Science.gov

Sample records for partial cmb maps

  1. Cosmic string induced CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Landriau, M.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2011-02-15

    We compute maps of CMB temperature fluctuations seeded by cosmic strings using high resolution simulations of cosmic strings in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We create full-sky, 18 deg. and 3 deg. CMB maps, including the relevant string contribution at each resolution from before recombination to today. We extract the angular power spectrum from these maps, demonstrating the importance of recombination effects. We briefly discuss the probability density function of the pixel temperatures, their skewness, and kurtosis.

  2. Joint Planck and WMAP CMB map reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Rassat, A.; Paykari, P.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel estimate of the cosmological microwave background (CMB) map by combining the two latest full-sky microwave surveys: WMAP nine-year and Planck PR1. The joint processing benefits from a recently introduced component separation method coined"local-generalized morphological component analysis" (LGMCA) and based on the sparse distribution of the foregrounds in the wavelet domain. The proposed estimation procedure takes advantage of the IRIS 100 μm as an extra observation on the galactic center for enhanced dust removal. We show that this new CMB map presents several interesting aspects: i) it is a full sky map without using any inpainting or interpolating method; ii) foreground contamination is very low; iii) the Galactic center is very clean with especially low dust contamination as measured by the cross-correlation between the estimated CMB map and the IRIS 100 μm map; and iv) it is free of thermal SZ contamination. Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Preferred axis of CMB parity asymmetry in the masked maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Wen; Huang, Qing-Guo; Santos, Larissa

    2016-06-01

    Both WMAP and Planck data show a significant odd-multipole preference in the large scales of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. If this pattern originates from cosmological effects, then it can be considered a crucial clue for a violation in the cosmological principle. By defining various direction dependent statistics in the full-sky Planck 2015 maps (see, for instance, Naselsky et al. (2012); W. Zhao (2014)), we found that the CMB parity asymmetry has a preferred direction, which is independent of the choices of the statistics. In particular, this preferred axis is strongly aligned with those in the CMB quadrupole and octopole, as well as that in the CMB kinematic dipole, which hints to their non-cosmological origin. In realistic observations, the foreground residuals are inevitable, and should be properly masked out in order to avoid possible misinterpretation of the results. In this paper, we extend our previous analyses to the masked Planck 2015 data. By defining a similar direction dependent statistic in the masked map, we find a preferred direction of the CMB parity asymmetry, in which the axis also coincides with that found in the full-sky analysis. Therefore, our conclusions on the CMB parity violation and its directional properties are confirmed.

  4. Efficient inversion for CMB topography: benchmarks and preliminary maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, A.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Boschi, L.

    2012-12-01

    We map lateral topography variations of global seismic discontinuities focusing on the core-mantle boundary (CMB), in the framework of high-resolution forward modeling and seismic imaging. We present a method to compute sensitivity kernels relating seismic travel times (measured by cross-correlation of observed and theoretical seismograms) to the topography of seismic discontinuities at any depth in the Earth using full 3D wave propagation. Calculation of accurate finite-frequency sensitivity kernels is notoriously expensive, but we reduce computational costs drastically by limiting ourselves to spherically symmetric reference models, and exploiting the axial symmetry of the resulting propagating wave-field that collapses to a 2D numerical domain. We compute and analyze a suite of kernels for CMB sensitive phases that can be used for finite frequency waveform inversion. We benchmark and tune our methodology inverting cross-correlation travel-times of PcP, various PKP branches, Pdiff and ScS computed with 3-D wave-propagation with ground-truth Earth models including realistic CMB topography. Finally, we present CMB topography maps derived from two different datasets that we inverted using our technique. One includes ~50000 cross-correlated travel-time measurement for SKSac, and ScS phases while the other consists of ~220000 ISC manually picked travel-time for PKIKP and PcP phases. Prior to interpretation, we analyze the coverage using the approximate Hessian to discriminate well-constrained areas from less determined locations. Although with different amplitudes, our new CMB models reveal a low-elevation ring around the Pacific similar to other studies. While this is a pilot study extending topography inversions to full-wave based imaging mainly showing consistency with previous findings, we expect to further enhance these studies for a new generation of CMB topography models by combining various datasets and joint inversion with mantle structure.

  5. Non-Gaussianity in the foreground-reduced CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Bernui, A.; Reboucas, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    A detection or nondetection of primordial non-Gaussianity by using the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) data is crucial not only to discriminate inflationary models but also to test alternative scenarios. Non-Gaussianity offers, therefore, a powerful probe of the physics of the primordial Universe. The extraction of primordial non-Gaussianity is a difficult enterprise since several effects of a nonprimordial nature can produce non-Gaussianity. Given the far-reaching consequences of such a non-Gaussianity for our understanding of the physics of the early Universe, it is important to employ a range of different statistical tools to quantify and/or constrain its amount in order to have information that may be helpful for identifying its causes. Moreover, different indicators can in principle provide information about distinct forms of non-Gaussianity that can be present in CMB data. Most of the Gaussianity analyses of CMB data have been performed by using part-sky frequency, where the mask is used to deal with the galactic diffuse foreground emission. However, full-sky map seems to be potentially more appropriate to test for Gaussianity of the CMB data. On the other hand, masks can induce bias in some non-Gaussianity analyses. Here we use two recent large-angle non-Gaussianity indicators, based on skewness and kurtosis of large-angle patches of CMB maps, to examine the question of non-Gaussianity in the available full-sky five-year and seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) maps. We show that these full-sky foreground-reduced maps present a significant deviation from Gaussianity of different levels, which vary with the foreground-reducing procedures. We also make a Gaussianity analysis of the foreground-reduced five-year and seven-year WMAP maps with a KQ75 mask, and compare with the similar analysis performed with the corresponding full-sky foreground-reduced maps. This comparison shows a significant reduction in the levels of non

  6. N-body lensed CMB maps: lensing extraction and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Antolini, Claudia; Martinelli, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Fantaye, Yabebal; Carbone, Carmelita E-mail: y.t.fantaye@astro.uio.no E-mail: carmelita.carbone@brera.inaf.it

    2014-02-01

    We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the ΛCDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 μK-arcmin. The noise contribution in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at ℓ ≅ 1500. The recovered signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with Δℓ ≅ 100 in the angular multiple interval 1000∼<ℓ∼<2000 for T, and about 10% for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ΛCDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.

  7. Cosmological Parameters from CMB Maps without Likelihood Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, B.; Jewell, J. B.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.

    2016-03-01

    We propose an efficient Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for estimating cosmological parameters from cosmic microwave background (CMB) data without the use of likelihood approximations. It builds on a previously developed Gibbs sampling framework that allows for exploration of the joint CMB sky signal and power spectrum posterior, P({\\boldsymbol{s}},{C}{\\ell }| {\\boldsymbol{d}}), and addresses a long-standing problem of efficient parameter estimation simultaneously in regimes of high and low signal-to-noise ratio. To achieve this, our new algorithm introduces a joint Markov chain move in which both the signal map and power spectrum are synchronously modified, by rescaling the map according to the proposed power spectrum before evaluating the Metropolis-Hastings accept probability. Such a move was already introduced by Jewell et al., who used it to explore low signal-to-noise posteriors. However, they also found that the same algorithm is inefficient in the high signal-to-noise regime, since a brute-force rescaling operation does not account for phase information. This problem is mitigated in the new algorithm by subtracting the Wiener filter mean field from the proposed map prior to rescaling, leaving high signal-to-noise information invariant in the joint step, and effectively only rescaling the low signal-to-noise component. To explore the full posterior, the new joint move is then interleaved with a standard conditional Gibbs move for the sky map. We apply our new algorithm to simplified simulations for which we can evaluate the exact posterior to study both its accuracy and its performance, and find good agreement with the exact posterior; marginal means agree to ≲0.006σ and standard deviations to better than ˜3%. The Markov chain correlation length is of the same order of magnitude as those obtained by other standard samplers in the field.

  8. A new map-making algorithm for CMB polarization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Christopher G. R.; Bonaldi, A.; Brown, Michael L.; Battye, Richard A.

    2015-10-01

    With the temperature power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at least four orders of magnitude larger than the B-mode polarization power spectrum, any instrumental imperfections that couple temperature to polarization must be carefully controlled and/or removed. Here we present two new map-making algorithms that can create polarization maps that are clean of temperature-to-polarization leakage systematics due to differential gain and pointing between a detector pair. Where a half-wave plate is used, we show that the spin-2 systematic due to differential ellipticity can also be removed using our algorithms. The algorithms require no prior knowledge of the imperfections or temperature sky to remove the temperature leakage. Instead, they calculate the systematic and polarization maps in one step directly from the time-ordered data (TOD). The first algorithm is designed to work with scan strategies that have a good range of crossing angles for each map pixel and the second for scan strategies that have a limited range of crossing angles. The first algorithm can also be used to identify if systematic errors that have a particular spin are present in a TOD. We demonstrate the use of both algorithms and the ability to identify systematics with simulations of TOD with realistic scan strategies and instrumental noise.

  9. Searching for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps using a combined estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, C.P.; Wuensche, C.A.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I.S. E-mail: bernui@on.br E-mail: ca.wuensche@inpe.br

    2014-01-01

    The extensive search for deviations from Gaussianity in cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) data is very important due to the information about the very early moments of the universe encoded there. Recent analyses from Planck CMB data do not exclude the presence of non-Gaussianity of small amplitude, although they are consistent with the Gaussian hypothesis. The use of different techniques is essential to provide information about types and amplitudes of non-Gaussianities in the CMB data. In particular, we find interesting to construct an estimator based upon the combination of two powerful statistical tools that appears to be sensitive enough to detect tiny deviations from Gaussianity in CMB maps. This estimator combines the Minkowski functionals with a Neural Network, maximizing a tool widely used to study non-Gaussian signals with a reinforcement of another tool designed to identify patterns in a data set. We test our estimator by analyzing simulated CMB maps contaminated with different amounts of local primordial non-Gaussianity quantified by the dimensionless parameter f{sub  NL}. We apply it to these sets of CMB maps and find ∼> 98% of chance of positive detection, even for small intensity local non-Gaussianity like f{sub  NL} = 38±18, the current limit from Planck data for large angular scales. Additionally, we test the suitability to distinguish between primary and secondary non-Gaussianities: first we train the Neural Network with two sets, one of nearly Gaussian CMB maps (|f{sub  NL}| ≤ 10) but contaminated with realistic inhomogeneous Planck noise (i.e., secondary non-Gaussianity) and the other of non-Gaussian CMB maps, that is, maps endowed with weak primordial non-Gaussianity (28 ≤ f{sub  NL} ≤ 48); after that we test an ensemble composed of CMB maps either with one of these non-Gaussian contaminations, and find out that our method successfully classifies ∼ 95% of the tested maps as being CMB maps containing primordial or

  10. Searching for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps using a combined estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I. S.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    The extensive search for deviations from Gaussianity in cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) data is very important due to the information about the very early moments of the universe encoded there. Recent analyses from Planck CMB data do not exclude the presence of non-Gaussianity of small amplitude, although they are consistent with the Gaussian hypothesis. The use of different techniques is essential to provide information about types and amplitudes of non-Gaussianities in the CMB data. In particular, we find interesting to construct an estimator based upon the combination of two powerful statistical tools that appears to be sensitive enough to detect tiny deviations from Gaussianity in CMB maps. This estimator combines the Minkowski functionals with a Neural Network, maximizing a tool widely used to study non-Gaussian signals with a reinforcement of another tool designed to identify patterns in a data set. We test our estimator by analyzing simulated CMB maps contaminated with different amounts of local primordial non-Gaussianity quantified by the dimensionless parameter f NL. We apply it to these sets of CMB maps and find gtrsim 98% of chance of positive detection, even for small intensity local non-Gaussianity like f NL = 38±18, the current limit from Planck data for large angular scales. Additionally, we test the suitability to distinguish between primary and secondary non-Gaussianities: first we train the Neural Network with two sets, one of nearly Gaussian CMB maps (|f NL| <= 10) but contaminated with realistic inhomogeneous Planck noise (i.e., secondary non-Gaussianity) and the other of non-Gaussian CMB maps, that is, maps endowed with weak primordial non-Gaussianity (28 <= f NL <= 48); after that we test an ensemble composed of CMB maps either with one of these non-Gaussian contaminations, and find out that our method successfully classifies ~ 95% of the tested maps as being CMB maps containing primordial or secondary non-Gaussianity. Furthermore

  11. CMB anisotropy power spectrum using linear combinations of WMAP maps

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Jain, Pankaj; Souradeep, Tarun

    2008-07-15

    In recent years the goal of estimating different cosmological parameters precisely has set new challenges in the effort to accurately measure the angular power spectrum of the CMB. This has required removal of foreground contamination as well as detector noise bias with reliability and precision. Recently, a novel, model-independent method for the estimation of the CMB angular power spectrum solely from multifrequency observations has been proposed and implemented on the first year WMAP data by Saha et al. 2006. All previous estimates of the power spectrum of the CMB are based upon foreground templates using data sets from different experiments. However, our methodology demonstrates that the CMB angular spectrum can be reliably estimated with precision from a self-contained analysis of the WMAP data. In this work we provide a detailed description of this method. We also study and identify the biases present in our power spectrum estimate. We apply our methodology to extract the power spectrum from the WMAP data.

  12. A special kind of local structure in the CMB intensity maps: duel peak structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ti-Pei

    2009-03-01

    We study the local structure of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature maps released by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team, and find a new kind of structure, which can be described as follows: a peak (or valley) of average temperature is often followed by a peak of temperature fluctuation that is 4° away. This structure is important for the following reasons: both the well known cold spot detected by Cruz et al. and the hot spot detected by Vielva et al. with the same technology (the third spot in their article) have such structure; more spots that are similar to them can be found on CMB maps and they also tend to be significant cold/hot spots; if we change the 4° characteristic into an artificial one, such as 3° or 5°, there will be less 'similar spots', and the temperature peaks or valleys will be less significant. The presented 'similar spots' have passed a strict consistency test which requires them to be significant on at least three different CMB temperature maps. We hope that this article could arouse some interest in the relationship of average temperature with temperature fluctuation in local areas; meanwhile, we are also trying to find an explanation for it which might be important to CMB observation and theory.

  13. Designs for a large-aperture telescope to map the CMB 10× faster.

    PubMed

    Niemack, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Current large-aperture cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescopes have nearly maximized the number of detectors that can be illuminated while maintaining diffraction-limited image quality. The polarization-sensitive detector arrays being deployed in these telescopes in the next few years will have roughly 10⁴ detectors. Increasing the mapping speed of future instruments by at least an order of magnitude is important to enable precise probes of the inflationary paradigm in the first fraction of a second after the big bang and provide strong constraints on cosmological parameters. The CMB community has begun planning a next generation "Stage IV" CMB project that will be comprised of multiple telescopes with between 10⁵-10⁶ detectors to pursue these goals. This paper introduces the new crossed Dragone telescope and receiver optics designs that increase the usable diffraction-limited field-of-view, and therefore the mapping speed, by an order of magnitude compared to the upcoming generation of large-aperture instruments. Polarization systematics and engineering considerations are presented, including a preliminary receiver model to demonstrate that these designs will enable high efficiency illumination of >10⁵ detectors in a next generation CMB telescope. PMID:26974631

  14. SILC: a new Planck internal linear combination CMB temperature map using directional wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    We present new clean maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies (as measured by Planck) constructed with a novel internal linear combination (ILC) algorithm using directional, scale-discretized wavelets - scale-discretized, directional wavelet ILC or Scale-discretised, directional wavelet Internal Linear Combination (SILC). Directional wavelets, when convolved with signals on the sphere, can separate the anisotropic filamentary structures which are characteristic of both the CMB and foregrounds. Extending previous component separation methods, which use the frequency, spatial and harmonic signatures of foregrounds to separate them from the cosmological background signal, SILC can additionally use morphological information in the foregrounds and CMB to better localize the cleaning algorithm. We test the method on Planck data and simulations, demonstrating consistency with existing component separation algorithms, and discuss how to optimize the use of morphological information by varying the number of directional wavelets as a function of spatial scale. We find that combining the use of directional and axisymmetric wavelets depending on scale could yield higher quality CMB temperature maps. Our results set the stage for the application of SILC to polarization anisotropies through an extension to spin wavelets.

  15. Comparing and combining the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yongzhong; Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angelica; Devlin, Mark J.; Herbig, Thomas; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Page, Lyman

    2001-05-15

    We present a method for comparing and combining maps with different resolutions and beam shapes, and apply it to the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE-DMR data sets. Although the Saskatoon and QMAP maps detect signals at the 21{sigma} and 40{sigma} levels, respectively, their difference is consistent with pure noise, placing strong limits on possible systematic errors. In particular, we obtain quantitative upper limits on relative calibration and pointing errors. Splitting the combined data by frequency shows similar consistency between the Ka and Q bands, placing limits on foreground contamination. The visual agreement between the maps is equally striking. Our combined QMAP+Saskatoon map, nicknamed QMASK, is publicly available on the web together with its 6495x6495 noise covariance matrix. This thoroughly tested data set covers a large enough area (648 square degrees -- currently the largest degree-scale map available) to allow a statistical comparison with COBE-DMR, showing good agreement.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CMB intensity map from WMAP and Planck PR2 data (Bobin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel estimation of the CMB map reconstructed from the Planck 2015 data (PR2) and the WMAP nine-year data (Bennett et al., 2013ApJS..208...20B), which updates the CMB map we published in (Bobin et al., 2014A&A...563A.105B). This new map is based on the sparse component separation method L-GMCA (Bobin et al., 2013A&A...550A..73B). Additionally, the map benefits from the latest advances in this field (Bobin et al., 2015, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, 63, 1199), which allows us to accurately discriminate between correlated components. In this update to our previous work, we show that this new map presents significant improvements with respect to the available CMB map estimates. (3 data files).

  17. Semi-blind Bayesian inference of CMB map and power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vansyngel, Flavien; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Cardoso, Jean-François; Benabed, Karim

    2016-04-01

    We present a new blind formulation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) inference problem. The approach relies on a phenomenological model of the multifrequency microwave sky without the need for physical models of the individual components. For all-sky and high resolution data, it unifies parts of the analysis that had previously been treated separately such as component separation and power spectrum inference. We describe an efficient sampling scheme that fully explores the component separation uncertainties on the inferred CMB products such as maps and/or power spectra. External information about individual components can be incorporated as a prior giving a flexible way to progressively and continuously introduce physical component separation from a maximally blind approach. We connect our Bayesian formalism to existing approaches such as Commander, spectral mismatch independent component analysis (SMICA), and internal linear combination (ILC), and discuss possible future extensions.

  18. Non-Gaussian extrema counts for CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosyan, Dmitri; Pichon, Christophe; Gay, Christophe

    2011-10-15

    In the context of the geometrical analysis of weakly non-Gaussian cosmic microwave background maps, the 2D differential extrema counts as functions of the excursion set threshold is derived from the full moments expansion of the joint probability distribution of an isotropic random field, its gradient, and invariants of the Hessian. Analytic expressions for these counts are given to second order in the non-Gaussian correction, while a Monte Carlo method to compute them to arbitrary order is presented. Matching count statistics to these estimators is illustrated on fiducial non-Gaussian Planck data.

  19. CMB lensing power spectrum biases from galaxies and clusters using high-angular resolution temperature maps

    SciTech Connect

    Van Engelen, A.; Sehgal, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Holder, G. P.; Zahn, O.; Nagai, D.

    2014-05-01

    The lensing power spectrum from cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps will be measured with unprecedented precision with upcoming experiments, including upgrades to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and the South Pole Telescope. Achieving significant improvements in cosmological parameter constraints, such as percent level errors on σ{sub 8} and an uncertainty on the total neutrino mass of ∼50 meV, requires percent level measurements of the CMB lensing power. This necessitates tight control of systematic biases. We study several types of biases to the temperature-based lensing reconstruction signal from foreground sources such as radio and infrared galaxies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters. These foregrounds bias the CMB lensing signal due to their non-Gaussian nature. Using simulations as well as some analytical models we find that these sources can substantially impact the measured signal if left untreated. However, these biases can be brought to the percent level if one masks galaxies with fluxes at 150 GHz above 1 mJy and galaxy clusters with masses above M {sub vir} = 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}. To achieve such percent level bias, we find that only modes up to a maximum multipole of l {sub max} ∼ 2500 should be included in the lensing reconstruction. We also discuss ways to minimize additional bias induced by such aggressive foreground masking by, for example, exploring a two-step masking and in-painting algorithm.

  20. Cross-correlation of Planck CMB lensing and CFHTLenS galaxy weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Hill, J. Colin

    2015-09-01

    We cross-correlate cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and galaxy weak lensing maps using the Planck 2013 and 2015 data and the 154 deg2 Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). This measurement probes large-scale structure at intermediate redshifts ≈0.9 , between the high- and low-redshift peaks of the CMB and CFHTLenS lensing kernels, respectively. Using the noise properties of these data sets and standard Planck 2015 Λ CDM cosmological parameters, we forecast a signal-to-noise ratio ≈4.6 for the cross-correlation. We find that the noise level of our actual measurement agrees well with this estimate, but the amplitude of the signal lies well below the theoretical prediction. The best-fit amplitudes of our measured cross-correlations are A2013=0.48 ±0.26 and A2015=0.44 ±0.22 , using the 2013 and 2015 Planck CMB lensing maps, respectively, where A =1 corresponds to the fiducial Planck 2015 Λ CDM prediction. Due to the low measured amplitude, the detection significance is moderate (≈2 σ ) and the data are in tension with the theoretical prediction (≈2 - 2.5 σ ) . The tension is reduced somewhat when compared to predictions using WMAP9 parameters, for which we find A2013=0.56 ±0.30 and A2015=0.52 ±0.26 . We consider various systematic effects, finding that photometric redshift uncertainties, contamination by intrinsic alignments, and effects due to the masking of galaxy clusters in the Planck 2015 CMB lensing reconstruction are able to help resolve the tension at a significant level (≈10 % each). An overall multiplicative bias in the CFHTLenS shear data could also play a role, which can be tested with existing data. We close with forecasts for measurements of the CMB lensing—galaxy lensing cross-correlation using ongoing and future weak lensing surveys, which will definitively test the significance of the tension in our results with respect to Λ CDM .

  1. Statistical isotropy violation in WMAP CMB maps resulting from non-circular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Mitra, Sanjit; Rotti, Aditya; Pant, Nidhi; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Statistical isotropy (SI) of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations is a key observational test to validate the cosmological principle underlying the standard model of cosmology. While a detection of SI violation would have immense cosmological ramification, it is important to recognise their possible origin in systematic effects of observations. The WMAP seven year (WMAP-7) release claimed significant deviation from SI in the bipolar spherical harmonic (BipoSH) coefficients and . Here we present the first explicit reproduction of the measurements reported in WMAP-7, confirming that beam systematics alone can completely account for the measured SI violation. The possibility of such a systematic origin was alluded to in WMAP-7 paper itself and other authors but not as explicitly so as to account for it accurately. We simulate CMB maps using the actual WMAP non-circular beams and scanning strategy. Our estimated BipoSH spectra from these maps match the WMAP-7 results very well. It is also evident that only a very careful and adequately detailed modelling, as carried out here, can conclusively establish that the entire signal arises from non-circular beam effect. This is important since cosmic SI violation signals are expected to be subtle and dismissing a large SI violation signal as observational artefact based on simplistic plausibility arguments run the serious risk of "throwing the baby out with the bathwater".

  2. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  3. Searching for hidden mirror symmetries in CMB fluctuations from WMAP 7 year maps

    SciTech Connect

    Finelli, Fabio; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Starobinsky, Alexey A. E-mail: gruppuso@iasfbo.inaf.it E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru

    2012-07-01

    We search for hidden mirror symmetries at large angular scales in the WMAP 7 year Internal Linear Combination map of CMB temperature anisotropies using global pixel based estimators introduced for this aim. Two different axes are found for which the CMB intensity pattern is anomalously symmetric (or anti-symmetric) under reflection with respect to orthogonal planes at the 99.84(99.96)% CL (confidence level), if compared to a result for an arbitrary axis in simulations without the symmetry. We have verified that our results are robust to the introduction of the galactic mask. The direction of such axes is close to the CMB kinematic dipole and nearly orthogonal to the ecliptic plane, respectively. If instead the real data are compared to those in simulations taken with respect to planes for which the maximal mirror symmetry is generated by chance, the confidence level decreases to 92.39(76.65)%. But when the effect in question translates into the anomalous alignment between normals to planes of maximal mirror (anti)-symmetry and these natural axes mentioned. We also introduce the representation of the above estimators in the harmonic domain, confirming the results obtained in the pixel one. The symmetry anomaly is shown to be almost entirely due to low multipoles, so it may have a cosmological and even primordial origin. Contrary, the anti-symmetry one is mainly due to intermediate multipoles that probably suggests its non-fundamental nature. We have demonstrated that these anomalies are not connected to the known issue of the low variance in WMAP observations and we have checked that axially symmetric parts of these anomalies are small, so that the axes are not the symmetry ones.

  4. North-South non-Gaussian asymmetry in Planck CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Bernui, A.; Oliveira, A.F.; Pereira, T.S. E-mail: adhimar@unifei.edu.br

    2014-10-01

    We report the results of a statistical analysis performed with the four foreground-cleaned Planck maps by means of a suitably defined local-variance estimator. Our analysis shows a clear dipolar structure in Planck's variance map pointing in the direction (l,b) ≅ (220°,-32°), thus consistent with the North-South asymmetry phenomenon. Surprisingly, and contrary to previous findings, removing the CMB quadrupole and octopole makes the asymmetry stronger. Our results show a maximal statistical significance, of 98.1% CL, in the scales ranging from ℓ=4 to ℓ=500. Additionally, through exhaustive analyses of the four foreground-cleaned and individual frequency Planck maps, we find unlikely that residual foregrounds could be causing this dipole variance asymmetry. Moreover, we find that the dipole gets lower amplitudes for larger masks, evidencing that most of the contribution to the variance dipole comes from a region near the galactic plane. Finally, our results are robust against different foreground cleaning procedures, different Planck masks, pixelization parameters, and the addition of inhomogeneous real noise.

  5. Probing primordial non Gaussianity in the BOOMERanG CMB maps: an analysis based on analytical Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, M.; Natoli, P.; De Troia, G.; Hikage, C.; Komatsu, E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Di Stefano, G.; Hivon, E.; Kisner, T. S.; Jones, W. C.; Lange, A. E.; Masi, S.; Mauskopf, P. D.; MacTavish, C. J.; Melchiorri, A.; Montroy, T. E.; Netterfield, C. B.; Pascale, E.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Ricciardi, S.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J. E.; Tegmark, M.; Veneziani, M.; Vittorio, N.

    2009-10-01

    Minkowski functionals are a powerful tool to constrain the Gaussianity of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). In the limit of a weakly non Gaussian field, a perturbative approach can be derived [Hikage C., Komatsu E., & Matsubara T., 2006, ApJ, 653, 11] that is completely based on analytical formulae without requiring computationally intensive, dedicated Monte Carlo non Gaussian simulations of the CMB anisotropy. We apply this machinery to an intensity map derived from the 1998 and 2003 flights of BOOMERanG, analyzed here together for the first time. We set limits on the non-linear coupling parameter f as -1020

  6. CMB Lensing Cross Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleem, Lindsey

    2014-03-01

    A new generation of experiments designed to conduct high-resolution, low-noise observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)--including ACTpol, Planck, POLARBEAR and SPTpol--are producing exquisite measurements of the gravitational lensing of the CMB. Such measurements, covering large fractions of the sky, provide detailed maps of the projected mass distribution extending to the surface of the CMB's last scattering. Concurrently, a large number of deep, wide-area imaging and spectroscopic surveys (e.g., the Dark Energy Survey (DES),WISE all-sky survey, Subaru HyperSuprimeCam Survey, LSST, MS-DESI, BigBoss, etc.) are, or will soon be, providing maps of the distribution of galaxies in the Universe. Correlations of such tracer populations with lensing data allows new probes of where and how galaxies form in the dark matter skeleton of the Universe. Recent correlations of maps of galaxy and quasar densities with lensing convergence maps have produced significant measurements of galaxy bias. The near-term prospect for improvements in such measurements is notable as more precise lensing data from CMB polarization experiments will help to break cosmological and astrophysical parameter degeneracies. Work by the Planck, SPT, and POLARBEAR collaborations has also focused on the correlation of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) with CMB lensing convergence maps. This correlation is particularly strong as the redshifts of the CIB and CMB lensing kernel are well matched. Such correlations probe high-redshift structure, constraining models of star-formation and the characteristic mass scale for halos hosting CIB galaxies and have also been used to demonstrate the first detection of CMB B-mode polarization--an important milestone in CMB observations. Finally, combining galaxy number density, cosmic shear and CMB lensing maps has the potential to provide valuable systematic tests for upcoming cosmological results from large optical surveys such as LSST.

  7. Partial covariance mapping techniques at FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    The development of free-electron lasers (FELs) is driven by the desire to access the structure and chemical dynamics of biomolecules with atomic resolution. Short, intense FEL pulses have the potential to record x-ray diffraction images before the molecular structure is destroyed by radiation damage. However, even during the shortest, few-femtosecond pulses currently available, there are some significant changes induced by massive ionisation and onset of Coulomb explosion. To interpret the diffraction images it is vital to gain insight into the electronic and nuclear dynamics during multiple core and valence ionisations that compete with Auger cascades. This paper focuses on a technique that is capable to probe these processes. The covariance mapping technique is well suited to the high intensity and low repetition rate of FEL pulses. While the multitude of charges ejected at each pulse overwhelm conventional coincidence methods, an improved technique of partial covariance mapping can cope with hundreds of photoelectrons or photoions detected at each FEL shot. The technique, however, often reveals spurious, uninteresting correlations that spoil the maps. This work will discuss the strengths and limitations of various forms of covariance mapping techniques. Quantitative information extracted from the maps will be linked to theoretical modelling of ionisation and fragmentation paths. Special attention will be given to critical experimental parameters, such as counting rate, FEL intensity fluctuations, vacuum impurities or detector efficiency and nonlinearities. Methods of assessing and optimising signal-to-noise ratio will be described. Emphasis will be put on possible future developments such as multidimensional covariance mapping, compensation for various experimental instabilities and improvements in the detector response. This work has been supported the EPSRC, UK (grants EP/F021232/1 and EP/I032517/1).

  8. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi E-mail: khatri@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired.

  9. Lensing-induced morphology changes in CMB temperature maps in modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, D.; Hu, B.; Matsubara, T.; Coles, P.; Heavens, A.

    2016-04-01

    Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) changes the morphology of pattern of temperature fluctuations, so topological descriptors such as Minkowski Functionals can probe the gravity model responsible for the lensing. We show how the recently introduced two-to-two and three-to-one kurt-spectra (and their associated correlation functions), which depend on the power spectrum of the lensing potential, can be used to probe modified gravity theories such as f(R) theories of gravity and quintessence models. We also investigate models based on effective field theory, which include the constant-Ω model, and low-energy Hořava theories. Estimates of the cumulative signal-to-noise for detection of lensing-induced morphology changes, reaches Script O(103) for the future planned CMB polarization mission COrE+. Assuming foreground removal is possible to lmax=3000, we show that many modified gravity theories can be rejected with a high level of significance, making this technique comparable in power to galaxy weak lensing or redshift surveys. These topological estimators are also useful in distinguishing lensing from other scattering secondaries at the level of the four-point function or trispectrum. Examples include the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect which shares, with lensing, a lack of spectral distortion. We also discuss the complication of foreground contamination from unsubtracted point sources.

  10. Statistical nature of non-Gaussianity from cubic order primordial perturbations: CMB map simulations and genus statistic

    SciTech Connect

    Chingangbam, Pravabati; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2009-12-01

    We simulate CMB maps including non-Gaussianity arising from cubic order perturbations of the primordial gravitational potential, characterized by the non-linearity parameter g{sub NL}. The maps are used to study the characteristic nature of the resulting non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. We measure the genus and investigate how it deviates from Gaussian shape as a function of g{sub NL} and smoothing scale. We find that the deviation of the non-Gaussian genus curve from the Gaussian one has an antisymmetric, sine function like shape, implying more hot and more cold spots for g{sub NL} > 0 and less of both for g{sub NL} < 0. The deviation increases linearly with g{sub NL} and also exhibits mild increase as the smoothing scale increases. We further study other statistics derived from the genus, namely, the number of hot spots, the number of cold spots, combined number of hot and cold spots and the slope of the genus curve at mean temperature fluctuation. We find that these observables carry signatures of g{sub NL} that are clearly distinct from the quadratic order perturbations, encoded in the parameter f{sub NL}. Hence they can be very useful tools for distinguishing not only between non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations and Gaussian ones but also between g{sub NL} and f{sub NL} type non-Gaussianities.

  11. Astrophysical Uses Of Cmb Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep

    2009-01-01

    The future of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) research lies in exploiting the arcminute scale secondary anisotropies which encode information about the late time interaction of the CMB photons with the structure in the Universe. A specific form of such interaction is the gravitational lensing of the CMB - the main topic of this thesis. Upcoming experiments like ACT, SPT and PLANCK will measure these anisotropies with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In this thesis, we present new techniques to model and analyse such high resolution data and explore the implications of such measurements on Cosmology. First, we describe a novel method for simulating high resolution large sky lensed CMB maps. Maps simulated through this method will be instrumental in developing the detection and analysis techniques for CMB lensing. Second, we describe a new and efficient method for measuring the power spectrum of arcminute resolution CMB maps. At these resolutions, aliasing of power due to hard edges and point source masks become a serious problem. Our method efficiently remedies these problems and the reduces uncertainties in the final power spectrum estimate by several factors over those obtainable by the now standard methods. This technique will be also useful for estimating higher order statistics from the maps, like the ones related to the detection of CMB lensing and its cross-correlation with large scale structure. Next, we exemplify how such cross-correlations can be turned into Cosmological probes. We propose an estimator for cosmological distance ratios based on CMB and galaxy lensing and show that it can be measured to sufficient accuracy in future experiments to be Cosmologically useful. Finally, we show that CMB lensing can be used to constrain the void and the texture hypotheses that have been put forward for explaining the intriguing Cold Spot anomaly in the WMAP data.

  12. The Kullback-Leibler divergence as an estimator of the statistical properties of CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Assaf; Liu, Hao; Jackson, Andrew D.

    2015-06-01

    The identification of unsubtracted foreground residuals in the cosmic microwave background maps on large scales is of crucial importance for the analysis of polarization signals. These residuals add a non-Gaussian contribution to the data. We propose the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence as an effective, non-parametric test on the one-point probability distribution function of the data. With motivation in information theory, the KL divergence takes into account the entire range of the distribution and is highly non-local. We demonstrate its use by analyzing the large scales of the Planck 2013 SMICA temperature fluctuation map and find it consistent with the expected distribution at a level of 6%. Comparing the results to those obtained using the more popular Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we find the two methods to be in general agreement.

  13. Probing the statistical properties of CMB B-mode polarization through Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Larissa; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The detection of the magnetic type B-mode polarization is the main goal of future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. In the standard model, the B-mode map is a strong non-gaussian field due to the CMB lensing component. Besides the two-point correlation function, the other statistics are also very important to dig the information of the polarization map. In this paper, we employ the Minkowski functionals to study the morphological properties of the lensed B-mode maps. We find that the deviations from Gaussianity are very significant for both full and partial-sky surveys. As an application of the analysis, we investigate the morphological imprints of the foreground residuals in the B-mode map. We find that even for very tiny foreground residuals, the effects on the map can be detected by the Minkowski functional analysis. Therefore, it provides a complementary way to investigate the foreground contaminations in the CMB studies.

  14. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R. These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R=0) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits. PMID:27575138

  15. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Gabriel G.; Benito, R. M.; Borondo, F.

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R . These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R =0 ) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits.

  16. Astrophysical uses of CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep

    The future of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) research lies in exploiting the arcminute scale secondary anisotropies which encode information about the late time interaction of the CMB photons with the structure in the Universe. A specific form of such interaction is the gravitational lensing of the CMB photons by intervening matter--the main topic of this thesis. Upcoming experiments like the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and PLANCK will measure these anisotropies with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In four separate papers, laid out as four chapters in this thesis, we present new techniques to model and analyze such high resolution data and explore the implications of such measurements on Cosmology, mainly in the context of CMB lensing. The first chapter describes a novel and accurate method for simulating high resolution lensed CMB maps by ray-tracing through a large scale structure simulation. This method does not adopt the flat sky approximation and retains information from large angular scales in the dark matter distribution. Maps simulated through this method will be instrumental in developing the detection and analysis techniques for CMB lensing in high resolution CMB experiments like ACT. In the second chapter, we describe a new and efficient method for measuring the power spectrum of arcminute resolution CMB maps. At these resolutions, the CMB power spectrum is extremely red and is prone to aliasing of power due to hard edges and point source masks. By combining two new techniques, namely, prewhitening and the adaptive multitaper method, we show that these problems can be efficiently remedied and the uncertainties in the final power spectrum estimate can be reduced by several factors over those obtainable by the now standard methods. These techniques will be also useful for estimating higher order statistics from the maps, like the ones related to the detection of CMB lensing and its cross-correlation with large scale structure tracers. In

  17. Delensing CMB polarization with external datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kendrick M.; Hanson, Duncan; LoVerde, Marilena; Hirata, Christopher M.; Zahn, Oliver E-mail: duncan.hanson@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: chirata@tapir.caltech.edu

    2012-06-01

    One of the primary scientific targets of current and future CMB polarization experiments is the search for a stochastic background of gravity waves in the early universe. As instrumental sensitivity improves, the limiting factor will eventually be B-mode power generated by gravitational lensing, which can be removed through use of so-called ''delensing'' algorithms. We forecast prospects for delensing using lensing maps which are obtained externally to CMB polarization: either from large-scale structure observations, or from high-resolution maps of CMB temperature. We conclude that the forecasts in either case are not encouraging, and that significantly delensing large-scale CMB polarization requires high-resolution polarization maps with sufficient sensitivity to measure the lensing B-mode. We also present a simple formalism for including delensing in CMB forecasts which is computationally fast and agrees well with Monte Carlos.

  18. MAXIMA: Observations of CMB anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabii, Bahman

    This document describes the Millimeter Anisotropy eXperiment IMaging Array (MAXIMA), a balloon-borne experiment measuring the temperature anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on angular scales of 10 ' to 5°. MAXIMA data are used to discriminate between cosmological models and to determine cosmological parameters. MAXIMA maps the CMB using 16 bolometric detectors observing in spectral bands centered at 150 GHz, 230 GHz, and 410 GHz, with 10 ' resolution at all frequencies. The combined receiver sensitivity to CMB anisotropy is ˜40 μK sec , the best reported by any CMB experiment. Systematic errors are rejected by using four uncorrelated spatial modulations, multiple independent CMB observations, heavily baffled optics, and strong spectral discrimination. Observation patterns are well cross-linked and optimized for the extraction of cosmological information. Pointing is reconstructed to an accuracy of 1'. Absolute calibration uncertainty of 3 4% is the best achieved by any sub-orbital CMB experiment. Two MAXIMA flights were launched from the National Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine Texas in 1998 and 1999. During a total of 8.5 hours of CMB observations, 300 deg2 of the sky were mapped, with ˜50 deg2 overlap between the two flights. The observed region was selected for low foreground emission and post-flight data analysis confirms that foreground contamination is negligible. Cosmological results are presented from the 1998 flight, MAXIMA-I , in which 122 deg2 of sky were mapped over 3 hours. A maximum likelihood map with 3' pixelization is obtained from the three most sensitive and best tested detectors. The angular power spectrum derived from this map shows a narrow peak near ℓ = 200, and is consistent with inflationary Big Bang models. Within these models, cosmological parameters are estimated, including total density Ωtot = 0.9+0.18-0.16 , baryon density Ωbh2 = 0.033 ± 0.013, and power spectrum normalization C

  19. Prototype of Partial Cutting Tool of Geological Map Images Distributed by Geological Web Map Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonogaki, S.; Nemoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Geological maps and topographical maps play an important role in disaster assessment, resource management, and environmental preservation. These map information have been distributed in accordance with Web services standards such as Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) recently. In this study, a partial cutting tool of geological map images distributed by geological WMTS was implemented with Free and Open Source Software. The tool mainly consists of two functions: display function and cutting function. The former function was implemented using OpenLayers. The latter function was implemented using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). All other small functions were implemented by PHP and Python. As a result, this tool allows not only displaying WMTS layer on web browser but also generating a geological map image of intended area and zoom level. At this moment, available WTMS layers are limited to the ones distributed by WMTS for the Seamless Digital Geological Map of Japan. The geological map image can be saved as GeoTIFF format and WebGL format. GeoTIFF is one of the georeferenced raster formats that is available in many kinds of Geographical Information System. WebGL is useful for confirming a relationship between geology and geography in 3D. In conclusion, the partial cutting tool developed in this study would contribute to create better conditions for promoting utilization of geological information. Future work is to increase the number of available WMTS layers and the types of output file format.

  20. Bayesian Inference of CMB Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderes, Ethan; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Lavaux, Guilhem

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite, along with several ground-based telescopes, has mapped the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at sufficient resolution and signal-to-noise so as to allow a detection of the subtle distortions due to the gravitational influence of the intervening matter distribution. A natural modeling approach is to write a Bayesian hierarchical model for the lensed CMB in terms of the unlensed CMB and the lensing potential. So far there has been no feasible algorithm for inferring the posterior distribution of the lensing potential from the lensed CMB map. We propose a solution that allows efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling from the joint posterior of the lensing potential and the unlensed CMB map using the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. The main conceptual step in the solution is a re-parameterization of CMB lensing in terms of the lensed CMB and the “inverse lensing” potential. We demonstrate a fast implementation on simulated data, including noise and a sky cut, that uses a further acceleration based on a very mild approximation of the inverse lensing potential. We find that the resulting Markov Chain has short correlation lengths and excellent convergence properties, making it promising for applications to high-resolution CMB data sets in the future.

  1. Multiple mapping conditioning for flames with partial premixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenburg, A.; Cleary, M.J.

    2008-10-15

    Fully closed multiple mapping conditioning (MMC) is used to model partially premixed flames in homogeneous, isotropic decaying turbulence where the partial premixing is caused by local extinction and reignition phenomena. Two reference variables that represent mixing and reaction progress, such as mixture fraction and sensible enthalpy, are used to emulate turbulent scalar fluctuations. Local extinction is achieved by a priori coupling between scalar dissipation and temperature fluctuations via a correlation function that is based on the conditionally averaged sensible enthalpy at stoichiometric composition. The proposed model provides closures for the joint PDF of mixture fraction and sensible enthalpy, for the conditional variance equation of a reactive scalar, and for the doubly conditioned dissipation terms. Model results are compared with DNS in three flame cases with varying levels of local extinction, up to global extinction. The joint PDF predicted by MMC is in fair agreement with DNS. It constitutes, however, a clear improvement over conventional models using preassumed distribution functions for the PDFs. The doubly conditioned dissipation terms are modeled well and the results for all major chemical species are in good agreement with DNS. Predictions for intermediate species are also satisfactory. (author)

  2. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  3. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  4. The CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fergusson, J.R.; Liguori, M.; Shellard, E.P.S. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2012-12-01

    We use a separable mode expansion estimator with WMAP7 data to estimate the bispectrum for all the primary families of non-Gaussian models, including non-scaling feature (periodic) models, the flat (trans-Planckian) model, DBI and ghost inflation, as well as previously constrained simple cases. We review the late-time mode expansion estimator methodology which can be applied to any non-separable primordial and CMB bispectrum model, and we demonstrate how the method can be used to reconstruct the CMB bispectrum from an observational map. We extend the previous validation of the general estimator using local map simulations. We apply the estimator to the coadded WMAP 7-year V and W channel maps, reconstructing the WMAP bispectrum using l < 500 multipoles and n = 50 orthonormal 3D eigenmodes; both the mode expansion parameters and the reconstructed 3D WMAP bispectrum are plotted. We constrain all popular nearly scale-invariant models, ensuring that the theoretical bispectrum is well-described by a convergent mode expansion. Constraints from the local model f{sub NL} = 20.31±27.64 and the equilateral model f{sub NL} = 10.19±127.38 (F{sub NL} = 1.90±23.79) are consistent with previously published results. (Here, we use a nonlinearity parameter F{sub NL} normalised to the local case, to allow more direct comparison between different models.) Notable new constraints from our method include those for the constant model F{sub NL} = 7.82±24.57, the flat model F{sub NL} = 7.31±26.22, and warm inflation F{sub NL} = 2.10±25.83. We investigate feature models, which break scale invariance, surveying a wide parameter range for both the scale and phase (scanning for feature models with an effective period l* > 150). We find no significant evidence of non-Gaussianity for all cases well-described by the given eigenmodes. In the overall non-Gaussian analysis, we find one anomalous mode n = 33 with a 3.39σ amplitude which could give rise to an oscillatory model signal with l*

  5. New Measurements of CMB Polarization with SPTpol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Jason; SPTpol Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    All-sky surveys of the primary temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) are now cosmic variance limited on large to intermediate scales. To place tighter constraints on cosmology from CMB primary anisotropies we turn to measurements of CMB polarization. Not only is polarization another probe of ΛCDM cosmology, but secondary anisotropies are expected to have low polarized emission, which opens more of the so-called CMB damping tail to cosmological study. In this talk, we present new 150 GHz measurements of the CMB E-mode polarization auto-power and temperature-E-mode cross-power spectra from a 500 deg2 patch of sky observed with the SPTpol instrument, the second-generation receiver installed on the South Pole Telescope. Over a range of spherical harmonic multipoles 50 ≤ l < 10000 we detect 9 acoustic peaks in the E-mode spectrum. With these spectra we constrain ΛCDM cosmology independently from temperature-only measurements, and present new joint constraints with the Planck temperature auto-power spectrum. The CMB is also gravitationally lensed by large-scale structure. We use our high-fidelity map of E-mode polarization, in conjunction with SPTpol maps of B-mode polarization and temperature, to map the lensing potential of the CMB and measure its corresponding power spectrum. Finally, the CMB lensing potential can be combined with our E-mode map to estimate lensing B modes present in our field, which can be delensed to improve constraints on primordial B modes and the energy scale of inflation through the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r.

  6. A neural-network based estimator to search for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I. S.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    We present an upgraded combined estimator, based on Minkowski Functionals and Neural Networks, with excellent performance in detecting primordial non-Gaussianity in simulated maps that also contain a weighted mixture of Galactic contaminations, besides real pixel's noise from Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data. We rigorously test the efficiency of our estimator considering several plausible scenarios for residual non-Gaussianities in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps, with the intuition to optimize the training procedure of the Neural Network to discriminate between contaminations with primordial and secondary non-Gaussian signatures. We look for constraints of primordial local non-Gaussianity at large angular scales in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps. For the SMICA map we found fNL = 33 ± 23, at 1σ confidence level, in excellent agreement with the WMAP-9yr and Planck results. In addition, for the other three Planck maps we obtain similar constraints with values in the interval fNL in [33, 41], concomitant with the fact that these maps manifest distinct features in reported analyses, like having different pixel's noise intensities.

  7. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  8. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles alm's via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  9. A MEASUREMENT OF THE CORRELATION OF GALAXY SURVEYS WITH CMB LENSING CONVERGENCE MAPS FROM THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bleem, L. E.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Van Engelen, A.; Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Brodwin, M.; Busha, M. T.; Cho, H. M.; Desai, S.; Dore, O.; and others

    2012-07-01

    We compare cosmic microwave background lensing convergence maps derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) data with galaxy survey data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey, WISE, and a new large Spitzer/IRAC field designed to overlap with the SPT survey. Using optical and infrared catalogs covering between 17 and 68 deg{sup 2} of sky, we detect a correlation between the SPT convergence maps and each of the galaxy density maps at >4{sigma}, with zero correlation robustly ruled out in all cases. The amplitude and shape of the cross-power spectra are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and the measured galaxy bias is consistent with previous work. The detections reported here utilize a small fraction of the full 2500 deg{sup 2} SPT survey data and serve as both a proof of principle of the technique and an illustration of the potential of this emerging cosmological probe.

  10. Impact of secondary non-Gaussianities on the search for primordial non-Gaussianity with CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha

    2008-05-15

    When constraining the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} with cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps, the bias resulting from the covariance between primordial non-Gaussianity and secondary non-Gaussianities to the estimator of f{sub NL} is generally assumed to be negligible. We show that this assumption may not hold when attempting to measure the primordial non-Gaussianity out to angular scales below a few tens arcminutes with an experiment like Planck, especially if the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter is around the minimum detectability level with f{sub NL} between 5 and 10. In the future, it will be necessary to jointly estimate the combined primordial and secondary contributions to the cosmic microwave background bispectrum and establish f{sub NL} by properly accounting for the confusion from secondary non-Gaussianiti0008.

  11. Berkeley CMB Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, P. L.

    This paper describes the status of four CMB cosmology experiments which are currently being developed by the Berkeley group. These include the APEXSZ and South Pole Telescope searches for clusters of galaxies using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and the Polar Bear and EBEX CMB polarization anisotropy experiments. These experiments exploit new detector technologies with Superconducting TES bolometers and frequency domain output multiplexing, which has been developed at Berkeley.

  12. Direct cortical mapping via solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M; Dinov, Ivo; Osher, Stanley; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for cortical mapping that computes a direct map between two cortical surfaces while satisfying constraints on sulcal landmark curves. By computing the map directly, we can avoid conventional intermediate parameterizations and help simplify the cortical mapping process. The direct map in our method is formulated as the minimizer of a flexible variational energy under landmark constraints. The energy can include both a harmonic term to ensure smoothness of the map and general data terms for the matching of geometric features. Starting from a properly designed initial map, we compute the map iteratively by solving a partial differential equation (PDE) defined on the source cortical surface. For numerical implementation, a set of adaptive numerical schemes are developed to extend the technique of solving PDEs on implicit surfaces such that landmark constraints are enforced. In our experiments, we show the flexibility of the direct mapping approach by computing smooth maps following landmark constraints from two different energies. We also quantitatively compare the metric preserving property of the direct mapping method with a parametric mapping method on a group of 30 subjects. Finally, we demonstrate the direct mapping method in the brain mapping applications of atlas construction and variability analysis. PMID:17379568

  13. CMB cold spot from inflationary feature scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Yin-Zhe

    2016-05-01

    We propose a "feature-scattering" mechanism to explain the cosmic microwave background cold spot seen from WMAP and Planck maps. If there are hidden features in the potential of multi-field inflation, the inflationary trajectory can be scattered by such features. The scattering is controlled by the amount of isocurvature fluctuations, and thus can be considered as a mechanism to convert isocurvature fluctuations into curvature fluctuations. This mechanism predicts localized cold spots (instead of hot ones) on the CMB. In addition, it may also bridge a connection between the cold spot and a dip on the CMB power spectrum at ℓ ∼ 20.

  14. The partial captivity condition for U(1) extensions of expanding maps on the circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yushi; Tsujii, Masato; Wittsten, Jens

    2016-07-01

    This paper concerns the compact group extension f:T2→T2,f(x,s)=(E(x),s+τ(x) mod 1) of an expanding map E:{{{S}}1}\\to {{{S}}1} . The dynamics of f and its stochastic perturbations have previously been studied under the so-called partial captivity condition. Here we prove a supplementary result that shows that partial captivity is a \\mathscr{C}r generic condition on τ, once we fix E.

  15. Large-Angle Anomalies in the CMB

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2010-01-01

    We review the recently found large-scale anomalies in the maps of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. These include alignments of the largest modes of CMB anisotropy with each other and with geometry and direction of motion of the solar ssystem, and the unusually low power at these largest scales. We discuss these findings in relation to expectation from standard inflationary cosmology, their statistical significance, the tools to study them, and the various attempts to explain them.

  16. Status of CMB Observations in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The 2.725 K cosmic microwave background has played a key role in the development of modern cosmology by providing a solid observational foundation for constraining possible theories of what happened at very large redshifts and theoretical speculation reaching back almost to the would-be big bang initial singularity. After recounting some of the lesser known history of this area, I summarize the current observational situation and also discuss some exciting challenges that lie ahead: the search for B modes, the precision mapping of the CMB gravitational lensing potential, and the ultra-precise characterization of the CMB frequency spectrum, which would allow the exploitation of spectral distortions to probe new physics.

  17. General parity-odd CMB bispectrum estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Liguori, Michele; Fergusson, James R. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We develop a methodology for estimating parity-odd bispectra in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This is achieved through the extension of the original separable modal methodology to parity-odd bispectrum domains (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = odd). Through numerical tests of the parity-odd modal decomposition with some theoretical bispectrum templates, we verify that the parity-odd modal methodology can successfully reproduce the CMB bispectrum, without numerical instabilities. We also present simulated non-Gaussian maps produced by modal-decomposed parity-odd bispectra, and show the consistency with the exact results. Our new methodology is applicable to all types of parity-odd temperature and polarization bispectra.

  18. Low-ℓ CMB analysis and inpainting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, J.-L.; Fadili, M. J.; Rassat, A.

    2013-02-01

    Reconstructing the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in the Galactic plane is extremely difficult due to the dominant foreground emissions such as dust, free-free or synchrotron. For cosmological studies, the standard approach consists in masking this area where the reconstruction is insufficient. This leads to difficulties for the statistical analysis of the CMB map, especially at very large scales (to study for instance the low quadrupole, integrated Sachs Wolfe effect, axis of evil, etc.). We investigate how well some inpainting techniques can recover the low-ℓ spherical harmonic coefficients. We introduce three new inpainting techniques based on three different kinds of priors: sparsity, energy, and isotropy, which we compare. We show that sparsity and energy priors can lead to extremely high-quality reconstruction, within 1% of the cosmic variance for a mask with a sky coverage larger than 80%.

  19. CMB component separation in the pixel domain

    SciTech Connect

    Doroshkevich, A.; Verkhodanov, O.

    2011-02-15

    We show that the popular internal linear combination approach is unstable with respect to division of the observed map pixels to a set of 'homogeneous' subsamples. For various choices of such subsamples we can obtain a restored CMB signal with amplitudes ranging from zero to the amplitude of the observed signal. We propose an approach which allows us to obtain corrected estimates of the CMB power spectrum C{sub l} at l{<=}30 and provides results similar to WMAP for larger l. Using this approach, we eliminate some anomalies of the WMAP results. In particular, our estimate of the quadrupole is consistent with the theoretically expected one. The effect of the 'axis of evil' is suppressed, and the symmetry of the north and south galactic hemispheres increases. These results can change estimates of quadrupole polarization and the redshift of reionization of the Universe. We also propose a new simple approach which can improve the WMAP estimates of the high l power spectrum.

  20. POLARBEAR CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, H.; Ade, P.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A.; Arnold, K.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapmann, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M. A.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Fuller, G.; Ghribi, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaffe, A.; Jaehnig, G.; Kaneko, Y.; Katayama, N.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Kimura, N.; Kisner, T.; Lee, A. T.; Le Jeune, M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; O'Brient, R.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Shimizu, A.; Shimon, M.; Shimmin, C.; Sholl, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tomaru, T.; Tucker, C.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    POLARBEAR is a ground-based experiment in the Atacama desert in hile, measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. One of the science goals of POLARBEAR is to detect the B-mode polarization pattern of the CMB produced by primordial gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation. The detection of the B-mode polarization provides strong evidence for inflationary cosmological models. POLARBEAR is expected to reach a sensitivity to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.025 at 95% confidence level, using the data from two years of observation. With a beam size of 3.5 arcminutes, POLARBEAR is also sensitive to B-mode polarization signals at small-angular scales produced by weak gravitational lensing of large-scale structure. POLARBEAR is expected to provide a constraint on the sum of neutrino masses because of their effect on the large-scale structure. POLARBEAR was deployed in late 2011 and started observing in early 2012 at 150 GHz with an array of 1,274 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers. The current status of the POLARBEAR experiment is reported.

  1. Principal components of CMB non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Donough; Munshi, Dipak

    2015-04-01

    The skew-spectrum statistic introduced by Munshi & Heavens has recently been used in studies of non-Gaussianity from diverse cosmological data sets including the detection of primary and secondary non-Gaussianity of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Extending previous work, focused on independent estimation, here we deal with the question of joint estimation of multiple skew-spectra from the same or correlated data sets. We consider the optimum skew-spectra for various models of primordial non-Gaussianity as well as secondary bispectra that originate from the cross-correlation of secondaries and lensing of CMB: coupling of lensing with the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, coupling of lensing with thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich, as well as from unresolved point sources. For joint estimation of various types of non-Gaussianity, we use the principal component analysis (PCA) to construct the linear combinations of amplitudes of various models of non-Gaussianity, e.g. f^loc_NL,f^eq_NL,f^ortho_NL that can be estimated from CMB maps. We describe how the bias induced in the estimation of primordial non-Gaussianity due to secondary non-Gaussianity may be evaluated for arbitrary primordial models using a PCA analysis. The PCA approach allows one to infer approximate (but generally accurate) constraints using CMB data sets on any reasonably smooth model by use of a look-up table and performing a simple computation. This principle is validated by computing constraints on the Dirac-Born-Infeld bispectrum using a PCA analysis of the standard templates.

  2. CMB all-scale blackbody distortions induced by linearizing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, such as WMAP and Planck, measure intensity anisotropies and build maps using a linearized formula for relating them to the temperature blackbody fluctuations. However, this procedure also generates a signal in the maps in the form of y -type distortions which is degenerate with the thermal Sunyaev Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. These are small effects that arise at second order in the temperature fluctuations not from primordial physics but from such a limitation of the map-making procedure. They constitute a contaminant for measurements of our peculiar velocity, the tSZ and primordial y -distortions. They can nevertheless be well modeled and accounted for. We show that the distortions arise from a leakage of the CMB dipole into the y -channel which couples to all multipoles, mostly affecting the range ℓ≲400 . This should be visible in Planck's y -maps with an estimated signal-to-noise ratio of about 12. We note however that such frequency-dependent terms carry no new information on the nature of the CMB dipole. This implies that the real significance of Planck's Doppler coupling measurements is actually lower than reported by the collaboration. Finally, we quantify the level of contamination in tSZ and primordial y -type distortions and show that it is above the sensitivity of proposed next-generation CMB experiments.

  3. Amplifier arrays for CMB polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Lawrence, Charles R.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Wells, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Dawson, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Cryogenic low noise amplifier technology has been successfully used in the study of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MMIC (Monolithic Millimeter wave Integrated Circuit) technology makes the mass production of coherent detection receivers feasible.

  4. CMB lensing and giant rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  5. CMB hemispherical asymmetry: long mode modulation and non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir

    2014-08-01

    The observed hemispherical asymmetry in CMB map can be explained by modulation from a long wavelength super horizon mode which non-linearly couples to the CMB modes. We address the criticism in [1] about the role of non-Gaussianities in squeezed and equilateral configurations in generating hemispherical asymmetry from the long mode modulation. We stress that the modulation is sensitive to the non-Gaussianity in the squeezed limit. In addition, we demonstrate the validity of our approach in providing a consistency condition relating the amplitude of dipole asymmetry to f{sub NL} in the squeezed limit.

  6. Proteome Mapping of Adult Zebrafish Marrow Neutrophils Reveals Partial Cross Species Conservation to Human Peripheral Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sethi, Sachin; Aravamudhan, Sriram; Krüger, Marcus; Grabher, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes are pivotal cells within the first line of host defense of the innate immune system. In this study, we have used a gel-based LC-MS/MS approach to explore the proteome of primary marrow neutrophils from adult zebrafish. The identified proteins originated from all major cellular compartments. Gene ontology analysis revealed significant association of proteins with different immune-related network and pathway maps. 75% of proteins identified in neutrophils were identified in neutrophils only when compared to neutrophil-free brain tissue. Moreover, cross-species comparison with human peripheral blood neutrophils showed partial conservation of immune-related proteins between human and zebrafish. This study provides the first zebrafish neutrophil proteome and may serve as a valuable resource for an understanding of neutrophil biology and innate immunity. PMID:24019943

  7. AGI, a previously unreported D. melanogaster {alpha}-glucosidase: Partial purification, characterization, and cytogenetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.F.; Roberts, D.B.

    1996-04-01

    Inbred Drosophila melanogaster stocks were surveyed for {alpha}-glucosidases with nondenaturing gel electrophoresis using a fluorogenic substrate to stain the gels. The glucosidase most active under these conditions is polymorphic. We established that the polymorphism is genetic in origin and that the glucosidase was not likely to be a previously characterized enzyme. The gene encoding the enzyme was mapped cytogenetically to 33 A1-2- 33A8-B1, confirming that this is an enzyme not yet reported in D. melanogaster. The enzyme was partially purified by elution from nondenaturing gels, which enable us to establish that it has optimal activity at pH 6 and interacts most strongly with {alpha}- 1 -4 glucosides. A developmental and tissue survey suggested that this enzyme could have a purely digestive role or be involved in carbohydrate metabolism inside the organism. We propose that this enzyme is involved in either starch digestion or glycogen metabolism. 37 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Dynamics of Hollow Atom Formation in Intense X-Ray Pulses Probed by Partial Covariance Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, L. J.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Mucke, M.; Squibb, R. J.; Siano, M.; Eland, J. H. D.; Linusson, P.; v. d. Meulen, P.; Salén, P.; Thomas, R. D.; Larsson, M.; Foucar, L.; Ullrich, J.; Motomura, K.; Mondal, S.; Ueda, K.; Osipov, T.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B. F.; Berrah, N.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Schorb, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Cryan, J. P.; Coffee, R. N.; Takahashi, O.; Wada, S.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Feifel, R.

    2013-08-01

    When exposed to ultraintense x-radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) the innermost electronic shell can efficiently be emptied, creating a transient hollow atom or molecule. Understanding the femtosecond dynamics of such systems is fundamental to achieving atomic resolution in flash diffraction imaging of noncrystallized complex biological samples. We demonstrate the capacity of a correlation method called “partial covariance mapping” to probe the electron dynamics of neon atoms exposed to intense 8 fs pulses of 1062 eV photons. A complete picture of ionization processes competing in hollow atom formation and decay is visualized with unprecedented ease and the map reveals hitherto unobserved nonlinear sequences of photoionization and Auger events. The technique is particularly well suited to the high counting rate inherent in FEL experiments.

  9. Galactic dust polarized emission at high latitudes and CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prunet, S.; Sethi, S. K.; Bouchet, F. R.; Miville-Deschenes, M.-A.

    1998-11-01

    With recent instrumental advances, it might become possible to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), e.g. by future space missions like MAP and Planck Surveyor. In this paper, we estimate the dust polarized emission in our galaxy which is the major foreground to cope with for measuring the CMB polarization in the Wien part of CMB spectrum. We model the dust polarized emission in the galaxy using the three-dimensional HI maps of the Leiden/Dwingeloo survey at high galactic latitudes. We use the fact that the dust emission, for a wide range of wavelengths, has a tight correlation with the HI emission maps of this survey (Boulanger et al. 1996). Assuming the dust grains to be oblate with axis ratio =~ 2/3, which recent studies support, we determine the intrinsic dust polarized emissivity. The distribution of magnetic field with respect to the dust grain distribution is quite uncertain, we thus consider three extreme cases: (1) The magnetic field is aligned with the major axis of the dust structure, (2) the magnetic field has a random direction in the plane perpendicular to the direction of major axis of the dust structure, and (3) the magnetic field is unidirectional throughout. We further assume, as recent observations and theoretical analyses support, that the dust grains align with the magnetic field independently of its strength. The polarization reduction factor from misalignment of the direction of polarization from the plane of the sky and the differential polarization along a line of sight is calculated using these maps, to construct two-dimensional maps of dust polarized emission. We calculate the angular power spectrum of dust polarized emission from these maps and cast it in variables which allow a direct comparison with the polarized component of the CMB. Our results, at frequencies =~ 100 GHz, suggest that: (a) This foreground contamination is smaller than the scalar-induced polarization of the CMB at l ga 200 while the tensor

  10. Measuring the CMB Dipole at 11 GHz—for cheap!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, Aaron; Harrison, S.; Karkare, K. S.; Kimbert, R.; Kovac, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the design of a telescope capable of making mK-sensitivity maps of the microwave sky, with potential to map large-scale structure of the CMB and galaxy, within the budget of a classroom or amateur astronomer. This project modifies a telescope designed by Harvard’s advanced undergraduate astrophysics lab course, with the goal of improving sensitivity enough to detect the CMB dipole. The telescope’s design allows replication of the experiment within the resources of most similar undergraduate laboratory research courses. We use a low-noise block (LNB) receiver and a bandpass filter to amplify radiation near 10.7 GHz and remove RFI, and we rotate the telescope at constant angular velocity and elevation to provide coverage of the entire visible sky over 24 hours. Before modifications, the telescope accurately measured the isotropic CMB temperature, but interference and 1/f noise limited detection of isotropies in the microwave signal. With current modifications, the telescope can collect data continuously for over 24 hours, and produce maps used to constrain galactic and CMB signals.

  11. CMB temperature bispectrum induced by cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2009-10-15

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum of the temperature anisotropies induced by a network of cosmic strings is derived for small angular scales, under the assumption that the principal cause of temperature fluctuations is the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We provide analytical expressions for all isosceles triangle configurations in Fourier space. Their overall amplitude is amplified as the inverse cube of the angle and diverges for flat triangles. The isosceles configurations generically lead to a negative bispectrum with a power-law decay l{sup -6} for large multipole l. However, collapsed triangles are found to be associated with a positive bispectrum whereas the squeezed triangles still exhibit negative values. We then compare our analytical estimates to a direct computation of the bispectrum from a set of 300 statistically independent temperature maps obtained from Nambu-Goto cosmic string simulations in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe. We find good agreement for the overall amplitude, the power-law behavior, and the angle dependency of the various triangle configurations. At l{approx}500 the cosmic string Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect contributes approximately the same equilateral CMB bispectrum amplitude as an inflationary model with |f{sub NL}{sup loc}|{approx_equal}10{sup 3}, if the strings contribute about 10% of the temperature power spectrum at l=10. Current bounds on f{sub NL} are not derived using cosmic string bispectrum templates, and so our f{sub NL} estimate cannot be used to derive bounds on strings. However it does suggest that string bispectrum templates should be included in the search of CMB non-Gaussianities.

  12. CMB temperature bispectrum induced by cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2009-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum of the temperature anisotropies induced by a network of cosmic strings is derived for small angular scales, under the assumption that the principal cause of temperature fluctuations is the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We provide analytical expressions for all isosceles triangle configurations in Fourier space. Their overall amplitude is amplified as the inverse cube of the angle and diverges for flat triangles. The isosceles configurations generically lead to a negative bispectrum with a power-law decay ℓ-6 for large multipole ℓ. However, collapsed triangles are found to be associated with a positive bispectrum whereas the squeezed triangles still exhibit negative values. We then compare our analytical estimates to a direct computation of the bispectrum from a set of 300 statistically independent temperature maps obtained from Nambu-Goto cosmic string simulations in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. We find good agreement for the overall amplitude, the power-law behavior, and the angle dependency of the various triangle configurations. At ℓ˜500 the cosmic string Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect contributes approximately the same equilateral CMB bispectrum amplitude as an inflationary model with |fNLloc|≃103, if the strings contribute about 10% of the temperature power spectrum at ℓ=10. Current bounds on fNL are not derived using cosmic string bispectrum templates, and so our fNL estimate cannot be used to derive bounds on strings. However it does suggest that string bispectrum templates should be included in the search of CMB non-Gaussianities.

  13. Probing Inflation with CMB Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Daniel; Jackson, Mark G.; Adshead, Peter; Easther, Richard; Amblard, Alexandre; Cooray, Asantha; Ashoorioon, Amjad; Watson, Scott; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Bean, Rachel; Beltran, Maria; Dvorkin, Cora; Bernardis, Francesco de; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Bird, Simeon; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Chen Xingang; Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2009-06-09

    We summarize the utility of precise cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements as probes of the physics of inflation. We focus on the prospects for using CMB measurements to differentiate various inflationary mechanisms. In particular, a detection of primordial B-mode polarization would demonstrate that inflation occurred at a very high energy scale, and that the inflaton traversed a super-Planckian distance in field space. We explain how such a detection or constraint would illuminate aspects of physics at the Planck scale. Moreover, CMB measurements can constrain the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations and limit the possibility of a significant isocurvature contribution. Each such limit provides crucial information on the underlying inflationary dynamics. Finally, we quantify these considerations by presenting forecasts for the sensitivities of a future satellite experiment to the inflationary parameters.

  14. Bolometeric detector arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Day, P.; Goldin, A.; Golwala, S.; Holmes, W.; Irwin, K.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Rossinot, P.; Sterb, J.; Vayonakis, A.; Wang, G.; Yun, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the development of antenna coupled bolometers for CMB polarization experiments. The necessary components of a bolometric CMB polarimeter - a beam forming element, a band defining filter, and detectors - are all fabricated on a silicon chip with photolithography.

  15. Distinguishing between the Partial-Mapping Preparation Hypothesis and the Failure-to-Engage Hypothesis of Residual Switch Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsen, Job P.; de Jong, Ritske

    2010-01-01

    Lien, Ruthruff, Remington, & Johnston (2005) reported residual switch cost differences between stimulus-response (S-R) pairs and proposed the partial-mapping preparation (PMP) hypothesis, which states that advance preparation will typically be limited to a subset of S-R pairs because of structural capacity limitations, to account for these…

  16. Amiba Observation of CMB Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kin-Wang

    2003-03-01

    The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropies (AMiBA), a 13-element dual-channel 85-105 GHz interferometer array with full polarization capabilities, is being built to search for high redshift clusters of galaxies via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect as well as to probe the polarization properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We discuss several important issues in the observation of the CMB anisotropies such as observing strategy, l space resolution and mosaicing, optimal estimation of the power spectra, and ground pickup removal.

  17. Genetic dissection of heterosis using epistatic association mapping in a partial NCII mating design

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jia; Zhao, Xinwang; Wu, Guorong; Xiang, Dan; Liu, Qing; Bu, Su-Hong; Yi, Can; Song, Qijian; Dunwell, Jim M.; Tu, Jinxing; Zhang, Tianzhen; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis refers to the phenomenon in which an F1 hybrid exhibits enhanced growth or agronomic performance. However, previous theoretical studies on heterosis have been based on bi-parental segregating populations instead of F1 hybrids. To understand the genetic basis of heterosis, here we used a subset of F1 hybrids, named a partial North Carolina II design, to perform association mapping for dependent variables: original trait value, general combining ability (GCA), specific combining ability (SCA) and mid-parental heterosis (MPH). Our models jointly fitted all the additive, dominance and epistatic effects. The analyses resulted in several important findings: 1) Main components are additive and additive-by-additive effects for GCA and dominance-related effects for SCA and MPH, and additive-by-dominant effect for MPH was partly identified as additive effect; 2) the ranking of factors affecting heterosis was dominance > dominance-by-dominance > over-dominance > complete dominance; and 3) increasing the proportion of F1 hybrids in the population could significantly increase the power to detect dominance-related effects, and slightly reduce the power to detect additive and additive-by-additive effects. Analyses of cotton and rapeseed datasets showed that more additive-by-additive QTL were detected from GCA than from trait phenotype, and fewer QTL were from MPH than from other dependent variables. PMID:26679476

  18. Genomic mapping of phosphorothioates reveals partial modification of short consensus sequences

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bo; Chen, Chao; DeMott, Michael S.; Cheng, Qiuxiang; Clark, Tyson A.; Xiong, Xiaolin; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Butty, Vincent; Levine, Stuart S.; Yuan, George; Boitano, Matthew; Luong, Khai; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xiufen; Deng, Zixin; Turner, Stephen W.; Korlach, Jonas; You, Delin; Wang, Lianrong; Chen, Shi; Dedon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial phosphorothioate (PT) DNA modifications are incorporated by Dnd proteins A-E and often function with DndF-H as a restriction-modification (R-M) system, as in Escherichia coli B7A. However, bacteria such as Vibrio cyclitrophicus FF75 lack dndF-H, which points to other PT functions. To better understand PT biology, we report two novel, orthogonal technologies to map PTs across the genomes of B7A and FF75 with >90% agreement: real-time (SMRT) sequencing and deep sequencing of iodine-induced cleavage at PT (ICDS). In B7A, we detect PT on both strands of GpsAAC/GpsTTC motifs, but with only 18% of 40,701 possible sites modified. In contrast, PT in FF75 occurs as a single-strand modification at CpsCA, again with only 14% of 160,541 sites modified. Single-molecule analysis indicates that modification could be partial at any particular genomic site even with active restriction by DndF-H, with direct interaction of modification proteins with GAAC/GTTC sites demonstrated with oligonucleotides. These results point to highly unusual target selection by PT modification proteins and rule out known R-M mechanisms. PMID:24899568

  19. CMB component separation in the pixel domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A.; Verkhodanov, O.

    2011-02-01

    We show that the popular internal linear combination approach is unstable with respect to division of the observed map pixels to a set of “homogeneous” subsamples. For various choices of such subsamples we can obtain a restored CMB signal with amplitudes ranging from zero to the amplitude of the observed signal. We propose an approach which allows us to obtain corrected estimates of the CMB power spectrum Cℓ at ℓ≤30 and provides results similar to WMAP for larger ℓ. Using this approach, we eliminate some anomalies of the WMAP results. In particular, our estimate of the quadrupole is consistent with the theoretically expected one. The effect of the “axis of evil” is suppressed, and the symmetry of the north and south galactic hemispheres increases. These results can change estimates of quadrupole polarization and the redshift of reionization of the Universe. We also propose a new simple approach which can improve the WMAP estimates of the high ℓ power spectrum.

  20. Probing cosmic strings with satellite CMB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, E.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Smoot, G.F. E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2010-09-01

    We study the problem of searching for cosmic string signal patterns in the present high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This article discusses a technique capable of recognizing Kaiser-Stebbins effect signatures in total intensity anisotropy maps from isolated strings. We derive the statistical distributions of null detections from purely Gaussian fluctuations and instrumental performances of the operating satellites, and show that the biggest factor that produces confusion is represented by the acoustic oscillation features of the scale comparable to the size of horizon at recombination. Simulations show that the distribution of null detections converges to a χ{sup 2} distribution, with detectability threshold at 99% confidence level corresponding to a string induced step signal with an amplitude of about 100 μK which corresponds to a limit of roughly Gμ ∼ 1.5 × 10{sup −6}. We implement simulations for deriving the statistics of spurious detections caused by extra-Galactic and Galactic foregrounds. For diffuse Galactic foregrounds, which represents the dominant source of contamination, we construct sky masks outlining the available region of the sky where the Galactic confusion is sub-dominant, specializing our analysis to the case represented by the frequency coverage and nominal sensitivity and resolution of the Planck experiment. As for other CMB measurements, the maximum available area, corresponding to 7%, is reached where the foreground emission is expected to be minimum, in the 70–100 GHz interval.

  1. Reionization and CMB non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, D.; Corasaniti, P. S.; Coles, P.; Heavens, A.; Pandolfi, S.

    2014-08-01

    We show how cross-correlating a high-redshift external tracer field, such as the 21-cm neutral hydrogen distribution and product maps involving cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization fields, that probe mixed bispectrum involving these fields, can help to determine the reionization history of the Universe, beyond what can be achieved from cross-spectrum analysis. Taking clues from recent studies for the detection of primordial non-Gaussianity, we develop a set of estimators that can study reionization using a power spectrum associated with the bispectrum (or skew-spectrum). We use the matched filtering inherent in this method to investigate different reionization histories. We check to what extent they can be used to rule out various models of reionization and study cross-contamination from different sources such as the lensing of the CMB. The estimators can be fine-tuned to optimize study of a specific reionization history. We consider three different types of tracers in our study, namely: proto-galaxies; 21-cm maps of neutral hydrogen; and quasars. We also consider four alternative models of reionization. We find that the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detection at ℓmax = 2000 can reach O(70) for cosmic variance limited all-sky experiments. Combining 100 GHz, 143 GHz and 217 GHz channels of the Planck experiment, we find that the S/N lies in the range O(5)-O(35). The S/N depends on the specific choice of a tracer field, and multiple tracers can be effectively used to map out the entire reionization history with reasonable S/N. Contamination from weak lensing is investigated and found to be negligible, and the effects of Thomson scattering from patchy reionization are also considered.

  2. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  3. Interacted QTL mapping in partial NCII design provides evidences for breeding by design.

    PubMed

    Bu, Su Hong; Zhao, Xinwang; Xinwang, Zhao; Yi, Can; Wen, Jia; Tu, Jinxing; Jinxing, Tu; Zhang, Yuan Ming

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of heterosis in rice, maize and rapeseed has revolutionized crop production. Although elite hybrid cultivars are mainly derived from the F1 crosses between two groups of parents, named NCII mating design, little has been known about the methodology of how interacted effects influence quantitative trait performance in the population. To bridge genetic analysis with hybrid breeding, here we integrated an interacted QTL mapping approach with breeding by design in partial NCII mating design. All the potential main and interacted effects were included in one full model. If the number of the effects is huge, bulked segregant analysis were used to test which effects were associated with the trait. All the selected effects were further shrunk by empirical Bayesian, so significant effects could be identified. A series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed to validate the new method. Furthermore, all the significant effects were used to calculate genotypic values of all the missing F1 hybrids, and all these F1 phenotypic or genotypic values were used to predict elite parents and parental combinations. Finally, the new method was adopted to dissect the genetic foundation of oil content in 441 rapeseed parents and 284 F1 hybrids. As a result, 8 main-effect QTL and 37 interacted QTL were found and used to predict 10 elite restorer lines, 10 elite sterile lines and 10 elite parental crosses. Similar results across various methods and in previous studies and a high correlation coefficient (0.76) between the predicted and observed phenotypes validated the proposed method in this study. PMID:25822501

  4. Interacted QTL Mapping in Partial NCII Design Provides Evidences for Breeding by Design

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Can; Wen, Jia; Jinxing, Tu; Zhang, Yuan Ming

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of heterosis in rice, maize and rapeseed has revolutionized crop production. Although elite hybrid cultivars are mainly derived from the F1 crosses between two groups of parents, named NCII mating design, little has been known about the methodology of how interacted effects influence quantitative trait performance in the population. To bridge genetic analysis with hybrid breeding, here we integrated an interacted QTL mapping approach with breeding by design in partial NCII mating design. All the potential main and interacted effects were included in one full model. If the number of the effects is huge, bulked segregant analysis were used to test which effects were associated with the trait. All the selected effects were further shrunk by empirical Bayesian, so significant effects could be identified. A series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed to validate the new method. Furthermore, all the significant effects were used to calculate genotypic values of all the missing F1 hybrids, and all these F1 phenotypic or genotypic values were used to predict elite parents and parental combinations. Finally, the new method was adopted to dissect the genetic foundation of oil content in 441 rapeseed parents and 284 F1 hybrids. As a result, 8 main-effect QTL and 37 interacted QTL were found and used to predict 10 elite restorer lines, 10 elite sterile lines and 10 elite parental crosses. Similar results across various methods and in previous studies and a high correlation coefficient (0.76) between the predicted and observed phenotypes validated the proposed method in this study. PMID:25822501

  5. What will we learn from the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S.

    1997-10-01

    Within the next decade, experiments measuring the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) will add greatly to our knowledge of the universe. There are dozens of experiments scheduled to take data over the next several years, capped by the satellite missions of NASA (MAP) and ESA (PLANCK). What will we learn from these experiments? I argue that the potential pay-off is immense: We are quite likely to determine cosmological parameters to unprecedented accuracy. This will provide key information about the theory of structure formation and even about the physics behind inflation. If the experiments succeed, can anything spoil this pay-off? I focus on three possible spoilers - foregrounds, reionization, and defect models - and argue that we have every reason to be optimistic.

  6. How accurately can suborbital experiments measure the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira-Costa, Angelica de; Tegmark, Max; Devlin, Mark J.; Page, Lyman; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Xu Yongzhong

    2005-02-15

    Great efforts are currently being channeled into ground- and balloon-based CMB experiments, mainly to explore polarization and anisotropy on small angular scales. To optimize instrumental design and assess experimental prospects, it is important to understand in detail the atmosphere-related systematic errors that limit the science achievable with new instruments. As a step in this direction, we spatially compare the 648 square degree ground- and balloon-based QMASK map with the atmosphere-free WMAP map, finding beautiful agreement on all angular scales where both are sensitive. Although much work remains on quantifying atmospheric effects on CMB experiments, this is a reassuring quantitative assessment of the power of the state-of-the-art fast-Fourier-transform- and matrix-based mapmaking techniques that have been used for QMASK and virtually all subsequent experiments.

  7. Cross-correlation analysis of CMB with foregrounds for residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Rath, Pranati K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we try to probe whether a clean cosmic microwave background (CMB) map obtained from the raw satellite data using a cleaning procedure is sufficiently clean. Specifically, we study if there are any foreground residuals still present in the cleaned data using a cross-correlation statistic. Residual contamination is expected to be present, primarily, in the Galactic plane due to the high emission from our own Galaxy. A foreground mask is applied conventionally to avoid biases in the estimated quantities of interest due to foreground leakage. Here, we map foreground residuals, if present, in the unmasked region i.e. outside a CMB analysis mask. Further locally extended foreground-contaminated regions, found eventually, are studied to understand them better. The few contaminated regions thus identified may be used to slightly extend the available masks to make them more stringent.

  8. CMB: polarization and temperature waves from spatially limited cosmological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccigalupi, Carlo

    1999-05-01

    The most known inflationary model leaves traces in the form of Gaussian scale-invariant perturbations. It univoquely marks the CMB angular power spectrum. However, high energy physics may be more complicated and may leave other (and richer) traces, in the form of non-Gaussian scale-dependent perturbations. In this work we change our mind to the second issue. Instead of the CMB angular power spectrum only, we predict the temperature and polarization anisotropies from single well shaped spatially limited structures. These are generally characterized by some symmetries, and here we concentrate on the spherical ones. The treatment developed allows to express the anisotropy pattern as a function of (i) the geometrical coordinates of the particular structure under investigation, including its position relative to the last scattering surface, and (ii) the photon propagation direction n̂. Due to the wave-like behavior of the relevant equations, the general phenomenology that turns out is that for a localized initial inhomogeneity, the corresponding CMB perturbation propagates beyond the initial size, generating waves traveling outward with the sound velocity cs, and reaching the size of the sound horizon at the time we are examinating it. This behavior is a common feature of both the pure temperature and polarization anisotropies. The natural test of these computations will be the comparison with the observational data from the forthcoming high resolution CMB maps from the Planck mission.

  9. Can CMB Experiments Find Planet Nine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    authors propose that CMB experiments with high enough resolution (~5m telescopes and larger) could have the ability to detect Planet Nine!Theres one major catch: how can we differentiate between Planet Nine and the ~4000 foreground asteroids that are brighter than 30 mJy at millimeter wavelengths?Cowan and collaborators argue that this can be done using a combination of asteroid databases and parallax measurements. The authors calculate that Planet Nine should move roughly a few arcseconds per day, mostly due to parallax. In comparison, asteroids will move ~10 arcminutes per day in a combination of proper motion and parallax an order of magnitude faster than Planet Nine.Resolution ConstraintsTo hunt down Planet Nine, we therefore need telescopes that can not only resolve a 30 mJy point source, but can also resolve an annual parallax motion of ~5 arcminutes per year.The authors demonstrate that several current and planned CMB experiments have the resolution and ability to detect Planet Nine, provided that they map large swatches of the sky and return to the same regions every few months. These experiments include CCAT, the South Pole Telescope, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, CMB-S4, and even possibly Planck.With the astronomical community coming together to brainstormwaysto trackdown this elusive possible planet, the use of CMB experiments is an intriguing option. And even if Planet Nine is discovered by other means, measuring its heat signaturewillteach usmore about the internal workings of giant planets.CitationNicolas B. Cowan et al 2016 ApJ 822 L2. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/822/1/L2

  10. Early Universe with CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souradeep, Tarun

    2011-12-01

    The Universe is the grandest conceivable scale on which the human mind can strive to understand nature. The amazing aspect of cosmology, the branch of science that attempts to understand the origin and evolution of the Universe, is that it is largely comprehensible by applying the same basic laws of physics that we use for other branches of physics. The observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) is understood by applying the basic laws of radiative processes and transfer, masterfully covered in the classic text by S. Chandrasekhar, in the cosmological context. In addition to the now widely acclaimed temperature anisotropy, there is also linear polarization information imprinted on the observed Cosmic Microwave background. CMB polarization already has addressed, and promises to do a lot more to unravel the deepest fundamental queries about physics operating close to the origin of the Universe.

  11. Planned CMB Satellite Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    I will summarize space missions that are in the planning stage to measure the polarized spatial fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Space missions are complementary to ground-based observatories. First, the absence of atmospheric emission results in a wider range of frequencies that can be observed, which in turn improves removal of galactic foreground emission. Second, the stable observations possible from space give high-fidelity measurements at angular scales of tens of degrees where inflation theory predicts a peak in the B-mode angular power spectrum. Robust detection of both this ``reionization'' peak and the ``recombination'' peak at degree angular scales will give the most convincing case that the fingerprints of inflation have been detected. CMB polarization space missions in the planning stage include CORE+, LiteBIRD, and PIXIE. Science goals for all these missions include the detection and characterization of inflation and the characterization of the reionization epoch. CORE+ and LiteBIRD are imaging telescopes with sub-Kelvin superconducting focal-plane detector arrays with several thousand detectors. PIXIE is a two-beam differential spectrometer that will measure the Planck spectrum of the CMB in addition to searching for inflation.

  12. Probing gravity at large scales through CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; Ho, Shirley

    2015-06-01

    We describe a methodology to probe gravity with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence κ, specifically by measuring EG, the ratio of the Laplacian of the gravitational scalar potential difference to the velocity divergence. Using CMB lensing instead of galaxy-galaxy lensing avoids intrinsic alignments while also lacking a hard limit on the lens redshift and significant uncertainties in the source plane. We model EG for general relativity and modified gravity, finding that EG for f(R) gravity should be scale dependent due to the scale dependence of the growth rate f. Next, we construct an estimator for EG in terms of the galaxy-CMB lensing and galaxy clustering angular power spectra, along with the redshift-space distortion parameter β. We also forecast statistical errors for EG from the current Planck CMB lensing map and the spectroscopic galaxy and quasar samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 11, being 9 per cent with galaxies and 8 per cent when quasars are included. We also find that upcoming spectroscopic and photometric surveys, combined with the final Planck lensing map, can measure precisely the redshift- and scale dependence of EG out to redshifts z = 2 and higher, with photometric surveys having an advantage due to their high number densities. Advanced ACTPol's lensing map will increase the EG sensitivity even further. Finally, we find that Advanced ACTPol cross-correlated with spectroscopic (photometric) surveys can differentiate between general relativity and f(R) gravity at the level of 3σ (13σ). Performing a <1 per cent measurement of EG requires a 10 per cent precision in β from Euclid or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, currently achievable with a spectroscopic survey but difficult with only a photometric survey.

  13. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Partial Basin and Range Heat and Zones of Critical Stress Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Interpolated maps of heat flow, temperature gradient, and quartz geothermometers are included as TIF files. Zones of critical stress map is also included as a TIF file. The zones are given a 5km diameter buffer. The study area is only a part of the Basin and Range, but it does includes the Tularosa Basin.

  14. Non-Gaussianity and CMB aberration and Doppler

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Liguori, Michele; Renzi, Alessandro; Notari, Alessio E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it E-mail: arenzi@pd.infn.it

    2013-09-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces a deflection in the arrival direction of the observed photons (also known as CMB aberration) and a Doppler shift in the measured photon frequencies. As a consequence, aberration and Doppler effects induce non trivial correlations between the harmonic coefficients of the observed CMB temperature maps. In this paper we investigate whether these correlations generate a bias on non-Gaussianity estimators f{sub NL}. We perform this analysis simulating a large number of temperature maps with Planck-like resolution (lmax = 2000) as different realizations of the same cosmological fiducial model (WMAP7yr). We then add to these maps aberration and Doppler effects employing a modified version of the HEALPix code. We finally evaluate a generalization of the Komatsu, Spergel and Wandelt non-Gaussianity estimator for all the simulated maps, both when peculiar velocity effects have been considered and when these phenomena have been neglected. Using the value v/c = 1.23 × 10{sup −3} for our peculiar velocity, we found that the aberration/Doppler induced non-Gaussian signal is at most of about half of the cosmic variance σ for f{sub NL} both in a full-sky and in a cut-sky experimental configuration, for local, equilateral and orthogonal estimators. We conclude therefore that when estimating f{sub NL} it is safe to ignore aberration and Doppler effects if the primordial map is already Gaussian. More work is necessary however to assess whether a map which contains non-Gaussianity can be significantly distorted by a peculiar velocity.

  15. Optimal constraint on g{sub NL} from CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2013-09-01

    An optimal method to constrain the non-linearity parameter g{sub NL} of the local-type non-Gaussianity from CMB data is proposed. Our optimal estimator for g{sub NL} is separable and can be efficiently computed in real space. Combining the exact filtering of CMB maps with the full covariance matrix, our method allows us to extract cosmological information from observed data as much as possible and obtain a tighter constraint on g{sub NL} than previous studies. Applying our method to the WMAP 9-year data, we obtain the constraint g{sub NL} = (−3.3±2.2) × 10{sup 5}, which is a few times tighter than previous ones. We also make a forecast for PLANCK data by using the Fisher matrix analysis.

  16. Reconstruction of CMB temperature anisotropies with primordial CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-07-01

    Scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation in galaxy clusters induces polarization signals determined by the quadrupole anisotropy in the photon distribution at the location of clusters. This `remote quadrupole' derived from the measurements of the induced polarization in galaxy clusters provides an opportunity to reconstruct local CMB temperature anisotropies. In this Letter, we develop an algorithm of the reconstruction through the estimation of the underlying primordial gravitational potential, which is the origin of the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations and CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters. We found a nice reconstruction for the quadrupole and octopole components of the CMB temperature anisotropies with the assistance of the CMB induced polarization signals. The reconstruction can be an important consistency test on the puzzles of CMB anomalies, especially for the low-quadrupole and axis-of-evil problems reported in Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck data.

  17. Nonlinear electrodynamics and CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, Herman J. Mosquera; Lambiase, G. E-mail: lambiase@sa.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    Recently WMAP and BOOMERanG experiments have set stringent constraints on the polarization angle of photons propagating in an expanding universe: Δα = (−2.4±1.9)°. The polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) is reviewed in the context of nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED). We compute the polarization angle of photons propagating in a cosmological background with planar symmetry. For this purpose, we use the Pagels-Tomboulis (PT) Lagrangian density describing NLED, which has the form L ∼ (X/Λ{sup 4}){sup δ−1} X, where X = ¼F{sub αβ}F{sup αβ}, and δ the parameter featuring the non-Maxwellian character of the PT nonlinear description of the electromagnetic interaction. After looking at the polarization components in the plane orthogonal to the (x)-direction of propagation of the CMB photons, the polarization angle is defined in terms of the eccentricity of the universe, a geometrical property whose evolution on cosmic time (from the last scattering surface to the present) is constrained by the strength of magnetic fields over extragalactic distances.

  18. Genetic dissection of heterosis using epistatic QTL mapping in partial NCII mating design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterosis refers to the phenomenon in which hybrid F1 exhibits enhanced growth or agronomic performance. However, theoretical studies on the genetic basis of heterosis were based on bi-parental segregation populations instead of multiple-parental hybrid F1 populations. In simulation study, we mapped...

  19. Circular polarization of the CMB: Foregrounds and detection prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Soma; Lubin, Philip

    2016-07-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is one of the finest probes of cosmology. Its all-sky temperature and linear polarization fluctuations have been measured precisely at a level of δ T /TCMB˜10-6 . In contrast, circular polarization (C P ) of the CMB has not been precisely explored. The current upper limit on the C P of the CMB is at a level of δ V /TCMB˜10-4 and is limited on large scales. Some of the cosmologically important sources which can induce a C P in the CMB include early Universe symmetry breaking, a primordial magnetic field, galaxy clusters, and Pop III stars (also known as the first stars). Among these sources, Pop III stars are expected to induce the strongest signal with levels strongly dependent on the frequency of observation and on the number, Np, of the Pop III stars per halo. Optimistically, a C P signal in the CMB resulting from the Pop III stars could be at a level of δ V /TCMB˜2 ×10-7 in scales of 1° at 10 GHz, which is much smaller than the currently existing upper limits on the C P measurements. Primary foregrounds in the cosmological C P detection will come from the galactic synchrotron emission, which is naturally (intrinsically) circularly polarized. We use data-driven models of the galactic magnetic field, thermal electron density, and relativistic electron density to simulate all-sky maps of the galactic C P . This work also points out that the galactic C P levels are important below 50 GHz and is an important factor for telescopes aiming to detect primordial B modes using C P as a systematic rejection channel. In this paper, we focus on a SNR evaluation for the detectability of the Pop III induced C P signal in the CMB. We find that a SNR higher than unity is achievable, for example, with a 10 m telescope and an observation time of 20 months at 10 GHz, if Np≥100 . We also find that, if frequency of observation and resolution of the beam is appropriately chosen, a SNR higher than unity is possible with Np≥10 and

  20. Spin-SILC: CMB polarisation component separation with spin wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    We present Spin-SILC, a new foreground component separation method that accurately extracts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation E and B modes from raw multifrequency Stokes Q and U measurements of the microwave sky. Spin-SILC is an internal linear combination method that uses spin wavelets to analyse the spin-2 polarisation signal P = Q + iU. The wavelets are additionally directional (non-axisymmetric). This allows different morphologies of signals to be separated and therefore the cleaning algorithm is localised using an additional domain of information. The advantage of spin wavelets over standard scalar wavelets is to simultaneously and self-consistently probe scales and directions in the polarisation signal P = Q + iU and in the underlying E and B modes, therefore providing the ability to perform component separation and E-B decomposition concurrently for the first time. We test Spin-SILC on full-mission Planck simulations and data and show the capacity to correctly recover the underlying cosmological E and B modes. We also demonstrate a strong consistency of our CMB maps with those derived from existing component separation methods. Spin-SILC can be combined with the pseudo- and pure E-B spin wavelet estimators presented in a companion paper to reliably extract the cosmological signal in the presence of complicated sky cuts and noise. Therefore, it will provide a computationally-efficient method to accurately extract the CMB E and B modes for future polarisation experiments.

  1. Comparative Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Partial Resistance to Puccinia sorghi Across Four Populations of European Flint Maize.

    PubMed

    Lübberstedt, T; Klein, D; Melchinger, A E

    1998-12-01

    ABSTRACT We mapped and characterized quantitative trait loci (QTL) for partial resistance to Puccinia sorghi and investigated consistency across different European flint maize populations. Four independent populations, containing 280 F(3) lines (AxB(I)), 120 F(5) lines (AxB(II)), 131 F(4) lines (AxC), and 133 F(4) lines (CxD) were produced from four European elite flint inbreds (A, B, C, and D) and genotyped at 89, 151, 104, and 122 restriction fragment length polymorphism marker loci, respectively. All F(n) lines were evaluated in field trials with two replications in three or five (AxB(I)) environments. Genotypic variance was highly significant for rust ratings in all populations, and heritabilities exceeded 0.64. Between 4 and 13 QTL were detected in individual populations using composite interval mapping, explaining between 33 and 71% of the phenotypic variance. Twenty QTL were distributed over all ten chromosomes, without preference to chromosomes 3, 4, 6, and 10, which harbor qualitatively acting Rp loci. In most cases, gene action was additive or partially dominant. Four pairs of QTL displayed significant digenic epistatic interactions, and QTL-environment interactions were observed frequently. Approximately half of the QTL were consistent between AxB(I) and AxB(II) or AxC and CxD; fewer were consistent between AxB(I) and AxC or CxD. In European flint maize germ plasm, conventional selection for partial rust resistance seems to be more promising than marker-assisted selection. PMID:18944835

  2. Spectral Distortions of the CMB Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashev, S. A.; Kholupenko, E. E.; Chluba, J.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Varshalovich, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    We consider the distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole anisotropy related to primordial recombination radiation (PRR) and primordial y- and μ-distortions. The signals arise due to our motion relative to the CMB restframe and appear as a frequency-dependent distortion of the CMB temperature dipole. To leading order, the expected relative distortion of the CMB dipole does not depend on the particular observation directions and reaches the level of 10-6 for the PRR- and μ-distortions and 10-5 for the y-distortion in the frequency range 1-700 GHz. The temperature differences arising from the dipole anisotropy of the relic CMB distortions depend on the observation directions. For mutually opposite directions, collinear to the CMB dipole axis, the temperature differences due to the PRR- and μ-dipole anisotropy attain values {{Δ }}T≃ 10 {nK} in the considered range. The temperature difference arising from the y-dipole anisotropy may reach values of up to 1 μ {{K}}. The key features of the considered effect are as follow: (i) an observation of the effect does not require absolute calibration; (ii) patches of sky with minimal foreground contamination can be chosen. Future measurements of the CMB dipole distortion thus will provide an alternative method for direct detection of the PRR-, y-, and μ-distortions. The y-distortion dipole may be detectable with PIXIE at a few standard deviations.

  3. CMB source apportionment during REVEAL

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenthal, D.H.; Gertler, A.W.; Wittorff, D.; Sakiyama, S.

    1997-01-01

    Source contributions to PM{sub 2.5} aerosol measured at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows in the Lower Fraser Valley, B.C., Canada, during the REVEAL study, were estimated using chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor modeling. ON average, motor vehicles accounted for 34 and 43% of PM{sub 2.5} at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows, respectively. Secondary sulfate and secondary nitrate were the next most significant PM{sub 2.5} components, accounting for 25 and 27%, respectively, at Chilliwack, and 27 and 12%, respectively, at Pitt Meadows. Geological material accounted for 3 and 5% of PM{sub 2.5} at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows, respectively. A significant contribution of wood smoke was estimated for both sites: 8% at Chilliwack and 9% at Pitt Meadows.

  4. Disformal transformations on the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Cespedes, Sebastian; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2016-08-01

    In this work we study the role of disformal transformation on cosmological backgrounds and its relation to the speed of sound for tensor modes. A speed different from one for tensor modes can arise in several contexts, such as Galileons theories or massive gravity, nevertheless the speed is very constrained to be one by observations of gravitational wave emission. It has been shown that in inflation a disformal transformation allows to set the speed for tensor modes to one without making changes to the curvature power spectrum. Here we show that this invariance does not hold when considering the CMB anisotropy power spectrum. It turns out that the after doing the transformation there is an imprint on the acoustic peaks and the diffusion damping. This has interesting consequences; here we explore quartic galileon theories which allow a modified speed for tensor modes. For these theories the transformation can be used to constraint the parameter space in different regimes.

  5. Statistical aspect of trait mapping using a dense set of markers: A partial review

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a review of statistical methods used to locate trait loci using maps of markers spanning the whole genome. Such maps are becoming readily available and can be especially useful in mapping traits that are non Mendelian. Genome-wide search for a trait locus is often called a {open_quotes}global search{close_quotes}. Global search methods include, but are not restricted to, identifying disease susceptibility genes using affected relative pairs, finding quantitative trait loci in experimental organisms and locating quantitative trait loci in humans. For human linkage, we concentrate on methods using pairs of affected relatives rather than pedigree analysis. We begin in the next section with a review of work on the use of affected pairs of relatives to identify gene loci that increase susceptibility to a particular disease. We first review Risch`s 1990 series of papers. Risch`s method can be used to search the entire genome for such susceptibility genes. Using Risch`s idea Elston explored the issue of how many pairs and markers are necessary to reach a certain probability of detecting a locus if there exists one. He proposed a more economical two stage design that uses few markers at the first stage but adds markers around the {open_quotes}promising{close_quotes} area of the genome at the second stage. However, Risch and Elston do not use multipoint linkage analysis, which takes into account all markers at once (rather than one at a time) in the calculation of the test statistic. Such multipoint methods for affected relatives have been developed by Feingold and Feingold et al. The last authors` multipoint method is based on a continuous specification of identity by descent between the affected relatives but can also be used for a set of linked markers spanning the genome. A brief description of their method and treatment of more complex issues such as combining relative pairs is included. 29 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Search for primordial symmetry breakings in CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2016-06-01

    There are possibilities to violate symmetries (e.g. parity and rotational invariance) in the primordial cosmological fluctuations. Such symmetry breakings can imprint very rich signatures in late-time phenomena, which may be possible to observe. Especially, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) will change its face drastically, corresponding to the symmetry-breaking types, since the harmonic-space representation is very sensitive to the statistical, spin and angular dependences of cosmological perturbations. Here, we discuss (1) general responses of CMB to the symmetry breakings, (2) some theoretical models creating interesting CMB signatures, and (3) aspects of the estimation from observational data.

  7. Generation of circular polarization of the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, M.; Bavarsad, E.; Haghighat, M.; Mohammadi, R.; Motie, I.; Rezaei, Z.

    2010-04-01

    According to the standard cosmology, near the last scattering surface, the photons scattered via Compton scattering are just linearly polarized and then the primordial circular polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons is zero. In this work we show that CMB polarization acquires a small degree of circular polarization when a background magnetic field is considered or the quantum electrodynamic sector of standard model is extended by Lorentz-noninvariant operators as well as noncommutativity. The existence of circular polarization for the CMB radiation may be verified during future observation programs, and it represents a possible new channel for investigating new physics effects.

  8. Separation of sources in radiofrequency measurements of partial discharges using time-power ratio maps.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, R; Robles, G; Martinez-Tarifa, J M; Ardila-Rey, J

    2015-09-01

    Partial discharges measurement is one of the most useful tools for condition monitoring of high-voltage (HV) equipment. These phenomena can be measured on-line in radiofrequency (RF) with sensors such as the Vivaldi antenna, used in this paper, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio by rejecting FM and low-frequency TV bands. Additionally, the power ratios (PR), a signal-processing technique based on the power distribution of the incoming signals in frequency bands, are used to characterize different sources of PD and electromagnetic noise (EMN). The calculation of the time length of the pulses is introduced to separate signals where the PR alone do not give a conclusive solution. Thus, if several EM sources could be previously calibrated, it is possible to detect pulses corresponding to PD activity. PMID:25997372

  9. A CMB foreground study in WMAP data: Extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It serves as a primary tool to understand the global properties, content and evolution of the universe. Since 2001, NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite has been napping the full sky anisotropy with unprecedented accuracy, precision and reliability. The CMB angular power spectrum calculated from the WMAP full sky maps not only enables accurate testing of cosmological models, but also places significant constraints on model parameters. The CMB signal in the WMAP sky maps is contaminated by microwave emission from the Milky Way and from extragalactic sources. Therefore, in order to use the maps reliably for cosmological studies, the foreground signals must be well understood and removed from the maps. This thesis focuses on the separation of two foreground contaminants from the WMAP maps: extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission. Extragalactic point sources constitute the most important foreground on small angular scales. Various methods have been applied to the WMAP single frequency maps to extract sources. However, due to the limited angular resolution of WMAP, it is possible to confuse positive CMB excursions with point sources or miss sources that are embedded in negative CMB fluctuations. We present a novel CMB-free source finding technique that utilizes the spectrum difference of point sources and CMB to form internal linear combinations of multifrequency maps to suppress the CMB and better reveal sources. When applied to the WMAP 41, 64 and 94 GHz maps, this technique has not only enabled detection of sources that are previously cataloged by independent methods, but also allowed disclosure of new sources. Without the noise contribution from the CMB, this method responds rapidly with the integration time. The number of detections varies as 0( t 0.72 in the two-band search and 0( t 0.70 in the three-band search from one year to five years

  10. Measuring the Polarized CMB with ACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staggs, Suzanne

    2016-06-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a special-purpose 6m telescope designed for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements at arcminute resolution. We will describe recent results using the second-generation camera called ACTPol. The camera comprises three sets of optics and detectors. Two operate at 150 GHz, and the third is the first multichroic detector array deployed for the CMB. The latter operates at 90 and 150 GHz.

  11. Polarized cosmic microwave background map recovery with sparse component separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-11-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting this information from microwave surveys requires distinguishing between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which means solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies, but very rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to distinguish between the various components. More recent methods, which instead emphasize the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimates of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, we here introduce a new component separation technique dubbed the polarized generalized morphological component analysis (PolGMCA), which refines previous work to specifically work on the estimation of the polarized CMB maps: i) it benefits from a recently introduced sparsity-based mechanism to cope with partially correlated components; ii) it builds upon estimator aggregation techniques to further yield a better noise contamination/non-Gaussian foreground residual trade-off. The PolGMCA algorithm is evaluated on simulations of full-sky polarized microwave sky simulations using the Planck Sky Model (PSM). The simulations show that the proposed method achieves a precise recovery of the CMB map in polarization with low-noise and foreground contamination residuals. It provides improvements over standard methods, especially on the Galactic center, where estimating the CMB is challenging.

  12. Mapping amorphous material on a partially crystalline surface: nanothermal analysis for simultaneous characterisation and imaging of lactose compacts.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xuan; Reading, Mike; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2009-04-01

    The use of nanothermal analysis for mapping amorphous and crystalline lactose at a nanoscale is explored. Compressed tablets of amorphous and crystalline lactose (alone and mixed) were prepared and localised thermomechanical analysis (L-TMA) performed using micro- and nanothermal analysis in a addition to single point variable temperature pull-off force measurements. L-TMA was shown to be able to identify the different materials at a nanoscale via measurement of the thermal events associated with the amorphous and crystalline regions, while pull off force measurements showed that the adhesion of the amorphous material increased on approaching the T(g). Imaging was performed isothermally using topographic and pulsed force mode (PFM) measurements; both approaches were capable of discriminating two regions which L-TMA conformed to correspond to the two materials. In addition, force volume imaging (FVI) is suggested as a further approach to mapping the surfaces. We demonstrate that performing heated tip PFM measurements at a temperature close to the T(g) allows greater discrimination between the two regions. We therefore suggest that the nanothermal approach allows both characterisation and imaging of partially amorphous surfaces, and also demonstrate that heated tip imaging allows greater discrimination between crystalline and amorphous materials than is possible using ambient studies. PMID:18752293

  13. The BRAIN CMB polarization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polenta, G.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bartlett, J.; Bréelle, E.; Conversi, L.; de Bernardis, P.; Dufour, C.; Gervasi, M.; Giard, M.; Giordano, C.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Maffei, B.; Masi, S.; Nati, F.; Orlando, A.; Peterzen, S.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Piccirillo, L.; Pisano, G.; Pons, R.; Rosset, C.; Savini, G.; Sironi, G.; Tartari, A.; Veneziani, M.; Zannoni, M.

    2007-03-01

    In the standard cosmological scenario tensor perturbations of the metric produce a rotational component in the Cosmic Microwave Background polarization, called B-modes. The expected signal is of the order of ˜0.1 μK, well beyond the sensitivity of current experiments. In this paper, we introduce the BRAIN experiment, a bolometric interferometer devoted to measure the B-modes polarization of the CMB from Concordia station in Antarctica. This experiment will take advantage of both high sensitivity of bolometer arrays and low level of systematic effects of interferometers. We report the results obtained during the first campaign we carried out this austral summer at Dome-C. Using a pathfinder experiment, we demonstrated that a cryocooler based cryogenic system can work in such environmental conditions. We also carried out preliminary observations of the atmospheric emission at 145 GHz from Dome-C, and during the next campaign we'll extend the measurements to all the Stokes parameters I, Q, U, V all over the winter.

  14. The CMB modulation from inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lyth, David H.

    2013-08-01

    Erickcek, Kamionkowski and Carroll proposed in 2008 that the dipole modulation of the CMB could be due to a very large scale perturbation of the field φ causing the primordial curvature perturbation. We repeat their calculation using weaker assumptions and the current data. If φ is the inflaton of any single-field inflation with the attractor behaviour, the asymmetry is almost certainly too small. If instead φ is any curvaton-type field (ie. one with the canonical kinetic term and a negligible effect during inflation) the asymmetry can agree with observation if |f{sub NL}| in the equilateral configuration is ≅ 10 for k{sup −1} = 1Gpc and ∼<3 for k{sup −1} = 1Mpc. An f{sub NL} with these properties can apparently be obtained from the curvaton with an axionic potential. Within any specific curvaton-type model, the function f{sub NL}(k{sub 1},k{sub 2},k{sub 3}) required to generate the asymmetry would be determined, and could perhaps already be confirmed or ruled out using existing Planck or WMAP data.

  15. Quantifying the Effect of Component Covariances in CMB Extraction from Multi-frequency Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.

    2008-01-01

    Linear combination methods provide a global method for component separation of multi-frequency data. We present such a method that allows for consideration of possible covariances between the desired cosmic microwave background signal and various foreground signals that are also present. We also recover information on the foregrounds including the number of foregrounds, their spectra and templates. In all this, the covariances, which we would only expect to vanish 'in the mean' are included as parameters expressing the fundamental uncertainty due to this type of cosmic variance. When we make the reasonable assumption that the CMB is Gaussian, we can compute both a mean recovered CMB map and also an RMS error map, The mean map coincides with WMAP's Internal Linear Combination map.

  16. Planck 2013 results. XXIII. Isotropy and statistics of the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Räth, C.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The two fundamental assumptions of the standard cosmological model - that the initial fluctuations are statistically isotropic and Gaussian - are rigorously tested using maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from the Planck satellite. The detailed results are based on studies of four independent estimates of the CMB that are compared to simulations using a fiducial ΛCDM model and incorporating essential aspects of the Planck measurement process. Deviations from isotropy have been found and demonstrated to be robust against component separation algorithm, mask choice, and frequency dependence. Many of these anomalies were previously observed in the WMAP data, and are now confirmed at similar levels of significance (about 3σ). However, we find little evidence of non-Gaussianity, with the exception of a few statistical signatures that seem to be associated with specific anomalies. In particular, we find that the quadrupole-octopole alignment is also connected to a low observed variance in the CMB signal. A power asymmetry is now found to persist on scales corresponding to about ℓ = 600 and can be described in the low-ℓ regime by a phenomenological dipole modulation model. However, any primordial power asymmetry is strongly scale-dependent and does not extend toarbitrarily small angular scales. Finally, it is plausible that some of these features may be reflected in the angular power spectrum of the data, which shows a deficit of power on similar scales. Indeed, when the power spectra of two hemispheres defined by a preferred direction are considered separately, one shows evidence of a deficit in power, while its opposite contains oscillations between odd and even modes that may be related to the parity violation and phase correlations also detected in the data. Although these analyses represent a step forward in building an understanding of the anomalies, a satisfactory explanation based on physically motivated models is still lacking.

  17. Planck CMB anomalies: astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects and the curse of masking

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Paykari, P.; Sureau, F.; Bobin, J. E-mail: jstarck@cea.fr E-mail: florent.sureau@cea.fr

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes will be made available for download here http://www.cosmostat.org/anomaliesCMB.html.

  18. CMB B -mode non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; van Engelen, Alexander; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2016-06-01

    We study the degree to which the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be used to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity involving one tensor and two scalar fluctuations, focusing on the correlation of one polarization B mode with two temperature modes. In the simplest models of inflation, the tensor-scalar-scalar primordial bispectrum is nonvanishing and is of the same order in slow-roll parameters as the scalar-scalar-scalar bispectrum. We calculate the ⟨B T T ⟩ correlation arising from a primordial tensor-scalar-scalar bispectrum, and show that constraints from an experiment like CMB-Stage IV using this observable are more than an order of magnitude better than those on the same primordial coupling obtained from temperature measurements alone. We argue that B -mode non-Gaussianity opens up an as-yet-unexplored window into the early Universe, demonstrating that significant information on primordial physics remains to be harvested from CMB anisotropies.

  19. CMB μ distortion from primordial gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Atsuhisa; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Takahashi, Tomo; Tashiro, Hiroyuki E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new mechanism of generating the μ distortion in cosmic microwave background (CMB) originated from primordial gravitational waves. Such μ distortion is generated by the damping of the temperature anisotropies through the Thomson scattering, even on scales larger than that of Silk damping. This mechanism is in sharp contrast with that from the primordial curvature (scalar) perturbations, in which the temperature anisotropies mainly decay by Silk damping effects. We estimate the size of the μ distortion from the new mechanism, which can be used to constrain the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves on smaller scales independently from the CMB anisotropies, giving more wide-range constraint on their spectral index by combining the amplitude from the CMB anisotropies.

  20. CMB lensing forecasts for constraining the primordial perturbations: adding to the CMB temperature and polarization information

    SciTech Connect

    Kasanda, Simon Muya; Moodley, Kavilan E-mail: moodleyk41@ukzn.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    We forecast how current (PLANCK) and future (PRISM) cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments constrain the adiabatic mode and its admixtures with primordial isocurvature modes. The forecasts are based on measurements of the reconstructed CMB lensing potential and lensing-induced CMB B-mode polarization anisotropies in combination with the CMB temperature and E-mode polarization anisotropies. We first study the characteristic features of the CMB temperature, polarization and lensing spectra for adiabatic and isocurvature modes. We then consider how information from the CMB lensing potential and B-mode polarization induced by lensing can improve constraints on an admixture of adiabatic and three correlated isocurvature modes. We find that the CMB lensing spectrum improves constraints on isocurvature modes by at most 10% for the PLANCK and PRISM experiments. The limited improvement is a result of the low amplitude of isocurvature lensing spectra and cancellations between these spectra that render them only slightly detectable. There is a larger gain from using the lensing-induced B-mode polarization spectrum measured by PRISM. In this case constraints on isocurvature mode amplitudes improve by as much as 40% relative to the CMB temperature and E-mode polarization constraints. The addition of both lensing and lensing-induced B-mode polarization information constrains isocurvature mode amplitudes at the few percent level or better. In the case of admixtures of the adiabatic mode with one or two correlated isocurvature modes we find that constraints at the percent level or better are possible. We investigate the dependence of our results to various assumptions in our analysis, such as the inclusion of dark energy parameters, the CMB temperature-lensing correlation, and the presence of primordial tensor modes, and find that these assumptions do not significantly change our main results.

  1. Future detectability of gravitational-wave induced lensing from high-sensitivity CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    We discuss the future detectability of gravitational-wave induced lensing from high-sensitivity cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. Gravitational waves can induce a rotational component of the weak-lensing deflection angle, usually referred to as the curl mode, which would be imprinted on the CMB maps. Using the technique of reconstructing lensing signals involved in CMB maps, this curl mode can be measured in an unbiased manner, offering an independent confirmation of the gravitational waves complementary to B-mode polarization experiments. Based on the Fisher matrix analysis, we first show that with the noise levels necessary to confirm the consistency relation for the primordial gravitational waves, the future CMB experiments will be able to detect the gravitational-wave induced lensing signals. For a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r ≲0.1 , even if the consistency relation is difficult to confirm with a high significance, the gravitational-wave induced lensing will be detected at more than 3 σ significance level. Further, we point out that high-sensitivity experiments will be also powerful to constrain the gravitational waves generated after the recombination epoch. Compared to the B-mode polarization, the curl mode is particularly sensitive to gravitational waves generated at low redshifts (z ≲10 ) with a low frequency (k ≲1 0-3 Mpc-1 ), and it could give a much tighter constraint on their energy density ΩGW by more than 3 orders of magnitude.

  2. Large scale CMB anomalies from thawing cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeval, Christophe; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Bouchet, François R.

    2016-02-01

    Cosmic strings formed during inflation are expected to be either diluted over super-Hubble distances, i.e., invisible today, or to have crossed our past light cone very recently. We discuss the latter situation in which a few strings imprint their signature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies after recombination. Being almost frozen in the Hubble flow, these strings are quasi static and evade almost all of the previously derived constraints on their tension while being able to source large scale anisotropies in the CMB sky. Using a local variance estimator on thousand of numerically simulated Nambu-Goto all sky maps, we compute the expected signal and show that it can mimic a dipole modulation at large angular scales while being negligible at small angles. Interestingly, such a scenario generically produces one cold spot from the thawing of a cosmic string loop. Mixed with anisotropies of inflationary origin, we find that a few strings of tension GU = Script O(1) × 10-6 match the amplitude of the dipole modulation reported in the Planck satellite measurements and could be at the origin of other large scale anomalies.

  3. Weak lensing of the primary CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cooray, Asantha; Sarkar, Devdeep; Serra, Paolo

    2008-06-15

    The bispectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies is a well-known probe of the non-Gaussianity of primordial perturbations. Just as the intervening large-scale structure modifies the CMB angular power spectrum through weak gravitational lensing, the CMB primary bispectrum generated at the last scattering surface is also modified by lensing. We discuss the lensing modification to the CMB bispectrum and show that lensing leads to an overall decrease in the amplitude of the primary bispectrum at multipoles of interest between 100 and 2000 through additional smoothing introduced by lensing. Since weak lensing is not accounted for in current estimators of the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter, the existing measurements of f{sub NL} of the local model with WMAP out to l{sub max}{approx}750 is biased low by about 6%. For a high resolution experiment such as Planck, the lensing modification to the bispectrum must be properly included when attempting to estimate the primordial non-Gaussianity or the bias will be at the level of 30%. For Planck, weak lensing increases the minimum detectable value for the non-Gaussianity parameter of the local type f{sub NL} to 7 from the previous estimate of about 5 without lensing. The minimum detectable value of f{sub NL} for a cosmic variance limited experiment is also increased from less than 3 to {approx}5.

  4. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-01

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l , and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with the data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl . The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. After showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.

  5. Erratum: cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration Erratum: cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio

    2013-07-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles alm's via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In ref. [1] we checked the validity of this assumption in parameter estimation for a Planck-like angular resolution, both for a full-sky ideal experiment and also when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations with a sky fraction similar to the Planck satellite. The result to this analysis was that aberration and Doppler have a sizable impact on a CMB based parameter estimation. In this erratum we correct an error made in ref. [1] when comparing pseudo angular power spectra computed in the CMB rest frame with the ones measured by a moving observer. Properly comparing the two spectra we find now that although the corrections to the Cl due to aberration and Doppler are larger than the cosmic variance at l > 1000 and potentially important, the resulting bias on the parameters is negligible for Planck.

  6. Detection of thermal SZ-CMB lensing cross-correlation in Planck nominal mission data

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J. Colin; Spergel, David N. E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-02-01

    The nominal mission maps from the Planck satellite contain a wealth of information about secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), including those induced by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and gravitational lensing. As both the tSZ and CMB lensing signals trace the large-scale matter density field, the anisotropies sourced by these processes are expected to be correlated. We report the first detection of this cross-correlation signal, which we measure at 6.2σ significance using the Planck data. We take advantage of Planck's multifrequency coverage to construct a tSZ map using internal linear combination techniques, which we subsequently cross-correlate with the publicly-released Planck CMB lensing potential map. The cross-correlation is subject to contamination from the cosmic infrared background (CIB), which is known to correlate strongly with CMB lensing. We correct for this contamination via cross-correlating our tSZ map with the Planck 857 GHz map and confirm the robustness of our measurement using several null tests. We interpret the signal using halo model calculations, which indicate that the tSZ-CMB lensing cross-correlation is a unique probe of the physics of intracluster gas in high-redshift, low-mass groups and clusters. Our results are consistent with extrapolations of existing gas physics models to this previously unexplored regime and show clear evidence for contributions from both the one- and two-halo terms, but no statistically significant evidence for contributions from diffuse, unbound gas outside of collapsed halos. We also show that the amplitude of the signal depends rather sensitively on the amplitude of fluctuations (σ{sub 8}) and the matter density (Ω{sub m}), scaling as σ{sub 8}{sup 6.1}Ω{sub m}{sup 1.5} at ℓ = 1000. We constrain the degenerate combination σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.282){sup 0.26} = 0.824±0.029, a result that is in less tension with primordial CMB constraints than some recent t

  7. Applications of the Gaussian kinematic formula to CMB data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantaye, Yabebal; Marinucci, Domenico; Hansen, Frode; Maino, Davide

    2015-03-01

    The Gaussian kinematic formula (GKF) [R. J. Adler and J. E. Taylor, Random Fields and Geometry (Springer, New York, 2007).] is an extremely powerful tool allowing for explicit analytic predictions of expected values of Minkowski functionals under realistic experimental conditions for cosmological data collections. In this paper, we implement Minkowski functionals on multipoles and needlet components of CMB fields, thus allowing a better control of cosmic variance and extraction of information on both harmonic and real domains; we then exploit the GKF to provide their expected values on spherical maps, in the presence of arbitrary sky masks, and under non-Gaussian circumstances. All our results are validated by numerical experiments, which show a perfect agreement between theoretical predictions and Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. First measurement of the cross-correlation of CMB lensing and galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Nick; Leauthaud, Alexie; Das, Sudeep; Sherwin, Blake D.; Addison, Graeme E.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Charbonnier, Aldée; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Erben, Thomas; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hincks, Adam D.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kosowsky, Arthur; Makler, Martin; Miller, Lance; Moodley, Kavilan; Moraes, Bruno; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Shan, Huanyuan; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Taylor, James E.; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Welker, Charlotte; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    We measure the cross-correlation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps derived from Atacama Cosmology Telescope data with galaxy lensing convergence maps as measured by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey. The CMB-galaxy lensing cross power spectrum is measured for the first time with a significance of 4.2 σ , which corresponds to a 12% constraint on the amplitude of density fluctuations at redshifts ˜0.9 . With upcoming improved lensing data, this novel type of measurement will become a powerful cosmological probe, providing a precise measurement of the mass distribution at intermediate redshifts and serving as a calibrator for systematic biases in weak lensing measurements.

  9. Secondary anisotropies in CMB, skew-spectra and Minkowski Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Dipak; Coles, Peter; Heavens, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Secondary contributions to the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), such as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect, and the effect of gravitational lensing, have distinctive non-Gaussian signatures, and full descriptions therefore require information beyond that contained in their power spectra. The Minkowski Functionals (MF) are well-known as tools for quantifying any departure from Gaussianity and are affected by noise and other sources of confusion in a different way from the usual methods based on higher-order moments or polyspectra, thus providing complementary tools for CMB analysis and cross-validation of results. In this paper we use the recently introduced skew-spectra associated with the MFs to probe the topology of CMB maps to probe the secondary non-Gaussianity as a function of beam smoothing in order to separate various contributions. We devise estimators for these spectra in the presence of realistic observational masks and present expressions for their covariance as a function of instrumental noise. Specific results are derived for the mixed ISW-lensing and tSZ-lensing bispectra as well as contamination due to point sources for noise levels that correspond to the Planck (143 GHz channel) and Experimental Probe of Inflationary Cosmology (EPIC; 150 GHz channel) experiments. The cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for one-point generalized skewness parameters can reach an order of O(10) for Planck and two orders of magnitude higher forEPIC, i.e. O(10^3). We also find that these three skew-spectra are correlated, having correlation coefficients r ˜ 0.5-1.0; higher l modes are more strongly correlated. Although the values of S/N increase with decreasing noise, the triplets of skew-spectra that determine the MFs become more correlated; the S/N of lensing-induced skew-spectra are smaller compared to that of a frequency-cleaned tSZ map.

  10. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonavera, L.; Barreiro, R. B.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact of non-ideal conditions such as incomplete sky coverage or the presence of noise. In particular, three galaxy surveys are simulated, whose redshift distributions peak at low (z ≃ 0.3), intermediate (z ≃ 0.6) and high redshift (z ≃ 0.9). The contribution of each of the considered data sets as well as the effect of a mask and noise in the reconstructed ISW map is studied in detail. When combining all the considered data sets (CMB temperature and polarization, the three galaxy surveys and the lensing map), the proposed filter successfully reconstructs a map of the weak ISW signal, finding a perfect correlation with the input signal for the ideal case and around 80 per cent, on average, in the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage. We find that including CMB polarization improves the correlation between input and reconstruction although only at a small level. Nonetheless, given the weakness of the ISW signal, even modest improvements can be of importance. In particular, in realistic situations, in which less information is available from the LSS tracers, the effect of including polarization is larger. For instance, for the case in which the ISW signal is recovered from CMB plus only one survey, and taking into account the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage, the improvement in the correlation coefficient can be as large as 10 per cent.

  11. CMB Polarization Detector Operating Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randle, Kirsten; Chuss, David; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Ed

    2015-04-01

    Examining the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provides the only known way to probe the physics of inflation in the early universe. Gravitational waves produced during inflation are posited to produce a telltale pattern of polarization on the CMB and if measured would provide both tangible evidence for inflation along with a measurement of inflation's energy scale. Leading the effort to detect and measure this phenomenon, Goddard Space Flight Center has been developing high-efficiency detectors. In order to optimize signal-to-noise ratios, sources like the atmosphere and the instrumentation must be considered. In this work we examine operating parameters of these detectors such as optical power loading and photon noise. SPS Summer Internship at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center.

  12. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-15

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  13. Swiss cheese and a cheesy CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Valkenburg, Wessel

    2009-06-01

    It has been argued that the Swiss-Cheese cosmology can mimic Dark Energy, when it comes to the observed luminosity distance-redshift relation. Besides the fact that this effect tends to disappear on average over random directions, we show in this work that based on the Rees-Sciama effect on the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the Swiss-Cheese model can be ruled out if all holes have a radius larger than about 35 Mpc. We also show that for smaller holes, the CMB is not observably affected, and that the small holes can still mimic Dark Energy, albeit in special directions, as opposed to previous conclusions in the literature. However, in this limit, the probability of looking in a special direction where the luminosity of supernovae is sufficiently supressed becomes very small, at least in the case of a lattice of spherical holes considered in this paper.

  14. Pre-inflationary relics in the CMB?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppuso, A.; Kitazawa, N.; Mandolesi, N.; Natoli, P.; Sagnotti, A.

    2016-03-01

    String Theory and Supergravity allow, in principle, to follow the transition of the inflaton from pre-inflationary fast roll to slow roll. This introduces an infrared depression in the primordial power spectrum that might have left an imprint in the CMB anisotropy, if it occurred at accessible wavelengths. We model the effect extending Λ CDM with a scale Δ related to the infrared depression and explore the constraints allowed by PLANCK 2015 data, employing also more conservative, wider Galactic masks in the low resolution CMB likelihood. In an extended mask with fsky = 39 %, we thus find Δ =(0.351 ± 0.114) × 10-3Mpc-1, at 99.4% confidence level, to be compared with a nearby value at 88.5% with the standard fsky = 94 % mask. With about 64 e-folds of inflation, these values for Δ would translate into primordial energy scales O(1014) GeV.

  15. Reconciling the local void with the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Nadathur, Seshadri; Sarkar, Subir

    2011-03-15

    In the standard cosmological model, the dimming of distant Type Ia supernovae is explained by invoking the existence of repulsive ''dark energy'' which is causing the Hubble expansion to accelerate. However, this may be an artifact of interpreting the data in an (oversimplified) homogeneous model universe. In the simplest inhomogeneous model which fits the SNe Ia Hubble diagram without dark energy, we are located close to the center of a void modeled by a Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. It has been claimed that such models cannot fit the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and other cosmological data. This is, however, based on the assumption of a scale-free spectrum for the primordial density perturbation. An alternative physically motivated form for the spectrum enables a good fit to both SNe Ia (Constitution/Union2) and CMB (WMAP 7-yr) data, and to the locally measured Hubble parameter. Constraints from baryon acoustic oscillations and primordial nucleosynthesis are also satisfied.

  16. CMB lensing and primordial non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Duncan; Smith, Kendrick M.; Challinor, Anthony; Liguori, Michele

    2009-10-15

    We study the effects of gravitational lensing on the estimation of non-Gaussianity from the bispectrum of the CMB temperature anisotropies. We find that the effect of lensing on the bispectrum may qualitatively be described as a smoothing of the acoustic features analogous to the temperature power spectrum. In contrast to previous results, for a Planck-like experiment which is cosmic-variance limited to l{sub max}=2000, we find that lensing causes no significant degradation of our ability to constrain the non-Gaussianity amplitude f{sub NL} for both local and equilateral configurations, provided that the biases due to the cross correlation between the lensing potential and the integrated-Sachs-Wolfe contribution to the CMB temperature are adequately understood. With numerical simulations, we also verify that low-order Taylor approximations to the lensed bispectrum and integrated-Sachs-Wolfe-lensing biases are accurate.

  17. New constraints on inflation from the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, William H.; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Riotto, Antonio

    2001-10-01

    The recent data from the Boomerang and MAXIMA-1 balloon flights have marked the beginning of the precision era of Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy (CMB) measurements. We discuss the observational constraints from the current CMB anisotropy measurements on the simplest inflation models, characterized by a single scalar field φ, in the parameter space consisting of scalar spectral index nS and tensor/scalar ratio r. The data are consistent with the simplest assumption of a scale invariant power spectrum, but the specific error contours in the r-n plane depend on prior assumptions, particularly the baryon density of the universe and the reionization history. Models with significant ``red'' tilt (n<1) and appreciable tensor fluctuations are disfavored in all cases. .

  18. The Next Generation Ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlstrom, John E.; CMB-S4 Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    This talk will review the goals and status of the community planning for the next generation ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4. Following the detection of CMB polarization in 2002, the current generation of ground-based experiments each fielding of order 1000 superconducting detectors (Stage II experiments) have led to the first detection of the much fainter lensing B-mode polarization signal and the most stringent constraints on the level of the B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. We can expect significant advances in the next few years as the ongoing ground-based experiments deploy of order 10,000 detectors (Stage III). The CMB community is now planning an ambitious next generation (Stage IV) ground-based program with order of 500,000 detectors, CMB-S4, to achieve critical threshold crossing goals of 1) detecting or ruling out large field inflationary models, 2) determining the effective number and masses of the neutrinos, and 3) providing precision constraints on dark energy through its impact on structure formation.

  19. Transfer matrices for magnetized CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2006-05-15

    Large-scale magnetic fields can affect scalar cosmological perturbations whose evolution is described in the conformally Newtonian gauge and within the tight coupling approximation. The magnetized curvature perturbations present after matter-radiation equality (and prior to decoupling) are computed in terms of an appropriate transfer matrix allowing a general estimate of the Sachs-Wolfe plateau. From the observation that CMB initial conditions should be (predominantly) adiabatic, the contribution of the magnetic field intensity can be constrained.

  20. Suppressing CMB low multipoles with ISW effect

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santanu; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2014-02-01

    Recent results of Planck data reveal that the power [1,2] in the low multipoles of the CMB angular power spectrum, approximately up to l = 30, is significantly lower than the theoretically predicted in the best fit ΛCDM model. There are different known physical effects that can affect the power at low multipoles, such as features in the primordial power spectrum (PPS) in some models of inflation and ISW effect. In this paper we investigate the possibility of invoking the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect to explain the power deficit at low multipoles. The ISW effect that originates from the late time expansion history of the universe is rich in possibilities given the limited understanding of the origin of dark energy (DE). It is a common understanding that the ISW effect adds to the power at the low multipoles of the CMB angular power spectrum. In this paper we carry out an analytic study to show that there are some expansion histories in which the ISW effect, instead of adding power, provides negative contribution to the power at low multipoles. Guided by the analytic study, we present examples of the features required in the late time expansion history of the universe that could explain the power deficiency through the ISW effect. We also show that an ISW origin of power deficiency is consistent, at present, with other cosmological observations that probe the expansion history such as distance modulus, matter power spectrum and the evolution of cluster number count. We also show that the ISW effect may be distinguished from power deficit originating from features in the PPS using the measurements of the CMB polarization spectrum at low multipoles expected from Planck. We conclude that the power at low multipoles of the CMB anisotropy could well be closely linked to Dark Energy puzzle in cosmology and this observation could be actually pointing to richer phenomenology of DE beyond the cosmological constant Λ.

  1. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-28

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l, and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with themore » data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl. The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. Furthermore, after showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.« less

  2. Needlet detection of features in the WMAP CMB sky and the impact on anisotropies and hemispherical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrobon, Davide; Amblard, Alexandre; Cooray, Asantha; Balbi, Amedeo; Cabella, Paolo; Marinucci, Domenico

    2008-11-15

    We apply spherical needlets to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year cosmic microwave background (CMB) data set, to search for imprints of nonisotropic features in the CMB sky. We use the needlets' localization properties to resolve peculiar features in the CMB sky and to study how these features contribute to the anisotropy power spectrum of the CMB. In addition to the now well-known 'cold spot' of the CMB map in the southern hemisphere, we also find two hot spots at greater than 99% confidence level, again in the southern hemisphere and closer to the Galactic plane. While the cold spot contributes to the anisotropy power spectrum in the multipoles between l=6 to l=33, the hot spots are found to be dominating the anisotropy power in the range between l=6 and l=18. Masking both the cold and the two hot spots results in a reduction by about 15% in the amplitude of the angular power spectrum of CMB around l=10. The resulting changes to the cosmological parameters when the power spectrum is estimated masking these features (in addition to the WMAP team's KQ85 mask) are within the 1{sigma} errors published with the WMAP mask only. We also study the asymmetry between the angular power spectra evaluated on the northern and southern hemispheres. When the features detected by needlets are masked, we find that the difference in the power, measured in terms of the anisotropy variance between l=4 and l=18, is reduced by a factor 2. We make available a mask related to needlet features for more detailed studies on asymmetries in the CMB anisotropy sky.

  3. What is the distance to the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Chris; Umeh, Obinna; Maartens, Roy; Durrer, Ruth E-mail: umeobinna@gmail.com E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch

    2014-11-01

    The success of precision cosmology depends not only on accurate observations, but also on the theoretical model --- which must be understood to at least the same level of precision. Subtle relativistic effects can lead to biased measurements if they are neglected. One such effect gives a systematic shift in the distance-redshift relation away from its background value, due to the non-linear relativistic conservation of total photon flux. We also show directly how this shift follows from a fully relativistic analysis of the geodesic deviation equation. We derive the expectation value of the shift using second-order perturbations about a concordance background, and show that the distance to last scattering is increased by 1%. We argue that neglecting this shift could lead to a significant bias in the background cosmological parameters, because it alters the meaning of the background model. A naive adjustment of CMB parameter estimation if this shift is really a correction to the background would raise the H{sub 0} value inferred from the CMB by 5%, potentially removing the tension with local measurements of H{sub 0}. Other CMB parameters which depend on the distance would also be shifted by ∼ 1σ when combined with local H{sub 0} data. While our estimations rely on a simplistic analysis, they nevertheless illustrate that accurately defining the background model in terms of the expectation values of observables is critical when we aim to determine the model parameters at the sub-percent level.

  4. The theoretical agenda in CMB research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, J. R.

    The terrain that theorists cover in this CMB golden age is described. The author ponders early universe physics in quest of the fluctuation generator. He extolls the virtues of inflation and defects. He transports fields, matter and radiation into the linear (primary anisotropies) and nonlinear (secondary anisotropies) regimes. The author validates the linear codes to deliver accurate predictions for experimentalists to shoot at. He struggles at the computing edge to push the nonlinear simulations from only illustrative to fully predictive. He is now phenomenologists, optimizing statistical techniques for extrating truths and their errors from current and future experiments. He begins to clean foregrounds. He joins CMB experimental teams. He combines the CMB with large scale structure, galaxy and other cosmological observations in search of current concordance. The brave use all topical data. Others carefully craft their prior probabilities to downweight data sets. The author is always unbiased. He declares theories sick, dead, ugly. Sometimes he cures them, resurrect them, rarely beautify them. The goal is to understand how all cosmic structure we see arose and what the Universe is made of, and to use this to discover the laws of ultrahigh energy physics.

  5. Probing neutrino masses with CMB lensing extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Perotto, Laurence; Pastor, Sergio; Piat, Michel

    2006-02-01

    We evaluate the ability of future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to measure the power spectrum of large scale structure using quadratic estimators of the weak lensing deflection field. We calculate the sensitivity of upcoming CMB experiments such as BICEP, QUaD, BRAIN, ClOVER and Planck to the nonzero total neutrino mass Mν indicated by current neutrino oscillation data. We find that these experiments greatly benefit from lensing extraction techniques, improving their one-sigma sensitivity to Mν by a factor of order four. The combination of data from Planck and the SAMPAN mini-satellite project would lead to σ(Mν)˜0.1 eV, while a value as small as σ(Mν)˜0.035 eV is within the reach of a space mission based on bolometers with a passively cooled 3 4 m aperture telescope, representative of the most ambitious projects currently under investigation. We show that our results are robust not only considering possible difficulties in subtracting astrophysical foregrounds from the primary CMB signal but also when the minimal cosmological model (Λ Mixed Dark Matter) is generalized in order to include a possible scalar tilt running, a constant equation-of-state parameter for the dark energy and/or extra relativistic degrees of freedom.

  6. CMB Observations from DomeC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bernardis, P.

    DomeC is likely to be the best site in the world for mm and sub-mm observations. In this paper we focus on what can be done from DomeC to investigate the detailed properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Two experiment typologies are particularly promising: precision measurements of the polarization of the CMB, to confirm the presence of an inflation phase in the very early universe, and high resolution measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) in clusters of galaxies, which can be used to investigate dark energy and dark matter in the Universe. Several important teams are currently carrying out experiments of the first kind; DomeC is the location of the BRAIN experiment, which uses bolometric interferometry as the tool to produce sensitive measurements with low systematic effects, and certainly orthogonal to the systematic effects of all other instruments currently developed to this purpose. DomeC will be an ideal location for a large dish telescope for mm and sub-mm measurements. In addition to cutting-edge sub-mm science, a telescope complementing SPT (in size and/or in frequency) will be ideal for special CMB observation, like the detection of non-Gaussian features, the measurement of relativistic effects in SZE, the measurement of the SZE resulting from the decay products of super-symmetric dark matter in selected clusters.

  7. Phases of new physics in the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; Meyers, Joel; Wallisch, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations in the cosmic neutrino background are known to produce a phase shift in the acoustic peaks of the cosmic microwave background. It is through the sensitivity to this effect that the recent CMB data has provided a robust detection of free-streaming neutrinos. In this paper, we revisit the phase shift of the CMB anisotropy spectrum as a probe of new physics. The phase shift is particularly interesting because its physical origin is strongly constrained by the analytic properties of the Green's function of the gravitational potential. For adiabatic fluctuations, a phase shift requires modes that propagate faster than the speed of fluctuations in the photon-baryon plasma. This possibility is realized by free-streaming relativistic particles, such as neutrinos or other forms of dark radiation. Alternatively, a phase shift can arise from isocurvature fluctuations. We present simple models to illustrate each of these effects. We then provide observational constraints from the Planck temperature and polarization data on additional forms of radiation. We also forecast the capabilities of future CMB Stage IV experiments. Whenever possible, we give analytic interpretations of our results.

  8. Planck CMB Anomalies: Astrophysical and Cosmological Secondary Effects and the Curse of Masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes are available online.

  9. CMB as a Probe of New Physics and Old Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluscevic, Vera

    Cosmic birefringence (CB)---a rotation of photon-polarization plane in vacuum---is a generic signature of new scalar fields that could provide dark energy. Previously, WMAP observations excluded a uniform CB-rotation angle larger than a degree. In this thesis, we develop a minimum-variance--estimator formalism for reconstructing direction-dependent rotation from full-sky CMB maps, and forecast more than an order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity with incoming Planck data and future satellite missions. Next, we perform the first analysis of WMAP-7 data to look for rotation-angle anisotropies and report null detection of the rotation-angle power-spectrum multipoles below L=512, constraining quadrupole amplitude of a scale-invariant power to less than one degree. We further explore the use of a cross-correlation between CMB temperature and the rotation for detecting the CB signal, for different quintessence models. We find that it may improve sensitivity in case of marginal detection, and provide an empirical handle for distinguishing details of new physics indicated by CB. We then consider other parity-violating physics beyond standard models---in particular, a chiral inflationary-gravitational-wave background. We show that WMAP has no constraining power, while a cosmic-variance--limited experiment would be capable of detecting only a large parity violation. In case of a strong detection of EB/TB correlations, CB can be readily distinguished from chiral gravity waves. We next adopt our CB analysis to investigate patchy screening of the CMB, driven by inhomogeneities during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We constrain a toy model of reionization with WMAP-7 data, and show that data from Planck should start approaching interesting portions of the EoR parameter space and can be used to exclude reionization tomographies with large ionized bubbles. In light of the upcoming data from low-frequency radio observations of the redshifted 21-cm line from the EoR, we

  10. Unavoidable CMB Spectral Features and Blackbody Photosphere of Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Spectral features in the CMB energy spectrum contain a wealth of information about the physical processes in the early Universe, z ≲ 2 × 106. The CMB spectral distortions are complementary to all other probes of cosmology. In fact, most of the information contained in the CMB spectrum is inaccessible by any other means. This review outlines the main physics behind the spectral features in the CMB throughout the history of the Universe, concentrating on the distortions which are inevitable and must be present at a level observable by the next generation of proposed CMB experiments. The spectral distortions considered here include spectral features from cosmological recombination, resonant scattering of CMB by metals during reionization which allows us to measure their abundances, y-type distortions during and after reionization and μ-type and i-type (intermediate between μ and y) distortions created at redshifts z ≳ 1.5 × 104.

  11. Planck 2013 results. XV. CMB power spectra and likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rahlin, A.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the Planck 2013 likelihood, a complete statistical description of the two-point correlation function of the CMB temperature fluctuations that accounts for all known relevant uncertainties, both instrumental and astrophysical in nature. We use this likelihood to derive our best estimate of the CMB angular power spectrum from Planck over three decades in multipole moment, ℓ, covering 2 ≤ ℓ ≤ 2500. The main source of uncertainty at ℓ ≲ 1500 is cosmic variance. Uncertainties in small-scale foreground modelling and instrumental noise dominate the error budget at higher ℓs. For ℓ < 50, our likelihood exploits all Planck frequency channels from 30 to 353 GHz, separating the cosmological CMB signal from diffuse Galactic foregrounds through a physically motivated Bayesian component separation technique. At ℓ ≥ 50, we employ a correlated Gaussian likelihood approximation based on a fine-grained set of angular cross-spectra derived from multiple detector combinations between the 100, 143, and 217 GHz frequency channels, marginalising over power spectrum foreground templates. We validate our likelihood through an extensive suite of consistency tests, and assess the impact of residual foreground and instrumental uncertainties on the final cosmological parameters. We find good internal agreement among the high-ℓ cross-spectra with residuals below a few μK2 at ℓ ≲ 1000, in agreement with estimated calibration uncertainties. We compare our results with foreground-cleaned CMB maps derived from all Planck frequencies, as well as with cross-spectra derived from the 70 GHz Planck map, and find broad agreement in terms of spectrum residuals and cosmological parameters. We further show that the best-fit ΛCDM cosmology is in excellent agreement with preliminary PlanckEE and TE polarisation spectra. We find that the standard ΛCDM cosmology is well constrained by Planck from the measurements at ℓ ≲ 1500. One specific example is the

  12. Forecast constraints on inflation from combined CMB and gravitational wave direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Gordon, Christopher; Silk, Joseph; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2010-04-15

    We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, Big Bang Observer (BBO), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parametrization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

  13. Optimal bispectrum estimator and simulations of the CMB lensing-integrated Sachs Wolfe non-Gaussian signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangilli, A.; Wandelt, B.; Elsner, F.; Liguori, M.

    2013-07-01

    We present the tools to optimally extract the lensing-integrated Sachs Wolfe (L-ISW) bispectrum signal from future cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We implemented two different methods to simulate the non-Gaussian CMB maps with the L-ISW signal: a non-perturbative method based on the FLINTS lensing code and the separable mode-expansion method. We implemented the Komatsu, Spergel, and Wandelt (KSW) optimal estimator analysis for the L-ISW bispectrum and tested it on the non-Gaussian simulations for realistic CMB experimental settings with an inhomogeneous sky coverage. We show that the estimator approaches the Cramer-Rao bound and that Wiener filtering the L-ISW simulations slightly improves the estimate of fNLL-ISW by ≤ 10%. For a realistic CMB experimental setting that accounts for anisotropic noise and masked sky, we show that the linear term of the estimator is highly correlated to the cubic term and it is necessary to recover the signal and the optimal error bars. We also show that the L-ISW bispectrum, if not correctly accounted for, yields an underestimation of the fNLlocal error bars of ≃ 4%. A joint analysis of the non-Gaussian shapes and/or L-ISW template subtraction is needed to recover unbiased results of the primordial non-Gaussian signal from ongoing and future CMB experiments.

  14. CMB Anisotropies Two Years after Cobe: Observations, Theory and the Future - Proceedings of the 1994 Cwru Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Lawrence M.

    1995-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * I. The Experimental Situation Two Years After COBE: Anisotropies, and the CMB Power Spectrum * COBE DMR Data, Signal and Noise: Color Plates * CMB Two Years After the COBE Discovery of Anisotropies * Comparison of Spectral Index Determinations * Two-Point Correlations in the COBE-DMR Two-Year Anisotropy Maps * A Preliminary Analysis of UCSB's South Pole 1993-94 Results * CMB Anisotropy Measurements During the Fourth Flight of MAX * Observations of the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Firs, SK93, and MSAM-I Experiments * The Python Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiment * II. Theoretical Implications and Cosmology: The Early Universe, Large Scale Structure and Dark Matter * Testing Inflationary Cosmology and Measuring Cosmological Parameters Using the Cosmic Microwave Background * Inflation Confronts the CMB: An Analysis Including the Effects of Foreground * Testing Inflation with MSAM, MAX Tenerife and COBE * CMBR Anisotropy Due to Gravitational Radiation in Inflationary Cosmologies * Black Holes From Blue Spectra * Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies and the Geometry of the Universe * Ω and Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies * CDM Cosmogony in an Open Universe * Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Anisotropy Induced by Cosmic Strings * Temperature Anisotropies in a Universe with Global Defects * The Nature Versus Nurture of Anisotropies * The Existence of Baryons at z = 1000 * Polarization-Temperature Correlations in the Microwave Background * III. Related Issues: BBN Limits on ΩB, and Comparing Theoretical Predictions and Observations * Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and ΩB: A Guide for CMB Interpreters * Quoting Experimental Information

  15. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  16. What do we learn from the CMB observations?

    SciTech Connect

    Rubakov, V. A.; Vlasov, A. D.

    2012-09-15

    We give an account, at nonexpert and quantitative level, of physics behind the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarization and their peculiar features. We discuss, in particular, how cosmological parameters are determined from the CMB measurements and their combinations with other observations. We emphasize that CMB is the major source of information on the primordial density perturbations and, possibly, gravitational waves, and discuss the implication for our understanding of the extremely early Universe.

  17. Mapping and validation of QTL which confer partial resistance to broadly virulent post-2000 North American races of stripe rust in hexaploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Iago; Jankuloski, Ljupcho; Chao, Shiaoman; Chen, Xianming; See, Deven; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    A mapping population of 186 recombinant inbred lines developed from a cross between UC1110, an adapted California spring wheat, and PI610750, a synthetic derivative from CIMMYT’s wide-cross program, was evaluated for its response to current California races of stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) in replicated field trials over four seasons (2007–2010) in the northern Sacramento Valley. A genetic map was constructed consisting of 1,493 polymorphic probes (SSRs, DArTs, and ESTs) mapped to 559 unique loci; and QTL analysis revealed the presence of four stripe rust resistance QTL segregating in this population, two from UC1110 (on chromosomes 3BS and 2BS) and two from PI610750 (5AL and 2AS). The two QTL of largest effects (on 3BS and 5AL) were validated in independent populations and their intervals narrowed to 2.5 cM and 4.7 cM, respectively. The 3BS QTL was shown, by allelism test and genotype, to carry a gene different from the Yr30/Sr2 complex. Mapped position also suggests that the 3BS QTL is associated with a gene different from either Yrns-B1 or YrRub, two stripe rust resistance genes mapped to this region in other studies. The 5AL QTL carries a previously unreported partial stripe rust resistance gene, designated here as Yr48. This paper discusses the individual contributions to resistance of these four QTL, their epistatic interactions, and their potential in durable resistance breeding strategies based on combinations of partial resistance genes. PMID:21455722

  18. ACTPol: Overview of a next-generation polarization-sensitive CMB observatory in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeff

    2013-04-01

    ACTPol is a new polarization sensitive receiver on the six-meter Atacama Cosmology Telescope which is surveying the Chilean sky and will produce deep maps of the polarization, temperature, and lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in two frequency bands centered near 90 and 150 GHz. These measurements will improve constraints on inflation, neutrino properties, curvature, the primordial helium abundance, and dark energy. Cross correlating the ACTPol maps with optical surveys accessible from Chile will significantly amplify these constraints. In this talk I provide an overview of the project inclduing discussions of the instrument, science goals, and status of ACTPol.

  19. Genome-wide association mapping of partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean plant introductions from the Republic of Korea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot is one of the most yield-limiting diseases of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr], caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae. Partial resistance is controlled by several genes and, compared to single gene (Rps gene) resistance to P. sojae, places less selection pressure on...

  20. Mapping QTL conferring partial physiological resistance to white mold in the common bean RIL population Xana/Cornell 49242

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White mold, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a devastating disease in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Resistance to this pathogen can be due to physiological or avoidance mechanisms. We sought to characterize the partial physiological resistance exhibited by ‘Xa...

  1. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Mota, David F.; Arroja, Frederico E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no E-mail: arroja@pd.infn.it

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by P{sub h}(k) = P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) [ 1 + ∑{sub LM} f{sub L}(k) g{sub LM} Y{sub LM} ( k-circumflex )], where P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f{sub 0}(k) = f{sub 2}(k) ∝ k{sup -2} are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g{sub 00} = 30 and g{sub 2M} = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  2. When can preheating affect the CMB?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujikawa, Shinji; Bassett, Bruce A.

    2002-05-01

    We discuss the principles governing the selection of inflationary models for which preheating can affect the CMB. This is a (fairly small) subset of those models which have nonnegligible entropy/isocurvature perturbations on large scales during inflation. We study new models which belong to this class-two-field inflation with negative nonminimal coupling and hybrid/double/supernatural inflation models where the tachyonic growth of entropy perturbations can lead to the variation of the curvature perturbation, /R, on super-Hubble scales. Finally, we present evidence against recent claims for the variation of /R in the absence of substantial super-Hubble entropy perturbations.

  3. USING LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY AND PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES PREDICTIONS TO MAP WATERSHEDS THAT ARE VULNERABLE TO NON-POINT SOURCE POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development have mapped and interpreted landscape-scale (i.e., broad scale) ecological metrics among watersheds in the upper White River watershed, producing the first geospatial models of water quality vulnerabili...

  4. USING LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY AND PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES PREDICITIONS TO MAP WATERSHEDS THAT ARE VULNERABLE TO NON-POINT SOURCE POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency¿s Office of Research and Development have mapped and interpreted landscape-scale (i.e., broad scale) ecological metrics among watersheds in the upper White River watershed, producing the first geospatial models of water quality vulnerabili...

  5. Mapping of quantitative trait loci associated with partial resistance to phytophthora sojae and flooding tolerance in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufm. & Gerd. and flooding can limit growth and productivity, of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], especially on poorly drained soils. The primary objective of this research project was to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with f...

  6. CMB spectral distortions and energy release in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the spectral deviation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the blackbody spectrum has become a focus of attention as a probe of the thermal history of the Universe. It has been more than 20 years since COBE/FIRAS's measurement, which showed excellent agreement between the CMB spectrum and a perfect blackbody spectrum. Significant developments in the technology since then have allowed us to improve the sensitivity of the absolute spectrum measurement by a factor of {˜ }10^4. Therefore, the physics related to the generation of CMB spectral distortions should now be investigated in greater detail. To probe the physics in the early universe and to open an observational window for new physics, various energy release mechanisms both in and beyond standard cosmology need to be studied. In this paper, we provide a review of the physics of CMB distortions and the energy release that creates CMB distortions in the early universe.

  7. Detecting the cosmological neutrino background in the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellentin, Elena; Durrer, Ruth

    2015-09-01

    Three relativistic particles in addition to the photon are detected in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In the standard model of cosmology, these are interpreted as the three neutrino species. However, at the time of CMB decoupling, neutrinos are not only relativistic but they are also free-streaming. Here we investigate whether the CMB is sensitive to this defining feature of neutrinos, or whether the CMB data allow us to replace neutrinos with a relativistic fluid. We show that free-streaming particles are preferred over a relativistic perfect fluid with Δ χ2≃21 . We then study the possibility to replace the neutrinos by a viscous fluid and find that also a relativistic viscous fluid with either the standard values ceff2=cvis2=1 /3 or best-fit values for ceff2 and cvis2 has Δ χ2≃20 and thus cannot provide a good fit to present CMB data either.

  8. Smoothed Quantum Fluctuations and CMB Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielczarek, Jakub; Kamionka, Michał

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate power spectrum of a smoothed scalar field. The smoothing leads to regularization of the UV divergences and can be related with the internal structure of the considered field or the space itself. We perform Gaussian smoothing to the quantum fluctuations generated during the phase of cosmic inflation. We study whether this effect can be probed observationally and conclude that the modifications of the power spectrum due to the smoothing on the Planck scale are negligible and far beyond the observational abilities. Subsequently, we investigate whether smoothing in any other form can be probed observationally. We introduce phenomenological smoothing factor e-k2σ2 to the inflationary spectrum and investigate its effects on the spectrum of CMB anisotropies and polarization. We show that smoothing can lead to suppression of high multipoles in the spectrum of the CMB. Based on seven years observations of WMAP satellite we indicate that the present scale of high multipoles suppression is constrained by σ < 3.19 Mpc (95% CL). This corresponds to the constraint σ < 100 μm at the end of inflation. Despite this value is far above the Planck scale, other processes of smoothing can be possibly studied with this constraint, as decoherence or diffusion of primordial perturbations.

  9. Magnetized CMB observables: A dedicated numerical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo; Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2008-03-15

    Large-scale magnetic fields affect the scalar modes of the geometry whose ultimate effect is to determine the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB in what follows). For the first time, a consistent numerical approach to the magnetized CMB anisotropies is pursued with the aim of assessing the angular power spectra of temperature and polarization when the scalar modes of the geometry and a stochastic background of inhomogeneous magnetic fields are simultaneously present in the plasma. The effects related to the magnetized nature of the plasma are taken into account both at the level of the dynamical equations and at the level of the initial conditions of the Einstein-Boltzmann hierarchy. The temperature and polarization observables are exploited to infer the peculiar signatures of a pre-equality magnetic field. Using the extrapolated best fit to the three-year WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) data the increase and distortions of the first seven peaks in the temperature autocorrelations are monitored for different values of the regularized magnetic field intensity and for the physical range of spectral indices. Similar analyses are also conducted for the first few anticorrelation (and corrrelation) peaks of the temperature-polarization power spectra. Possible interesting degeneracies and stimulating perspectives are pointed out and explored.

  10. Testing distance duality with CMB anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Syksy; Väliviita, Jussi; Kosonen, Ville

    2016-04-01

    We constrain deviations of the form T propto (1+z)1+epsilon from the standard redshift-temperature relation, corresponding to modifying distance duality as DL = (1+z)2(1+epsilon) DA. We consider a consistent model, in which both the background and perturbation equations are changed. For this purpose, we introduce a species of dark radiation particles to which photon energy density is transferred, and assume epsilon >= 0. The Planck 2015 release high multipole temperature plus low multipole data give the limit epsilon < 4.5 × 10‑3 at 95% C.L. The main obstacle to improving this CMB-only result is strong degeneracy between epsilon and the physical matter densities ωb and ωc. A constraint on deuterium abundance improves the limit to epsilon < 1.8 × 10‑3. Adding the Planck high-multipole CMB polarisation and BAO data leads to a small improvement; with this maximal dataset we obtain epsilon < 1.3 × 10‑3. This dataset constrains the present dark radiation energy density to at most 12% of the total photon plus dark radiation density. Finally, we discuss the degeneracy between dark radiation and the effective number of relativistic species Neff, and consider the impact of dark radiation perturbations and allowing epsilon < 0 on the results.

  11. Punctuated inflation and the low CMB multipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sriramkumar, L.; Chingangbam, Pravabati; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: prava@kias.re.kr E-mail: sriram@hri.res.in

    2009-01-15

    We investigate inflationary scenarios driven by a class of potentials which are similar in form to those that arise in certain minimal supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. We find that these potentials allow a brief period of departure from inflation sandwiched between two stages of slow roll inflation. We show that such a background behavior leads to a step like feature in the scalar power spectrum. We set the scales such that the drop in the power spectrum occurs at a length scale that corresponds to the Hubble radius today - a feature that seems necessary to explain the lower power observed in the quadrupole moment of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to determine the values of the model parameters that provide the best fit to the recent WMAP 5-year data for the CMB angular power spectrum. We find that an inflationary spectrum with a suppression of power at large scales that we obtain leads to a much better fit (with just one extra parameter, {chi}{sub eff}{sup 2} improves by 6.62) of the observed data when compared to the best fit reference {Lambda}CDM model with a featureless, power law, primordial spectrum.

  12. Testing distance duality with CMB anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Syksy; Väliviita, Jussi; Kosonen, Ville

    2016-04-01

    We constrain deviations of the form T propto (1+z)1+epsilon from the standard redshift-temperature relation, corresponding to modifying distance duality as DL = (1+z)2(1+epsilon) DA. We consider a consistent model, in which both the background and perturbation equations are changed. For this purpose, we introduce a species of dark radiation particles to which photon energy density is transferred, and assume epsilon >= 0. The Planck 2015 release high multipole temperature plus low multipole data give the limit epsilon < 4.5 × 10-3 at 95% C.L. The main obstacle to improving this CMB-only result is strong degeneracy between epsilon and the physical matter densities ωb and ωc. A constraint on deuterium abundance improves the limit to epsilon < 1.8 × 10-3. Adding the Planck high-multipole CMB polarisation and BAO data leads to a small improvement; with this maximal dataset we obtain epsilon < 1.3 × 10-3. This dataset constrains the present dark radiation energy density to at most 12% of the total photon plus dark radiation density. Finally, we discuss the degeneracy between dark radiation and the effective number of relativistic species Neff, and consider the impact of dark radiation perturbations and allowing epsilon < 0 on the results.

  13. Mapping matter jointly with CMB lensing and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, Kevin; Rotti, Aditya; Maldonado, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In the near future, Stage III and Stage IV Cosmic Microwave Background experiments will measure to high precision the lensing distortions that trace matter fluctuations in the universe. On a similar timescale DES, HSC, WFIRST, EUCLID, DESI, LSST, and other surveys will provide galaxy redshift information, imaging, and cosmic shear data over large regions of the sky. Taking a holistic, Bayesian approach to combine datasets, we seek to understand the statistical properties of joint estimates of the matter distribution and its correlations, including their non-Gaussian likelihoods.

  14. Mapping matter jointly with CMB lensing and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, Kevin; Maldonado, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya

    2015-04-01

    In the near future, Stage III and Stage IV Cosmic Microwave Background experiments will measure to high precision the lensing distortions that trace matter fluctuations in the universe. On a similar timescale, WFIRST, EUCLID, DESI, LSST, and other surveys will provide galaxy redshift information, imaging, and cosmic shear data over large regions of the sky. Taking a holistic, Bayesian approach to combine datasets, we seek to understand keenly the statistical properties of joint estimates of the matter distribution and its correlations, including their non-Gaussian likelihoods.

  15. Constraining gravity at the largest scales through CMB lensing and galaxy velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. EG is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and σ8. While traditionally, the lensing field for EG has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for EG at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of EG ever, up to 150 Mpc h-1, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter β. We report EG(z = 0.57) = 0.243 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity (GR) prediction at a level of 2.6σ. Note that our EG measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc h-1, scales which have not been probed by previous EG tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.

  16. Semi-empirical lake level (SELL) model for mapping lake water depths from partially clouded satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velpuri, N.; Senay, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    Information on the variability in surface water is critical to understand the impact of climate change and global water cycle. Surface water features such as lakes, or reservoirs can affect local weather and regional climate. Hence, there is a widespread demand for accurate and quantitative global observations of surface water variability. Satellite imagery provides a direct way to monitor variations in surface water. However, estimating accurate surface area from satellite imagery can be a problem due to clouds. Hence, the use of optical imagery for operational implementation has been a challenge for monitoring variations in surface water. In this research, a semi-empirical lake level (SELL) model is developed to derive lake/reservoir water levels from partially covered satellite imagery. SRTM elevation combined with bathymetry was used to derive the relationships between lake depth vs. surface area and shore line (L). Using these relationships, lake level/depth (D) was estimated from the surface area (A) and/or shore line (L) delineated from Landsat and MODIS data. The SELL model was applied on Lake Turkana, one of the rift valley lakes in East Africa. First, Lake Turkana water levels were delineated using cloud-free or partially clouded Landsat and MODIS imagery over 1993-2009 and 2002-2009 time periods respectively. Historic lake depths were derived using 1972-1992 Landsat imagery. Lake depths delineated using this approach were validated using TOPEX/Poseidon/Jason satellite altimetry data. It was found that lake depths derived using SELL model matched reasonably well with the satellite altimetry data. The approach presented in this research can be used to (a) simulate lake water level variations in data scarce regions (b) increase the frequency of observation in regions where cloud cover is a problem (c) operationally monitor lake water levels in ungauged basins (d) derive historic lake level information using satellite data.

  17. Primordial gravitational waves measurements and anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Yu; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Mingzhe; Li, Hong; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-12-01

    Searching for the signal of primordial gravitational waves in the B-modes (BB) power spectrum is one of the key scientific aims of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments. However, this could be easily contaminated by several foreground issues, such as the interstellar dust grains and the galactic cyclotron electrons. In this paper we study another mechanism, the cosmic birefringence, which can be introduced by a CPT-violating interaction between CMB photons and an external scalar field. Such kind of interaction could give rise to the rotation of the linear polarization state of CMB photons, and consequently induce the CMB BB power spectrum, which could mimic the signal of primordial gravitational waves at large scales. With the recently released polarization data of BICEP2 and the joint analysis data of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck, we perform a global fitting analysis on constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by considering the polarization rotation angle [ α (n ˆ)] which can be separated into a background isotropic part [ α bar ] and a small anisotropic part [ Δα (n ˆ)]. Since the data of BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments have already been corrected by using the "self-calibration" method, here we mainly focus on the effects from the anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation angle. We find that including Δα (n ˆ) in the analysis could slightly weaken the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, when using current CMB polarization measurements. We also simulate the mock CMB data with the BICEP3-like sensitivity. Very interestingly, we find that if the effects of the anisotropic polarization rotation angle could not be taken into account properly in the analysis, the constraints on r will be dramatically biased. This implies that we need to break the degeneracy between the anisotropies of the CMB polarization rotation angle and the CMB primordial tensor perturbations, in order to measure the signal of primordial gravitational

  18. Observed parity-odd CMB temperature bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Liguori, Michele; Fergusson, James R. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2015-01-01

    Parity-odd non-Gaussianities create a variety of temperature bispectra in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), defined in the domain: ℓ{sub 1} + ℓ{sub 2} + ℓ{sub 3} = odd. These models are yet unconstrained in the literature, that so far focused exclusively on the more common parity-even scenarios. In this work, we provide the first experimental constraints on parity-odd bispectrum signals in WMAP 9-year temperature data, using a separable modal parity-odd estimator. Comparing theoretical bispectrum templates to the observed bispectrum, we place constraints on the so-called nonlineality parameters of parity-odd tensor non-Gaussianities predicted by several Early Universe models. Our technique also generates a model-independent, smoothed reconstruction of the bispectrum of the data for parity-odd configurations.

  19. Reionization history and CMB parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Kinney, William H.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.edu

    2013-05-01

    We study how uncertainty in the reionization history of the universe affects estimates of other cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background. We analyze WMAP7 data and synthetic Planck-quality data generated using a realistic scenario for the reionization history of the universe obtained from high-resolution numerical simulation. We perform parameter estimation using a simple sudden reionization approximation, and using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique proposed by Mortonson and Hu. We reach two main conclusions: (1) Adopting a simple sudden reionization model does not introduce measurable bias into values for other parameters, indicating that detailed modeling of reionization is not necessary for the purpose of parameter estimation from future CMB data sets such as Planck. (2) PCA analysis does not allow accurate reconstruction of the actual reionization history of the universe in a realistic case.

  20. CMB temperature trispectrum of cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2010-03-15

    We provide an analytical expression for the trispectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies induced by cosmic strings. Our result is derived for the small angular scales under the assumption that the temperature anisotropy is induced by the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. The trispectrum is predicted to decay with a noninteger power-law exponent l{sup -{rho}}with 6<{rho}<7, depending on the string microstructure, and thus on the string model. For Nambu-Goto strings, this exponent is related to the string mean square velocity and the loop distribution function. We then explore two classes of wave number configuration in Fourier space, the kite and trapezium quadrilaterals. The trispectrum can be of any sign and appears to be strongly enhanced for all squeezed quadrilaterals.

  1. CMB non-gaussianity from vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The Planck satellite has recently measured the CMB temperature anisotropies with unprecedented accuracy, and it has provided strong bounds on primordial non-gaussianity. Such bounds constrain models of inflation, and mechanisms that produce the primordial perturbations. We discuss the non-gaussian signatures from the interactions of the inflation φ with spin-1 fields. We study the two different cases in which the inflaton is (i) a pseudo-scalar field with a (φ)/(fa) F·F interaction with a vector field, and (ii) a scalar field with a f (φ)F² interaction. In the first case we obtain the strong limit f{sub a} ≥ 10¹⁶GeV on the decay constant. In the second case, specific choices of the function f (φ) can lead to a non-gaussianity with a characteristic shape not encountered in standard models of scalar field inflation, and which has also been constrained by Planck.

  2. CMB temperature trispectrum of cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2010-03-01

    We provide an analytical expression for the trispectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies induced by cosmic strings. Our result is derived for the small angular scales under the assumption that the temperature anisotropy is induced by the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. The trispectrum is predicted to decay with a noninteger power-law exponent ℓ-ρ with 6<ρ<7, depending on the string microstructure, and thus on the string model. For Nambu-Goto strings, this exponent is related to the string mean square velocity and the loop distribution function. We then explore two classes of wave number configuration in Fourier space, the kite and trapezium quadrilaterals. The trispectrum can be of any sign and appears to be strongly enhanced for all squeezed quadrilaterals.

  3. The full squeezed CMB bispectrum from inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Antony

    2012-06-01

    The small-scale CMB temperature we observe on the sky is modulated by perturbations that were super-horizon at recombination, giving differential focussing and lensing that generate a non-zero bispectrum even for single-field inflation where local physics is identical. Understanding this signal is important for primordial non-Gaussianity studies and also parameter constraints from the CMB lensing bispectrum signal. Because of cancellations individual effects can appear larger or smaller than they are in total, so a full analysis may be required to avoid biases. I relate angular scales on the sky to physical scales at recombination using the optical equations, and give full-sky results for the large-scale adiabatic temperature bispectrum from Ricci focussing (expansion of the ray bundle), Weyl lensing (convergence and shear), and temperature redshift modulations of small-scale power. The δN expansion of the beam is described by the constant temperature 3-curvature, and gives a nearly-observable version of the consistency relation prediction from single-field inflation. I give approximate arguments to quantify the likely importance of dynamical effects, and argue that they can be neglected for modulation scales l∼<100, which is sufficient for lensing studies and also allows robust tests of local primordial non-Gaussianity using only the large-scale modulation modes. For accurate numerical results early and late-time ISW effects must be accounted for, though I confirm that the late-time non-linear Rees-Sciama contribution is negligible compared to other more important complications. The total corresponds to f{sub NL} ∼ 7 for Planck-like temperature constraints and f{sub NL} ∼ 11 for cosmic-variance limited data to l{sub max} = 2000. Temperature lensing bispectrum estimates are affected at the 0.2σ level by Ricci focussing, and up to 0.5σ with polarization.

  4. SU(2,CMB), the nature of light and accelerated cosmological expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ralf

    2006-09-01

    We present quantitative and qualitative arguments in favor of the claim that, within the present cosmological epoch, the U(1)Y factor in the Standard Model is an effective manifestation of SU(2) pure gauge dynamics of Yang-Mills scale Λ ˜ 10-4 eV. Results for the pressure and the energy density in the deconfining phase of this theory, obtained in a nonperturbative and analytical way, support this connection in view of large-angle features inherent in the map of the CMB tempera- ture fluctuations and temperature-polarization cross correlations. Dedicated to Pierre van Baal with best wishes for a soon recuperation.

  5. Future of Colombo Airport (CMB) as an Airline Hub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayalath, J. T. D.; Bandara, J. M. S. J.

    2001-01-01

    Aviation throughout the world has seen profound changes within the last two decades. Today more and more airports are looking for hub operations. However, as the success of hub operation would depend on a number of parameters such as geographic location, route network, facilities available, passengers' acceptance etc., not all airports would be able to operate as successful hubs. This paper investigates the possibility for (he Bandaranayake international airport, Colombo, Sri Lanka (CMB) to emerge as a hub airport in the South Asian region. It is found that CMB is situated in a geographically advantageous position in the region with respect to the airline route network. Comparison of travel distances between CMB and prominent O-D pairs and evaluation of airline schedules at relevant established hub airports indicates that CMB could operate as a directional hub serving the South Asian market if the number of destinations with daily flights could be increased.

  6. Effects of Rayleigh scattering on the CMB and cosmic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Elham; Sigurdson, Kris; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2015-04-01

    During and after recombination, in addition to Thomson scattering with free electrons, photons also couple to neutral hydrogen and helium atoms through Rayleigh scattering. This coupling influences both cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and the distribution of matter in the Universe. The frequency dependence of the Rayleigh cross section breaks the thermal nature of CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies and effectively doubles the number of variables needed to describe CMB intensity and polarization statistics, while the additional atomic coupling changes the matter distribution and the lensing of the CMB. We introduce a new method to capture the effects of Rayleigh scattering on cosmological power spectra. Rayleigh scattering modifies CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies at the ˜1 % level at 35 GHz (scaling ∝ν4 ), and modifies matter correlations by as much as ˜0.3 %. We show the Rayleigh signal, especially the cross-spectra between the thermal (Rayleigh) E -polarization and Rayleigh (thermal) intensity signal, may be detectable with future CMB missions even in the presence of foregrounds, and how this new information might help to better constrain the cosmological parameters.

  7. CMB8: New software for chemical mass balance receptor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.W.

    1997-12-31

    The Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) method for receptor modeling of ambient air pollutants has been in use for over two decades. over the past year the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Office of Research and Development and Office of Air Quality Planning and standards have jointly sponsored the development of a new generation of CMB software, CMB8. Developmental work has been performed by the Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV. Changes embodied in CMB8 include (1) switch from a DOS-based to a Windows-based environment, (2) increased attention to volatile organic compounds (VOC) applications, (3) correction of some flaws in the previous version (CMB7), (4) more options for input and output data formats, (5) addition of a more accurate least squares computational algorithm, (6) a new treatment of source collinearity, (7) multiple defaults for sources and fitting species, and (8) choice of fitting criteria. Details of the changes and the procedure for obtaining CMB8 are given.

  8. Large angular scale CMB anisotropy from an excited initial mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojasi, A.; Mohsenzadeh, M.; Yusofi, E.

    2016-07-01

    According to inflationary cosmology, the CMB anisotropy gives an opportunity to test predictions of new physics hypotheses. The initial state of quantum fluctuations is one of the important options at high energy scale, as it can affect observables such as the CMB power spectrum. In this study a quasi-de Sitter inflationary background with approximate de Sitter mode function built over the Bunch-Davies mode is applied to investigate the scale-dependency of the CMB anisotropy. The recent Planck constraint on spectral index motivated us to examine the effect of a new excited mode function (instead of pure de Sitter mode) on the CMB anisotropy at large angular scales. In so doing, it is found that the angular scale-invariance in the CMB temperature fluctuations is broken and in the limit ℓ < 200 a tiny deviation appears. Also, it is shown that the power spectrum of CMB anisotropy is dependent on a free parameter with mass dimension H << M * < M p and on the slow-roll parameter ɛ. Supported by the Islamic Azad University, Rasht Branch, Rasht, Iran

  9. Cosmology from CMB polarization with POLARBEAR and the Simons Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Darcy; POLARBEAR Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    POLARBEAR is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The science goals of the POLARBEAR project are to do a deep search for CMB B-mode polarization created by inflationary gravitational waves, as well as characterize the CMB B-mode signal from gravitational lensing. POLARBEAR-1 started observations in 2012. The POLARBEAR team has published results from its first season of observations on a small fraction of the sky, including a measurement of a non-zero B-mode polarization angular power spectrum at sub-degree scales, where the dominant signal is gravitational lensing of the CMB. Improving these measurements requires precision characterization of the CMB polarization signal over large fractions of the sky, at multiple frequencies. To achieve these goals, POLARBEAR has begun expanding to include an additional two 3.5 meter telescopes with multi-chroic receivers, known as the Simons Array. With high sensitivity and large sky coverage, the Simons Array will create a detailed survey of B-mode polarization, and its spectral information will be used to extract the CMB signal from astrophysical foregrounds. The Simons Array data will place strong constraints on the sum of the neutrino masses, when combined with data from the next generation of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. We present the status of this funded instrument and its expected capabilities.

  10. CMB topography and electrical conductivity as additional constraints for the lowermost mantle thermo-chemical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, F.; Yin, Y.; Tackley, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of seismic observations, including tomographic models, indicate that the lowermost mantle is strongly heterogeneous. Seismic observations further support a thermo-chemical origin for the large scale heterogeneities. In particular, the large low-shear wave velocity provinces (LLSVP) observed by global tomographic images are better explained by a combination of thermal and chemical anomalies. Despite the accuracy of seismic information, uncertainties and trade-off still prevent the determination of a detailed lower mantle thermo-chemical structure. For instance, the nature of chemical heterogeneities and the exact role played by the post-perovskite phase transition are still debated. Additional constraints are needed to discriminate between the possible models of structure and dynamics of the lower mantle. Here, we consider two potential additional constraints, the electrical conductivity and the dynamic topography at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Unlike density and seismic velocities, electrical conductivity increases with temperature. In addition, it strongly varies with the iron and silicate content. Using appropriate mineral physics data, we calculated a 3D distribution of electrical conductivity in lower mantle from the thermo-chemical structure inferred by probabilistic tomography, which maps iron and silicate excess in the LLSVP. In the lowermost mantle, we observe a belt of high conductivity, with maximum values around 20 S/m located in the LLSVP. Such a belt may trigger electric currents in the lowermost mantle and induce magnetic field variations with period of one year or more. It may thus be seen by global models of electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, such models do not sample yet regions deeper than 2000 km. A second, independent constraint we explored is the dynamic topography at the CMB. We used stagYY to calculate the dynamic topography associated with several models of thermo-chemical convection, and observe strong differences

  11. Symmetry of the CMB sky as a new test of its statistical isotropy. Non cosmological octupole?

    SciTech Connect

    Naselsky, P.; Hansen, M.; Kim, J. E-mail: kirstejn@nbi.dk

    2011-09-01

    In this article we propose a novel test for statistical anisotropy of the CMB ΔT( n-circumflex = (θ,φ)). The test is based on the fact, that the Galactic foregrounds have a remarkably strong symmetry with respect to their antipodal points with respect to the Galactic plane, while the cosmological signal should not be symmetric or asymmetric under these transitions. We have applied the test for the octupole component of the WMAP ILC 7 map, by looking at a{sub 3,1} and a{sub 3,3}, and their ratio to a{sub 3,2} both for real and imaginary values. We find abnormal symmetry of the octupole component at the level of 0.58%, compared to Monte Carlo simulations. By using the analysis of the phases of the octupole we found remarkably strong cross-correlations between the phases of the kinematic dipole and the ILC 7 octupole, in full agreement with previous results. We further test the multipole range 2 < l < 100, by investigating the ratio between the l+m = even and l+m = odd parts of power spectra. We compare the results to simulations of a Gaussian random sky, and find significant departure from the statistically isotropic and homogeneous case, for a very broad range of multipoles. We found that for the most prominent peaks of our estimator, the phases of the corresponding harmonics are coherent with phases of the octupole. We believe, our test would be very useful for detections of various types of residuals of the foreground and systematic effects at a very broad range of multipoles 2 ≤ l ≤ 1500−3000 for the forthcoming PLANCK CMB map, before any conclusions about primordial non-Gaussianity and statistical anisotropy of the CMB.

  12. The effect of inhomogeneities on the distance to the last scattering surface and the accuracy of the CMB analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bolejko, Krzysztof

    2011-02-01

    The standard analysis of the CMB data assumes that the distance to the last scattering surface can be calculated using the distance-redshift relation as in the Friedmann model. However, in the inhomogeneous universe, even if (δρ) = 0, the distance relation is not the same as in the unperturbed universe. This can be of serious consequences as a change of distance affects the mapping of CMB temperature fluctuations into the angular power spectrum C{sub l}. In addition, if the change of distance is relatively uniform no new temperature fluctuations are generated. It is therefore a different effect than the lensing or ISW effects which introduce additional CMB anisotropies. This paper shows that the accuracy of the CMB analysis can be impaired by the accuracy of calculation of the distance within the cosmological models. Since this effect has not been fully explored before, to test how the inhomogeneities affect the distance-redshift relation, several methods are examined: the Dyer-Roeder relation, lensing approximation, and non-linear Swiss-Cheese model. In all cases, the distance to the last scattering surface is different than when homogeneity is assumed. The difference can be as low as 1% and as high as 80%. An usual change of the distance is around 20–30%. Since the distance to the last scattering surface is set by the position of the CMB peaks, in order to have a good fit, the distance needs to be adjusted. After correcting the distance, the cosmological parameters change. Therefore, a not properly estimated distance to the last scattering surface can be a major source of systematics. This paper shows that if inhomogeneities are taken into account when calculating the distance then models with positive spatial curvature and with Ω{sub Λ} ∼ 0.8−0.9 are preferred.

  13. Non-Gaussianity in WMAP data due to the correlation of CMB lensing potential with secondary anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Erminia; Smidt, Joseph; Amblard, Alexandre; Cooray, Asantha; Serra, Paolo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Heavens, Alan; Munshi, Dipak

    2010-02-15

    We measure the skewness power spectrum of the CMB anisotropies optimized for a detection of the secondary bispectrum generated by the correlation of the CMB lensing potential with integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The covariance of our measurements is generated by Monte Carlo simulations of Gaussian CMB fields with noise properties consistent with WMAP 5-year data. When interpreting multifrequency measurements we also take into account the confusion resulting from unresolved radio point sources. We analyze Q, V and W-band WMAP 5-year raw and foreground-cleaned maps using the KQ75 mask out to l{sub max}=600. We find no significant evidence for a nonzero non-Gaussian signal from the lensing-secondary correlation in all three bands and we constrain the overall amplitude of the cross-power spectrum between CMB lensing potential and the sum of SZ and ISW fluctuations to be 0.42{+-}0.86 and 1.19{+-}0.86 in combined V and W-band raw and foreground-cleaned maps provided by the WMAP team, respectively. The point-source amplitude at the bispectrum level measured with this skewness power spectrum is higher than previous measurements of point-source non-Gaussianity. We also consider an analysis where we also account for the primordial non-Gaussianity in addition to lensing-secondary bispectrum and point sources. The focus of this paper is on secondary anisotropies. Consequently the estimator is not optimized for primordial non-Gaussianity and the limit we find on local non-Gaussianity from the foreground-cleaned V+W maps is f{sub NL}=-13{+-}62, when marginalized over point sources and lensing-ISW/SZ contributions to the total bispectrum.

  14. CMB seen through random Swiss Cheese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavinto, Mikko; Räsänen, Syksy

    2015-10-01

    We consider a Swiss Cheese model with a random arrangement of Lemaȋtre-Tolman-Bondi holes in ΛCDM cheese. We study two kinds of holes with radius rb=50 h-1 Mpc, with either an underdense or an overdense centre, called the open and closed case, respectively. We calculate the effect of the holes on the temperature, angular diameter distance and, for the first time in Swiss Cheese models, shear of the CMB . We quantify the systematic shift of the mean and the statistical scatter, and calculate the power spectra. In the open case, the temperature power spectrum is three orders of magnitude below the linear ISW spectrum. It is sensitive to the details of the hole, in the closed case the amplitude is two orders of magnitude smaller. In contrast, the power spectra of the distance and shear are more robust, and agree with perturbation theory and previous Swiss Cheese results. We do not find a statistically significant mean shift in the sky average of the angular diameter distance, and obtain the 95% limit |Δ DA/bar DA|lesssim 10-4. We consider the argument that areas of spherical surfaces are nearly unaffected by perturbations, which is often invoked in light propagation calculations. The closed case is consistent with this at 1σ, whereas in the open case the probability is only 1.4%.

  15.  CMB anomalies after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2016-09-01

    Several unexpected features have been observed in the microwave sky at large angular scales, both by WMAP and by Planck. Among those features is a lack of both variance and correlation on the largest angular scales, alignment of the lowest multipole moments with one another and with the motion and geometry of the solar system, a hemispherical power asymmetry or dipolar power modulation, a preference for odd parity modes and an unexpectedly large cold spot in the Southern hemisphere. The individual p-values of the significance of these features are in the per mille to per cent level, when compared to the expectations of the best-fit inflationary ΛCDM model. Some pairs of those features are demonstrably uncorrelated, increasing their combined statistical significance and indicating a significant detection of CMB features at angular scales larger than a few degrees on top of the standard model. Despite numerous detailed investigations, we still lack a clear understanding of these large-scale features, which seem to imply a violation of statistical isotropy and scale invariance of inflationary perturbations. In this contribution we present a critical analysis of our current understanding and discuss several ideas of how to make further progress.

  16. CMB anisotropies from a gradient mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-03-01

    A linear gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect on short distance physics. We confirm this by showing that if there was such a gradient mode extending across the whole observable Universe, it would not cause any hemispherical asymmetry in the power of CMB anisotropies, as long as Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To study the effect of the long wavelength mode on short wavelength modes, we generalize the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. Next, we consider effects that are of second order in the long mode. A gradient mode Φ = qṡx generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce an observable quadrupole moment. For instance, in a matter-dominated model it is equal to Q = 5(qṡx)2/18. This quadrupole can be canceled by superposition of a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a nonlinear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  17. CMB constraints on cosmic strings and superstrings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Tom; Avgoustidis, Anastasios; Copeland, Edmund J.; Moss, Adam

    2016-06-01

    We present the first complete Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of cosmological models with evolving cosmic (super)string networks, using the unconnected segment model in the unequal-time correlator formalism. For ordinary cosmic string networks, we derive joint constraints on Λ cold dark matter (CDM) and string network parameters, namely the string tension G μ , the loop-chopping efficiency cr, and the string wiggliness α . For cosmic superstrings, we obtain joint constraints on the fundamental string tension G μF, the string coupling gs, the self-interaction coefficient cs, and the volume of compact extra dimensions w . This constitutes the most comprehensive CMB analysis of Λ CDM cosmology+strings to date. For ordinary cosmic string networks our updated constraint on the string tension, obtained using Planck2015 temperature and polarization data, is G μ <1.1 ×10-7 in relativistic units, while for cosmic superstrings our constraint on the fundamental string tension after marginalizing over gs, cs, and w is G μF<2.8 ×10-8.

  18. The CMB bispectrum in the squeezed limit

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Pitrou, Cyril; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: cyril.pitrou@gmail.com

    2011-11-01

    The CMB bispectrum generated by second-order effects at recombination can be calculated analytically when one of the three modes has a wavelength much longer than the other two and is outside the horizon at recombination. This was pointed out in [1] and here we correct their results. We derive a simple formula for the bispectrum, f{sub NL}{sup loc} = −(1/6+cos 2θ)⋅(1−1/2⋅dln (l{sub S}{sup 2}C{sub S})/dln l{sub S}), where C{sub S} is the short scale spectrum and θ the relative orientation between the long and the short modes. This formula is exact and takes into account all effects at recombination, including recombination-lensing, but neglects all late-time effects such as ISW-lensing. The induced bispectrum in the squeezed limit is small and will negligibly contaminate the Planck search for a local primordial signal: this will be biased only by f{sub NL}{sup loc} ≈ −0.4. The above analytic formula includes the primordial non-Gaussianity of any single-field model. It also represents a consistency check for second-order Boltzmann codes: we find substantial agreement with the current version of the CMBquick code.

  19. Can residuals of the solar system foreground explain low multipole anomalies of the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.; Kim, J.; Frejsel, A.M.; Ramazanov, S.; Naselsky, P.; Zhao, W.; Burigana, C. E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk E-mail: sabir_ra@nbi.dk E-mail: wzhao7@nbi.ku.dk

    2012-10-01

    The low multipole anomalies of the Cosmic Microwave Background has received much attention during the last few years. It is still not ascertained whether these anomalies are indeed primordial or the result of systematics or foregrounds. An example of a foreground, which could generate some non-Gaussian and statistically anisotropic features at low multipole range, is the very symmetric Kuiper Belt in the outer solar system. In this paper, expanding upon the methods presented in [1], we investigate the contributions from the Kuiper Belt objects (KBO) to the WMAP ILC 7 map, whereby we can minimize the contrast in power between even and odd multipoles in the CMB, discussed in [2,3]. We submit our KBO de-correlated CMB signal to several tests, to analyze its validity, and find that incorporation of the KBO emission can decrease the quadrupole-octupole alignment and parity asymmetry problems, provided that the KBO signals has a non-cosmological dipole modulation, associated with the statistical anisotropy of the ILC 7 map. Additionally, we show that the amplitude of the dipole modulation, within a 2σ interval, is in agreement with the corresponding amplitudes, discussed in [4].

  20. CMB polarization features from inflation versus reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Dvorkin, Cora; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Hu, Wayne

    2009-05-15

    The angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy observed by WMAP has an anomalous dip at l{approx}20 and a bump at l{approx}40. One explanation for this structure is the presence of features in the primordial curvature power spectrum, possibly caused by a step in the inflationary potential. The detection of these features is only marginally significant from temperature data alone. However, the inflationary feature hypothesis predicts a specific shape for the E-mode polarization power spectrum with a structure similar to that observed in temperature at l{approx}20-40. Measurement of the CMB polarization on few-degree scales can therefore be used as a consistency check of the hypothesis. The Planck satellite has the statistical sensitivity to confirm or rule out the model that best fits the temperature features with 3{sigma} significance, assuming all other parameters are known. With a cosmic variance limited experiment, this significance improves to 8{sigma}. For tests of inflationary models that can explain both the dip and the bump in temperature, the primary source of uncertainty is confusion with polarization features created by a complex reionization history, which, at most, reduces the significance to 2.5{sigma} for Planck and 5{sigma}-6{sigma} for an ideal experiment. Smoothing of the polarization spectrum by a large tensor component only slightly reduces the ability of polarization to test for inflationary features, as does requiring that polarization is consistent with the observed temperature spectrum, given the expected low level of TE correlation on few-degree scales. If polarized foregrounds can be adequately subtracted, Planck will supply valuable evidence for or against features in the primordial power spectrum. A future high-sensitivity polarization satellite would enable a decisive test of the feature hypothesis and provide complementary information about the shape of a possible step in the inflationary potential.

  1. CMB polarization features from inflation versus reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Dvorkin, Cora; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Hu, Wayne

    2009-05-01

    The angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy observed by WMAP has an anomalous dip at ℓ˜20 and a bump at ℓ˜40. One explanation for this structure is the presence of features in the primordial curvature power spectrum, possibly caused by a step in the inflationary potential. The detection of these features is only marginally significant from temperature data alone. However, the inflationary feature hypothesis predicts a specific shape for the E-mode polarization power spectrum with a structure similar to that observed in temperature at ℓ˜20-40. Measurement of the CMB polarization on few-degree scales can therefore be used as a consistency check of the hypothesis. The Planck satellite has the statistical sensitivity to confirm or rule out the model that best fits the temperature features with 3σ significance, assuming all other parameters are known. With a cosmic variance limited experiment, this significance improves to 8σ. For tests of inflationary models that can explain both the dip and the bump in temperature, the primary source of uncertainty is confusion with polarization features created by a complex reionization history, which, at most, reduces the significance to 2.5σ for Planck and 5σ-6σ for an ideal experiment. Smoothing of the polarization spectrum by a large tensor component only slightly reduces the ability of polarization to test for inflationary features, as does requiring that polarization is consistent with the observed temperature spectrum, given the expected low level of TE correlation on few-degree scales. If polarized foregrounds can be adequately subtracted, Planck will supply valuable evidence for or against features in the primordial power spectrum. A future high-sensitivity polarization satellite would enable a decisive test of the feature hypothesis and provide complementary information about the shape of a possible step in the inflationary potential.

  2. Measurements of the CMB temperature at z=0.89

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Sebastien; Curran, Steve; Beelen, Alexandre; Aalto, Susanne; Combes, Francoise; Guelin, Michel; Black, John Harry; Horellou, Cathy

    2011-04-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is one of the strongest pillars of the Big Bang theory. Determining the CMB temperature at high redshift has considerable interest to probe the T_CMB-z law and test decaying dark energy models. Our recent ATCA 7 mm spectral line survey toward the z=0.89 molecular absorber located in front of the lensed quasar PKS1830-211 has allowed us to detect a collection of about 30 different molecular species and to derive rotation temperatures of some of them toward one image of the quasar. Averaging these rotation temperatures, we obtain a value of 5.2 pm 0.3 K, consistent with the value T_CMB=5.14 K from standard cosmology. We now propose to strengthen this result by determining the rotation temperatures of a set of molecules toward the second lensed image, projected on the other side of the absorbing galaxy bulge, in a completely independent line of sight. We will therefore obtain a new, independent and presumably more robust measurement of T_CMB at z=0.89. A total of 8 hours of observations is requested in order to conduct the multi-transition analysis in the 7 mm and 3 mm bands.

  3. Rayleigh scattering: blue sky thinking for future CMB observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Antony

    2013-08-01

    Rayleigh scattering from neutral hydrogen during and shortly after recombination causes the CMB anisotropies to be significantly frequency dependent at high frequencies. This may be detectable with Planck, and would be a strong signal in any future space-based CMB missions. The later peak of the Rayleigh visibility compared to Thomson scattering gives an increased large-scale CMB polarization signal that is a greater than 4% effect for observed frequencies ν ∼> 500GHz. There is a similar magnitude suppression on small scales from additional damping. Due to strong correlation between the Rayleigh and primary signal, measurement of the Rayleigh component is limited by noise and foregrounds, not cosmic variance of the primary CMB, and should observable over a wide range of angular scales at frequencies 200GHz ∼< ν ∼< 800GHz. I give new numerical calculations of the temperature and polarization power spectra, and show that future CMB missions could measure the temperature Rayleigh cross-spectrum at high precision, detect the polarization from Rayleigh scattering, and also accurately determine the cross-spectra between the Rayleigh temperature signal and primary polarization. The Rayleigh scattering signal may provide a powerful consistency check on recombination physics. In principle it can be used to measure additional horizon-scale primordial perturbation modes at recombination, and distinguish a significant tensor mode B-polarization signal from gravitational lensing at the power spectrum level.

  4. External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott; Park, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments will improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the CMB polarized data as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density Ωch2 and the Hubble constant H0. If polarization on the largest scales (ℓ<50 ) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude As or the optical depth τ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, Neff, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index ns and the baryon energy density Ωbh2. Finally, an external prior on H0 will help constrain the dark energy equation of state (w ).

  5. External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott; Park, Youngsoo

    2015-12-08

    Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments can dramatically improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal to noise of the CMB polarized signal as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of high redshift large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are extremely tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density $\\Omega_{c}h^{2}$ and the Hubble constant $H_{0}$. If polarization on the largest scales ($\\ell<50$) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude $A_{s}$ or the optical depth $\\tau$ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, $N_{\\rm eff}$, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index $n_{s}$ and the baryon energy density $\\Omega_{b}h^{2}$. Finally, an external prior on $H_{0}$ will help constrain the dark energy equation of state ($w$).

  6. BICEP2/Keck - Planck joint analysis and prospects for Galactic foreground removal from CMB observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, Brendan

    2015-08-01

    The joint analysis of 150 GHz polarized maps from BICEP2 and Keck Array at 150 GHz with Planck data at 353 GHzallowed the removal of Galactic dust contamination from the measurement of lensed B-modes in the deep (57 nK deg)BICEP2/Keck maps as well as setting an upper limit on the primordial gravitational wave background from inflation. We present this analysis, describe prospects for polarized foreground cleaning of future suborbitalmeasurements of CMB, and additionally describe Planck's measurements of the spatial correlation of polarizedemission from synchrotron and dust at high galactic latitude, which complicates the removal of Galactic foregrounds at the foregroundminimum of 70-100 GHz.

  7. Optimized Large-scale CMB Likelihood and Quadratic Maximum Likelihood Power Spectrum Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerløw, E.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Eriksen, H. K.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Jewell, J. B.; Plaszczynski, S.; Wehus, I. K.

    2015-11-01

    We revisit the problem of exact cosmic microwave background (CMB) likelihood and power spectrum estimation with the goal of minimizing computational costs through linear compression. This idea was originally proposed for CMB purposes by Tegmark et al., and here we develop it into a fully functioning computational framework for large-scale polarization analysis, adopting WMAP as a working example. We compare five different linear bases (pixel space, harmonic space, noise covariance eigenvectors, signal-to-noise covariance eigenvectors, and signal-plus-noise covariance eigenvectors) in terms of compression efficiency, and find that the computationally most efficient basis is the signal-to-noise eigenvector basis, which is closely related to the Karhunen-Loeve and Principal Component transforms, in agreement with previous suggestions. For this basis, the information in 6836 unmasked WMAP sky map pixels can be compressed into a smaller set of 3102 modes, with a maximum error increase of any single multipole of 3.8% at ℓ ≤ 32 and a maximum shift in the mean values of a joint distribution of an amplitude-tilt model of 0.006σ. This compression reduces the computational cost of a single likelihood evaluation by a factor of 5, from 38 to 7.5 CPU seconds, and it also results in a more robust likelihood by implicitly regularizing nearly degenerate modes. Finally, we use the same compression framework to formulate a numerically stable and computationally efficient variation of the Quadratic Maximum Likelihood implementation, which requires less than 3 GB of memory and 2 CPU minutes per iteration for ℓ ≤ 32, rendering low-ℓ QML CMB power spectrum analysis fully tractable on a standard laptop.

  8. Constraining gravity at the largest scales through CMB lensing and galaxy velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. $E_G$ is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and $\\sigma_8$. While traditionally, the lensing field for $E_G$ has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for $E_G$ at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of $E_G$ ever, up to 150 Mpc/$h$, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter $\\beta$. We report $E_G(z=0.57)=0.243\\pm0.060$ (stat) $\\pm0.013$ (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity prediction at a level of 2.6$\\sigma$. Note that our $E_G$ measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc/$h$, scales which have not been probed by previous $E_G$ tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.

  9. Impact of point source clustering on cosmological parameters with CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha; Amblard, Alexandre; Pagano, Luca; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2008-08-15

    The faint radio point sources that are unresolved in cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy maps are likely to be a biased tracer of the large-scale structure dark matter distribution. While the shot-noise contribution to the angular power spectrum of unresolved radio point sources is included either when optimally constructing the CMB angular power spectrum, as with WMAP data, or when extracting cosmological parameters, we suggest that clustering part of the point source power spectrum should also be included. This is especially necessary at high frequencies above 150 GHz, where the clustering of far-IR sources is expected to dominate the shot-noise level of the angular power spectrum at tens of arcminute angular scales of both radio and sub-mm sources. We make an estimate of source clustering of unresolved radio sources in both WMAP and ACBAR, and marginalize over the amplitude of source clustering in each CMB data set when model fitting for cosmological parameters. For the combination of WMAP 5-year data and ACBAR, we find that the spectral index changes from the value of 0.963{+-}0.014 to 0.959{+-}0.014 (at 68% C.L.) when the clustering power spectrum of point sources is included in model fits. While we find that the differences are marginal with and without source clustering in current data, it may be necessary to account for source clustering with future data sets such as Planck, especially to properly model fit anisotropies at arcminute angular scales. If clustering is not accounted and point sources are modeled with a shot noise only out to l{approx}2000, the spectral index will be biased by about 1.5{sigma}.

  10. Effect of intermediate Minkowskian evolution on CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, S.A.; Rubakov, V.A.; Ramazanov, S.R. E-mail: Sabir.Ramazanov@ulb.ac.be

    2014-04-01

    We consider a non-inflationary early Universe scenario in which relevant scalar perturbations get frozen out at some point, but then are defrosted and follow a long nearly Minkowskian evolution before the hot era. This intermediate stage leaves specific imprint on the CMB 3-point function, largely independent of details of microscopic physics. In particular, the CMB bispectrum undergoes oscillations in the multipole l space with roughly constant amplitude. The latter is in contrast to the oscillatory bispectrum enhanced in the flattened triangle limit, as predicted by inflation with non-Bunch-Davies vacuum. Given this and other peculiar features of the bispectrum, stringent constraints imposed by the Planck data may not apply. The CMB 3-point function is suppressed by the inverse duration squared of the Minkowskian evolution, but can be of observable size for relatively short intermediate Minkowskian stage.

  11. Understanding the origin of CMB constraints on dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassal, H. K.; Bagla, J. S.; Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-07-01

    We study the observational constraints of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies on models of dark energy, with special focus on models with variation in properties of dark energy with time. We demonstrate that the key constraint from CMB observations arises from the location of acoustic peaks. An additional constraint arises from the limits on ΩNR from the relative amplitudes of acoustic peaks. Further, we show that the distance to the last scattering surface is not how the CMB observations constrain the combination of parameters for models of dark energy. We also use constraints from supernova observations and show that unlike the gold and silver samples, the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) sample prefers a region of parameter space that has a significant overlap with the region preferred by the CMB observations. This is a verification of a conjecture made by us in an earlier work. We discuss combined constraints from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-yr and SNLS observations. We find that models with w ~= - 1 are preferred for models with a constant equation-of-state parameters. In case of models with a time-varying dark energy, we show that constraints on evolution of dark energy density are almost independent of the type of variation assumed for the equation-of-state parameter. This makes it easy to get approximate constraints from CMB observations on arbitrary models of dark energy. Constraints on models with a time-varying dark energy are predominantly due to CMB observations, with supernova constraints playing only a marginal role.

  12. TESTING CPT SYMMETRY WITH CURRENT AND FUTURE CMB MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Si-Yu; Zhang, Xinmin; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Hong; Li, Mingzhe

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we use the current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to test the Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry. We consider a CPT-violating interaction in the photon sector L{sub cs}∼p{sub μ}A{sub ν} F-tilde {sup μν}, which gives rise to a rotation of the polarization vectors of the propagating CMB photons. By combining the 9 yr WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003, and BICEP1 observations, we obtain the current constraint on the isotropic rotation angle α-bar =−2.12±1.14 (1σ), indicating that the significance of the CPT violation is about 2σ. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. Then, we study the effects of the anisotropies of the rotation angle [Δα( n-hat )] on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. Due to the small effects, the current CMB polarization data cannot constrain the related parameters very well. We obtain the 95% C.L. upper limit of the variance of the anisotropies of the rotation angle C {sup α}(0) < 0.035 from all of the CMB data sets. More interestingly, including the anisotropies of rotation angle could lower the best-fit value of r and relax the tension on the constraints of r between BICEP2 and Planck. Finally, we investigate the capabilities of future Planck polarization measurements on α-bar and Δα( n-hat ). Benefited from the high precision of Planck data, the constraints of the rotation angle can be significantly improved.

  13. Testing CPT Symmetry with Current and Future CMB Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Yu; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Mingzhe; Li, Hong; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we use the current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to test the Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry. We consider a CPT-violating interaction in the photon sector {L}_cs˜ p_μ A_ν \\tilde{F}μ ν , which gives rise to a rotation of the polarization vectors of the propagating CMB photons. By combining the 9 yr WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003, and BICEP1 observations, we obtain the current constraint on the isotropic rotation angle \\bar{α } = -2.12 +/- 1.14 (1σ), indicating that the significance of the CPT violation is about 2σ. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. Then, we study the effects of the anisotropies of the rotation angle [Δ {α }({\\hat{n}})] on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. Due to the small effects, the current CMB polarization data cannot constrain the related parameters very well. We obtain the 95% C.L. upper limit of the variance of the anisotropies of the rotation angle C α(0) < 0.035 from all of the CMB data sets. More interestingly, including the anisotropies of rotation angle could lower the best-fit value of r and relax the tension on the constraints of r between BICEP2 and Planck. Finally, we investigate the capabilities of future Planck polarization measurements on \\bar{α } and Δ {α }({\\hat{n}}). Benefited from the high precision of Planck data, the constraints of the rotation angle can be significantly improved.

  14. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Frommert, Mona; Durrer, Ruth; Michaud, Jérôme E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the statistics of the cosmic microwave background using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We show that, when we correctly de-correlate the data, the partition function of the Kolmogorov stochasticity parameter is compatible with the Kolmogorov distribution and, contrary to previous claims, the CMB data are compatible with Gaussian fluctuations with the correlation function given by standard ΛCDM. We then use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to derive upper bounds on residual point source power in the CMB, and indicate the promise of this statistics for further datasets, especially Planck, to search for deviations from Gaussianity and for detecting point sources and Galactic foregrounds.

  15. Loop quantum cosmology, non-Gaussianity, and CMB power asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agullo, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    We argue that the anomalous power asymmetry observed in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) may have originated in a cosmic bounce preceding inflation. In loop quantum cosmology (LQC), the big bang singularity is generically replaced by a bounce due to quantum gravitational effects. We compute the spectrum of inflationary non-Gaussianity and show that strong correlation between observable scales and modes with longer (superhorizon) wavelength arise as a consequence of the evolution of perturbations across the LQC bounce. These correlations are strongly scale dependent and induce a dipole-dominated modulation on large angular scales in the CMB, in agreement with observations.

  16. Nonisotropy in the CMB power spectrum in single field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, John F.; Dutta, Koushik; Ross, Andreas

    2009-07-15

    Contaldi et al.[C. R. Contaldi, M. Peloso, L. Kofman, and A. Linde, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 07 (2003) 002] have suggested that an initial period of kinetic energy domination in single field inflation may explain the lack of CMB power at large angular scales. We note that in this situation it is natural that there also be a spatial gradient in the initial value of the inflaton field, and that this can provide a spatial asymmetry in the observed CMB power spectrum, manifest at low values of l. We investigate the nature of this asymmetry and comment on its relation to possible anomalies at low l.

  17. Scale-dependent CMB asymmetry from primordial configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lin, Chia-Min; Matsuda, Tomohiro E-mail: lin@chuo-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate that a topological defect can explain the hemispherical power asymmetry of the CMB. The first point is that a defect configuration, which already exists prior to inflation, can source asymmetry of the CMB. The second point is that modulation mechanisms, such as the curvaton and other modulation mechanisms, can explain scale-dependence of the asymmetry. Using a simple analysis of the δ N formalism, we show models in which scale-dependent hemispherical power asymmetry is explained by primordial configuration of a defect.

  18. Reconciling CMB and structure growth measurements with dark energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Tram, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study a coupled quintessence model with pure momentum exchange and present the effects of such an interaction on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and matter power spectrum. For a wide range of negative values of the coupling parameter β structure growth is suppressed and the model can reconcile the tension between cosmic microwave background observations and structure growth inferred from cluster counts. We find that this model is as good as Λ CDM for CMB and baryon acoustic oscillation data, while the addition of cluster data makes the model strongly preferred, improving the best-fit χ2 value by more than 16.

  19. Observing the CMB with the AMiBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyan, R.

    I discuss the capabilities and limitations of the AMiBA for imaging CMB anisotropies. Michael Kesteven (ATNF-CSIRO) has proposed drift-scanning as an observing strategy for measuring and rejecting any instrumental response that the close-packed interferometers may have to the local environment. The advantages of mosaic imaging CMB anisotropies using a co-mounted interferometric array in a drift-scanning observing mode are discussed. A particular case of mosaic imaging a sky strip using a two-element AMiBA prototype interferometer is considered and the signal-to-noise ratio in the measurement of sky anisotropy using this observing strategy is analysed.

  20. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Jaffe, Andrew H.

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)~1.3×10-4, σ(nt)~0.03, σ( ns )~1.8×10

  1. Exploring two-spin internal linear combinations for the recovery of the CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Cobos, R.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.; Martínez-González, E.; Barreiro, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    We present a methodology to recover cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization in which the quantity P = Q + iU is linearly combined at different frequencies using complex coefficients. This is the most general linear combination of the Q and U Stokes parameters which preserves the physical coherence of the residual contribution on the CMB estimation. The approach is applied to the internal linear combination (ILC) and the internal template fitting (ITF) methodologies. The variance of P of the resulting map is minimized to compute the coefficients of the linear combination. One of the key aspects of this procedure is that it serves to account for a global frequency-dependent shift of the polarization phase. Although in the standard case, in which no global E-B transference depending on frequency is expected in the foreground components, minimizing <|P|2> is similar to minimizing and separately (as previous methodologies proceed), multiplying Q and U by different coefficients induces arbitrary changes in the polarization angle and it does not preserve the coherence between the spinorial components. The approach is tested on simulations, obtaining a similar residual level with respect to the one obtained with other implementations of the ILC, and perceiving the polarization rotation of a toy model with the frequency dependence of the Faraday rotation.

  2. The shape of CMB temperature and polarization peaks on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Caballero, A.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Martínez-González, E.; Vielva, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of CMB temperature peaks, including its effect over the polarization field, and allowing nonzero eccentricity. The formalism is developed in harmonic space and using the covariant derivative on the sphere, which guarantees that the expressions obtained are completely valid at large scales (i.e., no flat approximation). The expected patterns induced by the peak, either in temperature or polarization, are calculated, as well as their covariances. It is found that the eccentricity introduces a quadrupolar dependence in the peak shape, which is proportional to a complex bias parameter bepsilon, characterizing the peak asymmetry and orientation. In addition, the one-point statistics of the variables defining the peak on the sphere is reviewed, finding some differences with respect to the flat case for large peaks. Finally, we present a mechanism to simulate constrained CMB maps with a particular peak on the field, which is an interesting tool for analysing the statistical properties of the peaks present in the data.

  3. MASKING VERSUS REMOVING POINT SOURCES IN CMB DATA: THE SOURCE-CORRECTED WMAP POWER SPECTRUM FROM NEW EXTENDED CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Scodeller, Sandro; Hansen, Frode K. E-mail: frodekh@astro.uio.no

    2012-12-20

    In Scodeller et al., a new and extended point source catalog obtained from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data was presented. It includes most of the sources included in the standard WMAP seven-year point source catalogs as well as a large number of new detections. Here, we study the effects on the estimated CMB power spectrum when taking the newly detected point sources into consideration. We create point source masks for all the 2102 sources that we detected as well as a smaller one for the 665 sources detected in the Q, V, and W bands. We also create WMAP7 maps with point sources subtracted in order to compare with the spectrum obtained with source masks. The extended point source masks and point source cleaned WMAP7 maps are made publicly available. Using the proper residual correction, we find that the CMB power spectrum obtained from the point source cleaned map without any source mask is fully consistent with the spectrum obtained from the masked map. We further find that the spectrum obtained masking all 2102 sources is consistent with the results obtained using the standard WMAP seven-year point source mask (KQ85y7). We also verify that the removal of point sources does not introduce any skewness.

  4. Dipole modulation in tensor modes: signatures in CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Moslem

    2015-06-01

    In this work we consider a dipole asymmetry in tensor modes and study the effects of this asymmetry on the angular power spectra of CMB. We derive analytical expressions for the and in the presence of such dipole modulation in tensor modes for . We also discuss on the amplitude of modulation term and show that the is considerably modified due to this term.

  5. CMB constraint on dark matter annihilation after Planck 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

    2016-05-01

    We update the constraint on the dark matter annihilation cross section by using the recent measurements of the CMB anisotropy by the Planck satellite. We fully calculate the cascade of dark matter annihilation products and their effects on ionization, heating and excitation of the hydrogen, hence do not rely on any assumption on the energy fractions that cause these effects.

  6. Joint Bayesian Component Separation and CMB Power Spectrum Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, H. K.; Jewell, J. B.; Dickinson, C.; Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    We describe and implement an exact, flexible, and computationally efficient algorithm for joint component separation and CMB power spectrum estimation, building on a Gibbs sampling framework. Two essential new features are (1) conditional sampling of foreground spectral parameters and (2) joint sampling of all amplitude-type degrees of freedom (e.g., CMB, foreground pixel amplitudes, and global template amplitudes) given spectral parameters. Given a parametric model of the foreground signals, we estimate efficiently and accurately the exact joint foreground- CMB posterior distribution and, therefore, all marginal distributions such as the CMB power spectrum or foreground spectral index posteriors. The main limitation of the current implementation is the requirement of identical beam responses at all frequencies, which restricts the analysis to the lowest resolution of a given experiment. We outline a future generalization to multiresolution observations. To verify the method, we analyze simple models and compare the results to analytical predictions. We then analyze a realistic simulation with properties similar to the 3 yr WMAP data, downgraded to a common resolution of 3 deg FWHM. The results from the actual 3 yr WMAP temperature analysis are presented in a companion Letter.

  7. CHEMICAL MASS BALANCE MODEL: EPA-CMB8.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) method has been a popular approach for receptor modeling of ambient air pollutants for over two decades. For the past few years the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development (ORD) and Office of Air Quality Plannin...

  8. CMB ISW-lensing bispectrum from cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2014-02-01

    We study the effect of weak lensing by cosmic (super-)strings on the higher-order statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A cosmic string segment is expected to cause weak lensing as well as an integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the so-called Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins (GKS) effect, to the CMB temperature fluctuation, which are thus naturally cross-correlated. We point out that, in the presence of such a correlation, yet another kind of the post-recombination CMB temperature bispectra, the ISW-lensing bispectra, will arise in the form of products of the auto- and cross-power spectra. We first present an analytic method to calculate the autocorrelation of the temperature fluctuations induced by the strings, and the cross-correlation between the temperature fluctuation and the lensing potential both due to the string network. In our formulation, the evolution of the string network is assumed to be characterized by the simple analytic model, the velocity-dependent one scale model, and the intercommutation probability is properly incorporated in order to characterize the possible superstringy nature. Furthermore, the obtained power spectra are dominated by the Poisson-distributed string segments, whose correlations are assumed to satisfy the simple relations. We then estimate the signal-to-noise ratios of the string-induced ISW-lensing bispectra and discuss the detectability of such CMB signals from the cosmic string network. It is found that in the case of the smaller string tension, Gμ << 10-7, the ISW-lensing bispectrum induced by a cosmic string network can constrain the string-model parameters even more tightly than the purely GKS-induced bispectrum in the ongoing and future CMB observations on small scales.

  9. CMB ISW-lensing bispectrum from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Takahashi, Keitaro E-mail: sendouda@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

    2014-02-01

    We study the effect of weak lensing by cosmic (super-)strings on the higher-order statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A cosmic string segment is expected to cause weak lensing as well as an integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the so-called Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins (GKS) effect, to the CMB temperature fluctuation, which are thus naturally cross-correlated. We point out that, in the presence of such a correlation, yet another kind of the post-recombination CMB temperature bispectra, the ISW-lensing bispectra, will arise in the form of products of the auto- and cross-power spectra. We first present an analytic method to calculate the autocorrelation of the temperature fluctuations induced by the strings, and the cross-correlation between the temperature fluctuation and the lensing potential both due to the string network. In our formulation, the evolution of the string network is assumed to be characterized by the simple analytic model, the velocity-dependent one scale model, and the intercommutation probability is properly incorporated in order to characterize the possible superstringy nature. Furthermore, the obtained power spectra are dominated by the Poisson-distributed string segments, whose correlations are assumed to satisfy the simple relations. We then estimate the signal-to-noise ratios of the string-induced ISW-lensing bispectra and discuss the detectability of such CMB signals from the cosmic string network. It is found that in the case of the smaller string tension, Gμ << 10{sup -7}, the ISW-lensing bispectrum induced by a cosmic string network can constrain the string-model parameters even more tightly than the purely GKS-induced bispectrum in the ongoing and future CMB observations on small scales.

  10. The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

  11. Preliminary DMR measurements of the CMB isotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Aymon, J.; Backus, C.; De Amici, G.; Galuk, K.; Jackson, P. D.; Keegstra, P.; Rokke, L.

    1991-01-01

    The COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument has produced preliminary full-sky maps at frequencies 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz. The redundant channels and matched beams at three frequencies distinguish the DMR from previous large-scale surveys. Galactic emission is seen unambiguously at all three frequencies. The only large-scale anisotropy detected in the cosmic microwave background is the dipole anisotropy. There is no clear evidence for any other large-angular-scale feature in the maps. Without correcting for any systematic effects, we are able to place limits DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 3 x 10 exp -5 for the rms quadrupole amplitude, DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 4 x 10 exp -5 for monochromatic fluctuations, and DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 4 x 10 exp -5 for Gaussian fluctuations (all limits are 95 percent C.L. with TO = 2.735 K). The data limit DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 10 exp -4 for any feature larger than 7 deg. We briefly review the DMR and discuss some implications of these results in cosmology.

  12. Superconducting Coplanar Switch and Phase Shifter for CMB Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordier, G.; Cammilleri, V. D.; Belier, B.; Bleurvacq, N.; Gadot, F.; Ghribi, A.; Piat, M.; Tartari, A.; Zanonni, M.

    2016-08-01

    The next generations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) instruments will be dedicated to the detection and characterization of CMB B-modes. To measure this tiny signal, instruments need to control and minimize systematics. Signal modulation is one way to achieve such a control. A new generation of focal planes will include the entire detection chain. In this context, we present a superconducting coplanar switch driven by DC current. It consists of a superconducting microbridge which commutes between its on (superconducting) and off (normal metal) states, depending on the amplitude of the injected current compared to the critical current. If the current injected inside the bridge is lower than the critical current, the phase of the signal passing through the bridge is tunable. A first prototype of this component working as a switch and as a phase shifter at 10 GHz has been made. The principle, the setup, and the first measurements made at 4 K will be shown.

  13. Nonisotropy in the CMB power spectrum in single field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoghue, John F.; Dutta, Koushik; Ross, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    Contaldi et al. [C. R. Contaldi, M. Peloso, L. Kofman, and A. Linde, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys.1475-7516 07 (2003) 00210.1088/1475-7516/2003/07/002] have suggested that an initial period of kinetic energy domination in single field inflation may explain the lack of CMB power at large angular scales. We note that in this situation it is natural that there also be a spatial gradient in the initial value of the inflaton field, and that this can provide a spatial asymmetry in the observed CMB power spectrum, manifest at low values of ℓ. We investigate the nature of this asymmetry and comment on its relation to possible anomalies at low ℓ.

  14. Testing the CMB Quenching for High-Redshift Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Gallo, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The identification of a dozen of high-redshift (z > 4) blazars implies that a much larger population of powerful, but mis-aligned jetted AGNs already exists in the early Universe. However, this parent population remains elusive, although they are expected to be within the sensitivity threshold of modern wide-field radio surveys. One appealing mechanism is that the CMB photons upscatter the diffuse synchrotron radio emission in the lobes to the X-ray band. In this scenario, the lobes will turn into luminous X-ray sources. We analyzed the extended X-ray emission around several radio galaxies at z~4 and constructed their broad-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Modeling their SEDs will test this CMB quenching scenario for high-redshift radio galaxies.

  15. Probing early-universe phase transitions with CMB spectral distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Grin, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Global, symmetry-breaking phase transitions in the early universe can generate scaling seed networks which lead to metric perturbations. The acoustic waves in the photon-baryon plasma sourced by these metric perturbations, when Silk damped, generate spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In this work, the chemical potential distortion (μ ) due to scaling seed networks is computed and the accompanying Compton y -type distortion is estimated. The specific model of choice is the O (N ) nonlinear σ -model for N ≫1 , but the results remain the same order of magnitude for other scaling seeds. If CMB anisotropy constraints to the O (N ) model are saturated, the resulting chemical potential distortion μ ≲2 ×1 0-9 .

  16. CMB dipole asymmetry from a fast roll phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Wang, Lingfei

    2013-10-01

    The observed CMB (cosmic microwave background) dipole asymmetry cannot be explained by a single field model of inflation - it inevitably requires more than one field where one of the fields is responsible for amplifying the super-Hubble fluctuations beyond the pivot scale. Furthermore the current constraints on f{sub NL} and τ{sub NL} require that such an amplification cannot produce large non-Gaussianity. In this paper we propose a model to explain this dipole asymmetry from a spectator field, which is responsible for generating all the curvature perturbations, but has a temporary fast roll phase before the Hubble exit of the pivot scale. The current data prefers spectator scenario because it leaves no isocurvature perturbations. The spectator model will also satisfy the well-known constraints arising from quasars, and the quadrupole and octupole of the CMB.

  17. Antenna-coupled TES bolometer arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Day, P. K.; Golwala, S.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Nguyen, H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Transgrud, A.; Turner, A.; Wang, G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the design and performance of polarization selective antenna-coupled TES arrays that will be used in several upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments: SPIDER, BICEP-2/SPUD. The fully lithographic polarimeter arrays utilize planar phased-antennas for collimation (F/4 beam) and microstrip filters for band definition (25% bandwidth). These devices demonstrate high optical efficiency, excellent beam shapes, and well-defined spectral bands. The dual-polarization antennas provide well-matched beams and low cross polarization response, both important for high-fidelity polarization measurements. These devices have so far been developed for the 100 GHz and 150 GHz bands, two premier millimeter-wave atmospheric windows for CMB observations. In the near future, the flexible microstrip-coupled architecture can provide photon noise-limited detection for the entire frequency range of the CMBPOL mission. This paper is a summary of the progress we have made since the 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, FL.

  18. Conformal invariance, dark energy, and CMB non-gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2012-09-01

    In addition to simple scale invariance, a universe dominated by dark energy naturally gives rise to correlation functions possessing full conformal invariance. This is due to the mathematical isomorphism between the conformal group of certain three dimensional slices of de Sitter space and the de Sitter isometry group SO(4,1). In the standard homogeneous, isotropic cosmological model in which primordial density perturbations are generated during a long vacuum energy dominated de Sitter phase, the embedding of flat spatial Bbb R3 sections in de Sitter space induces a conformal invariant perturbation spectrum and definite prediction for the shape of the non-Gaussian CMB bispectrum. In the case in which the density fluctuations are generated instead on the de Sitter horizon, conformal invariance of the Bbb S2 horizon embedding implies a different but also quite definite prediction for the angular correlations of CMB non-Gaussianity on the sky. Each of these forms for the bispectrum is intrinsic to the symmetries of de Sitter space, and in that sense, independent of specific model assumptions. Each is different from the predictions of single field slow roll inflation models, which rely on the breaking of de Sitter invariance. We propose a quantum origin for the CMB fluctuations in the scalar gravitational sector from the conformal anomaly that could give rise to these non-Gaussianities without a slow roll inflaton field, and argue that conformal invariance also leads to the expectation for the relation nS-1 = nT between the spectral indices of the scalar and tensor power spectrum. Confirmation of this prediction or detection of non-Gaussian correlations in the CMB of one of the bispectral shape functions predicted by conformal invariance can be used both to establish the physical origins of primordial density fluctuations, and distinguish between different dynamical models of cosmological vacuum dark energy.

  19. Relic vector field and CMB large scale anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.

  20. Conformal invariance, dark energy, and CMB non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil E-mail: mazur@physics.sc.edu

    2012-09-01

    In addition to simple scale invariance, a universe dominated by dark energy naturally gives rise to correlation functions possessing full conformal invariance. This is due to the mathematical isomorphism between the conformal group of certain three dimensional slices of de Sitter space and the de Sitter isometry group SO(4,1). In the standard homogeneous, isotropic cosmological model in which primordial density perturbations are generated during a long vacuum energy dominated de Sitter phase, the embedding of flat spatial R{sup 3} sections in de Sitter space induces a conformal invariant perturbation spectrum and definite prediction for the shape of the non-Gaussian CMB bispectrum. In the case in which the density fluctuations are generated instead on the de Sitter horizon, conformal invariance of the S{sup 2} horizon embedding implies a different but also quite definite prediction for the angular correlations of CMB non-Gaussianity on the sky. Each of these forms for the bispectrum is intrinsic to the symmetries of de Sitter space, and in that sense, independent of specific model assumptions. Each is different from the predictions of single field slow roll inflation models, which rely on the breaking of de Sitter invariance. We propose a quantum origin for the CMB fluctuations in the scalar gravitational sector from the conformal anomaly that could give rise to these non-Gaussianities without a slow roll inflaton field, and argue that conformal invariance also leads to the expectation for the relation n{sub S}−1 = n{sub T} between the spectral indices of the scalar and tensor power spectrum. Confirmation of this prediction or detection of non-Gaussian correlations in the CMB of one of the bispectral shape functions predicted by conformal invariance can be used both to establish the physical origins of primordial density fluctuations, and distinguish between different dynamical models of cosmological vacuum dark energy.

  1. High altitude measurements of fluctuations in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.D. )

    1990-01-15

    The detection of fluctuations in the primordial CMB emission requires long integrations on limited areas of the sky; such extensive observations are best made from the ground on (high) dry sites. A current programme of measurements is described covering the frequency range 5 to 32 GHz using equipment at Teide Observatory, Tenerife, and in Antarctica. A bolometer system is under development for observations in the range 100 to 300 GHz to be made on Mauna Kea.

  2. Testing inflation and curvaton scenarios with CMB distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clesse, Sébastien; Garbrecht, Björn; Zhu, Yi

    2014-10-01

    Prior to recombination, Silk damping causes the dissipation of energy from acoustic waves into the monopole of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), resulting in spectral distortions. These can be used to probe the primordial scalar power spectrum on smaller scales than it is possible with CMB anisotropies. An enhancement of power on these scales is nevertheless required for the resulting distortions to be detectable by future experiments like PIXIE. In this paper, we examine all 49 single-field inflation models listed by Martin et al. in the Encyclopaedia Inflationaris [1] and find that only one of these may lead to a detectable level of distortions in a tuned region of its parameter space, namely the original hybrid model. Three effective multi-field scenarios are also studied: with softly and suddenly turning trajectories, and with a mild waterfall trajectory. Softly turning trajectories do not induce distortions at any detectable level, whereas a sudden turn in the field space or a mild waterfall trajectory predicts a peak (plus damped oscillations in the sudden turn case) in the scalar power spectrum, which can lead to an observable amount of CMB distortions. Finally, another scenario leading to potentially detectable distortions involves a curvaton whose blue spectrum is subdominant on CMB angular scales and overtakes the inflaton spectrum on smaller scales. In this case however, we show that the bounds from ultra compact minihaloes are not satisfied. Expectations for an ultimate PRISM-class experiment characterized by an improvement in sensitivity by a factor of ten are discussed for some models.

  3. Forecasts for CMB μ and i-type spectral distortion constraints on the primordial power spectrum on scales 8∼

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A. E-mail: sunyaev@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-06-01

    Silk damping at redshifts 1.5 × 10{sup 4}∼CMB anisotropies on scales corresponding to the comoving wavenumbers 8∼CMB monopole, creating distortions from a blackbody in the CMB spectrum of the μ-type and the i-type. We study, using Fisher matrices, the constraints we can get from measurements of these spectral distortions on the primordial power spectrum from future experiments such as Pixie, and how these constraints change as we change the frequency resolution and the sensitivity of the experiment. We show that the additional information in the shape of the i-type distortions, in combination with the μ-type distortions, allows us to break the degeneracy between the amplitude and the spectral index of the power spectrum on these scales and leads to much tighter constraints. We quantify the information contained in both the μ-type distortions and the i-type distortions taking into account the partial degeneracy with the y-type distortions and the temperature of the blackbody part of the CMB. We also calculate the constraints possible on the primordial power spectrum when the spectral distortion information is combined with the CMB anisotropies measured by the WMAP, SPT, ACT and Planck experiments.

  4. Novel Calibration System with Sparse Wires for CMB Polarization Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, O.; Nguyen, H.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.

    2012-06-01

    A curl competent (also known as B-modes) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. To achieve better sensitivity to this faint signal, CMB polarization experiments aim to maximize the number of detector elements, resulting in a large focal plane receiver. Detector calibration of the polarization response becomes essential. It is extremely useful to be able to calibrate "simultaneously" all detectors on the large focal plane. We developed a novel calibration system that rotates a large "sparse" grid of metal wires, in front of and fully covering the field of view of the focal plane receiver. Polarized radiation is created via the reflection of ambient temperature photons from the wire surface. Since the detector has a finite beam size, the observed signal is convolved with the beam property. The intensity of the of the calibrator is reasonable (a few Kelvin or less) compared to sky temperature for typical observing conditions (˜10 K). The system played a successful role for receiver calibration of QUIET, a CMB polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The successful performance revealed that this system is applicable to other experiments based on different technologies, e.g. TES bolometers.

  5. CMB lensing and primordial squeezed non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Ruth; Lewis, Antony; Regan, Donough E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    2012-03-01

    Squeezed primordial non-Gaussianity can strongly constrain early-universe physics, but it can only be observed on the CMB after it has been gravitationally lensed. We give a new simple non-perturbative prescription for accurately calculating the effect of lensing on any squeezed primordial bispectrum shape, and test it with simulations. We give the generalization to polarization bispectra, and discuss the effect of lensing on the trispectrum. We explain why neglecting the lensing smoothing effect does not significantly bias estimators of local primordial non-Gaussianity, even though the change in shape can be ∼>10%. We also show how τ{sub NL} trispectrum estimators can be well approximated by much simpler CMB temperature modulation estimators, and hence that there is potentially a ∼ 10–30% bias due to very large-scale lensing modes, depending on the range of modulation scales included. Including dipole sky modulations can halve the τ{sub NL} error bar if kinematic effects can be subtracted using known properties of the CMB temperature dipole. Lensing effects on the g{sub NL} trispectrum are small compared to the error bar. In appendices we give the general result for lensing of any primordial bispectrum, and show how any full-sky squeezed bispectrum can be decomposed into orthogonal modes of distinct angular dependence.

  6. Cosmological avatars of the landscape. II. CMB and LSS signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R.; Mersini-Houghton, L.; Takahashi, T.

    2008-03-15

    This is the second paper in the series that confronts predictions of a model of the landscape with cosmological observations. We show here how the modifications of the Friedmann equation due to the decohering effects of long wavelength modes on the wave function of the Universe defined on the landscape leave unique signatures on the CMB spectra and large scale structure (LSS). We show that the effect of the string corrections is to suppress {sigma}{sub 8} and the CMB temperature-temperature (TT) spectrum at large angles, thereby bringing WMAP and SDSS data for {sigma}{sub 8} into agreement. We find interesting features imprinted on the matter power spectrum P(k): power is suppressed at large scales indicating the possibility of primordial voids competing with the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Furthermore, power is enhanced at structure and substructure scales, k{approx_equal}10{sup -2-0}h Mpc{sup -1}. Our smoking gun for discriminating this proposal from others with similar CMB and LSS predictions comes from correlations between cosmic shear and temperature anisotropies, which here indicate a noninflationary channel of contribution to LSS, with unique ringing features of nonlocal entanglement displayed at structure and substructure scales.

  7. Novel calibration system with sparse wires for CMB polarization receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, O.; Nguyen, H.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. /Chicago U., KICP

    2011-07-01

    B-modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. To achieve better sensitivity to this faint signal, CMB polarization experiments aim to maximize the number of detector elements, resulting in a large focal plane receiver. Detector calibration of the polarization response becomes essential. It is extremely useful to be able to calibrate 'simultaneously' all detectors on the large focal plane. We developed a novel calibration system that rotates a large 'sparse' grid of metal wires, in front of and fully covering the field of view of the focal plane receiver. Polarized radiation is created via the reflection of ambient temperature from the wire surface. Since the detector has a finite beam size, the observed signal is smeared according to the beam property. The resulting smeared polarized radiation has a reasonable intensity (a few Kelvin or less) compared to the sky temperature ({approx}10 K observing condition). The system played a successful role for receiver calibration of QUIET, a CMB polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The successful performance revealed that this system is applicable to other experiments based on different technologies, e.g. TES bolometers.

  8. The binned bispectrum estimator: template-based and non-parametric CMB non-Gaussianity searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin; Racine, Benjamin; van Tent, Bartjan

    2016-05-01

    We describe the details of the binned bispectrum estimator as used for the official 2013 and 2015 analyses of the temperature and polarization CMB maps from the ESA Planck satellite. The defining aspect of this estimator is the determination of a map bispectrum (3-point correlation function) that has been binned in harmonic space. For a parametric determination of the non-Gaussianity in the map (the so-called fNL parameters), one takes the inner product of this binned bispectrum with theoretically motivated templates. However, as a complementary approach one can also smooth the binned bispectrum using a variable smoothing scale in order to suppress noise and make coherent features stand out above the noise. This allows one to look in a model-independent way for any statistically significant bispectral signal. This approach is useful for characterizing the bispectral shape of the galactic foreground emission, for which a theoretical prediction of the bispectral anisotropy is lacking, and for detecting a serendipitous primordial signal, for which a theoretical template has not yet been put forth. Both the template-based and the non-parametric approaches are described in this paper.

  9. A FOREGROUND-CLEANED COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND MAP FROM NON-GAUSSIANITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Rajib

    2011-10-01

    In this Letter, we present a new method to estimate a foreground-cleaned cosmic microwave background (CMB) map at a resolution of 1{sup 0} by minimizing the non-Gaussian properties of the cleaned map which arise dominantly due to diffuse foreground emission components from the Milky Way. We employ simple kurtosis statistic as the measure of non-Gaussian properties and perform a linear combination of five frequency maps provided by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) in its seven-year data release in such a way that the cleaned map has a minimum kurtosis which leads to a non-Gaussianity-minimized, foreground-cleaned CMB map. We validate the method by performing Monte Carlo simulations. To minimize any residual foreground contamination from the cleaned map we flag out the region near the galactic plane based upon results from simulations. Outside the masked region our new estimate of the CMB map matches well with the WMAP's Internal Linear Combination (ILC) map. A simple pseudo-C{sub l} -based CMB TT power spectrum derived from the non-Gaussianity minimized map reproduces the earlier results of WMAP's power spectrum. An important advantage of the method is that it does not introduce any negative bias in angular power spectrum in the low multipole regime, unlike usual ILC method. Comparing our results with the previously published results we argue that CMB results are robust with respect to specific foreground removal algorithms employed.

  10. Breaking CMB degeneracy in dark energy through LSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale structure (LSS) are complementary probes in the investigatation of the early and late time Universe. After the current accomplishment of the high accuracies of CMB measurements, accompanying precision cosmology from LSS data is emphasized. We investigate the dynamical dark energy (DE) models which can produce the same CMB angular power spectra as that of the Λ CDM model with less than a sub-percent level accuracy. If one adopts the dynamical DE models using the so-called Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parametrization, ω equiv ω 0 + ω a(1-a), then one obtains models (ω 0,ω a) = (-0.8,-0.767),(-0.9,-0.375), (-1.1,0.355), (-1.2,0.688) named M8, M9, M11, and M12, respectively. The differences of the growth rate, f, which is related to the redshift-space distortions (RSD) between different DE models and the Λ CDM model are about 0.2 % only at z = 0. The difference of f between M8 (M9, M11, M12) and the Λ CDM model becomes maximum at z ˜eq 0.25 with -2.4 (-1.2, 1.2, 2.5) %. This is a scale-independent quantity. One can investigate the one-loop correction of the matter power spectrum of each model using the standard perturbation theory in order to probe the scale-dependent quantity in the quasi-linear regime (i.e. k le 0.4 {h^{-1} Mpc}). The differences in the matter power spectra including the one-loop correction between M8 (M9, M11, M12) and the Λ CDM model for the k= 0.4 {h^{-1} Mpc} scale are 1.8 (0.9, 1.2, 3.0) % at z=0, 3.0 (1.6, 1.9, 4.2) % at z=0.5, and 3.2 (1.7, 2.0, 4.5) % at z=1.0. The larger departure from -1 of ω 0, the larger the difference in the power spectrum. Thus, one should use both the RSD and the quasi-linear observable in order to discriminate a viable DE model among a slew of the models which are degenerate in CMB. Also we obtain the lower limit on ω 0> -1.5 from the CMB acoustic peaks and this will provide a useful limitation on phantom models.

  11. Re-evaluation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, R.

    2009-12-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) has an almost perfect black-body spectrum, with polarization. These characteristics are inconsistent with the Standard Big Bang (SBB) model. An almost perfect spectrum can arise only from a surface of last scattering which is an almost perfect black-body. Thermodynamically, this is matter in thermal equilibrium, absorbing almost 100% of incident radiation and re-emitting it as black-body radiation. By definition, a perfect black-body is matter at zero kelvin, and cold matter better approaches this perfection. SBB theory describes the CMB as originating from a hydrogen-helium plasma, condensing at a temperature of about 3,000 K. Such a surface would exhibit a continuous radiation spectrum, not unlike that of the sun, which is shown to have a spectrum similar, but not identical to, a black-body spectrum. An imperfect spectrum, even stretched 1100 fold as in the SBB model, remains an imperfect spectrum. Also, a plasma would not support the orientation required to impart polarization to the CMB. A better explanation of the observational evidence is possible if one views the observable universe as part of, and originating from, a much larger structure. Here we propose a defined physical description for such a model. It is shown how a "cosmic fabric" of spin-oriented atomic hydrogen, at zero kelvin, surrounding a matter-depletion zone and the observable universe, would produce the CMB observations. The cosmic fabric would be a perfect black-body and subsequently re-emit an almost perfect black-body spectrum. The radiation would be almost perfectly isotropic, imposed by the spherical distribution of the surface of last scattering, and spin-oriented hydrogen would impart the observed polarization. This geometry also obviates the so-called "horizon problem" of the SBB, why the CMB radiation is essentially isotropic when coming from points of origin with no apparent causal contact. This problem was supposedly "solved" with the

  12. Light WIMPs, equivalent neutrinos, BBN, and the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary; Nollett, Kenneth M.

    Recent updates to the observational determinations of the primordial abundances of helium (4He) and deuterium are compared to the predictions of BBN to infer the universal ratio of baryons to photons, eta 10 equiv 1010(n_B/ngamma )0 (or, the present Universe baryon mass density parameter, {Ω_B h^{2} = eta 10/273.9) as well as to constrain the effective number of neutrinos ({N_eff) and the number of equivalent neutrinos ({ΔN_ν}). These BBN results are compared to those derived independently from the Planck CMB data. In the absence of a light WIMP ({m_χ} ⪆ 20 MeV), {N_eff = 3.05(1 + ensuremath {DeltaN_ nu }/3). In this case, there is excellent agreement between BBN and the CMB but, the joint fit reveals that {ΔN_ν} = 0.40±0.17, disfavoring standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN) ({ΔN_ν} = 0) at ˜ 2.4 sigma , as well as a sterile neutrino ({ΔN_ν} = 1) at ˜ 3.5 sigma . In the presence of a light WIMP ({m_χ} ⪉ 20 MeV), the relation between {N_eff and {ΔN_&nu}; depends on the WIMP mass, leading to degeneracies among {N_eff, {ΔN_ν}, and {m_χ}. The complementary and independent BBN and CMB data can break some of these degeneracies. Depending on the nature of the light WIMP (Majorana or Dirac fermion, real or complex scalar) the joint BBN + CMB analyses set a lower bound to {m_χ} in the range 0.5 - 5 MeV (mchi /me ⪆ 1 - 10) and, they identify best fit values for {m_χ} in the range 5 - 10 MeV. The joint BBN + CMB analyses find a best fit value for the number of equivalent neutrinos, {ΔN_ν} ≈ 0.65, nearly independent of the nature of the WIMP. The best fit still disfavors the absence of dark radiation ({ΔN_ν} = 0 at ˜ 95% confidence), while allowing for the presence of a sterile neutrino ({ΔN_ν} = 1 at ⪉ 1 sigma ). For all cases considered here, the lithium problem persists. These results, presented at the Rencontres de l'Observatoire de Paris 2013 - ESO Workshop and summarized in these proceedings, are based on \\citet{kngs}.

  13. BBN and the CMB constrain neutrino coupled light WIMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollett, Kenneth M.; Steigman, Gary

    2015-04-01

    In the presence of a light weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) with mass mχ≲30 MeV , there are degeneracies among the nature of the WIMP (fermion or boson), its couplings to the standard model particles (to electrons, positrons, and photons, or only to neutrinos), its mass mχ, and the number of equivalent (additional) neutrinos, Δ Nν. These degeneracies cannot be broken by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraint on the effective number of neutrinos, Neff. However, since big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is also affected by the presence of a light WIMP and equivalent neutrinos, complementary BBN and CMB constraints can help to break some of these degeneracies. In a previous paper [K. M. Nollett and G. Steigman, Phys. Rev. D 89, 083508 (2014)] the combined BBN and Planck [P. A. R. Ade et al. (Planck Collaboration), Astron. Astrophys. 571, A16 (2014)] CMB constraints were used to explore the allowed ranges for mχ, Δ Nν, and Neff in the case where the light WIMPs annihilate electromagnetically (EM) to photons and/or e± pairs. In this paper the BBN predictions for the primordial abundances of deuterium and 4He (along with 3He and 7Li) in the presence of a light WIMP that only couples (annihilates) to neutrinos [either standard model (SM) only or both SM and equivalent] are calculated. Recent observational estimates of the relic abundances of D and 4He are used to limit the light WIMP mass, the number of equivalent neutrinos, the effective number of neutrinos, and the present Universe baryon density (ΩBh2 ). Allowing for a neutrino coupled light WIMP and Δ Nν equivalent neutrinos, the combined BBN and CMB data provide lower limits to the WIMP mass that depend very little on the nature of the WIMP (Majorana or Dirac fermion, real or complex scalar boson), with a best fit mχ≳35 MeV , equivalent to no light WIMP at all. The analysis here excludes all neutrino coupled WIMPs with masses below a few MeV, with specific limits varying from 4 to 9 Me

  14. Angular power spectrum of the FastICA CMB component from BEAST data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, Simona

    We present the angular power spectrum of the CMB component extracted with FASTICA from the data of the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST), operating in Q two input channels FASTICA returns two possible independent components. We found that one of them has an unphysical spectral behaviour, due to the poor S/N ratio, while the other is a reasonable CMB component. After a detailed calibration procedure based on Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations we extracted the angular power spectrum for the identified CMB component and found a very good agreement with the already published BEAST CMB angular power spectrum

  15. Mapping and validation of Yr48 and other QTL conferring partial resistance to broadly virulent post-2000 North American races of stripe rust in hexaploid wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mapping population of 188 recombinant inbred lines developed from a cross between UC1110, an adapted California spring wheat, and PI610750, a synthetic derivative from CIMMYT's wide-cross program, was evaluated for its response to current California races of stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f.sp....

  16. Quantifying Tensions between CMB and Distance Datasets in Models with Free Curvature or Lensing Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandis, S.; Rapetti, D.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Dietrich, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) by the Planck Collaboration have produced arguably the most powerful observational evidence in support of the standard model of cosmology, i.e. the spatially flat ΛCDM paradigm. In this work, we perform model selection tests to examine whether the base CMB temperature and large scale polarization anisotropy data from Planck 2015 (P15) prefer any of eight commonly used one-parameter model extensions with respect to flat ΛCDM. We find a clear preference for models with free curvature, ΩK, or free amplitude of the CMB lensing potential, AL. We also further develop statistical tools to measure tension between datasets. We use a Gaussianization scheme to compute tensions directly from the posterior samples using an entropy-based method, the surprise, as well as a calibrated evidence ratio presented here for the first time. We then proceed to investigate the consistency between the base P15 CMB data and six other CMB and distance datasets. In flat ΛCDM we find a 4.8σ tension between the base P15 CMB data and a distance ladder measurement, whereas the former are consistent with the other datasets. In the curved ΛCDM model we find significant tensions in most of the cases, arising from the well-known low power of the low-ℓ multipoles of the CMB data. In the flat ΛCDM+AL model, however, all datasets are consistent with the base P15 CMB observations except for the CMB lensing measurement, which remains in significant tension. This tension is driven by the increased power of the CMB lensing potential derived from the base P15 CMB constraints in both models, pointing at either potentially unresolved systematic effects or the need for new physics beyond the standard flat ΛCDM model.

  17. Anisotropic CMB distortions from non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Atsuhisa; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Tada, Yuichiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2015-03-01

    We calculate the CMB μ-distortion, langleμrangle, and the angular power spectrum of its cross-correlation with the temperature anisotropy, langleμTrangle, in the presence of the non-Gaussian neutrino isocurvature density (NID) mode. While the pure Gaussian NID perturbations give merely subdominant contributions to langleμrangle and do not create langleμTrangle, we show large langleμTrangle can be realized in case where, especially, the NID perturbations 𝒮(x) are proportional to the square of a Gaussian field g(x), i.e. 𝒮(x)propto g2(x). Such Gaussian-squared perturbations contribute to not only the power spectrum, but also the bispectrum of CMB anisotropies. The constraints from the power spectrum is given by 𝒫𝒮𝒮(k0)~𝒫g2(k0)lesssim10-10 at k0=0.05 Mpc-1. We also forecast constraints from the CMB temperature and E-mode polarisation bispectra, and show that 𝒫g(k0)lesssim10-5 would be allowed from the Planck data. We find that langleμrangle and |l(l+1)CμTl| can respectively be as large as 10-9 and 10-14 with uncorrelated scale-invariant NID perturbations for 𝒫g(k0)=10-5. When the spectrum of the Gaussian field is blue-tilted (with spectral index ngsimeq1.5), langleμTrangle can be enhanced by an order of magnitude.

  18. Measurement of the CMB Polarization at 95 GHz from QUIET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buder, Immanuel

    2012-09-01

    (Abridged) Despite the great success of precision cosmology, cosmologists cannot fully explain the initial conditions of the Universe. Inflation, an exponential expansion in the first 10^-36s, is a promising potential explanation. A generic prediction of inflation is odd-parity (B-mode) polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) aimed to limit or detect this polarization. We built a coherent pseudo-correlation microwave polarimeter. An array of mass-produced modules populated the focal plane of a 1.4m telescope. Each module had a sensitivity to polarization of 756muK sqrt{s} with a bandwidth of 10.7+/-1.1 GHz centered at 94.5+/-0.8 GHz; the combined sensitivity was 87+/-7muK sqrt{s}. We incorporated deck rotation, an absorbing ground screen, a new time-stream double-demodulation technique, and optimized optics into the design to reduce instrumental polarization. We observed with this instrument at the Atacama Plateau in Chile between August 2009 and December 2010. We collected 5336.9 hours of CMB observation and 1090 hours of astronomical calibration. This thesis describes the analysis and results of these data. We characterized the instrument using the astronomical calibration data as well as purpose-built artificial sources. We developed noise modeling, filtering, and data selection following a blind-analysis strategy. Central to this strategy was a suite of 32 null tests, each motivated by a possible instrumental problem or systematic effect. We also evaluated the systematic errors in the blind stage of the analysis before the result was known. We then calculated the CMB power spectra using a pseudo-Cl cross-correlation technique that suppressed contamination and made the result insensitive to noise bias.

  19. CMB quenching of high-redshift radio-loud AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Haardt, F.; Ciardi, B.; Sbarrato, T.; Gallo, E.; Tavecchio, F.; Celotti, A.

    2015-10-01

    The very existence of more than a dozen of high-redshift (z ≳ 4) blazars indicates that a much larger population of misaligned powerful jetted active galactic nucleus (AGN) was already in place when the Universe was ≲1.5 Gyr old. Such parent population proved to be very elusive, and escaped direct detection in radio surveys so far. High-redshift blazars themselves seem to be failing in producing extended radio lobes, raising questions about the connection between such class and the vaster population of radio galaxies. We show that the interaction of the jet electrons with the intense cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation explains the lack of extended radio emission in high-redshift blazars and in their parent population, helping to explain the apparently missing misaligned counterparts of high-redshift blazars. On the other hand, the emission from the more compact and more magnetized hotspots are less affected by the enhanced CMB energy density. By modelling the spectral energy distribution of blazar lobes and hotspots, we find that most of them should be detectable by low-frequency deep radio observations, e.g. by LOw-Frequency ARray for radio astronomy and by relatively deep X-ray observations with good angular resolution, e.g. by the Chandra satellite. At high redshifts, the emission of a misaligned relativistic jet, being debeamed, is missed by current large sky area surveys. The isotropic flux produced in the hotspots can be below ˜1 mJy and the isotropic lobe radio emission is quenched by the CMB cooling. Consequently, even sources with very powerful jets can go undetected in current radio surveys, and misclassified as radio-quiet AGNs.

  20. Foreground-induced biases in CMB polarimeter self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Hill, James; Johnson, Bradley

    2016-06-01

    Precise polarization measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) require accurate knowledge of the instrument orientation relative to the sky frame used to define the cosmological Stokes parameters. Suitable celestial calibration sources that could be used to measure the polarimeter orientation angle are limited, so current experiments commonly `self-calibrate.' The self-calibration method exploits the theoretical fact that the EB and TB cross-spectra of the CMB vanish in the standard cosmological model, so any detected EB and TB signals must be due to systematic errors. However, this assumption neglects the fact that polarized Galactic foregrounds in a given portion of the sky may have non-zero EB and TB cross-spectra. If these foreground signals remain in the observations, then they will bias the self-calibrated telescope polarization angle and produce a spurious B-mode signal. In this paper, we estimate the foreground-induced bias for various instrument configurations and then expand the self-calibration formalism to account for polarized foreground signals. Assuming the EB correlation signal for dust is in the range constrained by angular power spectrum measurements from Planck at 353 GHz (scaled down to 150 GHz), then the bias is negligible for high angular resolution experiments, which have access to CMB-dominated high 'ell' modes with which to self-calibrate. Low-resolution experiments observing particularly dusty sky patches can have a bias as large as 0.5°. A miscalibration of this magnitude generates a spurious BB signal corresponding to a tensor-to-scalar ratio of approximately r ~ 2 × 10-3, within the targeted range of planned experiments.

  1. Quantifying Discordance in the 2015 Planck CMB Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, G. E.; Huang, Y.; Watts, D. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Halpern, M.; Hinshaw, G.; Weiland, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the internal consistency of the Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropy power spectrum. We show that tension exists between cosmological constant cold dark matter ({{Λ }}{CDM}) model parameters inferred from multipoles {\\ell }\\lt 1000 (roughly those accessible to Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe), and from {\\ell }≥slant 1000, particularly the CDM density, {{{Ω }}}c{h}2, which is discrepant at 2.5σ for a Planck -motivated prior on the optical depth, τ =0.07+/- 0.02. We find some parameter tensions to be larger than previously reported because of inaccuracy in the code used by the Planck Collaboration to generate model spectra. The Planck {\\ell }≥slant 1000 constraints are also in tension with low-redshift data sets, including Planck ’s own measurement of the CMB lensing power spectrum (2.4σ ), and the most precise baryon acoustic oscillation scale determination (2.5σ ). The Hubble constant predicted by Planck from {\\ell }≥slant 1000, {H}0=64.1+/- 1.7 km s{}-1 Mpc-1, disagrees with the most precise local distance ladder measurement of 73.0+/- 2.4 km s{}-1 Mpc-1 at the 3.0σ level, while the Planck value from {\\ell }\\lt 1000, 69.7+/- 1.7 km s{}-1 Mpc-1, is consistent within 1σ . A discrepancy between the Planck and South Pole Telescope high-multipole CMB spectra disfavors interpreting these tensions as evidence for new physics. We conclude that the parameters from the Planck high-multipole spectrum probably differ from the underlying values due to either an unlikely statistical fluctuation or unaccounted-for systematics persisting in the Planck data.

  2. Foreground-induced biases in CMB polarimeter self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Hill, J. Colin; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2016-04-01

    Precise polarization measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) require accurate knowledge of the instrument orientation relative to the sky frame used to define the cosmological Stokes parameters. Suitable celestial calibration sources that could be used to measure the polarimeter orientation angle are limited, so current experiments commonly `self-calibrate.' The self-calibration method exploits the theoretical fact that the EB and TB cross-spectra of the CMB vanish in the standard cosmological model, so any detected EB and TB signals must be due to systematic errors. However, this assumption neglects the fact that polarized Galactic foregrounds in a given portion of the sky may have non-zero EB and TB cross-spectra. If these foreground signals remain in the observations, then they will bias the self-calibrated telescope polarization angle and produce a spurious B-mode signal. In this paper, we estimate the foreground-induced bias for various instrument configurations and then expand the self-calibration formalism to account for polarized foreground signals. Assuming the EB correlation signal for dust is in the range constrained by angular power spectrum measurements from Planck at 353 GHz (scaled down to 150 GHz), then the bias is negligible for high angular resolution experiments, which have access to CMB-dominated high ℓ modes with which to self-calibrate. Low-resolution experiments observing particularly dusty sky patches can have a bias as large as 0.5°. A miscalibration of this magnitude generates a spurious BB signal corresponding to a tensor-to-scalar ratio of approximately r ˜ 2 × 10-3, within the targeted range of planned experiments.

  3. CMB constraint on non-Gaussianity in isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Hikage, Chiaki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2013-07-01

    We study the CMB constraints on non-Gaussianity in CDM isocurvature perturbations. Non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations can be produced in various models at the very early stage of the Universe. Since the isocurvature perturbations little affect the structure formation at late times, CMB is the best probe of isocurvature non-Gaussianity at least in the near future. In this paper, we focus on non-Gaussian curvature and isocurvature perturbations of the local-type, which are uncorrelated and in the form ζ = ζ{sub G}+(3/5)f{sub NL}(ζ{sub G}{sup 2}−(ζ{sub G}{sup 2})) and S = S{sub G}+f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}(S{sub G}−(S{sub G}{sup 2})), and constrain the non-linearity parameter of isocurvature perturbations, f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}, as well as the curvature one f{sub NL}. For this purpose, we employ several state-of-art techniques for the analysis of CMB data and simulation. Assuming that isocurvature perturbations are subdominant, we apply our method to the WMAP 7-year data of temperature anisotropy and obtain constraints on a combination α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}, where α is the ratio of the power spectrum of isocurvature perturbations to that of the adiabatic ones. When the adiabatic perturbations are assumed to be Gaussian, we obtained a constraint α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)} = 40±66 assuming the power spectrum of isocurvature perturbations is scale-invariant. When we assume that the adiabatic perturbations can also be non-Gaussian, we obtain f{sub NL} = 38±24 and α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)} = −8±72. We also discuss implications of our results for the axion CDM isocurvature model.

  4. EBEX: A Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Daniel; Aboobaker, A. M.; Ade, P.; Aubin, F.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bandura, K.; Bao, C.; Borrill, J.; Didier, J.; Dobbs, M.; Gold, B.; Grain, J.; Grainger, W.; Hanany, S.; Helson, K.; Hillbrand, S. N.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, H.; Irwin, K.; Johnson, B.; Jaffe, A.; Jones, T. J.; Kisner, T.; Klein, J.; Korotkov, A.; Leach, S.; Lee, A. T.; Levinson, L.; Limon, M.; MacDermid, K.; Miller, A. D.; Milligan, M.; Pascale, E.; Raach, K.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, B.; Sagiv, I.; Smecher, G.; Stompor, R.; Tristram, M.; Tucker, G. S.; Westbrook, B.; Zilic, K.

    2014-01-01

    The E and B Experiment (EBEX) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the CMB resulting from primordial gravitational waves, gravitational lensing, and Galactic dust emission. EBEX is the first balloon-borne astrophysical polarimeter to use a continuously rotating achromatic half-wave plate on a superconducting magnetic bearing and over 1000 transition edge sensor bolometers read out with SQUID amplifiers. The instrument completed an 11 day flight over Antarctica in January 2013 and data analysis is underway. We will provide an overview of the experiment and the Antarctic flight, and give an update on the analysis.

  5. Planck Visualization Project: Seeing and Hearing the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Veen, Jatila; Lubin, P. M.; 2; Alper, B.; 3; Smith, W.; 4; McGee, R.; 5; US Planck Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The Planck Education and Public Outreach collaborators at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Purdue University have prepared a variety of materials to present the science goals of the Planck Mission to the public. Here we present our interactive simulation of the Cosmic Microwave Background, in which the user can change the ingredients of the universe and hear the different harmonics. We also present how we derive information about the early universe from the power spectrum of the CMB by using the physics of music for the public.

  6. Inflation in de Sitter spacetime and CMB large scale anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dong; Li, Ming-Hua; Wang, Ping; Chang, Zhe

    2015-09-01

    The influence of cosmological constant-type dark energy in the early universe is investigated. This is accommodated by a new dispersion relation in de Sitter spacetime. We perform a global fit to explore the cosmological parameter space by using the CosmoMC package with the recently released Planck TT and WMAP polarization datasets. Using the results from the global fit, we compute a new CMB temperature-temperature (TT) spectrum. The obtained TT spectrum has lower power compared with that based on the ACDM model at large scales. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375203)

  7. Cosmological implications of the CMB large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Melia, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck may have uncovered several anomalies in the full cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky that could indicate possible new physics driving the growth of density fluctuations in the early universe. These include an unusually low power at the largest scales and an apparent alignment of the quadrupole and octopole moments. In a ΛCDM model where the CMB is described by a Gaussian Random Field, the quadrupole and octopole moments should be statistically independent. The emergence of these low probability features may simply be due to posterior selections from many such possible effects, whose occurrence would therefore not be as unlikely as one might naively infer. If this is not the case, however, and if these features are not due to effects such as foreground contamination, their combined statistical significance would be equal to the product of their individual significances. In the absence of such extraneous factors, and ignoring the biasing due to posterior selection, the missing large-angle correlations would have a probability as low as ∼0.1% and the low-l multipole alignment would be unlikely at the ∼4.9% level; under the least favorable conditions, their simultaneous observation in the context of the standard model could then be likely at only the ∼0.005% level. In this paper, we explore the possibility that these features are indeed anomalous, and show that the corresponding probability of CMB multipole alignment in the R{sub h}=ct universe would then be ∼7–10%, depending on the number of large-scale Sachs–Wolfe induced fluctuations. Since the low power at the largest spatial scales is reproduced in this cosmology without the need to invoke cosmic variance, the overall likelihood of observing both of these features in the CMB is ⩾7%, much more likely than in ΛCDM, if the anomalies are real. The key physical ingredient responsible for this difference is the existence in the former of a

  8. The BICEP/Keck CMB polarization program: Status and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Bryan

    2016-06-01

    The BICEP/Keck program is searching for the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background polarization with 5000 detectors in sub 1-m aperture telescopes observing at 95, 150 and 220GHz. Combining BICEP/Keck data with Planck polarization data, we constrain the tensor to scalar ratio (r) to be less than 0.09 at 95% confidence, for the first time exceeding the strength of the constraint from CMB temperature data. In this talk we report on this result, along with the quality of polarized 220GHz observations at the South Pole and the deployment of the BICEP-3 camera.

  9. Cosmological Implications of the CMB Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck may have uncovered several anomalies in the full cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky that could indicate possible new physics driving the growth of density fluctuations in the early universe. These include an unusually low power at the largest scales and an apparent alignment of the quadrupole and octopole moments. In a ΛCDM model where the CMB is described by a Gaussian Random Field, the quadrupole and octopole moments should be statistically independent. The emergence of these low probability features may simply be due to posterior selections from many such possible effects, whose occurrence would therefore not be as unlikely as one might naively infer. If this is not the case, however, and if these features are not due to effects such as foreground contamination, their combined statistical significance would be equal to the product of their individual significances. In the absence of such extraneous factors, and ignoring the biasing due to posterior selection, the missing large-angle correlations would have a probability as low as ˜0.1% and the low-l multipole alignment would be unlikely at the ˜4.9% level; under the least favorable conditions, their simultaneous observation in the context of the standard model could then be likely at only the ˜0.005% level. In this paper, we explore the possibility that these features are indeed anomalous, and show that the corresponding probability of CMB multipole alignment in the {{R}h}=ct universe would then be ˜7-10%, depending on the number of large-scale Sachs-Wolfe induced fluctuations. Since the low power at the largest spatial scales is reproduced in this cosmology without the need to invoke cosmic variance, the overall likelihood of observing both of these features in the CMB is ≥slant 7%, much more likely than in ΛCDM, if the anomalies are real. The key physical ingredient responsible for this difference is the existence in the former of a maximum

  10. CMB lensing bispectrum from nonlinear growth of the large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2016-06-01

    We discuss detectability of the nonlinear growth of the large-scale structure in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing. The lensing signals involved in the CMB fluctuations have been measured from multiple CMB experiments, such as Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), Planck, POLARBEAR, and South Pole Telescope (SPT). The reconstructed CMB lensing signals are useful to constrain cosmology via their angular power spectrum, while detectability and cosmological application of their bispectrum induced by the nonlinear evolution are not well studied. Extending the analytic estimate of the galaxy lensing bispectrum presented by Takada and Jain (2004) to the CMB case, we show that even near term CMB experiments such as Advanced ACT, Simons Array and SPT3G could detect the CMB lensing bispectrum induced by the nonlinear growth of the large-scale structure. In the case of the CMB Stage-IV, we find that the lensing bispectrum is detectable at ≳50 σ statistical significance. This precisely measured lensing bispectrum has rich cosmological information, and could be used to constrain cosmology, e.g., the sum of the neutrino masses and the dark-energy properties.

  11. Lensing as a probe of early universe: from CMB to galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Farbod; Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2016-05-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation lensing is a promising tool to study the physics of early universe. In this work we probe the imprints of deviations from isotropy and scale invariance of primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum on CMB lensing potential and convergence. Specifically, we consider a scale-dependent hemispherical asymmetry in primordial power spectrum. We show that the CMB lensing potential and convergence and also the cross-correlation of the CMB lensing and late time galaxy convergence can probe the amplitude and the scale dependence of the dipole modulation. As another example, we consider a primordial power spectrum with local feature. We show that the CMB lensing and the cross-correlation of the CMB lensing and galaxy lensing can probe the amplitude and the shape of the local feature. We show that the cross correlation of CMB lensing convergence and galaxy lensing is capable to probe the effects of local features in power spectrum on smaller scales than the CMB lensing. Finally we showed that the current data can constrain the amplitude and moment dependence of dipole asymmetry.

  12. Efficient decomposition of cosmic microwave background polarization maps into pure E, pure B, and ambiguous components

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Emory F.

    2011-04-15

    Separation of the B component of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization map from the much larger E component is an essential step in CMB polarimetry. For a map with incomplete sky coverage, this separation is necessarily hampered by the presence of ambiguous modes which could be either E or B modes. I present an efficient pixel-space algorithm for removing the ambiguous modes and separating the map into pure E and B components. The method, which works for arbitrary geometries, does not involve generating a complete basis of such modes and scales the cube of the number of pixels on the boundary of the map.

  13. Foreground removal from Planck Sky Model temperature maps using a MLP neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Hebert, K.

    2009-08-01

    Unfortunately, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is contaminated by emission originating in the Milky Way (synchrotron, free-free and dust emission). Since the cosmological information is statistically in nature, it is essential to remove this foreground emission and leave the CMB with no systematic errors. To demonstrate the feasibility of a simple multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network for extracting the CMB temperature signal, we have analyzed a specific data set, namely the Planck Sky Model maps, developed for evaluation of different component separation methods before including them in the Planck data analysis pipeline. It is found that a MLP neural network can provide a CMB map of about 80 % of the sky to a very high degree uncorrelated with the foreground components. Also the derived power spectrum shows little evidence for systematic errors.

  14. Impact of post-Born lensing on the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratten, Geraint; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Lensing of the CMB is affected by post-Born lensing, producing corrections to the convergence power spectrum and introducing field rotation. We show numerically that the lensing convergence power spectrum is affected at the lesssim 0.2% level on accessible scales, and that this correction and the field rotation are negligible for observations with arcminute beam and noise levels gtrsim 1 μK arcmin. The field rotation generates ~ 2.5% of the total lensing B-mode polarization amplitude (0.2% in power on small scales), but has a blue spectrum on large scales, making it highly subdominant to the convergence B modes on scales where they are a source of confusion for the signal from primordial gravitational waves. Since the post-Born signal is non-linear, it also generates a bispectrum with the convergence. We show that the post-Born contributions to the bispectrum substantially change the shape predicted from large-scale structure non-linearities alone, and hence must be included to estimate the expected total signal and impact of bispectrum biases on CMB lensing reconstruction quadratic estimators and other observables. The field-rotation power spectrum only becomes potentially detectable for noise levels ll 1 μK arcmin, but its bispectrum with the convergence may be observable at ~ 3σ with Stage IV observations. Rotation-induced and convergence-induced B modes are slightly correlated by the bispectrum, and the bispectrum also produces additional contributions to the lensed BB power spectrum.

  15. Conformal invariance, dynamical dark energy and the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at cosmological distance scales. These effects arise from conformal scalar degrees of freedom in the extended Effective Field Theory (EFT) of gravity required by the trace anomaly of the quantum stress tensor in curved space. Scalar degrees of freedom in cosmology arise naturally from the effective action of the trace anomaly in the Standard Model, without the ad hoc introduction of an inflaton field. In the EFT including the trace anomaly terms, {Lambda}{sub eff} becomes dynamical and potentially dependent upon both space and time. The fluctuations of these anomaly scalars may also influence the spectrum and statistics of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Under the hypothesis that scale invariance should be promoted to full conformal invariance, an hypothesis supported by the embedding of the conformal group of three dimensional flat sections in de Sitter space, the form of the CMB bi-spectrum can be fixed, and the tri-spectrum constrained. The angular spectra predicted by conformal invariance differ from those suggested by simple models of inflation.

  16. Parity violation in the CMB bispectrum by a rolling pseudoscalar

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Saga, Shohei E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it

    2013-11-01

    We investigate parity-violating signatures of temperature and polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in an inflationary model where a rolling pseudoscalar produces large equilateral tensor non-Gaussianity. By a concrete computation based on full-sky formalism, it is shown that resultant CMB bispectra have nonzero signals in both parity-even (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = even) and parity-odd (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = odd) spaces, and are almost uncorrelated with usual scalar-mode equilateral bispectra. These characteristic signatures and polarization information help to detect such tensor non-Gaussianity. Use of both temperature and E-mode bispectra potentially improves of 400% the detectability with respect to an analysis with temperature bispectrum alone. Considering B-mode bispectrum, the signal-to-noise ratio may be able to increase by 3 orders of magnitude. We present the 1σ uncertainties of a parameter depending on a coupling constant and a rolling condition for the pseudoscalar expected in the Planck and the proposed PRISM experiments.

  17. CMB Science: Opportunities for a Cryogenic Filter-Bank Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartari, A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Piat, M.; Prêle, D.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral science is experiencing a renewed interest after the impressive result of COBE-FIRAS in the early Nineties. In 2011, the PIXIE proposal contributed to reopen the prospect of measuring deviations from a perfect 2.725 K planckian spectrum. Both COBE-FIRAS and PIXIE are differential Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSes) capable to operate in the null condition across ˜ 2 frequency decades (in the case of PIXIE, the frequency span is 30 GHz-6 THz). We discuss a complementary strategy to observe CMB spectral distortions at frequencies lower than 250 GHz, down to the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the spectrum. The throughput advantage that makes the FTS capable of achieving exquisite sensitivity via multimode operation becomes limited at lower frequencies. We demonstrate that an array of 100 cryogenic planar filter-bank spectrometers coupled to single mode antennas, on a purely statistical ground, can perform better than an FTS between tens of GHz and 200 GHz (a relevant frequency window for cosmology) in the hypothesis that (1) both instruments have the same frequency resolution and (2) both instruments are operated at the photon noise limit (with the FTS frequency band extending from ˜ tens of GHz up to 1 THz). We discuss possible limitations of these hypotheses, and the constraints that have to be fulfilled (mainly in terms of efficiency) in order to operate a cryogenic filter-bank spectrometer close to its ultimate sensitivity limit.

  18. How well can future CMB missions constrain cosmic inflation?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2014-10-01

    We study how the next generation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurement missions (such as EPIC, LiteBIRD, PRISM and COrE) will be able to constrain the inflationary landscape in the hardest to disambiguate situation in which inflation is simply described by single-field slow-roll scenarios. Considering the proposed PRISM and LiteBIRD satellite designs, we simulate mock data corresponding to five different fiducial models having values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ranging from 10{sup -1} down to 10{sup -7}. We then compute the Bayesian evidences and complexities of all Encyclopædia Inflationaris models in order to assess the constraining power of PRISM alone and LiteBIRD complemented with the Planck 2013 data. Within slow-roll inflation, both designs have comparable constraining power and can rule out about three quarters of the inflationary scenarios, compared to one third for Planck 2013 data alone. However, we also show that PRISM can constrain the scalar running and has the capability to detect a violation of slow roll at second order. Finally, our results suggest that describing an inflationary model by its potential shape only, without specifying a reheating temperature, will no longer be possible given the accuracy level reached by the future CMB missions.

  19. Development of 1000 arrays MKID camera for the CMB observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatsu, Kenichi; Naruse, Masato; Nitta, Tom; Sekine, Masakazu; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Noguchi, Takashi; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Kiuchi, Hitoshi

    2012-09-01

    A precise measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provides us a wealth of information about early universe. LiteBIRD is a future satellite mission lead by High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and its scientific target is detection of the B-mode polarization of the CMB, which is a footprint of primordial gravitational waves generated during inflation era, but has not been successfully observed so far due to lack of sensitivity. Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) is one candidate of sensitive millimeterwave camera which will be able to detect the B-mode polarization. We have been developing MKID at National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) in cooperation with KEK and RIKEN for the focal plane detector of the LiteBIRD. The developed technologies are: fabrication process of MKIDs with epitaxially-formed aluminum (Al) on silicon (Si) wafer; optical system of the camera consisting of double-slot antenna with Si lens array; and readout circuit utilizing Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FFTS). With these technologies, we designed a prototype MKIDs camera for the LiteBIRD.

  20. Testable polarization predictions for models of CMB isotropy anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorkin, Cora; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Hu, Wayne

    2008-03-15

    Anomalies in the large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature sky measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe have been suggested as possible evidence for a violation of statistical isotropy on large scales. In any physical model for broken isotropy, there are testable consequences for the CMB polarization field. We develop simulation tools for predicting the polarization field in models that break statistical isotropy locally through a modulation field. We study two different models: dipolar modulation, invoked to explain the asymmetry in power between northern and southern ecliptic hemispheres, and quadrupolar modulation, posited to explain the alignments between the quadrupole and octopole. For the dipolar case, we show that predictions for the correlation between the first 10 multipoles of the temperature and polarization fields can typically be tested at better than the 98% CL. For the quadrupolar case, we show that the polarization quadrupole and octopole should be moderately aligned. Such an alignment is a generic prediction of explanations which involve the temperature field at recombination and thus discriminate against explanations involving foregrounds or local secondary anisotropy. Predicted correlations between temperature and polarization multipoles out to l=5 provide tests at the {approx}99% CL or stronger for quadrupolar models that make the temperature alignment more than a few percent likely. As predictions of anomaly models, polarization statistics move beyond the a posteriori inferences that currently dominate the field.

  1. Joint resonant CMB power spectrum and bispectrum estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerburg, P. Daniel; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    We develop the tools necessary to assess the statistical significance of resonant features in the CMB correlation functions, combining power spectrum and bispectrum measurements. This significance is typically addressed by running a large number of simulations to derive the probability density function (PDF) of the feature-amplitude in the Gaussian case. Although these simulations are tractable for the power spectrum, for the bispectrum they require significant computational resources. We show that, by assuming that the PDF is given by a multivariate Gaussian where the covariance is determined by the Fisher matrix of the sine and cosine terms, we can efficiently produce spectra that are statistically close to those derived from full simulations. By drawing a large number of spectra from this PDF, both for the power spectrum and the bispectrum, we can quickly determine the statistical significance of candidate signatures in the CMB, considering both single frequency and multifrequency estimators. We show that for resonance models, cosmology and foreground parameters have little influence on the estimated amplitude, which allows us to simplify the analysis considerably. A more precise likelihood treatment can then be applied to candidate signatures only. We also discuss a modal expansion approach for the power spectrum, aimed at quickly scanning through large families of oscillating models.

  2. An estimator for statistical anisotropy from the CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, N.; Dimastrogiovanni, E.; Matarrese, S.; Liguori, M.; Riotto, A. E-mail: dimastro@pd.infn.it E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2012-01-01

    Various data analyses of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provide observational hints of statistical isotropy breaking. Some of these features can be studied within the framework of primordial vector fields in inflationary theories which generally display some level of statistical anisotropy both in the power spectrum and in higher-order correlation functions. Motivated by these observations and the recent theoretical developments in the study of primordial vector fields, we develop the formalism necessary to extract statistical anisotropy information from the three-point function of the CMB temperature anisotropy. We employ a simplified vector field model and parametrize the bispectrum of curvature fluctuations in such a way that all the information about statistical anisotropy is encoded in some parameters λ{sub LM} (which measure the anisotropic to the isotropic bispectrum amplitudes). For such a template bispectrum, we compute an optimal estimator for λ{sub LM} and the expected signal-to-noise ratio. We estimate that, for f{sub NL} ≅ 30, an experiment like Planck can be sensitive to a ratio of the anisotropic to the isotropic amplitudes of the bispectrum as small as 10%. Our results are complementary to the information coming from a power spectrum analysis and particularly relevant for those models where statistical anisotropy turns out to be suppressed in the power spectrum but not negligible in the bispectrum.

  3. CMB Science: Opportunities for a Cryogenic Filter-Bank Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartari, A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Piat, M.; Prêle, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral science is experiencing a renewed interest after the impressive result of COBE-FIRAS in the early Nineties. In 2011, the PIXIE proposal contributed to reopen the prospect of measuring deviations from a perfect 2.725 K planckian spectrum. Both COBE-FIRAS and PIXIE are differential Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSes) capable to operate in the null condition across ˜ 2 frequency decades (in the case of PIXIE, the frequency span is 30 GHz-6 THz). We discuss a complementary strategy to observe CMB spectral distortions at frequencies lower than 250 GHz, down to the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the spectrum. The throughput advantage that makes the FTS capable of achieving exquisite sensitivity via multimode operation becomes limited at lower frequencies. We demonstrate that an array of 100 cryogenic planar filter-bank spectrometers coupled to single mode antennas, on a purely statistical ground, can perform better than an FTS between tens of GHz and 200 GHz (a relevant frequency window for cosmology) in the hypothesis that (1) both instruments have the same frequency resolution and (2) both instruments are operated at the photon noise limit (with the FTS frequency band extending from ˜ tens of GHz up to 1 THz). We discuss possible limitations of these hypotheses, and the constraints that have to be fulfilled (mainly in terms of efficiency) in order to operate a cryogenic filter-bank spectrometer close to its ultimate sensitivity limit.

  4. Mapping possible non-Gaussianity in the Planck maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernui, A.; Rebouças, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The study of the non-Gaussianity of the temperature fluctuations of cosmic background radiation (CMB) can be used to break the degeneracy between the inflationary models and to test alternative scenarios of the early universe. However, there are several sources of non-Gaussian contaminants in the CMB data, which make a convincing extraction of primordial non-Gaussianity into an ambitious observational and statistical enterprise. It is conceivable that no single statistical estimator can be sensitive to all forms and levels of non-Gaussianity that may be present in observed CMB data. In recent works a statistical procedure based upon the calculation of the skewness and kurtosis of the patches of CMB sky sphere has been proposed and used to find out significant large-angle deviation from Gaussianity in the foreground-reduced WMAP maps. Aims: Here we address the question of how previous recent analyses of Gaussianity of WMAP maps are modified if the nearly full-sky foreground-cleaned Planck maps are used, therefore extending and complementing such an examination in several regards. Methods: Once the foregrounds are cleaned through different component separation procedures, each of the resulting Planck maps is then tested for Gaussianity. We determine quantitatively the effects for Gaussianity when masking the foreground-cleaned Planck maps with the inpmask, valmask, and U73 Planck masks. Results: We show that although the foreground-cleaned Planck maps present significant deviation from Gaussianity of different degrees when the less severe inpmask and valmask are used, they become consistent with Gaussianity as detected by our indicator S when masked with the union U73 mask. A slightly smaller consistency with Gaussianity is found when the K indicator is employed, which seems to be associated with the large-angle anomalies reported by the Planck team. Finally, we examine the robustness of the Gaussianity analyses with respect to the real pixel's noise as

  5. Unveiling hidden black holes in the cosmic web: Dark matter halos of WISE quasars from Planck CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickox, Ryan

    The WISE and Planck surveys have now produced groundbreaking data sets which, in concert, can be exploited to obtain revolutionary constraints on the evolution of structure in the Universe. One particularly powerful application of WISE has been to uncover millions of the previously "hidden" obscured quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes that are shrouded in gas and dust and so are not detectable using traditional ground-based optical and near-IR techniques. Recently, Planck has produced the most precise all-sky map to date of dark matter structures via the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose to combine these data sets to obtain a uniquely powerful measurement of the link between rapidly growing black holes and their host dark matter structures, by cross-correlating the density field of WISE-selected quasars with the CMB lensing convergence maps obtained from Planck. This proposal will build on our current ADAP program (NNX12AE38G), which studies the host dark matter halos of WISE-selected quasars via spatial clustering. NNX12AE38G involves a detailed characterization of the redshifts, luminosities, and spectral energy distributions of WISE-selected quasars and uses new techniques to measure how quasars cluster around themselves. NNX12AE38G has contributed to more than 10 journal articles and 5 conference proceedings. Building on our current work, an even more complete understanding of the link between black holes and their host dark matter structures is possible if we employ an independent method for measuring the clustering bias (and thus characteristic halo mass) of the quasar population. This has recently become possible using CMB lensing maps. In the past two years, our team has conducted an initial analysis covering 2500 square degrees using WISE-selected quasars and lensing maps from the South Pole Telescope (Geach, Hickox, Myers et al., 2013), and have implemented this technique with Planck over part of the SDSS region

  6. Planck 2014 and beyond: the CMB polarization at large angular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangilli, Anna

    2015-08-01

    One of the main challenge left for the present and the future CMB experiments is the high precision measurement of the CMB polarization at large angular scales. The reionization bump in the CMB polarization EE and BB power spectra encodes unique informations about the reionization history of the Universe and the inflationary epoch. Such valuable information can be accessed only with an unprecedented accuracy and care on each step of the data analysis and its interpretation. The Planck 2014 release represents a first step towards the accurate characterization of the CMB polarization on the full sky. In this talk I will go through a brief introduction about the CMB polarization mainly focusing on the large angular scales. I will show how the EE and BB spectra at low-l can be used to improve the constraints on the cosmological parameters, in particular those related to the reionization history (τ) and the amount of tensor modes (r). As a Planck Scientist I will present, on behalf of the Planck collaboration, the status of the CMB analysis at large scales after the 2014 release. I will present different methods that can be used for the low-l analysis, focusing on a spectral based approach (Mangilli et al. in preparation). Finally I will present the theoretical implications of the results and the future prospects in view of the Planck release at the end of 2015 and future CMB experiments.

  7. Beyond y and μ: the shape of the CMB spectral distortions in the intermediate epoch, 1.5 × 10{sup 4}∼

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A. E-mail: sunyaev@mpa-Garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We calculate numerical solutions and analytic approximations for the intermediate-type spectral distortions. Detection of a μ-type distortion (saturated comptonization) in the CMB will constrain the time of energy injection to be at a redshift 2 × 10{sup 6}∼>z∼>2 × 10{sup 5}, while a detection of a y-type distortion (minimal comptonization) will mean that there was heating of CMB at redshift z∼<1.5 × 10{sup 4}. We point out that the partially comptonized spectral distortions, generated in the redshift range 1.5 × 10{sup 4}∼CMB spectral distortions has the possibility to constrain precisely not only the amount of energy release in the early Universe but also the mechanism, for example, particle annihilation and Silk damping can be distinguished from particle decay. The intermediate-type distortion templates and software code using these templates to calculate the CMB spectral distortions for user-defined energy injection rate is made publicly available.

  8. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or

  9. Constraining the evolution of the CMB temperature with SZ measurements from Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzzi, G.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; De Petris, M.; Lamagna, L.

    2015-09-01

    The CMB temperature-redshift relation, TCMB(z)=T0(1+z), is a key prediction of the standard cosmology but is violated in many non-standard models. Constraining possible deviations from this law is an effective way to test the ΛCDM paradigm and to search for hints of new physics. We have determined TCMB(z), with a precision up to 3%, for a subsample (103 clusters) of the Planck SZ cluster catalog, at redshifts in the range 0.01-0.94, using measurements of the spectrum of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect obtained from Planck temperature maps at frequencies from 70 to 353 GHz. The method adopted to provide individual determinations of TCMB(z) at cluster redshift relies on the use of SZ intensity change, Δ ISZ(ν) at different frequencies and on a Monte Carlo Markov chain approach. By applying this method to the sample of 103 clusters, we limit possible deviations of the form TCMB(z)=T0(1+z)1-β to be β= 0.012 ± 0.016, at 1σ uncertainty, consistent with the prediction of the standard model. Combining these measurements with previously published results, we get β=0.013±0.011.

  10. Optimal analysis of azimuthal features in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Stephen; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2013-10-01

    We present algorithms for searching for azimuthally symmetric features in CMB data. Our algorithms are fully optimal for masked all-sky data with inhomogeneous noise, computationally fast, simple to implement, and make no approximations. We show how to implement the optimal analysis in both Bayesian and frequentist cases. In the Bayesian case, our algorithm for evaluating the posterior likelihood is so fast that we can do a brute-force search over parameter space, rather than using a Monte Carlo Markov chain. Our motivating example is searching for bubble collisions, a pre-inflationary signal which can be generated if multiple tunneling events occur in an eternally inflating spacetime, but our algorithms are general and should be useful in other contexts.

  11. Future CMB cosmological constraints in a dark coupled universe

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Honorez, Laura Lopez

    2010-05-15

    Cosmic microwave background satellite missions as the ongoing Planck experiment are expected to provide the strongest constraints on a wide set of cosmological parameters. Those constraints, however, could be weakened when the assumption of a cosmological constant as the dark energy component is removed. Here we show that it will indeed be the case when there exists a coupling among the dark energy and the dark matter fluids. In particular, the expected errors on key parameters as the cold dark matter density and the angular diameter distance at decoupling are significantly larger when a dark coupling is introduced. We show that it will be the case also for future satellite missions as EPIC, unless CMB lensing extraction is performed.

  12. Modeling the quasi-optical performance of CMB astronomical interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Gareth S.; Gradziel, Marcin L.; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Murphy, J. Anthony; Korotkov, Andrei; Malu, Siddharth; Timbie, Peter; Tucker, Gregory

    2008-07-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a ground-based instrument designed to measure the polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and contains a number of quasi-optical components, including a complex back-to-back system of corrugated feed-horn antennas. In this paper we use MBI as an example to demonstrate the existing modeling techniques and as a focus to develop extended modeling capabilities. The software we use to model this system targets the millimeter and sub-millimeter region of the electromagnetic spectrum and has been extended to efficiently model the performance of back-to-back corrugated horns embedded in larger optical systems. This allows the calculation of the coupling of radiation from the sky to the detector array through a back-to-back horn feed system.

  13. Contribution of domain wall networks to the CMB power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazanu, A.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2015-07-01

    We use three domain wall simulations from the radiation era to the late-time dark energy domination era based on the PRS algorithm to calculate the energy-momentum tensor components of domain wall networks in an expanding universe. Unequal time correlators in the radiation, matter and cosmological constant epochs are calculated using the scaling regime of each of the simulations. The CMB power spectrum of a network of domain walls is determined. The first ever quantitative constraint for the domain wall surface tension is obtained using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method; an energy scale of domain walls of 0.93 MeV, which is close but below the Zel'dovich bound, is determined.

  14. B-mode CMB polarization from patchy screening during reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorkin, Cora; Hu, Wayne; Smith, Kendrick M.

    2009-05-15

    B modes in CMB polarization from patchy reionization arise from two effects: generation of polarization from scattering of quadrupole moments by reionization bubbles and fluctuations in the screening of E modes from recombination. The scattering contribution has been studied previously, but the screening contribution has not yet been calculated. We show that on scales smaller than the acoustic scale (l > or approx. 300), the B-mode power from screening is larger than the B-mode power from scattering. The ratio approaches a constant {approx}2.5 below the damping scale (l > or approx. 2000). On degree scales relevant for gravitational waves (l < or approx. 100), screening B modes have a white noise tail and are subdominant to the scattering effect. These results are robust to uncertainties in the modeling of patchy reionization.

  15. Overview of Current and Planned CMB Ballooning Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Shaul

    2016-03-01

    Balloon-borne experiments have a unique role in probing the polarization of the CMB. They enable access to frequencies that can not be probed by ground-based instruments, they can straight-forwardly measure signals on large angular scales, and they serve as test-beds for technologies that are ultimately used on space missions. With these roles in mind, I will discuss the status of the three NASA-funded experiments EBEX, SPIDER and PIPER, and their complementarity with ground-based efforts. I will also discuss plans for next generation instruments, with which the detector count is expected to increase by another factor of 10 to about 10,000.

  16. Precision CMB Polarization from Dome-C: the BRAIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, S.; de Bernardis, P.; Giordano, C.; Nati, F.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Veneziani, M.; Gervasi, M.; Sironi, G.; Tartari, A.; Zannoni, M.; Peterzen, S.; Bartlett, J.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Piat, M.; Rosset, C.; Giard, M.; Pons, R.; Maffei, B.; Ade, P.; Gear, W.; Mauskopf, P.; Piccirillo, L.; Pisano, G.; Savini, G.

    In the current cosmological scenario, part of the linearly polarized emission of the CMB is expected to be rotational (B-modes). This component is due to tensor perturbations of the metric produced by primordial gravitational waves, which are generated a split-second after the Big Bang. The signal expected is of the order of ≲ 0.1 μ K, well below the non-rotational component of the polarization signal (E-modes), and beyond the sensitivity of present generation instruments. New, more sensitive instruments are developed in several labs, with the goal to measure the B-modes. Control of systematics and foregrounds will be the key to make the results of these experiments believable. In this paper we shortly outline BRAIN, a bolometric interferometer devoted to B-modes research, and its pathfinder experiment, devoted to test the Dome-C site.

  17. Constraints on cosmological birefringence energy dependence from CMB polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, G.; Paci, F. E-mail: fpaci@sissa.it

    2013-02-01

    We study the possibility of constraining the energy dependence of cosmological birefringence by using CMB polarization data. We consider four possible behaviors, characteristic of different theoretical scenarios: energy-independent birefringence motivated by Chern-Simons interactions of the electromagnetic field, linear energy dependence motivated by a 'Weyl' interaction of the electromagnetic field, quadratic energy dependence, motivated by quantum gravity modifications of low-energy electrodynamics, and inverse quadratic dependence, motivated by Faraday rotation generated by primordial magnetic fields. We constrain the parameters associated to each kind of dependence and use our results to give constraints on the models mentioned. We forecast the sensitivity that Planck data will be able to achieve in this respect.

  18. Constraining dark sector perturbations II: ISW and CMB lensing tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soergel, B.; Giannantonio, T.; Weller, J.; Battye, R. A.

    2015-02-01

    Any Dark Energy (DE) or Modified Gravity (MG) model that deviates from a cosmological constant requires a consistent treatment of its perturbations, which can be described in terms of an effective entropy perturbation and an anisotropic stress. We have considered a recently proposed generic parameterisation of DE/MG perturbations and compared it to data from the Planck satellite and six galaxy catalogues, including temperature-galaxy (Tg), CMB lensing-galaxy (varphi g) and galaxy-galaxy (gg) correlations. Combining these observables of structure formation with tests of the background expansion allows us to investigate the properties of DE/MG both at the background and the perturbative level. Our constraints on DE/MG are mostly in agreement with the cosmological constant paradigm, while we also find that the constraint on the equation of state w (assumed to be constant) depends on the model assumed for the perturbation evolution. We obtain w=-0.92+0.20-0.16 (95% CL; CMB+gg+Tg) in the entropy perturbation scenario; in the anisotropic stress case the result is w=-0.86+0.17-0.16. Including the lensing correlations shifts the results towards higher values of w. If we include a prior on the expansion history from recent Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) measurements, we find that the constraints tighten closely around w=-1, making it impossible to measure any DE/MG perturbation evolution parameters. If, however, upcoming observations from surveys like DES, Euclid or LSST show indications for a deviation from a cosmological constant, our formalism will be a useful tool towards model selection in the dark sector.

  19. μ distortions or running: A guaranteed discovery from CMB spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabass, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the implications of a PIXIE-like experiment, which would measure μ -type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a level of σμ=(1 /n )×10-8 , with n ≥1 representing an improved sensitivity (e.g. n =10 corresponds to PRISM). Using Planck data and considering the six-parameter Λ CDM model, we compute the posterior for μ8≡μ ×108 and find μ8=1.5 7-0.13+0.11 (68% C.L.). This becomes μ8=1.2 8-0.52+0.30 (68% C.L.) when the running αs of the spectral index is included. We point out that a sensitivity of about 3 ×PIXIE implies a guaranteed discovery: μ distortion is detected or αs≥0 is excluded (both at 95% C.L. or higher). This threshold sensitivity sets a clear benchmark for CMB spectrometry. For a combined analysis of PIXIE and current Planck data, we discuss the improvement on measurements of the tilt ns and the running αs and the dependence on the choice of the pivot. A fiducial running of αs=-0.01 (close to the Planck best fit) leads to a detection of negative running at 2 σ for 5 ×PIXIE . A fiducial running of αs=-0.02 , still compatible with Planck, requires 3 ×PIXIE to rule out αs=0 (at 95% C.L.). We propose a convenient and compact visualization of the improving constraints on the tilt, running and tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  20. Temporal variability of vertical nontidal circulation pattern in a partially mixed estuary: Comparison of self-organizing map and empirical orthogonal functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Wilson, Robert E.

    2006-12-01

    On the basis of a 233-day moored acoustic Doppler current profiler data set in an estuarine strait, temporal variability of vertical estuarine circulation is examined using self-organizing map (SOM) and empirical orthogonal functions (EOF). The SOM identifies a continuum of patterns of which eight have been selected. The best matching unit (BMU) time series shows distinct seasonal variation which separates the data set into three seasonal segments. Also, monthly variation can be discerned by BMU sequences, and the data set is further separated into seven monthly segments. The EOF analysis of the whole record identifies only four patterns which are contained in the SOM patterns. However, EOF analysis of the seven monthly segments shows distinct monthly variation of the first two EOF modes. Moreover, those EOF modes are compatible with the SOM patterns showing consistency between the two techniques. The synoptic variability is described by four selected events which correspond to particular BMU sequences and represent filling and draining processes. The pattern-forcing relationships are explored with EOF principle components. Long-term variations of circulation patterns are dominated by river discharge and winds. Short-term variations explored within seasonal and monthly segments indicate that the flow patterns are results of combined effect of forcing. Officer's (1976) analytical solutions of estuarine circulation are applied, and the results support the flow patterns and pattern-forcing relationship revealed by SOM and EOF analysis.

  1. Force mapping on a partially H-covered Si(111)-(7×7) surface: Influence of tip and surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsever, Ayhan; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Hideki; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo; Ondráček, Martin; Pou, Pablo; Pérez, Rubén; Jelínek, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    We report force mapping experiments on Si(111)-(7×7) surfaces with adsorbed hydrogen, using atomic force microscopy at room temperature supported by density functional theory (DFT) simulations. On the basis of noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) images as well as force versus distance curves measured over both hydrogen-passivated and bare Si adatoms, we identified two types of tip termination, which result in different modes of interaction with the surface. The statistics of the tip dependence of the measured forces, which are effectuated using various tip states with different cantilevers, reveal the typical values of the force and their distribution in the two characteristic interaction modes. The experimental results are corroborated by DFT calculations performed for different tip structures. As a reactive tip, the dimer-terminated Si tip yields results in satisfactory agreement with experimental force curves for hydrogen-passivated and nonpassivated Si adatom sites. An oxidized Si dimer tip that bears a hydroxyl group on its apex reproduces well the experimental force curves acquired by nonreactive tips. This tip model could thus be used to interpret the experimentally obtained weak image contrast for the Si(111)-(7×7) surface. The forces are thought to arise as a result of a weak electrostatic interaction involving a permanent dipole at the tip apex enhanced by the charge density redistribution due to the interaction with surface adatoms.

  2. Relationship between Yield Components and Partial Resistance to Lecanicillium fungicola in the Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, Assessed by Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Anne; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Dry bubble, caused by Lecanicillium fungicola, is one of the most detrimental diseases affecting button mushroom cultivation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that breeding for resistance to this pathogen is quite challenging due to its quantitative inheritance. A second-generation hybrid progeny derived from an intervarietal cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar was characterized for L. fungicola resistance under artificial inoculation in three independent experiments. Analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTL) was used to determine the locations, numbers, and effects of genomic regions associated with dry-bubble resistance. Four traits related to resistance were analyzed. Two to four QTL were detected per trait, depending on the experiment. Two genomic regions, on linkage group X (LGX) and LGVIII, were consistently detected in the three experiments. The genomic region on LGX was detected for three of the four variables studied. The total phenotypic variance accounted for by all QTL ranged from 19.3% to 42.1% over all traits in all experiments. For most of the QTL, the favorable allele for resistance came from the wild parent, but for some QTL, the allele that contributed to a higher level of resistance was carried by the cultivar. Comparative mapping with QTL for yield-related traits revealed five colocations between resistance and yield component loci, suggesting that the resistance results from both genetic factors and fitness expression. The consequences for mushroom breeding programs are discussed. PMID:22247161

  3. From Cavendish to PLANCK: Constraining Newton's gravitational constant with CMB temperature and polarization anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Smoot, George F.; Zahn, Oliver

    2009-07-15

    We present new constraints on cosmic variations of Newton's gravitational constant by making use of the latest CMB data from WMAP, BOOMERANG, CBI and ACBAR experiments and independent constraints coming from big bang nucleosynthesis. We found that current CMB data provide constraints at the {approx}10% level, that can be improved to {approx}3% by including big bang nucleosynthesis data. We show that future data expected from the Planck satellite could constrain G at the {approx}1.5% level while an ultimate, cosmic variance limited, CMB experiment could reach a precision of about 0.4%, competitive with current laboratory measurements.

  4. Precise measurement of CMB polarisation from Dome-C: the BRAIN and CLOVER experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piat, M.; Rosset, C.; Bartlett, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Bréele, E.; Maestrini, A.; Tripon Canseliet, C.; Algani, C.; Girard, M.; Pajot, F.; Masi, S.; de Bernardis, P.; Piccirillo, L.; Mafei, B.; Jones, M.; Taylor, A.

    2004-12-01

    The characterisation of CMB polarisation is one of the next challenge in observational cosmology. This is especially true for the so-called B-modes that are at least 3 order of magnitude lower than CMB temperature fluctuations. A precise measurement of the angular power spectrum of these B-modes will give important constraints on inflation parameters. In this talk, I will describe two complementary experiments, BRAIN and CLOVER, dedicated to CMB polarisation measurement. These experiments are proposed to be installed in Dome-C, Antarctica, to take advantage of the extreme dryness of the atmosphere and to allow long integration time.

  5. CMB constraints on dark matter models with large annihilation cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Iocco, Fabio; Bertone, Gianfranco; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    The injection of secondary particles produced by dark matter (DM) annihilation around redshift {approx}1000 would inevitably affect the process of recombination, leaving an imprint on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and polarization. We show that the most recent CMB measurements provided by the WMAP satellite mission place interesting constraints on DM self-annihilation rates, especially for models that exhibit a large Sommerfeld enhancement of the annihilation cross section, as recently proposed to fit the PAMELA and ATIC results. Furthermore, we argue that upcoming CMB experiments such as Planck, will improve the constraints by at least 1 order of magnitude, thus providing a sensitive probe of the properties of DM particles.

  6. Relation between the isotropy of the CMB and the geometry of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Raesaenen, Syksy

    2009-06-15

    The near isotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is considered to be the strongest indication for the homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe, a cornerstone of most cosmological analysis. We derive new theorems which extend the Ehlers-Geren-Sachs result that an isotropic CMB implies that the Universe is either stationary or homogeneous and isotropic, and its generalization to the almost isotropic case. We discuss why the theorems do not apply to the real Universe, and why the CMB observations do not imply that the Universe would be nearly homogeneous and isotropic.

  7. Toward a Tomographic Analysis of the Cross-Correlation between Planck CMB Lensing and H-ATLAS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, F.; Lapi, A.; Calabrese, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Danese, L.; de Zotti, G.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Valiante, E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an improved and extended analysis of the cross-correlation between the map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential derived from the Planck mission data and the high-redshift galaxies detected by the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) in the photometric redshift range {z}{{ph}}≥slant 1.5. We compare the results based on the 2013 and 2015 Planck datasets, and investigate the impact of different selections of the H-ATLAS galaxy samples. Significant improvements over our previous analysis have been achieved thanks to the higher signal-to-noise ratio of the new CMB lensing map recently released by the Planck collaboration. The effective galaxy bias parameter, b, for the full galaxy sample, derived from a joint analysis of the cross-power spectrum and of the galaxy auto-power spectrum is found to be b={3.54}-0.14+0.15. Furthermore, a first tomographic analysis of the cross-correlation signal is implemented by splitting the galaxy sample into two redshift intervals: 1.5≤slant {z}{{ph}}\\lt 2.1 and {z}{{ph}}≥slant 2.1. A statistically significant signal was found for both bins, indicating a substantial increase with redshift of the bias parameter: b=2.89+/- 0.23 for the lower and b={4.75}-0.25+0.24 for the higher redshift bin. Consistent with our previous analysis, we find that the amplitude of the cross-correlation signal is a factor of {1.45}-0.13+0.14 higher than expected from the standard ΛCDM model for the assumed redshift distribution. The robustness of our results against possible systematic effects has been extensively discussed, although the tension is mitigated by passing from 4 to 3σ.

  8. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: CMB polarization at 200 < ℓ < 9000

    SciTech Connect

    Naess, Sigurd; Allison, Rupert; Calabrese, Erminia; Hasselfield, Matthew; McMahon, Jeff; Coughlin, Kevin; Datta, Rahul; Niemack, Michael D.; De Bernardis, Francesco; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Battaglia, Nick; Beall, James A.; Britton, Joe; Cho, Hsiao-mei; Bond, J Richard; Crichton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; and others

    2014-10-01

    We report on measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and celestial polarization at 146 GHz made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) in its first three months of observing. Four regions of sky covering a total of 270 square degrees were mapped with an angular resolution of 1.3'. The map noise levels in the four regions are between 11 and 17 μK-arcmin. We present TT, TE, EE, TB, EB, and BB power spectra from three of these regions. The observed E-mode polarization power spectrum, displaying six acoustic peaks in the range 200 < ℓ < 3000, is an excellent fit to the prediction of the best-fit cosmological models from WMAP9+ACT and Planck data. The polarization power spectrum, which mainly reflects primordial plasma velocity perturbations, provides an independent determination of cosmological parameters consistent with those based on the temperature power spectrum, which results mostly from primordial density perturbations. We find that without masking any point sources in the EE data at ℓ < 9000, the Poisson tail of the EE power spectrum due to polarized point sources has an amplitude less than 2.4 μ {sup 2} at ℓ = 3000 at 95% confidence. Finally, we report that the Crab Nebula, an important polarization calibration source at microwave frequencies, has 8.7% polarization with an angle of 150.7{sup o} ± 0.6{sup o} when smoothed with a 5' Gaussian beam.

  9. Using CMB data to constrain non-isotropic Planck-scale modifications to Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Migliaccio, Marina; Pagano, Luca; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Polenta, Gianluca E-mail: Marina.Migliaccio@roma2.infn.it E-mail: giovanni.amelino-camelia@roma1.infn.it E-mail: paolo.natoli@roma2.infn.it

    2011-11-01

    We develop a method to constrain non-isotropic features of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization, of a type expected to arise in some models describing quantum gravity effects on light propagation. We describe the expected signatures of this kind of anomalous light propagation on CMB photons, showing that it will produce a non-isotropic birefringence effect, i.e. a rotation of the CMB polarization direction whose observed amount depends in a peculiar way on the observation direction. We also show that the sensitivity levels expected for CMB polarization studies by the Planck satellite are sufficient for testing these effects if, as assumed in the quantum-gravity literature, their magnitude is set by the minute Planck length.

  10. Using White Dish CMB Anisotropy Data to Probe Open and Flat-A CDM Cosmogonies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratra, Bharat; Ganga, Ken; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tucker, G. S.; Griffin, G. S.; Nguyen, H. T.; Peterson, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present a similar analysis of the Tucker at al. (1993, hereafter T93) White Dish CMB anisotropy data collected at the South Pole. The white dish detector and telescope are described in Tucker et al. (1994).

  11. Future Developments in Low Temperature Detectors for CMB and Submm Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Golwala, Sunil

    2009-12-16

    We summarize the wide range of current and upcoming developments in low temperature detectors for CMB and submillimeter astronomy. We discuss work in sensor development, photon coupling and filtering architectures, and polarimetry and how these tie to applications requirements.

  12. Isolation and characterisation of the carnation floral-specific MADS box gene, CMB2.

    PubMed

    Baudinette; Stevenson; Savin

    2000-06-29

    The cDNA clone KD81, was isolated from a carnation petal cDNA library based on its strong differential expression in petals compared with leaves. The deduced amino acid sequence of KD81 indicated high homology with members of the MADS box family of transcription factors. Identified within the deduced amino acid sequence are two conserved domains; an N-terminal, MADS box and a central, K box. The gene encoding KD81 was termed Carnation MADS Box gene 2 (CMB2). Expression of CMB2 is floral-specific and in petal, transcripts were persistent from the initial stages of development through flower opening. Transcripts were not detected in vegetative tissues. The CMB2 protein is most homologous to TDR6 from tomato, the product of the petal and stamen identity gene DEFICIENS (DEFA), and several DEFA homologues including SLM3, STDEF, PMADS1 and APETALA3. Southern blot analysis indicated that CMB2 is present as a single copy within the carnation genome. Characterisation of a genomic clone encoding CMB2, revealed the molecular structure of CMB2 to be consistent with that reported for other plant MADS box genes. Analysis of the CMB2 promoter sequence revealed the presence of two putative cis-acting elements known as serum response elements (SREs). These elements are proposed as the target for MADS box domain binding and may be involved in the regulation/autoregulation of gene expression. CMB2 represents the first reported isolation of a MADS box gene from carnation. PMID:10814815

  13. Large-scale anomalies of the CMB in the curvaton scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hao; Frejsel, Anne Mette; Naselsky, Pavel E-mail: frejsel@nbi.dk

    2013-07-01

    We extend the curvaton scenario presented by Erickcek et al. [1,2], to explain how the even-odd multipole asymmetry of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) (also called parity asymmetry, [3,4]) and power anisotropies can be generated by the curvaton field, which acts as an extra component to the spectrum of adiabatic perturbations in the inflationary epoch. Our work provides a possible cosmic explanation to the CMB large-scale asymmetry problems besides systematics and unknown residuals.

  14. Bias to CMB lensing measurements from the bispectrum of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Vanessa; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sherwin, Blake D.

    2016-08-01

    The rapidly improving precision of measurements of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) also requires a corresponding increase in the precision of theoretical modeling. A commonly made approximation is to model the CMB deflection angle or lensing potential as a Gaussian random field. In this paper, however, we analytically quantify the influence of the non-Gaussianity of large-scale structure (LSS) lenses, arising from nonlinear structure formation, on CMB lensing measurements. In particular, evaluating the impact of the nonzero bispectrum of large-scale structure on the relevant CMB four-point correlation functions, we find that there is a bias to estimates of the CMB lensing power spectrum. For temperature-based lensing reconstruction with CMB stage III and stage IV experiments, we find that this lensing power spectrum bias is negative and is of order 1% of the signal. This corresponds to a shift of multiple standard deviations for these upcoming experiments. We caution, however, that our numerical calculation only evaluates two of the largest bias terms and, thus, only provides an approximate estimate of the full bias. We conclude that further investigation into lensing biases from nonlinear structure formation is required and that these biases should be accounted for in future lensing analyses.

  15. EBEX: a balloon-borne CMB polarization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichborn-Kjennerud, Britt; Aboobaker, Asad M.; Ade, Peter; Aubin, François; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bao, Chaoyun; Borrill, Julian; Cantalupo, Christopher; Chapman, Daniel; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Grain, Julien; Grainger, William; Hanany, Shaul; Hillbrand, Seth; Hubmayr, Johannes; Jaffe, Andrew; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Terry; Kisner, Theodore; Klein, Jeff; Korotkov, Andrei; Leach, Sam; Lee, Adrian; Levinson, Lorne; Limon, Michele; MacDermid, Kevin; Matsumura, Tomotake; Meng, Xiaofan; Miller, Amber; Milligan, Michael; Pascale, Enzo; Polsgrove, Daniel; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Raach, Kate; Sagiv, Ilan; Smecher, Graeme; Stivoli, Federico; Stompor, Radek; Tran, Huan; Tristram, Matthieu; Tucker, Gregory S.; Vinokurov, Yury; Yadav, Amit; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zilic, Kyle

    2010-07-01

    EBEX is a NASA-funded balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Observations will be made using 1432 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometric detectors read out with frequency multiplexed SQuIDs. EBEX will observe in three frequency bands centered at 150, 250, and 410 GHz, with 768, 384, and 280 detectors in each band, respectively. This broad frequency coverage is designed to provide valuable information about polarized foreground signals from dust. The polarized sky signals will be modulated with an achromatic half wave plate (AHWP) rotating on a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) and analyzed with a fixed wire grid polarizer. EBEX will observe a patch covering ~1% of the sky with 8' resolution, allowing for observation of the angular power spectrum from l = 20 to 1000. This will allow EBEX to search for both the primordial B-mode signal predicted by inflation and the anticipated lensing B-mode signal. Calculations to predict EBEX constraints on r using expected noise levels show that, for a likelihood centered around zero and with negligible foregrounds, 99% of the area falls below r = 0.035. This value increases by a factor of 1.6 after a process of foreground subtraction. This estimate does not include systematic uncertainties. An engineering flight was launched in June, 2009, from Ft. Sumner, NM, and the long duration science flight in Antarctica is planned for 2011. These proceedings describe the EBEX instrument and the North American engineering flight.

  16. Oscillations in the CMB from Axion Monodromy Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; McAllister, Liam; Pajer, Enrico; Westphal, Alexander; Xu, Gang; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-12-01

    We study the CMB observables in axion monodromy inflation. These well-motivated scenarios for inflation in string theory have monomial potentials over super-Planckian field ranges, with superimposed sinusoidal modulations from instanton effects. Such periodic modulations of the potential can drive resonant enhancements of the correlation functions of cosmological perturbations, with characteristic modulations of the amplitude as a function of wavenumber. We give an analytical result for the scalar power spectrum in this class of models, and we determine the limits that present data places on the amplitude and frequency of modulations. Then, incorporating an improved understanding of the realization of axion monodromy inflation in string theory, we perform a careful study of microphysical constraints in this scenario. We find that detectable modulations of the scalar power spectrum are commonplace in well-controlled examples, while resonant contributions to the bispectrum are undetectable in some classes of examples and detectable in others. We conclude that resonant contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum are a characteristic signature of axion monodromy inflation that, in favorable cases, could be detected in near-future experiments.

  17. Optimal estimator for resonance bispectra in the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münchmeyer, Moritz; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2015-02-01

    We propose an (optimal) estimator for a CMB bispectrum containing logarithmically spaced oscillations. There is tremendous theoretical interest in such bispectra, and they are predicted by a plethora of models, including axion monodromy models of inflation and initial state modifications. The number of resolved logarithmical oscillations in the bispectrum is limited due to the discrete resolution of the multipole bispectrum. We derive a simple relation between the maximum number of resolved oscillations and the frequency. We investigate several ways to factorize the primordial bispectrum, and conclude that a one-dimensional expansion in the sum of the momenta ∑ki=kt is the most efficient and flexible approach. We compare the expansion to the exact result in multipole space and show for ωeff=100 that O (1 03) modes are sufficient for an accurate reconstruction. We compute the expected σfNL and find that within an effective field theory (EFT) the overall signal to noise scales as S /N ∝ω3 /2. Using only the temperature data we find S /N ˜O (1 - 1 02) for the frequency domain set by the EFT.

  18. Cosmological constant, violation of cosmological isotropy and CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R. E-mail: arz@physics.ubc.ca

    2009-09-01

    We suggest that the solution to the cosmological vacuum energy puzzle does not require any new field beyond the standard model, but rather can be explained as a result of the interaction of the infrared sector of the effective theory of gravity with standard model fields. The cosmological constant in this framework can be presented in terms of QCD parameters and the Hubble constant H as follows, ε{sub vac} ≅ H⋅m{sub q}( q-bar q)/m{sub η'} ≅ (4.3⋅10{sup −3}eV){sup 4}, which is amazingly close to the observed value today. In this work we explain how this proposal can be tested by analyzing CMB data. In particular, knowing the value of the observed cosmological constant fixes univocally the smallest size of the spatially flat, constant time 3d hypersurface which, for instance in the case of an effective 1-torus, is predicted to be around 74 Gpc. We also comment on another important prediction of this framework which is a violation of cosmological isotropy. Such anisotropy is indeed apparently observed by WMAP, and will be confirmed (or ruled out) by future PLANCK data.

  19. Model-independent cosmological constraints from the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Vonlanthen, Marc; Räsänen, Syksy; Durrer, Ruth E-mail: syksy.rasanen@iki.fi

    2010-08-01

    We analyse CMB data in a manner which is as independent as possible of the model of late-time cosmology. We encode the effects of late-time cosmology into a single parameter which determines the distance to the last scattering surface. We exclude low multipoles l < 40 from the analysis. We consider the WMAP5 and ACBAR data. We obtain the cosmological parameters 100ω{sub b} = 2.13±0.05, ω{sub c} = 0.124±0.007, n{sub s} = 0.93±0.02 and θ{sub A} = 0.593°±0.001° (68% C.L.). The last number is the angular scale subtended by the sound horizon at decoupling. There is a systematic shift in the parameters as more low l data are omitted, towards smaller values of ω{sub b} and n{sub s} and larger values of ω{sub c}. The scale θ{sub A} remains stable and very well determined.

  20. Oscillations in the CMB from axion monodromy inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; McAllister, Liam; Pajer, Enrico; Xu, Gang; Westphal, Alexander E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu E-mail: awestpha@stanford.edu

    2010-06-01

    We study the CMB observables in axion monodromy inflation. These well-motivated scenarios for inflation in string theory have monomial potentials over super-Planckian field ranges, with superimposed sinusoidal modulations from instanton effects. Such periodic modulations of the potential can drive resonant enhancements of the correlation functions of cosmological perturbations, with characteristic modulations of the amplitude as a function of wavenumber. We give an analytical result for the scalar power spectrum in this class of models, and we determine the limits that present data places on the amplitude and frequency of modulations. Then, incorporating an improved understanding of the realization of axion monodromy inflation in string theory, we perform a careful study of microphysical constraints in this scenario. We find that detectable modulations of the scalar power spectrum are commonplace in well-controlled examples, while resonant contributions to the bispectrum are undetectable in some classes of examples and detectable in others. We conclude that resonant contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum are a characteristic signature of axion monodromy inflation that, in favorable cases, could be detected in near-future experiments.

  1. Evidence for horizon-scale power from CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Hu, Wayne

    2009-07-15

    The CMB temperature power spectrum offers ambiguous evidence for the existence of horizon-scale power in the primordial power spectrum due to uncertainties in spatial curvature and the physics of cosmic acceleration as well as the observed low quadrupole. Current polarization data from WMAP provide evidence for horizon-scale power that is robust to these uncertainties. Polarization on the largest scales arises mainly from scattering at z < or approx. 6 when the Universe is fully ionized, making the evidence robust to ionization history variations at higher redshifts as well. A cutoff in the power spectrum is limited to C=k{sub C}/10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -1}<5.2 (95% C.L.) by polarization, only slightly weaker than joint temperature and polarization constraints in flat {lambda}CDM (C<4.2). Planck should improve the polarization limit to C<3.6 for any model of the acceleration epoch and ionization history as well as provide tests for foreground and systematic contamination.

  2. String theory clues for the low-ℓ CMB ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, N.; Sagnotti, A.

    2015-05-01

    "Brane Supersymmetry Breaking" is a peculiar string-scale mechanism that can unpair Bose and Fermi excitations in orientifold models. It results from the simultaneous presence, in the vacuum, of collections of D-branes and orientifolds that are not mutually BPS, and is closely tied to the scale of string excitations. It also leaves behind, for a mixing of dilaton and internal breathing mode, an exponential potential that is just too steep for a scalar to emerge from the initial singularity while descending it. As a result, in this class of models the scalar can generically bounce off the exponential wall, and this dynamics brings along, in the power spectrum, an infrared depression typically followed by a pre-inflationary peak. We elaborate on a possible link between this type of bounce and the low-ℓ end of the CMB angular power spectrum. For the first 32 multipoles, one can reach a 50% reduction in χ2 with respect to the standard ΛCDM setting.

  3. CMB lensing tomography with the DES Science Verification galaxies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giannantonio, T.

    2016-01-07

    We measure the cross-correlation between the galaxy density in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as reconstructed with the Planck satellite and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). When using the DES main galaxy sample over the full redshift range 0.2 < zphot < 1.2, a cross-correlation signal is detected at 6σ and 4σ with SPT and Planck respectively. We then divide the DES galaxies into five photometric redshift bins, finding significant (>2σ) detections in all bins. Comparing to the fiducial Planck cosmology, we find the redshift evolution of themore » signal matches expectations, although the amplitude is consistently lower than predicted across redshift bins. We test for possible systematics that could affect our result and find no evidence for significant contamination. Finally, we demonstrate how these measurements can be used to constrain the growth of structure across cosmic time. We find the data are fit by a model in which the amplitude of structure in the z < 1.2 universe is 0.73 ± 0.16 times as large as predicted in the LCDM Planck cosmology, a 1.7σ deviation.« less

  4. Modeling the Effect of Refractive Optics on CMB Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Sarah Marie; Gallardo, Patricio; Koopman, Brian; Niemack, Michael; ACTPol Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Precise CMB polarization measurements are crucial in investigating dark energy. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) in Chile is built to simultaneously measure temperature and polarization. Polarization angle measurements require an error margin < 0.1°, or these will limit our results. This requires greater understanding of how refractive optics alter the polarization of the microwave radiation. Lens coatings are necessary to avoid the reflection of the majority of the incoming light. Early experiments found that there were systematic angular distortions in the data, in which the optical elements in the ACTPol telescope rotated the polarization of the incoming microwave radiation slightly. We modeled a single lens using two commercial optics modeling software packages, CodeV and Zemax, with single and double-layer coatings. Unexpectedly, significant disparities between these models were observed. We subsequently developed our own Python model of the single lens system in order to predict the polarization rotation values. I will present the results of this work. Our next aim is to reproduce the modeled phenomena using physical lenses.

  5. CMB lensing tomography with the DES Science Verification galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannantonio, T.; Fosalba, P.; Cawthon, R.; Omori, Y.; Crocce, M.; Elsner, F.; Leistedt, B.; Dodelson, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Holder, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Percival, W. J.; Kirk, D.; Bauer, A. H.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Carretero, J.; Crawford, T. M.; Crittenden, R.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Krause, E.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ross, A. J.; Simard, G.; Soergel, B.; Stark, A.; Story, K. T.; Vieira, J. D.; Weller, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; D'Andrea, C. B.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.

    2016-03-01

    We measure the cross-correlation between the galaxy density in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as reconstructed with the Planck satellite and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). When using the DES main galaxy sample over the full redshift range 0.2 < zphot < 1.2, a cross-correlation signal is detected at 6σ and 4σ with SPT and Planck , respectively. We then divide the DES galaxies into five photometric redshift bins, finding significant (>2σ) detections in all bins. Comparing to the fiducial Planck cosmology, we find the redshift evolution of the signal matches expectations, although the amplitude is consistently lower than predicted across redshift bins. We test for possible systematics that could affect our result and find no evidence for significant contamination. Finally, we demonstrate how these measurements can be used to constrain the growth of structure across cosmic time. We find the data are fit by a model in which the amplitude of structure in the z < 1.2 universe is 0.73 ± 0.16 times as large as predicted in the Λ cold dark matter Planck cosmology, a 1.7σ deviation.

  6. Extragalactic foreground contamination in temperature-based CMB lens reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Stephen J.; Hanson, Duncan; Doré, Olivier E-mail: dhanson@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the effect of unresolved point source contamination on estimates of the CMB lensing potential, from components such as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, radio point sources, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. We classify the possible trispectra associated with such source populations, and construct estimators for the amplitude and scale-dependence of several of the major trispectra. We show how to propagate analytical models for these source trispectra to biases for lensing. We also construct a ''source-hardened'' lensing estimator which experiences significantly smaller biases when exposed to unresolved point sources than the standard quadratic lensing estimator. We demonstrate these ideas in practice using the sky simulations of Sehgal et al., for cosmic-variance limited experiments designed to mimic ACT, SPT, and Planck. We find that for radio sources and SZ the bias is significantly reduced, but for CIB it is essentially unchanged. However, by using the high-frequency, all-sky CIB measurements from Planck and Herschel it may be possible to suppress this contribution.

  7. Dark matter CMB constraints and likelihoods for poor particle physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, James M.; Scott, Pat

    2013-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background provides constraints on the annihilation and decay of light dark matter at redshifts between 100 and 1000, the strength of which depends upon the fraction of energy ending up in the form of electrons and photons. The resulting constraints are usually presented for a limited selection of annihilation and decay channels. Here we provide constraints on the annihilation cross section and decay rate, at discrete values of the dark matter mass mχ, for all the annihilation and decay channels whose secondary spectra have been computed using PYTHIA in arXiv:1012.4515 (``PPPC 4 DM ID: a poor particle physicist cookbook for dark matter indirect detection''), namely e, μ, τ, V → e, V → μ, V → τ, u, d s, c, b, t, γ, g, W, Z and h. By interpolating in mass, these can be used to find the CMB constraints and likelihood functions from WMAP7 and Planck for a wide range of dark matter models, including those with annihilation or decay into a linear combination of different channels.

  8. Amplitude-Phase Analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D.; Naselsky, P.; Silk, J.

    We suggest the amplitude-phase analysis (APA) as a new method for the CMB image reconstruction. This method has been adopted for any kind of possible noise in the CMB observational data ( like point sources, dust emission, pixel and radiometer noise and so on). The important advantage of our scheme is that unlike other methods the phase analysis doesn't require any information about the expected CMB power spectra to subtract the noise. The only assumption we made is that the initial cosmological signal has a Gaussian nature. This method is very efficient computationally because it requires only O(Nln (N)) operations, where N is the number of pixels. Therefore, the full advantage of our scheme can be reached on very large data sets. Its efficiency has been successfully tested on simulated signals corresponding to MAP, PLANCK and RATAN-600 angular resolutions. P. Naselsky (TAC, Denmark), I. Novikov (TAC, Denmark)

  9. On the significance of power asymmetries in Planck CMB data at all scales

    SciTech Connect

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2015-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the CMB temperature data taken by the Planck satellite investigating if there is any significant deviation from cosmological isotropy. We look for differences in the spectrum between two opposite hemispheres and also for dipolar modulations. We propose a new way to avoid biases due to partial-sky coverage by producing a mask symmetrized in antipodal directions, in addition to the standard smoothing procedure. We also properly take into account both Doppler and aberration effects due to our peculiar velocity and the anisotropy of the noise, since these effects induce a significant hemispherical asymmetry. We are thus able to probe scales all the way to ℓ = 2000. After such treatment we find no evidence for significant hemispherical anomalies along any of the analyzed directions (i.e. deviations are less than 1.5σ when summing over all scales). Although among the larger scales there are sometimes higher discrepancies, these are always less than 3σ. We also find results on a dipolar modulation of the power spectrum. Along the hemispheres aligned with the most asymmetric direction for 2 ≤ ℓ ≤ 2000 we find a 3.3σ discrepancy when comparing to simulations. However, if we do not restrict ourselves to Planck's maximal asymmetry axis, which can only be known a posteriori, and compare Planck data with the modulation of simulations along their respective maximal asymmetry directions, the discrepancy goes down to less than 1σ (with, again, almost 3σ discrepancies in some low-ℓ modes). We thus conclude that no significant power asymmetries seem to be present in the full data set. Interestingly, without proper removal of Doppler and aberration effects one would find spurious anomalies at high ℓ, between 3σ and 5σ. Even when considering only ℓ < 600 we find that the boost is non-negligible and alleviates the discrepancy by roughly half-σ.

  10. Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in an anisotropic CMB model: Measuring low multipoles of the CMB at higher redshifts using intensity and polarization spectral distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasini, Siavash; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel mathematical formalism that allows us to easily compute the expected kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) signal in intensity and polarization due to an anisotropic primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB). We derive the expected intensity and polarization distortions in the direction of nonmoving galaxy clusters, and then we generalize our calculations for nonzero peculiar velocity. We show that, in the direction of moving clusters, low CMB multipoles impose intensity and polarization spectral distortions with different frequency dependences. The polarization signal primarily probes the quadrupole moment of the CMB, with a significant contribution from the primordial dipole and octupole moments. For a typical cluster velocity of 1000 km /s , corrections to the quadrupole-induced polarization of a nonmoving cluster are of the order of 2%-10% between 200-600 GHz, and depend on cluster's position on the sky, velocity magnitude, and direction of motion. We also find that the angular dependence of the signal varies with frequency of observation. The distinct frequency and angular dependences of the polarization induced by the primordial dipole and octupole can be exploited to measure them despite other physical effects and foregrounds. Contrary to polarization, intensity distortions are affected by all the CMB multipoles, so they cannot be readily used to probe the low multipoles at higher redshifts. However, correlations between intensity and polarization signals can be used to enhance the signal to noise ratio for the measurements of the primordial dipole, quadrupole, and octupole. The more general calculation of the aberration kernel presented in this work has applications reaching beyond the SZ cluster science addressed here. For example, it can be exploited to the deboost/deaberrate CMB multipoles as observed in our local frame.

  11. Single-field inflation constraints from CMB and SDSS data

    SciTech Connect

    Finelli, Fabio; Leach, Samuel M.; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: hamann@phys.au.dk E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2010-04-01

    We present constraints on canonical single-field inflation derived from WMAP five year, ACBAR, QUAD, BICEP data combined with the halo power spectrum from SDSS LRG7. Models with a non-scale-invariant spectrum and a red tilt n{sub S} < 1 are now preferred over the Harrison-Zel'dovich model (n{sub S} = 1, tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0) at high significance. Assuming no running of the spectral indices, we derive constraints on the parameters (n{sub S}, r) and compare our results with the predictions of simple inflationary models. The marginalised credible intervals read n{sub S} = 0.962{sup +0.028}{sub −0.026} and r < 0.17 (95% confidence level). With respect to previous analyses, the portion of the 68% c.l. contours compatible with potentials which are concave in the observable region becomes even smaller, but the quadratic potential model remains inside the 95% c.l. contours. We demonstrate that these results are robust to changes in the datasets considered and in the theoretical assumptions made. We then consider a non-vanishing running of the spectral indices by employing different methods, non-parametric but approximate, or parametric but exact. With our combination of CMB and LSS data, running models are preferred over power-law models only by a Δχ{sup 2} ≅ 5.8, allowing inflationary stages producing a sizable negative running −0.063{sup +0.061}{sub −0.049} and larger tensor-scalar ratio r < 0.33 at the 95% c.l. This requires large values of the third derivative of the inflaton potential within the observable range. We derive bounds on this derivative under the assumption that the inflaton potential can be approximated as a third order polynomial within the observable range.

  12. Modified gravity: the CMB, weak lensing and general parameterisations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Shaun A.; Appleby, Stephen A.; Weller, Jochen E-mail: stephen.appleby@ph.tum.de

    2011-03-01

    We examine general physical parameterisations for viable gravitational models in the f(R) framework. This is related to the mass of an additional scalar field, called the scalaron, that is introduced by the theories. Using a simple parameterisation for the scalaron mass M(a) we show there is an exact correspondence between the model and popular parameterisations of the modified Poisson equation μ(a,k) and the ratio of the Newtonian potentials η(a,k). We argue that although f(R) models are well described by the general [μ(a,k),η(a,k)] parameterization, specific functional forms of μ,η in the literature do not accurately represent f(R) behaviour, specifically at low redshift. We subsequently construct an improved description for the scalaron mass (and therefore μ(a,k) and η(a,k)) which captures their essential features and has benefits derived from a more physical origin. We study the scalaron's observational signatures and show the modification to the background Friedmann equation and CMB power spectrum to be small. We also investigate its effects in the linear and non linear matter power spectrum-where the signatures are evident-thus giving particular importance to weak lensing as a probe of these models. Using this new form, we demonstrate how the next generation Euclid survey will constrain these theories and its complementarity to current solar system tests. In the most optimistic case Euclid, together with a Planck prior, can constrain a fiducial scalaron mass M{sub 0} = 9.4 × 10{sup −30}eV at the ∼ 20% level. However, the decay rate of the scalaron mass, with fiducial value ν = 1.5, can be constrained to ∼ 3% uncertainty.

  13. Single-field inflation constraints from CMB and SDSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finelli, Fabio; Hamann, Jan; Leach, Samuel M.; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2010-04-01

    We present constraints on canonical single-field inflation derived from WMAP five year, ACBAR, QUAD, BICEP data combined with the halo power spectrum from SDSS LRG7. Models with a non-scale-invariant spectrum and a red tilt nS < 1 are now preferred over the Harrison-Zel'dovich model (nS = 1, tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0) at high significance. Assuming no running of the spectral indices, we derive constraints on the parameters (nS, r) and compare our results with the predictions of simple inflationary models. The marginalised credible intervals read nS = 0.962+0.028-0.026 and r < 0.17 (95% confidence level). With respect to previous analyses, the portion of the 68% c.l. contours compatible with potentials which are concave in the observable region becomes even smaller, but the quadratic potential model remains inside the 95% c.l. contours. We demonstrate that these results are robust to changes in the datasets considered and in the theoretical assumptions made. We then consider a non-vanishing running of the spectral indices by employing different methods, non-parametric but approximate, or parametric but exact. With our combination of CMB and LSS data, running models are preferred over power-law models only by a Δχ2 simeq 5.8, allowing inflationary stages producing a sizable negative running -0.063+0.061-0.049 and larger tensor-scalar ratio r < 0.33 at the 95% c.l. This requires large values of the third derivative of the inflaton potential within the observable range. We derive bounds on this derivative under the assumption that the inflaton potential can be approximated as a third order polynomial within the observable range.

  14. CMB power spectra induced by primordial cross-bispectra between metric perturbations and vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Saga, Shohei; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: saga.shohei@nagoya-u.jp

    2012-11-01

    We study temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation sourced from primordial cross-bispectra between metric perturbations and vector fields, which are generated from the inflation model where an inflaton and a vector field are coupled. In case the vector field survives after the reheating, both the primordial scalar and tensor fluctuations can be enhanced by the anisotropic stress composed of the vector fields during radiation dominated era. We show that through this enhancement the primordial cross-bispectra generate not only CMB bispectra but also CMB power spectra. In general, we can expect such cross-bispectra produce the non-trivial mode-coupling signals between the scalar and tensor fluctuations. However, we explicitly show that such mode-coupling signals do not appear in CMB power spectra. Through the numerical analysis of the CMB scalar-mode power spectra, we find that although signals from these cross-bispectra are smaller than primary non-electromagnetic ones, these have some characteristic features such as negative auto-correlations of the temperature and polarization modes, respectively. On the other hand, signals from tensor modes are almost comparable to primary non-electromagnetic ones and hence the shape of observed B-mode spectrum may deviate from the prediction in the non-electromagnetic case. The above imprints may help us to judge the existence of the coupling between the scalar and vector fields in the early Universe.

  15. Receptor model technical series. Volume 3 (1989 revision): CMB7 user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.G.; Henry, R.C.; Nguyen, Q.T.; Meyer, E.L.; Pace, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model uses chemical composition measured in the source and receptor samples to estimate the relative contributions of different source categories to ambient particulate concentration. The manual describes the CMB7 receptor model software. It is designed to allow users to use the CMB receptor model constructively with a few hour's learning time. Emphasizing rapid command of modeling procedures, the manual covers primarily the mechanical aspects of operating the model. Information on the theoretical basic principles of CMB receptor modeling is also briefly explained in the appendices. The manual is intended for wide use by State and local air pollution control agency personnel in developing State Implementation Plans for PM10. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has published a companion document to this manual that should be consulted for this application. The Protocol for Applying and Validating the CMB Model, EPA-450/4-87-010, provides guidance on applicability, assumptions and interpretation of results. This protocol provides a practical strategy for obtaining valid results.

  16. Microfabrication of Arrays of Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors for CMB Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Chrystian; Ding, Junjia; Bender, Amy; Khaire, Trupti; Lendinez, Sergi; Ciocys, Samuel; Wang, Gensheng; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Padin, Steve; Carlstrom, John; Chang, Clarence; Novosad, Valentine; Spt3G Collaboration

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides a unique window for exploring fundamental physics. Increasing the sensitivity of CMB experiments requires fabricating focal planes with orders of magnitude more detectors than current instruments. This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory for the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic detectors for CMB measurements. The detectors are composed of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip transmission line. In-line filters define the spectral response, allowing for individual measurement of three band-passes (95 GHz, 150GHz and 220 GHz). A Ti /Au termination resistor is used to couple the mm-wave signal to Ti/Au transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. There are six bolometers per pixel, for a total of 16,140 detectors in the CMB receiver being fabricated. The monolithic microfabrication of the detector arrays will be presented and discussed in detail. The SPT3G collaboration is developing the thrid-generation camera for CMB measurements with the South Pole Telescope. Additional information can be found in the following link: https://pole.uchicago.edu/spt/.

  17. Cross-correlation between the CMB Lensing Potential Measured by Planck and High-z Submillimeter Galaxies Detected by the Herschel-Atlas Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, F.; Bielewicz, P.; Lapi, A.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; de Zotti, G.; Danese, L.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Ivison, R.; Maddox, S.; Negrello, M.; Scott, D.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present the first measurement of the correlation between the map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential derived from the Planck nominal mission data and z≳ 1.5 galaxies detected by the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) survey covering about 600 {{deg }2}, i.e., about 1.4% of the sky. We reject the hypothesis that there is no correlation between CMB lensing and galaxy detection at a 20σ significance, checking the result by performing a number of null tests. The significance of the detection of the theoretically expected cross-correlation signal is found to be 10σ . The galaxy bias parameter, b, derived from a joint analysis of the cross-power spectrum and of the autopower spectrum of the galaxy density contrast is found to be b=2.80-0.11+0.12, consistent with earlier estimates for H-ATLAS galaxies at similar redshifts. On the other hand, the amplitude of the cross-correlation is found to be a factor 1.62 ± 0.16 higher than expected from the standard model and also found by cross-correlation analyses with other tracers of the large-scale structure. The enhancement due to lensing magnification can account for only a fraction of the excess cross-correlation signal. We suggest that part of it may be due to an incomplete removal of the contamination of the cosmic infrared background, which includes the H-ATLAS sources we are cross-correlating with. In any case, the highly significant detection reported here using a catalog covering only 1.4% of the sky demonstrates the potential of CMB lensing correlations with submillimeter surveys. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  18. Full-sky lensing reconstruction of gradient and curl modes from CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi E-mail: yamauchi@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-01-01

    We present a method of lensing reconstruction on the full sky, by extending the optimal quadratic estimator proposed by Okamoto and Hu (2003) to the case including the curl mode of deflection angle. The curl mode is induced by the vector and tensor metric perturbations, and the reconstruction of the curl mode would be a powerful tool to not only check systematics in the estimated gradient mode but also probe any vector and tensor sources. We find that the gradient and curl modes can be reconstructed separately, thanks to the distinctive feature in the parity symmetry between the gradient and curl modes. We compare our estimator with the flat-sky estimator proposed by Cooray et al (2005). Based on the new formalism, the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the curl mode produced by the primordial gravitational-waves and a specific model of cosmic strings are estimated, and prospects for future observations are discussed.

  19. Pearson's random walk in the space of the CMB phases: Evidence for parity asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.; Frejsel, A. M.; Kim, J.; Naselsky, P.; Nesti, F.

    2011-05-15

    The temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are supposed to be distributed randomly in both magnitude and phase, following to the simplest model of inflation. In this paper, we look at the odd and even multipoles of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the CMB, and the different characteristics of these, giving rise to a parity asymmetry. We compare the even and odd multipoles in the CMB power spectrum, and also the even and odd mean angles. We find for the multipoles of the power spectrum that there is power excess in odd multipoles, compared to even ones, meaning that we have a parity asymmetry. Further, for the phases, we present a random walk for the mean angles, and find a significant separation for even/odd mean angles, especially so for galactic coordinates. This is further tested and confirmed with a directional parity test, comparing the parity asymmetry in galactic and ecliptic coordinates.

  20. Total CMB analysis of streaker aerosol samples by PIXE, PIGE, beta- and optical-absorption analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annegarn, H. J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.

    1993-04-01

    Multielemental analyses of aerosol samples are widely used in air pollution receptor modelling. Specifically, the chemical mass balance (CMB) model has become a powerful tool in urban air quality studies. Input data required for the CMB includes not only the traditional X-ray fluorescence (and hence PIXE) detected elements, but also total mass, organic and inorganic carbon, and other light elements including Mg, Na and F. The circular streaker sampler, in combination with PIXE analysis, has developed into a powerful tool for obtaining time-resolved, multielemental aerosol data. However, application in CMB modelling has been limited by the absence of total mass and complementary light element data. This study reports on progress in using techniques complementary to PIXE to obtain additional data from circular streaker samples, maintaining the nondestructive, instrumental approach inherent in PIXE: beta-gauging using a 147Pm source for total mass; optical absorption for inorganic carbon; and PIGE to measure the lighter elements.

  1. Mixed inflaton and spectator field models: CMB constraints and μ distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, Kari; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

    2016-04-01

    We discuss mixed inflaton and spectator field models where both the fields are responsible for the observed density fluctuations. We combine the angular power spectrum of the CMB temperature anisotropy from the Planck 2013 result and other ground-based CMB observations in order to constrain both the general mixed model as well as some specific representative scenarios. Based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, in addition to constraints on model parameters, we obtain the predictive posterior distributions of the CMB spectral μ distortion for those models. We demonstrate that the standard single-field inflaton model typically predicts μ ~ 10-8 with a relatively narrow distribution, whereas for the mixed models, the distribution turns out to be much broader, and μ could be larger by almost an order of magnitude. Hence future experiments of μ distortion could provide a tool for the critical testing of the mixed source models of the primordial perturbation.

  2. Constraining the CMB optical depth through the dispersion measure of cosmological radio transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A.

    2016-05-01

    The dispersion measure of extragalactic radio transients can be used to measure the column density of free electrons in the intergalactic medium. The same electrons also scatter the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons, affecting precision measurements of cosmological parameters. We explore the connection between the dispersion measure of radio transients existing during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the total optical depth for the CMB showing that the existence of such transients would provide a new sensitive probe of the CMB optical depth. As an example, we consider the population of FRBs. Assuming they exist during the EoR, we show that: (i) such sources can probe the reionization history by measuring the optical depth to sub-percent accuracy, and (ii) they can be detected with high significance by an instrument such as the Square Kilometer Array.

  3. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Geodynamo Models With a Thick Stable Layer and Heterogeneous CMB Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, U. R.

    2015-12-01

    The upward revision of the thermal conductivity in the Earth's core makes it plausible that the mean heat flow at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) could be only afraction of what can be conducted down the core adiabat (perhaps one half). The upper part of the fluid core would be stably stratified to substantial depth. This is inconsistent with evidence for upwelling flow near the CMB from observations ofof magnetic flux expulsion. Heat flow at the CMB is likely very heterogeneous and would still be superadiabatic in some regions of the CMB. The dynamics of such a system is unclear. Gubbins et al. (Phys. Earth Planet. Int., in press, 2015)suggest that the locally unstable gradient would mix up the stable layer as a wholeand replace it by a weakly convecting one. We study dynamo models driven by a codensity flux from the inner core. On the outer boundary an inverse (on average) gradient is imposed, leading to stable stratification of the top 40% of the fluid shell. In addition to control cases with homogeneous CMB flux, we run models with two unstableregions centered on the equator. In the latter cases a predominantly horizontal circulation in a thin layer immediately below the outer boundary redistributes the heat that is conducted radially upward in the stable layer and transports ittowards the high heat-flow spots. Radial flow below these spots does not penetrate deeply into the stable layer, nor does the layer become mixed up to a significant degree. A dynamo operates in the convecting deep interior, however, its dipole moment is low in comparison to the Earth value. Heat flow heterogeneity at the CMB does not sem to solve the problems that exist for the geodynamo when the average heat flux is substantially subadiabatic.

  5. A MAP OF THE INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE SIGNAL FROM LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Granett, Benjamin R.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2009-08-10

    We construct a map of the time derivative of the gravitational potential traced by Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The potential decays on large scales due to cosmic acceleration, leaving an imprint on cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. With a template fit, we directly measure this signature on the CMB at a 2{sigma} confidence level. The measurement is consistent with the cross-correlation statistic, strengthening the claim that dark energy is indeed the cause of the correlation. This new approach potentially simplifies the cosmological interpretation. Our constructed linear ISW map shows no evidence for degree-scale cold and hot spots associated with supervoid and supercluster structures. This suggests that the linear ISW effect in a concordance {lambda}CDM cosmology is insufficient to explain the strong CMB imprints from these structures that we previously reported.

  6. Compensation for large tensor modes with iso-curvature perturbations in CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: shu@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-05-01

    Recently, BICEP2 has reported the large tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.2{sup +0.07}{sub −0.05} from the observation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode at degree-scales. Since tensor modes induce not only CMB B-mode but also the temperature fluctuations on large scales, to realize the consistent temperature fluctuations with the Planck result we should consider suppression of scalar perturbations on corresponding large scales. To realize such a suppression, we consider anti-correlated iso-curvature perturbations which could be realized in the simple curvaton model.

  7. Local analyses of Planck maps with Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Marques, G. A.; Ferreira, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    Minkowski functionals (MF) are excellent tools to investigate the statistical properties of the cosmic background radiation (CMB) maps. Between their notorious advantages is the possibility to use them efficiently in patches of the CMB sphere, which allow studies in masked skies, inclusive analyses of small sky regions. Then, possible deviations from Gaussianity are investigated by comparison with MF obtained from a set of Gaussian isotropic simulated CMB maps to which are applied the same cut-sky masks. These analyses are sensitive enough to detect contaminations of small intensity like primary and secondary CMB anisotropies. Our methodology uses the MF, widely employed to study non-Gaussianities in CMB data, and asserts Gaussian deviations only when all of them points out an exceptional χ2 value, at more than 2.2σ confidence level, in a given sky patch. Following this rigorous procedure, we find 13 regions in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps that evince such high levels of non-Gaussian deviations. According to our results, these non-Gaussian contributions show signatures that can be associated to the presence of hot or cold spots in such regions. Moreover, some of these non-Gaussian deviations signals suggest the presence of foreground residuals in those regions located near the Galactic plane. Additionally, we confirm that most of the regions revealed in our analyses, but not all, have been recently reported in studies done by the Planck collaboration. Furthermore, we also investigate whether these non-Gaussian deviations can be possibly sourced by systematics, like inhomogeneous noise and beam effect in the released Planck data, or perhaps due to residual Galactic foregrounds.

  8. Searching for signatures of cosmic superstrings in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Danos, Rebecca J.; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2010-02-01

    Because cosmic superstrings generically form junctions and gauge theoretic strings typically do not, junctions may provide a signature to distinguish between cosmic superstrings and gauge theoretic cosmic strings. In cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps, cosmic strings lead to distinctive line discontinuities. String junctions lead to junctions in these line discontinuities. In turn, edge detection algorithms such as the Canny algorithm can be used to search for signatures of strings in anisotropy maps. We apply the Canny algorithm to simulated maps which contain the effects of cosmic strings with and without string junctions. The Canny algorithm produces edge maps. To distinguish between edge maps from string simulations with and without junctions, we examine the density distribution of edges and pixels crossed by edges. We find that in string simulations without Gaussian noise (such as produced by the dominant inflationary fluctuations) our analysis of the output data from the Canny algorithm can clearly distinguish between simulations with and without string junctions. In the presence of Gaussian noise at the level expected from the current bounds on the contribution of cosmic strings to the total power spectrum of density fluctuations, the distinction between models with and without junctions is more difficult. However, by carefully analyzing the data the models can still be differentiated.

  9. Detecting cosmic strings in the CMB with the Canny algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Stephen; Brandenberger, Robert H; Berger, Joshua E-mail: jb454@cornell.edu

    2008-04-15

    Line discontinuities in cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps are a distinctive prediction of models with cosmic strings. These signatures are visible in anisotropy maps with good angular resolution and should be identifiable using edge-detection algorithms. One such algorithm is the Canny algorithm. We study the potential of this algorithm to pick out the line discontinuities generated by cosmic strings. By applying the algorithm to small-scale microwave anisotropy maps generated from theoretical models with and without cosmic strings, we find that, given an angular resolution of several minutes of arc, cosmic strings can be detected down to a limit of the mass per unit length of the string which is one order of magnitude lower than the current upper bounds.

  10. Analytical Spectra of RGWs and its Induced CMB Anisotropies and Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang

    We present our results from a series of analytical studies on the relic gravitational waves (RGW). Influences of various cosmological parameters and processes, possible detections of, and constraints on RGWs are examined. With the resulting RGW, we present the analytical spectra ClXX of CMB anisotropies and polarizations, particularly, reionization is also included.

  11. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: likelihood for small-scale CMB data

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkley, J.; Calabrese, E.; Sievers, J.; Addison, G.E.; Halpern, M.; Battaglia, N.; Battistelli, E.S.; Bond, J.R.; Hajian, A.; Hincks, A.D.; Das, S.; Devlin, M.J.; Dünner, R.; Fowler, J.W.; Irwin, K.D.; Gralla, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hlozek, R.; Hughes, J.P.; Kosowsky, A.; and others

    2013-07-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope has measured the angular power spectra of microwave fluctuations to arcminute scales at frequencies of 148 and 218 GHz, from three seasons of data. At small scales the fluctuations in the primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) become increasingly obscured by extragalactic foregounds and secondary CMB signals. We present results from a nine-parameter model describing these secondary effects, including the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ and kSZ) power; the clustered and Poisson-like power from Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) sources, and their frequency scaling; the tSZ-CIB correlation coefficient; the extragalactic radio source power; and thermal dust emission from Galactic cirrus in two different regions of the sky. In order to extract cosmological parameters, we describe a likelihood function for the ACT data, fitting this model to the multi-frequency spectra in the multipole range 500 < l < 10000. We extend the likelihood to include spectra from the South Pole Telescope at frequencies of 95, 150, and 220 GHz. Accounting for different radio source levels and Galactic cirrus emission, the same model provides an excellent fit to both datasets simultaneously, with χ{sup 2}/dof= 675/697 for ACT, and 96/107 for SPT. We then use the multi-frequency likelihood to estimate the CMB power spectrum from ACT in bandpowers, marginalizing over the secondary parameters. This provides a simplified 'CMB-only' likelihood in the range 500 < l < 3500 for use in cosmological parameter estimation.

  12. An improved upper limit to the CMB circular polarization at large angular scales

    SciTech Connect

    Mainini, R.; Minelli, D.; Gervasi, M.; Boella, G.; Sironi, G.; Baú, A.; Banfi, S.; Passerini, A.; Lucia, A. De; Cavaliere, F. E-mail: daniele.minelli@gmail.com E-mail: giuliano.boella@unimib.it E-mail: bau@mib.infn.it E-mail: andrea.passerini@mib.infn.it E-mail: francesco.cavaliere@fisica.unimi.it

    2013-08-01

    Circular polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) offers the possibility of detecting rotations of the universe and magnetic fields in the primeval universe or in distant clusters of galaxies. We used the Milano Polarimeter (MIPOL) installed at the Testa Grigia Observatory, on the italian Alps, to improve the existing upper limits to the CMB circular polarization at large angular scales. We obtain 95% confidence level upper limits to the degree of the CMB circular polarization ranging between 5.0⋅10{sup −4} and 0.7⋅10{sup −4} at angular scales between 8° and 24°, improving by one order of magnitude preexisting upper limits at large angular scales. Our results are still far from the nK region where today expectations place the amplitude of the V Stokes parameter used to characterize circular polarization of the CMB but improve the preexisting limit at similar angular scales. Our observations offered also the opportunity of characterizing the atmospheric emission at 33 GHz at the Testa Grigia Observatory.

  13. B Mode Correlation Enhancement of CMB from Thermal Squeezed Vacuum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayour, Basem; Suresh, P. K.

    2013-02-01

    The generated gravitational waves during inflation are placed in thermal squeezed vacuum state. The B mode angular power spectrum of the CMB anisotropy is found enhanced for all multipole moments l ⩾ 2 but less than the upper bound of the WMAP 7-year data.

  14. Slow-roll inflation and BB-mode angular power spectrum of CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malsawmtluangi, N.; Suresh, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    The BB-mode correlation angular power spectrum of CMB is obtained by considering the primordial gravitational waves in the squeezed vacuum state for various inflationary models and results are compared with the joint analysis of the BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck 353 GHz data. The present results may constrain several models of inflation.

  15. Probing the Gaussianity and the statistical isotropy of the CMB with spherical wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielva, Patricio

    2007-09-01

    This article focuses on the study of the statistical properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations. This study helps to define a coherent framework for the origin of the Universe, its evolution and the structure formation. The current standard model is based in the Big-Bang theory, in the context of the Cosmic Inflation scenario, and predicts that the CMB temperature fluctuations can be understood as the realization of a statistical isotropic and Gaussian random field. To probe whether these statistical properties are satisfied or not is capital, since deviations from these hypotheses would indicate that non-standard models might play an important role in the dynamics of the Universe. But that is not all. There are alternative sources of anisotropy or non-Gaussianity that could contaminate the CMB signal as well. Hence, sophisticated techniques must be used to carry out such a probe. Among all the methodologies that one can face in the literature, those based on wavelets are providing one of the most interesting insights to the problem. Their ability to explore several scales keeping, at the same time, spatial information of the CMB, is a very useful property to discriminate among possible sources of anisotropy and/or non-Gaussianity.

  16. What can the CMB tell about the microphysics of cosmic reheating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Marco

    2016-03-01

    In inflationary cosmology, cosmic reheating after inflation sets the initial conditions for the hot big bang. We investigate how CMB data can be used to study the effective potential and couplings of the inflaton during reheating to constrain the underlying microphysics. If there is a phase of preheating that is driven by a parametric resonance or other instability, then the thermal history and expansion history during the reheating era depend on a large number of microphysical parameters in a complicated way. In this case the connection between CMB observables and microphysical parameters can only established with intense numerical studies. Such studies can help to improve CMB constraints on the effective inflaton potential in specific models, but parameter degeneracies usually make it impossible to extract meaningful best-fit values for individual microphysical parameters. If, on the other hand, reheating is driven by perturbative processes, then it can be possible to constrain the inflaton couplings and the reheating temperature from CMB data. This provides an indirect probe of fundamental microphysical parameters that most likely can never be measured directly in the laboratory, but have an immense impact on the evolution of the cosmos by setting the stage for the hot big bang.

  17. An improved upper limit to the CMB circular polarization at large angular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainini, R.; Minelli, D.; Gervasi, M.; Boella, G.; Sironi, G.; Baú, A.; Banfi, S.; Passerini, A.; De Lucia, A.; Cavaliere, F.

    2013-08-01

    Circular polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) offers the possibility of detecting rotations of the universe and magnetic fields in the primeval universe or in distant clusters of galaxies. We used the Milano Polarimeter (MIPOL) installed at the Testa Grigia Observatory, on the italian Alps, to improve the existing upper limits to the CMB circular polarization at large angular scales. We obtain 95% confidence level upper limits to the degree of the CMB circular polarization ranging between 5.0ṡ10-4 and 0.7ṡ10-4 at angular scales between 8° and 24°, improving by one order of magnitude preexisting upper limits at large angular scales. Our results are still far from the nK region where today expectations place the amplitude of the V Stokes parameter used to characterize circular polarization of the CMB but improve the preexisting limit at similar angular scales. Our observations offered also the opportunity of characterizing the atmospheric emission at 33 GHz at the Testa Grigia Observatory.

  18. Planck 2013 results. XXVII. Doppler boosting of the CMB: Eppur si muove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    Our velocity relative to the rest frame of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) generates a dipole temperature anisotropy on the sky which has been well measured for more than 30 years, and has an accepted amplitude of v/c = 1.23 × 10-3, or v = 369. In addition to this signal generated by Doppler boosting of the CMB monopole, our motion also modulates and aberrates the CMB temperature fluctuations (as well as every other source of radiation at cosmological distances). This is an order 10-3 effect applied to fluctuations which are already one part in roughly 105, so it is quite small. Nevertheless, it becomes detectable with the all-sky coverage, high angular resolution, and low noise levels of the Planck satellite. Here we report a first measurement of this velocity signature using the aberration and modulation effects on the CMB temperature anisotropies, finding a component in the known dipole direction, (l,b) = (264°,48°), of 384 km s-1 ± 78 km s-1 (stat.) ± 115 km s-1 (syst.). This is a significant confirmation of the expected velocity. "And yet it moves", the phrase popularly attributed to Galileo Galilei after being forced to recant his view that the Earth goes around the Sun.

  19. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Likelihood for Small-Scale CMB Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkley, J.; Calabrese, E.; Sievers, J.; Addison, G. E.; Battaglia, N.; Battistelli, E. S.; Bond, J. R.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dunner, R.; Fowler, J. W.; Gralla, M.; Hajian, A.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hincks, A. D.; Hlozek, R.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Kosowsky, A.; Louis, T.; Marriage, T. A.; Marsden, D.; Menanteau, F.; Niemack, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope has measured the angular power spectra of microwave fluctuations to arcminute scales at frequencies of 148 and 218 GHz, from three seasons of data. At small scales the fluctuations in the primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) become increasingly obscured by extragalactic foregounds and secondary CMB signals. We present results from a nine-parameter model describing these secondary effects, including the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ and kSZ) power; the clustered and Poisson-like power from Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) sources, and their frequency scaling; the tSZ-CIB correlation coefficient; the extragalactic radio source power; and thermal dust emission from Galactic cirrus in two different regions of the sky. In order to extract cosmological parameters, we describe a likelihood function for the ACT data, fitting this model to the multi-frequency spectra in the multipole range 500 < l < 10000. We extend the likelihood to include spectra from the South Pole Telescope at frequencies of 95, 150, and 220 GHz. Accounting for different radio source levels and Galactic cirrus emission, the same model provides an excellent fit to both datasets simultaneously, with ?2/dof= 675/697 for ACT, and 96/107 for SPT. We then use the multi-frequency likelihood to estimate the CMB power spectrum from ACT in bandpowers, marginalizing over the secondary parameters. This provides a simplified 'CMB-only' likelihood in the range 500 < l < 3500 for use in cosmological parameter estimation

  20. CMB maximum temperature asymmetry axis: Alignment with other cosmic asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Antonio; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2013-02-01

    We use a global pixel-based estimator to identify the axis of the residual Maximum Temperature Asymmetry (MTA) (after the dipole subtraction) of the WMAP seven-year Internal Linear Combination (ILC) cosmic microwave background temperature sky map. The estimator is based on considering the temperature differences between opposite pixels in the sky at various angular resolutions (4°-15°) and selecting the axis that maximizes this difference. We consider three large-scale HEALPix resolutions: Nside=16(3.7°), Nside=8(7.3°) and Nside=4(14.7°). We compare the direction and magnitude of this asymmetry with three other cosmic asymmetry axes (α dipole, dark energy dipole and dark flow) and find that the four asymmetry axes are abnormally close to each other. We compare the observed MTA axis with the corresponding MTA axes of 104 Gaussian isotropic simulated ILC maps (based on ΛCDM). The fraction of simulated ILC maps that reproduce the observed magnitude of the MTA asymmetry and alignment with the observed α dipole is in the range of 0.1%-0.5% (depending on the resolution chosen for the cosmic microwave background map). The corresponding magnitude+alignment probabilities with the other two asymmetry axes (dark energy dipole and dark flow) are at the level of about 1%. We propose Extended Topological Quintessence as a physical model qualitatively consistent with this coincidence of directions.

  1. Reconstructing the integrated Sachs-Wolfe map with galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Jessica; Huterer, Dragan

    2016-08-01

    The integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is a large-angle modulation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), generated when CMB photons traverse evolving potential wells associated with large scale structure (LSS). Recent efforts have been made to reconstruct maps of the ISW signal using information from surveys of galaxies and other LSS tracers, but investigation into how survey systematics affect their reliability has so far been limited. Using simulated ISW and LSS maps, we study the impact of galaxy survey properties and systematic errors on the accuracy of a reconstructed ISW signal. We find that systematics that affect the observed distribution of galaxies along the line of sight, such as photo-z and bias-evolution related errors, have a relatively minor impact on reconstruction quality. In contrast, however, we find that direction-dependent calibration errors can be very harmful. Specifically, we find that, in order to avoid significant degradation of our reconstruction quality statistics, direction-dependent number density fluctuations due to systematics must be controlled so that their variance is smaller than 10-6 (which corresponds to a 0.1% calibration). Additionally, we explore the implications of our results for attempts to use reconstructed ISW maps to shed light on the origin of large-angle CMB alignments. We find that there is only a weak correlation between the true and reconstructed angular momentum dispersion, which quantifies alignment, even for reconstructed ISW maps which are fairly accurate overall.

  2. Technical note: An improved estimate of uncertainty for source contribution from effective variance Chemical Mass Balance (EV-CMB) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guo-Liang; Zhou, Xiao-Yu; Feng, Yin-Chang; Tian, Ying-Ze; Liu, Gui-Rong; Zheng, Mei; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Yuan-Hang

    2015-01-01

    The CMB (Chemical Mass Balance) 8.2 model released by the USEPA is a commonly used receptor model that can determine estimated source contributions and their uncertainties (called default uncertainty). In this study, we propose an improved CMB uncertainty for the modeled contributions (called EV-LS uncertainty) by adding the difference between the modeled and measured values for ambient species concentrations to the default CMB uncertainty, based on the effective variance least squares (EV-LS) solution. This correction reconciles the uncertainty estimates for EV and OLS regression. To verify the formula for the EV-LS CMB uncertainty, the same ambient datasets were analyzed using the equation we developed for EV-LS CMB uncertainty and a standard statistical package, SPSS 16.0. The same results were obtained by both ways indicate that the equation for EV-LS CMB uncertainty proposed here is acceptable. In addition, four ambient datasets were studies by CMB 8.2 and the source contributions as well as the associated uncertainties were obtained accordingly.

  3. Linear and Circular polarization of CMB and cosmic 21cm radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Soma; Vachaspati, T.; Pogosian, L.; Tashiro, H.

    2014-01-01

    I will discuss the effect of galactic and primordial magnetic field on the linear polarization of CMB. Faraday Rotation (FR) of CMB polarization, as measured through mode-coupling correlations of E and B modes, can be a promising probe of a stochastic primordial magnetic field (PMF). We use existing estimates of the Milky Way rotation measure (RM) to forecast its detectability with upcoming and future CMB experiments. We find that a realistic future sub-orbital experiment, covering a patch of the sky near the galactic poles, can detect a scale-invariant PMF of 0.1 nano-Gauss at better than 95% confidence level. Next I'll discuss how the galactic magnetic field affects polarization of 21 cm. Unpolarized 21 cm radiation acquires a certain level of linear polarization during the EoR due to Thompson scattering. This linear polarization, if measured, could probe important information about the EoR. We show that a 99 % accuracy on galactic rotation measure (RM) data is necessary to recover the initial E-mode signal. I will conclude my talk by addressing the very interesting question of if CMB can be circularly polarized due to the secondary effects along the line of sight. As the CMB passes through galaxies and galaxy clusters, which could generate a circular polarization by the method of Faraday conversion (FC) (Pacholczyk, 1998, Cooray et al, 2002). Particularly explosions of first stars can induce circular polarization (due to Faraday conversion) and it has no strong local foreground. The unique frequency dependence of FC signal will allow one to eliminate other possible sources of circular polarization enabling to probe the first star explosions.

  4. CMB aberration and Doppler effects as a source of hemispherical asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel; Catena, Riccardo

    2014-03-01

    Our peculiar motion with respect to the CMB rest frame represents a preferred direction in the observed CMB sky since it induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons (aberration) and a shift in their frequency (Doppler). Both effects distort the multipoles alm's at all l's. Such effects are real as it has been recently measured for the first time by Planck according to what was forecast in some recent papers. However, the common lore when estimating a power spectrum from CMB is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, neglecting any other corrections. In this work we use simulations of the CMB sky in a boosted frame with a peculiar velocity β≡v/c = 1.23 × 10-3 in order to assess the impact of such effect on power spectrum estimations in different regions of the sky. We show that the boost induces a north-south asymmetry in the power spectrum which is highly significant and non-negligible, of about (0.58±0.10)% for half-sky cuts when going up to l ≈ 2500. We suggest that these effects are relevant and may account for some of the north-south asymmetries seen in the Planck data, being especially important at small scales. Finally we analyze the particular case of the ACT experiment, which observed only a small fraction of the sky and show that it suffers a bias of about 1% on the power spectrum and of similar size on some cosmological parameters: for example the position of the peaks shifts by 0.5% and the overall amplitude of the spectrum is about 0.4% lower than a full-sky case.

  5. Analysing the Effect on CMB in a Parity and Charge Parity Violating Varying Alpha Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Debaprasad; Chen, Pisin; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    In this paper we study in detail the effect of our recently proposed model of parity and charge-parity (PCP) violating varying alpha on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photon passing through the intra galaxy-cluster medium (ICM). The ICM is well known to be composed of magnetized plasma. According to our model, the polarization and intensity of the CMB would be affected when traversing through the ICM due to non-trivial scalar photon interactions. We have calculated the evolution of such polarization and intensity collectively, known as the stokes parameters of the CMB photon during its journey through the ICM and tested our results against the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) measurement on Coma galaxy cluster. Our model contains a PCP violating parameter, {beta}, and a scale of alpha variation {omega}. Using the derived constrained on the photon-to-scalar conversion probability, {bar P}{sub {gamma}{yields}{phi}}, for Coma cluster in ref.[34] we found a contour plot in the ({omega},{beta}) parameter plane. The {beta} = 0 line in this parameter space corresponds to well-studied Maxwell-dilaton type models which has lower bound on {omega} {approx}> 6.4 x 10{sup 9} GeV. In general, as the absolute value of {beta} increases, lower bound on {omega} also increases. Our model in general predicts the modification of the CMB polarization with a non-trivial dependence on the parity violating coupling parameter {beta}. However, it is unconstrained in this particular study. We show that this effect can in principle be detected in the future measurements on CMB polarization such that {beta} can also be constrained.

  6. Ali Observatory in Tibet: a unique northern site for future CMB ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based CMB observations have been performed at the South Pole and the Atacama desert in Chile. However, a significant fraction of the sky can not be observed from just these two sites. For a full sky coverage from the ground in the future, a northern site for CMB observation, in particular CMB polarization, is required. Besides the long-thought site in Greenland, the high altitude Tibet plateau provides another opportunity. I will describe the Ali Observatory in Tibet, located at N32°19', E80°01', as a potential site for ground-based CMB observations. The new site is located on almost 5100m mountain, near Gar town, where is an excellent site for both infrared and submillimeter observations. Study with the long-term database of ground weather stations and archival satellite data has been performed. The site has enough relative height on the plateau and is accessible by car. The Shiquanhe town is 40 mins away by driving, and a recently opened airport with 40 mins driving, the site also has road excess, electricity, and optical fiber with fast internet. Preliminary measurement of the Precipitable Water Vapor is ~one quarter less than 0.5mm per year and the long term monitoring is under development. In addition, surrounding higher sites are also available and could be further developed if necessary. Ali provides unique northern sky coverage and together with the South Pole and the Atacama desert, future CMB observations will be able to cover the full sky from ground.

  7. CMB aberration and Doppler effects as a source of hemispherical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel; Catena, Riccardo E-mail: mquartin@if.ufrj.br

    2014-03-01

    Our peculiar motion with respect to the CMB rest frame represents a preferred direction in the observed CMB sky since it induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons (aberration) and a shift in their frequency (Doppler). Both effects distort the multipoles a{sub ℓm}'s at all ℓ's. Such effects are real as it has been recently measured for the first time by Planck according to what was forecast in some recent papers. However, the common lore when estimating a power spectrum from CMB is to consider that Doppler affects only the ℓ = 1 multipole, neglecting any other corrections. In this work we use simulations of the CMB sky in a boosted frame with a peculiar velocity β≡v/c = 1.23 × 10{sup −3} in order to assess the impact of such effect on power spectrum estimations in different regions of the sky. We show that the boost induces a north-south asymmetry in the power spectrum which is highly significant and non-negligible, of about (0.58±0.10)% for half-sky cuts when going up to ℓ ≈ 2500. We suggest that these effects are relevant and may account for some of the north-south asymmetries seen in the Planck data, being especially important at small scales. Finally we analyze the particular case of the ACT experiment, which observed only a small fraction of the sky and show that it suffers a bias of about 1% on the power spectrum and of similar size on some cosmological parameters: for example the position of the peaks shifts by 0.5% and the overall amplitude of the spectrum is about 0.4% lower than a full-sky case.

  8. Thermodynamics of SU(2) quantum Yang-Mills theory and CMB anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    A brief review of effective SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics in the deconfining phase is given, including the construction of the thermal ground-state estimate in terms of an inert, adjoint scalar field φ, based on non-propagating (anti)selfdual field configurations of topological charge unity. We also discuss kinematic constraints on interacting propagating gauge fields implied by the according spatial coarse-graining, and we explain why the screening physics of an SU(2) photon is subject to an electric-magnetically dual interpretation. This argument relies on the fact that only (anti)calorons of scale parameter ρ ˜ |φ|-1 contribute to the coarse-graining required for thermal-ground-state emergence at temperature T. Thus, use of the effective gauge coupling e in the (anti)caloron action is justified, yielding the value ħ for the latter at almost all temperatures. As a consequence, the indeterministic transition of initial to final plane waves caused by an effective, pointlike vertex is fundamentally mediated in Euclidean time by a single (anti)caloron being part of the thermal ground state. Next, we elucidate how a low-frequency excess of line temperature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) determines the value of the critical temperature of the deconfining-preconfining phase transition of an SU(2) Yang-Mills theory postulated to describe photon propagation, and we describe how, starting at a redshift of about unity, SU(2) photons collectively work 3D temperature depressions into the CMB. Upon projection along a line of sight, a given depression influences the present CMB sky in a cosmologically local way, possibly explaining the large-angle anomalies confirmed recently by the Planck collaboration. Finally, six relativistic polarisations residing in the SU(2) vector modes roughly match the number of degrees of freedom in cosmic neutrinos (Planck) which would disqualify the latter as radiation. Indeed, if interpreted as single center-vortex loops in

  9. Construction of cosmic string induced temperature anisotropy maps with CMBFAST and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simatos, N.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2001-01-01

    We use the publicly available code CMBFAST, as modified by Pogosian and Vachaspati, to simulate the effects of wiggly cosmic strings on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Using the modified CMBFAST code, which takes into account vector modes and models wiggly cosmic strings by the one-scale model, we go beyond the angular power spectrum to construct CMB temperature maps with a resolution of a few degrees. The statistics of these maps are then studied using conventional and recently proposed statistical tests optimized for the detection of hidden temperature discontinuities induced by the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We show, however, that these realistic maps cannot be distinguished in a statistically significant way from purely Gaussian maps with an identical power spectrum.

  10. Class of positive partial transposition states

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2006-08-15

    We construct a class of quantum bipartite d(multiply-in-circle sign)d states which are positive under partial transposition (PPT states). This class is invariant under the maximal commutative subgroup of U(d) and contains as special cases many well-known examples of PPT states. States from our class provide criteria for testing the indecomposability of positive maps. Such maps are crucial for constructing entanglement witnesses.

  11. Analytical Spectra of Rgw and its Induced CMB Anisotropies and Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang

    2010-04-01

    We present the results from a series of analytical studies on relic gravitational waves (RGW) and the anisotropies and polarization of cosmic background radiation (CMB). The analytical spectrum h(ν) of RGW shows the influences of the dark energy, neutrino free-streaming (NFS), quantum chro-modynamical (QCD) phase transition, e+e- annihilation, and inflation. Various possible detections of, and constraints on RGW are examined. The resulting h(ν) is then used to analytically calculate the spectra ClXX of CMB anisotropies and polarizations. The influences of the inflation index, NFS, and baryon on ClXX are demonstrated. We also extend analytical calculation of ClXX to the case with reionization. The explicit dependence of ClXX on the optical depth is obtained, whose degeneracies with the amplitude and index of RGW are shown, and the consequential implications in extracting RGW signal from observed ClXX are explored.

  12. Photon-axion conversion as a mechanism for supernova dimming: Limits from CMB spectral distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg G.; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2005-07-15

    Axion-photon conversion induced by intergalactic magnetic fields has been proposed as an explanation for the dimming of distant supernovae of type Ia (SNe Ia) without cosmic acceleration. The effect depends on the intergalactic electron density n{sub e} as well as the B-field strength and domain size. We show that for n{sub e} < or approx. 10{sup -9} cm{sup -3} the same mechanism would cause excessive spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This small-n{sub e} parameter region had been left open by the most restrictive previous constraints based on the dispersion of quasar (QSO) spectra. The combination of CMB and QSO limits suggests that the photon-axion conversion mechanism can only play a subleading role for SN Ia dimming. A combined analysis of all the observables affected by the photon-axion oscillations would be required to give a final verdict on the viability of this model.

  13. A note on the birefringence angle estimation in CMB data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppuso, A.; Maggio, G.; Molinari, D.; Natoli, P.

    2016-05-01

    Parity violating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics induces a rotation of the linear polarization of photons. This effect, also known as cosmological birefringence (CB), can be tested with the observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies which are linearly polarized at the level of 5–10%. In particular CB produces non-null CMB cross correlations between temperature and B mode-polarization, and between E- and B-mode polarization. Here we study the properties of the so called D-estimators, often used to constrain such an effect. After deriving the framework of both frequentist and Bayesian analysis, we discuss the interplay between birefringence and weak-lensing, which, albeit parity conserving, modifies pre-existing TB and EB cross correlation.

  14. Limits on decaying dark energy density models from the CMB temperature-redshift relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Tortora, Crescenzo

    2012-03-01

    We discuss the thermodynamic and dynamical properties of a variable dark energy model with density scaling as ρx propto (1 + z)m, z being the redshift. These models lead to the creation/disruption of matter and radiation, which affect the cosmic evolution of both matter and radiation components in the Universe. In particular, we have studied the temperature-redshift relation of radiation, which has been constrained using a recent collection of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature measurements up to z ~ 3. We find that, within the uncertainties, the model is indistinguishable from a cosmological constant which does not exchange any particles with other components. Future observations, in particular measurements of CMB temperature at large redshift, will allow to give firmer bounds on the effective equation of state parameter weff for such types of dark energy models.

  15. Circulant states with positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2007-09-15

    We construct a large class of quantum dxd states which are positive under partial transposition (so called PPT states). The construction is based on certain direct sum decomposition of the total Hilbert space displaying characteristic circular structure - that is why we call them circulant states. It turns out that partial transposition maps any such decomposition into another one and hence both original density matrix and its partially transposed partner share similar cyclic properties. This class contains many well-known examples of PPT states from the literature and gives rise to a huge family of completely new states.

  16. Measuring distance ratios with CMB-galaxy lensing cross-correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.

    2009-02-15

    We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We cross-correlate the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at z{approx}1100 and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing cross-correlation to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing cross-correlation is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution function of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the ratio can be measured to {approx}4% accuracy, whereas a future polarization-based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise ({approx}1%) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Combining this method with the stacked cluster mass reconstruction cosmography technique as proposed by Hu, Holz, and Vale (2007), the uncertainty in the ratio can be further reduced, improving the constraints on cosmological parameters. We also study the implications of the lensing-ratio measurement for early dark energy models, in the context of the parametrization proposed by Doran and Robbers (2006). For models which are degenerate with respect to the CMB, we find both baryon acoustic oscillation and lensing-ratio measurements to be insensitive to the early component of the dark energy density.

  17. Creation of the CMB spectrum: precise analytic solutions for the blackbody photosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A. E-mail: sunyaev@mpa-Garching.mpg.de

    2012-06-01

    The blackbody spectrum of CMB was created in the blackbody photosphere at redshifts z∼>2 × 10{sup 6}. At these early times, the Universe was dense and hot enough that complete thermal equilibrium between baryonic matter (electrons and ions) and photons could be established on time scales much shorter than the age of the Universe. Any perturbation away from the blackbody spectrum was suppressed exponentially. New physics, for example annihilation and decay of dark matter, can add energy and photons to CMB at redshifts z∼>10{sup 5} and result in a Bose-Einstein spectrum with a non-zero chemical potential (μ). Precise evolution of the CMB spectrum around the critical redshift of z ≅ 2 × 10{sup 6} is required in order to calculate the μ-type spectral distortion and constrain the underlying new physics. Although numerical calculation of important processes involved (double Compton process, comptonization and bremsstrahlung) is not difficult with present day computers, analytic solutions are much faster and easier to calculate and provide valuable physical insights. We provide precise (better than 1%) analytic solutions for the decay of μ, created at an earlier epoch, including all three processes, double Compton, Compton scattering on thermal electrons and bremsstrahlung in the limit of small distortions. This is a significant improvement over the existing solutions with accuracy ∼ 10% or worse. We also give a census of important sources of energy injection into CMB in standard cosmology. In particular, calculations of distortions from electron-positron annihilation and primordial nucleosynthesis illustrate in a dramatic way the strength of the equilibrium restoring processes in the early Universe. Finally, we point out the triple degeneracy in standard cosmology, i.e., the μ and y distortions from adiabatic cooling of baryons and electrons, Silk damping and annihilation of thermally produced WIMP dark matter are of similar order of magnitude ( ∼ 10{sup

  18. Extended analysis of CMB constraints on non-gaussianity in isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Hikage, Chiaki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2013-03-01

    We study CMB constraints on non-Gaussianity from isocurvature perturbations of general types. Specifically, we study CDM/neutrino isocurvature perturbations which are uncorrelated or totally correlated with adiabatic ones. Using the data from the WMAP 7-year observation at V and W bands, we obtained optimal constraints on the nonlinearity parameters of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. Our result shows that primordial perturbations are consistent with Gaussian ones at around 2σ level for above mentioned isocurvature modes.

  19. What we know and what we don't know about the CMB spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, John C.; COBE Team; PIXIE Team

    2014-01-01

    To a precision of 50 ppm, the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation has a blackbody spectrum with a temperature of 2.725 K, at wavelengths from 0.5 to 5 mm. This measurement by the COBE satellite team confirmed the concept of an expanding universe that was extremely hot and dense when it was young. In this picture, the CMB spectrum could be slightly distorted from the blackbody form by energy release or conversion after the universe was a few months old. At that time, the interaction of photons and electrons became weak enough that photons could no longer be easily created or destroyed, so that energy added or subtracted from the CMB would result in a spectrum with a chemical potential (mu distortion). Later, Compton scattering became incapable of equilibrating the spectrum to the chemical potential form, leading to a possibility of a mixture of blackbodies at different temperatures (y distortion). So far, there are only upper limits on the y and mu distortions, setting limits on possible sources of energy release such as the dissipation of acoustic modes at small scales, the decay of WIMPs, the action of primordial black holes, etc. On the other hand, the CMB spectrum is not expected to follow a blackbody to arbitrary precision. Energy releases associated with various astrophysical processes (recombination, reionization, and structure formation) will inevitably distort the CMB spectrum to create y or mu distortions at potentially observable amplitudes. Improved instrumentation capable of detecting such distortions could open a new window into the early universe, providing new constraints on processes ranging from inflation and the nature of the first stellar objects to exotic phenomena including primordial black holes, cosmic strings, and the decay or annihilation of dark matter.

  20. Distinguishing interacting dark energy from wCDM with CMB, lensing, and baryon acoustic oscillation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väliviita, Jussi; Palmgren, Elina

    2015-07-01

    We employ the Planck 2013 CMB temperature anisotropy and lensing data, and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data to constrain a phenomenological wCDM model, where dark matter and dark energy interact. We assume time-dependent equation of state parameter for dark energy, and treat dark matter and dark energy as fluids whose energy-exchange rate is proportional to the dark-matter density. The CMB data alone leave a strong degeneracy between the interaction rate and the physical CDM density parameter today, ωc, allowing a large interaction rate |Γ| ~ H0. However, as has been known for a while, the BAO data break this degeneracy. Moreover, we exploit the CMB lensing potential likelihood, which probes the matter perturbations at redshift z ~ 2 and is very sensitive to the growth of structure, and hence one of the tools for discerning between the ΛCDM model and its alternatives. However, we find that in the non-phantom models (wde>-1), the constraints remain unchanged by the inclusion of the lensing data and consistent with zero interaction, -0.14 < Γ/H0 < 0.02 at 95% CL. On the contrary, in the phantom models (wde<-1), energy transfer from dark energy to dark matter is moderately favoured over the non-interacting model; 0-0.57 < Γ/H0 < -0.1 at 95% CL with CMB+BAO, while addition of the lensing data shifts this to -0.46 < Γ/H0 < -0.01.

  1. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 67. ...

  2. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  3. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  4. The effects of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature uncertainties on cosmological parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y Y E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-03-15

    We estimate the effect of the experimental uncertainty in the measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the extraction of cosmological parameters from future CMB surveys. We find that even for an ideal experiment limited only by cosmic variance up to l=2500 for both the temperature and polarization measurements, the projected cosmological parameter errors are remarkably robust against the uncertainty of 1 mK in the firas CMB temperature monopole measurement. The maximum degradation in sensitivity is 20%, for the baryon density estimate, relative to the case in which the monopole is known infinitely well. While this degradation is acceptable, we note that reducing the uncertainty in the current temperature measurement by a factor of five will bring it down to {approx}1%. We also estimate the effect of the uncertainty in the dipole temperature measurement. Assuming the overall calibration of the data to be dominated by the dipole error of 0.2% from firas, the sensitivity degradation is insignificant and does not exceed 10% in any parameter direction.

  5. A constraint on Planck-scale modifications to electrodynamics with CMB polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Pagano, Luca; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha E-mail: luca.pagano@roma1.infn.it E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it

    2009-08-01

    We show that the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization data gathered by the BOOMERanG 2003 flight and WMAP provide an opportunity to investigate in-vacuo birefringence, of a type expected in some quantum pictures of space-time, with a sensitivity that extends even beyond the desired Planck-scale energy. In order to render this constraint more transparent we rely on a well studied phenomenological model of quantum-gravity-induced birefringence, in which one easily establishes that effects introduced at the Planck scale would amount to values of a dimensionless parameter, denoted by ξ, with respect to the Planck energy which are roughly of order 1. By combining BOOMERanG and WMAP data we estimate ξ ≅ −0.110±0.075 at the 68% c.l. Moreover, we forecast on the sensitivity to ξ achievable by future CMB polarization experiments (PLANCK, Spider, EPIC), which, in the absence of systematics, will be at the 1-σ confidence of 8.5 × 10{sup −4} (PLANCK), 6.1 × 10{sup −3} (Spider), and 1.0 × 10{sup −5} (EPIC) respectively. The cosmic variance-limited sensitivity from CMB is 6.1 × 10{sup −6}.

  6. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 145 mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bolometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  7. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil S.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Stiehl, gregory M.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization o[ the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 128mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bo|ometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  8. CMB polarization systematics due to beam asymmetry: Impact on inflationary science

    SciTech Connect

    Shimon, Meir; Keating, Brian; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Hivon, Eric

    2008-04-15

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization provides a unique window into cosmological inflation; the amplitude of the B-mode polarization from last scattering is uniquely sensitive to the energetics of inflation. However, numerous systematic effects arising from optical imperfections can contaminate the observed B-mode power spectrum. In particular, systematic effects due to the coupling of the underlying temperature and polarization fields with elliptical or otherwise asymmetric beams yield spurious systematic signals. This paper presents a nonperturbative analytic calculation of some of these signals. We show that results previously derived in real space can be generalized, formally, by including infinitely many higher-order corrections to the leading order effects. These corrections can be summed and represented as analytic functions when a fully Fourier-space approach is adopted from the outset. The formalism and results presented in this paper were created to determine the susceptibility of CMB polarization probes of the primary gravitational wave signal but can be easily extended to the analysis of gravitational lensing of the CMB.

  9. CMB power spectrum parameter degeneracies in the era of precision cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Cullan; Lewis, Antony; Hall, Alex; Challinor, Anthony E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info E-mail: adc1000@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    Cosmological parameter constraints from the CMB power spectra alone suffer several well-known degeneracies. These degeneracies can be broken by numerical artefacts and also a variety of physical effects that become quantitatively important with high-accuracy data e.g. from the Planck satellite. We study degeneracies in models with flat and non-flat spatial sections, non-trivial dark energy and massive neutrinos, and investigate the importance of various physical degeneracy-breaking effects. We test the CAMB power spectrum code for numerical accuracy, and demonstrate that the numerical calculations are accurate enough for degeneracies to be broken mainly by true physical effects (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, CMB lensing and geometrical and other effects through recombination) rather than numerical artefacts. We quantify the impact of CMB lensing on the power spectra, which inevitably provides degeneracy-breaking information even without using information in the non-Gaussianity. Finally we check the numerical accuracy of sample-based parameter constraints using CAMB and COSMOMC. In an appendix we document recent changes to CAMB's numerical treatment of massive neutrino perturbations, which are tested along with other recent improvements by our degeneracy exploration results.

  10. INTRODUCING MEXICAN NEEDLETS FOR CMB ANALYSIS: ISSUES FOR PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH STANDARD NEEDLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Scodeller, S.; Rudjord, Oe.; Hansen, F. K.; Marinucci, D.; Geller, D.; Mayeli, A.

    2011-06-01

    Over the last few years, needlets have emerged as a useful tool for the analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Our aim in this paper is first to introduce into the CMB literature a different form of needlets, known as Mexican needlets, first discussed in the mathematical literature by Geller and Mayeli. We then proceed with an extensive study of the properties of both standard and Mexican needlets; these properties depend on some parameters which can be tuned in order to optimize the performance for a given application. Our second aim in this paper is then to give practical advice on how to adjust these parameters for WMAP and Planck data in order to achieve the best properties for a given problem in CMB data analysis. In particular, we investigate localization properties in real and harmonic space and propose a recipe for quantifying the influence of galactic and point-source masks on the needlet coefficients. We also show that for certain parameter values, the Mexican needlets provide a close approximation to the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelets (whence their name), with some advantages concerning their numerical implementation and derivation of their statistical properties.

  11. Contamination of early-type galaxy alignments to galaxy lensing-CMB lensing cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, Nora Elisa; Dunkley, Joanna; Miller, Lance; Allison, Rupert

    2015-10-01

    Galaxy shapes are subject to distortions due to the tidal field of the Universe. The cross-correlation of galaxy lensing with the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) cannot easily be separated from the cross-correlation of galaxy intrinsic shapes with CMB lensing. Previous work suggested that the intrinsic alignment contamination can be 15 per cent of this cross-spectrum for the CFHT Stripe 82 (CS82) and Atacama Cosmology Telescope surveys. Here we re-examine these estimates using up-to-date observational constraints of intrinsic alignments at a redshift more similar to that of CS82 galaxies. We find an ≈10 per cent contamination of the cross-spectrum from red galaxies, with ≈3 per cent uncertainty due to uncertainties in the redshift distribution of source galaxies and the modelling of the spectral energy distribution. Blue galaxies are consistent with being unaligned, but could contaminate the cross-spectrum by an additional 9.5 per cent within current 95 per cent confidence levels. While our fiducial estimate of alignment contamination is similar to previous work, our work suggests that the relevance of alignments for CMB lensing-galaxy lensing cross-correlation remains largely unconstrained. Little information is currently available about alignments at z > 1.2. We consider the upper limiting case where all z > 1.2 galaxies are aligned with the same strength as low-redshift luminous red galaxies, finding as much as ≈60 per cent contamination.

  12. Neutrino constraints: what large-scale structure and CMB data are telling us?

    SciTech Connect

    Costanzi, Matteo; Sartoris, Barbara; Borgani, Stefano; Viel, Matteo E-mail: sartoris@oats.inaf.it E-mail: borgani@oats.inaf.it

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the reliability of neutrino mass constraints, either active or sterile, from the combination of different low redshift Universe probes with measurements of CMB anisotropies. In our analyses we consider WMAP 9-year or Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data in combination with Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) measurements from BOSS DR11, galaxy shear measurements from CFHTLenS, SDSS Ly α forest constraints and galaxy cluster mass function from Chandra observations. At odds with recent similar studies, to avoid model dependence of the constraints we perform a full likelihood analysis for all the datasets employed. As for the cluster data analysis we rely on to the most recent calibration of massive neutrino effects in the halo mass function and we explore the impact of the uncertainty in the mass bias and re-calibration of the halo mass function due to baryonic feedback processes on cosmological parameters. We find that none of the low redshift probes alone provide evidence for massive neutrino in combination with CMB measurements, while a larger than 2σ detection of non zero neutrino mass, either active or sterile, is achieved combining cluster or shear data with CMB and BAO measurements. Yet, the significance of the detection exceeds 3σ if we combine all four datasets. For a three active neutrino scenario, from the joint analysis of CMB, BAO, shear and cluster data including the uncertainty in the mass bias we obtain ∑ m{sub ν} =0.29{sup +0.18}{sub -0.21} eV and ∑ m{sub ν} =0.22{sup +0.17}{sub -0.18} eV 95%CL) using WMAP9 or Planck as CMB dataset, respectively. The preference for massive neutrino is even larger in the sterile neutrino scenario, for which we get m{sub s}{sup eff}=0.44{sup +0.28}{sub -0.26} eV and Δ N{sub eff}=0.78{sup +0.60}{sub -0.59} 95%CL) from the joint analysis of Planck, BAO, shear and cluster datasets. For this data combination the vanilla ΛCDM model is rejected at more than 3σ and a sterile neutrino mass

  13. Neutrino constraints: what large-scale structure and CMB data are telling us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Matteo; Sartoris, Barbara; Viel, Matteo; Borgani, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the reliability of neutrino mass constraints, either active or sterile, from the combination of different low redshift Universe probes with measurements of CMB anisotropies. In our analyses we consider WMAP 9-year or Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data in combination with Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) measurements from BOSS DR11, galaxy shear measurements from CFHTLenS, SDSS Ly α forest constraints and galaxy cluster mass function from Chandra observations. At odds with recent similar studies, to avoid model dependence of the constraints we perform a full likelihood analysis for all the datasets employed. As for the cluster data analysis we rely on to the most recent calibration of massive neutrino effects in the halo mass function and we explore the impact of the uncertainty in the mass bias and re-calibration of the halo mass function due to baryonic feedback processes on cosmological parameters. We find that none of the low redshift probes alone provide evidence for massive neutrino in combination with CMB measurements, while a larger than 2σ detection of non zero neutrino mass, either active or sterile, is achieved combining cluster or shear data with CMB and BAO measurements. Yet, the significance of the detection exceeds 3σ if we combine all four datasets. For a three active neutrino scenario, from the joint analysis of CMB, BAO, shear and cluster data including the uncertainty in the mass bias we obtain ∑ mν =0.29+0.18-0.21 eV and ∑ mν =0.22+0.17-0.18 eV 95%CL) using WMAP9 or Planck as CMB dataset, respectively. The preference for massive neutrino is even larger in the sterile neutrino scenario, for which we get mseff=0.44+0.28-0.26 eV and Δ Neff=0.78+0.60-0.59 95%CL) from the joint analysis of Planck, BAO, shear and cluster datasets. For this data combination the vanilla ΛCDM model is rejected at more than 3σ and a sterile neutrino mass as motivated by accelerator anomaly is within the 2σ errors. Conversely, the Ly

  14. Excess B-modes extracted from the Planck polarization maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.

    2016-07-01

    One of the main obstacles for extracting the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from mm/submm observations is the pollution from the main Galactic components: synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emission. The feasibility of using simple neural networks to extract CMB has been demonstrated on both temperature and polarization data obtained by the WMAP satellite. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of neural networks for extracting the CMB signal from the Planck polarization data with high precision. Both auto-correlation and cross-correlation power spectra within a mask covering about 63 % of the sky have been used together with a ``high pass filter'' in order to minimize the influence of the remaining systematic errors in the Planck Q and U maps. Using the Planck 2015 released polarization maps, a BB power spectrum have been extracted by Multilayer Perceptron neural networks. This spectrum contains a bright feature with signal to noise ratios ≃ 4.5 within 200 ≤ l ≤ 250. The spectrum is significantly brighter than the BICEP2 2015 spectrum, with a spectral behaviour quite different from the ``canonical'' models (weak lensing plus B-modes spectra with different tensor to scalar ratios). The feasibility of the neural network to remove the residual systematics from the available Planck polarization data to a high level has been demonstrated.

  15. Database of extended radiation maps and its access system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Naiden, Ya. V.; Chernenkov, V. N.; Verkhodanova, N. V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the architecture of the developed computing web server http://cmb.sao.ru allowing to synthesize the maps of extended radiation on the full sphere from the spherical harmonics in the GLESP pixelization grid, smooth them with the power beam pattern with various angular resolutions in the multipole space, and identify regions of the sky with given coordinates. We describe the server access and administration systems as well as the technique constructing the sky region maps, organized in Python in the Django web-application development framework.

  16. Point Source Correction And The Galaxy-reduced Map From Wmap 3-yr Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Wright, E. L.

    2007-12-01

    Combining the new sources we found using a CMB-independent method in WMAP V- and W-band (61 and 94 GHz) maps with those in the WMAP three-year point source catalog, we find a source correction A = 0.012 ± 0.004 uK2·sr to the CMB power spectrum. More sources are found by adding in the Q-band (41 GHz) map in our search since Q band has a higher SNR. We therefore re-model the source count distribution and report a new estimate of the level of residual contamination due to unresolved point sources. We also present a three-color weighted combination image from the WMAP three-year Q-, V- and W-band maps. The V- and W-band maps are smoothed to match Q-band resolution. The band weights are chosen in such a way as to maintain unity response to the CMB while reducing the galactic light as well as minimizing the variance of the resulting map. We acknowledge the use of the Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis (LAMBDA). Support for LAMBDA is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science.

  17. Neural networks and the separation of cosmic microwave background and astrophysical signals in sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccigalupi, C.; Bedini, L.; Burigana, C.; De Zotti, G.; Farusi, A.; Maino, D.; Maris, M.; Perrotta, F.; Salerno, E.; Toffolatti, L.; Tonazzini, A.

    2000-11-01

    We implement an independent component analysis (ICA) algorithm to separate signals of different origin in sky maps at several frequencies. Owing to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on either the frequency dependence or the angular power spectrum of the various signals; rather, it learns directly from the input data how to identify the statistically independent components, on the assumption that all but, at most, one of the components have non-Gaussian distributions. We have applied the ICA algorithm to simulated patches of the sky at the four frequencies (30, 44, 70 and 100GHz) used by the Low Frequency Instrument of the European Space Agency's Planck satellite. Simulations include the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the synchrotron and thermal dust emissions, and extragalactic radio sources. The effects of the angular response functions of the detectors and of instrumental noise have been ignored in this first exploratory study. The ICA algorithm reconstructs the spatial distribution of each component with rms errors of about 1per cent for the CMB, and 10per cent for the much weaker Galactic components. Radio sources are almost completely recovered down to a flux limit corresponding to ~=0.7σCMB, where σCMB is the rms level of the CMB fluctuations. The signal recovered has equal quality on all scales larger than the pixel size. In addition, we show that for the strongest components (CMB and radio sources) the frequency scaling is recovered with per cent precision. Thus, algorithms of the type presented here appear to be very promising tools for component separation. On the other hand, we have been dealing here with a highly idealized situation. Work to include instrumental noise, the effect of different resolving powers at different frequencies and a more complete and realistic characterization of astrophysical foregrounds is in progress.

  18. Spatial Statistics of Cosmic Microwave Background Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, I.

    2007-11-01

    Spatial statistics in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps are characterized by N-point correlation functions and their corresponding poly-spectra. I focus on basic statistical properties (noise, bias, optimality), and computational issues regarding two- and three-point functions, or angular power spectrum and bi-spectrum. Optimal estimators scale as D^3 for even the two-point statistics, where D is the number of data elements Even naive estimators scale scale D^N for N-point functions. I show that these daunting computational challenges can be met for present and future megapixel CMB maps with considerations about symmetries, multi-resolution techniques, and Monte Carlo methods and careful balancing of optimality, and resolution against computational resources. Once estimated, the interpretation of higher order correlation functions presents unique difficulties due to the large number of configurations: e.g., χ^2 fitting of parameters becomes non-trivial because of the large size of the corresponding covariance matrices. I show that False Discovery Rate based methods can be used for massive hypothesis testing, and I present techniques which help diagnosing and inverting covariance matrices obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Precision epoch of reionization studies with next-generation CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Erminia; Louis, Thibaut; Hložek, Renée; Hil, J. Colin; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; De Bernardis, Francesco; Henderson, Shawn; Niemack, Michael D.; Devlin, Mark J.; Kosowsky, Arthur; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Newburgh, Laura; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima E-mail: rhlozek@astro.princeton.edu; and others

    2014-08-01

    Future arcminute resolution polarization data from ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) observations can be used to estimate the contribution to the temperature power spectrum from the primary anisotropies and to uncover the signature of reionization near ℓ=1500 in the small angular-scale temperature measurements. Our projections are based on combining expected small-scale E-mode polarization measurements from Advanced ACTPol in the range 300<ℓ<3000 with simulated temperature data from the full Planck mission in the low and intermediate ℓ region, 2<ℓ<2000. We show that the six basic cosmological parameters determined from this combination of data will predict the underlying primordial temperature spectrum at high multipoles to better than 1% accuracy. Assuming an efficient cleaning from multi-frequency channels of most foregrounds in the temperature data, we investigate the sensitivity to the only residual secondary component, the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) term. The CMB polarization is used to break degeneracies between primordial and secondary terms present in temperature and, in effect, to remove from the temperature data all but the residual kSZ term. We estimate a 15σ detection of the diffuse homogeneous kSZ signal from expected AdvACT temperature data at ℓ>1500, leading to a measurement of the amplitude of matter density fluctuations, σ{sub 8}, at 1% precision. Alternatively, by exploring the reionization signal encoded in the patchy kSZ measurements, we bound the time and duration of the reionization with σ(z{sub re})=1.1 and σ(Δz{sub re})=0.2. We find that these constraints degrade rapidly with large beam sizes, which highlights the importance of arcminute-scale resolution for future CMB surveys.

  20. Using Big Bang Nucleosynthesis to extend CMB probes of neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Shimon, M.; Miller, N.J.; Fuller, G.M.; Keating, B.G.; Kishimoto, C.T.; Smith, C.J. E-mail: nmiller@physics.ucsd.edu E-mail: christel.smith@asu.edu E-mail: bkeating@ucsd.edu

    2010-05-01

    We present calculations showing that upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments will have the power to improve on current constraints on neutrino masses and provide new limits on neutrino degeneracy parameters. The latter could surpass those derived from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the observationally-inferred primordial helium abundance. These conclusions derive from our Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) simulations which incorporate a full BBN nuclear reaction network. This provides a self-consistent treatment of the helium abundance, the baryon number, the three individual neutrino degeneracy parameters and other cosmological parameters. Our analysis focuses on the effects of gravitational lensing on CMB constraints on neutrino rest mass and degeneracy parameter. We find for the PLANCK experiment that total (summed) neutrino mass M{sub ν} > 0.29 eV could be ruled out at 2σ or better. Likewise neutrino degeneracy parameters ξ{sub ν{sub e}} > 0.11 and |ξ{sub ν{sub μ{sub /{sub τ}}}}| > 0.49 could be detected or ruled out at 2σ confidence, or better. For POLARBEAR we find that the corresponding detectable values are M{sub ν} > 0.75 eV, ξ{sub ν{sub e}} > 0.62, and |ξ{sub ν{sub μ{sub /{sub τ}}}}| > 1.1, while for EPIC we obtain M{sub ν} > 0.20 eV, ξ{sub ν{sub e}} > 0.045, and |ξ{sub ν{sub μ{sub /{sub τ}}}}| > 0.29. Our forcast for EPIC demonstrates that CMB observations have the potential to set constraints on neutrino degeneracy parameters which are better than BBN-derived limits and an order of magnitude better than current WMAP-derived limits.

  1. Constraints on standard and non-standard early universe models from CMB B-mode polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; Brown, Michael L.; Zhao, Wen E-mail: Wen.Zhao@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the observational signatures of three models of the early Universe in the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. In addition to the standard single field inflationary model, we also consider the constraints obtainable on the loop quantum cosmology model (from Loop Quantum Gravity) and on cosmic strings, expected to be copiously produced during the latter stages of Brane inflation. We first examine the observational features of the three models, and then use current B-mode polarization data from the BICEP and QUaD experiments to constrain their parameters. We also examine the detectability of the primordial B-mode signal predicted by these models and forecast the parameter constraints achievable with future CMB polarization experiments. We find that: (a) since B-mode polarization measurements are mostly unaffected by parameter degeneracies, they provide the cleanest probe of these early Universe models; (b) using the BICEP and QUaD data we obtain the following parameter constraints: r = 0.02{sup +0.31}{sub −0.26} (1σ for the tensor-to-scalar ratio in the single field inflationary model); m < 1.36 × 10{sup −8}M{sub pl} and k{sub *} < 2.43 × 10{sup −4} Mpc{sup −1} (1σ for the mass and scale parameters in the loop quantum cosmology model); and Gμ < 5.77 × 10{sup −7} (1σ for the cosmic string tension); (c) future CMB observations (both satellite missions and forthcoming sub-orbital experiments) will provide much more rigorous tests of these early Universe models.

  2. Characterization of Detectors and Instrument Systematics for the SPIDER CMB Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Rebecca Suzanne

    We know from the CMB and observations of large-scale structure that the universe is extremely flat, homogenous, and isotropic. The current favored mechanism for generating these characteristics is inflation, a theorized period of exponential expansion of the universe that occurred shortly after the Big Bang. Most theories of inflation generically predict a background of stochastic gravitational waves. These gravitational waves should leave their unique imprint on the polarization of the CMB via Thompson scattering. Scalar perturbations of the metric will cause a pattern of polarization with no curl (E-mode). Tensor perturbations (gravitational waves) will cause a unique pattern of polarization on the CMB that includes a curl component (B-mode). A measurement of the ratio of the tensor to scalar perturbations (r ) tells us the energy scale of inflation. Recent measurements by the BICEP2 team detect the B-mode spectrum with a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r=0.2 (+0.05, -0.07). An independent confirmation of this result is the next step towards understanding the inflationary universe. This thesis describes my work on a balloon-borne polarimeter called SPIDER, which is designed to illuminate the physics of the early universe through measurements of the cosmic microwave background polarization. SPIDER consists of six single-frequency, on-axis refracting telescopes contained in a shared-vacuum liquid-helium cryostat. Its large format arrays of millimeter-wave detectors and tight control of systematics will give it unprecedented sensitivity. This thesis describes how the SPIDER detectors are characterized and calibrated for flight, as well as how the systematics requirements for the SPIDER system are simulated and measured.

  3. Dark matter velocity dispersion effects on CMB and matter power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piattella, O. F.; Casarini, L.; Fabris, J. C.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    Effects of velocity dispersion of dark matter particles on the CMB TT power spectrum and on the matter linear power spectrum are investigated using a modified CAMB code. Cold dark matter originated from thermal equilibrium processes does not produce appreciable effects but this is not the case if particles have a non-thermal origin. A cut-off in the matter power spectrum at small scales, similar to that produced by warm dark matter or that produced in the late forming dark matter scenario, appears as a consequence of velocity dispersion effects, which act as a pressure perturbation.

  4. Primordial helium abundance from CMB: A constraint from recent observations and a forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

    2008-08-15

    We studied a constraint on the primordial helium abundance Y{sub p} from current and future observations of CMB. Using the currently available data from WMAP, ACBAR, CBI, and BOOMERANG, we obtained the constraint as Y{sub p}=0.25{sub -0.07}{sup +0.10} at 68% confidence level. We also provide a forecast for the Planck experiment using the Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. In addition to forecasting the constraint on Y{sub p}, we investigate how assumptions for Y{sub p} affect constraints on the other cosmological parameters.

  5. Production of biosurfactant lipopeptides Iturin A, fengycin and surfactin A from Bacillus subtilis CMB32 for control of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pyoung Il; Ryu, Jaewon; Kim, Young Hwan; Chi, Youn-Tae

    2010-01-01

    A bacterial strain isolated from soil for its potential to control the anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was identified as a Bacillus subtilis. Bacillus subtilis CMB32 produced antifungal agents on M9 broth at 30degreesC. Biosurfactant lipopeptides produced by Bacillus subtilis CMB32 were precipitated by adjusting to pH 2 and extracting using chloroform/methanol, and then were purified using column chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Molecular masses of the lipopeptides were estimated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as (a) 1080, (b) 1486, and (c) 1044 Da, respectively. They had cyclic structures and amino acid compositions of (a) Pro, Asx, Ser, Tyr, Glx, (b) Glx, Tyr, Thr, Ala, Pro, Ile, and (c) Glx, Leu, Val, Asx, respectively. Further analysis revealed that Bacillus subtilis CMB32 produced three antifungal lipopeptides: (a) iturin A, (b) fengycin, and (c) surfactin A. PMID:20134245

  6. Physics of Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; 1. Partially ionized plasmas here and everywhere; 2. Multifluid description of partially ionized plasmas; 3. Equilibrium of partially ionized plasmas; 4. Waves in partially ionized plasmas; 5. Advanced topics in partially ionized plasmas; 6. Research problems in partially ionized plasmas; Supplementary matter; Index.

  7. Conformal Visualization for Partially-Immersive Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhang, Min; Kaufman, Arie E.; Gu, Xianfeng

    2010-01-01

    Current immersive VR systems such as the CAVE provide an effective platform for the immersive exploration of large 3D data. A major limitation is that in most cases at least one display surface is missing due to space, access or cost constraints. This partially-immersive visualization results in a substantial loss of visual information that may be acceptable for some applications, however it becomes a major obstacle for critical tasks, such as the analysis of medical data. We propose a conformal deformation rendering pipeline for the visualization of datasets on partially-immersive platforms. The angle-preserving conformal mapping approach is used to map the 360°3D view volume to arbitrary display configurations. It has the desirable property of preserving shapes under distortion, which is important for identifying features, especially in medical data. The conformal mapping is used for rasterization, realtime raytracing and volume rendering of the datasets. Since the technique is applied during the rendering, we can construct stereoscopic images from the data, which is usually not true for image-based distortion approaches. We demonstrate the stereo conformal mapping rendering pipeline in the partially-immersive 5-wall Immersive Cabin (IC) for virtual colonoscopy and architectural review. PMID:26279083

  8. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  9. Cosmological constraint on the light gravitino mass from CMB lensing and cosmic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osato, Ken; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shirasaki, Masato; Kamada, Ayuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Light gravitinos of mass lesssim O (10) eV are of particular interest in cosmology, offering various baryogenesis scenarios without suffering from the cosmological gravitino problem. The gravitino may contribute considerably to the total matter content of the Universe and affect structure formation from early to present epochs. After the gravitinos decouple from other particles in the early Universe, they free-stream and consequently suppress density fluctuations of (sub-)galactic length scales. Observations of structure at the relevant length-scales can be used to infer or constrain the mass and the abundance of light gravitinos. We derive constraints on the light gravitino mass using the data of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing from Planck and of cosmic shear from the Canada France Hawaii Lensing Survey survey, combined with analyses of the primary CMB anisotropies and the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations in galaxy distributions. The obtained constraint on the gravitino mass is m3/2 < 4.7 eV (95 % C.L.), which is substantially tighter than the previous constraint from clustering analysis of Ly-α forests.

  10. Including birefringence into time evolution of CMB: current and future constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, G.; Pagano, L.; Martinelli, M. E-mail: martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-12-01

    We introduce birefringence effects within the propagation history of CMB, considering the two cases of a constant effect and of an effect that increases linearly in time, as the rotation of polarization induced by birefringence accumulates during photon propagation. Both cases result into a mixing of E and B modes before lensing effects take place, thus leading to the fact that lensing is acting on spectra that are already mixed because of birefringence. Moreover, if the polarization rotation angle increases during propagation, birefringence affects more the large scales that the small scales. We put constraints on the two cases using data from WMAP 9yr and BICEP 2013 and compare these results with the constraints obtained when the usual procedure of rotating the final power spectra is adopted, finding that this dataset combination is unable to distinguish between effects, but it nevertheless hints for a non vanishing value of the polarization rotation angle. We also forecast the sensitivity that will be obtained using data from Planck and PolarBear, highlighting how this combination is capable to rule out a vanishing birefringence angle, but still unable to distinguish the different scenarios. Nevertheless, we find that the combination of Planck and PolarBear is sensitive enough to highlight the existence of degeneracies between birefringence rotation and gravitational lensing of CMB photons, possibly leading to false detection of non standard lensing effects if birefringence is neglected.

  11. The Robinson Gravitational Wave Background Telescope (BICEP): a bolometric large angular scale CMB polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, K. W.; Ade, P. A. R.; Barkats, D.; Battle, J. O.; Bierman, E. M.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Crites, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Griffin, G. S.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hristov, V. V.; Keating, B. G.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Lange, A. E.; Leitch, E. M.; Mason, P. V.; Nguyen, H. T.; Ponthieu, N.; Takahashi, Y. D.; Renbarger, T.; Weintraub, L. C.; Woolsey, D.

    2006-06-01

    The Robinson Telescope (BICEP) is a ground-based millimeter-wave bolometric array designed to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) and galactic foreground emission. Such measurements probe the energy scale of the inflationary epoch, tighten constraints on cosmological parameters, and verify our current understanding of CMB physics. Robinson consists of a 250-mm aperture refractive telescope that provides an instantaneous field-of-view of 17° with angular resolution of 55' and 37' at 100 GHz and 150 GHz, respectively. Forty-nine pair of polarization-sensitive bolometers are cooled to 250 mK using a 4He/ 3He/ 3He sorption fridge system, and coupled to incoming radiation via corrugated feed horns. The all-refractive optics is cooled to 4 K to minimize polarization systematics and instrument loading. The fully steerable 3-axis mount is capable of continuous boresight rotation or azimuth scanning at speeds up to 5 deg/s. Robinson has begun its first season of observation at the South Pole. Given the measured performance of the instrument along with the excellent observing environment, Robinson will measure the E-mode polarization with high sensitivity, and probe for the B-modes to unprecedented depths. In this paper we discuss aspects of the instrument design and their scientific motivations, scanning and operational strategies, and the results of initial testing and observations.

  12. Analytical model for CMB temperature angular power spectrum from cosmic (super-)strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Yoo, Chul-Moon; Sasaki, Misao; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sendouda, Yuuiti

    2010-09-15

    We present a new analytical method to calculate the small angle cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature angular power spectrum due to cosmic (super-)string segments. In particular, using our method, we clarify the dependence on the intercommuting probability P. We find that the power spectrum is dominated by Poisson-distributed string segments. The power spectrum for a general value of P has a plateau on large angular scales and shows a power-law decrease on small angular scales. The resulting spectrum in the case of conventional cosmic strings is in very good agreement with the numerical result obtained by Fraisse et al.. Then we estimate the upper bound on the dimensionless tension of the string for various values of P by assuming that the fraction of the CMB power spectrum due to cosmic (super-)strings is less than ten percent at various angular scales up to l=2000. We find that the amplitude of the spectrum increases as the intercommuting probability. As a consequence, strings with smaller intercommuting probabilities are found to be more tightly constrained.

  13. CMB power spectra from cosmic strings: Predictions for the Planck satellite and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin; Urrestilla, Jon

    2010-09-15

    We present a significant improvement over our previous calculations of the cosmic string contribution to cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra, with particular focus on sub-WMAP angular scales. These smaller scales are relevant for the now-operational Planck satellite and additional suborbital CMB projects that have even finer resolutions. We employ larger Abelian Higgs string simulations than before and we additionally model and extrapolate the statistical measures from our simulations to smaller length scales. We then use an efficient means of including the extrapolations into our Einstein-Boltzmann calculations in order to yield accurate results over the multipole range 2{<=}l{<=}4000. Our results suggest that power-law behavior cuts in for l > or approx. 3000 in the case of the temperature power spectrum, which then allows cautious extrapolation to even smaller scales. We find that a string contribution to the temperature power spectrum making up 10% of power at l=10 would be larger than the Silk-damped primary adiabatic contribution for l > or approx. 3500. Astrophysical contributions such as the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect also become important at these scales and will reduce the sensitivity to strings, but these are potentially distinguishable by their frequency-dependence.

  14. Lenses in the forest: cross--correlation of the Lyman-alpha flux with CMB lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.; Viel, Matteo; /Trieste Observ. /INFN, Trieste

    2009-03-01

    We present a theoretical estimate for a new observable: the cross-correlation between the Lyman-{alpha}-flux fluctuations in quasar (QSO) spectra and the convergence of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as measured along the same line-of-sight. As a first step toward the assessment of its detectability, we estimate the signal-to-noise ratio using linear theory. Although the signal-to-noise is small for a single line-of-sight and peaks at somewhat smaller redshifts than those probed by the Lyman-{alpha} forest, we estimate a total signal-to-noise of 9 for cross-correlating QSO spectra of SDSSIII with Planck and 20 for cross-correlating with a future polarization based CMB experiment. The detection of this effect would be a direct measure of the neutral hydrogen-matter cross-correlation and could provide important information on the growth of structures at large scales in a redshift range which is still poorly probed by observations.

  15. Measuring the CMB temperature in the classroom with a low-cost antenna and radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkare, Kirit S; Bowens-Rubin, Rachel; Connors, Jake; Dame, Thomas M.; Gao, Ryan; Harrison, Samuel; Kimberk, Robert S; Kovac, John M; Law-Smith, Jamie; Robins, Derek; Sansone, Steve; Wilson, Robert W.; Yermakova, Anya; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2014-06-01

    Estimation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature through a skydip is an ambitious undergraduate laboratory exercise in which care must be taken to understand and account for systematic errors. It is an ideal environment for learning about careful experimental design. We present two versions of a low-cost antenna and radiometer system replicating the CMB discovery measurement (Penzias and Wilson, 1965), operating at 11 and 19 GHz. We describe two small-aperture (8") antenna designs: an HDPE lens-coupled corrugated horn, and a single-groove Potter horn, both of which are simple and inexpensive to fabricate. They have been designed to minimize far sidelobe pickup from the ground in conjunction with a straight-walled or Winston cone. The radiometers are based on low-cost commercial satellite TV receivers, read out with standard laboratory equipment. We describe the design of aperture-filling calibration loads necessary to characterize the radiometer performance. Several iterations of this experiment have been run in the advanced undergraduate astrophysics laboratory course (Ay 191) at Harvard University, with the students building the apparatus starting from scratch and finishing in about 6 weeks. Positive detections of background radiation have been achieved with typical uncertainties of 0.3 K.

  16. Cosmological parameter estimation from CMB and X-ray cluster after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian-Wei; Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Hu, Bin

    2014-05-01

    We investigate constraints on cosmological parameters in three 8-parameter models with the summed neutrino mass as a free parameter, by a joint analysis of CCCP X-ray cluster data, the newly released Planck CMB data as well as some external data sets including baryon acoustic oscillation measurements from the 6dFGS, SDSS DR7 and BOSS DR9 surveys, and Hubble Space Telescope H0 measurement. We find that the combined data strongly favor a non-zero neutrino masses at more than 3σ confidence level in these non-vanilla models. Allowing the CMB lensing amplitude AL to vary, we find AL > 1 at 3σ confidence level. For dark energy with a constant equation of state w, we obtain w < -1 at 3σ confidence level. The estimate of the matter power spectrum amplitude σ8 is discrepant with the Planck value at 2σ confidence level, which reflects some tension between X-ray cluster data and Planck data in these non-vanilla models. The tension can be alleviated by adding a 9% systematic shift in the cluster mass function.

  17. Cosmological parameter estimation from CMB and X-ray cluster after Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian-Wei; Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Hu, Bin E-mail: cairg@itp.ac.cn E-mail: hu@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl

    2014-05-01

    We investigate constraints on cosmological parameters in three 8-parameter models with the summed neutrino mass as a free parameter, by a joint analysis of CCCP X-ray cluster data, the newly released Planck CMB data as well as some external data sets including baryon acoustic oscillation measurements from the 6dFGS, SDSS DR7 and BOSS DR9 surveys, and Hubble Space Telescope H{sub 0} measurement. We find that the combined data strongly favor a non-zero neutrino masses at more than 3σ confidence level in these non-vanilla models. Allowing the CMB lensing amplitude A{sub L} to vary, we find A{sub L} > 1 at 3σ confidence level. For dark energy with a constant equation of state w, we obtain w < −1 at 3σ confidence level. The estimate of the matter power spectrum amplitude σ{sub 8} is discrepant with the Planck value at 2σ confidence level, which reflects some tension between X-ray cluster data and Planck data in these non-vanilla models. The tension can be alleviated by adding a 9% systematic shift in the cluster mass function.

  18. Cosmology with CMB measurements from ACTPol: current status and future constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bernardis, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Backround (CMB) contain important information complementary to the temperature anisotropies. The ACTPol polarization sensitive receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) is measuring CMB polarization from arcminute to degree scales. These data will improve constraints on cosmological parameters, in particular on neutrino mass, dark energy and inflationary models. One of the unique advantages of ACTPol is its ability to overlap with several large scale structure surveys, allowing cross-correlation studies that will achieve even stronger constraints on the cosmological parameters. Additional science is enabled by the combination of high sensitivity and arcminute resolution, such as surveys of galaxy clusters and new probes of dark energy via the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects. Beyond ACTPol is the stage III Advanced ACTPol project, which offers greater sensitivity and frequency coverage than ACTPol. I will discuss ACTPol constraints and projections achievable with the Advanced ACTPol experiment. I will focus in particular on neutrino mass and on dark energy constraints from measurements of galaxy clusters peculiar velocities made by combining SZ effect measurements with galaxy surveys data.

  19. CMB bispectrum, trispectrum, non-Gaussianity, and the Cramer-Rao bound

    SciTech Connect

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Smith, Tristan L.; Heavens, Alan

    2011-01-15

    Minimum-variance estimators for the parameter f{sub nl} that quantifies local-model non-Gaussianity can be constructed from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum (three-point function) and also from the trispectrum (four-point function). Some have suggested that a comparison between the estimates for the values of f{sub nl} from the bispectrum and trispectrum allow a consistency test for the model. But others argue that the saturation of the Cramer-Rao bound--which gives a lower limit to the variance of an estimator--by the bispectrum estimator implies that no further information on f{sub nl} can be obtained from the trispectrum. Here, we elaborate the nature of the correlation between the bispectrum and trispectrum estimators for f{sub nl}. We show that the two estimators become statistically independent in the limit of large number of CMB pixels, and thus that the trispectrum estimator does indeed provide additional information on f{sub nl} beyond that obtained from the bispectrum. We explain how this conclusion is consistent with the Cramer-Rao bound. Our discussion of the Cramer-Rao bound may be of interest to those doing Fisher-matrix parameter-estimation forecasts or data analysis in other areas of physics as well.

  20. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity from galaxy-CMB lensing cross correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Matsubara, Takahiko

    2010-07-15

    Recent studies have shown that the primordial non-Gaussianity affects the clustering of dark matter halos through a scale-dependent bias, and various constraints on the non-Gaussianity through this scale-dependent bias have been placed. Here, we introduce the cross correlation between the CMB lensing potential and the galaxy angular distribution to effectively extract information about the bias from the galaxy distribution. Then, we estimate the error of the nonlinear parameter, f{sub NL}, for the ongoing CMB experiments and galaxy surveys, such as Planck and Hyper Suprime-Cam. We found that for the constraint on f{sub NL} with Planck and Hyper Suprime-Cam, the wide field galaxy survey is preferable to the deep one, and the expected error on f{sub NL} can be as small as {Delta}f{sub NL{approx}}80 for b{sub 0}=2 and {Delta}f{sub NL{approx}}30 for b{sub 0}=4, where b{sub 0} is the linear bias parameter. It is also found that a future wide field galaxy survey could achieve {Delta}f{sub NL{approx}}5 with cosmic microwave background prior to Planck, if one could observe highly biased objects at higher redshift (z{approx}2).

  1. Quantum fluctuations and CMB anisotropies in one-bubble open inflation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Misao; Tanaka, Takahiro

    1996-10-01

    We first develop a method to calculate a complete set of mode functions that describe the quantum fluctuations generated in one-bubble open inflation models. We consider two classes of models. One is a single scalar field model proposed by Bucher, Goldhaber, and Turok and by us as an example of the open inflation scenario, and the other is a two-field model such as the ``supernatural'' inflation proposed by Linde and Mezhlumian. In both cases we assume the difference in the vacuum energy density between inside and outside the bubble is negligible. There are two kinds of mode functions. One kind has the usual continuous spectrum and the other has a discrete spectrum with characteristic wavelengths exceeding the spatial curvature scale. The latter can be further divided into two classes in terms of its origin. One is called the de Sitter supercurvature mode, which arises due to the global spacetime structure of de Sitter space, and the other is due to fluctuations of the bubble wall. We calculate the spectrum of quantum fluctuations in these models and evaluate the resulting large angular scale CMB anisotropies. We find there are ranges of model parameters that are consistent with observed CMB anisotropies.

  2. Why arthroscopic partial meniscectomy?

    PubMed

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey

    2015-09-01

    "Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy versus Sham Surgery for a Degenerative Meniscal Tear" published in the New England Journal of Medicine on December 26, 2013 draws the conclusion that arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy provides no significant benefit over sham surgery in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear and no knee osteoarthritis. This result argues against the current practice of performing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since the number of APM performed has been increasing, the information provided by this study should lead to a change in clinical care of patients with a degenerative meniscus tear. PMID:26488013

  3. Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. |

    1994-09-01

    mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

  4. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  5. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Most people recover quickly and have much less pain than they did before surgery. People who have a partial knee replacement recover faster than those who have a total knee replacement. Many people are able to walk ...

  6. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  7. PARTIAL TORUS INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie

    2010-07-20

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  8. Smoothing methods comparison for CMB E- and B-mode separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Fan; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Wen

    2016-04-01

    The anisotropies of the B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background radiation play a crucial role in the study of the very early Universe. However, in real observations, a mixture of the E-mode and B-mode can be caused by partial sky surveys, which must be separated before being applied to a cosmological explanation. The separation method developed by Smith (2006) has been widely adopted, where the edge of the top-hat mask should be smoothed to avoid numerical errors. In this paper, we compare three different smoothing methods and investigate leakage residuals of the E-B mixture. We find that, if less information loss is needed and a smaller region is smoothed in the analysis, the sin- and cos-smoothing methods are better. However, if we need a cleanly constructed B-mode map, the larger region around the mask edge should be smoothed. In this case, the Gaussian-smoothing method becomes much better. In addition, we find that the leakage caused by numerical errors in the Gaussian-smoothing method is mostly concentrated in two bands, which is quite easy to reduce for further E-B separations.

  9. Constraints from the CMB temperature and other common observational data sets on variable dark energy density models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Tortora, Crescenzo

    2011-08-01

    The thermodynamic and dynamical properties of a variable dark energy model with density scaling as ρx∝(1+z)m, z being the redshift, are discussed following the outline of Jetzer et al. [P. Jetzer, D. Puy, M. Signore, and C. Tortora, Gen. Relativ. Gravit. 43, 1083 (2011).GRGVA80001-770110.1007/s10714-010-1091-4]. These kinds of models are proven to lead to the creation/disruption of matter and radiation, which affect the cosmic evolution of both matter and radiation components in the Universe. In particular, we have concentrated on the temperature-redshift relation of radiation, which has been constrained using a very recent collection of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature measurements up to z˜3. For the first time, we have combined this observational probe with a set of independent measurements (Supernovae Ia distance moduli, CMB anisotropy, large-scale structure and observational data for the Hubble parameter), which are commonly adopted to constrain dark energy models. We find that, within the uncertainties, the model is indistinguishable from a cosmological constant which does not exchange any particles with other components. Anyway, while temperature measurements and Supernovae Ia tend to predict slightly decaying models, the contrary happens if CMB data are included. Future observations, in particular, measurements of CMB temperature at large redshift, will allow to give firmer bounds on the effective equation of state parameter weff of this kind of dark energy model.

  10. A COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING MASS MAP AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J.; Viero, M. P.; Bock, J.; Zahn, O.; Aird, K. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H-M.; Conley, A.; George, E. M.; Halverson, N. W.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We use a temperature map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained using the South Pole Telescope at 150 GHz to construct a map of the gravitational convergence to z {approx} 1100, revealing the fluctuations in the projected mass density. This map shows individual features that are significant at the {approx}4{sigma} level, providing the first image of CMB lensing convergence. We cross-correlate this map with Herschel/SPIRE maps covering 90 deg{sup 2} at wavelengths of 500, 350, and 250 {mu}m. We show that these submillimeter (submm) wavelength maps are strongly correlated with the lensing convergence map, with detection significances in each of the three submm bands ranging from 6.7{sigma} to 8.8{sigma}. We fit the measurement of the cross power spectrum assuming a simple constant bias model and infer bias factors of b = 1.3-1.8, with a statistical uncertainty of 15%, depending on the assumed model for the redshift distribution of the dusty galaxies that are contributing to the Herschel/SPIRE maps.

  11. Final Results from the BIMA CMB Anisotropy Survey and Search for Signature of the SZ Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, K. S.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report the final results of our study of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with the BIMA array. Over 1000 hours of observation were dedicated to this project exploring CMB anisotropy on scales between 1' and 2' in eighteen 6'.6 FWHM fields. In the analysis of the CMB power spectrum, the visibility data is divided into two bins corresponding to different angular scales. Modeling the observed excess power as a flat band of average multipole l(sub eff)= 5237, we find deltaT(sup 2)(sub 1) = 220(sup +140)(sub -120) mu K(sup 2) at 68% confidence and deltaT(sup 2)(sub 1) greater than 0 muK(sup 2) with 94.7% confidence. In a second band with average multipole of l(sub eff) = 8748, we find deltaT(sup 2)(sub 2) consistent with zero, and an upper limit 880 muK(sup 2) at 95% confidence. An extensive series of tests and supplemental observations with the VLA provide strong evidence against systematic errors or radio point sources being the source of the observed excess power. The dominant source of anisotropy on these scales is expected to arise from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in a population of distant galaxy clusters. If the excess power is due to the SZ effect, we can place constraints on the normalization of the matter power spectrum sigma(sub 8) = 1.03(sup +0.20)(sub -0.29) at 68% confidence. The distribution of pixel fluxes in the BIMA images are found to be consistent with simulated observations of the expected SZ background and rule out instrumental noise or radio sources as the source of the observed excess power with similar confidence to the detection of excess power. Follow-up optical observations to search for galaxy over-densities anti-correlated with flux in the BIMA images, as might be expected from the SZ effect, proved to be inconclusive.

  12. Denaturation mapping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Welch, Robert L; Sladek, Robert; Dewar, Ken; Reisner, Walter W

    2012-09-21

    Optical mapping of DNA provides large-scale genomic information that can be used to assemble contigs from next-generation sequencing, and to detect rearrangements between single cells. A recent optical mapping technique called denaturation mapping has the advantage of using physical principles rather than the action of enzymes to probe genomic structure. Denaturation mapping uses fluorescence microscopy to image the pattern of partial melting along a DNA molecule extended in a channel of cross-section 120 nm at the heart of a nanofluidic device. We used denaturation mapping to locate single DNA molecules on the yeast genome (12.1 Mbp) by comparing images to a computationally predicted map for the entire genome sequence. By locating 84 molecules we assembled an optical map of the yeast genome with > 50% coverage. PMID:22820669

  13. Galaxy-CMB and galaxy-galaxy lensing on large scales: Sensitivity to primordial non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Donghui; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2009-12-01

    A convincing detection of primordial non-Gaussianity in the local form of the bispectrum, whose amplitude is given by the fNL parameter, offers a powerful test of inflation. In this paper, we calculate the modification of two-point cross-correlation statistics of weak lensing—galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy-cosmic microwave background (CMB) crosscorrelation—due to fNL. We derive and calculate the covariance matrix of galaxy-galaxy lensing, including cosmic variance terms. We focus on large scales (l<100) for which the shape noise of the shear measurement becomes irrelevant and cosmic variance dominates the error budget. For a modest degree of non-Gaussianity, fNL=±50 modifications of the galaxy-galaxy-lensing signal at the 10% level are seen on scales R˜300Mpc, and grow rapidly toward larger scales as ∝R2. We also see a clear signature of the baryonic acoustic oscillation feature in the matter power spectrum at ˜150Mpc, which can be measured by next-generation lensing experiments. In addition, we can probe the local-form primordial non-Gaussianity in the galaxy-CMB lensing signal by correlating the lensing potential reconstructed from CMB with high-z galaxies. For example, for fNL=±50, we find that the galaxy-CMB lensing cross-power spectrum is modified by ˜10% at l˜40, and by a factor of 2 at l˜10, for a population of galaxies at z=2 with a bias of 2. The effect is greater for more highly biased populations at larger z; thus, high-z galaxy surveys cross correlated with CMB offer a yet another probe of primordial non-Gaussianity.

  14. Active Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Explains a social studies lesson for third graders that uses KidPix, a computer software graphics program to help students make maps and map keys. Advantages to using the computer versus hand drawing maps are discussed, and an example of map requirements for the lesson is included. (LRW)

  15. Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Explains concept mapping as a heuristic device that is helpful in visualizing the relationships between and among ideas. Highlights include how to begin a map; brainstorming; map applications, including document or information summaries and writing composition; and mind mapping to strengthen note-taking. (LRW)

  16. Partial spread OFDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghariani, Ali; Zoltowski, Michael D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, partial spread OFDM system has been presented and its performance has been studied when different detection techniques are employed, such as minimum mean square error (MMSE), grouped Maximum Likelihood (ML) and approximated integer quadratic programming (IQP) techniques . The performance study also includes applying two different spreading matrices, Hadamard and Vandermonde. Extensive computer simulation have been implemented and important results show that partial spread OFDM system improves the BER performance and the frequency diversity of OFDM compared to both non spread and full spread systems. The results from this paper also show that partial spreading technique combined with suboptimal detector could be a better solution for applications that require low receiver complexity and high information detectability.

  17. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  18. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  19. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  20. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  1. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  2. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  3. Gabor transforms on the sphere with applications to CMB power spectrum estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Frode K.; Górski, Krzysztof M.; Hivon, Eric

    2002-11-01

    The Fourier transform of a data set apodized with a window function is known as the Gabor transform. In this paper we extend the Gabor transform formalism to the sphere with the intention of applying it to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data analysis. The Gabor coefficients on the sphere known as the pseudo power spectrum is studied for windows of different size. By assuming that the pseudo power spectrum coefficients are Gaussian distributed, we formulate a likelihood ansatz using these as input parameters to estimate the full-sky power spectrum from a patch on the sky. As this likelihood can be calculated quickly without having to invert huge matrices, this allows for fast power spectrum estimation. By using the pseudo power spectrum from several patches on the sky together, the full-sky power spectrum can be estimated from full-sky or nearly full-sky observations.

  4. Studying Heavy Ion Collisions Using Methods From Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaardhøje, J. J.; Tabassam, H.

    2014-04-01

    We present and discuss a framework for studying the morphology of high-multiplicity events from relativistic heavy ion collisions using methods commonly employed in the analysis of the photons from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The analysis is based on the decomposition of the distribution of the number density of (charged) particles expressed in polar and azimuthal coordinates into a sum of spherical harmonic functions. We present an application of the method exploting relevant symmetries to the study of azimuthal correlations arizing from collective flow among charged particles produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss perspectives for event-by- event analyses, which with increasing collision energy will eventually open entirely new dimensions in the study of ultrarelaticistic heavy ion reactions.

  5. Constraining scale-dependent non-Gaussianity with future large-scale structure and the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Adam; Huterer, Dragan; Kadota, Kenji E-mail: huterer@umich.edu

    2012-12-01

    We forecast combined future constraints from the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure on the models of primordial non-Gaussianity. We study the generalized local model of non-Gaussianity, where the parameter f{sub NL} is promoted to a function of scale, and present the principal component analysis applicable to an arbitrary form of f{sub NL}(k). We emphasize the complementarity between the CMB and LSS by using Planck, DES and BigBOSS surveys as examples, forecast constraints on the power-law f{sub NL}(k) model, and introduce the figure of merit for measurements of scale-dependent non-Gaussianity.

  6. Multichroic Antenna-Coupled Bolometers for CMB Polarization and Sub-mm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Adrian

    We propose to develop planar antenna-coupled superconducting bolometer arrays for observations at sub-millimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Our pixel architecture features a dual-polarization log-periodic antenna with a 4:1-bandwidth ratio, followed by a filter bank that divides the total bandwidth into several broad photometric bands. The advantages of this approach, compared with those using conventional single-color pixels, include a combination of greatly reduced focal-plane mass, higher array sensitivity, and a larger number of spectral bands. These advantages have the potential to greatly reduce the cost and/or increase the performance of NASA missions in the sub-millimeter to millimeter bands. For CMB polarization measurements, a wide frequency range of roughly 30 to 300 GHz is required to subtract galactic foregrounds. The multichroic architecture we propose enables a relatively low-cost 30-cm aperture space mission to have sufficient sensitivity to probe below the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.01. For a larger aperture mission, such as the EPIC-IM concept, the proposed technology could reduce the focal-plane mass by a factor of 2-3, with great savings in required cryocooler performance and therefore cost. We have demonstrated the lens-coupled antenna concept in the POLARBEAR ground-based CMB polarization experiment now operating in Chile. That experiment uses a single-band planar antenna and produces excellent beam properties and optical efficiency. In the laboratory, we have measured two octaves of total bandwidth in the log-periodic sinuous antenna. We have built filter banks of 2, 3, and 7 bands with 4, 6, and 14 bolometers per pixel for two linear polarizations. Building on these accomplishments, the deliverables for the proposed work include: *Two pixel types that together cover the range from 30 to 300 GHz. The low-frequency pixel will have bands centered at 35, 50, and 80 GHz and the high frequency pixel will have bands centered at 120, 180, and 270

  7. Impact of reionization on CMB polarization tests of slow-roll inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Hu, Wayne

    2008-02-01

    Estimates of inflationary parameters from the CMB B-mode polarization spectrum on the largest scales depend on knowledge of the reionization history, especially at low tensor-to-scalar ratio. Assuming an incorrect reionization history in the analysis of such polarization data can strongly bias the inflationary parameters. One consequence is that the single-field slow-roll consistency relation between the tensor-to-scalar ratio and tensor tilt might be excluded with high significance even if this relation holds in reality. We explain the origin of the bias and present case studies with various tensor amplitudes and noise characteristics. A more model-independent approach can account for uncertainties about reionization, and we show that parametrizing the reionization history by a set of its principal components with respect to E-mode polarization removes the bias in inflationary parameter measurement with little degradation in precision.

  8. Contour Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the Ohio State University Center for Mapping, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), developed a system for mobile mapping called the GPSVan. While driving, the users can map an area from the sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. George J. Igel and Company and the Ohio State University Center for Mapping advanced the technology for use in determining the contours of a construction site. The new system reduces the time required for mapping and staking, and can monitor the amount of soil moved.

  9. Broad-bandwidth Metamaterial Antireflection Coatings for Sub-Millimeter Astronomy and CMB Foreground Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeff

    Sub-millimeter observations are crucial for answering questions about star and galaxy formation; understanding galactic dust foregrounds; and for removing these foregrounds to detect the faint signature of inflationary gravitational waves in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Achieving these goals requires improved, broad-band antireflection coated lenses and half-wave plates (HWPs). These optical elements will significantly boost the sensitivity and capability of future sub-millimeter and CMB missions. We propose to develop wide-bandwidth metamaterial antireflection coatings for silicon lenses and sapphire HWPs with 3:1 ratio bandwidth that are scalable across the sub-millimeter band from 300 GHz to 3 THz. This is an extension of our successful work on saw cut metamaterial AR coatings for silicon optics at millimeter wave lengths. These, and the proposed coatings consist of arrays of sub-wavelength scale features cut into optical surfaces that behave like simple dielectrics. We have demonstrated saw cut 3:1 bandwidth coatings on silicon lenses, but these coatings are limited to the millimeter wave band by the limitations of dicing saw machining. The crucial advance needed to extend these broad band coatings throughout the sub-millimeter band is the development of laser cut graded index metamaterial coatings. The proposed work includes developing the capability to fabricate these coatings, optimizing the design of these metamaterials, fabricating and testing prototype lenses and HWPs, and working with the PIPER collaboration to achieve a sub-orbital demonstration of this technology. The proposed work will develop potentially revolutionary new high performance coatings for the sub-millimeter bands, and cary this technology to TRL 7 paving the way for its use in space. We anticipate that there will be a wide range of applications for these coatings on future NASA balloons and satellites.

  10. Testing the origin of the CMB large-angle correlation deficit with a galaxy imaging survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Gibelyou, Cameron E-mail: gibelyou@umich.edu

    2011-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature distribution measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) exhibits anomalously low correlation at large angles. Quantifying the degree to which this feature in the temperature data is in conflict with standard ΛCDM cosmology is somewhat ambiguous because of the a posteriori nature of the observation. One physical mechanism that has been proposed as a possible explanation for the deficit in the large-angle temperature correlations is a suppression of primordial power on ∼ Gpc scales. To distinguish whether the anomaly is a signal of new physics, such as suppressed primordial power, it would be invaluable to perform experimental tests of the authenticity of this signal in data sets which are independent of the WMAP temperature measurements or even other CMB measurements. We explore the possibility of testing models of power suppression with large-scale structure observations, and compare the ability of planned photometric and spectroscopic surveys to constrain the power spectrum. Of the surveys planned for the next decade, a spectroscopic redshift survey such as BigBOSS will have a greater number of radial modes available for study, but we find that this advantage is outweighed by the greater surface density of high-redshift sources that will be observed by photometric surveys such as LSST or Euclid. We also find that the ability to constrain primordial power suppression is insensitive to the precision of the calibration of photometric redshifts. We conclude that very-wide-area imaging surveys have the potential to probe viable models for the missing power but that it will be difficult to use such surveys to conclusively rule out primordial power suppression as the mechanism behind the observed anomaly.

  11. Testing statistics of the CMB B -mode polarization toward unambiguously establishing quantum fluctuation of the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Hikage, Chiaki; Namba, Ryo; Namikawa, Toshiya; Hazumi, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The B -mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies at large angular scales provides compelling evidence for the primordial gravitational waves (GWs). It is often stated that a discovery of the GWs establishes the quantum fluctuation of vacuum during the cosmic inflation. Since the GWs could also be generated by source fields, however, we need to check if a sizable signal exists due to such source fields before reaching a firm conclusion when the B mode is discovered. Source fields of particular types can generate non-Gaussianity (NG) in the GWs. Testing statistics of the B mode is a powerful way of detecting such NG. As a concrete example, we show a model in which gauge field sources chiral GWs via a pseudoscalar coupling and forecast the detection significance at the future CMB satellite LiteBIRD. Effects of residual foregrounds and lensing B mode are both taken into account. We find the B -mode bispectrum "BBB" is in particular sensitive to the source-field NG, which is detectable at LiteBIRD with a >3 σ significance. Therefore the search for the BBB will be indispensable toward unambiguously establishing quantum fluctuation of vacuum when the B mode is discovered. We also introduced the Minkowski functional to detect the NGs. While we find that the Minkowski functional is less efficient than the harmonic-space bispectrum estimator, it still serves as a useful cross-check. Finally, we also discuss the possibility of extracting clean information on parity violation of GWs and new types of parity-violating observables induced by lensing.

  12. Partial Participation Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Dianne L.; Baumgart, Diane

    1991-01-01

    This article reanalyzes the principle of partial participation in integrated educational programing for students with severe or profound disabilities. The article presents four "error patterns" in how the concept has been used, some reasons why such error patterns have occurred, and strategies for avoiding these errors. (Author/JDD)

  13. Partial gravity habitat study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen; Lorandos, Jason; Akhidime, Eval; Bunch, Michael; Lund, Denise; Moore, Nathan; Murakawa, Kiosuke

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate comprehensive design requirements associated with designing habitats for humans in a partial gravity environment, then to apply them to a lunar base design. Other potential sites for application include planetary surfaces such as Mars, variable-gravity research facilities, and a rotating spacecraft. Design requirements for partial gravity environments include locomotion changes in less than normal earth gravity; facility design issues, such as interior configuration, module diameter, and geometry; and volumetric requirements based on the previous as well as psychological issues involved in prolonged isolation. For application to a lunar base, it is necessary to study the exterior architecture and configuration to insure optimum circulation patterns while providing dual egress; radiation protection issues are addressed to provide a safe and healthy environment for the crew; and finally, the overall site is studied to locate all associated facilities in context with the habitat. Mission planning is not the purpose of this study; therefore, a Lockheed scenario is used as an outline for the lunar base application, which is then modified to meet the project needs. The goal of this report is to formulate facts on human reactions to partial gravity environments, derive design requirements based on these facts, and apply the requirements to a partial gravity situation which, for this study, was a lunar base.

  14. Covariance mapping techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, Leszek J.

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation of intense femtosecond pulses have made covariance mapping an attractive analytical technique. The laser pulses available are so intense that often thousands of ionisation and Coulomb explosion events will occur within each pulse. To understand the physics of these processes the photoelectrons and photoions need to be correlated, and covariance mapping is well suited for operating at the high counting rates of these laser sources. Partial covariance is particularly useful in experiments with x-ray free electron lasers, because it is capable of suppressing pulse fluctuation effects. A variety of covariance mapping methods is described: simple, partial (single- and multi-parameter), sliced, contingent and multi-dimensional. The relationship to coincidence techniques is discussed. Covariance mapping has been used in many areas of science and technology: inner-shell excitation and Auger decay, multiphoton and multielectron ionisation, time-of-flight and angle-resolved spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, stimulated Raman scattering, directional gamma ray sensing, welding diagnostics and brain connectivity studies (connectomics). This review gives practical advice for implementing the technique and interpreting the results, including its limitations and instrumental constraints. It also summarises recent theoretical studies, highlights unsolved problems and outlines a personal view on the most promising research directions.

  15. Genetic map construction with constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Rawlings, C.J.; Soursenot, S.

    1994-12-31

    A pilot program, CME, is described for generating a physical genetic map from hybridization fingerprinting data. CME is implemented in the parallel constraint logic programming language ElipSys. The features of constraint logic programming are used to enable the integration of preexisting mapping information (partial probe orders from cytogenetic maps and local physical maps) into the global map generation process, while parallelism enables the search space to be traversed more efficiently. CME was tested using data from chromosome 2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and was found able to generate maps as well as (and sometimes better than) a more traditional method. This paper illustrates the practical benefits of using a symbolic logic programming language and shows that the features of constraint handling and parallel execution bring the development of practical systems based on Al programming technologies nearer to being a reality.

  16. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  17. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    DOEpatents

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  18. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  19. Partial quantum logics revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterlein, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Partial Boolean algebras (PBAs) were introduced by Kochen and Specker as an algebraic model reflecting the mutual relationships among quantum-physical yes-no tests. The fact that not all pairs of tests are compatible was taken into special account. In this paper, we review PBAs from two sides. First, we generalise the concept, taking into account also those yes-no tests which are based on unsharp measurements. Namely, we introduce partial MV-algebras, and we define a corresponding logic. Second, we turn to the representation theory of PBAs. In analogy to the case of orthomodular lattices, we give conditions for a PBA to be isomorphic to the PBA of closed subspaces of a complex Hilbert space. Hereby, we do not restrict ourselves to purely algebraic statements; we rather give preference to conditions involving automorphisms of a PBA. We conclude by outlining a critical view on the logico-algebraic approach to the foundational problem of quantum physics.

  20. RICH MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Michael Goodchild recently gave eight reasons why traditional maps are limited as communication devices, and how interactive internet mapping can overcome these limitations. In the past, many authorities in cartography, from Jenks to Bertin, have emphasized the importance of sim...

  1. Kentucky map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A wall-sized geological map of Kentucky, the product of 18 years of work, has just been released. Produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) at the University of Kentucky, the map is unique, according to state geologist Donald Haney, because it is the first and only state map ever produced in detailed form from geologic quadrangle maps already available from the KGS.At a scale of 1:250,000, the map shows the surface distribution of various types of rock throughout the state, as well as geologic structure, faults, and surface coal beds. Numerous geologic sections, stratigraphic diagrams, correlation charts, and structure sections accompany the map. Compiled by R. C. McDowell and S. L. Moore of the USGS and by G. J . Grabowski of the KGS, the map was made by photoreducing and generalizing the detailed geologic quadrangle maps.

  2. Map adventures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1994-01-01

    Map Adventures, with seven accompanying lessons, is appropriate for grades K-3. Students will learn basic concepts for visualizing objects from different perspectives and how to understand /and use maps.

  3. Pseudo Boolean Programming for Partially Ordered Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angibaud, Sébastien; Fertin, Guillaume; Thévenin, Annelyse; Vialette, Stéphane

    Comparing genomes of different species is a crucial problem in comparative genomics. Different measures have been proposed to compare two genomes: number of common intervals, number of adjacencies, number of reversals, etc. These measures are classically used between two totally ordered genomes. However, genetic mapping techniques often give rise to different maps with some unordered genes. Starting from a partial order between genes of a genome, one method to find a total order consists in optimizing a given measure between a linear extension of this partial order and a given total order of a close and well-known genome. However, for most common measures, the problem turns out to be NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a (0,1)-linear programming approach to compute a linear extension of one genome that maximizes the number of common intervals (resp. the number of adjacencies) between this linear extension and a given total order. Next, we propose an algorithm to find linear extensions of two partial orders that maximize the number of adjacencies.

  4. Supernova, baryon acoustic oscillations, and CMB surface distance constraints on f(G) higher order gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Moldenhauer, Jacob; Ishak, Mustapha; Thompson, John; Easson, Damien A.

    2010-03-15

    We consider recently proposed higher-order gravity models where the action is built from the Einstein-Hilbert action plus a function f(G) of the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. The models were previously shown to pass physical acceptability conditions as well as solar system tests. In this paper, we compare the models to combined data sets of supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and constraints from the CMB surface of last scattering. We find that the models provide fits to the data that are close to those of the lambda cold dark matter concordance model. The results provide a pool of higher-order gravity models that pass these tests and need to be compared to constraints from large scale structure and full CMB analysis.

  5. The role of partial knowledge in statistical word learning

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, Damian C.; Yu, Chen; Smith, Linda B.

    2013-01-01

    A critical question about the nature of human learning is whether it is an all-or-none or a gradual, accumulative process. Associative and statistical theories of word learning rely critically on the later assumption: that the process of learning a word's meaning unfolds over time. That is, learning the correct referent for a word involves the accumulation of partial knowledge across multiple instances. Some theories also make an even stronger claim: Partial knowledge of one word–object mapping can speed up the acquisition of other word–object mappings. We present three experiments that test and verify these claims by exposing learners to two consecutive blocks of cross-situational learning, in which half of the words and objects in the second block were those that participants failed to learn in Block 1. In line with an accumulative account, Re-exposure to these mis-mapped items accelerated the acquisition of both previously experienced mappings and wholly new word–object mappings. But how does partial knowledge of some words speed the acquisition of others? We consider two hypotheses. First, partial knowledge of a word could reduce the amount of information required for it to reach threshold, and the supra-threshold mapping could subsequently aid in the acquisition of new mappings. Alternatively, partial knowledge of a word's meaning could be useful for disambiguating the meanings of other words even before the threshold of learning is reached. We construct and compare computational models embodying each of these hypotheses and show that the latter provides a better explanation of the empirical data. PMID:23702980

  6. Analytic spectra of CMB anisotropies and polarization generated by scalar perturbations in synchronous gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-05-01

    The temperature anisotropies and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation not only serve as indispensable cosmological probes, but also provide a unique channel to detect relic gravitational waves (RGW) at very long wavelengths. Analytical studies of the anisotropies and polarization improve our understanding of various cosmic processes and help to separate the contribution of RGW from that of density perturbations. We present a detailed analytical calculation of CMB temperature anisotropies αk and polarization βk generated by scalar metric perturbations in synchronous gauge, parallel to our previous work with RGW as a generating source. This is realized primarily by an analytic time integration of Boltzmann’s equation, yielding the closed forms of αk and βk. Approximations, such as the tight-coupling approximation for photons a priori to the recombination and the long-wavelength limit for scalar perturbations, are used. The residual gauge modes in scalar perturbations are analyzed and a proper joining condition of scalar perturbations at the radiation-matter equality is chosen, ensuring the continuity of energy perturbation. The resulting analytic expressions of the multipole moments of polarization aEl and of temperature anisotropies aTl are explicit functions of the scalar perturbations, recombination time, recombination width, photon-free streaming damping factor, baryon fraction, initial amplitude, primordial scalar spectral index and the running index. These results show that a longer recombination width yields higher amplitudes of polarization on large scales and more damping on small scales, and that a late recombination time shifts the peaks of C^{XX^{\\prime }}_l to larger angular scales. Calculations show that aEl is generated in the presence of the quadrupole α2 of temperature anisotropies via scattering, both having similar structures and being smaller than the total aTl, which consists of the contributions from the

  7. Galaxy clustering, CMB and supernova data constraints on ϕCDM model with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a scalar field dark energy model (i.e., ϕCDM model) with massive neutrinos, where the scalar field possesses an inverse power-law potential, i.e., V (ϕ) ∝ϕ-α (α > 0). We find that the sum of neutrino masses Σmν has significant impacts on the CMB temperature power spectrum and on the matter power spectrum. In addition, the parameter α also has slight impacts on the spectra. A joint sample, including CMB data from Planck 2013 and WMAP9, galaxy clustering data from WiggleZ and BOSS DR11, and JLA compilation of Type Ia supernova observations, is adopted to confine the parameters. Within the context of the ϕCDM model under consideration, the joint sample determines the cosmological parameters to high precision: the angular size of the sound horizon at recombination, the Thomson scattering optical depth due to reionization, the physical densities of baryons and cold dark matter, and the scalar spectral index are estimated to be θ* = (1.0415-0.0011+0.0012) ×10-2, τ =0.0914-0.0242+0.0266, Ωbh2 = 0.0222 ± 0.0005, Ωch2 = 0.1177 ± 0.0036, and ns =0.9644-0.0119+0.0118, respectively, at 95% confidence level (CL). It turns out that α < 4.995 at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model. And yet, the ΛCDM scenario corresponding to α = 0 is not ruled out at 95% CL. Moreover, we get Σmν < 0.262 eV at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model, while the corresponding one for the ΛCDM model is Σmν < 0.293 eV. The allowed scale of Σmν in the ϕCDM model is a bit smaller than that in the ΛCDM model. It is consistent with the qualitative analysis, which reveals that the increases of α and Σmν both can result in the suppression of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, when α is larger, in order to avoid suppressing the matter power spectrum too much, the value of Σmν should be smaller.

  8. The Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey: observations and CMB polarization foreground analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, E.; Haverkorn, M.; McConnell, D.; Bernardi, G.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Cortiglioni, S.; Poppi, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present observations and cosmic microwave background (CMB) foreground analysis of the Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey, an investigation of the Galactic latitude behaviour of the polarized synchrotron emission at 2.3GHz with the Parkes Radio Telescope. The survey consists of a 5° wide strip along the Galactic meridian l = 254° extending from the Galactic plane to the South Galactic pole. We identify three zones distinguished by polarized emission properties: the disc, the halo and a transition region connecting them. The halo section lies at latitudes |b| > 40° and has weak and smooth polarized emission mostly at large scale with steep angular power spectra of median slope βmed ~ -2.6. The disc region covers the latitudes |b| < 20° and has a brighter, more complex emission dominated by the small scales with flatter spectra of median slope βmed = -1.8. The transition region has steep spectra as in the halo, but the emission increases towards the Galactic plane from halo to disc levels. The change of slope and emission structure at b ~ -20° is sudden, indicating a sharp disc-halo transition. The whole halo section is just one environment extended over 50° with very low emission which, once scaled to 70GHz, is equivalent to the CMB B-mode emission for a tensor-to-scalar perturbation power ratio rhalo = (3.3 +/- 0.4) × 10-3. Applying a conservative cleaning procedure, we estimate an r detection limit of δr ~ 2 × 10-3 at 70GHz (3σ confidence limit) and, assuming a dust polarization fraction of <12per cent, δr ~ 1 × 10-2 at 150GHz. The 150-GHz limit matches the goals of planned sub-orbital experiments, which can therefore be conducted at this high frequency. The 70-GHz limit is close to the goal of proposed next-generation space missions, which thus might not strictly require space-based platforms.

  9. Estimation of inflation parameters for Perturbed Power Law model using recent CMB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Das, Santanu; Souradeep, Tarun; Joy, Minu E-mail: santanud@iucaa.ernet.in E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is an important probe for understanding the inflationary era of the Universe. We consider the Perturbed Power Law (PPL) model of inflation which is a soft deviation from Power Law (PL) inflationary model. This model captures the effect of higher order derivative of Hubble parameter during inflation, which in turn leads to a non-zero effective mass m{sub eff} for the inflaton field. The higher order derivatives of Hubble parameter at leading order sources constant difference in the spectral index for scalar and tensor perturbation going beyond PL model of inflation. PPL model have two observable independent parameters, namely spectral index for tensor perturbation ν{sub t} and change in spectral index for scalar perturbation ν{sub st} to explain the observed features in the scalar and tensor power spectrum of perturbation. From the recent measurements of CMB power spectra by WMAP, Planck and BICEP-2 for temperature and polarization, we estimate the feasibility of PPL model with standard ΛCDM model. Although BICEP-2 claimed a detection of r=0.2, estimates of dust contamination provided by Planck have left open the possibility that only upper bound on r will be expected in a joint analysis. As a result we consider different upper bounds on the value of r and show that PPL model can explain a lower value of tensor to scalar ratio (r<0.1 or r<0.01) for a scalar spectral index of n{sub s}=0.96 by having a non-zero value of effective mass of the inflaton field m{sup 2}{sub eff}/H{sup 2}. The analysis with WP + Planck likelihood shows a non-zero detection of m{sup 2}{sub eff}/H{sup 2} with 5.7 σ and 8.1 σ respectively for r<0.1 and r<0.01. Whereas, with BICEP-2 likelihood m{sup 2}{sub eff}/H{sup 2} = −0.0237 ± 0.0135 which is consistent with zero.

  10. Degree-2 in the Transition Zone and Near the CMB: Bottom up Tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Lekic, V.; Tsai, V. C.; Dziewonski, A. M.; Kellogg, L. H.; Matas, J.; Panero, W. R.; Romanowicz, B.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 Cooperative Institute for Deep Earth Research (CIDER) program facilitated collaboration between researchers from seismology, geodynamics, mineral physics, and geochemistry to study, model and better understand the interior of the Earth. Through this multidisciplinary approach, we have developed a self- consistent paradigm of mantle structure and dynamics. Geochemical studies necessitate multiple mantle components, a requirement that can be met by a layered mantle structure with the 660-km discontinuity serving as a boundary between a depleted upper mantle and undepleted lower mantle. Seismological studies show strong evidence for reorganization of flow at the 660 km discontinuity, but some tomographic models also suggest a significant mass flux across this depth. We investigate the possibility that the large low-velocity seismic anomalies beneath south Africa and the central Pacific are thermochemical reservoirs that may serve as the undepleted, undegassed mantle end-member commonly seen in intraplate volcanics. These superplumes may represent an extension of the degree-2 heterogeneity dominating the deepest 500-1000 km of the lower mantle, and may comprise >20% of the mantle by volume. A comparison of S-velocity anomalies in the mantle with the slab reconstruction model of Lithgow-Bertelloni and Richards (1998) reveals a high degree-2 correlation between these models; in general, the slab model has much more power in higher harmonics. However, for degree-2, the slab density anomaly integrated over the upper mantle has the same pattern as the velocity anomalies at the bottom of the transition zone, but not at other depths in the upper mantle, suggesting that the transition zone acts as a low-pass filter, preferentially removing shorter wavelengths of mantle flow. The degree-2 velocity anomaly just above the core-mantle boundary (CMB) parallels the last 120 Ma of slab signal integrated over the entire mantle, indicating a long-lived origin of this boundary

  11. Effect of width, amplitude and position of a CMB hot spot on core convection and dynamo action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W.; Wicht, J.; Hori, K.

    2015-10-01

    Within the fluid iron cores of terrestrial planets, convection and hence the generation of global magnetic fields are controlled by the overlying rocky mantle. The thermal structure of the lower mantle determines how much heat is allowed to escape the core. Hot lower mantle features, like the thermal footprint of a giant impact or hot mantle plumes will reduce locally the heat flux through the core mantle boundary (CMB) and thereby weaken core convection and affect the magnetic field generation process. In this study, we numerically investigate how parametrised hot spots at the CMB with arbitrary size, amplitude and position affect core convection and hence the dynamo. The effect of the heat flux anomaly is quantified by changes in global flow symmetry properties, such as the emergence of equatorial antisymmetric and axisymmetric (EAA) zonal flows. For pure hydrodynamic models the EAA symmetry scales almost linearly with its respective amplitude and size, whereas self-consistent dynamo simulations typically either suppress or drastically enhance EAA depending mainly on the length scale of the heat flux anomaly. Our results suggest, that the horizontal extent of the anomaly should be on the order of the outer core radius to significantly affect flow and field symmetries. As an implication to Mars, the study concludes that an ancient core field modified by a CMB heat flux anomaly is not able to heteroge- neously magnetise the crust to the present-day level of north-south asymmetry.

  12. Testing chirality of primordial gravitational waves with Planck and future CMB data: no hope from angular power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbino, Martina; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    We use the 2015 Planck likelihood in combination with the Bicep2/Keck likelihood (BKP and BK14) to constrain the chirality, χ, of primordial gravitational waves in a scale-invariant scenario. In this framework, the parameter χ enters theory always coupled to the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, e.g. in combination of the form χ ṡ r. Thus, the capability to detect χ critically depends on the value of r. We find that with present data sets χ is de facto unconstrained. We also provide forecasts for χ from future CMB experiments, including COrE+, exploring several fiducial values of r. We find that the current limit on r is tight enough to disfavor a neat detection of χ. For example, in the unlikely case in which r~0.1(0.05), the maximal chirality case, i.e. χ = ±1, could be detected with a significance of ~2.5(1.5)σ at best. We conclude that the two-point statistics at the basis of CMB likelihood functions is currently unable to constrain chirality and may only provide weak limits on χ in the most optimistic scenarios. Hence, it is crucial to investigate the use of other observables, e.g. provided by higher order statistics, to constrain these kinds of parity violating theories with the CMB.

  13. Second-order power spectra of CMB anisotropies due to primordial random perturbations in flat cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji

    2008-05-15

    Second-order power spectra of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies due to random primordial perturbations at the matter-dominant stage are studied, based on the relativistic second-order theory of perturbations in flat cosmological models and on the second-order formula of CMB anisotropies derived by Mollerach and Matarrese. So far the second-order integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect has been analyzed using the three-point correlation or bispectrum. In this paper we derive the second-order term of power spectra given using the two-point correlation of temperature fluctuations. The second-order density perturbations are small, compared with the first-order ones. The second-order power spectra of CMB anisotropies, however, are not small at all, compared with the first-order power spectra, because at the early stage the first-order integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is very small and the second-order integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect may be dominant over the first-order ones. So their characteristic behaviors may be measured through future precise observation and bring useful information on the structure and evolution of our universe in the future.

  14. Oxygen Pumping. II. Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High-Frequency CMB Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Haiman, Zoltán; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2008-01-01

    At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 μm fine-structure line of O I is pumped by the ~1300 Å soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen in which metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and the cosmic epoch when the O I pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak [(δy)rms <~ 10-7 roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of ~1 nK], it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able to set useful constraints on the heavy-element enrichment history of the IGM.

  15. General classification of partially polarized partially coherent beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Herrero, Rosario; Piquero, Gemma; Mejias, Pedro M.

    2003-05-01

    The behavior of the so-called generalized degree of polarization of partially coherent partially polarized beams upon free propagation is investigated. On the basis of this parameter a general classification scheme of partially polarized beams is proposed. The results are applied to certain classes of fields of special interest.

  16. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  17. Interpreting the CMB aberration and Doppler measurements: boost or intrinsic dipole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan, Omar; Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The aberration and Doppler coupling effects of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) were recently measured by the Planck satellite. The most straightforward interpretation leads to a direct detection of our peculiar velocity β, consistent with the measurement of the well-known dipole. In this paper we discuss the assumptions behind such interpretation. We show that Doppler-like couplings appear from two effects: our peculiar velocity and a second order large-scale effect due to the dipolar part of the gravitational potential. We find that the two effects are exactly degenerate but only if we assume second-order initial conditions from single-field Inflation. Thus, detecting a discrepancy in the value of β from the dipole and the Doppler couplings implies the presence of a primordial non-Gaussianity. We also show that aberration-like signals likewise arise from two independent effects: our peculiar velocity and lensing due to a first order large-scale dipolar gravitational potential, independently on Gaussianity of the initial conditions. In general such effects are not degenerate and so a discrepancy between the measured β from the dipole and aberration could be accounted for by a dipolar gravitational potential. Only through a fine-tuning of the radial profile of the potential it is possible to have a complete degeneracy with a boost effect. Finally we discuss that we also expect other signatures due to integrated second order terms, which may be further used to disentangle this scenario from a simple boost.

  18. CMB-galaxy correlation in Unified Dark Matter scalar field cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Raccanelli, Alvise; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide; Giannantonio, Tommaso E-mail: alvise.raccanelli@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    We present an analysis of the cross-correlation between the CMB and the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe in Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field cosmologies. We work out the predicted cross-correlation function in UDM models, which depends on the speed of sound of the unified component, and compare it with observations from six galaxy catalogues (NVSS, HEAO, 2MASS, and SDSS main galaxies, luminous red galaxies, and quasars). We sample the value of the speed of sound and perform a likelihood analysis, finding that the UDM model is as likely as the ΛCDM, and is compatible with observations for a range of values of c{sub ∞} (the value of the sound speed at late times) on which structure formation depends. In particular, we obtain an upper bound of c{sub ∞}{sup 2} ≤ 0.009 at 95% confidence level, meaning that the ΛCDM model, for which c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 0, is a good fit to the data, while the posterior probability distribution peaks at the value c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 10{sup −4} . Finally, we study the time dependence of the deviation from ΛCDM via a tomographic analysis using a mock redshift distribution and we find that the largest deviation is for low-redshift sources, suggesting that future low-z surveys will be best suited to constrain UDM models.

  19. Brane SUSY breaking and inflation: Implications for scalar fields and CMB distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Augusto

    2014-12-01

    I elaborate on a link between the string-scale breaking of supersymmetry that occurs in a class of superstring models and the onset of inflation. The link rests on spatially flat cosmologies supported by a scalar field driven by an exponential potential. If, as in String Theory, this potential is steep enough, under some assumptions that are spelled out in the text the scalar can only climb up as it emerges from an initial singularity. In the presence of another mild exponential, slow-roll inflation is thus injected during the ensuing descent and definite imprints are left in the CMB power spectrum: the quadrupole is systematically reduced and, depending on the choice of two parameters, an oscillatory behavior can also emerge for low multipoles l < 50, in qualitative agreement with WMAP9 and PLANCK data. The experimentally favored value of the spectral index, n s ≈ 0.96, points to a potentially important role for the NS fivebrane, which is unstable in this class of models, in the Early Universe.

  20. Relic density and CMB constraints on dark matter annihilation with Sommerfeld enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Zavala, Jesus; White, Simon D. M.; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2010-04-15

    We calculate how the relic density of dark matter particles is altered when their annihilation is enhanced by the Sommerfeld mechanism due to a Yukawa interaction between the annihilating particles. Maintaining a dark matter abundance consistent with current observational bounds requires the normalization of the s-wave annihilation cross section to be decreased compared to a model without enhancement. The level of suppression depends on the specific parameters of the particle model, with the kinetic decoupling temperature having the most effect. We find that the cross section can be reduced by as much as an order of magnitude for extreme cases. We also compute the {mu}-type distortion of the CMB energy spectrum caused by energy injection from such Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. Our results indicate that in the vicinity of resonances, associated with bound states, distortions can be large enough to be excluded by the upper limit |{mu}|{<=}9.0x10{sup -5} found by the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) instrument on the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) satellite.

  1. Gravity from refraction of CMB photons using the optical-mechanical analogy in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.

    2014-06-01

    Relativistic light bending and gravitational lensing have traditionally been viewed purely as effects of spacetime curvature. Yet for many years they have also been treated as a quasi-refraction of light in a special optical medium, wherein the refractive index is considered proportional to the gravitational potential. We now propose that this `optical-mechanical analogy' in general relativity can also account for gravity. Using classical optics we show that a photon moving through the refractive medium about a mass transfers momentum first to the medium and then to the mass itself. Due to transfer of momentum primarily from ultra-remote CMB photons, masses are then subject to a cosmic pressure on all sides. Where two masses occur, mutual screening by their respective envelopes of refractive medium is shown to result in an attractive force of the Le Sage or `pushing gravity' type. We suggest that the gravito-optical medium is comprised of gravitons, which may be modeled as a quasi-Einstein-Bose conjugate interconnecting all the masses of the visible universe.

  2. Statistical anisotropy of CMB as a probe of conformal rolling scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, S.R.; Rubtsov, G.I. E-mail: grisha@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2012-05-01

    Search for the statistical anisotropy in the CMB data is a powerful tool for constraining models of the early Universe. In this paper we focus on the recently proposed cosmological scenario with conformal rolling. We consider two sub-scenarios, one of which involves a long intermediate stage between conformal rolling and conventional hot epoch. Primordial scalar perturbations generated within these sub-scenarios have different direction-dependent power spectra, both characterized by a single parameter h{sup 2}. We search for the signatures of this anisotropy in the seven-year WMAP data using quadratic maximum likelihood method, first applied for similar purposes by Hanson and Lewis. We confirm the large quadrupole anisotropy detected in V and W bands, which has been argued to originate from systematic effects rather than from cosmology. We construct an estimator for the parameter h{sup 2}. In the case of the sub-scenario with the intermediate stage we set an upper limit h{sup 2} < 0.045 at the 95% confidence level. The constraint on h{sup 2} is much weaker in the case of another sub-scenario, where the intermediate stage is absent.

  3. Interaction Between Dark Energy and Dark Matter: Observational Constraints from Ohd, BAO, CMB and SNe Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuo; Liang, Nan

    2013-12-01

    In order to test if there is energy transfer between dark energy (DE) and dark matter (DM), we investigate cosmological constraints on two forms of nontrivial interaction between the DM sector and the sector responsible for the acceleration of the universe, in light of the newly revised observations including OHD, CMB, BAO and SNe Ia. More precisely, we find the same tendencies for both phenomenological forms of the interaction term Q = 3γHρ, i.e. the parameter γ to be a small number, |γ| ≈ 10-2. However, concerning the sign of the interaction parameter, we observe that γ > 0 when the interaction between dark sectors is proportional to the energy density of dust matter, whereas the negative coupling (γ < 0) is preferred by observations when the interaction term is proportional to DE density. We further discuss two possible explanations to this incompatibility and apply a quantitative criteria to judge the severity of the coincidence problem. Results suggest that the γmIDE model with a positive coupling may alleviate the coincidence problem, since its coincidence index C is smaller than that for the γdIDE model, the interacting quintessence and phantom models by four orders of magnitude.

  4. Testing string vacua in the lab: from a hidden CMB to dark forces in flux compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Goodsell, Mark; Jaeckel, Joerg; Ringwald, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the phenomenological properties of hidden Abelian gauge bosons with a kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon within type IIB flux compactifications. We study the interplay between moduli stabilisation and the Green-Schwarz mechanism that gives mass to the hidden photon paying particular attention to the rôle of D-terms. We present two generic classes of explicit Calabi-Yau examples with an isotropic and an anisotropic shape of the extra dimensions showing how the last case turns out to be very promising to make contact with current experiments. In fact, anisotropic compactifications lead naturally to a GeV-scale hidden photon ("dark forces" that can be searched for in beam dump experiments) for an intermediate string scale; or, allowing for some fine-tuning, even to an meV-scale hidden photon (which could lead to a "hidden CMB" and can be tested by light-shining-through-a-wall experiments) in the case of TeV-scale strings.

  5. A string-inspired model for the low-ℓ CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, N.; Sagnotti, A.

    2015-07-01

    We present a semi-analytic exploration of some low-ℓ angular power spectra inspired by “brane supersymmetry breaking (BSB)”. This mechanism splits Bose and Fermi excitations in string theory, leaving behind an exponential potential that is just too steep for the inflaton to emerge from the initial singularity while descending it. As a result, the scalar generically bounces against the exponential wall, which typically introduces an infrared depression and a pre-inflationary peak in the power spectrum of scalar perturbations. We elaborate on a possible link between this phenomenon and the low-ℓ CMB. For the first 32 multipoles, combining the hard exponential with a milder one leading to ns ≃ 0.96 and with a small Gaussian bump, we have attained a reduction of χ2 to about 46% of the standard ΛCDM setting, with both WMAP9 and PLANCK 2013 data. This result corresponds to a χ2/DOF of about 0.45, to be compared with a ΛCDM value of about 0.85. The preferred choices combine naturally quadrupole depression, a first peak around ℓ = 5 and a wide minimum around ℓ = 20. We have also gathered some evidence that similar spectra emerge if the hard exponential is combined with more realistic models of inflation. A problem of the preferred examples is their slow convergence to an almost scale-invariant profile.

  6. Cosmic Microwave Background Maps from the HACME Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angélica; Staren, John W.; Meinhold, Peter R.; Lubin, Philip M.; Childers, Jeffrey D.; Figueiredo, Newton; Gaier, Todd; Lim, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Villela, Thyrso; Wuensche, C. Alexandre

    2000-10-01

    We present cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps from the Santa Barbara HACME balloon experiment (Staren et al.), covering about 1150 square degrees split between two regions in the northern sky, near the stars γ Ursae Minoris and α Leonis, respectively. The FWHM of the beam is ~0.77d in three frequency bands centered on 39, 41, and 43 GHz. The results demonstrate that the thoroughly interconnected scan strategy employed allows efficient removal of 1/f-noise and slightly variable scan-synchronous offsets. The maps display no striping, and the noise correlations are found to be virtually isotropic, decaying on an angular scale ~1°. The noise performance of the experiment resulted in an upper limit on CMB anisotropy. However, our results demonstrate that atmospheric contamination and other systematics resulting from the circular scanning strategy can be accurately controlled and bode well for the planned follow-up experiments BEAST and ACE, since they show that even with the overly cautious assumption that 1/f-noise and offsets will be as dominant as for HACME, the problems they pose can be readily overcome with the mapmaking algorithm discussed. Our prewhitened notch-filter algorithm for destriping and offset removal is proving useful also for other balloon- and ground-based experiments whose scan strategies involve substantial interleaving, e.g., Boomerang.

  7. Mapping Van

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) - developed system for satellite mapping has been commercialized for the first time. Global Visions, Inc. maps an area while driving along a road in a sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. Data is fed into a computerized geographic information system (GIS). The resulting amps can be used for tax assessment purposes, emergency dispatch vehicles and fleet delivery companies as well as other applications.

  8. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  9. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  10. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  11. Making Maps from Planck LFI 30GHz Data with Asymmetric Beams and Cooler Noise

    SciTech Connect

    The Planck CTP Working Group; Ashdown, M.A.J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bartlett, J.G.; Borrill, J.; Cantalupo, C.; de Gasperis, G.; Gorski, K.M.; Hivon, E.; Huffenberger, K.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Hurki-Suonio, H.; Lawrence, C.R.; Natoli, P.; Poutanen, T.; Prezeau, G.; Reinecke, M.; Rocha, G.; Sandri, M.; Stompor, R..; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B.; de Troia, G.

    2008-06-19

    The Planck satellite will observe the full sky at nine frequencies from 30 to 857 GHz. Temperature and polarization frequency maps made from these observations are prime deliverables of the Planck mission. The goal of this paper is to examine the effects of four realistic instrument systematics in the 30 GHz frequency maps: non-axially-symmetric beams, sample integration, sorption cooler noise, and pointing errors. They simulated one year long observations of four 30 GHz detectors. The simulated timestreams contained CMB, foreground component (both galactic and extra-galactic), instrument nolise (correlated and white), and the four instrument systematic effects. They made maps from the timelines and examined the magnitudes of the systematics effects in the maps and their angular power spectra. They also compared the maps of different mapmaking codes to see how they performed. They used five mapmaking codes (two destripers and three optimal codes). None of their mapmaking codes makes an attempt to deconvolve the beam from its output map. Therefore all our maps had similar smoothing due to beams and sample integration. This is a complicated smoothing, because every map pixel has its own effective beam. Temperature to polarization cross-coupling due to beam mismatch causes a detectable bias in the TE spectrum of the CMB map. The effects of cooler noise and pointing errors did not appear to be major concerns for the 30 GHz channel. The only essential difference found so far between mapmaking codes that affects accuracy (in terms of residual RMS) is baseline length. All optimal codes give essentially indistiguishable results. A destriper gives the same result as the optimal codes when the baseline is set short enough (Madam). For longer baselines destripers (Springtide and Madam) require less computing resources but deliver a noisier map.

  12. Undersea Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a cooperative learning activity in which students assume different roles in an effort to produce a relief map of the ocean floor. Materials, procedures, definitions, student roles, and questions are discussed. A reproducible map for the activity is provided. (CW)

  13. Question Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Josh

    2012-01-01

    After accepting the principal position at Farmersville (TX) Junior High, the author decided to increase instructional rigor through question mapping because of the success he saw using this instructional practice at his prior campus. Teachers are the number one influence on student achievement (Marzano, 2003), so question mapping provides a…

  14. Map Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet about maps, with seven accompanying lessons, is appropriate for students in grades K-3. Students learn basic concepts for visualizing objects from different perspectives and how to understand and use maps. Lessons in the packet center on a story about a little girl, Nikki, who rides in a hot-air balloon that gives her, and…

  15. A LEKID-based CMB instrument design for large-scale observations in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, D. C.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bond, J. R.; Bradford, K. J.; Chapman, D.; Che, G.; Day, P. K.; Didier, J.; Doyle, S.; Eriksen, H. K.; Flanigan, D.; Groppi, C. E.; Hillbrand, Seth N.; Johnson, B. R.; Jones, G.; Limon, Michele; Miller, A. D.; Mauskopf, P.; McCarrick, H.; Mroczkowski, T.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, B.; Smiley, B.; Sobrin, Joshua; Wehus, I. K.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of a feasibility study, which examined deployment of a ground-based millimeter-wave polarimeter, tailored for observing the cosmic microwave background (CMB), to Isi Station in Greenland. The instrument for this study is based on lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) and an F/2.4 catoptric, crossed-Dragone telescope with a 500 mm aperture. The telescope is mounted inside the receiver and cooled to < 4 K by a closed-cycle 4He refrigerator to reduce background loading on the detectors. Linearly polarized signals from the sky are modulated with a metal-mesh half-wave plate that is rotated at the aperture stop of the telescope with a hollow-shaft motor based on a superconducting magnetic bearing. The modular detector array design includes at least 2300 LEKIDs, and it can be configured for spectral bands centered on 150 GHz or greater. Our study considered configurations for observing in spectral bands centered on 150, 210 and 267 GHz. The entire polarimeter is mounted on a commercial precision rotary air bearing, which allows fast azimuth scan speeds with negligible vibration and mechanical wear over time. A slip ring provides power to the instrument, enabling circular scans (360 degrees of continuous rotation). This mount, when combined with sky rotation and the latitude of the observation site, produces a hypotrochoid scan pattern, which yields excellent cross-linking and enables 34% of the sky to be observed using a range of constant elevation scans. This scan pattern and sky coverage combined with the beam size (15 arcmin at 150 GHz) makes the instrument sensitive to 5 < ` < 1000 in the angular power spectra.

  16. Cosmic bandits: Exploration versus exploitation in CMB B-mode experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-02-01

    A preferred method to detect the curl-component, or B-mode, signature of inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, in the absence of foregrounds and lensing, is a prolonged integration over a single patch of sky of a few square degrees. In practice, however, foregrounds abound and the sensitivity to B modes can be improved considerably by finding the region of sky cleanest of foregrounds. The best strategy to detect B modes thus involves a tradeoff between exploration (to find lower-foreground patches) and exploitation (through prolonged integration). This problem is akin to the multi-armed bandit (MAB) problem in probability theory, wherein a gambler faces a series of slot machines with unknown winning odds and must develop a strategy to maximize his/her winnings with some finite number of pulls. While the optimal MAB strategy remains to be determined, a number of algorithms have been developed in an effort to maximize the winnings. Here, based on this resemblance, we tackle the search for IGW B modes with single frequency experiments in the presence of spatially varying foregrounds by developing adaptive survey strategies to optimize the sensitivity to IGW B modes. We demonstrate, using realistic foreground models and taking lensing-induced B modes into account, that adaptive experiments can substantially improve the upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio (by factors of 2 and 3 in single frequency experiments, and possibly even more). Similar techniques can be applied to other surveys, including 21-cm measurements of signatures of the epoch of reionization, searches for a stochastic primordial gravitational wave background, deep-field imaging by the James Webb Space Telescope or various radio interferometers, and transient follow-up searches.

  17. Constraints on CDM cosmology from galaxy power spectrum, CMB and SNIa evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferramacho, L. D.; Blanchard, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Aims: We examine the constraints that can be obtained on standard cold dark matter models from the most currently used data set: CMB anisotropies, type Ia supernovae and the SDSS luminous red galaxies. We also examine how these constraints are widened when the equation of state parameter w and the curvature parameter Ωk are left as free parameters. Finally, we investigate the impact on these constraints of a possible form of evolution in SNIa intrinsic luminosity. Methods: We obtained our results from MCMC analysis using the full likelihood of each data set. Results: For the ΛCDM model, our “vanilla” model, cosmological parameters are tightly constrained and consistent with current estimates from various methods. When the dark energy parameter w is free we find that the constraints remain mostly unchanged, i.e. changes are smaller than the 1 sigma uncertainties. Similarly, relaxing the assumption of a flat universe leads to nearly identical constraints on the dark energy density parameter of the universe Ω_Λ , baryon density of the universe Ω_b, the optical depth τ, the index of the power spectrum of primordial fluctuations n_S, with most one sigma uncertainties better than 5%. More significant changes appear on other parameters: while preferred values are almost unchanged, uncertainties for the physical dark matter density Ω_ch^2, Hubble constant H0 and σ8 are typically twice as large. The constraint on the age of the Universe, which is very accurate for the vanilla model, is the most degraded. We found that different methodological approaches on large scale structure estimates lead to appreciable differences in preferred values and uncertainty widths. We found that possible evolution in SNIa intrinsic luminosity does not alter these constraints by much, except for w, for which the uncertainty is twice as large. At the same time, this possible evolution is severely constrained. Conclusions: We conclude that systematic uncertainties for some estimated

  18. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  19. Testing gravity at large scales with H I intensity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the possibility of testing Einstein's general theory of relativity (GR) and the standard cosmological model via the EG statistic using neutral hydrogen (H I) intensity mapping. We generalize the Fourier space estimator for EG to include H I as a biased tracer of matter and forecast statistical errors using H I clustering and lensing surveys that can be performed in the near future, in combination with ongoing and forthcoming optical galaxy and cosmic microwave background (CMB) surveys. We find that fractional errors <1 per cent in the EG measurement can be achieved in a number of cases and compare the ability of various survey combinations to differentiate between GR and specific modified gravity models. Measuring EG with intensity mapping and the Square Kilometre Array can provide exquisite tests of gravity at cosmological scales.

  20. Partial hepatectomy in mice.

    PubMed

    Nevzorova, Y A; Tolba, R; Trautwein, C; Liedtke, C

    2015-04-01

    The surgical procedure of two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PH) in rodents was first described more than 80 years ago by Higgins and Anderson. Nevertheless, this technique is still a state-of-the-art method for the community of liver researchers as it allows the in-depth analysis of signalling pathways involved in liver regeneration and hepatocarcinogenesis. The importance of PH as a key method in experimental hepatology has even increased in the last decade due to the increasing availability of genetically-modified mouse strains. Here, we propose a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the implementation of PH in mice, which is based on our experience of more than 10 years. In particular, the SOP offers all relevant background information on the PH model and provides comprehensive guidelines for planning and performing PH experiments. We provide established recommendations regarding optimal age and gender of animals, use of appropriate anaesthesia and biometric calculation of the experiments. We finally present an easy-to-follow step-by-step description of the complete surgical procedure including required materials, critical steps and postoperative management. This SOP especially takes into account the latest changes in animal welfare rules in the European Union but is still in agreement with current international regulations. In summary, this article provides comprehensive information for the legal application, design and implementation of PH experiments. PMID:25835741