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Sample records for partial cranial cruciate

  1. Stifle synovial cyst in a Labrador Retriever with concurrent cranial cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Franklin, A D; Havlicek, M; Krockenberger, M B

    2011-01-01

    A seven-year-old Labrador Retriever dog was presented with the complaint of chronic left hindlimb lameness. A diagnosis of partial rupture of the left cranial cruciate ligament with concurrent cranio-medial synovial cyst formation was made. This cystic structure was assumed to be communicating with the stifle joint. There was no evidence of a meniscal tear, but superficial fibrillation of the axial border was present. Surgical excision of the cyst with concurrent treatment of the cranial cruciate ligament deficiency by tibial tuberosity advancement was performed with a successful outcome. Whilst commonly encountered in humans, synovial cysts are uncommon in dogs. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of synovial cyst formation in the stifle of a dog. PMID:21243179

  2. Degenerative changes of the cranial cruciate ligament harvested from dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    ICHINOHE, Tom; KANNO, Nobuo; HARADA, Yasuji; YOGO, Takuya; TAGAWA, Masahiro; SOETA, Satoshi; AMASAKI, Hajime; HARA, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is characterized histologically by degenerating extracellular matrix (ECM) and chondroid metaplasia. Here, we describe the progression of chondroid metaplasia and the changes in the expression of ECM components in canine CCL rupture (CCLR). CCLs from 26 stifle joints with CCLR (CCLR group) and normal CCLs from 12 young beagles (control group) were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for expression of type I (COLI), type II (COLII), type III collagen (COLIII) and Sry-type HMG box 9 (SOX9). Cell density and morphology of CCLs were quantified using hematoxylin–eosin staining. The percentage of round cells was higher in the CCLR group than in controls. COLI-positive areas were seen extensively in the connecting fibers, but weakly represented in the cytoplasm of normal CCLs. In the CCLR group, there were fewer COLI-positive areas, but many COLI-positive cells. The percentages of COLII-, COLIII- and SOX9-positive cells were higher in the CCLR group than in controls. The number of spindle cells with perinuclear halo was high in the CCLR group, and most of these cells were SOX9-positive. Deposition of COLI, the main ECM component of ligaments, decreased with increased COLIII expression in degenerated CCL tissue, which shows that the deposition of the ECM is changed in CCLR. On the contrary, expression of SOX9 increased, which may contribute to the synthesis of cartilage matrix. The expression of COLII and SOX9 in ligamentocytes showed that these cells tend to differentiate into chondrocytes. PMID:25716871

  3. Genetic basis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Baird, Arabella Elizabeth Gardiner; Carter, Stuart D; Innes, John F; Ollier, William E; Short, Andrea D

    2014-08-01

    Cranial Cruciate Ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most common forms of lameness in dogs and is analogous to rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans, for which it can serve as a model. As there is a strong breed-related predisposition to CCLR in dogs, a study was undertaken to consider putative genetic components in susceptible dog breeds. A candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping approach using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (Sequenom Ltd) was designed to investigate several CCLR-susceptible dog breeds and identify CCLR-associated genes/gene regions that may confer susceptibility or resistance. A meta-analysis was performed using the breed case/control candidate gene data to identify SNP associations that were common to the whole cohort of susceptible dogs. We identified SNPs in key genes involved in ligament strength, stability and extracellular matrix formation (COL5A1, COL5A2, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL11A1, COL24A1, FBN1, LOX, LTBP2) which were significantly associated with CCLR susceptibility across the dog breeds used in this study. These SNPs could have an involvement in CCLR due to a detrimental effect on ligament structure and strength. This is the first published candidate gene study that has revealed significant genetic associations with canine CCLR. PMID:24684544

  4. Cranial cruciate ligament repair in dogs with and without meniscal lesions treated by different minimally invasive methods.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, J; Fehr, M

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate different minimally invasive surgical options as therapy for cranial cruciate ligament rupture and resulting meniscal injuries. In this study, 81 stifle joints of dogs with complete or partial rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament were treated with minimally invasive surgery at the Small Animal Clinic of the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover. The patients were divided into three groups depending on intraoperative diagnosis and the surgical technique applied. The dogs in group I (n = 26) had an isolated rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCLR), while those in groups II (n = 26) and III (n = 29) also had an injury of the medial meniscus. Resection of the damaged meniscal part was performed by arthroscopically guided partial meniscectomy (AGPM) on the dogs in group II, while minimally invasive medial arthrotomy (MIMA) was used on the dogs of group III. All of the stifles were stabilized with a modified lateral imbrication technique using a braided, synthetic, absorbable suture material (Panacryl). Six months after surgery 76.5% of all patients were examined clinically and 74.1% radiographically for evaluation of the success of the different treatment techniques. At this examination, there were no signs of lameness in 42.1% of group I (CCLR), 65.0% of group II (AGPM) and 87.0% of group III (MIMA). Upon palpation, 75.8% of these stifle joints were found to be stable. Radiographic evaluations did not show any indication of progression of gonarthrosis in 73.3% of all stifle joints examined here. PMID:19151866

  5. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy in a cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) with cranial cruciate ligament ruptures.

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Jackson, Joshua; Clippinger, Tracy L; Sutherland-Smith, Meg

    2015-03-01

    A 13-yr-old female Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) presented with an acute mild right pelvic limb lameness that progressed to a non-weight-bearing lameness. Diagnosis of a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) was made based on positive cranial drawer during physical examination and was supported by radiographs. A surgical repair with a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) and bone anchor with an OrthoFiber suture was performed. The tibial plateau angle was reduced from 30 to 5 degrees. The otter returned to normal function after 12 wk of exercise restriction. Twelve months after surgery, the left CCL ruptured and a TPLO was performed. No complications developed after either surgery, and the otter had an excellent return to function. This is the first report of a cranial cruciate ligament rupture and TPLO procedure in a mustelid, supporting its application to noncanid and felid species. PMID:25831598

  6. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography to assess stifle lesions in dogs after cranial cruciate ligament rupture: 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Arnault, F; Cauvin, E; Viguier, E; Kraft, E; Sonet, J; Carozzo, C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonographic diagnosis of lesions in the canine stifle associated with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Thirteen dogs that had a diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture were included in this prospective clinical study. Two ultrasonographers who were unaware of specific historical and clinical data performed the sonography with a high frequency (8-16 MHz) linear transducer. Surgical treatment of the affected stifle was performed within two days of ultrasonography by a surgeon who was unaware of the ultrasonographic findings. The lesions observed during ultrasonography and arthrotomy were compared at the completion of the study. Visualisation of the superficial tendons (quadriceps and long digital extensor) and ligaments (patellar ligament, collateral ligaments) of the stifle using ultrasonography was excellent. However, the detection of deep stifle ligaments (cranial cruciate ligament and caudal cruciate ligament) was extremely difficult to perform using ultrasonography. For cranial cruciate ligament rupture, the sensitivity for ultrasonographic diagnosis was 15.4%. For meniscal lesions, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for ultrasonographic diagnosis were 82%, 93%, 90% and 88% respectively. High frequency ultrasonography is a non-invasive method for accurately and efficiently detecting superficial ligaments, tendons and meniscal lesions associated with cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the stifle of non-sedated dogs. PMID:19876521

  7. Preactivation of the quadriceps muscle could limit cranial tibial translation in a cranial cruciate ligament deficient canine stifle.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Juan M; Lefebvre, Michael; Böhme, Beatrice; Laurent, Cédric; Balligand, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficiency is the leading cause of lameness of the canine stifle. Application of tension in the quadriceps muscle could trigger cranial tibial translation in case of CrCL rupture. We replaced the quadriceps muscle and the gastrocnemius muscle by load cells and turn-buckles. First, eight canine limbs were placed in a servo-hydraulic testing machine, which applied 50% of body weight (BW). In a second phase, the CrCL was transected, and the limbs were tested in a similar manner. In a third phase, a quadriceps pretension of 15% BW was applied and limbs were again tested in a similar manner. Cranial tibial translation was significantly decreased in CrCL deficient stifles (p < 0.05) when quadriceps pretension was applied. These findings indicate that quadriceps pretension could play a role in the stability of a CrCL deficient stifle and should then be considered in rehabilitation programs and conservative treatment of CrCL rupture in dogs. PMID:25487559

  8. Feasibility of utilizing the patellar ligament angle for assessing cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-ha

    2014-01-01

    The patellar ligament angle (PLA) was assessed in 105 normal stifle joints of 79 dogs and 33 stifle joints of 26 dogs with a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL). The PLA of stifles with complete CrCL rupture was significantly lower than that of normal stifles, particularly at a flexion angle of 60~80° in both plain and stress views. If the PLA was <90.55° on the stress view with a 60~80° flexion angle, the dog was diagnosed with a complete rupture of the CrCL with a sensitivity of 83.9% and specificity of 100%. In conclusion, measuring the PLA is a quantitative method for diagnosing complete CrCL rupture in canines. PMID:24962409

  9. Radiographic Risk Factors for Contralateral Rupture in Dogs with Unilateral Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Connie; Ramaker, Megan A.; Kaur, Sirjaut; Csomos, Rebecca A.; Kroner, Kevin T.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Dogs with unilateral CR often develop contralateral CR over time. Although radiographic signs of contralateral stifle joint osteoarthritis (OA) influence risk of subsequent contralateral CR, this risk has not been studied in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of client-owned dogs with unilateral CR to determine how severity of radiographic stifle synovial effusion and osteophytosis influence risk of contralateral CR over time. Detailed survival analysis was performed for a cohort of 85 dogs after case filtering of an initial sample population of 513 dogs. This population was stratified based on radiographic severity of synovial effusion (graded on a scale of 0, 1, and 2) and severity of osteophytosis (graded on a scale of 0, 1, 2, and 3) of both index and contralateral stifle joints using a reproducible scoring method. Severity of osteophytosis in the index and contralateral stifles was significantly correlated. Rupture of the contralateral cranial cruciate ligament was significantly influenced by radiographic OA in both the index and contralateral stifles at diagnosis. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral radiographic stifle effusion was 13.4 at one year after diagnosis and 11.4 at two years. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral osteophytosis was 9.9 at one year after diagnosis. These odds ratios were associated with decreased time to contralateral CR. Breed, age, body weight, gender, and tibial plateau angle did not significantly influence time to contralateral CR. Conclusion Subsequent contralateral CR is significantly influenced by severity of radiographic stifle effusion and osteophytosis in the contralateral stifle, suggesting that synovitis and arthritic joint degeneration are significant factors in the

  10. The effectiveness of 3D animations to enhance understanding of cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dylan N; Broadhurst, Henry; Clarke, Stephen P; Farrell, Michael; Bennett, David; Mosley, John R; Mellanby, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is one of the most important orthopedic diseases taught to veterinary undergraduates. The complexity of the anatomy of the canine stifle joint combined with the plethora of different surgical interventions available for the treatment of the disease means that undergraduate veterinary students often have a poor understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of CCL rupture. We designed, developed, and tested a three dimensional (3D) animation to illustrate the pertinent clinical anatomy of the stifle joint, the effects of CCL rupture, and the mechanisms by which different surgical techniques can stabilize the joint with CCL rupture. When compared with a non-animated 3D presentation, students' short-term retention of functional anatomy improved although they could not impart a better explanation of how different surgical techniques worked. More students found the animation useful than those who viewed a comparable non-animated 3D presentation. Multiple peer-review testing is required to maximize the usefulness of 3D animations during development. Free and open access to such tools should improve student learning and client understanding through wide-spread uptake and use. PMID:23475409

  11. Comparison of the tibial mechanical joint orientation angles in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Mark C.; Kapatkin, Amy S.; Bruecker, Kenneth A.; Holsworth, Ian G.; Kass, Philip H.; Hayashi, Kei

    2014-01-01

    Use of the tibial mechanical joint orientation angles is now the standard of care for evaluating tibial deformities, although they have not been used to evaluate dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) rupture. The objective of this study was to compare the tibial mechanical joint orientation angles and tibial plateau angle (TPA) between dogs with bilateral CrCL rupture (BR) and unilateral CrCL rupture with (UR-SR) and without subsequent contralateral CrCL rupture (UR-w/o-SR) as risk factors for subsequent contralateral CrCL rupture. Twenty dogs (21.7%) were classified as BR, 38 (41.3%) were classified as UR-SR, and 34 (37.0%) were classified as UR-w/o-SR. The tibial mechanical joint orientation angles and TPA, in the range studied (< 35°), were not statistically different for dogs with BR, UR-SR, and UR-w/o-SR, and were not significant risk factors for subsequent contralateral CrCL rupture. PMID:25082991

  12. Cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the dog--a retrospective study comparing surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Moore, K W; Read, R A

    1995-08-01

    Three surgical techniques, grouped as intra-articular techniques, extracapsular techniques and fibular head transposition, were used for repair of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL)-deficient stifle in 113 dogs over a 4 year 4 month period. The clinical outcome of the techniques were compared using information provided by the owners and physical examination. Regardless of surgical technique, 85.7 to 91.0% of dogs showed clinical improvement after surgery. However, less than 50% of dogs became clinically sound on the operated leg and 9.0 to 14.3% of dogs remained persistently lame on the operated leg. No statistical association was found between result after surgery and age, body weight, sex, duration of injury before surgery, association with injury, tibial plateau angle, degree of radiographic osteoarthritis before surgery or the presence of concurrent medial meniscal injury. On physical examination, extra-capsular techniques appeared superior to the fibular head transposition in terms of joint stability and limb function. Concurrent medial meniscal injury necessitating meniscectomy existed in 48.0% of cases. Twenty-two percent of dogs ruptured their contralateral CCL at an average of 14 months after the first. PMID:8579557

  13. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10–27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction. PMID:26229890

  14. Arthroscopic Assessment of Stifle Synovitis in Dogs with Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Little, Jeffrey P.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Sutherland, Brian J.; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L.; Ramaker, Megan A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for meniscal tears in dogs affected with naturally occuring cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Blond, Laurent; Thrall, Donald E; Roe, Simon C; Chailleux, Nadege; Robertson, Ian D

    2008-01-01

    A stifle magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol was developed based on the appearance of the cruciate ligaments and menisci in normal dogs. Proton density images were subjectively considered to have the highest likelihood of detecting a meniscal lesion. Following this initial evaluation, the accuracy of high-field MR imaging to detect meniscal tears in dogs was evaluated in 11 dogs suffering from naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Dogs underwent MR imaging of the affected stifle before surgery. MR imaging and surgical findings were assessed independently, and then compared. Five tears of the medial meniscus were correctly diagnosed with MR imaging and 19 normal menisci were accurately characterized as such, based on MR images. In one medial meniscus, changes consistent with meniscal degeneration were seen on MR images but this was not seen at surgery. With regard to the lateral meniscus, one false positive diagnosis of a tear was made and this likely represented a normal variation. One other lateral meniscus had changes consistent with meniscal degeneration but, as with the similar lesion seen in the medial meniscus, this was not confirmed surgically. The global sensitivity of MR imaging for the diagnosis of a meniscal tear was 100% and the specificity was 94%. High-field MR imaging is a reliable method to diagnose meniscal tears preoperatively and this may be useful in selecting the surgical approach to clinically abnormal joints and may decrease the need for arthrotomy. PMID:18833948

  16. Effect of tibial tuberosity advancement on cranial tibial subluxation in the feline cranial cruciate deficient stifle joint: An ex vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Retournard, M; Bilmont, A; Asimus, E; Palierne, S; Autefage, A

    2016-08-01

    The effects of Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA) on Cranial Tibial Subluxation (CTS) and Tibial Rotation Angle (TRA) were evaluated in a model of feline Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifle joint. Ten hindlimbs of adult cats were used. Quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles were simulated using cables, turnbuckles and a spring. An axial load of 30% body weight was applied. The stifle and talocrural joint angles were adjusted to 120°. Patellar tendon angle (PTA), CTS and TRA were measured radiographically before and after CrCL section, after TTA and after additional advancement by 1 and 2mm. CrCL section resulted in a CTS of 8.1±1.5mm and a TRA of 18.4±5.7 °. After TTA, PTA was significantly decreased from 99.1±1.7° to 89.1±0.7°; CTS and TRA did not change significantly (7.8±1.0mm and 15.9±5.7° respectively). Additional advancement of the tibial tuberosity by 1mm did not significantly affect CTS and TRA. Additional advancement of the tibial tuberosity by 2mm significantly reduced the PTA to 82.9±0.9°. A significant decrease of CTS (6.9±1.3mm) and TRA (14.7±3.6°) was also observed. A lack of stabilization of the CrCL deficient stifle was observed after TTA in this model of the feline stifle. Even though the validity of the model can be questioned, simple transposition of the technique of TTA from the cat to the dog appeared hazardous. PMID:27474002

  17. Effects of stifle flexion angle and scan plane on visibility of the normal canine cranial cruciate ligament using low-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Podadera, Juan; Gavin, Patrick; Saveraid, Travis; Hall, Evelyn; Chau, Jennifer; Makara, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used to evaluate dogs with suspected cranial cruciate ligament injury; however, effects of stifle positioning and scan plane on visualization of the ligament are incompletely understood. Six stifle joints (one pilot, five test) were collected from dogs that were scheduled for euthanasia due to reasons unrelated to the stifle joint. Each stifle joint was scanned in three angles of flexion (90°, 135°, 145°) and eight scan planes (three dorsal, three axial, two sagittal), using the same low-field MRI scanner and T2-weighted fast spin echo scan protocol. Two experienced observers who were unaware of scan technique independently scored visualization of the cranial cruciate ligament in each scan using a scale of 0-3. Visualization score rank sums were higher when the stifle was flexed at 90° compared to 145°, regardless of the scan plane. Visualization scores for the cranial cruciate ligament in the dorsal (H (2) = 19.620, P = 0.000), axial (H (2) = 14.633, P = 0.001), and sagittal (H (2) = 8.143, P = 0.017) planes were significantly affected by the angle of stifle flexion. Post hoc analysis showed that the ligament was best visualized at 90° compared to 145° in the dorsal (Z = -3.906, P = 0.000), axial (Z = -3.398, P = 0.001), and sagittal (Z = -2.530, P = 0.011) planes. Findings supported the use of a 90° flexed stifle position for maximizing visualization of the cranial cruciate ligament using low-field MRI in dogs. PMID:24450293

  18. Low-field Mri and arthroscopy of meniscal lesions in ten dogs with experimentally induced cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Martig, Sandra; Konar, Martin; Schmökel, Hugo G; Rytz, Ueli; Spreng, David; Scheidegger, Jürg; Höhl, Birgit; Kircher, Patrick R; Boisclair, Julie; Lang, Johann

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of canine meniscal lesions. The aim of this study is to describe the MR appearance of meniscal lesions in dogs with experimentally induced cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) deficiency. The pilot study revealed dogs weighing approximately 10 kg to be too small for meniscal evaluation on low-field MRI. In the main study, dogs weighing approximately 35 kg were used. The left CCL was transected and low-field MRI was performed regularly until 13 months post-surgery. Normal menisci were defined as grade 0. Intrameniscal lesions not reaching any surface corresponded to grade 1 if focal and to grade 2 if linear or diffuse. Grade 3 lesions consisted in linear tears penetrating a meniscal surface. Grade 4 lesions included complex signal changes or meniscal distortion. Between 2 and 13 months post-surgery, all dogs developed grade 4 lesions in the medial meniscus. Most of them corresponded to longitudinal or bucket handle tears on arthroscopy and necropsy. Two dogs showed grade 3 lesions reaching the tibial surface of the lateral meniscus on MRI but not in arthroscopy. Such tears are difficult to evaluate arthroscopically; MRI provides more accurate information about the tibial meniscal surface. Grades 1 and 2 lesions could not be differentiated from presumably normal menisci with our imaging technique. An MRI grading system better adapted to canine lesions has yet to be developed. MRI is a helpful tool for the diagnosis of complete tears in the canine meniscus, especially in larger dogs. PMID:17153058

  19. Fast presurgical magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal tears and concurrent subchondral bone marrow lesions. Study of dogs with naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Olive, J; d'Anjou, M-A; Cabassu, J; Chailleux, N; Blond, L

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal tears and subchondral bone marrow lesions have both been described in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture, but their possible concurrence has not been evaluated. In a population of 14 dogs exhibiting signs of stifle pain with surgically confirmed cranial cruciate ligament rupture, a short presurgical 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol including dorsal proton density, dorsal T1-weighted gradient recalled echo, and sagittal fat-saturated dual echo sequences was tested to further investigate these features and illustrate meniscal tears. Interobserver agreement for detection of medial meniscal tears (k=0.83) and bone marrow lesions (k=0.87) was excellent. Consensus MR reading allowed detection of nine out of 12 surgically confirmed medial meniscal tears and there was no false positive. All dogs had cruciate ligament enthesis-related bone marrow lesions in the tibia, femur or both bones. Additionally, among the 12 dogs with confirmed medial meniscal tears, subchondral bone marrow lesions were present in the caudomedial (9 dogs) and caudoaxial (11 dogs) regions of the tibial plateau, resulting in odds ratios (13.6, p=0.12, and 38.3, p=0.04, respectively) that had large confidence intervals due to the small group size of this study. The other two dogs had neither tibial bone marrow lesions in these locations nor medial meniscal tears. These encouraging preliminary results warrant further investigation using this clinically realistic preoperative MR protocol. As direct diagnosis of meniscal tears remained challenging in dogs even with high-field MR, identification of associated signs such as subchondral bone marrow lesions might indirectly allow suspicion of an otherwise unrecognized meniscal tear. PMID:24226972

  20. Expression of immune response genes in the stifle joint of dogs with oligoarthritis and degenerative cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Muir, P; Schaefer, S L; Manley, P A; Svaren, J P; Oldenhoff, W E; Hao, Z

    2007-10-15

    Dysregulation of immune responses within joints plays an important role in development of inflammatory arthritis. We determined expression of a panel of immune response and matrix turnover genes in synovial fluid collected from a group of dogs with stifle oligoarthritis and associated degenerative cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture (n=27). We also studied synovial fluid gene expression in dogs affected with other forms of degenerative arthritis (n=9) and in the stifle joint of healthy dogs with intact CCL (n=14). After collection, synovial cells were pelleted and RNA was isolated. Relative expression of cathepsin K, cathepsin S, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), invariant chain (li), toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2), and TLR-9 was determined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Data were normalized to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as an internal control. Relative expression of cathepsin K, MMP-9, TRAP, and li was increased in the stifle synovial fluid of dogs with oligoarthritis, when compared with the stifles of healthy dogs (P<0.05). In contrast, relative expression of all of the genes-of-interest in synovial fluid from joints affected with other forms of arthritis was not significantly different from the stifles of healthy dogs. TRAP expression was also significantly increased in the stifle joints of dogs with oligoarthritis, when compared to joint expression of TRAP in dogs with other forms of degenerative arthritis (P<0.05). In the dogs with stifle oligoarthritis, expression of both matrix turnover and immune response genes was increased in stifle synovial fluid, when compared with the internal PBMC control, whereas in healthy dogs and dogs with other forms of arthritis, only expression of matrix turnover genes was increased in synovial fluid, when compared with the internal PBMC control (P<0.05). Taken together, these findings suggest that antigen-specific immune responses within the stifle joint may

  1. Post-operative complications associated with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System in small- to medium-sized dogs: A retrospective analysis (2009-2012).

    PubMed

    Rappa, Nick S; Radasch, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    This study classified and determined the post-operative complication rate associated with stabilization of cranial (CCL) ligament deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System (CCLRAS). Eighty-five medical records from 2009 to 2012 from 1 institution were evaluated. Complications were classified according to previously proposed definitions for orthopedic studies in veterinary medicine. Fifty-two owners were contacted by telephone at least 6 months after surgery and given a questionnaire to classify complications related to the implant. A visual analog scale was used to assess functionality and degree of pain. The overall complication rate was 30.3% with an inflammation-infection rate of 5.4% and a documented infection rate requiring implant removal of 1.8%. Owners reported full or acceptable function in 96% of cases with an average functional score of 86.5. Stabilization of CCL-deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine CCLRAS is reliable with acceptable complication rates. PMID:27493284

  2. Partial tears of anterior cruciate ligament: Results of single bundle augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Sabat, Dhananjaya; Kumar, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background: Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and usually present with symptomatic instability. The remnant fibers are usually removed and a traditional ACL reconstruction is done. But with increased understanding of ACL double bundle anatomy, the remnant tissue preservation along with a single bundle augmentation of the torn bundle is also suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of selective anatomic augmentation of symptomatic partial ACL tears. Our hypothesis is that this selective augmentation of partial ACL tears could restore knee stability and function. Materials and Methods: Consecutive cases of 314 ACL reconstructions, 40 patients had intact ACL fibers in the location corresponding to the anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle and were diagnosed as partial ACL tears perioperatively. All patients underwent selective augmentation of the torn bundle, while keeping the remaining fibers intact using autogenous hamstring graft. A total of 38 patients (28 males, 10 females) were available with a minimum of 3 years followup. 26 cases had AM bundle tears and 12 cases had PL bundle tears respectively. Patients were assessed with International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 Knee Evaluation Form, Lysholm score; instrumented knee testing was performed with the arthrometer (KT 2000). Statistical analysis was performed to compare the preoperative and postoperative objective evaluation. Results: At 3 years followup, 31.6% patients were graded A, 65.8% were graded B and 2.6% was graded C at IKDC objective evaluation. Manual laxity tests, Lysholm's score, mean side to side instrumental laxity and Tegner activity score improved significantly. 76% patients returned to preinjury level of sports activity after augmentation. Conclusion: The results of anatomic single bundle augmentation in partial ACL tears are encouraging with excellent improvement in functional scores, side to side laxity and return to

  3. 3D FSE Cube and VIPR-aTR 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging predicts canine cranial cruciate ligament structural properties.

    PubMed

    Racette, Molly; Al saleh, Habib; Waller, Kenneth R; Bleedorn, Jason A; McCabe, Ronald P; Vanderby, Ray; Markel, Mark D; Brounts, Sabrina H; Block, Walter F; Muir, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) structural properties in client-owned dogs with incipient cruciate rupture would be advantageous. The objective of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of normal CrCL volume in an ex-vivo canine model predicts structural properties. Stifles from eight dogs underwent 3.0 Tesla 3D MRI. CrCL volume and normalized median grayscale values were determined using 3D Fast Spin Echo (FSE) Cube and Vastly under-sampled Isotropic PRojection (VIPR)-alternative repetition time (aTR) sequences. Stifles were then mechanically tested. After joint laxity testing, CrCL structural properties were determined, including displacement at yield, yield load, load to failure, and stiffness. Yield load and load to failure (R(2)=0.56, P <0.01) were correlated with CrCL volume determined by VIPR-aTR. Yield load was also correlated with CrCL volume determined by 3D FSE Cube (R(2)=0.32, P <0.05). Structural properties were not related to median grayscale values. Joint laxity and CrCL stiffness were not related to MRI parameters, but displacement at yield load was related to CrCL volume for both sequences during testing (R(2)>0.57, P <0.005). In conclusion, 3D MRI offers a predictive method for estimating canine CrCL structural properties. 3D MRI may be useful for monitoring CrCL properties in clinical trials. PMID:26831152

  4. Partial anterior cruciate ligament tears treated with intraligamentary plasma rich in growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Álvarez, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cugat, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of the application of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF)-Endoret to the remaining intact bundle in partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. METHODS: A retrospective review of the rate of return to play in football players treated with the application of PRGF-Endoret in the remaining intact bundle in partial ACL injuries that underwent surgery for knee instability. Patients with knee instability requiring revision surgery for remnant ACL were selected. PRGF was applied in the wider part of posterolateral bundle and the time it took patients to return to their full sporting activities at the same level before the injury was evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 19 patients were reviewed. Three had a Tegner activity level of 10 and the remaining 16 level 9. The time between the injury and the time of surgery was 5.78 wk (SD 1.57). In total, 81.75% (16/19) returned to the same pre-injury level of sport activity (Tegner 9-10). 17 males and 2 females were treated. The rate of associated injury was 68.42% meniscal lesions and 26.31% cartilage lesions. The KT-1000 values were normalized in all operated cases. One patient was not able to return to sport due to the extent of their cartilage lesions. The 15 patients with Tegner activity level 9 returned to play at an average of 16.20 wk (SD 1.44) while the 3 patients with Tegner activity level 10 did so in 12.33 wk (SD 1.11). CONCLUSION: With one remaining intact bundle the application of PRGF-Endoret in instability cases due to partial ACL tear showed high return to sport rates at pre- injury level in professional football players. PMID:25035842

  5. Comparison of owner satisfaction between stifle joint orthoses and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy for the management of cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hart, Juliette L; May, Kimberly D; Kieves, Nina R; Mich, Patrice M; Goh, Clara S S; Palmer, Ross H; Duerr, Felix M

    2016-08-15

    OBJECTIVE To compare owner satisfaction between custom-made stifle joint orthoses and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) for the management of medium- and large-breed dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD). DESIGN Owner survey. SAMPLE 819 and 203 owners of dogs with CCLD that were managed with a custom-made stifle joint orthosis or TPLO, respectively. PROCEDURES Client databases of an orthosis provider and veterinary teaching hospital were reviewed to identify potential survey respondents. An online survey was developed to evaluate owner-reported outcomes, complications, and satisfaction associated with the nonsurgical (orthosis group) and surgical (TPLO group) interventions. Survey responses were compared between groups. RESULTS The response rate was 25% (203/819) and 37% (76/203) for the orthosis and TPLO groups, respectively. The proportion of owners who reported that their dogs had mild or no lameness and rated the intervention as excellent, very good, or good was significantly greater for the TPLO group than for the orthosis group. However, ≥ 85% of respondents in both groups reported that they would choose the selected treatment again. Of 151 respondents from the orthosis group, 70 (46%) reported skin lesions associated with the device, 16 (11%) reported that the dog subsequently underwent surgery, and 10 (7%) reported that the dog never tolerated the device. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated high owner satisfaction rates for both interventions. Owners considering nonsurgical management with an orthosis should be advised about potential complications such as persistent lameness, skin lesions, patient intolerance of the device, and the need for subsequent surgery. PMID:27479283

  6. Regeneration of ring-shaped lateral meniscus after partial resection of discoid meniscus with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction☆

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, Takashi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Tabuchi, Kousuke; Noguchi, Kouji; Inoue, Takashi; Murakami, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The ring-shaped lateral meniscus is very rare. Although it is essentially known as a congenital anomaly, a central tear in an incomplete discoid meniscus or an old bucket-handle tear in a meniscus may be easily mistaken for a ring-shaped meniscus. We experienced a ring-shaped lateral meniscus that regenerated after partial resection of a discoid meniscus together with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 37-year-old female patient still experienced unrelenting knee pain 6 months after ACL reconstruction and partial meniscectomy of a discoid lateral meniscus. A repeat arthroscopy was performed. The lateral tibial plateau was covered in the form of a ring by meniscus-like tissue. The meniscus-like tissue appeared to have regenerated inward toward the center from the stump after the partial meniscectomy and was connected from the anterior to posterior horn, forming an interhorn bridge. Partial meniscectomy was repeated. Histologically, the regenerated tissue was not meniscal, but comprised mature fibrocartilage; macroscopically; however, it was very similar to meniscal tissue. Two years after the initial operation, the patient had no complaints and experienced full return of function. DISCUSSION The reason for such regeneration is unknown, but may have been attributed to the specific intra-articular environment that developed after the ACL reconstruction. CONCLUSION This is the first report of regenerative development of a ring-shaped lateral meniscus. When a ring-shaped lateral meniscus is diagnosed, we must accurately determine whether it is a true congenital anomaly in consideration of the present case. PMID:24240076

  7. MR imaging of cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Naraghi, Ali; White, Lawrence M

    2014-11-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries, and in particular injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), are the most commonly reconstructed ligamentous injuries of the knee. As such, accurate preoperative diagnosis is essential in optimal management of patients with cruciate ligament injuries. This article reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and describes the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearances of complete and partial tears. Normal postoperative appearances of ACL and PCL reconstructions as well as MR imaging features of postoperative complications will also be reviewed. PMID:25442023

  8. Healing of a surgically created partial detachment of the posterior cruciate ligament using marrow stimulation: an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodkey, William G; Arnoczky, Steven P; Steadman, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The inability of intra-articular (cruciate) ligaments to generate a substantive reparative response may preclude the primary surgical repair of such lesions. A marrow stimulation technique that provides access to a fibrin scaffold, cytokines, and mesenchymal stem cells has been shown to be successful in generating a repair response in articular cartilage. We hypothesized that a similar approach may be effective in initiating and supporting a healing response in cruciate ligament injuries. The ability to treat cruciate ligament injuries by primary repair may have significant advantages over the more extensive reconstructive procedures currently advocated. Bilateral subtotal (75% of width) lacerations were made in the proximal aspect of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in 10 adult mongrel dogs. A marrow stimulation technique in which small holes were made through the femoral origin of the PCL into the marrow cavity immediately adjacent to the lesion was performed in one limb. The contralateral limb served as the non-stimulated control. Twelve weeks after surgery the extent of healing and the histological character of the repair tissue in both groups were compared. Marrow stimulation resulted in a statistically significant (P<.05) improvement in the healing of subtotal lacerations made in the PCL. The marrow-stimulated repair tissue was more cellular and had a more organized extracellular matrix than the repair tissue in the non-stimulated group. Our hypothesis was confirmed. Marrow stimulation can induce a "healing response" in intra-articular (cruciate) ligaments. This technique may have clinical applications in primary surgical repair of these structures. PMID:16468489

  9. Cranial sutures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Cranial sutures URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002320.htm Cranial sutures To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial sutures ...

  10. Efficacy test of Polycan, a beta-glucan originated from Aureobasidium pullulans SM-2001, on anterior cruciate ligament transection and partial medial meniscectomy-induced-osteoarthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Wan; Cho, Hyung-Rae; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to assess the efficacy of Polycan from Aureobasidium pullulans SM-2001, which is composed mostly of beta-1,3-1,6-glucan, on osteoarthritis (OA)-induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection and partial medial meniscectomy (ACLT&PMM). Three different dosages of Polycan (85, 42.5, and 21.25 mg/kg) were orally administered once a day for 84 days to male rats a week after ACLT&PMM surgery. Changes in the circumference and maximum extension angle of each knee, and in cartilage histopathology were assessed using Mankin scores 12 weeks after Polycan administration. In addition, cartilage proliferation was evaluated using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). As the result of ACLT&PMM, classic OA was induced with increases in maximum extension angles, edematous knees changes, and capsule thickness, as well as decreases in chondrocyte proliferation, cartilages degenerative changes, and loss of articular cartilage. However, these changes (except for capsule thickness) were markedly inhibited in all Polycan- and diclofenac sodium-treated groups compared with OA control. Although diclofenac sodium did not influence BrdU uptake, BrdU-immunoreactive cells were increased with all dosages of Polycan, which means that Polycan treatment induced proliferation of chondrocytes in the surface articular cartilage of the tibia and femur. The results obtained in this study suggest that 84 days of continuous oral treatment of three different dosages of Polycan led to lesser degrees of articular stiffness and histological cartilage damage compared with OA controls 91 days after OA inducement, suggesting that the optimal Polycan dosage to treat OA is 42.5 mg/kg based on the present study. PMID:22370362

  11. A New Osteophyte Segmentation Algorithm Using the Partial Shape Model and Its Applications to Rabbit Femur Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection via Micro-CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, G.; Elkins, J. M.; Coimbra, A.; Duong, L. T.; Williams, D. S.; Sonka, M.

    2015-01-01

    Osteophyte is an additional bony growth on a normal bone surface limiting or stopping motion at a deteriorating joint. Detection and quantification of osteophytes from computed tomography (CT) images is helpful in assessing disease status as well as treatment and surgery planning. However, it is difficult to distinguish between osteophytes and healthy bones using simple thresholding or edge/texture features due to the similarity of their material composition. In this paper, we present a new method primarily based on the active shape model (ASM) to solve this problem and evaluate its application to the anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) rabbit femur model via micro-CT imaging. The common idea behind most ASM-based segmentation methods is to first build a parametric shape model from a training dataset and then apply the model to find a shape instance in a target image. A common challenge with such approaches is that a diseased bone shape is significantly altered at regions with osteophyte deposition misguiding an ASM method and eventually leading to suboptimum segmentations. This difficulty is overcome using a new partial-ASM method that uses bone shape over healthy regions and extrapolates it over the diseased region according to the underlying shape model. Finally, osteophytes are segmented by subtracting partial-ASM-derived shape from the overall diseased shape. Also, a new semiautomatic method is presented in this paper for efficiently building a 3-D shape model for an anatomic region using manual reference of a few anatomically defined fiducial landmarks that are highly reproducible on individuals. Accuracy of the method has been examined on simulated phantoms while reproducibility and sensitivity have been evaluated on micro-CT images of 2-, 4- and 8-week post-ACLT and sham-treated rabbit femurs. Experimental results have shown that the method is highly accurate (R2 = 0.99), reproducible (ICC = 0.97), and sensitive in detecting disease progression (p

  12. A new osteophyte segmentation algorithm using partial shape model and its applications to rabbit femur anterior cruciate ligament transection via micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Saha, P K; Liang, G; Elkins, J M; Coimbra, A; Duong, L T; Williams, D S; Sonka, M

    2011-08-01

    Osteophyte is an additional bony growth on a normal bone surface limiting or stopping motion at a deteriorating joint. Detection and quantification of osteophytes from CT images is helpful in assessing disease status as well as treatment and surgery planning. However, it is difficult to distinguish between osteophytes and healthy bones using simple thresholding or edge/texture features due to the similarity of their material composition. In this paper, we present a new method primarily based active shape model (ASM) to solve this problem and evaluate its application to anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) rabbit femur model via CT imaging. The common idea behind most ASM based segmentation methods is to first build a parametric shape model from a training dataset and apply the model to find a shape instance in a target image. A common challenge with such approaches is that a diseased bone shape is significantly altered at regions with osteophyte deposition misguiding an ASM method and eventually leading to suboptimum segmentations. This difficulty is overcome using a new partial ASM method that uses bone shape over healthy regions and extrapolates it over the diseased region according to the underlying shape model. Finally, osteophytes are segmented by subtracting partial-ASM derived shape from the overall diseased shape. Also, a new semi-automatic method is presented in this paper for efficiently building a 3D shape model for an anatomic region using manual reference of a few anatomically defined fiducial landmarks that are highly reproducible on individuals. Accuracy of the method has been examined on simulated phantoms while reproducibility and sensitivity have been evaluated on CT images of 2-, 4- and 8-week post-ACLT and sham-treated rabbit femurs. Experimental results have shown that the method is highly accurate ( R2 = 0.99), reproducible (ICC = 0.97), and sensitive in detecting disease progression (p-values: 0.065,0.001 and < 0.001 for 2- vs. 4, 4

  13. Cranial sutures

    MedlinePlus

    ... by strong, fibrous, elastic tissues called sutures. The spaces between the bones that remain open in babies and young children are called fontanelles. Sometimes, they are called soft spots. These spaces are a part of normal development. The cranial ...

  14. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    MedlinePlus

    Third cranial nerve palsy; Oculomotor palsy; Pupil-involving third cranial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy - compression type ... cranial (oculomotor) nerve. This is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Local tumors or swelling ...

  15. Mucoid Degeneration of Posterior Cruciate Ligament with Secondary Impingement of Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon Ho; Jangir, Rajat R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mucoid degeneration of cruciate ligament is well known entity, but symptomatic lesions are rare. It is even rarer to find a symptomatic posterior cruciate ligament mucoid degeneration than anterior cruciate ligament. Case Report: A 65-years-old female presented to our hospital complaining of pain in right knee joint on terminal extension since 6 months. On clinical examination, there was a flexion deformity of 5 degree and a further flexion of 150 degree with mild pain exacerbated by extension. MRI of the right knee joint showed a diffusely thickened posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with increased intra ligamentous signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The arthroscopic findings of grossly thickened PCL with a yellowish hue are characteristic and the PCL was filled with a yellowish substance. We excised the yellowish substance from the PCL as precisely as possible not to damage the remaining PCL fiber (Limited Debulking). We did notchplasty of lateral wall and roof to accommodate the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and avoid impingement. Conclusion: Posterior cruciate ligament may enlarge significantly and may push the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in the notch and may lead to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) impingement symptoms. Partial Debulking of Posterior Cruciate Ligament and notchplasty is effective treatment with immediate postoperative pain relief and good functional results. PMID:27299097

  16. [Meniscus injuries in dogs with rupture of the cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Timmermann, C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Nolte, I

    1998-10-01

    In a period of 18 months, 132 stifle joints of 125 dogs with a partial or complete rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament were examined according to a systematic protocol at the Clinic for Small Animals of the School of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany. Surgery was performed with either an intraarticular or extraarticular surgical technique. In all cases a "cleaning up" was carried out. If the medial meniscus was damaged it was resected and the lesion was inspected macroscopically. After six months, 88 patients were examined clinically and radiologically according to the same protocol as half a year before. Injuries of the medial meniscus occurred in 77.3% of the 132 cases. Furthermore it could be shown that patients which had a lameness for more than six weeks before examination had a higher rate of lesions of the medial meniscus than patients that had been lame for a shorter period. A detachment of the caudal horn of the medial meniscus was the most common meniscal lesion. There was no difference in success of therapy between patients with a meniscal resection and those without resection. PMID:9818524

  17. Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulate Molecular Markers of Inflammation in Dogs with Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Peter; Hans, Eric C.; Racette, Molly; Volstad, Nicola; Sample, Susannah J.; Heaton, Caitlin; Holzman, Gerianne; Schaefer, Susan L.; Bloom, Debra D.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Hao, Zhengling; Amene, Ermias; Suresh, M.; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Mid-substance rupture of the canine cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) and associated stifle osteoarthritis (OA) is an important veterinary health problem. CR causes stifle joint instability and contralateral CR often develops. The dog is an important model for human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, where rupture of graft repair or the contralateral ACL is also common. This suggests that both genetic and environmental factors may increase ligament rupture risk. We investigated use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to reduce systemic and stifle joint inflammatory responses in dogs with CR. Twelve dogs with unilateral CR and contralateral stable partial CR were enrolled prospectively. BM-MSCs were collected during surgical treatment of the unstable CR stifle and culture-expanded. BM-MSCs were subsequently injected at a dose of 2x106 BM-MSCs/kg intravenously and 5x106 BM-MSCs by intra-articular injection of the partial CR stifle. Blood (entry, 4 and 8 weeks) and stifle synovial fluid (entry and 8 weeks) were obtained after BM-MSC injection. No adverse events after BM-MSC treatment were detected. Circulating CD8+ T lymphocytes were lower after BM-MSC injection. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was decreased at 4 weeks and serum CXCL8 was increased at 8 weeks. Synovial CRP in the complete CR stifle was decreased at 8 weeks. Synovial IFNγ was also lower in both stifles after BM-MSC injection. Synovial/serum CRP ratio at diagnosis in the partial CR stifle was significantly correlated with development of a second CR. Systemic and intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs in dogs with partial CR suppresses systemic and stifle joint inflammation, including CRP concentrations. Intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs had profound effects on the correlation and conditional dependencies of cytokines using causal networks. Such treatment effects could ameliorate risk of a second CR by modifying the stifle joint inflammatory response

  18. Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulate Molecular Markers of Inflammation in Dogs with Cruciate Ligament Rupture.

    PubMed

    Muir, Peter; Hans, Eric C; Racette, Molly; Volstad, Nicola; Sample, Susannah J; Heaton, Caitlin; Holzman, Gerianne; Schaefer, Susan L; Bloom, Debra D; Bleedorn, Jason A; Hao, Zhengling; Amene, Ermias; Suresh, M; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Mid-substance rupture of the canine cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) and associated stifle osteoarthritis (OA) is an important veterinary health problem. CR causes stifle joint instability and contralateral CR often develops. The dog is an important model for human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, where rupture of graft repair or the contralateral ACL is also common. This suggests that both genetic and environmental factors may increase ligament rupture risk. We investigated use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to reduce systemic and stifle joint inflammatory responses in dogs with CR. Twelve dogs with unilateral CR and contralateral stable partial CR were enrolled prospectively. BM-MSCs were collected during surgical treatment of the unstable CR stifle and culture-expanded. BM-MSCs were subsequently injected at a dose of 2x106 BM-MSCs/kg intravenously and 5x106 BM-MSCs by intra-articular injection of the partial CR stifle. Blood (entry, 4 and 8 weeks) and stifle synovial fluid (entry and 8 weeks) were obtained after BM-MSC injection. No adverse events after BM-MSC treatment were detected. Circulating CD8+ T lymphocytes were lower after BM-MSC injection. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was decreased at 4 weeks and serum CXCL8 was increased at 8 weeks. Synovial CRP in the complete CR stifle was decreased at 8 weeks. Synovial IFNγ was also lower in both stifles after BM-MSC injection. Synovial/serum CRP ratio at diagnosis in the partial CR stifle was significantly correlated with development of a second CR. Systemic and intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs in dogs with partial CR suppresses systemic and stifle joint inflammation, including CRP concentrations. Intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs had profound effects on the correlation and conditional dependencies of cytokines using causal networks. Such treatment effects could ameliorate risk of a second CR by modifying the stifle joint inflammatory response

  19. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for

  20. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy ... mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial (skull) nerve. This nerve, also called the abducens nerve, helps ...

  1. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    MedlinePlus

    Abducens paralysis; Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy ... VI is damage to the sixth cranial (skull) nerve. This nerve, also called the abducens nerve, helps ...

  2. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic third nerve palsy; Pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy ... Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type -- is a mononeuropathy . This means that only one nerve is damaged. The condition affects the third cranial (oculomotor) ...

  3. [Ultrasound imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament. Possibilities and limits].

    PubMed

    Kelsch, G; Ulrich, C; Bickelhaupt, A

    1996-02-01

    certainty (sensitivity 65%). On the other hand, a positive sonographic finding points with relative certainty to a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament even before the operation (precision 79%). Histological analysis of the cruciate ligament preparations obtained intraoperatively showed that in particular the fresh anterior cruciate ligament rupture can be imaged sonographically. Retrospectively, knowledge of the history is thus crucial for interpretation of the sonographic image. After acute trauma to the knee, a side difference in the femoral region of origin of the anterior cruciate ligament of more than 1.5 mm, as revealed sonographically, is a certain indication that the anterior cruciate ligament is ruptured. When there is a positive sonographic finding, ligament strain, synovial bleeding and partial ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as plica ruptures must be considered as possible diagnoses. PMID:8881227

  4. Variations in cell morphology in the canine cruciate ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Spiller, D G; Clegg, P D; Innes, J F; Comerford, E J

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology may reflect the mechanical environment of tissues and influence tissue physiology and response to injury. Normal cruciate ligaments (CLs) from disease-free stifle joints were harvested from dog breeds with a high (Labrador retriever) and low (Greyhound) risk of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Antibodies against the cytoskeletal components vimentin and alpha tubulin were used to analyse cell morphology; nuclei were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and images were collected using conventional and confocal microscopy. Both cranial and caudal CLs contained cells of heterogenous morphologies. Cells were arranged between collagen bundles and frequently had cytoplasmic processes. Some of these processes were long (type A cells), others were shorter, thicker and more branched (type B cells), and some had no processes (type C cells). Processes were frequently shown to contact other cells, extending longitudinally and transversely through the CLs. Cells with longer processes had fusiform nuclei, and those with no processes had rounded nuclei and were more frequent in the mid-substance of both CLs. Cells with long processes were more commonly noted in the CLs of the Greyhound. As contact between cells may facilitate direct communication, variances in cell morphology between breeds at a differing risk of CCL rupture may reflect differences in CL physiology. PMID:22465617

  5. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    MedlinePlus

    ... is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Local tumors or swelling can press on and ... show: Enlarged (dilated) pupil of the affected eye Eye movement abnormalities Eyes that are not aligned Your health ...

  6. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  7. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  8. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000692.htm Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial mononeuropathy III -- diabetic type -- is usually a complication of diabetes that causes ...

  9. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations.

  10. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes.

  11. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option. PMID:19857299

  12. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  13. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  14. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  15. Cruciate retaining and cruciate substituting ultra-congruent insert

    PubMed Central

    Deledda, Davide; Rosso, Federica; Ratto, Nicola; Bruzzone, Matteo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) conservation and the polyethylene insert constraint in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debated. The PCL is one of the primary stabilizers of the joint, but cruciate retaining (CR) implants have the disadvantage of a difficult balancing of the PCL. Postero-stabilized (PS) implants were introduced to reduce this problem. However, also the PS implants have some disadvantages, due to the cam-mechanism, such as high risk of cam-mechanism polyethylene wear. To minimize the polyethylene wear of the cam-mechanism and the bone sacrifice due to the intercondylar box, different types of inserts were developed, trying to increase the implant conformity and to reduce stresses on the bone-implant interface. In this scenario ultra-congruent (UC) inserts were developed. Those inserts are characterized by a high anterior wall and a deep-dished plate. This conformation should guarantee a good stability without the posterior cam. Few studies on both kinematic and clinical outcomes of UC inserts are available. Clinical and radiological outcomes, as well as kinematic data are similar between UC mobile bearing (MB) and standard PS MB inserts at short to mid-term follow-up. In this manuscript biomechanics and clinical outcomes of UC inserts will be described, and they will be compared to standard PS or CR inserts. PMID:26855938

  16. Simultaneous bicompartmental bucket-handle meniscal tears with intact anterior cruciate ligament: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bucket handle tear of the menisci is a common type of lesion resulting from injury to the knee joint. Bucket handle injury of both menisci in almost all cases is associated with a lesion to either the anterior or the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint. We describe a case of acute bucket-handle tear of the medial and lateral menisci with intact anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments in a dancer. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of this type of injury in the literature. Case presentation A 28-year-old Caucasian Greek woman presented to the emergency department after sustaining an injury to her right knee during dancing. An MRI evaluation demonstrated tears in both menisci of the right knee, while the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were found to be intact. A partial medial and lateral meniscectomy was then performed. At a follow-up examination six months after her injury, clinical tests demonstrated that our patient's right knee was stable, had a full range of motion and had no tenderness. She was satisfied with the outcome of the operation and returned to her pre-injury activities. Conclusion We present the first case in the literature that describes a combined bucket-handle injury of both the medial and lateral menisci with an intact anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical examination of the anterior cruciate ligament was unremarkable, with no signs of deficiency or rupture. The posterior cruciate ligament was also intact. On magnetic resonance imaging, the ligaments were visualised as intact in all their length. These findings were confirmed by arthroscopic evaluation. PMID:20181059

  17. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is located inside your knee joint and connects the bones of your upper and ... such as a knee dislocation , you will need knee surgery to repair the joint. For milder injuries, you may not need surgery. ...

  18. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  19. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies. PMID:26581970

  20. Ancient legacy of cranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Ghannaee Arani, Mohammad; Fakharian, Esmaeil; Sarbandi, Fahimeh

    2012-01-01

    Cranial injury, as it is known today, is not a new concern of modern medicine. On stepping on the earth, the man was in reality encountered with various types of injuries, particularly those of a cranial nature. Leading a life, whether wild or civilized, has always been associated with injuries for human race from the very beginning of birth. Therefore, managing cases of this type has gradually forced him to establish and fix strategies and approaches to handle the dilemma. This study is thus focused on tracing the first documented traumatized cranial cases ever reported, ranging from those trials attributed to our ancient predecessors to the identical examples in the present time. PMID:24396747

  1. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  2. Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Murawski, Christopher D.; Wolf, Megan R.; Araki, Daisuke; Muller, Bart; Tashman, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons, particularly in association with sports-related injuries. Whereas traditional reconstruction techniques used a single bundle graft that was typically placed in a non-anatomic position, a renewed interest in anatomy has facilitated the popularization of anatomic reconstruction techniques. Recently, a focus has been placed on individualizing ACL surgery based on each patient’s native anatomical characteristics (e.g., insertion site size, notch size, and shape), thereby dictating the ultimate procedure of choice. As subjective outcome measurements have demonstrated varying outcomes with respect to single- versus double-bundle ACL reconstruction, investigators have turned to more objective techniques, such as in vivo kinematics, as a means of evaluating joint motion and cartilage contact mechanics. Further investigation in this area may yield important information with regard to the potential progression to osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction, including factors affecting or preventing it. PMID:26069663

  3. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-01-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the globe in adduction related to the innervation of the lateral rectus by the III nerve causing co-contraction in adduction. Clinical features that may be of concern in adulthood may not be relevant in childhood; whereas the presence of mydriasis in III palsy suggests a compressive aetiology in adults, this is not the case in children. However, the frequency of associated CNS abnormalities in III palsy and the risk of tumour in VI palsy can be indications for early neuroimaging depending on presenting features elicited through a careful history and clinical examination. The latter should include the neighbouring cranial nerves. We discuss the impact of our evolving knowledge of congenital cranial dysinnervation syndromes on this field. PMID:25572578

  4. Cranial trauma and the assessment of posttraumatic survival time.

    PubMed

    Steyn, M; De Boer, H H; Van der Merwe, A E

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of trauma on skeletal remains can be very difficult, especially when it comes to the estimation of posttraumatic survival time in partially healed lesions. The ability to reliably estimate the time an individual has survived after sustaining an injury is especially important in cases of child abuse and torture, but can also aid in determining the association between an injury and eventual death. Here a case from South Africa is reported, where the skeletal remains of an unknown individual were found with cranial and scapular fractures. These fractures all presented with macroscopic features indicative of healing. Using recently published data on the timing of fractures by De Boer et al., the two sets of cranial trauma and the scapular fracture were assessed by means of radiology, histology and microCT scanning. This was primarily done in order to obtain more information on the events surrounding the death of this individual, but also to assess the usability of the published methods on cranial fractures. It was found that the initial trauma was most likely sustained at least two weeks before death, whilst a neurosurgical procedure was performed at least one week before death. It seems that cranial fractures, especially if stable, may show some different healing features than postcranial fractures. The individual has since been identified, but unfortunately as is often the case in South Africa, limited information is available and the medical records could not be found. PMID:25217847

  5. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction. PMID:27327919

  6. The controversy of cranial bone motion.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J S; Witt, P L

    1997-08-01

    Cranial bone motion continues to stimulate controversy. This controversy affects the general acceptance of some intervention methods used by physical therapists, namely, cranial osteopathic and craniosacral therapy techniques. Core to these intervention techniques is the belief that cranial bone mobility provides a compliant system where somatic dysfunction can occur and therapeutic techniques can be applied. Diversity of opinion over the truth of this concept characterizes differing viewpoints on the anatomy and physiology of the cranial complex. Literature on cranial bone motion was reviewed for the purpose of better understanding this topic. Published research overall was scant and inconclusive. Animal and human studies demonstrate a potential for small magnitude motion. Physical therapists should carefully scrutinize the literature presented as evidence for cranial bone motion. Further research is needed to resolve this controversy. Outcomes research, however, is needed to validate cranial bone mobilization as an effective treatment. PMID:9243408

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament assessment using arthrometry and stress imaging.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Eric M; Macalena, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Arthrometry and stress imaging are useful clinical tools for the objective assessment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) integrity. They are most frequently used for the diagnosis of a complete ACL tear when other workup is equivocal, in conjunction with history and clinical exam findings. Other applications include the diagnosis of partial ACL tears, injury prognosis, and post-operative monitoring. However, further studies are needed to validate these uses. Many different devices and techniques exist for objective examination, which have been compared in recent literature. Reliability and validity measures of these methods vary, and often depend upon examiner familiarity and skill. The KT series of devices is the current gold standard for arthrometry, although the newer robotic GNRB device shows promising early results. Newer methods of data interpretation have been developed for stress imaging, and portable technology may impact this field further. PMID:26984335

  8. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  9. Cranial computed tomography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book appears to be a hybrid between an atlas and a text. The second edition attempts to depict the current status of both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in neuroradiology. Although only the final chapter of the book is completely devoted to cranial MR imaging, MR images are scattered throughout various other chapters. There is coverage of the major anatomic and pathophysiologic entities. There are 17 chapters with images, tables, and diagrams.

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rick W.; Haas, Amanda K.; Anderson, Joy; Calabrese, Gary; Cavanaugh, John; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lorring, Dawn; McKenzie, Christopher; Preston, Emily; Williams, Glenn; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation has evolved over the past 20 years. This evolution has been driven by a variety of level 1 and level 2 studies. Evidence Acquisition: The MOON Group is a collection of orthopaedic surgeons who have developed a prospective longitudinal cohort of the ACL reconstruction patients. To standardize the management of these patients, we developed, in conjunction with our physical therapy committee, an evidence-based rehabilitation guideline. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Results: This review was based on 2 systematic reviews of level 1 and level 2 studies. Recently, the guideline was updated by a new review. Continuous passive motion did not improve ultimate motion. Early weightbearing decreases patellofemoral pain. Postoperative rehabilitative bracing did not improve swelling, pain range of motion, or safety. Open chain quadriceps activity can begin at 6 weeks. Conclusion: High-level evidence exists to determine appropriate ACL rehabilitation guidelines. Utilizing this protocol follows the best available evidence. PMID:26131301

  11. Cruciate ligament loading during common knee rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-09-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries are common and may lead to dysfunction if not rehabilitated. Understanding how to progress anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament loading, early after injury or reconstruction, helps clinicians prescribe rehabilitation exercises in a safe manner to enhance recovery. Commonly prescribed therapeutic exercises include both weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise. This review was written to summarize and provide an update on the available literature on cruciate ligament loading during commonly used therapeutic exercises. In general, weight-bearing exercise produces smaller loads on the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament compared with non-weight-bearing exercise. The anterior cruciate ligament is loaded less at higher knee angles (i.e. 50-100 degrees). Squatting and lunging with a more forward trunk tilt and moving the resistance pad proximally on the leg during the seated knee extension unloads the anterior cruciate ligament. The posterior cruciate ligament is less loaded at lower knee angles (i.e. 0-50 degrees), and may be progressed from level ground walking to a one-leg squat, lunges, wall squat, leg press, and the two-leg squat (from smallest to greatest). Exercise type and technique variation affect cruciate ligament loading, such that the clinician may prescribe therapeutic exercises to progress ligament loading safely, while ensuring optimal recovery of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23025167

  12. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  13. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  14. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Management and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vivek; Suman, CPS; Sharma, Swati; Rao, Sripathi P; Kiran Acharya, KV; Sambaji, Charudutt

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mucoid degeneration (MD) is a rare pathological affection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Mucinous material within the substance of ACL produces pain and limited motion in the knee. This series describes the clinicoradiological presentation of patients with mucoid ACL, partial arthroscopic debridement of ACL and outcomes. Materials and Methods: During a period of 3 years, 11 patients were included based upon the clinical suspicion, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, arthroscopic features and histopathologic confirmation of MD of ACL. Result: Six patients were male and five were female with median age of 40 years (range 21-59 years). All patients complained of knee pain with median duration of 5 months (range 1-24 months). All patients had painful deep flexion with 63.6% (N = 7) reporting trivial trauma before the onset of symptoms. MRI revealed MD of ACL in all with associated cyst in three patients. Partial debridement of ACL was done in ten and complete in one patient. None of them required notchplasty. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis in all of them. At the mean followup of 13.81 months (range 6-28 months), all patients regained complete flexion and none complained of instability. Conclusion: Prior knowledge of condition with high index of suspicion and careful interpretation of MRI can establish the diagnosis preoperatively. It responds well to partial debridement of ACL and mucinous material without development of instability. PMID:24741143

  15. Biomaterials for reconstruction of cranial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of cranial defect is commonly performed in neurosurgical operations. Many materials have been employed for repairing cranial defects. In this paper, materials used for cranioplasty, including autografts, allografts, and synthetic biomaterials are comprehensively reviewed. This paper also gives future perspective of the materials and development trend of manufacturing process for cranioplasty implants.

  16. Morphological integration between the cranial base and the face in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Gkantidis, Nikolaos; Halazonetis, Demetrios J

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to assess morphological covariation between the face and the basicranium (midline and lateral), and to evaluate patterns of integration at two specific developmental stages. A group of 71 children (6–10 years) was compared with a group of 71 adults (20–35 years). Lateral cephalometric radiographs were digitized and a total of 28 landmarks were placed on three areas; the midline cranial base, the lateral cranial base and the face. Geometric morphometric methods were applied and partial least squares analysis was used to evaluate correlation between the three shape blocks. Morphological integration was tested both with and without removing the effect of allometry. In children, mainly the midline and, to a lesser extent, the lateral cranial base were moderately correlated to the face. In adults, the correlation between the face and the midline cranial base, which ceases development earlier than the lateral base, was reduced. However, the lateral cranial base retained and even strengthened its correlation to the face. This suggests that the duration of common developmental timing is an important factor that influences integration between craniofacial structures. However, despite the apparent switch of primary roles between the cranial bases during development, the patterns of integration remained stable, thereby supporting the role of genetics over function in the establishment and development of craniofacial shape. PMID:21323666

  17. Cranial ultrasound - optimizing utility in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Wezel-Meijler, Gerda van; de Vries, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Cranial ultrasonography (cUS) is a reliable tool to detect the most frequently occurring congenital and acquired brain abnormalities in full-term and preterm neonates. Appropriate equipment, including a dedicated ultrasound machine and appropriately sized transducers with special settings for cUS of the newborn brain, and ample experience of the ultrasonographist are required to obtain optimal image quality. When, in addition, supplemental acoustic windows are used whenever indicated and cUS imaging is performed from admission throughout the neonatal period, the majority of the lesions will be diagnosed with information on timing and evolution of brain injury and on ongoing brain maturation. For exact determination of site and extent of lesions, for detection of lesions that (largely or partially) remain beyond the scope of cUS and for depiction of myelination, a single, well timed MRI examination is invaluable in many high risk neonates. However, as cUS enables bedside, serial imaging it should be used as the primary brain imaging modality in high risk neonates. PMID:25055860

  18. Cranial base evolution within the hominin clade

    PubMed Central

    Nevell, L; Wood, B

    2008-01-01

    The base of the cranium (i.e. the basioccipital, the sphenoid and the temporal bones) is of particular interest because it undergoes significant morphological change within the hominin clade, and because basicranial morphology features in several hominin species diagnoses. We use a parsimony analysis of published cranial and dental data to predict the cranial base morphology expected in the hypothetical last common ancestor of the Pan–Homo clade. We also predict the primitive condition of the cranial base for the hominin clade, and document the evolution of the cranial base within the major subclades within the hominin clade. This analysis suggests that cranial base morphology has continued to evolve in the hominin clade, both before and after the emergence of the genus Homo. PMID:18380865

  19. [Plastic surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament: experimental study of intra-articular aramid fibers in dogs].

    PubMed

    Passuti, N; Daculsi, G; Gouin, F; Martin, S; Vigneron, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors explored the possibility of replacing an anterior cruciate ligament with an aramid fiber (Kevlar) implant. This study was performed in intra-articular site in 9 dogs and the average implantation period was 5 months. Studies were carried out by macroscopic, photon microscopy, and electron microscopy examination of the samples obtained at the time the animals were sacrificed. Clinical and radiographic studies of the knees were performed in order to assess functional consequences. Overall, the results showed a partial or complete rupture of 10 neoligaments out of the 17 studied ligaments; on the other hand, osseous anchorage and reintegration in the intra-articular zone appeared satisfactory. Kevlar fiber only partially meets the performance specifications for an artificial ligament intended to serve as an anterior cruciate ligament substitute. Some positive results have encouraged the authors to carry on further this experimental study. PMID:2595049

  20. [Arthroscopic tightening of the anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Charrois, O; Cheyrou, E; Remi, J; Panarella, L; Jouve, F; Beaufils, P

    2008-02-01

    We present here the preliminary results obtained with arthroscopic tightening of the anterior cruciate ligament. Six patients underwent the technique. Four had had prior ligamentoplasty, two had sequelae of tibial spine fractures. Laxity persisted in all cases. The transplant or the ligament were continuous and insertion points were well-positioned. The procedure consisted in using a trephine to bore the tibial bone at the "foot" of the ligament or transplant in order to tighten the ligament. There was no evidence of instability after the arthroscopic tightening procedure. Mean pre- and postoperative differential anterior drawer values were successively 9.2 and 3.9 mm. For native or reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, which are continuous and well-positioned but not loose, arthroscopic tightening spares the need for ligament transplant and appears to be free of specific morbidity. PMID:18342033

  1. Return to Play Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ryan C; Hulstyn, Michael J; Fleming, Braden C; Owens, Brett D; Fadale, Paul D

    2016-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions are commonly performed in an attempt to return an athlete to sports activities. Accelerated rehabilitation has made recovery for surgery more predictable and shortened the timeline for return to play. Despite success with and advancements in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, some athletes still fail to return to play. PMID:27543405

  2. Neonatal cranial ultrasound screening for intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tudehope, D I; Lamont, A C

    1998-04-01

    The cost effectiveness of performing routine neonatal cranial ultrasound scans to diagnose intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) on cohorts of high risk infants is in question. In the early 1980s cranial ultrasound scans were performed on preterm infants to expand knowledge of the incidence, aetiology, pathogenesis and evolution of IVH. In many neonatal units high risk infants are scanned on days 5-7 and 10-14 and prior to discharge for extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infants. Cranial ultrasound scanning is often used as a surrogate for assessment of neurodevelopmental outcome with information from meta analyses used to counsel parents about the likelihood of subsequent neurosensory disability. PMID:9588629

  3. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  4. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prominent regions of an infant's cranium in order to improve cranial symmetry and/or shape in infants from 3... infants with plagiocephalic-, brachycephalic-, and scaphocephalic-shaped heads. (b) Classification....

  5. Multiple cranial neuropathies following etanercept administration.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There have been recent reports of sarcoid-like granulomatosis development following the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. To date, only four cases of neurosarcoidosis have been reported in association with TNF inhibitors, two of which were attributed to etanercept. We present the first case of etanercept-induced neurosarcoidosis involving multiple cranial neuropathies, including the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves, while also highlighting the differential diagnoses of multiple cranial neuropathies and the association of TNF inhibitors and neurosarcoidosis. PMID:27178520

  6. Neurosurgical considerations of cranial base surgery.

    PubMed

    Chenelle, A G; Shaffrey, M E; Delashaw, J B; Jane, J A

    1995-07-01

    Several craniotomies have been described that allow extensive resection of skull base and low-lying cranial tumors that involve little disfigurement to the patient. These techniques should be of interest to plastic surgeons as they may be called to aid their neurosurgical colleagues in exposing the anterior skull base or may be involved in combined procedures to resect tumors that involve the face, sinuses, orbit, and cranial vault. PMID:7554716

  7. Frame-based cranial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hochfeld, Mascha; Lamecker, Hans; Thomale, Ulrich-W; Schulz, Matthias; Zachow, Stefan; Haberl, Hannes

    2014-03-01

    The authors report on the first experiences with the prototype of a surgical tool for cranial remodeling. The device enables the surgeon to transfer statistical information, represented in a model, into the disfigured bone. The model is derived from a currently evolving databank of normal head shapes. Ultimately, the databank will provide a set of standard models covering the statistical range of normal head shapes, thus providing the required template for any standard remodeling procedure as well as customized models for intended overcorrection. To date, this technique has been used in the surgical treatment of 14 infants (age range 6-12 months) with craniosynostosis. In all 14 cases, the designated esthetic result, embodied by the selected model, has been achieved, without morbidity or mortality. Frame-based reconstruction provides the required tools to precisely realize the surgical reproduction of the model shape. It enables the establishment of a self-referring system, feeding back postoperative growth patterns, recorded by 3D follow-up, into the model design. PMID:24437987

  8. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils. PMID:18402165

  9. Giant-cell arteritis without cranial manifestations

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Lambert, Marc; Liozon, Eric; Boutemy, Jonathan; Maigné, Gwénola; Ollivier, Yann; Ly, Kim; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is challenging in the absence of cardinal cranial symptoms/signs. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and disease course of GCA patients without cranial symptoms, and to compare them to those of patients with typical cranial presentation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we enrolled patients with GCA who satisfied at least 3 of the 5 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with contributory vascular biopsy other than temporal artery biopsy or with demonstration of large-vessel involvement; underwent iconographic evaluation of large arterial vessels (aortic CT scan or a positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan or cardiac echography combined with a large-vessel Doppler) at diagnosis. We divided the cohort into 2 groups, distinguishing between patients without cranial symptoms/signs (i.e., headaches, clinical temporal artery anomaly, jaw claudication, ophthalmologic symptoms) and those with cranial symptoms/signs. In the entire cohort of 143 patients, all of whom underwent vascular biopsy and vascular imaging, we detected 31 (22%) patients with no cranial symptoms/signs. In the latter, diagnosis was biopsy proven in an arterial sample in 23 cases (74% of patients, on a temporal site in 20 cases and on an extratemporal site in 3). One-third of these 31 patients displayed extracranial symptoms/signs whereas the remaining two-thirds presented only with constitutional symptoms and/or inflammatory laboratory test results. Compared to the 112 patients with cardinal cranial clinical symptoms/signs, patients without cranial manifestations displayed lower levels of inflammatory laboratory parameters (C-reactive level: 68 [9–250] mg/L vs 120 [3–120] mg/L; P < 0.01), highest rate of aorta and aortic branch involvement identified (19/31 (61%) vs 42/112 (38%); P = 0.02) and also

  10. Knee imaging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M B; Silva, J J; Homsi, C; Stump, X M; Lecouvet, F E

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are performed every year, due to both the increasing occurrence of sport related injuries and the development of diagnostic and surgical techniques. The most used surgical procedure for the torn ACL reconstruction is the use of autogenous material, most often the patellar and semitendinosus tendons. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spiral-CT performed after arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions are the imaging methods of choice for post-operative evaluation of ACL ligamentoplasty. This paper provides a brief bibliographic and more extensive pictorial review of the normal evolution and possible complications after ACL repair. PMID:11817479

  11. Concurrent cranial mediastinal Blastomyces granuloma and carcinoma with cranial vena caval syndrome in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Natashia A.; Viviano, Katrina R.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes an unusual progression of blastomycosis in a dog with concurrent mediastinal carcinoma. The dog was evaluated for respiratory distress. Diagnostic results revealed chylothorax and a cranial vena caval thrombus. Histopathology of the cranial mediastinal mass diagnosed mediastinal carcinoma and fungal granuloma. Intercurrent disease may complicate the clinical presentation and clinical course of blastomycosis. PMID:26538674

  12. Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Brown, Gregory A; Murray, Jayson; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2016-08-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed the Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) document Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain the best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from patient indications that generally accompany an anterior cruciate ligament injury, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature. The 56 patient scenarios and 8 treatments were developed by the Writing Panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Lastly, a separate, multidisciplinary Voting Panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3). PMID:27355285

  13. Case report ganglion cysts of the bilateral cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Kurosaka, M; Maeno, K; Mizuno, K

    1999-01-01

    Ganglion cysts originating from the cruciate ligaments have been reported rarely. A 38-year-old woman developed symptoms of knee pain with 10 degrees loss of knee extension. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed a well-demarcated cystic mass surrounding the posterior cruciate ligament so clearly that further examination was not recommended. Because examination under anesthesia confirmed full extension of the knee, we presumed that pain produced by compression caused the diminished extension, and that mechanical block was not the reason. During arthroscopic examination, a mass was impinged between the anterior cruciate ligament and the intercondylar notch when extension of the knee was attempted. The mass was resected and immediate improvement was noted. The patient had experienced the same episode in the contralateral knee and removal of a ganglion cyst on the cruciate ligament 10 years ago. At the latest follow-up she was completely symptom free in both knees without any sign of recurrence. PMID:10564867

  14. Cranial osteopathy: its fate seems clear

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Steve E

    2006-01-01

    Background According to the original model of cranial osteopathy, intrinsic rhythmic movements of the human brain cause rhythmic fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid and specific relational changes among dural membranes, cranial bones, and the sacrum. Practitioners believe they can palpably modify parameters of this mechanism to a patient's health advantage. Discussion This treatment regime lacks a biologically plausible mechanism, shows no diagnostic reliability, and offers little hope that any direct clinical effect will ever be shown. In spite of almost uniformly negative research findings, "cranial" methods remain popular with many practitioners and patients. Summary Until outcome studies show that these techniques produce a direct and positive clinical effect, they should be dropped from all academic curricula; insurance companies should stop paying for them; and patients should invest their time, money, and health elsewhere. PMID:16762070

  15. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  16. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  17. The cranial nerve skywalk: A 3D tutorial of cranial nerves in a virtual platform.

    PubMed

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways is difficult using two-dimensional (2D) illustrations alone. Three-dimensional (3D) models aid the teacher in describing intricate and complex anatomical structures and help students visualize them. The study of the cranial nerves can be supplemented with 3D, which permits the students to fully visualize their distribution within the craniofacial complex. This article describes the construction and usage of a virtual anatomy platform in Second Life™, which contains 3D models of the cranial nerves III, V, VII, and IX. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk features select cranial nerves and the associated autonomic pathways in an immersive online environment. This teaching supplement was introduced to groups of pre-healthcare professional students in gross anatomy courses at both institutions and student feedback is included. PMID:24678025

  18. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution.

    PubMed

    Fahlke, Julia M; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing. PMID:26336812

  19. Restoration of large cranial defect for cranioplasty with alloplastic cranial implant material: a case report.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shelly; Goyal, Mukesh Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Cranial defects result either from trauma or after intentional osteocraniotomies or external decompression craniectomies. These defects occur most frequently during wartime, but their incidence during peacetime, as a result of accident or disease, makes knowledge of cranioplasty useful to the interested practitioner. Most cranial defects will have some variable proportion of cosmetic and mechanical aspects, and the decision regarding cranioplasty must be influenced by the patient's age, prognosis, activity level and the specific conditions of the scalp and calvarium. This case report is oriented towards post-traumatic restoration of large cranial defect with alloplastic heat-cure poly methyl methacrylate resin material. PMID:24757358

  20. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  1. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  2. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  3. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  4. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  5. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  6. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  7. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  8. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  9. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  10. Familial Aggregation of Cranial Tremor in Familial Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Hernandez, Nora; Clark, Lorraine N.; Ottman, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Background Essential tremor (ET) is often familial and phenotypic features may be shared within families. Cranial (neck, voice, jaw) tremor is an important feature of ET. We examined whether cranial tremor aggregates in ET families, after controlling for other factors (age, tremor severity and duration). Methods Among ET probands and relatives enrolled in a genetic study at Columbia University (95 subjects in 28 families), we assessed the degree to which occurrence of cranial tremor in the proband predicted occurrence of cranial tremor in affected relatives. Results Forty-five (47.4%) subjects had cranial tremor on neurological examination (probands 66.7%, relatives 39.7%). Among 28 families, 23 (82.1%) contained individuals with and individuals without cranial tremor, indicating a high degree of within-family heterogeneity. In comparison to subjects without cranial tremor, those with cranial tremor had higher total tremor scores (p<0.001), were older (p=0.003), and had tremor of longer duration (p=0.01). In logistic regression models, the odds of cranial tremor in a relative was not related to occurrence of cranial tremor in the proband (p>0.24). Conclusions Cranial tremor did not aggregate in families with ET; the major predictor of this disease feature was tremor severity rather than presence of cranial tremor in another family member. PMID:23712245

  11. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  15. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  20. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture and osteoarthritis progression.

    PubMed

    Wong, James Min-Leong; Khan, Tanvir; Jayadev, Chethan S; Khan, Wasim; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sporting injury that frequently affects young, athletic patients. Apart from the functional problems of instability, patients with ACL deficient knees also develop osteoarthritis. Although this is frequently cited as an indication for ACL reconstruction, the relationship between ACL rupture, reconstruction and the instigation and progression of articular cartilage degenerative change is controversial.The purpose of this paper is to review the published literature with regards ACL rupture and the multifactorial causes for osteoarthritis progression, and whether or not this is slowed or stopped by ACL reconstruction.There is no evidence in the published literature to support the view that ACL reconstruction prevents osteoarthritis, although it may prevent further meniscal damage. It must be recognised that this conclusion is based on the current literature which has substantial methodological limitations. PMID:22896777

  2. Infections in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Charlton; Garras, David N.; Shaner, Julie L.; Cohen, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a safe, common, and effective method of restoring stability to the knee after injury, but evolving techniques of reconstruction carry inherent risk. Infection after ACL reconstruction, while rare, carries a high morbidity, potentially resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December 2012) as well as from textbook chapters. Results: Treatment with culture-specific antibiotics and debridement with graft retention is recommended as initial treatment, but with persistent infection, consideration should be given to graft removal. Graft type likely has no effect on infection rates. Conclusion: The early diagnosis of infection and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid the complications of articular cartilage damage and arthrofibrosis. PMID:24427432

  3. Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Focus on Conflicting Issues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk

    2013-01-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed. PMID:24340144

  4. Tibial Tuberosity-Posterior Cruciate Ligament Distance.

    PubMed

    Daynes, Jake; Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Farr, Jack

    2016-08-01

    When trochlear dysplasia is present, it is difficult to measure the tibial tuberosity to trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance. A new measurement to assess tuberosity position was recently described by Seitlinger et al, which avoids the difficulty of identifying the TG as it references the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). To evaluate the reproducibility of the Seitlinger et al findings, 42 knees in 41 patients with a documented history of recurrent patellar instability and 84 knees in patients with no history of patellar instability or patellofemoral symptoms were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. The TT-PCL distance was increased in the instability group (mean, 21.6 mm) compared with the control group (mean, 19.0 mm). The TT-PCL distance is an independent risk factor for patients with recurrent patellar instability. Its role in surgical planning remains to be determined. PMID:26509659

  5. Patellotibial contusions in anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    PubMed

    Wissman, Robert D; England, Eric; Mehta, Kaushal; Nepute, Joshua; Von Fischer, Nathaniel; Apgar, Josh; Javadi, Ariyan

    2014-02-01

    Bone contusions are an important ancillary finding of many knee injuries. Not only are they a source of pain, they may suggest a mechanism of injury or a specific derangement of the knee joint. We have encountered a small number of patients being evaluated for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears with unexplained patellar and tibial edema at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We present three individuals with contusions of the inferior patella with a corresponding contusion of the anteromedial tibial plateau. Internal derangements in these patients were similar to other individuals with acute ACL tears, however osseous contusions were more widespread. In conclusion, patellotibial contusions are rare and may indicate an injury with forces greater than usually encountered in most ACL tears. A careful search for uncommon associated injuries is prudent in these high-energy knee injuries. PMID:24037484

  6. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment. PMID:8997803

  7. Miniature piezoelectric triaxial accelerometer measures cranial accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Rogallo, V. L.

    1966-01-01

    Tiny triaxial accelerometer whose sensing elements are piezoelectric ceramic beams measures human cranial accelerations when a subject is exposed to a centrifuge or other simulators of g environments. This device could be considered for application in dental, medical, and automotive safety research.

  8. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry. PMID:20532157

  9. Post-operative cranial pressure monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fager, C. A., Jr.; Long, L. E.; Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System for monitoring of fluidic pressures in cranial cavity uses a miniaturized pressure sensing transducer, combined with suitable amplification means, a meter with scale calibrated in terms of pressures between minus 100 and plus 900 millimeters of water, and a miniaturized chart recorder covering similar range of pressures.

  10. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia): Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Julien; Manger, Paul R.; Fernandez, Vincent; Rubidge, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma), has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays) associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism), its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia). PMID:27548428

  11. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia): Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Julien; Manger, Paul R; Fernandez, Vincent; Rubidge, Bruce S

    2016-01-01

    Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma), has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays) associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism), its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia). PMID:27548428

  12. Autologous cranial particulate bone grafting reduces the frequency of osseous defects after cranial expansion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin Lin; Rogers, Gary F; Clune, James E; Proctor, Mark R; Meara, John G; Mulliken, John B; Greene, Arin K

    2010-03-01

    Primary autologous particulate bone grafting has been demonstrated to heal osseous defects after fronto-orbital advancement. We sought to determine if this technique was equally effective for larger defects resulting from major cranial expansion procedures. We studied children who underwent cranial expansion (other than fronto-orbital advancement) between 1989 and 2008. Defects either were left to heal spontaneously (group 1) or had autologous cranial particulate bone graft placed over dura at the time of cranial expansion (group 2). Particulate bone graft was harvested from the endocortical or ectocortical surface using a hand-driven brace and bit. Outcome variables were ossification and need for revision cranioplasty. The study included 53 children. Mean (SD) age at procedure was 12.2 (8.1) months (range, 1.0-36.0 months) for group 1 (n = 15) and 20.2 (15.1) months (range, 3.3-78.6 months) for group 2 (n = 38) (P = 0.06). There were palpable bony defects in 33.0% (n = 5) of group 1 patients versus 7.9% (n = 3) of group 2 patients (P = 0.03). Corrective cranioplasty was needed in 26.7% of group 1 patients and only 5.3% of those in group 2 (P = 0.04). Primary cranial particulate bone grafting significantly reduced the frequency of osseous defects and secondary cranioplasty following cranial remodeling. PMID:20186093

  13. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399242

  14. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  15. Disorders of Cranial Nerves IX and X

    PubMed Central

    Erman, Audrey B.; Kejner, Alexandra E.; Hogikyan, Norman D.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    The glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves mediate the complex interplay between the many functions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Defects may occur anywhere from the brainstem to the peripheral nerve and can result in significant impairment in speech, swallowing, and breathing. Multiple etiologies can produce symptoms. This review will broadly examine the normal functions, clinical examination, and various pathologies of cranial nerves IX and X. PMID:19214937

  16. Serotonin regulates mouse cranial neural crest migration.

    PubMed Central

    Moiseiwitsch, J R; Lauder, J M

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic agents (uptake inhibitors, receptor ligands) cause significant craniofacial malformations in cultured mouse embryos suggesting that 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT) may be an important regulator of craniofacial development. To determine whether serotonergic regulation of cell migration might underly some of these effects, cranial neural crest (NC) explants from embryonic day 9 (E9) (plug day = E1) mouse embryos or dissociated mandibular mesenchyme cells (derived from NC) from E12 embryos were placed in a modified Boyden chamber to measure effects of serotonergic agents on cell migration. A dose-dependent effect of 5-HT on the migration of highly motile cranial NC cells was demonstrated, such that low concentrations of 5-HT stimulated migration, whereas this effect was progressively lost as the dose of 5-HT was increased. In contrast, most concentrations of 5-HT inhibited migration of less motile, mandibular mesenchyme cells. To investigate the possible involvement of specific 5-HT receptors in the stimulation of NC migration, several 5-HT subtype-selective antagonists were used to block the effects of the most stimulatory dose of 5-HT (0.01 microM). Only NAN-190 (a 5-HT1A antagonist) inhibited the effect of 5-HT, suggesting involvement of this receptor. Further evidence was obtained by using immunohistochemistry with 5-HT receptor antibodies, which revealed expression of the 5-HT1A receptor but not other subtypes by migrating NC cells in both embryos and cranial NC explants. These results suggest that by activating appropriate receptors 5-HT may regulate migration of cranial NC cells and their mesenchymal derivatives in the mouse embryo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7638165

  17. Cranial-base surgery: a reconstructive algorithm.

    PubMed

    Georgantopoulou, A; Hodgkinson, P D; Gerber, C J

    2003-01-01

    Skull-base surgery is associated with a high risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, infection, and functional and aesthetic deformity. Appropriate reconstruction of cranial-base defects following surgery helps to prevent these complications. Between March 1998 and May 2000, 28 patients (age: 1-68 years) underwent reconstruction of the anterior and middle cranial fossae. The indications for surgery were tumours, trauma involving the anterior cranial fossa, midline dermoid cysts with intracranial extension, late post-traumatic CSF leak, craniofacial deformity and recurrent frontal mucocoele. We used local anteriorly based pericranial flaps (23 flaps, alone or in combination with other flaps), bipedicled galeal flaps (seven patients) and free flaps (nine patients; radial forearm fascial/fasciocutaneous flaps, rectus abdominis muscle flap and latissimus dorsi muscle flap). Follow-up has been 4-24 months. We had no deaths, no flap failure and no incidence of infection. Complications included two CSF leaks, three intracranial haematomas and one pulsatile enophthalmos. All patients had a very good aesthetic result. We present an algorithm for skull-base reconstruction and comment on the design and vascularity of the bipedicled galeal flap. The monitoring of intracranial flaps and the difficulties of perioperative management of free flaps in neurosurgical patients are also discussed. PMID:12706142

  18. Cranial osteology of meiglyptini (aves: piciformes: picidae).

    PubMed

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    THE MEIGLYPTINI COMPRISE EIGHT SPECIES GROUPED INTO THREE GENERA: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

  19. Cranial Osteology of Meiglyptini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae)

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    The Meiglyptini comprise eight species grouped into three genera: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

  20. Cranial mediastinal carcinomas in nine dogs.

    PubMed

    Liptak, J M; Kamstock, D A; Dernell, W S; Ehrhart, E J; Rizzo, S A; Withrow, S J

    2008-03-01

    Nine dogs were diagnosed with cranial mediastinal carcinomas. Based on histological and immunohistochemical analysis, four dogs were diagnosed with ectopic follicular cell thyroid carcinomas, one dog with ectopic medullary cell thyroid carcinoma, two dogs with neuroendocrine carcinomas and two dogs with anaplastic carcinomas. Clinical signs and physical examination findings were associated with a space-occupying mass, although one dog was diagnosed with functional hyperthyroidism. Surgical resection was attempted in eight dogs. The cranial mediastinal mass was invasive either into the heart or into the cranial vena cava in three dogs. Resection was complete in six dogs and unresectable in two dogs. All dogs survived surgery, but four dogs developed pulmonary thromboembolism and two dogs died of respiratory complications postoperatively. Adjunctive therapies included pre-operative radiation therapy (n=1) and postoperative chemotherapy (n=3). Three dogs had metastasis at the time of diagnosis, but none developed metastasis following surgery. The overall median survival time was 243 days. Local invasion, pleural effusion and metastasis did not have a negative impact on survival time in this small case series. PMID:19178660

  1. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The fate of cranial neuropathy after flow diversion for carotid aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Brown, Benjamin L; Lopes, Demetrius; Miller, David A; Tawk, Rabih G; Brasiliense, Leonardo B C; Ringer, Andrew; Sauvageau, Eric; Powers, Ciarán J; Arthur, Adam; Hoit, Daniel; Snyder, Kenneth; Siddiqui, Adnan; Levy, Elad; Hopkins, L Nelson; Cuellar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Mercado, Rafael; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Binning, Mandy; Mocco, J; Aguilar-Salinas, Pedro; Boulos, Alan; Yamamoto, Junichi; Hanel, Ricardo A

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The authors sought to determine whether flow diversion with the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) can approximate microsurgical decompression in restoring function after cranial neuropathy following carotid artery aneurysms. METHODS This multiinstitutional retrospective study involved 45 patients treated with PED across the United States. All patients included presented between November 2009 and October 2013 with cranial neuropathy (cranial nerves [CNs] II, III, IV, and VI) due to intracranial aneurysm. Outcome analysis included clinical and procedural variables at the time of treatment as well as at the latest clinical and radiographic follow-up. RESULTS Twenty-six aneurysms (57.8%) were located in the cavernous segment, while 6 (13.3%) were in the clinoid segment, and 13 (28.9%) were in the ophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery. The average aneurysm size was 18.6 mm (range 4-35 mm), and the average number of flow diverters placed per patient was 1.2. Thirty-eight patients had available information regarding duration of cranial neuropathy prior to treatment. Eleven patients (28.9%) were treated within 1 month of symptom onset, while 27 (71.1%) were treated after 1 month of symptoms. The overall rate of cranial neuropathy improvement for all patients was 66.7%. The CN deficits resolved in 19 patients (42.2%), improved in 11 (24.4%), were unchanged in 14 (31.1%), and worsened in 1 (2.2%). Overtime, the rate of cranial neuropathy improvement was 33.3% (15/45), 68.8% (22/32), and 81.0% (17/21) at less than 6, 6, and 12 months, respectively. At last follow-up, 60% of patients in the isolated CN II group had improvement, while in the CN III, IV, or VI group, 85.7% had improved. Moreover, 100% (11/11) of patients experienced improvement if they were treated within 1 month of symptom onset, whereas 44.4% (12/27) experienced improvement if they treated after 1 month of symptom onset; 70.4% (19/27) of those with partial deficits improved compared with 30

  3. Neurocranium versus Face: A Morphometric Approach with Classical Anthropometric Variables for Characterizing Patterns of Cranial Integration in Extant Hominoids and Extinct Hominins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Jiménez-Arenas, Juan Manuel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the two main cranial complexes, the neurocranium and the splanchnocranium, has been examined in the five species of extant hominoids and in a huge sample of extinct hominins using six standard craniometric variables that measure the length, width and height of each cranial module. Factor analysis and two-block partial least squares were used for establishing the major patterns of developmental and evolutionary integration between both cranial modules. The results obtained show that all extant hominoids (including the anatomically modern humans) share a conserved pattern of developmental integration, a result that agrees with previous studies. The pattern of evolutionary integration between both cranial modules in australopiths runs in parallel to developmental integration. In contrast, the pattern of evolutionary and developmental integration of the species of the genus Homo is the opposite, which is probably the consequence of distinctive selective regimes for both hominin groups. PMID:26177535

  4. Neurocranium versus Face: A Morphometric Approach with Classical Anthropometric Variables for Characterizing Patterns of Cranial Integration in Extant Hominoids and Extinct Hominins

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Jiménez-Arenas, Juan Manuel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the two main cranial complexes, the neurocranium and the splanchnocranium, has been examined in the five species of extant hominoids and in a huge sample of extinct hominins using six standard craniometric variables that measure the length, width and height of each cranial module. Factor analysis and two-block partial least squares were used for establishing the major patterns of developmental and evolutionary integration between both cranial modules. The results obtained show that all extant hominoids (including the anatomically modern humans) share a conserved pattern of developmental integration, a result that agrees with previous studies. The pattern of evolutionary integration between both cranial modules in australopiths runs in parallel to developmental integration. In contrast, the pattern of evolutionary and developmental integration of the species of the genus Homo is the opposite, which is probably the consequence of distinctive selective regimes for both hominin groups. PMID:26177535

  5. Active knee motion after cruciate ligament rupture. Stereoradiography.

    PubMed

    Kärrholm, J; Selvik, G; Elmqvist, L G; Hansson, L I

    1988-04-01

    In 10 patients with an old injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, the three-dimensional movements of the knee joint were studied when the patients flexed their knees. Tibial motions were recorded using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Internal rotation and adduction of the tibia were reduced in the injured knees when compared with the intact knees; during flexion of the knee joint, the tibial intercondylar eminence occupied a more lateral and posterior position on the injured side. Our results may indicate that the knee joint is continuously exposed to abnormal stresses when the anterior cruciate ligament is torn. PMID:3364185

  6. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  7. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? What are the relevant parameters that influence the indication for an ACL reconstruction? Which findings or complaints are predictive of a bad result of an ACL injury treatment? What is the optimal timing for surgery for an ACL injury? What is the outcome of different conservative treatment modalities? Which kind of graft gives the best result in an ACL reconstruction? What is the optimal postoperative treatment concerning rehabilitation, resumption of sports, and physiotherapy? These 8 questions were answered and recommendations were made, using the “Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation” instrument. This instrument seeks to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practical guidelines by establishing a shared framework to develop, report, and assess. The steering group has also developed 7 internal indicators to aid in measuring and enhancing the quality of the treatment of patients with an ACL injury, for use in a hospital or practice. PMID:22900914

  8. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Poldervaart, Michelle T; Diercks, Ron L; Fievez, Alex W F M; Patt, Thomas W; Hart, Cor P van der; Hammacher, Eric R; Meer, Fred van der; Goedhart, Edwin A; Lenssen, Anton F; Muller-Ploeger, Sabrina B; Pols, Margreet A; Saris, Daniel B F

    2012-08-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? What are the relevant parameters that influence the indication for an ACL reconstruction? Which findings or complaints are predictive of a bad result of an ACL injury treatment? What is the optimal timing for surgery for an ACL injury? What is the outcome of different conservative treatment modalities? Which kind of graft gives the best result in an ACL reconstruction? What is the optimal postoperative treatment concerning rehabilitation, resumption of sports, and physiotherapy? These 8 questions were answered and recommendations were made, using the "Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation" instrument. This instrument seeks to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practical guidelines by establishing a shared framework to develop, report, and assess. The steering group has also developed 7 internal indicators to aid in measuring and enhancing the quality of the treatment of patients with an ACL injury, for use in a hospital or practice. PMID:22900914

  9. Approaching the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, Khaled M; Sadri, Amir; Thevendran, Gowreeson; Vedi, Vikas

    2011-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) disruptions are common injuries that currently hold a fearsome reputation among athletes of all abilities and disciplines. Indeed, if the diagnosis is missed at first presentation, it is difficult to attribute ongoing instability and recurrent injury to an ACL tear. Classically, patients then often improve shortly before repeatedly reinjuring their knee. At some point, the knee may lock, necessitating an arthroscopic meniscectomy. Tragically, this then hastens the progression of joint arthrosis and the decline of the joint function. While the burden of responsibility does not lie solely with the junior doctor or the general practitioner, it is often at the first consultation that the natural history of this devastating injury is decided. The ability to recognise, institute early management and reassure patients with ACL tears about the future is an invaluable asset to the non-specialist junior doctor. Once diagnosed, the responsibility of advising and further counselling of patients with ACL injuries is best left to the orthopaedic knee specialist. Family practitioners and emergency room doctors should not feel pressured to offer advice on specialist areas such as return to sports without reconstruction or indeed the need for reconstruction. Indeed, decisions to return to sports with ACL-deficient knees have all too often led to disastrous reinjury events to the articular cartilage and/or the menisci. PMID:21097944

  10. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  11. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Seedhom, B B

    1992-01-01

    Ligaments are strong collagenous structures that act as constraints on joint motion, thus confining the articular surfaces to more or less the same paths. In so doing they prevent arbitrary apposition of these surfaces from occurring and resulting in abnormal stresses which may damage the joint surfaces. Ligaments rupture due to excessive loads, particularly those resulting from trauma occurring during sporting events or motor vehicle accidents. Knee and ankle joints have the highest frequency of ligamentous injuries. This paper is a brief review of the current approaches to the reconstruction of the knee ligaments with specific reference to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) being the most frequently reconstructed. This is not only because it is frequently injured but also because of the debilitating consequences of such an injury. Approaches ranging from the conservative to those that advocate the use of frank prosthetic replacement have been adopted by surgeons at both ends of the spectrum. Following a discussion of the rationale for reconstruction of the ACL, the mechanical and biological considerations of the reconstructive procedure are discussed. The different methods of ACL reconstruction are reviewed. These include: (a) primary repair, (b) reconstruction with different tissues, including autogenous allografts and xenografts, (c) reconstruction employing different synthetic devices. A brief discussion of the procedures used for reconstruction with different types of tissue and of the surviving examples of the synthetic devices will follow. PMID:1418190

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament surgery in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various methods regarding allograft knee replacements have been described. The animal models, which are generally used for this purpose include sheep, dogs, goats, and pigs, and accrue significant costs for study protocols. The authors herein describe an efficient and cost-effective model to study either native or tissue-engineered allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement in a New Zealand rabbit model with the potential for transgenic and cell migration studies. Methods ACL reconstructions were performed in rabbits under general anesthesia. For fresh allograft implantations, two animals were operated in parallel. Each right extensor digitorum longus tendon was harvested and prepared for implantation. After excision of the ACL, tibial and femoral bone tunnels were created to implant each graft in the native ACL position. Results During a 2-year period, the authors have successfully undertaken this surgery in 61 rabbits and have not noticed any major complications attributed to this surgical technique. In addition, the authors have observed fast recovery in the animals postoperatively. Conclusion The authors recommend this surgical procedure as an excellent model for the study of knee surgery. PMID:23957941

  13. Knee Bracing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Merchán, E Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Although some articles in the literature are in favor of the use of a postoperative brace after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, this review found that several systematic reviews and other reports on the topic do not support the use of a postoperative brace after ACL reconstruction. There is no scientific evidence so far to support the routine use of a functional knee brace following a successful ACL reconstruction in the postoperative course. Most authors believe that bracing is not necessary. There is insufficient evidence to inform current practice. Good-quality randomized trials are required to remedy this situation. Future studies should better define the role of a brace following ACL surgery. A search of MEDLINE for articles published between January 1, 1995, and September 30, 2013, was performed. Key search terms used were ACL reconstruction and knee brace. Ninety-one articles were found, but only 28 focused on the subject of bracing after ACL reconstruction and were selected for this review. Several systematic reviews and randomized, controlled trials on the topic do not recommend the use of postoperative brace after ACL reconstruction. Postoperative bracing after ACL reconstruction does not seem to help with pain, function, rehabilitation, and stability. The literature does not support the use of a postoperative brace following ACL reconstruction. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e602-e609.]. PMID:27203412

  14. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament healing

    SciTech Connect

    Ihara, Hidetoshi; Miwa, Megumi; Deya, Keizo; Torisu, Kenji

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate using MRI the natural healing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) when treated conservatively by early protective motion. Consecutive acute complete intraligamentous ruptures of the ACL in 50 cases that were allowed to heal without surgery were evaluated before and after 3 month treatment by MRI, arthroscopy, and stress radiographs. Twenty-nine of the 50 patients were also reevaluated 11 months from the initial injury, of which 7 were reevaluated again 24 months from the initial injury by MRI. The MR appearance of the treated ACL was categorized into four grades depending on homogeneity, straight band, and size. MR assessment of the ACL after 3 month treatment demonstrated a well defined normal-sized straight band in 37 cases (74%). There was a significant relationship between the 3 and 11 month MR evaluations (r. = 0.801, p < 0.0001). There were also significant relationships between the MR and arthroscopic evaluations (r, = 0.455, p < 0.005) and between the MR and stress radiographic evaluations (r, = 0.348, p < 0.025) after the 3 month treatment. MRI can demonstrate ACL healing when treated conservatively with early protective mobilization. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves. PMID:24323823

  16. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China. PMID:27161475

  17. Spatial Change of Cruciate Ligaments in Rat Embryo Knee Joint by Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takaishi, Ryota; Higuchi, Shinya; Yamada, Shigehito; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spatial developmental changes of rat cruciate ligaments by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC). Cruciate ligaments of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E) 16 and E20 were analyzed. Samples were sectioned and visualized using EFIC. 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. The length of the cruciate ligaments, distances between attachment points to femur and tibia, angles of the cruciate ligaments and the cross angle of the cruciate ligaments were measured. The shape of cruciate ligaments was clearly visible at E17. The lengths of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) increased gradually from E17 to E19 and drastically at E20. Distances between attachment points to the femur and tibia gradually increased. The ACL angle and PCL angle gradually decreased. The cross angle of the cruciate ligaments changed in three planes. The primordium of the 3D structure of rat cruciate ligaments was constructed from the early stage, with the completion of the development of the structures occurring just before birth. PMID:26098761

  18. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  19. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chang, Ji-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity has been considered a risk factor causing late failure of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, although it is unknown whether that is the case for reconstructed posterior cruciate ligaments. We hypothesized patients with generalized joint laxity, compared with those without laxity, would have similar postoperative knee stability, range of motion, and functional scores after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Beighton and Horan criteria were used to determine generalized joint laxity. We enrolled 24 patients with generalized joint laxity (Group L) and 29 patients without any positive findings of joint laxity (Group N) matched by gender and age. The average side-by-side differences of posterior tibial translation were 4.72 mm in Group L and 3.63 mm in Group N. We observed no differences in posterior tibial translation with differing graft materials or combined procedures. In Group L the International Knee Documentation Committee score was normal in 12.5% and nearly normal in 45.8% whereas in Group N, 24.1% were normal and 55.2% nearly normal. Patients with generalized joint laxity showed more posterior laxity than patients without joint laxity. Generalized joint laxity therefore appears to be a risk factor associated with posterior laxity after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18843524

  20. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:20808583

  1. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  2. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Duthon, Victoria; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goals of this study are to address several questions, the answers to which are key to the understanding and eventually to the prevention of this frequent source of morbidity. These questions include the following: (1) What is the natural history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency? (2) How important is the status of the meniscus at the time of reconstruction? (3) Does ACL reconstruction prevent the development of osteoarthritis in the long term? (4) Can we predict which patients will develop osteoarthritis? (5) What can be done? Design: This study addresses the key questions above through the long-term follow-up of a cohort of patients treated with ACL reconstruction by Professor Henri Dejour in Lyon, France, supplemented with a review of the relevant literature. Results: The prevalence of osteoarthritis in ACL-deficient knees is about 40% after 15 years and close to 90% after 25 to 35 years. It remains unclear whether reconstruction of the ACL significantly reduces this risk. The status of the meniscus at the time of ACL reconstruction is a strong predictor of the risk of osteoarthritis: Patients who undergo total meniscectomy are at 2- to 10-fold increased risk of developing osteoarthritis relative to those with intact menisci. Patients showing early evidence of arthritis at short- to medium-term follow-up are at high risk for progression over subsequent years. Numerous emerging techniques may provide tools to more effectively prevent and treat osteoarthritis following ACL injury in the future. Conclusion: Osteoarthritis following ACL injury continues to be a major problem requiring further research. PMID:26069662

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Wakeboarding

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Harlan M.; Sanders, Brett

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wakeboarding is an increasingly popular sport that involves aggressive stunts with high risk for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Little has been reported on prevalence or mechanism of ACL injury while wakeboarding. Hypothesis: The prevalence of ACL injury in wakeboarding approaches that of other high-risk sports. Analyzing the mechanism of ACL injury may aid in future efforts of prevention. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: In sum, 1580 surveys were sent internationally to professional and amateur wakeboarders. The survey questioned the participants on their history of an ACL tear while wakeboarding and asked them to describe the mechanism of injury and treatment. Results: A total of 123 surveys were returned. Of this group, 52 (42.3%) acknowledged having had an ACL tear while wakeboarding. The majority described feeling a pop or buckle after attempting to land a high jump. Only 5 participants (13.5%) described a rotational mechanism created by catching the board edge in the water. Thirty-seven participants (71.15%) said that the injury ruined their ability to wakeboard before reconstruction, and 41 (78.85%) had the injury repaired surgically. Conclusion: The prevalence of ACL tears in this data set, 42.3%, is the highest reported in the literature for wakeboarding and one of the highest for any sport. The main mechanism of injury appears to involve axial compression while one lands in a provocative position; it is not related to a rotational force created by fixed bindings. The injury should be surgically repaired to effectively continue the sport. Further study is needed to determine if wakeboarding represents a high-risk sport for ACL injury. Clinical Significance: Wakeboarding may be a high-risk sport for ACL injury. Noncontact axial compression appears to be the main mechanism of injury. PMID:23016104

  5. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 μm. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 μm through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 μm of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  6. Cranial mediastinal liposarcoma in a horse.

    PubMed

    Kondo, H; Wickins, S C; Conway, J A; Mallicote, M F; Sanchez, L C; Agnew, D W; Farina, L L; Abbott, J R

    2012-11-01

    A 23-year-old Anglo-Arabian mare was presented with tachypnea, dyspnea, and pitting edema of the ventral thoracic subcutis. On necropsy, a tan to red, friable, irregularly shaped mass (23 × 20 × 18 cm) occupied the cranial mediastinum. Histologically, the mass was classified as a liposarcoma and was composed of short interlacing bundles of spindle-shaped to irregularly rounded cells with discrete, variably sized, clear cytoplasmic vacuoles, which were stained with oil red O in frozen sections of formalin-fixed tissue. PMID:22287648

  7. Retained garden fork following cranial stab injury

    PubMed Central

    Gonya, Sonwabile; Mbatha, Andile; Moyeni, Nondabula; Enicker, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Retained garden fork is a rare complication of penetrating cranial trauma. Retained knife blade is the most commonly reported presentation. We report an unusual case of a 30-year-old male patient treated at our institution, who presented with a retained garden fork following a stab to the head, with no associated neurological deficits. Computerized tomographic scan of the brain was performed preoperatively to assess the trajectory of the weapon and parenchymal injury. A craniectomy was performed to facilitate removal of the weapon in the operating theatre under general anaesthesia. Intravenous prophylactic antibiotics were administered pre- and postoperatively to prevent septic complications. The patient recovered well and was discharged home. PMID:26747398

  8. Two Helpful MRI Signs for Evaluation of Posterolateral Bundle Tears of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Volokhina, Yulia V.; Syed, Hasan M.; Pham, Peter H.; Blackburn, Allie K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is difficult on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the isolated tears of the posterolateral bundle. Purpose: To describe 2 MRI signs of partial ACL tear involving the posterolateral bundle on conventional knee MRI sequences, specifically, the “gap” and “footprint” signs. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the MRI appearance of the ACL in 11 patients with arthroscopically proven partial ACL tears isolated to the posterolateral bundle, as well as in 10 patients with arthroscopically proven intact ACLs, and evaluated for the presence of gap and/or footprint signs. Results: There was high degree of sensitivity and specificity associated with the MRI findings of “gap” and “footprint” signs with arthroscopically proven isolated posterolateral bundle tears. Conclusion: Gap and footprint signs are suggestive of posterolateral bundle tear of the ACL, and the presence of 1 or both of these imaging findings should alert the radiologist to the possibility of a posterolateral bundle tear. PMID:26535387

  9. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed Central

    Rayfield, Emily J.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals. PMID:15306316

  10. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development.

    PubMed

    Moody, Sally A; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized "neural border zone" forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and nonneural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the preplacodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with cofactor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest, and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently becomes subdivided into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia, and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  11. Improving cranial ultrasound scanning strategy in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Cranial ultrasound scans are undertaken in this tertiary neonatal intensive care unit by the doctors within the department. A quality improvement project was undertaken by means of two PDSA cycles to determine adherence to neonatal cranial ultrasound scanning schedule, assess the quality of scan reporting, and formulate a comprehensive guideline outlining best practice. The baseline measurements assessed 93 scans of preterm infants and 9 of term infants. The results of this prompted intradepartmental education (PDSA cycle 1) then creation and implementation of a documentation template, a local guideline, and education via presentations, posters, and email (PDSA cycle 2). These encompassed 77 preterm and 5 term scans. In our baseline measurements, 52% of preterm infant scans and 44% of term infant scans were performed to schedule. Of premature baby scan reports, 75% had the time documented and 92% the name of the scanning doctor. After implementing changes PDSA cycle 2 data showed that 74% of preterm infant scans and all term infant scans were performed according to schedule, with 100% having the doctor's name and time of scan documented. We successfully introduced a guideline and documentation template, improving performance to schedule and documentation in most areas. It remains an ongoing challenge to adhere to basic standards of documentation; a template can assist in achieving this. Rotating trainees may offer insight into areas that could benefit from quality improvement. This enthusiasm can be successfully harnessed to implement changes to improve quality of patient care. PMID:27096095

  12. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    Rayfield, Emily J

    2004-07-22

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals. PMID:15306316

  13. Improving cranial ultrasound scanning strategy in neonates.

    PubMed

    Bray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Cranial ultrasound scans are undertaken in this tertiary neonatal intensive care unit by the doctors within the department. A quality improvement project was undertaken by means of two PDSA cycles to determine adherence to neonatal cranial ultrasound scanning schedule, assess the quality of scan reporting, and formulate a comprehensive guideline outlining best practice. The baseline measurements assessed 93 scans of preterm infants and 9 of term infants. The results of this prompted intradepartmental education (PDSA cycle 1) then creation and implementation of a documentation template, a local guideline, and education via presentations, posters, and email (PDSA cycle 2). These encompassed 77 preterm and 5 term scans. In our baseline measurements, 52% of preterm infant scans and 44% of term infant scans were performed to schedule. Of premature baby scan reports, 75% had the time documented and 92% the name of the scanning doctor. After implementing changes PDSA cycle 2 data showed that 74% of preterm infant scans and all term infant scans were performed according to schedule, with 100% having the doctor's name and time of scan documented. We successfully introduced a guideline and documentation template, improving performance to schedule and documentation in most areas. It remains an ongoing challenge to adhere to basic standards of documentation; a template can assist in achieving this. Rotating trainees may offer insight into areas that could benefit from quality improvement. This enthusiasm can be successfully harnessed to implement changes to improve quality of patient care. PMID:27096095

  14. Study on the Korean adult cranial capacity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Y I; Lee, K H; Choi, B Y; Lee, K S; Lee, H Y; Sir, W S; Kim, H J; Koh, K S; Han, S H; Chung, M S

    1995-08-01

    Cranial capacity was measured in Korean adult skulls. The cavity was filled with rice seeds and the volume of the seeds were measured in a graduated cylinder. The results were 1470 +/- 107 (mean +/- standard deviation) in male and 1317 +/- 117 cc in female skulls. These values were in good accordance with those previously reported. In addition, regression formulae were obtained with the product of the length, breadth, and height of the skull as an independent parameter and the measured capacity as a dependent one. With known external measurements, the expected cranial capacity was as follows: when using baso-bregmatic height, male: capacity = 307.5 + 333 x 10(-6) x (length.breadth.baso-bregmatic height) female: capacity = -12.0 + 435 x 10(-6) x (length.breadth.baso-bregmatic height) and, when using auriculo-bregmatic height, male: capacity = 214.6 + 429 x 10(-6) x (length.breadth.auriculo-bregmatic height) female: capacity = 131.6 + 461 x 10(-6) x (length.breadth.auriculo-bregmatic height). PMID:8593202

  15. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  16. The contribution of subsistence to global human cranial variation.

    PubMed

    Noback, Marlijn L; Harvati, Katerina

    2015-03-01

    Diet-related cranial variation in modern humans is well documented on a regional scale, with ample examples of cranial changes related to the agricultural transition. However, the influence of subsistence strategy on global cranial variation is less clear, having been confirmed only for the mandible, and dietary effects beyond agriculture are often neglected. Here we identify global patterns of subsistence-related human cranial shape variation. We analysed a worldwide sample of 15 populations (n = 255) with known subsistence strategies using 3-D landmark datasets designed to capture the shape of different units of the cranium. Results show significant correlations between global cranial shape and diet, especially for temporalis muscle shape and general cranial shape. Importantly, the differences between populations with either a plant- or an animal-based diet are more pronounced than those between agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers, suggesting that the influence of diet as driver of cranial variation is not limited to Holocene transitions to agricultural subsistence. Dental arch shape did not correlate with subsistence pattern, possibly indicating the high plasticity of this region of the face in relation to age, disease and individual use of the dentition. Our results highlight the importance of subsistence strategy as one of the factors underlying the evolution of human geographic cranial variation. PMID:25661439

  17. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  20. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that...

  7. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  8. Non-uniform dose distributions in cranial radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Edward T.

    Radiation treatments are often delivered to patients with brain metastases. For those patients who receive radiation to the entire brain, there is a risk of long-term neuro-cognitive side effects, which may be due to damage to the hippocampus. In clinical MRI and CT scans it can be difficult to identify the hippocampus, but once identified it can be partially spared from radiation dose. Using deformable image registration we demonstrate a semi-automatic technique for obtaining an estimated location of this structure in a clinical MRI or CT scan. Deformable image registration is a useful tool in other areas such as adaptive radiotherapy, where the radiation oncology team monitors patients during the course of treatment and adjusts the radiation treatments if necessary when the patient anatomy changes. Deformable image registration is used in this setting, but there is a considerable level of uncertainty. This work represents one of many possible approaches at investigating the nature of these uncertainties utilizing consistency metrics. We will show that metrics such as the inverse consistency error correlate with actual registration uncertainties. Specifically relating to brain metastases, this work investigates where in the brain metastases are likely to form, and how the primary cancer site is related. We will show that the cerebellum is at high risk for metastases and that non-uniform dose distributions may be advantageous when delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small cell lung cancer in complete remission.

  9. Neonatal cranial sonography: A concise review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Cranial sonography continues to hold an important place in neonatal care. Attributes favorable to sonography that make it almost indispensable for routine care of the newborn includes easy access, low cost, portability, lack of ionizing radiations and exemption from sedation or anaesthesia. Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage. Not withstanding this, cranial sonography has yielded results for a repertoire of indications. Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation. Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss the technique, normal and variant anatomy as well as disease entities of neonatal cranial sonography. PMID:27195026

  10. Clinical Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, Lisa M.; Long, Joy L.; Schilling, Peter L.; Lilly, Ryan J.; Carpenter, James E.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinical outcomes of autograft and allograft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are mixed, with some reports of excellent to good outcomes and other reports of early graft failure or significant donor site morbidity. Objective: To determine if there is a difference in functional outcomes, failure rates, and stability between autograft and allograft ACL reconstructions. Data Sources: Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews Collection), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched for articles on ACL reconstruction. Abstracts from annual meetings of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and Arthroscopy Association of North America were searched for relevant studies. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria for studies were as follows: primary unilateral ACL injuries, mean patient age less than 41 years, and follow-up for at least 24 months postreconstruction. Exclusion criteria for studies included the following: skeletally immature patients, multiligament injuries, and publication dates before 1990. Data Extraction: Joint stability measures included Lachman test, pivot-shift test, KT-1000 arthrometer assessment, and frequency of graft failures. Functional outcome measures included Tegner activity scores, Cincinnati knee scores, Lysholm scores, and IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) total scores. Results: More than 5000 studies were identified. After full text review of 576 studies, 56 were included, of which only 1 directly compared autograft and allograft reconstruction. Allograft ACL reconstructions were more lax when assessed by the KT-1000 arthrometer. For all other outcome measures, there was no statistically significant difference between autograft and allograft ACL reconstruction. For all outcome measures, there was strong evidence of statistical heterogeneity between

  11. The Effect of Dietary Adaption on Cranial Morphological Integration in Capuchins (Order Primates, Genus Cebus)

    PubMed Central

    Makedonska, Jana; Wright, Barth W.; Strait, David S.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental challenge of morphology is to identify the underlying evolutionary and developmental mechanisms leading to correlated phenotypic characters. Patterns and magnitudes of morphological integration and their association with environmental variables are essential for understanding the evolution of complex phenotypes, yet the nature of the relevant selective pressures remains poorly understood. In this study, the adaptive significance of morphological integration was evaluated through the association between feeding mechanics, ingestive behavior and craniofacial variation. Five capuchin species were examined, Cebus apella sensu stricto, Cebus libidinosus, Cebus nigritus, Cebus olivaceus and Cebus albifrons. Twenty three-dimensional landmarks were chosen to sample facial regions experiencing high strains during feeding, characteristics affecting muscular mechanical advantage and basicranial regions. Integration structure and magnitude between and within the oral and zygomatic subunits, between and within blocks maximizing modularity and within the face, the basicranium and the cranium were examined using partial-least squares, eigenvalue variance, integration indices compared inter-specifically at a common level of sampled population variance and cluster analyses. Results are consistent with previous findings reporting a relative constancy of facial and cranial correlation patterns across mammals, while covariance magnitudes vary. Results further suggest that food material properties structure integration among functionally-linked facial elements and possibly integration between the face and the basicranium. Hard-object-feeding capuchins, especially C.apella s.s., whose faces experience particularly high biomechanical loads are characterized by higher facial and cranial integration especially compared to C.albifrons, likely because morphotypes compromising feeding performance are selected against in species relying on obdurate fallback foods. This is the

  12. Cranial base topology and basic trends in the facial evolution of Homo.

    PubMed

    Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Facial prognathism and projection are important characteristics in human evolution but their three-dimensional (3D) architectonic relationships to basicranial morphology are not clear. We used geometric morphometrics and measured 51 3D-landmarks in a comparative sample of modern humans (N = 78) and fossil Pleistocene hominins (N = 10) to investigate the spatial features of covariation between basicranial and facial elements. The study reveals complex morphological integration patterns in craniofacial evolution of Middle and Late Pleistocene hominins. A downwards-orientated cranial base correlates with alveolar maxillary prognathism, relatively larger faces, and relatively larger distances between the anterior cranial base and the frontal bone (projection). This upper facial projection correlates with increased overall relative size of the maxillary alveolar process. Vertical facial height is associated with tall nasal cavities and is accommodated by an elevated anterior cranial base, possibly because of relations between the cribriform and the nasal cavity in relation to body size and energetics. Variation in upper- and mid-facial projection can further be produced by basicranial topology in which the midline base and nasal cavity are shifted anteriorly relative to retracted lateral parts of the base and the face. The zygomatics and the middle cranial fossae act together as bilateral vertical systems that are either projected or retracted relative to the midline facial elements, causing either midfacial flatness or midfacial projection correspondingly. We propose that facial flatness and facial projection reflect classical principles of craniofacial growth counterparts, while facial orientation relative to the basicranium as well as facial proportions reflect the complex interplay of head-body integration in the light of encephalization and body size decrease in Middle to Late Pleistocene hominin evolution. Developmental and evolutionary patterns of integration may

  13. On the terminology of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Simon, František; Marečková-Štolcová, Elena; Páč, Libor

    2011-10-20

    The present contribution adopts various points of view to discuss the terminology of the twelve nervi craniales. These are paired nerves and have dual names, terms with Roman ordinal numerals, i.e., the nerves are numbered in the top-to-bottom direction, and descriptive historical names. The time of origin and motivation behind the investigated terms are determined. The majority of terms come from the 17th and 18th centuries. The motivation behind most of them is (a) nerve localization, as this is in conformity with anatomical nomenclature in general, (b) nerve function, and rarely (c) nerve appearance. The occurrence of synonymous names and variants is also a focus of attention. In several cases, reference is made to the process called terminologization, meaning when a certain expression acquires technical meaning and the characteristic/feature of the term. PMID:21724380

  14. [Vascular compression syndromes of the cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Kuncz, Adám; Vörös, Erika; Barzó, Pál

    2011-01-30

    The blood vessels which are running nearby the cranial nerves and the brainstem can be elongated; curves and loops of the vessels may develop mostly due to the degenerative alterations of ageing and these vessels can compress the surrounding neural elements. The authors report a review of vascular compression syndromes based on the literature and their own experience. The typical clinical symptoms of the syndromes subserving the proper diagnosis, the pathomechanism, the significance of imaging especially the magnetic resonance angiography, the experience with the surgical technique of microvascular decompression which is the only causal treatment of the syndromes are discussed. In cases of non-responsible medical treatment the microvascular decompression should be the eligible treatment in certain syndromes (trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm) for it is a highly effective and low risk method. PMID:21428033

  15. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm, and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized “neural border zone” forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and non-neural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the pre-placodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with co-factor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally-derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently subdivides into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, somatic sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  16. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Female Athletes: Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Mary Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To present epidemiologic studies on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in female athletes. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched from 1978 to 1998 with the terms “anterior cruciate ligament” and “female athlete” among others. Additional sources were knowledge base and oral, didactic, and video presentations. Data Synthesis: Epidemiologic studies have focused on level of participation, specific sports, sex differences and contributing factors, injury mechanism, prevention programs, and outcomes studies. Female athletes have a significantly increased risk of noncontact ACL injuries over male athletes in soccer and basketball. Conclusions/Recommendations: I believe that appropriate intervention programs can reduce these alarming rates of ACL injuries. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3. PMID:16558558

  18. Ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament in a child.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Sujir, Premjit; Naik, Monappa A; Rao, Sharath K

    2012-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are more commonly associated with the anterior cruciate ligament than the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A literature review showed that all reported cases of ganglion cysts to date involved adults. We report a rare case of ganglion cyst in the PCL of a four-year-old boy, and discuss its aetiology, clinical presentation, imaging features and management. Ganglion cysts of the PCL may be confused with meniscal cysts arising from tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hence, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus has to be carefully evaluated to rule out a tear. MR imaging is the method of choice to confirm diagnosis, and arthroscopic resection is a safe treatment modality even in children. PMID:22511069

  19. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel E.; McBratney, Brandeis M.; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the origin of modern human cranial form. In terms of pattern, AMHS crania are uniquely characterized by two general structural autapomorphies: facial retraction and neurocranial globularity. Morphometric analysis of the ontogeny of these autapomorphies indicates that the developmental changes that led to modern human cranial form derive from a combination of shifts in cranial base angle, cranial fossae length and width, and facial length. These morphological changes, some of which may have occurred because of relative size increases in the temporal and possibly the frontal lobes, occur early in ontogeny, and their effects on facial retraction and neurocranial globularity discriminate AMHS from AH crania. The existence of these autapomorphies supports the hypothesis that AMHS is a distinct species from taxa of “archaic” Homo (e.g., Homo neanderthalensis). PMID:11805284

  20. Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcoma in a young dog

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcomas are uncommon tumors. A 30-kg, 2-year-old, intact female German shepherd was presented for evaluation of cachexia and respiratory distress of a few days’ duration. Lateral radiographic projection of the thorax revealed significant pleural effusion. Computed tomography revealed a cranial mediastinal mass effect adjacent to the heart. On surgical exploration, a pedunculated mass attached to the esophagus, trachea, brachiocephalic trunk, left subclavian artery and cranial vena cava without attachment to the right atrium and auricular appendage was removed and debrided by use of blunt dissection and dry gauzes, respectively. Histopathology results described the cranial mediastinal mass as hemangiosarcoma. At 8 months and 5 days post-operatively, the patient died. Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcomas, although a seemingly rare cause of thoracic pathology in young dogs, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for pleural effusion and soft tissue mass effect in the cranial mediastinum. This is the first case report in a dog to describe primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcoma. PMID:25089185

  1. Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcoma in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hun-Young; Kang, Hye-Mi; Lee, Mi-Young

    2014-01-01

    Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcomas are uncommon tumors. A 30-kg, 2-year-old, intact female German shepherd was presented for evaluation of cachexia and respiratory distress of a few days' duration. Lateral radiographic projection of the thorax revealed significant pleural effusion. Computed tomography revealed a cranial mediastinal mass effect adjacent to the heart. On surgical exploration, a pedunculated mass attached to the esophagus, trachea, brachiocephalic trunk, left subclavian artery and cranial vena cava without attachment to the right atrium and auricular appendage was removed and debrided by use of blunt dissection and dry gauzes, respectively. Histopathology results described the cranial mediastinal mass as hemangiosarcoma. At 8 months and 5 days post-operatively, the patient died. Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcomas, although a seemingly rare cause of thoracic pathology in young dogs, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for pleural effusion and soft tissue mass effect in the cranial mediastinum. This is the first case report in a dog to describe primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcoma. PMID:25089185

  2. Controversies in Knee Rehabilitation: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Mathew J.; Arundale, Amelia J.H.; Logerstedt, David S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no re-injury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to pre-injury sports. Using these criterions, we will review the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury and provide recommendations for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury. PMID:25818715

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autologous Hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian M.; Williams, Phillip N.; Burge, Alissa; Voigt, Marcia; Altchek, David W.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical investigations have identified inadequate autograft hamstring graft diameter (<8 mm) to be predictive of failure after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables of the hamstring tendons for the prediction of graft diameter at the time of surgery. The hypothesis was that cross-sectional area (CSA) of the hamstring tendon measured on MRI could accurately predict graft diameter, and threshold measurements could be established to predict graft diameter at the time of surgery. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 84 consecutive skeletally mature patients prospectively enrolled in our ACL reconstruction patient registry were identified for study purposes. Patients were included if they underwent an MRI of the affected knee at our institution prior to ACL reconstruction with hamstring (HT) autograft. Graft preparation was performed via a standard quadrupled hamstring technique after harvesting both the gracilis and semitendinosus (4-GST). The smallest diameter end of the HT autograft was then utilized for measurement analysis. Total CSA was calculated for both hamstring tendons using the “region of interest tool” on the corresponding proton density–weighted axial image of the knee at the widest condylar dimension. Three independent reviewers measured the MRI scans so that intra- and interrater reliability of the measurements could be determined. A trend analysis was then undertaken to establish correlations between the MRI CSA and graft diameter. Predictive analysis was then performed to establish threshold MRI measurement values for specific graft diameters and determine whether any patient-specific factors would affect graft diameter (age, sex, and body mass index). Results: Mean patient age at the time of surgery was 36 years (range, 11

  4. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in skeletally immature patients: an individualized approach☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Júnior, Osmar Valadão; Saggin, Paulo Renato; Matos do Nascimento, Gilberto; Kuhn, André; Saggin, José; Inácio, André Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate a series of skeletally immature patients who underwent three surgical techniques for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction according to each patient's growth potential. Methods a series of 23 skeletally immature patients who underwent ACL reconstruction surgery at ages ranging from 7 to 15 years was evaluated prospectively. The surgical technique was individualized according to the Tanner sexual maturity score. The surgical techniques used were transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction and extraphyseal reconstruction. Four patients underwent the extraphyseal technique, seven the partial transphyseal technique and twelve the full transphyseal technique, on the ACL. The postoperative evaluation was based on the Lysholm score, clinical analysis on the knee and the presence of angular deformity or dysmetria of the lower limb. Results the mean Lysholm score was 96.34 (±2.53). None of the patients presented differences in length and/or clinical or radiographic misalignment abnormality of the lower limbs. Conclusion ACL reconstruction using flexor tendon grafts in skeletally immature patients provided satisfactory functional results. Use of individualized surgical techniques according to growth potential did not give rise to physeal lesions capable of causing length discrepancies or misalignments of the lower limbs, even in patients with high growth potential. PMID:26229809

  5. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  6. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  7. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jessica M; Cohen, Yale E; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L

    2016-04-20

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates. PMID:27096188

  8. Intra-cranial Toxoplasmosis in an Immunocompetent Female.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Yaser Ud Din; Aziz, Amir; Ishaque, Khurram; Abbas, Sadia; Ud Din, Tariq Salah

    2016-06-01

    Intra-cranial toxoplasmosis is a rare entity occurring mostly in immunosuppressed individuals. It is extremely rare in an immune competent patient. Toxoplasmosis is the third leading cause of food borne illness. Depending upon the site, degree of inflammation and local damage, toxoplasmosis encephalitis and cranial abscess can cause long lasting neurologic sequel. With modern imaging techniques, toxoplasmosis antibody titers, slit lamp examination and brain biopsy, there is improvement in diagnosis along with reduction in the mortality rate. We present a case illustrating the radiological manifestations, complications, potential pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment of intra-cranial toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patient. PMID:27376217

  9. A Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Laxity Between Female and Male Basketball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weesner, Carol L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament laxity of 90 uninjured male and female high school players were measured. No significant differences were found, indicating that the greater female injury rate may be due to inadequate conditioning, not greater knee ligament laxity. (Author/MT)

  10. Ecological correlates to cranial morphology in Leporids (Mammalia, Lagomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, Emma; Bumacod, Nicholas; Wedel, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian order Lagomorpha has been the subject of many morphometric studies aimed at understanding the relationship between form and function as it relates to locomotion, primarily in postcranial morphology. The leporid cranial skeleton, however, may also reveal information about their ecology, particularly locomotion and vision. Here we investigate the relationship between cranial shape and the degree of facial tilt with locomotion (cursoriality, saltation, and burrowing) within crown leporids. Our results suggest that facial tilt is more pronounced in cursors and saltators compared to generalists, and that increasing facial tilt may be driven by a need for expanded visual fields. Our phylogenetically informed analyses indicate that burrowing behavior, facial tilt, and locomotor behavior do not predict cranial shape. However, we find that variables such as bullae size, size of the splenius capitus fossa, and overall rostral dimensions are important components for understanding the cranial variation in leporids. PMID:25802812

  11. 3D Reconstruction For The Detection Of Cranial Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, B.; Shalev, S.; Lavelle, C.

    1986-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of three-dimensional (3D) cranial reconstruction from CT scans for surgical planning. A low-cost imaging system has been developed, which provides pseudo-3D images which may be manipulated to reveal the craniofacial skeleton as a whole or any particular component region. The contrast between congenital (hydrocephalic), normocephalic and acquired (carcinoma of the maxillary sinus) anomalous cranial forms demonstrates the potential of this system.

  12. MEMO1 drives cranial endochondral ossification and palatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Feng, Weiguo; Jones, Kenneth L; Hynes, Nancy E; Clouthier, David E; Niswander, Lee; Williams, Trevor

    2016-07-15

    The cranial base is a component of the neurocranium and has a central role in the structural integration of the face, brain and vertebral column. Consequently, alteration in the shape of the human cranial base has been intimately linked with primate evolution and defective development is associated with numerous human facial abnormalities. Here we describe a novel recessive mutant mouse strain that presented with a domed head and fully penetrant cleft secondary palate coupled with defects in the formation of the underlying cranial base. Mapping and non-complementation studies revealed a specific mutation in Memo1 - a gene originally associated with cell migration. Expression analysis of Memo1 identified robust expression in the perichondrium and periosteum of the developing cranial base, but only modest expression in the palatal shelves. Fittingly, although the palatal shelves failed to elevate in Memo1 mutants, expression changes were modest within the shelves themselves. In contrast, the cranial base, which forms via endochondral ossification had major reductions in the expression of genes responsible for bone formation, notably matrix metalloproteinases and markers of the osteoblast lineage, mirrored by an increase in markers of cartilage and extracellular matrix development. Concomitant with these changes, mutant cranial bases showed an increased zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes accompanied by a reduction in both vascular invasion and mineralization. Finally, neural crest cell-specific deletion of Memo1 caused a failure of anterior cranial base ossification indicating a cell autonomous role for MEMO1 in the development of these neural crest cell derived structures. However, palate formation was largely normal in these conditional mutants, suggesting a non-autonomous role for MEMO1 in palatal closure. Overall, these findings assign a new function to MEMO1 in driving endochondral ossification in the cranium, and also link abnormal development of the cranial base

  13. Short course prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, R.; Clamon, G.H.; Blum, R.; Moran, E.; Weiner, R.; Kramer, B.; Evans, W.K.; Herman, J.G.; Hoffman, F.; Burmeister, L.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety-one patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were given a shortened, intensive course of prophylactic cranial irradiation consisting of 2,000 rad in five fractions. The CNS relapse rate was 21%, but in only one of 91 patients was the brain the first and only site of relapse. Acute toxicities consisting of headache (16%) and nausea and vomiting (15%) were observed. Results are compared with previous results from other studies of cranial irradiation.

  14. A fast cranial drilling technique in treating severe intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Liu, Hui-Fang; Chai, Shuai; Kang, Xuan-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study is a retrospective case analysis of 143 patients who suffered from severe intracranial hemorrhage and underwent a fast and simple procedure of cranial drilling followed with external ventricle drain treatment (referred as Fast-D here after) during 2003–2013 to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the treatment. Methods: Fast-D procedure was conducted on 143 patients with severe acute craniocerebral diseases. Those patients were evaluated using activities of daily living (ADL) scales at hospital discharge and after 6-month of physical therapy, and were compared to 36 patients with similar craniocerebral diseases but received the traditional Dandy's surgical treatment. Results: At discharge, 11% (16 cases) was classified as ADL I (fully functional for physical and social activities); 26% (37 cases) had ADL II (fully functional for physical activities but partially impaired for social activities); 34% (49 cases) was ADL III (require assistance performing physical activities); 9% (13 cases) was ADL IV (being conscious, but completely lost ability of physical activities); 27% (10 cases) was ADL V (vegetative stage); and 13% (18 cased) was ADL VI (died) among the 143 patients. Six-month physical therapy improved ADL in 88% of the patients. Those outcomes are equal or better than the more complicated Dandy's procedure probably due to the time-saving factor. Conclusion: Fast-D procedure is much faster (6.7 min vs. 53.6 min of the Dandy's procedure) and can be performed outside operating rooms (computed tomography room or bedside). This technique could serve as a tool to rapidly release intracranial pressure and reduce subsequent morbidity and mortality of severe craniocerebral diseases when resource and condition are limited and more elaborate operating room procedures are not possible. PMID:26539310

  15. Major cranial changes during Triceratops ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Horner, John R; Goodwin, Mark B

    2006-11-01

    This is the first cranial ontogenetic assessment of Triceratops, the well-known Late Cretaceous dinosaur distinguished by three horns and a massive parietal-squamosal frill. Our analysis is based on a growth series of 10 skulls, ranging from a 38 cm long baby skull to about 2 m long adult skulls. Four growth stages correspond to a suite of ontogenetic characters expressed in the postorbital horns, frill, nasal, epinasal horn and epoccipitals. Postorbital horns are straight stubs in early ontogeny, curve posteriorly in juveniles, straighten in subadults and recurve anteriorly in adults. The posterior margin of the baby frill is deeply scalloped. In early juveniles, the frill margin becomes ornamented by 17-19 delta-shaped epoccipitals. Epoccipitals are dorsoventrally compressed in subadults, strongly compressed and elongated in adults and ultimately merge onto the posterior frill margin in older adults. Ontogenetic trends within and between growth stages include: posterior frill margin transitions from scalloped to wavy and smooth; progressive exclusion of the supraoccipital from the foramen magnum; internal hollowing at the base of the postorbital horns; closure of the midline nasal suture; fusion of the epinasal onto the nasals; and epinasal expansion into a morphologically variable nasal horn. We hypothesize that the changes in horn orientation and epoccipital shape function to allow visual identity of juveniles, and signal their attainment of sexual maturity. PMID:17015322

  16. Major cranial changes during Triceratops ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Horner, John R; Goodwin, Mark B

    2006-01-01

    This is the first cranial ontogenetic assessment of Triceratops, the well-known Late Cretaceous dinosaur distinguished by three horns and a massive parietal–squamosal frill. Our analysis is based on a growth series of 10 skulls, ranging from a 38 cm long baby skull to about 2 m long adult skulls. Four growth stages correspond to a suite of ontogenetic characters expressed in the postorbital horns, frill, nasal, epinasal horn and epoccipitals. Postorbital horns are straight stubs in early ontogeny, curve posteriorly in juveniles, straighten in subadults and recurve anteriorly in adults. The posterior margin of the baby frill is deeply scalloped. In early juveniles, the frill margin becomes ornamented by 17–19 delta-shaped epoccipitals. Epoccipitals are dorsoventrally compressed in subadults, strongly compressed and elongated in adults and ultimately merge onto the posterior frill margin in older adults. Ontogenetic trends within and between growth stages include: posterior frill margin transitions from scalloped to wavy and smooth; progressive exclusion of the supraoccipital from the foramen magnum; internal hollowing at the base of the postorbital horns; closure of the midline nasal suture; fusion of the epinasal onto the nasals; and epinasal expansion into a morphologically variable nasal horn. We hypothesize that the changes in horn orientation and epoccipital shape function to allow visual identity of juveniles, and signal their attainment of sexual maturity. PMID:17015322

  17. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  18. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  19. A review of hedgehog signaling in cranial bone development.

    PubMed

    Pan, Angel; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; James, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    During craniofacial development, the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is essential for mesodermal tissue patterning and differentiation. The HH family consists of three protein ligands: Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Indian Hedgehog (IHH), and Desert Hedgehog (DHH), of which two are expressed in the craniofacial complex (IHH and SHH). Dysregulations in HH signaling are well documented to result in a wide range of craniofacial abnormalities, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), hypotelorism, and cleft lip/palate. Furthermore, mutations in HH effectors, co-receptors, and ciliary proteins result in skeletal and craniofacial deformities. Cranial suture morphogenesis is a delicate developmental process that requires control of cell commitment, proliferation and differentiation. This review focuses on both what is known and what remains unknown regarding HH signaling in cranial suture morphogenesis and intramembranous ossification. As demonstrated from murine studies, expression of both SHH and IHH is critical to the formation and fusion of the cranial sutures and calvarial ossification. SHH expression has been observed in the cranial suture mesenchyme and its precise function is not fully defined, although some postulate SHH to delay cranial suture fusion. IHH expression is mainly found on the osteogenic fronts of the calvarial bones, and functions to induce cell proliferation and differentiation. Unfortunately, neonatal lethality of IHH deficient mice precludes a detailed examination of their postnatal calvarial phenotype. In summary, a number of basic questions are yet to be answered regarding domains of expression, developmental role, and functional overlap of HH morphogens in the calvaria. Nevertheless, SHH and IHH ligands are integral to cranial suture development and regulation of calvarial ossification. When HH signaling goes awry, the resultant suite of morphologic abnormalities highlights the important roles of HH signaling in cranial development. PMID:23565096

  20. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  1. Rodent model of direct cranial blast injury.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Reed; Simard, Philippe F; Driscoll, Ian; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Williams, Alicia; Bochicchio, Grant; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury resulting from an explosive blast is one of the most serious wounds suffered by warfighters, yet the effects of explosive blast overpressure directly impacting the head are poorly understood. We developed a rodent model of direct cranial blast injury (dcBI), in which a blast overpressure could be delivered exclusively to the head, precluding indirect brain injury via thoracic transmission of the blast wave. We constructed and validated a Cranium Only Blast Injury Apparatus (COBIA) to deliver blast overpressures generated by detonating .22 caliber cartridges of smokeless powder. Blast waveforms generated by COBIA replicated those recorded within armored vehicles penetrated by munitions. Lethal dcBI (LD(50) ∼ 515 kPa) was associated with: (1) apparent brainstem failure, characterized by immediate opisthotonus and apnea leading to cardiac arrest that could not be overcome by cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (2) widespread subarachnoid hemorrhages without cortical contusions or intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhages; and (3) no pulmonary abnormalities. Sub-lethal dcBI was associated with: (1) apnea lasting up to 15 sec, with transient abnormalities in oxygen saturation; (2) very few delayed deaths; (3) subarachnoid hemorrhages, especially in the path of the blast wave; (4) abnormal immunolabeling for IgG, cleaved caspase-3, and β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP), and staining for Fluoro-Jade C, all in deep brain regions away from the subarachnoid hemorrhages, but in the path of the blast wave; and (5) abnormalities on the accelerating Rotarod that persisted for the 1 week period of observation. We conclude that exposure of the head alone to severe explosive blast predisposes to significant neurological dysfunction. PMID:21639724

  2. Cranial morphometry of early hominids: facial region.

    PubMed

    Bilsborough, A; Wood, B A

    1988-05-01

    We report here on early hominid facial diversity, as part of a more extensive morphometric survey of cranial variability in Pliocene and early Pleistocene Hominidae. Univariate and multivariate techniques are used to summarise variation in facial proportions in South and East African hominids, and later Quaternary groups are included as comparators in order to scale the variation displayed. The results indicate that "robust" australopithecines have longer, broader faces than the "gracile" form, but that all australopithecine species show comparable degrees of facial projection. "Robust" crania are characterised by anteriorly situated, deep malar processes that slope forwards and downwards. Smaller hominid specimens, formally or informally assigned to Homo (H. habilis, KNM-ER 1813, etc.), have individual facial dimensions that usually fall within the range of Australopithecus africanus, but which in combination reveal a significantly different morphological pattern; SK 847 shows similarly hominine facial proportions, which differ significantly from those of A. robustus specimens from Swartkrans. KNM-ER 1470 possesses a facial pattern that is basically hominine, but which in some respects mimics that of "robust" australopithecines. Early specimens referred to H. erectus possess facial proportions that contrast markedly with those of other Villafranchian hominids and which suggest differing masticatory forces, possibly reflecting a shift in dietary niche. Overall the results indicate two broad patterns of facial proportions in Hominidae: one is characteristic of Pliocene/basal Pleistocene forms with opposite polarities represented by A. boisei and H. habilis; the other pattern, which typifies hominids from the later Lower Pleistocene onwards, is first found in specimens widely regarded as early representatives of H. erectus, but which differ in which certain respects from the face of later members of that species. PMID:3136656

  3. Anatomic Double-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Nitri, Marco; Civitarese, David; Dean, Chase S; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is known to be the main posterior stabilizer of the knee. Anatomic single-bundle PCL reconstruction, focusing on reconstruction of the larger anterolateral bundle, is the most commonly performed procedure. Because of the residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after the single-bundle procedure and the inability to restore the normal knee kinematics, an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction has been proposed in an effort to re-create the native PCL footprint more closely and to restore normal knee kinematics. We detail our technique for an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using Achilles and anterior tibialis tendon allografts. PMID:27284530

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    PubMed

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed. PMID:26545750

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, John; Hutt, Jonathan; Rickman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS). There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario. PMID:26221555

  6. Ossicle in Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A Rare Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amanpreet; Gogna, Paritosh

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of an intra-articular ossicle is not rare in the knee, with reports suggesting the existence of meniscal osscile. There are also reports describing the attachment of the posterolateral bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) to an accessory ossicle. However, despite an extensive search of the English literature we did not find much written about an intrasubstance ossicle in the ACL. We present the case of a 13-year-old male with an intrasubstance ossicle in the anteromedial bundle of the ACL of his right knee. PMID:24822144

  7. An audit of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Topliss, C; Webb, J

    2001-03-01

    We audited 114 primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Notes were reviewed and tunnel positions assessed on lateral and AP radiographs. A literature review established optimal tunnel position. Sixteen surgeons performed 57 arthroscopic and 57 open reconstructions, using 24 hamstring and 90 bone-tendon-bone autografts. Eighty-five sets of radiographs were available for review. Sixty-five percent of femoral tunnels and 59% of the tibial tunnels were malpositioned in the sagittal plane. Guidelines for best practice are required for key procedures in each speciality. Tunnel position in ACL reconstruction can be easily measured and should be correct in at least 90% of cases. PMID:11248570

  8. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  9. The Evolution of Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Getgood, Alan; Spalding, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has evolved significantly since the early 1900’s, back when an emphasis was placed on repair and not reconstruction. Over the past century, the technique has evolved from intra-articular non anatomic reconstruction, to extra articular reconstruction, back to intra articular (performed arthroscopically), to now, the advent of anatomic insertion site restoration. This review will aim to illustrate the changes that have occurred, describing the rational for this process, based upon anatomical, radiological, biomechanical and clinical studies, all of which have aimed to improve patient function following ACL injury. PMID:22905073

  10. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in indoor ball games.

    PubMed

    Ebstrup, J F; Bojsen-Møller, F

    2000-04-01

    Three videorecorded incidents of knee injuries inflicted during indoor ball games are reported. Injuries and especially anterior cruciate ligament ruptures seemed to be triggered in varus loaded knees by femural external rotation, or in valgus loaded knees by femural internal rotation with the pivot shifted to the lateral femurotibial compartment. The observations suggest that it may be to the players' advantage to be trained in not letting their knees sag medially or laterally during side-stepping or sudden changes in speed. PMID:10755283

  12. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Compensation during Gait using Hamstring Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catalfamo, Paola Formento; Aguiar, Gerardo; Curi, Jorge; Braidot, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an increase in hamstring activation may compensate for anterior tibial transalation (ATT) in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee (ACLd); however, the effects of this compensation still remain unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify the activation of the hamstring muscles needed to compensate the ATT in ACLd knee during the complete gait cycle and to evaluate the effect of this compensation on quadriceps activation and joint contact forces. A two dimensional model of the knee was used, which included the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints, knee ligaments, the medial capsule and two muscles units. Simulations were conducted to determine the ATT in healthy and ACLd knee and the hamstring activation needed to correct the abnormal ATT to normal levels (100% compensation) and to 50% compensation. Then, the quadriceps activation and the joint contact forces were calculated. Results showed that 100% compensation would require hamstring and quadriceps activations larger than their maximum isometric force, and would generate an increment in the peak contact force at the tibiofemoral (115%) and patellofemoral (48%) joint with respect to the healthy knee. On the other hand, 50% compensation would require less force generated by the muscles (less than 0.85 of maximum isometric force) and smaller contact forces (peak tibiofemoral contact force increased 23% and peak patellofemoral contact force decreased 7.5% with respect to the healthy knee). Total compensation of ATT by means of increased hamstring activity is possible; however, partial compensation represents a less deleterious strategy. PMID:20721326

  13. Proprioceptive deficit in patients with complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Pedro; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Cossich, Victor; de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; Velasques, Bruna; Salles, José Inácio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of proprioceptive deficits between the injured limb and the uninjured (i.e. contralateral normal) limb, in individuals who suffered complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), using a strength reproduction test. Methods Sixteen patients with complete tearing of the ACL participated in the study. A voluntary maximum isometric strength test was performed, with reproduction of the muscle strength in the limb with complete tearing of the ACL and the healthy contralateral limb, with the knee flexed at 60°. The meta-intensity was used for the procedure of 20% of the voluntary maximum isometric strength. The proprioceptive performance was determined by means of absolute error, variable error and constant error values. Results Significant differences were found between the control group and ACL group for the variables of absolute error (p = 0.05) and constant error (p = 0.01). No difference was found in relation to variable error (p = 0.83). Conclusion Our data corroborate the hypothesis that there is a proprioceptive deficit in subjects with complete tearing of the ACL in an injured limb, in comparison with the uninjured limb, during evaluation of the sense of strength. This deficit can be explained in terms of partial or total loss of the mechanoreceptors of the ACL. PMID:26229870

  14. Plagiocephaly and brachycephaly treatment with cranial orthosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Schreen, Gerd; Matarazzo, Carolina Gomes

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The number of cranial deformities has increased considerably since international efforts of pediatricians to recommend parents putting their babies to sleep in the supine position as a strategy to reduce sudden death syndrome of the newborn. On the one hand, this program has demonstrated very efficient results at reducing deaths and, on the other hand, such recommendation has increased the incidence of cranial asymmetries. In addition, infants are kept too long in one position, much of this due to abusive use of strollers, baby carriers, car seats, swings and other devices. Among resulting asymmetries, the most frequently found are plagiocephaly (parallelogram shaped skull, with posterior unilateral flattening with the opposite frontal area also flattened) and brachycephaly (occipital bilateral flattening). The present study is a case report of a patient with brachycephaly associated with deformational plagiocephaly treated with cranial orthosis. The same physician clinically evaluated the patient before and after treatment using photographic recording and a laser scanning device, which allows the accurate measurement of variables determining asymmetries. It became clear during treatment that there was significant improvement in cranial symmetry documented by decrease in the cephalic index, diagonal difference and volume gain in the quadrant that was flattened. The authors conclude that orthotic therapy is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for position cranial asymmetries. PMID:23579755

  15. Clinically Relevant Injury Patterns After an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Provide Insight Into Injury Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Jason W.; Kiapour, Ata M.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Demetropoulos, Constantine K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The functional disability and high costs of treating anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have generated a great deal of interest in understanding the mechanism of noncontact ACL injuries. Secondary bone bruises have been reported in over 80% of partial and complete ACL ruptures. Purpose The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify ACL strain under a range of physiologically relevant loading conditions and (2) to evaluate soft tissue and bony injury patterns associated with applied loading conditions thought to be responsible for many noncontact ACL injuries. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seventeen cadaveric legs (age, 45 ± 7 years; 9 female and 8 male) were tested utilizing a custom-designed drop stand to simulate landing. Specimens were randomly assigned between 2 loading groups that evaluated ACL strain under either knee abduction or internal tibial rotation moments. In each group, combinations of anterior tibial shear force, and knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments under axial impact loading were applied sequentially until failure. Specimens were tested at 25° of flexion under simulated 1200-N quadriceps and 800-N hamstring loads. A differential variable reluctance transducer was used to calculate ACL strain across the anteromedial bundle. A general linear model was used to compare peak ACL strain at failure. Correlations between simulated knee injury patterns and loading conditions were evaluated by the χ2 test for independence. Results Anterior cruciate ligament failure was generated in 15 of 17 specimens (88%). A clinically relevant distribution of failure patterns was observed including medial collateral ligament tears and damage to the menisci, cartilage, and subchondral bone. Only abduction significantly contributed to calculated peak ACL strain at failure (P = .002). While ACL disruption patterns were independent of the loading mechanism, tibial plateau injury patterns (locations) were

  16. A chronic scheme of cranial window preparation to study pial vascular reactivity in murine cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Peng Kai; Meays, Diana; Frangos, John A.; Carvalho, Leonardo J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The acute implantation of a cranial window for studying cerebroarteriolar reactivity in living animals involves a highly surgically-invasive craniotomy procedure at the time of experimentation, which limits its application in severely ill animals such as in the experimental murine model of cerebral malaria (ECM). To overcome this problem, a chronic window implantation scheme was designed and implemented. Methods A partial craniotomy is first performed by creating a skull bone flap in the healthy mice, which are then left to recover for 1–2 weeks, followed by infection to induce ECM. Uninfected animals are utilized as control. When cranial superfusion is needed, the bone flap is retracted and window implantation completed by assembling a perfusion chamber for compound delivery to the exposed brain surface. The presurgical step is intended to minimize surgical trauma on the day of experimentation. Results Chronic preparations in uninfected mice exhibited remarkably improved stability over acute ones by significantly reducing periarteriolar tissue damage and enhancing cerebroarteriolar dilator responses. The chronic scheme was successfully implemented in ECM mice which unveiled novel preliminary insights on impaired cerebroarteriolar reactivity and eNOS dysfunction. Conclusion The chronic scheme presents an innovative approach for advancing our mechanistic understanding on cerebrovascular dysfunction in ECM. PMID:23279271

  17. Novel Use of the Contura for High Dose Rate Cranial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Alksne, John F.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator.

  18. A negative cranial computed tomographic scan is not adequate to support a diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Said, Rana R; Rosman, N Paul

    2004-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy with daily headache for 1 month and intermittent diplopia for 1 week was found to have a unilateral partial abducens palsy and bilateral papilledema; otherwise, his neurologic examination showed no abnormalities. A cranial computed tomographic (CT) scan was normal. Lumbar puncture disclosed a markedly elevated opening pressure of > 550 mm of cerebrospinal fluid with normal cerebrospinal fluid. Medical therapy with acetazolamide for presumed pseudotumor cerebri was begun. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, done several days later because of continuing symptoms, unexpectedly showed multiple hyperintensities of cerebral white matter on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Despite high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone for possible demyelinating disease, he failed to improve. A left temporal brain biopsy followed and disclosed an anaplastic oligodendroglioma. In a patient with features indicating pseudotumor cerebri, a negative cranial CT scan is not adequate to rule out underlying pathology; thus, MRI of the brain should probably always be performed. A revised definition of pseudotumor cerebri could better include "normal MRI of the brain" rather than "normal neuroimaging." PMID:15605471

  19. Multiple, supernumerary retained teeth in the course of cleido-cranial dysplasia. A case report.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Bogumił; Martula-Gala, Katarzyna; Brodowski, Robert; Zych, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Cleido-cranial dysplasia, often referred to as Scheuthauer-Marie-Sainton syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder of the musculo-skeletal system. Patients with cleido-cranial dysplasia are characterized by short stature, frequent varus or valgus hip, kyphoscoliosis, underdevelopment of the scapulas and the sternum, incorrect number of ribs. The most characteristic feature is unilateral or bilateral, partial or total underdevelopment of clavicles. Mental development is not affected in this syndrome. Malocclusion, occlusal irregularities, multiple supernumerary teeth, impacted teeth, and persistent milk teeth are found in the stomatognathic system. Teeth often have abnormal anatomy. Gothic palate, cleft hard and soft palate are diagnosed. The aim of this paper is to present a case of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with irregularities in the masticatory system involving an additional number of retained teeth. The boy was referred by an orthodontist for surgical and orthodontic team therapy. The case presented confirms the observations of other authors that only the multi-specialty collaboration of a pediatrician, a geneticist, an orthopedist, an orthodontist, a maxillofacial surgeon, an implant prosthetic surgeon and a physiotherapist can provide proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26982761

  20. The effect of immediate weightbearing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tyler, T F; McHugh, M P; Gleim, G W; Nicholas, S J

    1998-12-01

    Immediate weightbearing has been advocated after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and is thought to enhance the return of quadriceps muscle activity and knee extension range of motion without jeopardizing graft integrity. This study examined the effect of immediate weightbearing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the return of vastus medialis oblique electromyography activity, knee extension range of motion, knee stability, physical examination, Lysholm score, and anterior knee pain. Forty-nine patients (24 men and 25 women) undergoing endoscopic central third patella tendon autograft reconstruction were randomized prospectively into two groups. Group 1 patients underwent immediate weightbearing as tolerated. Group 2 patients were kept nonweightbearing for 2 weeks. All measurements were taken before surgery, 2 weeks after surgery, and between 6 and 14 months (average, 7.3 months) followup. There was no effect of weightbearing on knee extension range of motion or vastus medialis oblique function at followup. In addition, knee stability was not compromised after surgery. Seven of 20 (35%) nonweightbearing patients and only two of 25 (8%) immediate weightbearing patients reported anterior knee pain at followup. Overall, immediate weightbearing did not compromise knee joint stability and resulted in a better outcome with a decreased incidence of anterior knee pain. PMID:9917711

  1. REHABILITATION PROTOCOL AFTER ISOLATED POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Kiyomoto, Henry Dan; Rosal, Gustavo Fogolin; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; de Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix

    2015-01-01

    To create a rehabilitation protocol following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), through a literature review. The literature review was conducted in the Medline and Embase databases, to search for data on biomechanical concepts and analyses relating to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The search strategy was set up using the following rules: problem or injury in association with anatomical location terms; or surgical intervention procedure in association with rehabilitation terms. We began the process in this manner and subsequently introduced restrictions on certain terms to improve the search specificity. To design the protocol, a table was created for better data assessment, based on the time that elapsed between surgery and the start of physiotherapy. A rehabilitation protocol was created to improve weight-bearing control in the initial weeks after surgery, with the aid of a knee brace. Our aim was to achieve gains in total range of motion of the knee, which should be attained by the third month, thereby avoiding contractures resulting from the tissue healing process. Strengthening exercises and sensory-motor training were guided accordingly, thus avoiding overload on the graft and respecting the healing phases. The protocol proposed through this review was based on the current evidence relating to this subject. PMID:27047844

  2. Evaluation of pain after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brown, D W; Curry, C M; Ruterbories, L M; Avery, F L; Anson, P S

    1997-01-01

    Pain after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate reconstruction was examined during the first 5 postoperative days to evaluate its intensity and duration. One hundred consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft were examined. During surgery, ketorolac (60 mg) was given intravenously and 0.25% bupivicaine (1 ml/kg total) was injected into the joint space and the graft donor site. After surgery, all patients received scheduled doses of oral acetaminophen (650 mg) and ketorolac (10 mg) four times a day, and they were allowed to take oral oxycodone (5 to 10 mg) every 2 hours as needed. Pain scores at rest and with activity reached a maximum on the 2nd postoperative morning. Oxycodone consumption also peaked on the 2nd postoperative day. Eighty-nine (89%) patients reported overall pain as mild or moderate, and 95 patients (95%) reported either excellent or good overall relief of pain. The 5-day cumulative mean of visual analog scale pain scores for attempting straight leg raises was significantly higher for patients unable to successfully perform that activity than for patients who were able to perform it. The association between elevated pain scores and diminished ability to perform straight leg raises suggests that pain may inhibit function and therefore early rehabilitation. PMID:9079170

  3. Osseous expansion of the cranial vault by craniotasis.

    PubMed

    Remmler, D; McCoy, F J; O'Neil, D; Willoughby, L; Patterson, B; Gerald, K; Morris, D C

    1992-05-01

    A study of cranial vault lengthening using a custom expandable fixation-distraction (craniotatic) appliance was performed in the young-adult rabbit model. Ten 24-week-old rabbits underwent circumferential suturectomy plus expansion (expanded group), 10 underwent circumferential suturectomy without expansion (sham control group), and 10 served as normal controls. The appliance was lengthened at a rate of 2.5 mm per week for 5 weeks. Serial lateral cephalometry, comparative dry-skull anthropometric measurements, and histologic examinations were performed. The expanded group demonstrated a significantly longer skull, cranial vault, anterior cranial base, posterior face, and orbit as compared with the control groups (p less than 0.05). Callus bone filled the distracted suturectomy and united the frontofacial complex to the posterior cranium. In conclusion, skull lengthening by distraction osteogenesis is possible in the rabbit model and offers a new technique for future investigation in the treatment of coronal synostosis. PMID:1561249

  4. 3D Printed, Customized Cranial Implant for Surgical Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogu, Venkata Phanindra; Ravi Kumar, Yennam; Asit Kumar, Khanra

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of the present work is to model cranial implant and printed in FDM machine (printer model used: mojo). Actually this is peculiar case and the skull has been damaged in frontal, parietal and temporal regions and a small portion of frontal region damaged away from saggital plane, complexity is to fill this frontal region with proper curvature. The Patient CT-data (Number of slices was 381 and thickness of each slice is 0.488 mm) was processed in mimics14.1 software, mimics file was sent to 3-matic software and calculated thickness of skull at different sections where cranial implant is needed then corrected the edges of cranial implant to overcome CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) leakage and proper fitting. Finally the implant average thickness is decided as 2.5 mm and printed in FDM machine with ABS plastic.

  5. Mass stranding of Odontoceti caused by parasitogenic eighth cranial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Morimitsu, T; Nagai, T; Ide, M; Kawano, H; Naichuu, A; Koono, M; Ishii, A

    1987-10-01

    Hearing organs of the Odontoceti from two mass strandings in 1983 and 1986 were examined histopathologically. In the 1983 stranding, two of three pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) were necropsied and numerous Nasitrema sp. were found close to the eighth cranial nerve (nervus vistibulo cochlearis) in both animals. Patchy degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve in and out of the modiolus of the cochlea was observed. In the 1986 stranding, five of 125 false killer whales (Pseudorca crassiclens) were examined and numerous trematodes (Nasitrema gondo) were found in the tympanic cavities. Severe degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve was discovered and there were many trematode eggs in the nervous and surrounding tissues. Parasitogenic eighth neuropathy is proposed again as the cause of mass stranding of the Odontoceti. PMID:3682083

  6. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments. PMID:25197599

  7. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome. PMID:27047834

  8. Application of a 3D printed customized implant for canine cruciate ligament treatment by tibial tuberosity advancement.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Vorndran, Elke; Gbureck, Uwe; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Armés, Henrique; Pires, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    Fabrication of customized implants based on patient bone defect characteristics is required for successful clinical application of bone tissue engineering. Recently a new surgical procedure, tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA), has been used to treat cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficient stifle joints in dogs, which involves an osteotomy and the use of substitutes to restore the bone. However, limitations in the use of non-biodegradable implants have been reported. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development of a bioceramic customized cage to treat a large domestic dog assigned for TTA treatment. A cage was designed using a suitable topology optimization methodology in order to maximize its permeability whilst maintaining the structural integrity, and was manufactured using low temperature 3D printing and implanted in a dog. The cage material and structure was adequately characterized prior to implantation and the in vivo response was carefully monitored regarding the biological response and patient limb function. The manufacturing process resulted in a cage composed of brushite, monetite and tricalcium phosphate, and a highly permeable porous morphology. An overall porosity of 59.2% was achieved by the combination of a microporosity of approximately 40% and a designed interconnected macropore network with pore sizes of 845 μm. The mechanical properties were in the range of the trabecular bone although limitations in the cage's reliability and capacity to absorb energy were identified. The dog's limb function was completely restored without patient lameness or any adverse complications and also the local biocompatibility and osteoconductivity were improved. Based on these observations it was possible to conclude that the successful design, fabrication and application of a customized cage for a dog CrCL treatment using a modified TTA technique is a promising method for the future fabrication of patient-specific bone implants, although

  9. Repair of a complete anterior cruciate tear using prolotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Walter; Delucia, Rosa; Waxman, Robert; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Wilson, John; Rabago, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective and Importance Surgical reconstruction is considered definitive treatment for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears but precise surgical indications are debated. Some patients are reluctant or inappropriate surgical candidates. Prolotherapy is a non-surgical injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain and instability. This case report documents the non-surgical repair of a torn ACL using prolotherapy and at-home exercise. Clinical Presentation and Intervention The 18 year old female patient sustained a right knee injury during a downhill skiing accident. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) revealed a high-grade partial versus complete rupture; Lachman exam findings suggested a complete rupture. She deferred surgical treatment. At 21 weeks post-injury, with unstable gait, inability to climb stairs and more than 1 cm anterior drawer test, she consented to undergo prolotherapy injections. She received 7 prolotherapy sessions over a 15 week period. At-home exercises were initiated at the 3rd prolotherapy session. Results The patient improved. Walking on flat ground improved 4 weeks after initiation of prolotherapy; she could ride a stationary bicycle for 30 minutes by 12 weeks. By 15 weeks, the patient had no instability climbing and descending stairs, the anterior drawer test was negative and MRI showed an intact ACL with fibrosis. Subsequently, she returned to full sport activity. Conclusions We document the non-surgical repair of a high-grade partial or complete ACL tear using prolotherapy and at-home exercise. Prolotherapy may be an alternative to surgery in carefully selected patients. This report is consistent with findings of recent pilot-level studies and suggests the need for rigorous clinical trials assessing prolotherapy as treatment for ligament and tendon injury in selected patients. PMID:20802815

  10. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or