Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guadalupe Mountains National Park. 7.93 Section 7.93 Parks, Forests...AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.93 Guadalupe Mountains National Park. (a) Cave entry. No person shall...

2011-07-01

408

Case Studies Relating to UMore Park UMore Development LLC  

E-print Network

Case Studies Relating to UMore Park UMore Development LLC 230 McNamara Alumni Center 200 Oak Street.edu #12;Case Studies: UMore Park Martin Kohn Summer 2012 2 Executive Summary In order to better understand Park (UMore Park) case studies were carried out on other successful planned communities

Netoff, Theoden

409

Building for Quality Education--The Educational Park Concept.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Speakers and discussions at this one day conference were dedicated to building for quality education, with major emphasis on the concept of educational parks. The five major speeches are--(1) Advantages and Disadvantages of Educational Parks, (2) Educational Parks: Appalachian Style, emphasizing a twist in the park idea in order to accommodate…

McClurkin, W.D.

410

Induced volition: Resettlement from the Limpopo National Park, Mozambique  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on the resettlement process taking place in the context of the creation of the Limpopo National Park in Mozambique, which is part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park. About 26,000 people are currently living in the park; 7000 of whom will be resettled to an area southeast of the park. The Mozambican government and donors funding the

Jessica Milgroom; Marja Spierenburg

2008-01-01

411

Rural Latino Youth Park Use: Characteristics, Park Amenities, and Physical Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Less than half of youth engage in sufficient physical activity to achieve health benefits. Key environmental factors of park\\u000a and recreation spaces may influence youth physical activity. We sought to ascertain youth characteristics and behaviors that\\u000a attract youth to parks with specific amenities and encourage physical activity while at the parks in a rural, predominantly\\u000a Latino community. We examined the

Cynthia K. PerryBrain; Brain E. Saelens; Beti Thompson

2011-01-01

412

15 CFR 265.17 - Parking permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...REGULATIONS GOVERNING TRAFFIC AND CONDUCT ON THE GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS & TECHNOLOGY, GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND, AND BOULDER AND FORT COLLINS, COLORADO Traffic and Vehicular Regulations § 265.17 Parking permits. No...

2013-01-01

413

15 CFR 265.17 - Parking permits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...REGULATIONS GOVERNING TRAFFIC AND CONDUCT ON THE GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS & TECHNOLOGY, GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND, AND BOULDER AND FORT COLLINS, COLORADO Traffic and Vehicular Regulations § 265.17 Parking permits. No...

2010-01-01

414

15 CFR 265.16 - Parking.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...REGULATIONS GOVERNING TRAFFIC AND CONDUCT ON THE GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS & TECHNOLOGY, GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND, AND BOULDER AND FORT COLLINS, COLORADO Traffic and Vehicular Regulations § 265.16 Parking. No person,...

2014-01-01

415

Fire Damage in Yosemite National Park  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The sequoia forests of Yosemite National Park rely on a fire ecology-based ecosystem. Periodic forest fires clear out underbrush and shade-tolerant trees like white fir trees, allowing sequoia seedlings to reach adulthood. ...

416

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA, a high mountain lake in an alpine setting. This lake is kept full of water mainly from precipitation runoff from the surrounding hills and, in the spring, from snowmelt....

417

SECTION ELEVEN Site Design Guidelines Parking  

E-print Network

outlines loca ons for these facili es. Parking lots should be considered according to the following criteria: Their size in rela on to the facili es they serve and to site limita ons such as: available

Duchowski, Andrew T.

418

Parking & Transportation Department RESIDENT -PERSONAL INFORMATION  

E-print Network

_____________________________________________________________________________________ Please be sure to contact the Parking & Transportation Department with any changes to your information, i.e. personal or vehicle. For Office Use Only: Reg Date: ________________ Permit Issue Date

Oliver, Douglas L.

419

Urban Parks: Volunteers and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

When citizens are engaged with urban park and recreation departments, everyone benefits. This publication describes successful programs that involve community volunteers, and explains what managers can do to engage citizens in such programs....

Schuett, Michael A.

2007-03-02

420

Occurrence of breeding bird species in urban parks: Effects of park structure and broad-scale variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occurrences of breeding bird species in 54 urban parks were investigated in the city of Oulu in northern Finland. Park area, human activity, habitat, and landscape structure within a 9-ha square surrounding the study park were related to the bird species richness and occurrence of individual bird species. A total of 22 species was observed. The area of the park

Jukka Jokimäki

1999-01-01

421

Parking at or near Smithsonian Museums At Smithsonian museums: The Smithsonian does not operate any commercial parking facilities; however,  

E-print Network

throughout the city; time limit varies by street. A. Commercial parking companies in Washington, D commercial parking facilities; however, there are numerous commercial parking lots and garages located within.si.edu. Near Smithsonian museums: On-street parking in Washington, D.C., is limited; the use of public

Mathis, Wayne N.

422

Geology Fieldnotes: Zion National Park, Utah  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Zion is located on the edge of the Colorado Plateau, and is part of a formation known as the Grand Staircase (Bryce Canyon and the Grand Canyon are also part of this formation). The site discusses the formation of the park, from sedimentation 240 million years ago (Triassic), to lithification, uplift, and erosion. Visible formations include the Navajo sandstone and the Kaibab formation. Additional resources include visitor information, maps, photographs, and a teacher feature (lessons for teaching geology with National Parks as examples).

Foos, Annabelle

423

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago�s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-01

424

Acid Rain in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Visitors to Shenandoah National Park (SNP) enjoy the animal and plant life and the scenery but may not realize how vulnerable these features are to various threats, such as invasion of exotic plants and insects, improper use of park resources by humans, and air and water pollution. The National Park Service strives to protect natural resources from such threats to ensure that the resources will be available for enjoyment now and in the future. Because SNP has limited influence over the air pollution that envelops the region, acidic deposition--commonly known as acid rain--is one of the more challenging threats facing park managers. With the help of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists, park managers can understand how acid rain interacts with ground- and surface-water resources, which enables them to explain why reductions in air pollution can help preserve park resources. Such understanding also provides essential insight into ecosystem processes, as managers strive to unravel and resolve other environmental problems that are interrelated to acid rain.

Rice, Karen C.; Deviney, Frank A., Jr.; Olson, Gordon

2007-01-01

425

Automated parking garage system model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A one-twenty-fifth scale model of the key components of an automated parking garage system is described. The design of the model required transferring a vehicle from an entry level, vertically (+Z, -Z), to a storage location at any one of four storage positions (+X, -X, +Y, +Y, -Y) on the storage levels. There are three primary subsystems: (1) a screw jack to provide the vertical motion of the elevator, (2) a cam-driven track-switching device to provide X to Y motion, and (3) a transfer cart to provide horizontal travel and a small amount to vertical motion for transfer to the storage location. Motive power is provided by dc permanent magnet gear motors, one each for the elevator and track switching device and two for the transfer cart drive system (one driving the cart horizontally and the other providing the vertical transfer). The control system, through the use of a microprocessor, provides complete automation through a feedback system which utilizes sensing devices.

Collins, E. R., Jr.

1975-01-01

426

National Park Service: Dry Tortugas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The website for the Dry Tortugas, a group of seven islands 70 miles off the coast of Key West, and a National Park site, will warm visitors instantly with its photos of the blue and green waters and sun-kissed lands. The website also offers visitors lots of background on these islands that are "near-pristine natural resources including sea grass beds, fisheries, and sea turtle and bird nesting habitat." On the left hand side of the homepage are links to "History and Culture", "Photos and Multimedia", "Nature and Science", and "For Kids". The "History and Culture" section called "Places" provides the Tortugas' history as a "ship trap" with the subcategories "Windjammer Shipwreck", "Fort Jefferson" and "Lighthouses". Visitors shouldn't miss checking out the "Preservation" category, which includes "Submerged Cultural Resources". Visitors can view a short slide show of the underwater cultural treasures on which archaeological survey crews conduct condition assessments. Some of the treasures include cannons and anchors that now reside in the South Florida Collections Management Center.

427

Parking/Carpooling/Busing options for Daniels Recital Hall 811 5th Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (5th & Marion)  

E-print Network

this garage closes at 7pm on Sunday. Going by Bus: You can park your car at the UW Campus central garage to the map. street map of downtown seattle wa and daniels recital hall - Google Maps http://maps.google

428

Digital geologic map and database of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park and Potomac River corridor, District of Columbia, Virginia, Maryland, and West Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Chesapeake and Ohio (CO) Canal National Historical Park is unique in that it is the only land within the National Park system that crosses 5 physiographic provinces along a major river. From Georgetown, District of Columbia (D.C.) to Cumberland, Maryland (Md.), the CO Canal provides an opportunity to examine the geologic history of the central Appalachian region and how the canal contributed to the development of this area. The geologic map data covers the 184.5-mile long park in a 2-mile wide corridor centered on the Potomac River

Southworth, C. Scott; Brezinski, David K.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Chirico, Peter G.; Lagueux, Kerry M.

2001-01-01

429

Holocene climate in the western Great Lakes national parks and lakeshores: Implications for future climate change  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We reconstruct Holocene climate history (last 10,000 years) for each of the U.S. National Park Service units in the western Great Lakes region in order to evaluate their sensitivity to global warming. Annual precipitation, annual temperature, and July and January temperatures were reconstructed by comparing fossil pollen in lake sediment with pollen in surface samples, assuming that ancient climates were similar to modern climate near analogous surface samples. In the early Holocene, most of the parks experienced colder winters, warmer summers, and lower precipitation than today. An exception is Voyageurs National Park in northern Minnesota where, by 8000 years ago, January temperatures were higher than today. The combination of high mean annual temperature and lower precipitation at Voyageurs resulted in a dry period between 8000 and 5000 years ago, similar to the Prairie Period in regions to the south and west. A mid-Holocene warm-dry period also occurred at other northern and central parks but was much less strongly developed. In southern parks there was no clear evidence of a mid-Holocene warm-dry period. These differences suggest that global model predictions of a warm, dry climate in the northern Great Plains under doubled atmospheric CO2 may be more applicable to Voyageurs than to the other parks. The contrast in reconstructed temperatures at Voyageurs and Isle Royale indicates that the ameliorating effect of the Great Lakes on temperatures has been in effect throughout the Holocene and presumably will continue in the future, thus reducing the potential for species loss caused by future temperature extremes. Increased numbers of mesic trees at all of the parks in the late Holocene reflect increasing annual precipitation. This trend toward more mesic conditions began 6000 years ago in the south and 4000 years ago in the north and increased sharply in recent millennia at parks located today in lake-effect snow belts. This suggests that lake-effect snowfall is sensitive to continental-scale changes in climate and could be affected by future climate change. Plant and animal species sensitive to changes in the moisture regime could thus be endangered within the Great Lakes parks.

Davis, Margaret; Douglas, Christine; Cole, K.L.; Winkler, Marge; Flaknes, Robyn

2000-01-01

430

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Traffic and Parking: Current Issues, Future Solutions Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) is experiencing increased visitor use and congestion/  

E-print Network

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Traffic and Parking: Current Issues, Future Solutions Hawaii, and unsafe practices. This project will record and analyze these issues. NPS staff and University of Hawaii

Prevedouros, Panos D.

431

ParkingPermit.docx 11/2/2012 Eligibility for Visitors/Temporary Parking Permits  

E-print Network

employees) to the Statler College can receive a single day visitor Parking Permit for lots 40, 41, 44 campus can park on Evansdale campus in lots 42, 44(54), 45, 46, 50, or 52. Maps found at ... http://www.its.statler

Mohaghegh, Shahab

432

Bark in the Park: A Review of Domestic Dogs in Parks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The presence of domestic dogs Canis familiaris in public open spaces is increasingly controversial. In our review of the literature, we located 133 publications of various types (papers, reports etc.) that examine some aspect of dogs in parks and open spaces (50 % focussed solely on dogs). There has been an exponential growth in the cumulative number of articles ( R 2 = 0.96; 82 % published since 1997); almost all pertain to temperate latitudes (97 %) and most to the northern hemisphere (62 %). Most articles focus on impacts on wildlife (51 %), zoonotic diseases (17 %), and people's perceptions regarding dogs (12 %). Articles mostly describe problems associated with dogs, while reports of low compliance with dog regulations are common. We outline six major findings regarding dogs in parks: (1) there is a paucity of information on dogs in parks, particularly in relation to their interactions with wildlife and regarding their management; (2) published studies are mainly restricted to a handful of locations in developed countries; (3) sectors of societies hold different views over the desirability of dogs in parks; (4) the benefits and risks of dogs to humans and park values are poorly documented and known; (5) dogs represent a notable disease risk in some but not all countries; and (6) coastal parks are over-represented in the literature in terms of potential negative impacts. Park managers globally require better information to achieve conservation outcomes from dog management in parks.

Weston, Michael A.; Fitzsimons, James A.; Wescott, Geoffrey; Miller, Kelly K.; Ekanayake, Kasun B.; Schneider, Thomas

2014-09-01

433

Public Parking is available at an hourly rate at the University Square car park.  

E-print Network

Public Parking is available at an hourly rate at the University Square car park. Enter via Bouverie, Parkville ABSTRACT: There were search engines before Google, and they should have served us well, but spammers were able to render early search engines useless. The key innovations in Google -- Page

Heiser, Gernot

434

Assessment of Soil Erosion at a DC Park Facility Spring Valley Park  

E-print Network

1 Assessment of Soil Erosion at a DC Park Facility Spring Valley Park NW Washington, DC Annual of this project is to provide a preliminary site inventory and assessment of soil erosion for the Spring Valley erosion. Due to its location relative to the University and small size it was determined to be an ideal

District of Columbia, University of the

435

Job Placement Manual: Forest Park Senior High School: Forest Park, Georgia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The job placement manual of Forest Park Senior High School, Forest Park, Georgia, assists in producing a more effective program by providing specific job placement procedures for the high school. The 1,900 student high school, located in a suburban area south of Atlanta, had 522 graduates in 1974 (42 percent--college-bound, 10 percent--technical…

Simpson, Wayne

436

Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management Park Management Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

16000 Foundations of Recreation and Leisure 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 1Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Park Management ­ Bachelor of Science [EH Diversity 4 Fulfills Kent Core Basic Sciences RPTM 26030 Recreation Group Leadership 3 PSYC 11762 General

Sheridan, Scott

437

Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management Park Management Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

16000 Foundations of Recreation and Leisure 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State: FYE 1 Not requiredRoadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Park Management ­ Bachelor of Science [EH Requirements 3 Kent Core Requirements 3 Semester Two: [15 Credit Hours] RPTM 26030 Recreation Group Leadership

Sheridan, Scott

438

Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for central venous access device occlusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maintaining and restoring the function of central venous access devices (CVAD) is an important component of pediatric oncology nursing care. Until 1999, Abbokinase Open Cath (urokinase; Abbott, Abbott Park, IL), a thrombolytic agent was the product primarily used to resolve thrombotic occlusions in intravascular devices. Changes in the manufacturing process mandated by the FDA have resulted in a lack of

Casey Hooke

2000-01-01

439

Pesticides in amphibian habitats of central and northern California  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Amphibians in California are facing serious population declines. Contaminants, especially pesticides, have been linked to these declines. This study reports on a survey of central and northern California wetlands sampled along four transects associated with Lassen National Park, Lake Tahoe, Yosemit...

440

Cicada Central  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, hosted by University of Connecticut, "is designed to be a center for the exchange of scientific information concerning cicadas of the world." This Cicada Central website links to reprints for scientific literature concerning cicadas, a list of cicada researchers from around the world, a list of world cicada tribes, and more.

Simon, Chris

441

Engineering Central  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Engineering Central website provides a plethora of listings of employment resources for engineers. The website allows users to submit their resume to a resume bank, browse through entry-level jobs, as well as post jobs online. Several links that point to other engineering resources are also provided.

1999-01-01

442

[Occurrence of Platynosomum illiciens in enclosured wild cats in the state of Bahia, Brazil].  

PubMed

This paper reports the occurrence of eggs of Platynosomum illiciens, found in the feces of three species of wild cats Herpailurus yagouaroundi, Puma concolor and Leopardus tigrinus from material collected at the enclosures of the Park Zoobotânico Getúlio Vargas in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. It is the first record of this parasite in P. onca and L. tigrinus. PMID:19265585

Castro, Letícia S de; Albuquerque, George R

2008-01-01

443

Conservation-related Resettlement in Central Africa: Environmental and Social Risks  

E-print Network

Conservation-related Resettlement in Central Africa: Environmental and Social Risks Kai Schmidt and the creation of national parks to be priorities, resettlements resulting from conservation projects in Central Africa have been on the increase, as people living inside protected areas are relocated. Hardly any

Wilmers, Chris

444

The Schome Park Programme: Exploring Educational Alternatives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Schome Park Programme set out to extend thinking about what the education system for the information age (Schome) should be like. The first three phases of the programme spanned 13 months and involved the use of Schome Park, our "closed" island(s) in Teen Second LifeTM (TSL) virtual world alongside a wiki and forum. During this time approximately two hundred 13-17 year olds and around 50 adults were given access to Schome Park. Having explained the context in which this work took place the paper outlines the initial educational design underpinning the programme and describes some of the activities which took place. It goes on to explore some dimensions of practice which emerged from the data analysis towards the end of Phase 3, focusing on learner experiences of experimentation, playfulness, curriculum, choice, participation and the expression of the learner voice.

Twining, Peter; Footring, Shri

445

Falls of the Ohio State Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Falls of the Ohio State Park, on the banks of the Ohio river, is home to 386 million year old fossil beds, among the largest naturally exposed Devonian fossil beds in the world. The interpretive center, featuring a video presentation and exhibit gallery, overlooks the fossil beds. The Park holds a number of special events throughout the year, including fossil bed hikes, Young Paleontologist camp, summer programs for kids, geology, archeology, and paleontology workshops, and environmental education. There are several downloadable resources from the website, including illustrated information on brachiopods, crinoids, and trilobites, as well as activities to foster learning about life in the Devonian seas. In addition to the interpretive center, there are the Ohio River and Coral Reef Aquariums where visitors can view many species of fish, corals and other invertebrates. While fossil collecting is prohibited, the park staff encourages visitors to explore and discover the many different types of fossils that can be found on the ancient sea bottom.

446

Geochemistry and origin of the early Mesoproterozoic mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite association of the Serra da Providência suite and associated gabbros, central-eastern Rondônia, SW Amazonian Craton, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Serra da Providência suite (SPS) is constituted of quartz mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite and coeval mafic rocks, intruded during the 1.60-1.53 Ga interval into Paleoproterozoic metamorphic basement (Jamari Complex) in the Juruena-Rondônia geochronologic province, SW Amazonian Craton. In this region the Serra da Providência suite consists of two batholiths and several small plutons represented by syeno-monzogranites and igneous quartz mangerite and charnockites. The Serra da Providência granites are ferroan, calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic and characterized by high Na2O + K2O, Rb, Zr, Y, Nb, Ta, Ce, Zn, Ga, and REE (except for Eu), moderate Ba, and low Sr, MgO, and CaO. Ga/Al, Y/Nb, FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) and K2O/Na2O ratios are high and Sr/Ba and Rb/Ba are low and are geochemically similar to typical A2-subtype granites. The SPS charnockites and quartz mangerites display values of FeOT, MgO, CaO, Ba, Rb, Sr, Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf similar to the SPS A-type granites. The occurrence of magnetite as an accessory phase and the high FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) in granites, charnockites and quartz mangerites suggest crystallization from a relatively oxidized magma and also explain the occurrence of titanite as a primary phase in these granites, similar to those reported in several localities of the Amazonian Craton. The parental magma of the mafic rocks of the SPS probably had mainly enriched sources and resulted from melting of heterogeneous mantle reservoirs with coherent chemical characteristics. Trace elements data indicate subduction-modified mantle sources for the mafic rocks that are in agreement with the post-collisional character of this magmatism. A large set of whole-rock Sm-Nd isotope data (Bettencourt et al., 1999; Scandolara, 2006; Santos et al., 2008 and this work) demonstrate that granites, charnockites and quartz mangerites of the study area are the product of magmas derived from interaction between enriched mantle derived magmas (in very subordinate proportions) and recycled crust in larger proportion. The source region is dominated by Paleoproterozoic material, but several samples yield Archaean model ages that are the first evidence for such ancient source materials in the SW Amazonian Craton. The Serra da Providência suite was emplaced during the post-collisional stage of the Juruena-Jamari arc and Madeirinha orogeny (Scandolara et al., 2011), and post-dates the collision between the Tapajós (Tapajós-Parima geochronological province, Pará, Brazil) and Bolívia (palaeocontinent which precedes Sunsás geochronological province) blocks. Its geochemical and structural features are coincident with those recognized in post-collisional granitoids. Geochemical data suggest that complex processes which involved crustal melting, fractional crystallization, magma mixing and, in some extent, crustal assimilation were responsible for the magmatism of the Serra da Providência suite. The magmas that constitute the Serra da Providência suite resulted from varying degrees of partial melting of a compositionally heterogeneous source. The nature of the source and the degree of melting exerted a significant control over compositional variation in some of the parental magmas which were also affected by subsequent fractional crystallization and mingling processes. Internal variations in composition observed in several bodies can be the result of incremental amalgamation of different magma pulses that varied mainly in the degree of partial melting.

Scandolara, Jaime E.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Dantas, Elton L.

2013-08-01

447

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management  

E-print Network

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Park-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Park Management ­ Bachelor of Science [EH

Sheridan, Scott

448

78 FR 60309 - Minor Boundary Revision at Rocky Mountain National Park  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1] Minor Boundary Revision at Rocky Mountain National Park AGENCY: National Park...SUMMARY: The boundary of Rocky Mountain National Park is modified to include...the current eastern boundary of Rocky Mountain National Park. DATES: The...

2013-10-01

449

109. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of alligator back and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

109. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of alligator back and the parkway seen from bluff mountain. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

450

114. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of Laurel Spring Valley ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

114. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of Laurel Spring Valley in distance, alligator back, and overlook in foreground. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

451

111. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of parkway with the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

111. Doughton Park Recreation Area. View of parkway with the road crossing alligator back. Facing southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

452

Detail, exterior side of doubleplanked north end, Burton Park Club ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Detail, exterior side of double-planked north end, Burton Park Club House, view to south-southwest (135mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

453

Detail, front doors, Burton Park Club House, view to west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Detail, front doors, Burton Park Club House, view to west northwest (135mm lens). Note simplified pilasters flanking doors. - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

454

Contextual view to northnorthwest of Burton Park Club House and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Contextual view to north-northwest of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater (90 mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

455

Oblique view, north end and west side, Burton Park Club ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Oblique view, north end and west side, Burton Park Club House, view to south (90mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

456

Contextual view to north of Burton Park Club House and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Contextual view to north of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater, taken from adjacent circular drive (135mm lens) - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

457

East façade, Burton Park Club House, with Amphitheater in foreground, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

East façade, Burton Park Club House, with Amphitheater in foreground, view to north from Amphitheater stage (90 mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

458

Interior detail, fireplace, main room, Burton Park Club House, view ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior detail, fireplace, main room, Burton Park Club House, view to northwest (135mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

459

Contextual view to southwest of Burton Park Club House and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Contextual view to southwest of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater (90mm lens). Pedestals within Amphitheater are supports for bench seating - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

460

Something is Askew at Mammoth Cave National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum/Geology of National Parks module. Students use the geometric mean and multiplicative standard deviation to examine the right-skewed distribution of nutrient concentrations in water-quality data at Mammoth Cave National Park.

Module by: Amie O. West, University of South Florida Cover Page by: Amie O. West, University of South Florida

461

23. MADISON GRANT TABLET AT PRAIRIE CREEK STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. MADISON GRANT TABLET AT PRAIRIE CREEK STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

462

24. ROAD VIEW AT PRAIRE CREEK STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. ROAD VIEW AT PRAIRE CREEK STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

463

VIEW OF HOWLAND HILL ROAD, JEDEDIAH SMITH STATE PARK. CRESCENT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF HOWLAND HILL ROAD, JEDEDIAH SMITH STATE PARK. CRESCENT CITY, DEL NORTE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING E. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

464

15. HIGHWAY 101 BRIDGE IN RICHARDSON STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. HIGHWAY 101 BRIDGE IN RICHARDSON STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

465

12. Photocopy of photograph, National Park Service, US Department of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. Photocopy of photograph, National Park Service, US Department of Interior, Washington, DC. Photograph No. 9525-A, 15 December 1965 ARMILLARY SPHERE AT EXEDRA - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

466

20. Photocopy of National Park Service photograph, US Department of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Photocopy of National Park Service photograph, US Department of Interior, Washington, DC. Photograph No. 8005.B, 4 July 1963. CASCADE FROM ABOVE - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

467

36 CFR 1280.12 - Is parking available?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...parking available? (a) The National Archives Building. There is no parking available...researchers or visitors to the National Archives Building. However, this...

2010-07-01

468

5. TUNNEL TREE AT DRIVETHROUGHTREE PARK. LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. TUNNEL TREE AT DRIVE-THROUGH-TREE PARK. LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NE. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

469

1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW DOWNSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

470

2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW UPSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

471

What is the purpose of our national parks?  

E-print Network

. Psychological needs to relieve stress in natural environments have been responsible for millions of visitors seeking recreation in National Parks and retirement communities surrounding them. Parks have been losing species since the 1920's when...

Manning, Orlinda D.

2001-01-01

472

36 CFR 7.39 - Mesa Verde National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...by the public at park headquarters and other convenient locations within the park. Persons hiking on the Pictograph Point or Spruce Canyon Trails must register in advance with the Superintendent. (c) Commercial automobiles and buses. The...

2014-07-01

473

36 CFR 7.39 - Mesa Verde National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...by the public at park headquarters and other convenient locations within the park. Persons hiking on the Pictograph Point or Spruce Canyon Trails must register in advance with the Superintendent. (c) Commercial automobiles and buses. The...

2010-07-01

474

36 CFR 7.39 - Mesa Verde National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...by the public at park headquarters and other convenient locations within the park. Persons hiking on the Pictograph Point or Spruce Canyon Trails must register in advance with the Superintendent. (c) Commercial automobiles and buses. The...

2011-07-01

475

36 CFR 7.39 - Mesa Verde National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...by the public at park headquarters and other convenient locations within the park. Persons hiking on the Pictograph Point or Spruce Canyon Trails must register in advance with the Superintendent. (c) Commercial automobiles and buses. The...

2013-07-01

476

36 CFR 7.39 - Mesa Verde National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...by the public at park headquarters and other convenient locations within the park. Persons hiking on the Pictograph Point or Spruce Canyon Trails must register in advance with the Superintendent. (c) Commercial automobiles and buses. The...

2012-07-01

477

36 CFR 910.33 - Off-street parking.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...schedule of limitations for parking spaces is as follows: (1) Hotel: One parking space for each four sleeping rooms or suites; (2) Places of public assemblage other than hotels: (i.e., arena, armory, theater, auditorium,...

2010-07-01

478

36 CFR 910.33 - Off-street parking.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...schedule of limitations for parking spaces is as follows: (1) Hotel: One parking space for each four sleeping rooms or suites; (2) Places of public assemblage other than hotels: (i.e., arena, armory, theater, auditorium,...

2011-07-01

479

Let's Take a Hike in Catoctin Mountain Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum module/Geology of National Parks course. Students use a topographic map and spreadsheet to find how many Big Macs they burned off on a five-mile hike at Catoctin Mountain Park.

Module by: Meghan Lindsey, University of South Florida Cover Page by: Meghan Lindsey, Len Vacher and Denise Davis, University of South Florida

480

WATER QUALITY IN ISLAND PARK RESERVOIR, IDAHO 1981  

EPA Science Inventory

Idahos Island Park Reservoir area (17040202) offers recreational opportunities, although water quality is impaired by nuisance algal blooms and occasional high fecal coliform bacteria counts. The fecal coliform bacteria observed in Island Park Reservoir probably originate from i...

481

View of Chapel Park, showing bomb shelters at right foreground, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Chapel Park, showing bomb shelters at right foreground, from building 746 parking lot across Walnut Avenue; camera facing north. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, East of Nave Drive, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

482

Secretary Salazar: Announcing Investments in America's National Parks  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Secretary Salazar at the podium as he announces a $750 million investment in national parks. Behind him left to right are Tom Kiernan, President of the National Parks Conservation Association and Mindy Meade of the American Recreation Coalition....

2009-04-23

483

36 CFR 7.14 - Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...park waters are open to fishing in accordance with National Park Service regulations. (4) Season. Open all year for rainbow and brown trout, smallmouth bass, and redeye (rockbass). All other fish are protected and may not be taken by any...

2013-07-01

484

Cambridge in transition : regulating parking in a growing city  

E-print Network

Parking is regulated today by cities to achieve a variety of goals including traffic reduction, air quality improvement, urban densification, and climate change mitigation. In the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts, parking ...

Ferrentino, Cara Elizabeth

2013-01-01

485

36 CFR 7.14 - Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...park waters are open to fishing in accordance with National Park Service regulations. (4) Season. Open all year for rainbow and brown trout, smallmouth bass, and redeye (rockbass). All other fish are protected and may not be taken by any...

2011-07-01

486

36 CFR 7.14 - Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...park waters are open to fishing in accordance with National Park Service regulations. (4) Season. Open all year for rainbow and brown trout, smallmouth bass, and redeye (rockbass). All other fish are protected and may not be taken by any...

2014-07-01

487

36 CFR 7.14 - Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...park waters are open to fishing in accordance with National Park Service regulations. (4) Season. Open all year for rainbow and brown trout, smallmouth bass, and redeye (rockbass). All other fish are protected and may not be taken by any...

2012-07-01

488

2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF MEDIAN. NOTE VOLCANIC STONE CURBING (EDGING) TYPICAL OF MOST PARKING AREAS; TRIANGLING AT END NOT TYPICAL. MAUNA LOA VOLCANO IN BACK. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

489

36 CFR 7.11 - Saguaro National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.11 Saguaro National Park. (a) Bicycles. That portion of the Cactus Forest Trail inside the Cactus Forest Drive is open to non-motorized bicycle use. (b) [Reserved] [68 FR 50077, Aug....

2011-07-01

490

36 CFR 7.11 - Saguaro National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.11 Saguaro National Park. (a) Bicycles. That portion of the Cactus Forest Trail inside the Cactus Forest Drive is open to non-motorized bicycle use. (b) [Reserved] [68 FR 50077, Aug....

2010-07-01

491

36 CFR 7.11 - Saguaro National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.11 Saguaro National Park. (a) Bicycles. That portion of the Cactus Forest Trail inside the Cactus Forest Drive is open to non-motorized bicycle use. (b) [Reserved] [68 FR 50077, Aug....

2012-07-01

492

12. VIEW OF NATURAL BRIDGE OVERLOOK PARKING AREA, FACING NORTHEAST. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. VIEW OF NATURAL BRIDGE OVERLOOK PARKING AREA, FACING NORTHEAST. NOTE DETERIORATION OF WALL AND USE OF AESTHETICALLY INTRUSIVE FENCING. - Bryce Canyon National Park Rim Road, State Highway 63 to Rainbow Point, Tropic, Garfield County, UT

493

Geology Fieldnotes: Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This park is home to the Fairweather Mountains, which formed during the Laramide Orogeny, as well as many glaciers. The site includes introductory information about glacial formation and icebergs, links to park maps, and visitor information.

494

FACING SOUTHWEST OF NORTHEASTERN CORNER OF PARK FROM INTERSECTION OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FACING SOUTHWEST OF NORTHEASTERN CORNER OF PARK FROM INTERSECTION OF TERRACE AVENUE AND CLIFTON ROAD - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

495

FACING NORTHEAST ACROSS NORTHERN END OF PARK TOWARDS ITS NORTHERN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FACING NORTHEAST ACROSS NORTHERN END OF PARK TOWARDS ITS NORTHERN CORNER - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

496

FACING SOUTH OF LANDSCAPING IN NORTHWESTERN PORTION OF PARK ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FACING SOUTH OF LANDSCAPING IN NORTHWESTERN PORTION OF PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

497

FACING NORTHWEST OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF CANDLER PARK Candler ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FACING NORTHWEST OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF CANDLER PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

498

IPO Central  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

IPO (Initial Public Offerings) Central, provided by The Reference Press, contains a wealth of information on IPOs. It features a complete list of companies that "filed for an initial public offering of common stock on or after May 6, 1996, the first day that all US companies were required to file electronically," along with EDGAR Online SEC filings. This directory can be accessed alphabetically or by date, and the latest filings are available under a separate menu item. IPO Central also highlights one featured IPO per week, with a free link to a Hoover Online profile on that company. "The Insider" offers short analytical columns on IPOs, and the "Beginner's Guide" has links to basic IPO information to help the novice. The site also offers links to other IPO-related sites. IPO Central does not at this time offer a searchable interface to its directory, but the providers promise improved search features soon. Note that listings are removed from the directory after six months and that EDGAR Online is in no way related to SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) EDGAR.

499

Parks, Place and Pedagogy - Education Partnerships with the National Park Service  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Michigan Teaching Excellence Program (MITEP) is a multi-year program of teacher leadership development that empowers science teachers in Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, and Jackson to lead their schools and districts through the process of improving science teaching and learning. A component of this program is facilitated through partnership between academia, K-12 educators, and the National Park Service (NPS) that aims to develop place-based education strategies that improve diversity and Earth Science literacy. This tangible education method draws upon both the sense of place that National Parks offer and the art of interpretation employed by the park service. Combined, these deepen cognitive process and provide a more diverse reflection of what place means and the processes behind shaping what we see. Our partnerships present participants the opportunity to intern in a Midwest national park for 3-8 weeks during their third year in the program. In summer 2011, eleven teachers from the Grand Rapids school district participated in this innovative way of learning and teaching Earth Science. One goal was to develop geological interpretive materials desired and needed for the parks. Secondly, and important to place-based educational methodologies, these deliverables will be used as a way of bringing the parks to urban classrooms. Participants lived in the parks and worked directly with both national park and Michigan Tech staff to create lesson plans, podcasts, media clips, video, and photographic documentation of their experiences. These lesson plans will be hosted in the Views of the National Park website in an effort to provide innovative teaching resources nationally for teachers or free-choice learners wishing to access information on Midwest national parks. To the benefit of park staff, working with teachers from urban areas offered an opportunity for park staff to access diverse learners in urban settings unable to visit the park. The foundation has been laid for future work in this program aiming to develop a stronger appreciation of environment and geological processes and connections between what K-12 students do and their impact on Earth systems. This paper presents preliminary results of the following evaluation methods: 1) pre-post surveys administered to examine depth and breadth of geological knowledge, awareness of cultural significance, and emotional meanings and attachments toward the park, and 2) semi-structured interviews with participants, park staff, and academic faculty to determine how these programs can be best implemented and improved in both parks and classrooms alike. Learning about Earth system processes can be fostered by employing different ways of knowing, or the art of interpretation. It is hoped that this engagement between teachers, parks, and academia will increase diversity in Earth Science, enrich Earth Science curriculum, and help develop a sense of place for students

Vye, E. C.; Rose, W. I.; Nash, B.; Klawiter, M.; Huntoon, J. E.; Engelmann, C. A.; Gochis, E. E.; MiTEP

2011-12-01

500

National parks. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning U.S. and foreign national parks. Citations discuss terrestrial biology, botany, coastal biology, fire ecology, endangered and exotic species, and resource analysis. Topics also include the impact of park visitors on natural resources in the parks, resource management, planning, and mapping. Information about specific parks including Rocky Mountain, Great Smoky Mountains, Redwood, Grand Canyon, Sequoia, Glacier Bay, and others is presented. (Contains a minimum of 55 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-02-01